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Sample records for gynecology outpatient unit

  1. Psychological Symptoms Among Obstetric Fistula Patients Compared to Gynecology Outpatients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Watt, Melissa H.; Masenga, Gileard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that causes uncontrollable leaking of urine and/or feces. Research has documented the social and psychological sequelae of obstetric fistula, including mental health dysfunction and social isolation. Purpose This cross-sectional study sought to quantify the psychological symptoms and social support in obstetric fistula patients, compared with a patient population of women without obstetric fistula. Methods Participants were gynecology patients (N = 144) at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center in Moshi, Tanzania, recruited from the Fistula Ward (n = 54) as well as gynecology outpatient clinics (n = 90). Measures included previously validated psychometric questionnaires, administered orally by Tanzanian nurses. Outcome variables were compared between obstetric fistula patients and gynecology outpatients, controlling for background demographic variables and multiple comparisons. Results Compared to gynecology outpatients, obstetric fistula patients reported significantly higher symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatic complaints, and maladaptive coping. They also reported significantly lower social support. Conclusions Obstetric fistula patients present for repair surgery with more severe psychological distress than gynecology outpatients. In order to address these mental health concerns, clinicians should engage obstetric fistula patients with targeted mental health interventions. PMID:25670025

  2. Prevalence of HPV infection among Greek women attending a gynecological outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a causative factor for cervical cancer. Early detection of high risk HPV types might help to identify women at high risk of cervical cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the HPV prevalence and distribution in cervical smears in a sample of Greek women attending a gynecological outpatient clinic and to explore the determinants of the infection. Methods A total of 225 women were studied. All women underwent a regular gynecological control. 35 HPV types were studied; 6, 11, 16, 18, 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 58, 59, 61, 62, 66, 68, 70, 71, 72, 73, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 and 89. Also, basic demographic information, sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behavior were recorded. Results HPV was detected in 22.7% of the study population. The percentage of the newly diagnosed women with HPV infection was 17.3%. HPV-16 was the most common type detected (5.3%) followed by HPV-53 (4.9%). 66.2% of the study participants had a Pap test during the last year without any abnormalities. HPV infection was related positively with alcohol consumption (OR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.04-4.63, P = 0.04) and number of sexual partners (OR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.44-3.25, P < 0.001), and negatively with age (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87-0.99, P = 0.03), and monthly income (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.44-0.89, P = 0.01). Conclusion The prevalence of HPV in women attending an outpatient clinic is high. Number of sexual partners and alcohol consumption were the most significant risk factors for HPV infection, followed by young age and lower income. PMID:20156352

  3. Domestic sexual violence and sexual problems among gynecology outpatients: an example from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ipekten Alaman, Mehtap; Yıldız, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence is a universal problem, and sexual violence in marriage, in particular, is a hidden form of it. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to determine to the prevalence of domestic sexual violence by husbands, the prevalence of sexual problems, and the relation of these among married women attending a gynecology outpatient clinic. This study was performed in a university hospital in Turkey and data were collected February-April 2009. The study sample consisted of 200 married women, 53% of whom reported having been exposed to at least one type of domestic sexual violence behaviors by their husbands. Among those behaviors, the rate of marital rape was 33%. The frequency of experiencing any sexual problem was 82%. Women expressed that they mostly had orgasmic problems, and their husbands had premature ejaculation problems. The majority of women who reported sexual violence reported experiencing sexual problems; the frequency of sexual problems was higher in the participants who did (94.3%) than in those who did not report (68.1%) sexual violence (p < .001). Bad sexual harmony (Odds ratio [OR] = 13.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.87-47.01) and experiencing sexual problems (OR = 12.67, 95% CI = 3.78-42.35) were strongly related to sexual violence in marriage. The results also revealed that the prevalence of sexual violence and sexual problems among those married women who attended gynecology clinics was considerable, even though they did not report this to the health care provider as a problem. PMID:24794853

  4. Obstetrics and gynecology outpatient scenario of an Indian homeopathic hospital: A prospective, research-targeted study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhranil; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Sangita; Singh, Rakesh; Hossain, Md. Monowar; Pramanik, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to document prescriptions and clinical outcomes in routine homeopathic practice to short list promising areas of targeted research and efficacy trials of homeopathy in obstetrics and gynecology (O&G). Three homeopathic physicians participated in methodical data collection over a 3-month period in the O&G outpatient setting of The Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. A specifically designed Excel spreadsheet was used to record data on consecutive appointments, including date, patient identity, socioeconomic status, place of abode, religion, medical condition/complaint, whether chronic/acute, new/follow-up case, patient-assessed outcome (7-point Likert scale: −3 to +3), prescribed homeopathic medication, and whether other medication/s was being taken for the condition. These spreadsheets were submitted monthly for data synthesis and analysis. Data on 878 appointments (429 patients) were collected, of which 61% were positive, 20.8% negative, and 18.2% showed no change. Chronic conditions (93.2%) were chiefly encountered. A total of 434 medical conditions and 52 varieties were reported overall. The most frequently treated conditions were leucorrhea (20.5%), irregular menses (13.3%), dysmenorrhea (10%), menorrhagia (7.5%), and hypomenorrhea (6.3%). Strongly positive outcomes (+3/+2) were mostly recorded in oligomenorrhea (41.7%), leucorrhea (34.1%), polycystic ovary (33.3%), dysmenorrhea (28%), and irregular menses (22.2%). Individualized prescriptions predominated (95.6%). A total of 122 different medicines were prescribed in decimal (2.9%), centesimal (87.9%), and 50 millesimal potencies (4.9%). Mother tinctures and placebo were prescribed in 3.4% and 30.4% instances, respectively. Several instances of medicine-condition pairings were detected. This systematic recording cataloged the frequency and success rate of treating O&G conditions using homeopathy. PMID:27114940

  5. Obstetrics and gynecology outpatient scenario of an Indian homeopathic hospital: A prospective, research-targeted study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhranil; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Sangita; Singh, Rakesh; Hossain, Md Monowar; Pramanik, Indrani

    2016-04-01

    The authors aimed to document prescriptions and clinical outcomes in routine homeopathic practice to short list promising areas of targeted research and efficacy trials of homeopathy in obstetrics and gynecology (O&G). Three homeopathic physicians participated in methodical data collection over a 3-month period in the O&G outpatient setting of The Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. A specifically designed Excel spreadsheet was used to record data on consecutive appointments, including date, patient identity, socioeconomic status, place of abode, religion, medical condition/complaint, whether chronic/acute, new/follow-up case, patient-assessed outcome (7-point Likert scale: -3 to +3), prescribed homeopathic medication, and whether other medication/s was being taken for the condition. These spreadsheets were submitted monthly for data synthesis and analysis. Data on 878 appointments (429 patients) were collected, of which 61% were positive, 20.8% negative, and 18.2% showed no change. Chronic conditions (93.2%) were chiefly encountered. A total of 434 medical conditions and 52 varieties were reported overall. The most frequently treated conditions were leucorrhea (20.5%), irregular menses (13.3%), dysmenorrhea (10%), menorrhagia (7.5%), and hypomenorrhea (6.3%). Strongly positive outcomes (+3/+2) were mostly recorded in oligomenorrhea (41.7%), leucorrhea (34.1%), polycystic ovary (33.3%), dysmenorrhea (28%), and irregular menses (22.2%). Individualized prescriptions predominated (95.6%). A total of 122 different medicines were prescribed in decimal (2.9%), centesimal (87.9%), and 50 millesimal potencies (4.9%). Mother tinctures and placebo were prescribed in 3.4% and 30.4% instances, respectively. Several instances of medicine-condition pairings were detected. This systematic recording cataloged the frequency and success rate of treating O&G conditions using homeopathy. PMID:27114940

  6. The structure and function of the outpatient endoscopy unit.

    PubMed

    Larson, D E; Ott, B J

    1986-02-01

    The authors present an analysis of the requirements for space, equipment, and personnel for an outpatient unit. These studies were derived from personnel and procedure time studies, evaluation of equipment and maintenance costs, and utilization of space studies and should be applicable to any outpatient endoscopy unit performing more than 1000 procedures per year. PMID:3949126

  7. Prevalence of genital warts in reproductive-aged Turkish women presenting at gynecology outpatient clinics for any reason.

    PubMed

    Kose, M F; Akin, L; Yuce, K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this multicenter descriptive study was to calculate the frequency of genital warts among Turkish women aged 15-49 years, who visited outpatient gynecology clinics for a variety of reasons. The study was conducted in February 2011 to collect data for a minimum of 154 patients at each center, and the total sample size reached 2,967 women (95.1% completion rate). Oral informed consents were obtained. A questionnaire including data on socio-demographic characteristics and reasons for admission was administered, and a pelvic examination was performed. The overall point prevalence was 35% (95% CI = 3.1%-4.0%), correcting for sampling design, with the highest rates observed in the 15 to 19-year-old group. The odds of having a genital wart was 1.82 times (95% CI = 0.99-3.33) higher among non-pregnant participants than in pregnant women (p = 0.051). The overall point prevalence of genital warts among reproductive-aged women attending gynecology outpatient clinics for any reason in Turkey was 35%. PMID:24283176

  8. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references.

  9. Characteristics of outpatient clinical summaries in the United States.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Christopher; O'Conor, Rachel; Singh, Sereena; Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Kannry, Joseph; Wolf, Michael S; Federman, Alex D

    2016-10-01

    In the United States, federal regulations require that outpatient practices provide a clinical summary to ensure that patients understand what transpired during their appointment and what to do before the next visit. To determine whether clinical summaries are appropriately designed to achieve these objectives, we examined their content and formatting and their usability. We obtained a convenience sample of clinical summaries from 13 diverse practices across the U.S. and assessed their characteristics using validated measures. We also interviewed key informants at these practices to assess their views of the documents. The summaries were generated by seven different electronic health record platforms. They had small font sizes (median, 10 point) and high reading grade levels (median, 10). Suitability, measured with the Suitability Assessment of Materials was low (median score, 61%) and understandability and actionability, measured with the Patient Education Materials Assessment Test, were fair to moderate (65% and 78%, respectively). Content and order of content were inconsistent across the summaries. Among physicians, 46% found the summaries helpful for clarifying medications while 38% found them helpful for conveying follow-up information. Results suggest that clinical summaries in the U.S. may often be suboptimally designed for communicating important information with patients. A patient-centered approach to designing them is warranted. PMID:27573314

  10. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy. PMID:24754466

  11. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain), to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B) specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US), 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL). Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p < 0.001). Strikingly, in N/B diagnoses, genotypes from A5 species were found as coinfecting in all cases. Genotypes from A7 or A9 species appeared in co-infections in 56.5% and 54% respectively whereas genotypes from A6 species appeared in 25.1% of cases. Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization. PMID:19664248

  12. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained. PMID:17164988

  13. Psychiatric Information Systems: An Analysis of Inpatient and Outpatient Unit Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wisdom, Jennifer; Bielavitz, Sarann; French, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a sample of inpatient and out-patient psychiatric treatment units use technology to aid in patient care through scheduling, tracking, billing, and documenting clinical services. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 68) at four inpatient and four outpatient psychiatric facilities in Oregon. Results indicate psychiatric facilities are assembling systems for managing information that include a combination of electronic linked clinical records, paper records, and unit-specific, unlinked databases. Barriers remain in (1) improving the sophistication of psychiatric information systems, (2) improving linkages of behavioral health with other medical information systems, and (3) increasing information technology support. PMID:21603591

  14. Factors associated with quality of life of outpatients with breast cancer and gynecologic cancers and their family caregivers: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Gholoum, Abdullah; Khalid, Ahmed OA; Hamad, Hussein MA; Jacob, Anila

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) issues are of interest in cancer because effective methods of treatment and detection have led to an increase in the number of long-term survivors. The objectives of the study were: to assess the subjective QOL of stable Sudanese women cancer outpatients and their family caregivers, using the WHO 26-item QOL Instrument; compare with matched general population groups, as well as diabetic and psychiatric patient groups; examine patient-caregiver concordance in ratings; and assess the variables associated with their QOL, with a view to identifying factors that can enhance quality of care. Methods Responses of oncology outpatients with breast cancer (117), cervical cancer (46) and ovarian cancer (18) (aged 44.6, SD 11.5) were compared with those of their family caregivers and matched general population groups. Data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistics. Results The cancer groups had similar QOL domain scores, which were significantly lower than those of their caregivers, but higher than the control group as well as those of psychiatric and diabetic patients studied previously. Patients who were married, with higher education, better employment, and with longer duration of illness had higher QOL. Patients on radiotherapy and their caregivers had higher QOL scores. Correlations between patient's ratings and caregiver impression of patient's QOL were high. Caregiver impression was a significant predictor of patient's and caregiver's QOL. Other predictors for the patient were: currently feeling sick and duration of illness; for the caregiver: feeling sick, relationship to patient, and age. Conclusion Cancer patients in stable condition and with psychosocial support can hope to enjoy good QOL with treatment. The findings constitute an evidence base for the country's cancer care program, to boost national health education about prognosis in cancer. Families living with women cancer patients are vulnerable and need support if

  15. Antibiotic Resistance among Urinary Isolates from Female Outpatients in the United States in 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo V; Babiker, Ahmed; Master, Ronald N; Luu, Tony; Mathur, Anisha; Bordon, Jose

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed using The Surveillance Network, USA, to examine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among urine isolates from U.S. female outpatients in 2012 and assessed trends in antibiotic resistance comparing data from 2003 and 2012. The most common pathogen identified in 2012 (n = 285,325) was Escherichia coli (64.9% of isolates). In 2012, E. coli resistance to nitrofurantoin was low (<3%) across all age groups. E. coli resistance to ciprofloxacin was high among adults (11.8%) and elderly outpatients (29.1%). When comparing the 2003 and 2012 data from isolates from adults, E. coli resistance to nitrofurantoin changed only slightly (from 0.7% to 0.9%), whereas increases in resistance to ciprofloxacin (3.6% to 11.8%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (17.2% to 22.2%) changed substantially. In the United States, E. coli has become increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) in adult female outpatients. Nitrofurantoin retains high levels of antibiotic activity against urinary E. coli. PMID:26883714

  16. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting. PMID:21655513

  17. Patient satisfaction in the outpatients' chemotherapy unit of Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey: a staff survey

    PubMed Central

    Turhal, Nazim S; Efe, Basak; Gumus, Mahmut; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Karamanoglu, Ayla; Sengoz, Meric

    2002-01-01

    Background We conducted a survey to find out how patients feel about the care they receive in the outpatient chemotherapy unit of Marmara University Hospital. Methods The American College of Physicians Patient Satisfaction survey translated into Turkish was used. A meeting was held with all involved staff, before conducting the survey, to review the purpose and determine the process. The study was conducted with 100 random patients. Results Consistent with cancer frequency, most patients had either lung, colorectal or breast cancer. Their insurance was government sponsored in close to 90%. The educational levels were above Turkish median but consistent with the area the hospital is serving. They were coming to the unit on average 8.5 months. The responses were not influenced by the surveyed diagnosis, age, sex or educational status (p > 0,05). Particularly health care team's attention, trust and courtesy came forward as strong points. The weaknesses noted as difficulties in booking an outpatient doctor visit appointment because the phone line was busy or the secretary was not courteous, the excessive amount of time and effort it required to get laboratory and radiology results. Conclusion The health care system is basically a service based industry and customer satisfaction is at utmost importance just as in other service-oriented sectors. We hope this study will shed light in that area and Turkish health care providers will pay closer attention to how their patients feel about the services that they are getting. PMID:12443536

  18. Exploring Death Anxiety and Burnout Among Staff Members Who Work In Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Lee, Valerie L; King, Anita H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient hemodialysis unit staff members are at risk for psychological stress, including death anxiety, unresolved grieving, and burnout, due tofrequent interactions with chronically ill patients who have a high mortality rate. Experiencing death anxiety and burnout may impair the ability to build interpersonal relationships, decrease job satisfaction, and impact quality of patient care. A quantitative study to evaluate the effect of educational classes on the level of death anxiety and burnout among hemodialysis caregivers revealed a decrease in participants' level of death anxiety and a decrease in emotional exhaustion in one area that was directly related to the work environment Information from the study can be used to decrease psychological stress through education and support for staff members who work in the hemodialysis unit environment. PMID:26295090

  19. Complications of Common Gynecologic Surgeries among HIV-Infected Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Whiteman, Maura K.; Cox, Shanna; Posner, Samuel F.; Meikle, Susan F.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare frequencies of complications among HIV-infected and-uninfected women undergoing common gynecological surgical procedures in inpatient settings. Methods. We used 1994–2007 data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, a nationally representative sample of inpatient hospitalizations. Our analysis included discharge records of women aged ≥15 undergoing hysterectomy, oophorectomy, salpingectomy for ectopic pregnancy, bilateral tubal sterilization, or dilation and curettage. Associations between HIV infection status and surgical complications were evaluated in multivariable logistic regression models, adjusting for key covariates. Results. For each surgery, HIV infection was associated with experiencing ≥1 complication. Adjusted ORs ranged from 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 2.2) for hysterectomy with oophorectomy to 3.1 (95% CI: 2.4, 4.0) for bilateral tubal sterilization with no comorbidity present. HIV infection was positively associated with extended length of stay and infectious complications of all of the surgeries examined. For some surgeries, it was positively associated with transfusion and anemia due to acute blood loss. Among HIV-infected women, the odds of infectious and other complications did not decrease between 1994–2000 and 2001–2007. Conclusion. HIV infection was associated with elevated frequencies of complications of gynecologic surgeries in the US, even in the era of HAART. PMID:22675242

  20. Methods of surveillance for HIV infection in primary care outpatients in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, L R; Calonge, N B; Chamberland, M E; Engel, R H; Herring, N C

    1990-01-01

    Primary care outpatients provide a good sentinel population for monitoring levels and trends of HIV infection in the United States. Because a broad cross section of the population seeks primary medical care, excess blood from specimens routinely collected for other purposes is available for anonymous, unlinked HIV testing, and all age groups and both sexes can be sampled. The CDC family of surveys includes two surveys of primary care outpatients: (a) a survey of 100,000 blood specimens per year submitted by more than 6,000 primary care physicians to a national diagnostic laboratory for complete blood count or hematocrit and (b) a survey of approximately 10,000 blood specimens per year from a network of 242 primary care physicians. Each survey has different advantages: the laboratory-based survey has a large sample from a large population base, and the physician network survey has a well-defined patient population in which each patient's clinical condition can be determined. In the primary care physician network, a concurrent study of clinical patterns of disease in patients with recognized HIV infection provides additional information on the clinical syndromes associated with HIV infection and estimates of the occurrence of unrecognized HIV infection. PMID:2108462

  1. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wares, Joanna R.; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D’Agata, Erika M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies. PMID:27195984

  2. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D'Agata, Erika M C

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies. PMID:27195984

  3. Local inpatient units may increase patients’ utilization of outpatient services: a comparative cohort-study in Nordland County, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Sørgaard, Knut; Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the last few decades, there has been a restructuring of the psychiatric services in many countries. The complexity of these systems may represent a challenge to patients that suffer from serious psychiatric disorders. We examined whether local integration of inpatient and outpatient services in contrast to centralized institutions strengthened continuity of care. Methods Two different service-systems were compared. Service-utilization over a 4-year period for 690 inpatients was extracted from the patient registries. The results were controlled for demographic variables, model of service-system, central inpatient admission or local inpatient admission, diagnoses, and duration of inpatient stays. Results The majority of inpatients in the area with local integration of inpatient and outpatient services used both types of care. In the area that did not have beds locally, many patients that had been hospitalized did not receive outpatient follow-up. Predictors of inpatients’ use of outpatient psychiatric care were: Model of service-system (centralized vs decentralized), a diagnosis of affective disorder, central inpatient admission only, and duration of inpatient stays. Conclusion Psychiatric centers with local inpatient units may positively affect continuity of care for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, probably because of a high functional integration of inpatient and outpatient care. PMID:26604843

  4. Comparing the performance of FAM19A4 methylation analysis, cytology and HPV16/18 genotyping for the detection of cervical (pre)cancer in high-risk HPV-positive women of a gynecologic outpatient population (COMETH study).

    PubMed

    Luttmer, Roosmarijn; De Strooper, Lise M A; Berkhof, Johannes; Snijders, Peter J F; Dijkstra, Maaike G; Uijterwaal, Margot H; Steenbergen, Renske D M; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Rozendaal, Lawrence; Helmerhorst, Theo J M; Verheijen, Rene H M; Ter Harmsel, W Abraham; Van Baal, W Marchien; Graziosi, Peppino G C M; Quint, Wim G V; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2016-02-15

    Recently, DNA methylation analysis of FAM19A4 in cervical scrapes has been shown to adequately detect high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer (≥ CIN3) in high-risk HPV (hrHPV)-positive women. Here, we compared the clinical performance of FAM19A4 methylation analysis to cytology and HPV16/18 genotyping, separately and in combination, for ≥ CIN3 detection in hrHPV-positive women participating in a prospective observational multi-center cohort study. The study population comprised hrHPV-positive women aged 18-66 years, visiting a gynecological outpatient clinic. From these women, cervical scrapes and colposcopy-directed biopsies (for histological confirmation) were obtained. Cervical scrapes were analyzed for FAM19A4 gene promoter methylation, cytology and HPV16/18 genotyping. Methylation analysis was performed by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). Sensitivities and specificities for ≥ CIN3 were compared between tests. Stratified analyses were performed for variables that potentially influence marker performance. Of all 508 hrHPV-positive women, the sensitivities for ≥ CIN3 of cytology, FAM19A4 methylation analysis, and cytology combined with HPV16/18 genotyping were 85.6, 75.6 and 92.2%, respectively, with corresponding specificities of 49.8, 71.1 and 29.4%, respectively. Both sensitivity and specificity of FAM19A4 methylation analysis were associated with age (p ≤ 0.001 each). In women ≥ 30 years (n = 287), ≥ CIN3 sensitivity of FAM19A4 methylation analysis was 88.3% (95%CI: 80.2-96.5) which was noninferior to that of cytology [85.5% (95%CI: 76.0-94.0)], at a significantly higher specificity [62.1% (95%CI: 55.8-68.4) compared to 47.6% (95%CI: 41.1-54.1)]. In conclusion, among hrHPV-positive women from an outpatient population aged ≥ 30 years, methylation analysis of FAM19A4 is an attractive marker for the identification of women with ≥ CIN3. PMID:26317579

  5. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  6. Patterns in admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Salkever, David S; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2011-12-01

    Waiting lists for methadone treatment have existed in many U.S. communities, but little is known nationally about what patient and service system factors are related to admission delays that stem from program capacity shortfalls. Using a combination of national data sources, this study examined patterns in capacity-related admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in 40 U.S. metropolitan areas (N = 28,920). Patient characteristics associated with admission delays included racial/ethnic minority status, lower education, criminal justice referral, prior treatment experience, secondary cocaine or alcohol use, and co-occurring psychiatric problems. Injection drug users experienced fewer delays, as did self-pay patients and referrals from health care and addiction treatment providers. Higher community-level utilization of methadone treatment was associated with delay, whereas delays were less common in communities with higher utilization of alternative modalities. These findings highlight potential disparities in timely admission to outpatient methadone treatment. Implications for improving treatment access and service system monitoring are discussed. PMID:21821378

  7. Dissociative identity disorder among adolescents: prevalence in a university psychiatric outpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Onder, Canan; Kilincaslan, Ayse; Zoroglu, Süleyman S; Alyanak, Behiye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and other dissociative disorders among adolescent psychiatric outpatients. A total of 116 consecutive outpatients between 11 and 17 years of age who were admitted to the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic of a university hospital for the 1st time were evaluated using the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale, adolescent version of the Child Symptom Inventory-4, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and McMaster Family Assessment Device. All patients were invited for an interview with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) administered by 2 senior psychiatrists in a blind fashion. There was excellent interrater reliability between the 2 clinicians on SCID-D diagnoses and scores. Among 73 participants, 33 (45.2%) had a dissociative disorder: 12 (16.4%) had DID, and 21 (28.8%) had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. There was no difference in gender distribution, childhood trauma, or family dysfunction scores between the dissociative and nondissociative groups. Childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction correlated with self-reported dissociation. Of the dissociative adolescents, 93.9% had an additional psychiatric disorder. Among them, only separation anxiety disorder was significantly more prevalent than in controls. Although originally designed for adults, the SCID-D is promising for diagnosing dissociative disorders in adolescents, its modest congruence with self-rated dissociation and lack of relationship between diagnosis and childhood trauma and family dysfunction suggest that the prevalence rates obtained with this instrument originally designed for adults must be replicated. The introduction of diagnostic criteria for adolescent DID in revised versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, would refine the assessment of dissociative disorders in this age group. PMID

  8. Adolescent gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Joseph S; Lara-Torre, Eduardo

    2009-04-01

    Given new developments in the field of adolescent reproductive health, this review focuses on highlighting new guidelines and practice patterns in evaluation and management of adolescent gynecologic problems. First, understanding the proper techniques for the initial examination is key to establishing a long-term relationship with this age group. Reservations about the first gynecologic examination are common, and the practitioner's goal is foremost to make the patient as comfortable as possible. Preventive health in this patient population is key, and practitioners should become comfortable with providing education about topics as diverse as sexuality, eating disorders, and dating violence. Furthermore, the frequency with which teenagers report sexual activity and the high unintended pregnancy rate in this age group makes counseling regarding effective contraception essential. Additionally, practitioners are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss the availability of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with adolescents. In 2007, adolescents were designated as a special population, given the frequency with which they acquire and clear mild HPV-related cervical dysplasia. More conservative treatment in this population is generally favored. During their transition through puberty, disorders of menstruation become the most common complaint requiring the attention of the gynecologist. Most commonly, anovulation serves as the cause behind such abnormal bleeding. Polycystic ovarian syndrome can develop in early puberty and carry its consequences into adulthood. Infertility, diabetes, and hirsutism mark the most important components of the syndrome and require age-appropriate management. Finally, the consequences of endometriosis on the future fertility of adolescents have brought early intervention to light. Recognition and prompt treatment are advocated to prevent the future implications of this disease. PMID:19305342

  9. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Leeya F; Nelson, Brett D; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population's high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  10. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Leeya F.; Nelson, Brett D.; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population’s high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  11. How Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Unit Director Activities May Affect Provision of Community Outreach Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey; Green, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Community outreach services play an important role in infectious disease prevention and engaging drug users not currently in treatment. However, fewer than half of US substance abuse treatment units provide these services and many have little financial incentive to do so. Unit directors generally have latitude about scope of services,…

  12. [Cryogenic technic in gynecological practice].

    PubMed

    Verkin, B I; Grishchenko, V I; Medvedev, E M; Murinets-Markevich, B N; Nosov, M E

    1978-01-01

    Two units with different refrigerants and cooling temperature are recommended for treating various gynecological affections by the method of cryodestruction of pathological changes in the cervical tissue and the uterine mucosa. In these liquid nitrogen, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide are employed as refrigerants. PMID:651580

  13. Reported Sexual Violence among Women and Children Seen at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Rural Tertiary Health Facility, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ashimi, AO; Amole, TG; Ugwa, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various forms of sexual violence including: Coerced marriage or wife inheritance, female genital mutilation, forced exposure to pornography, rape by intimate partner or strangers, unwanted sexual advances, and sexual abuse occurs, especially in vulnerable groups. However, most of these cases are not reported. Aim: The aim was to review reported cases in the facility, determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study undertaken at the Gynecological Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Health Facility in a rural setting Northwest Nigeria. A study of survivors of alleged sexual violence who presented to the hospital from the September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2013. Results: During the study period, there were 24 cases of sexual violence (22 were alleged rape and 2 were others) of 973 gynecological consultations at the emergency unit, giving a prevalence of 3% (24/973) for sexual violence and 2.3% (22/973) for alleged rape. Majority 91.7% (22/24) of the cases were children < 16 years; 45.8% (11/24) had no formal education while 33.3% (8/24) hawked homemade drinks and snacks. The assailants were known in 83.3% (20/24) of the cases; of which 45.8% (11/24) were neighbors, 29.2% (7/24) were buyers of snacks and drinks while 8.3% (2/24) were family members. Conclusion: The prevalence of reported sexual violence in this facility was low with the majority of the survivors being children and nonstranger assailants’, mostly neighbors. PMID:25745572

  14. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  15. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  16. Staff perception of interprofessional working relationships after a work redesign intervention in a Danish orthopaedic hand unit outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    de Beijer, Anke Elisabeth; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Stilling, Maiken; Jakobsen, Flemming

    2016-03-01

    There is evidence that clinical pathways improve quality of care; however, knowledge is limited concerning the influence on and the benefits experienced by the interprofessional teams working with these pathways. Our working methods in a hand unit in an orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Denmark were redesigned to include, among other changes, the introduction of clinical pathways. Changes included standardising treatment and communication methods, delegating tasks from medical specialists to nurses, and providing nurses with their own consultation room. Using focus group interviews before and after the implementation of the new working methods, we investigated staff-perceived experiences of the effects on working relationships and the utilisation of professional skills and attitudes, resulting from the mentioned change in working methods. The results were changes in daily communication methods among healthcare staff and improvements in the actual communication and collaborative problem solving skills concerning standard patients with simple hand pathology; however, there are still challenges for patients with more complex hand pathology. Though this new interprofessional arrangement improves the use of nurse and medical specialist professional competencies, it also requires a high degree of trust among the team members. PMID:27026187

  17. What’s in a Name? Use of Brand versus Generic Drug Names in United States Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of brand rather than generic names for medications can increase health care costs. However, little is known at a national level about how often physicians refer to drugs using their brand or generic names. Objective To evaluate how often physicians refer to drugs using brand or generic terminology. Design and Participants We used data from the 2003 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative survey of 25,288 community-based outpatient visits in the United States. After each visit, patient medications were recorded on a survey encounter form by the treating physician or transcribed from office notes. Measurements Our main outcome measure was the frequency with which medications were recorded on the encounter form using their brand or generic names. Results For 20 commonly used drugs, the median frequency of brand name use was 98% (interquartile range, 81–100%). Among 12 medications with no generic competition at the time of the survey, the median frequency of brand name use was 100% (range 92–100%). Among 8 medications with generic competition at the time of the survey (“multisource” drugs), the median frequency of brand name use was 79% (range 0–98%; P < .001 for difference between drugs with and without generic competition). Conclusions Physicians refer to most medications by their brand names, including drugs with generic formulations. This may lead to higher health care costs by promoting the use of brand-name products when generic alternatives are available. PMID:17443372

  18. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Policymakers | Members | Patients | News Media Anesthesia 101 Patient Safety Stories Resources About Home » Patients » Preparing For Surgery » Types of Surgery » Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For ...

  19. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Hibner, Michał; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Mirosław

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This

  20. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  1. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... optional skills stations for laparoscopic suturing, hysteroscopy and robotic simulation . Due to space constraints of the cadaver ... for March 2015 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology on “Robotic Surgery in Gynecology”. Mentors Honored by their Mentees ...

  2. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods. PMID:22714030

  3. Robotic versus laparoscopic surgery in gynecology: which should we use?

    PubMed

    Fanfani, Francesco; Restaino, Stefano; Ercoli, Alfredo; Chiantera, Vito; Fagotti, Anna; Gallotta, Valerio; Monterossi, Giorgia; Cappuccio, Serena; Scambia, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    This review of the literature aims at assessing the safety and effectiveness of robotic versus laparoscopic surgery in benign and malignant gynecological diseases. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy is already widely used in the United States and Europe for the main gynecological procedure - hysterectomy - and has proved feasible and comfortable for other benign and malignant gynecological procedures. However, the clinical effectiveness and safety of robotic surgery compared with standard laparoscopy have not been undoubtedly established. We reviewed the literature by searching in the Ovid/MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases for all the articles published from January 1995 to September 2015. More rigorous experimental studies are needed, that compare robotic-assisted surgery and laparoscopic surgery for gynecological diseases. However, current data seem to encourage the use of minimally-invasive surgery to treat benign and malignant gynecological diseases. PMID:26633042

  4. Patients' experiences of receiving chemotherapy in outpatient clinic and/or onboard a unique nurse-led mobile chemotherapy unit: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T

    2013-07-01

    There is a drive in the UK to revise chemotherapy provision for people living in rural communities. Using a different model of treatment delivery might impact positively upon the experience of receiving chemotherapy. In 2007 the first nurse-led mobile chemotherapy unit (MCU) in the UK was launched in the South West of England with the intention of providing treatment closer to home. The aim of the research was to explore experiences of people with cancer who received chemotherapy treatment in outpatient clinic and/or onboard the MCU using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Interviews were conducted with 20 people and data were interpreted using thematic analysis. The cancer and chemotherapy journey was described as being undertaken by the participant and their significant other. Available car parking and travelling impacted upon quality of life, as did the environment and accessibility of nurses to discuss issues with participants. The most important, distinguishing feature between receiving chemotherapy in outpatient clinic and the MCU was the amount of time spent waiting. Having treatment on the MCU was perceived to be less formal and therefore less stressful. Participants reported significant savings in time spent travelling, waiting and having treatment, expenditure on fuel and companion costs. PMID:23611562

  5. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  6. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  7. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  8. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  9. Setting up an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) unit in Switzerland: review of the first 18 months of activity.

    PubMed

    Gardiol, C; Voumard, R; Cochet, C; de Vallière, S

    2016-05-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) has been recognised as a useful, cost-effective and safe alternative to inpatient treatment, but no formal OPAT unit existed in Switzerland until recently. In December 2013 an OPAT unit was established at Lausanne University Hospital. We review here the experience of this new OPAT unit after 18 months of activity. Patient characteristics, clinical activities and outcomes were recorded prospectively. Need and acceptance was evaluated as number of OPAT courses administered and number of patients refusing OPAT. Safety and efficacy were evaluated as: (1) adverse events linked to antimicrobials and catheters, (2) re-admission to hospital, (3) rate of treatment failures and (4) mortality. Over 18 months, 179 courses of OPAT were administered. Acceptance was high with only four patients refusing OPAT. Urinary tract infections with resistant bacteria and musculoskeletal infections were the most common diagnoses. Self-administration of antibiotics using elastomeric pumps became rapidly the most frequently used approach. Sixteen patients presented with adverse events linked to antimicrobials and catheters. OPAT-related readmissions occurred in nine patients. The overall cure rate was 94 %. This study shows that OPAT is very well accepted by patients and medical staff, even in a setting which has not used this type of treatment approach until now. Self-administration using elastomeric pumps proved to be particularly useful, safe and efficient. OPAT offers a good alternative to hospitalisation for patients presenting with infections due to resistant bacteria that cannot be treated orally anymore and for difficult to treat infections. PMID:26886452

  10. Illness Progression as a Function of Independent and Accumulating Poor Prognosis Factors in Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph; Grunze, Heinz; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Rowe, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with bipolar disorder in the United States experience a deteriorating course of illness despite naturalistic treatment in the community. We examined a variety of factors associated with this pattern of illness progression. Method: From 1995 to 2002, we studied 634 adult outpatients with bipolar disorder (mean age of 40 years) emanating from 4 sites in the United States. Patients gave informed consent and completed a detailed questionnaire about demographic, vulnerability, and course-of-illness factors and indicated whether their illness had shown a pattern of increasing frequency or severity of manic or depressive episodes. Fifteen factors previously linked in the literature to a poor outcome were examined for their relationship to illness progression using Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by a 2-sample Wilcoxon rank sum (Mann-Whitney) test, χ2, and logistical regression. Results: All of the putative poor prognosis factors occurred with a high incidence, and, with the exception of obesity, were significantly (P < .05) associated with illness progression. These factors included indicators of genetic and psychosocial risk and loss of social support, early onset, long delay to first treatment, anxiety and substance abuse comorbidity, rapid cycling in any year, and the occurrence of more than 20 prior episodes prior to entering the network. A greater number of factors were linearly associated with the likelihood of a progressively worsening course. Conclusions: Multiple genetic, psychosocial, and illness factors were associated with a deteriorating course of bipolar disorder from onset to study entry in adulthood. The identification of these factors provides important targets for earlier and more effective therapeutic intervention in the hope of achieving a more benign course of bipolar disorder. PMID:25834764

  11. [Antibiotical prophylaxy in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Záhumenský, J; Menzlová, E; Zmrhal, J; Kučera, E

    2013-08-01

    Gynecological surgery is considered to be clear with possible contamination by gram-positive cocci from the skin, gram-negatives from the perineum or groins or polymicrobial biocenosis from vagina, depending on the surgical approach. Antibiotical prophylaxy enforces the natural mechanisms of immunity and helps to exclude present infection. There were presented many studies comparing useful effect of prophylaxis in gynecological surgery. The benefits of antibiotical prophylaxy before IUD insertion, before the cervical surgery and before hysteroscopies were not verified. On the other hand the prophylaxy of vaginal surgery including vaginal hysterectomy decreases the number of postoperative febrile complications. The positive influence of prophylaxis before the simple laparoscopy and laparoscopy without bowel injury or the opening of the vagina was not evidently verified. In abdominal hysterectomy the antibiotical prophylaxy decreases the incidence of postoperative complications significantly. The administration of 2 g of cefazolin can be recommended. In procedures taking more than 3 hours the repeated administration of cefazolin is suitable. New urogynecological procedures, using mesh implants, were not sufficiently evaluated as for postoperative infections and the posible antibiotical effect. The presence of implant in possibly non sterile area should be considered as high risc of postoperative complications. PMID:24040985

  12. OCT in Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Irina A.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Belinson, Jerome L.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    Timely and efficient diagnosis of diseases of the female reproductivesystem is very important from the social viewpoint [1, 2]. Diagnosticefficacy of the existing techniques still needs improvement sincemalignant neoplasms of the female reproductive system organs are stableleaders among causes of death (over 35.9 %) [3]. Each year, 851.9 thousand genital cancer cases are recorded worldwide [1, 2]. However, the diagnostic efficacy of the visual examination with biopsy is limited. Correct interpretation of colposcopic features requires high skills and long-term clinical experience, which makes colposcopy very subjective and limits interobserver agreement [8-10]. OCT is known to visualize in vivo and noninvasively tissue microstructure with spatial resolution approaching the histologic level and therefore can be expected to guide biopsies and to provide real-time tissue structure information when biopsies are contraindicated or impractical. Although thorough clinical studies are required to determine if OCT can be suitable for this purpose in gynecology in general and for cervical cancer in particular, the early results look encouraging. In this chapter, we present a wide spectrum of the OCT studies of different partsof the female reproductive system and demonstrate the potential of the clinical use of this new visualization method in gynecological practice.

  13. Outpatient burn management.

    PubMed

    Warner, Petra M; Coffee, Tammy L; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-08-01

    Most burn patients have injuries that may be treated on an outpatient basis. Newer silver-based dressings and improved medications for the treatment of pain and pruritus have led to further growth of outpatient care. The final barrier of distance from the burn center will decrease with the growth of telemedicine. It is incumbent for burn centers to develop outpatient guidelines to facilitate this growth of outpatient care. PMID:25085094

  14. Gynecologic malignancy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yong Il

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancy during pregnancy is a stressful problem. For the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy during pregnancy, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Patients should be advised about the benefits and risk of treatment. When selecting a treatment for malignancy during pregnancy, the physiologic changes that occur with the pregnancy should be considered. Various diagnostic procedures that do not harm the fetus can be used. Laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy may be safely performed. The staging approach and treatment should be standard. Systemic chemotherapy during the first trimester should be delayed if possible. Radiation therapy should preferably start postpartum. Although delivery should be delayed preferably until after 35 weeks of gestation, termination of pregnancy may be considered when immediate treatment is required. Subsequent pregnancies do not increase the risk of malignancy recurrence. PMID:24328018

  15. Outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation clinics.

    PubMed

    Lew, E; Pavlin, D J; Amundsen, L

    2004-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift from an inpatient to outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation. This has been driven by rising healthcare costs and the increasing popularity of ambulatory and same-day admission surgery. These outpatient preanaesthesia clinics play an important role in enhancing the cost-effectiveness of the perioperative process. This review describes the structure of modern outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation clinics, and the associated benefits, limitations and controversies. PMID:15510321

  16. Withdrawal strategies for outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Mezciems, Edgar

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses outpatient withdrawal strategies for patients addicted to alcohol, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and opiates and describes some practical ways to support recovery. PMID:8828877

  17. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  18. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  19. Erbium laser in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Vizintin, Z; Lukac, M; Kazic, M; Tettamanti, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel laser technology utilizing the erbium YAG laser for various minimally invasive, non-surgical procedures in gynecology. Non-ablative, thermal-only SMOOTH-mode erbium pulses are used to produce vaginal collagen hyperthermia, followed by collagen remodeling and the synthesis of new collagen fibers, resulting in improved vaginal tissue tightness and elasticity. This erbium laser technology is used for treatments of vaginal laxity, stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and vaginal atrophy. In the period from 2010 to 2014, several clinical studies covering all four indications were conducted with the aim to prove the efficacy and safety of this novel technology. An overview is presented of the results of these studies where several objective as well as subjective assessment tools were used. The results have shown that SMOOTH-mode erbium laser seems to be an effective and safe method for treating vaginal laxity, stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapses and vaginal atrophy. PMID:26366793

  20. Robot-Assisted Gynecologic Oncology Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ROBOTIC-ASSISTED GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY PROCEDURE HALIFAX HEALTH DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA April 24, 2008 00:00:11 KELLY ... You're just minutes away from seeing a robotic-assisted laparoscopic gynecological case live. This very progressive ...

  1. Prospective monitoring study: isolating Legionella pneumophila in a hospital water system located in the obstetrics and gynecology ward after eradication of Legionella anisa and reconstruction of shower units.

    PubMed

    Koide, Michio; Owan, Tomoko; Nakasone, Chikara; Yamamoto, Natsuo; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Fujita, Jiro

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported on the sporadic contamination by Legionella anisa of shower units and sink taps at Ryukyu University Hospital. Starting in July 2003, the neonatal area underwent an 8-month reconstruction, and in March 2005, the boiler system was replaced. We therefore examined shower water and tap water for the presence of Legionella just after replacement of the boiler system. In 3 of the 8 water samples collected from the remodeled area, we isolated Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa. Moreover, L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated in 4 of the 5 water samples gathered from the unreconstructed area of the same floor. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis suggested that a single clone of L. pneumophila might exist throughout the floors of the water distribution system. We replaced the shower units at the Legionella-positive site, and began flushing the sink-faucets with water heated to 55N for at least 1 h every morning. As a result, Legionella was not subsequently isolated in water samples. In this prospective study, we identified a central contamination by L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and showed that flushing with hot tap water was effective to counter this situation. PMID:17314417

  2. [Laparoscopy in the gynecologic clinic].

    PubMed

    Palatyński, A

    1992-11-01

    Three thousand and twelve (3012) diagnostic laparoscopies in children, girls and women were carried out during the period 1970--1992. The age of the patients was between 6--49 years. The present studies show that laparoscopy fills up the space between the clinical investigation and laparotomy probatoria. It helps to solve in a clear way, a lot of diagnostic problems in gynecology in adult women, in gynecology of developmental age and gynecological endocrinology. There were the following indications to laparoscopy: 1. Adnexitis chronica 2. Infertility-primary and secondary. 3. Unclear tumor and pelvic infections in adolescence. 4. Primary and secondary failure of ovaries. 5. Suspicion of polycystic ovaries. 6. Second look laparoscopy. 7. Suspicion of endometriosis. 8. Suspicion of ectopic pregnancy. 9. Developmental faults of sexual organs. 10. Pubertas praecox. PMID:1305570

  3. Common problems in pediatric gynecology: new developments.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, J; Muram, D

    1999-10-01

    Physicians, particularly gynecologists, pediatricians and family practitioners, are often called upon to perform a gynecological evaluation of a child. The following article is a review of current developments in the area of pediatric and adolescent gynecology. It outlines the recent clinical information and offers a review of common gynecological disorders among children and adolescent girls. PMID:10526922

  4. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented. PMID:12722411

  5. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  6. Medication Errors in Outpatient Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors may occur during parental administration of prescription and over-the-counter medications in the outpatient pediatric setting. Misinterpretation of medication labels and dosing errors are two types of errors in medication administration. Health literacy may play an important role in parents' ability to safely manage their child's medication regimen. There are several proposed strategies for decreasing these medication administration errors, including using standardized dosing instruments, using strictly metric units for medication dosing, and providing parents and caregivers with picture-based dosing instructions. Pediatric healthcare providers should be aware of these strategies and seek to implement many of them into their practices. PMID:27537086

  7. Responses of advanced directives by Jehovah’s Witnesses on a gynecologic oncology service

    PubMed Central

    Nagarsheth, Nimesh P; Gupta, Nikhil; Gupta, Arpeta; Moshier, Erin; Gretz, Herbert; Shander, Aryeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To review the responses of advance directives signed by Jehovah’s Witness patients prior to undergoing surgery at a gynecologic oncology service. Study design A retrospective chart review of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing surgery at a bloodless surgery center from 1998–2007 was conducted. Demographic, pathologic, and clinical data were recorded. The proportion of patients who accepted and refused various blood-derived products was determined and was compared to previously published results from a similar study of labor and delivery unit patients. Results No gynecologic oncology patients agreed to accept transfusions of whole blood, red cells, white cells, platelets, or plasma under any circumstance, whereas 9.8% of pregnant patients accepted transfusion (P=0.0385). However, 98% of gynecologic oncology patients agreed to accept some blood products, including fractions such as albumin, immunoglobulins, and clotting factors, while only 39% of pregnant patients agreed (P<0.0001). In addition, all gynecologic oncology patients (100%) accepted intraoperative hemodilution, compared to 55% of pregnant patients (P<0.0001). Conclusion Our results confirm the commonly held belief that the majority of Jehovah’s Witness patients refuse to accept major blood components. However, Jehovah’s Witness patients at a gynecologic oncology service will accept a variety of blood-derived products (minor fractions) and interventions designed to optimize outcomes when undergoing transfusion-free surgery. Patients presenting to a gynecologic oncology service respond differently to advanced directives related to bloodless surgery, as compared to patients from an obstetrical service. PMID:25565911

  8. The Effect of Information About Gynecological Examination on the Anxiety Level of Women Applying to Gynecology Clinics: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Ulker, Kahraman; Kivrak, Yuksel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crowded hospital outpatient clinics and endless waiting lines that make patients feel overlooked tend to exaggerate patients’ anxiety levels. In addition, fear of pain, shyness, religious and traditional thoughts, women’s sexual role in society, and previous information and experience also contribute to people’s anxiety levels with regard to gynecologic examination. Objectives: We aimed to analyze the effect of specific information about gynecologic examination on anxiety levels of women applying to gynecology clinics. Materials and Methods: In this randomized prospective study, the women applying for a gynecological examination were randomly allocated into control, intervention 1, and intervention 2 groups. Power analysis indicated that in order to achieve a one-point decrease from the previous anxiety score of 43.85 ± 5.41 at one side alpha 0.05 with a power of 80%, at least 79 women were needed in each group. Four medical school students interviewed 75 women (25 in control, 25 in intervention 1, and 25 in intervention 2). The data were collected using the demographic, social, and economic data form, and the Turkish version of the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI). The women in the intervention 1 and 2 groups were instructed to read a paper that contained brief information about the gynecological examination procedure and the profits obtained from forests, respectively. All participants, including the women in the control group, filled the STAI by themselves. The three groups were compared appropriately. Results: The demographics pertaining to age, gravidity and parity, miscarriage, induced abortion, ectopic pregnancy, offspring number, place of residence, working status, education level and previous experience of gynecological examination did not differ among the groups (P > 0.05). According to the STAI scores, all groups had mild state (control: 40.20 ± 10.53, intervention 1: 42.00 ± 11.98, and intervention 2: 39.53 ± 10.32) and severe

  9. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  10. Prevention of Diseases in Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Izetbegovic, Sebija; Alajbegovic, Jasmin; Mutevelic, Alma; Pasagic, Almir; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of diseases in gynecology can be improved by better understanding of health promotion and management of diseases. Management is “the art of performing jobs by or with other people” Mary Parker Follet. Methods: A descriptive analysis was performed on scientific studies in several published articles in medical journals and books. Results: There are five primary functions of management as: Anticipate and plan, organize, command, coordinate and control. If we introduce the following definition in the sense of medical science and apply it to the medical practice that would mean way of recognizing, managing and resolving issues of diagnosis and therapy of diseases (in this case gynecology diseases) according to certain guidelines and treatment algorithms. Treatment of family doctors is an important aspect in the quality-of-life of women and their reproductive health as well as a significant issue in public, environmental and social problems. Conclusions: It is very important to deal with it on the primary care level and in addition to promote the primary and secondary prevention of diseases, which is sometimes more important than the curative procedures. The primary prevention involves regular gynecological examinations and screening. The doctors have also a duty to educate women about the risk factors for malignant diseases, as well as proposing some of the qualitative preventive measures. PMID:24498489

  11. Outpatients in Neurological Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, M. P.; Skeil, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the multidisciplinary approach used at a neurological rehabilitation clinic in England. Analysis of questionnaire responses from outpatients indicated general support for the multidisciplinary approach, though a significant minority felt intimidated by the large number of professionals seen simultaneously. Patients also…

  12. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  13. Neonatal and Prepubertal Gynecologic Concerns.

    PubMed

    Merens, Teri A

    2015-10-01

    The role of the pediatrician in today's health care environment is one of constant evolution, as specialty care becomes more difficult to access for a growing number of young patients and their families. The primary care doctor will now have to offer more reassurance and follow-up that was once thought to be solely the role of the subspecialist. This article helps to define commonly seen entities in pediatric gynecology and offers the necessary background enabling the practitioner to provide a simple course of treatment, reassurance, or appropriate referral for specialty care. PMID:26473420

  14. Outpatient anorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Medwell, S J; Friend, W G

    1979-10-01

    Over a period of 16 months, three-fourths of the proctologic surgery performed by our clinic was done on an outpatient basis. By doing so, 1,200 patient visits and approximately 300 histories, physicals, and discharge summaries are eliminated, while obviously benefiting patients and reducing health care costs. Thus, we can conclude that hospitalization is not necessary for the majority of proctologic surgery patients. PMID:527434

  15. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884.4550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4550 Gynecologic surgical laser....

  16. Gynecological and reproductive issues for women in space: a review.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R T; Baker, E S

    2000-02-01

    Women have been an integral part of United States space crews since the initial flight of Dr. Sally Ride in 1983, and a total of 40 women have been selected as U.S. astronauts. This article examines the reproductive and gynecological aspects of selecting, training, medically certifying, and flying women in space. Gynecological data from the astronaut selection cycles in 1991 to 1997 are reviewed. In addition, the reproductive implications of delaying childbearing for a career as an astronaut and the impact of new technology such as assisted reproductive techniques are examined. The reproductive outcomes of U.S. female astronauts after spaceflight are also presented. Because women have gained considerable operational experience on the Shuttle and Mir, the unique operational considerations for preflight certification, menstruation control and hygiene, contraception, and urination are discussed. Medical and surgical implications for women on long-duration missions to remote locations are still evolving, and enabling technologies for health care delivery are being developed. There has been considerable progress in the development of zero-gravity surgical techniques, including laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, and laparotomy. The concepts of prevention of illness, conversion of surgical conditions to medically treatable conditions, and surgical intervention for long-duration spaceflights are explored in detail. There currently are no operational gynecological or reproductive constraints for women that would preclude their successful participation in the exploration of our nearby solar system. PMID:10674254

  17. Contemporary Quality of Life Issues Affecting Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Penson, Richard; Barakat, Richard; Wenzel, Lari

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers account for approximately 11% of the newly diagnosed cancers in women in the United States and 18% in the world.1 The most common gynecologic malignancies occur in the uterus and endometrium (53%), ovary (25%), and cervix (14%).2 Cervical cancer is most prevalent in premenopausal women, during their childbearing years, whereas uterine and ovarian cancers tend to present in the perimenopausal or menopausal period. Vaginal and vulvar cancers and malignancies arising from gestation, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasms, occur to a lesser extent. Regardless of cancer origin or age of onset, the disease and its treatment can produce short- and long-term sequelae (ie, sexual dysfunction, infertility, or lymphedema) that adversely affect quality of life (QOL). This article outlines the primary contemporary issues or concerns that may affect QOL and offers strategies to offset or mitigate QOL disruption. These contemporary issues are identified within the domains of sexual functioning, reproductive issues, lymphedema, and the contribution of health-related QOL (HRQOL) in influential gynecologic cancer clinical trials. PMID:22244668

  18. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy. PMID:27352554

  19. A Matter of Perspective: Comparison of the Characteristics of Persons with HIV Infection in the United States from the HIV Outpatient Study, Medical Monitoring Project, and National HIV Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Frazier, Emma L.; Hall, H. Irene; Hart, Rachel; Huang, Ping; Franklin, Dana; Hu, Xiaohong; Palella, Frank J.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Novak, Richard M.; Wood, Kathy; Yangco, Bienvenido; Armon, Carl; Brooks, John T.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the characteristics of persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) in the United States (US) captured in surveillance and other observational databases are few. To explore potential joint data use to guide HIV treatment and prevention in the US, we examined three CDC-funded data sources in 2012: the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), a multisite longitudinal cohort; the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a probability sample of PLWH receiving medical care; and the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS), a surveillance system of all PLWH. Overall, data from 1,697 HOPS, 4,901 MMP, and 865,102 NHSS PLWH were analyzed. Compared with the MMP population, HOPS participants were more likely to be older, non-Hispanic/Latino white, not using injection drugs, insured, diagnosed with HIV before 2009, prescribed antiretroviral therapy, and to have most recent CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count ≥500 cells/mm3 and most recent viral load test<2 00 copies/mL. The MMP population was demographically similar to all PLWH in NHSS, except it tended to be slightly older, HIV diagnosed more recently, and to have AIDS. Our comparative results provide an essential first step for combined epidemiologic data analyses to inform HIV care and prevention for PLWH in the US. PMID:26793282

  20. A Matter of Perspective: Comparison of the Characteristics of Persons with HIV Infection in the United States from the HIV Outpatient Study, Medical Monitoring Project, and National HIV Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, Kate; Frazier, Emma L; Hall, H Irene; Hart, Rachel; Huang, Ping; Franklin, Dana; Hu, Xiaohong; Palella, Frank J; Chmiel, Joan S; Novak, Richard M; Wood, Kathy; Yangco, Bienvenido; Armon, Carl; Brooks, John T; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the characteristics of persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) in the United States (US) captured in surveillance and other observational databases are few. To explore potential joint data use to guide HIV treatment and prevention in the US, we examined three CDC-funded data sources in 2012: the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), a multisite longitudinal cohort; the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a probability sample of PLWH receiving medical care; and the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS), a surveillance system of all PLWH. Overall, data from 1,697 HOPS, 4,901 MMP, and 865,102 NHSS PLWH were analyzed. Compared with the MMP population, HOPS participants were more likely to be older, non-Hispanic/Latino white, not using injection drugs, insured, diagnosed with HIV before 2009, prescribed antiretroviral therapy, and to have most recent CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count ≥500 cells/mm3 and most recent viral load test<2 00 copies/mL. The MMP population was demographically similar to all PLWH in NHSS, except it tended to be slightly older, HIV diagnosed more recently, and to have AIDS. Our comparative results provide an essential first step for combined epidemiologic data analyses to inform HIV care and prevention for PLWH in the US. PMID:26793282

  1. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review. PMID:26168643

  2. Ureteric injuries associated with gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Onwudiegwu, U; Makinde, O O; Badejo, O A; Okonofua, F E; Ogunniyi, S O

    1991-03-01

    We conducted a review of eight ureteric injuries associated with major gynecologic surgery in seven patients over an 11-year period. Our low incidence of 0.36% is comparable with other reports. Diagnosis was made either intra-operatively or postoperatively. Immediate ureteric repair is advocated for all injuries discovered intra-operatively. Attention to preventive measures both before and during gynecological operations will reduce the incidence of ureteric injuries. PMID:1673940

  3. Outpatient care: a nationwide revolution.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J; Hudson, T; Eubanks, P

    1990-08-01

    Most CEOs expect outpatient utilization to increase, but are executives planning ahead for what some term a virtual "revolution" in health care delivery? This issue's cover story takes a look at some of the key strategies that outpatient executives are implementing in their markets. Examples range from a large university teaching hospital, to a suburban facility, to a 40-bed rural hospital in Minnesota. Business strategy is only part of the outpatient story, however. One of the key questions that health care executives must answer is where the outpatient management talent will come from. Outpatient executives report that many of the same skills are needed in this setting as are necessary in the traditional inpatient side; however, there are major differences in management expertise that could make or break a hospital's outpatient services. Moreover, some experts say that this emerging definition of what it takes to be a successful outpatient services executive may be shaping the mold for all future health care executives, both inpatient and outpatient. PMID:2373495

  4. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  5. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk-Joon; Park, Sang-Yoon; Ryu, Sang-Young; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Chi-Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae-Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Wang, Kung-Liahng

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  6. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk Joon; Park, Sang Yoon; Ryu, Sang Young; Kim, Jae Hoon; Cho, Chi Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung Gie; Kim, Dae Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae Kwan; Wang, Kung Liahng; Nam, Joo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  7. Successfully reforming orthopaedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Peter A; Adair, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    Since 2005, Barwon Health has successfully reformed its orthopaedic outpatient service to address the following issues: increasing number of referrals, inefficient referral management and triage, long waiting times for non-urgent appointments, high 'Did Not Attend' (DNA) rates and poor utilisation of conservative therapies before referral to surgeon. Numerous strategies have been implemented including: waiting list audits, triage guidelines, physiotherapy-led clinics, a DNA policy, an orthopaedic lead nurse role and a patient-focussed booking system. There has been a 66% reduction in the number of patients waiting for their first appointment; an 87% reduction in the waiting time from referral to first appointment; a 10% reduction in new patient DNAs; and more efficient referral management and communication processes. Patients are now seen in clinically appropriate time frames and offered earlier access to a wider range of conservative treatments. PMID:22624648

  8. Urinary conduits in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, K.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Saul, P.B.; Wharton, J.T.; Rutledge, F.N.

    1986-05-01

    Over an 11-year period (1971 to 1981), 212 urinary conduit surgeries were performed by the Department of Gynecology at the University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston. The urinary diversions were performed as part of the pelvic exenteration operation in 154 patients, for radiation injury in 48 patients, and for palliation of disease recurrence in ten patients. Ninety-three percent had prior pelvic radiotherapy. Various segments of the gastrointestinal tract were used, including the ileum (102), sigmoid colon (99), transverse colon (four), jejunum (four), and others (three). Fifty percent of abnormal preoperative intravenous pyelograms reverted to normal after urinary diversion. Revision of the stoma was required in 6%. Other complications included infection (18%), renal loss (17%), and urinary leaks and fistulae (3%). The overall perioperative mortality was 7%, decreasing from 11% in the first five years to 3% during the last six years. Ureteral stents were routinely used. When selecting a segment of bowel for a urinary conduit, both tissue quality and mobility are important. Mortality and morbidity of urinary conduit surgery continues to decrease with experience.

  9. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  10. The Relevance of Gynecologic Oncologists to Provide High-Quality of Care to Women with Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minig, Lucas; Padilla-Iserte, Pablo; Zorrero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic oncologists have an essential role to treat women with gynecological cancer. It has been demonstrated that specialized physicians who work in multidisciplinary teams to treat women with gynecological cancers are able to obtain the best clinical and oncological outcomes. However, the access to gynecologic oncologists for women with suspected gynecological cancer is scarce. Therefore, this review analyzes the importance of specialized care of women with ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. In addition, the role of gynecologic oncologists who offer fertility-sparing treatment as well as their role in assisting general gynecologists and obstetricians is also reviewed. PMID:26835417

  11. Pathways of lymphatic spread in gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Paño, Blanca; Sebastià, Carmen; Ripoll, Enric; Paredes, Pilar; Salvador, Rafael; Buñesch, Laura; Nicolau, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Precise radiologic evaluation of regional adenopathic involvement in pelvic gynecologic tumors is fundamental to clinical practice because of its prognostic and therapeutic significance. Likewise, the identification of metastatic adenopathies at posttreatment imaging is essential for assessing response and detecting recurrence. Similar to urologic neoplasms, gynecologic neoplasms most often spread regionally to the pelvic and retroperitoneal lymph nodes, following the normal drainage pathways of the pelvic organs. Familiarity with routes of dissemination, treatment options, and means of analyzing lymph node characteristics is crucial to determine the extent of disease. Two staging systems can be used in characterizing gynecologic malignancies: the FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) system, which is the most commonly and universally used, and the TNM (tumor, node, metastasis) system, which is based on clinical and/or pathologic classification. Anatomic assessment with multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is still the most commonly used technique for the detection of lymph node spread, which is mainly based on morphologic criteria, the most important of which is nodal size. However, size has limited diagnostic specificity. Consequently, functional imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging, positron emission tomography combined with CT, lymphoscintigraphy, and sentinel lymph node mapping, which are based on molecular and physiologic activity and allow more precise evaluation, are often incorporated into diagnostic imaging protocols for staging of gynecologic malignancies. PMID:25969940

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  13. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  14. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Mott, Frank E; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  15. Leptin: pharmacological aspects in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sorace, M; Tripodi, L; Tripodi, A; Groppetti, D; Cremonesi, F

    2006-01-01

    Hematic levels of leptin vary in relation to numerous metabolic factors and are able to interact in perfect synchrony with the hormones involved in the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis during the various phases of the reproductive cycle. In general it is maintained that the complex and multiple action mechanisms of leptin need to be clarified by further in-depth research studies. It is likely that valid pharmacological applications of leptin will be found for human use although it is too premature to talk about concrete pharmacological answers and to formulate the relative complete technical protocols. In medicine the therapeutic use of leptin for humans has been reported in only a few cases. In fact human recombinant leptin has already been administered in gynecology for hypothalamic amenorrhea with precise protocols. In addition, very recent studies have provided the basis for new strategies to be developed concerning the use of leptin to fight multiple sclerosis. At present there are considerable technical and economic problems in the production of leptin on a large scale. Most likely these problems will be overcome in the foreseeable future, and will involve new techniques related to genetics, cellular reprograming, and stem cells. In fact, new pharmacogenetic research has provided encouraging results for the production in industrial quantities of a more effective and fail-proof leptin. Even considering that norms have not yet been proposed for pharmacological interventions with leptin for use directly on humans, in our work we have studied by immunohistochemistry methods the distribution of leptin and its receptor (Ob-R) in the ovaries of the female dog as a biological model, in the pre- and postpubertal phases and in other phases of the ovarian cycle. Given the hypothesis that the information obtained from immunohistochemical localization of the hormone and its receptor in various ovarian structures is transferable to humans, it could be useful to define

  16. Hereditary non-BRCA gynecological tumors.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Valerio G; Paudice, Michele; Varesco, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis and proper management of gynecologic malignancies represent a challenge in modern oncology. A growing interest has arisen around the gynecological manifestations of hereditary cancer syndromes. In particular, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ovarian cancer and the mismatch repair genes (MMR) in endometrial carcinoma has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis and screening of women for ovarian and uterine cancers. The clinical, genetic and pathological features of hereditary cancer syndromes with gynecological manifestations are reviewed focusing on Lynch Syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS), Cowden Syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome or nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and Reed's Syndrome or hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). PMID:26930387

  17. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To participate successfully in a cytology proficiency testing program for gynecologic examinations (Pap...

  18. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To participate successfully in a cytology proficiency testing program for gynecologic examinations (Pap...

  19. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To participate successfully in a cytology proficiency testing program for gynecologic examinations (Pap...

  20. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. 493... Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations. To participate successfully in a cytology proficiency testing program for gynecologic examinations (Pap...

  1. 21 CFR 884.1720 - Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories. 884.1720 Section 884.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Diagnostic Devices § 884.1720...

  2. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  3. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  4. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  5. 21 CFR 884.4550 - Gynecologic surgical laser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gynecologic surgical laser. 884.4550 Section 884....4550 Gynecologic surgical laser. (a) Identification. A gynecologic surgical laser is a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser designed to destroy tissue thermally or to remove tissue by radiant light...

  6. 21 CFR 884.1720 - Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories. 884.1720 Section 884.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  7. 21 CFR 884.1720 - Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories. 884.1720 Section 884.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  8. Gender Differences in Scholarly Productivity Within Academic Gynecologic Oncology Departments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Emily K.; Blake, Rachel A.; Emerson, Jenna B.; Svider, Peter; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Raker, Christina; Robison, Katina; Stuckey, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate whether there is a gender difference in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, the academic rank and gender of gynecologic oncology faculty in the United States were determined from online residency and fellowship directories and departmental web sites. Each individual’s h-index and years of publication were determined from Scopus (a citation database of peer-reviewed literature). The h-index is a quantification of an author’s scholarly productivity that combines the number of publications with the number of times the publications have been cited. We generated descriptive statistics and compared rank, gender, and productivity scores. RESULTS Five hundred seven academic faculty within 137 U.S. teaching programs were identified. Of these, 215 (42%) were female and 292 (58%) were male. Men had significantly higher median h-indices than women, 16 compared with 8, respectively (P<.001). Women were more likely to be of junior academic rank with 63% of assistant professors being female compared with 20% of full professors. When stratifying h-indices by gender and academic rank, men had significantly higher h-indices at the assistant professor level (7 compared with 5, P<.001); however, this difference disappeared at the higher ranks. Stratifying by the years of active publication, there was no significant difference between genders. CONCLUSION Female gynecologic oncologists at the assistant professor level had lower scholarly productivity than men; however, at higher academic ranks, they equaled their male counterparts. Women were more junior in rank, had published for fewer years, and were underrepresented in leadership positions. PMID:26551177

  9. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  10. [Sexual medicine in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Fornage, Sandra; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Obstetrics and gynecology specialists should be women's favoured interlocutors when talking about their sexuality. Indeed every day they assess their patient's intimacy, they manage pathologies that have a potential but well-known impact on sexuality, and they are very early aware of a more global approach like psycho-somatic. Furthermore, women are going to meet their obstetrician and gynecologist through all ages, from adolescence to post-menopause. At every step sexual problems can occur that can be searched, investigated and mostly managed by this specialist. The relationship between female sexual medicine and obstetrics and gynecology is undeniable and deserve to be favoured and consolidated. PMID:27149716

  11. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  12. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  13. Early Working Alliance in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment: Predicting Substance Use Frequency and Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuuttila, Vesa; Kuusisto, Katja; Saarnio, Pekka; Nummi, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The study examined the effect of the early working alliance on outcome in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Methods: A total of 327 clients and 33 therapists participated in the study. Data were collected in southern and western Finland in outpatient treatment units (N = 7). The dependent variables were percentage of days abstinent…

  14. Integrating Prevention into Obstetrics/Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, J. Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Discusses formats to teach preventive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology (including learning objectives, lectures/seminars, and rounds/office practice) and evaluation methods (oral examinations, computerized question banks, objective structured clinical examinations). Offers examples from specific programs at American medical schools, including…

  15. [Haptoglobins in gynecologic tumors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tatra, G; Moser, C

    1978-05-01

    Serum concentrations of haptoglobins were checked in 100 women with benign or malign gynecologic tumors. Typification of haptoglobins was determined by starch gel electrophoresis, quantification by single radial immunodiffusion. Cases with malignancies showed significant increased levels in comparison to healthy women. In cases with cervical carcinoma, a significant increase of the haptoglobin level was evaluated according to advanced carcinoma. PMID:418536

  16. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  17. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Trokhanova O.; A, Chijova Y.; B, Okhapkin M.; V, Korjenevsky A.; S, Tuykin T.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  18. Taxanes: Their Impact on Gynecologic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L.; English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of taxanes in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies expanded tremendously over the past 30 years. Both paclitaxel and docetaxel have unique microtubule stabilizing, antiangiogenic and radiation sensitizing properties that endow them with remarkable activity as chemotherapeutic agents. As research into the appropriate dose, timing, treatment interval and response rates have been studied, they emerged as one of the most active agents available in the treatment of gynecologic cancer. The body of research on taxanes continues to expand especially in regard to the use of taxanes in alternative formulations and in combination with newer treatments or routes of treatment. This review focuses on the development of taxanes as an effective therapy in the treatment of gynecologic cancers and data currently available in the literature regarding their efficacy. Future directions of taxane based chemotherapy in regards to ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers are also addressed. There is little doubt that taxane based chemotherapy will remain an integral part of the treatment of gynecologic cancer for the foreseeable future. PMID:24300913

  19. Life-Space Assessment in Urogynecology and Gynecologic Oncology Surgery Patients: A Measure of Perioperative Mobility and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Chere’ M.L.; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Markland, Alayne D.; Straughn, J. Michael; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of gynecologic surgery on mobility and functional status in women ≥ 60 years of age using Life-Space Assessment (LSA). Design Observational prospective cohort study Setting Academic outpatient urogynecology and gynecologic oncology clinics Participants Women presenting for urogynecology (N=51) and gynecologic oncology (N=51) surgery. Measurements LSA scores six weeks, six months and one year after surgery. Participant demographics, preoperative diagnoses, surgical approach, and medical comorbidities were collected. Analyses utilized repeated measures. Results Mean age was 71 + 7 years. Urogynecology participants started and maintained a higher LSA (p-value=0.03) than oncology participants at all study intervals. At six weeks post-surgery, urogynecology and oncology participants’ mean decline was 13-points (95% CI 4, 21 p-value=.004) and 23-points (95% CI 13, 33 p-value < .001), respectively. At six months, the urogynecology and oncology participants’ scores increased by a mean of 9-points (95% CI 1, 17 p-value=.033), and 13-points (95% CI 5, 20 p-value=.001) points, respectively. No significant difference was found at one year from baseline within each group or between groups in LSA scores. Income, depression, Body Mass Index (BMI) and having an operative complication predicted a larger decline in life-space over time in both groups. Conclusion Gynecologic surgical interventions in older women limit physical and functional ability at six weeks postoperatively. Both the urogynecology and gynecologic oncology cohorts returned to baseline levels by six months which was sustained to one year. PMID:19874406

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    comes at the expense of decreased dose uniformity in the SBRT cancer target. This may have implications for both subsequent tumor control in the SBRT target and normal tissue tolerance of organs at-risk. Due to the sharp dose falloff in SBRT, the possibility of occult disease escaping ablative radiation dose occurs when cancer targets are not fully recognized and inadequate SBRT dose margins are applied. Clinical target volume (CTV) expansion by 0.5 cm, resulting in a larger planning target volume (PTV), is associated with increased target control without undue normal tissue injury.(7,8) Further reduction in the probability of geographic miss may be achieved by incorporation of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).(8) Use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in SBRT treatment planning is only the beginning of attempts to discover new imaging target molecular signatures for gynecologic cancers. PMID:22546879

  1. URINARY PROBLEMS AMONGST GYNECOLOGICAL CONSULTATIONS. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PROLAPSE, GYNECOLOGICAL SURGERY AND DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  2. Urinary Problems Amongst Gynecological Consultations. Association Between Prolapse, Gynecological Surgery and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  3. Outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation – rehabilitation models and shortcomings in outpatient aftercare

    PubMed Central

    Korczak, Dieter; Huber, Beate; Steinhauser, Gerlinde; Dietl, Markus

    2010-01-01

    attained in out-patient as well as in in-patient pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding the best frequency of training units per week or the duration and the content of a unit further research is needed. Final results for the ideal length of an in-patient rehabilitation are still missing. None of the studies deals with the analysis of the different treatment forms of a COPD which are frequently defined by an alteration of in-patient and out-patient treatments and participation in sports clubs or self-help groups. There are some other limitations of the studies. The results concerning self-management programmes are not distinct. (Self-) Selection leads to high drop-out rates. Many studies have only small sample sizes. Confounder and long-time effects are seldom researched, relevant economic evaluations do not exist The improvement of health related quality of life is primarily obtained by an improved disease management than by an improvement of a medical parameter. Conclusion Out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation is as effective as in-patient pulmonary rehabilitation. But there is a critical shortage of out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation supply in Germany. Domains for further research are the evaluation of models for integrated care, the length, frequency and content of training programmes, psychiatric assessments and the cost-effectiveness of out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation. PMID:21289884

  4. Growth of Secure Messaging Through a Patient Portal as a Form of Outpatient Interaction across Clinical Specialties

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S.E.; Shenson, J.A.; Chen, Q.; Rosenbloom, S.T.; Jackson, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Patient portals are online applications that allow patients to interact with healthcare organizations. Portal adoption is increasing, and secure messaging between patients and healthcare providers is an emerging form of outpatient interaction. Research about portals and messaging has focused on medical specialties. We characterized adoption of secure messaging and the contribution of messaging to outpatient interactions across diverse clinical specialties after broad portal deployment. Methods This retrospective cohort study at Vanderbilt University Medical Center examined use of patient-initiated secure messages and clinic visits in the three years following full deployment of a patient portal across adult and pediatric specialties. We measured the proportion of outpatient interactions (i.e., messages plus clinic visits) conducted through secure messaging by specialty over time. Generalized estimating equations measured the likelihood of message-based versus clinic outpatient interaction across clinical specialties. Results Over the study period, 2,422,114 clinic visits occurred, and 82,159 unique portal users initiated 948,428 messages to 1,924 recipients. Medicine participated in the most message exchanges (742,454 messages; 78.3% of all messages sent), followed by surgery (84,001; 8.9%) and obstetrics/gynecology (53,424; 5.6%). The proportion of outpatient interaction through messaging increased from 12.9% in 2008 to 33.0% in 2009 and 39.8% in 2010 (p<0.001). Medicine had the highest proportion of outpatient interaction conducted through messaging in 2008 (23.3% of outpatient interactions in medicine). By 2010, this proportion was highest for obstetrics/gynecology (83.4%), dermatology (71.6%), and medicine (56.7%). Growth in likelihood of message-based interaction was greater for anesthesiology, dermatology, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry than for medicine (p<0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates rapid adoption of

  5. Treatment-related cancers after gynecologic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-10-15

    Second malignancies are one of the known complications of cancer treatment. Several recent studies which have quantified the risk of treatment-induced cancers following gynecologic malignancies are reviewed. After cervical cancer, there is a 9% excess risk of second cancers, of which only 5% could be attributed to radiation therapy. Most of the treatment-related malignancies after cervical or endometrial cancer are solid tumors occurring within the radiation field. Following both cervical and endometrial cancer, there is a small increased risk of leukemia associated with radiation therapy. In contrast, after ovarian cancer, there is significantly increased risk of leukemia related to treatment with alkylating agents, which varies by drug type and total dose. The cumulative risk of leukemia and preleukemia following single agent melphalan is 11.2% +/- 2.6% at ten years; the risk after cyclophosphamide is 5.4% +/- 3.2%. Overall, the risk of second malignancies following treatment of gynecologic cancers is small. 38 references.

  6. [Operative risk related to tobacco in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Yaribakht, S; Malartic, C; Grange, G; Morel, O

    2014-05-01

    If tobacco has been recognized for many years as a major risk factor for cardiovascular, lung diseases and cancer in the general population, women are insufficiently aware of the consequences and the specific gynecological operative risks related to this intoxication. Thus, a regular tobacco consumption increases the risk for many gynecological conditions may require surgical treatment with in addition a significant negative impact on the healing process and the risk of postoperative complications. The operative risk must be explained by surgeons in daily practice gynecological, pelvic surgery or breast screening. The issue of smoking cessation should precede surgery has been established by a consensus conference of experts on perioperative smoking held in 2005. The implementation of these recommendations during the preoperative period requires improvement of staff training and better practices to allow smoking cessation effective and sustainable. It is lawful in this context to delay scheduled surgery of 6 to 8 weeks to allow an optimal smoking cessation and to continue smoking cessation for the time necessary for healing to reduce the excess operative risk associated with smoking. PMID:24787606

  7. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  8. RTOG Gynecologic Oncology Working Group: Comprehensive Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, David K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Viswanathan, Akila; Schefter, Tracey; Weidhaas, Joanne; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to comprehensively describe the activities of the Gynecologic Oncology Working Group within the RTOG. Clinical trials will be reviewed as well as translational science and ancillary activities. Over the past 40 years, a myriad of clinical trials have been performed within the RTOG with the aim of improving overall survival and decreasing morbidity in women with cervical or endometrial cancer. Major study questions have included hyperbaric oxygen, neutron radiotherapy, altered fractionation, hypoxic cell sensitization, chemosensitization, and volume directed radiotherapy. RTOG 7920 demonstrated improvement in overall survival in patients with stages IB through IIB cervical carcinoma receiving prophylactic paraaortic irradiation compared to pelvic radiation alone. RTOG 9001 demonstrated that cisplatin and 5-FU chemoradiotherapy to the pelvis for advanced cervix cancer markedly improved overall survival compared to extended field radiotherapy alone. More recent trials have employed radioprotectors, molecular targeted therapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy. Ancillary studies have developed CTV atlases for research protocols and routine clinical use. Worldwide practice patterns have been investigated in cervix, endometrial, and vulvar cancer thru the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Translational studies have focused on immunohistochemical markers, changes in gene expression, and miRNA patterns impacting prognosis. The RTOG gynecologic working group has performed clinical trials that have defined the standard of care, improved survival, and added to our understanding of the biology of cervical and endometrial cancers. PMID:24819663

  9. Preparedness of Ob/Gyn residents for fellowship training in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Doo, David W; Powell, Matthew; Novetsky, Akiva; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Guntupalli, Saketh R

    2015-04-01

    Residency training in obstetrics and gynecology is being challenged by increasingly stringent regulations and decreased operative experience. We sought to determine the perception of preparedness of incoming gynecologic oncology fellows for advanced surgical training in gynecologic oncology. An online survey was sent to gynecologic oncologists involved in fellowship training in the United States. They were asked to evaluate their most recent incoming clinical fellows in the domains of professionalism, level of independence/graduated responsibility, psychomotor ability, clinical evaluation and management, and academia and scholarship using a standard Likert-style scale. The response rate among attending physicians was 40% (n = 105/260) and 61% (n = 28/46) for program directors. Of those who participated, 49% reported that their incoming fellows could not independently perform a hysterectomy, 59% reported that they could not independently perform 30 min of a major procedure, 40% reported that they could not control bleeding, 40% reported that they could not recognize anatomy and tissue planes, and 58% reported that they could not dissect tissue planes. Fellows lacked an understanding of pathophysiology, treatment recommendations, and the ability to identify and treat critically ill patients. In the academic domain, respondents agreed that fellows were deficient in the areas of protocol design (54%), statistical analysis (54%), and manuscript writing (65%). These results suggest that general Ob/Gyn residency is ineffective in preparing fellows for advanced training in gynecologic oncology and should prompt a revision of the goals and objectives of resident education to correct these deficiencies. PMID:26076160

  10. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  11. Ultrasound evaluation of gynecologic causes of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Cicchiello, Lawrence A; Hamper, Ulrike M; Scoutt, Leslie M

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound should be considered the first-line imaging modality of choice in women presenting with acute or chronic pelvic pain of suspected gynecologic or obstetric origin because many, if not most, gynecologic/obstetric causes of pelvic pain are easily diagnosed on ultrasound examination. Since the clinical presentation of gynecologic causes of pelvic pain overlaps with gastrointestinal and genitourinary pathology, referral to CT or MRI, especially in pregnant patients, should be considered if the US examination is nondiagnostic. PMID:21419329

  12. Insights into preferences for psycho-oncology services among women with gynecologic cancer following distress screening.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian; Boyes, Allison; Cameron, Alexander; Adams, Catherine; Proietto, Anthony; Girgis, Afaf

    2014-06-01

    Much attention has been given to implementing routine screening programs in cancer care to improve the management of distress following diagnosis. Although patients might screen positive for distress, several studies have found that most then refuse additional psychosocial support. To inform the development of successful models of distress screening, this qualitative study explored preferences for psychosocial care among 18 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer who scored at least 4 on the Distress Thermometer (DT). Participants were recruited from a gynecologic oncology outpatient clinic in Newcastle, Australia, and interviewed. Unanimously, participants felt that completing the DT was an integral part of their cancer care. However, half then refused the referral to see a psychologist. These women typically reported that a referral was not needed, because their rating on the DT reflected transient stressors or physical distress. Many also spoke about their need to cope with the challenges they were facing on their own and the extensive social support they already had in place to help them overcome these challenges. In contrast, women who accepted referral to the psychologist often struggled to cope with several losses they felt had existential and long-term effects. Commonly, these women reported not having the social support they needed, managing several concurrent life stressors, and/or not having the repertoire of coping skills they required to "remain afloat." Findings from this study begin to bridge the gap between clinicians' and patients' expectations of how psychosocial services should be used in response to distress screening. PMID:24925200

  13. Trajectories of Evening Fatigue in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fay; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Hammer, Marilyn; Schmidt, Brian L.; Knobf, M. Tish; Paul, Steven M.; Cartwright, Frances; Mastick, Judy; Cooper, Bruce A.; Chen, Lee-May; Melisko, Michelle; Levine, Jon D.; Kober, Kord; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a distressing, persistent sense of physical tiredness that is not proportional to a person’s recent activity. Fatigue impacts patients’ treatment decisions and can limit their self-care activities. While significant interindividual variability in fatigue severity has been noted, little is known about predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of evening fatigue severity in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy (CTX). Objectives To determine whether demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with initial levels as well as the trajectories of evening fatigue. Methods A sample of outpatients with breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and lung cancer (N=586) completed demographic and symptom questionnaires a total of six times over two cycles of CTX. Fatigue severity was evaluated using the Lee Fatigue Scale. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to answer the study objectives. Results A large amount of interindividual variability was found in the evening fatigue trajectories. A piecewise model fit the data best. Patients who were White, diagnosed with breast, gynecological, or lung cancer, and who had more years of education, child care responsibilities, lower functional status, and higher levels of sleep disturbance and depression reported higher levels of evening fatigue at enrollment. Conclusion This study identified both non-modifiable (e.g., ethnicity) and modifiable (e.g., child care responsibilities, depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance) risk factors for more severe evening fatigue. Using this information, clinicians can identify patients at higher risk for more severe evening fatigue, provide individualized patient education, and tailor interventions to address the modifiable risk factors. PMID:25828560

  14. Is outpatient robotic pyeloplasty feasible?

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia B; Van Batavia, Jason P; Casale, Pasquale

    2016-09-01

    With increased experience, many laparoscopic procedures have evolved from mandatory same-day admission to the outpatient setting. Given the shorter operative time and length of stay, the potential to perform robotic surgery as an outpatient procedure exists. We sought to describe our initial experience with performing robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty (RP) on children in an outpatient setting. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively collected database of all patients undergoing RP from July 2012 to May 2014 by a single surgeon. All patients discharged home within 12 h of completion of surgery were included in the analysis. Prior to discharge the Wong-Baker Pain Scale 1-10 was reviewed and given to all patients. All patients were prescribed oxybutynin and phenazopyridine for bladder spasms and stent discomfort. Post-operative follow-up telephone calls were made inquiring about oral intake, pain control, constitutional symptoms, and voiding issues. Readmission rates and post-operative outcomes were reviewed. During the study period, 62 children underwent RP and 13 patients (21 %) were selected for outpatient management. These 7 boys and 6 girls had a mean age of 8.1 years old. Of the 13 patients, 11 patients had left-sided procedures and 2 had right; all had primary UPJO. Mean pain score was 2.7 in the first 12 h at home. Within 24 h, the pain score decreased to a mean of 2.2. No patient required opioid analgesics and no child required admission after surgery. At 3-month follow-up, 7 patients had resolved hydronephrosis, 5 had improved hydronephrosis and 1 was unchanged. MAG3 renal scan in the latter patient showed no sign of obstruction. Outpatient RP is feasible and appears to be safe. Great care must be taken when selecting which patients can be fast tracked. PMID:27026272

  15. 42 CFR 493.855 - Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Subspecialty for Laboratories Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.855 Standard; Cytology: gynecologic examinations....

  16. Synchronous gynecologic cancer and the use of imaging for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Galvão, José Lucas Scarpinetti; Soares, Giovanna Milanes Bego; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens; Bringel, Shenia Lauanna Rezende; Brot, Louise De

    2016-04-01

    Endometrial and cervical cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic neoplasms. While endometrial cancer occurs in older women, cervical cancer is more prevalente in young subjects. The most common clinical manifestation in these two gynecological cancers is vaginal bleeding. In the first case, diagnosis is made based on histological and imaging evaluation of the endometrium, while cervical cancers are diagnosed clinically, according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The authors present a case of synchronous gynecological cancer of the endometrium and cervix diagnosed during staging on MRI and confirmed by histological analysis of the surgical specimen. PMID:27167539

  17. The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David J; Vander Plaetse, Bart

    2014-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health developed the organizational capacity of national professional organizations of obstetrics and gynecology in eight African and Asian countries. The initiative was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and had three key objectives. These goals were to support the eight FIGO member associations to strengthen their capacity to work effectively; to influence national policies on maternal and newborn health; and to work toward improving clinical practice in this area. The current supplement presents evidence that the focus and effectiveness of a national obstetric and gynecologic association-as well as its influence on major public health issues (such as United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5)-can be substantially broadened and enhanced by the provision of external support. PMID:25115412

  18. Treatment for Gynecologic Cancer: A Review of the Effects on Female Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Hacker, Neville F.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 75,000 new cases of gynecologic cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. Since few women can be treated by chemotherapy alone, most undergo extensive treatments that directly alter their sexuality either by causing specific anatomic changes or by generating concerns about continued responsiveness or activity. The major treatments for gynecologic malignancies including radiation therapy or radical hysterectomy for cervical carcinoma, radical vulvectomy for vulvar carcinoma, and pelvic exenteration for recurrent disease, are outlined. Research relating to their effects on female sexuality is critically reviewed. Also discussed are the relevant domains of treatment and patient characteristics that need assessment and investigation in this new and important research area. PMID:20631850

  19. MAST scores, alcohol consumption, and gynecological symptoms in endometriosis patients.

    PubMed

    Perper, M M; Breitkopf, L J; Breitstein, R; Cody, R P; Manowitz, P

    1993-04-01

    Alcohol consumption (quantity, frequency, and pattern) and alcohol-related problems were determined in endometriosis patients (n = 137), patients with other gynecological disorders (n = 91), and normal control subjects (n = 98). Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire, including the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), questions to determine the quantity and frequency of alcohol use, and questions regarding the relationship between gynecological symptoms and alcohol intake. The percentage of endometriosis patients with MAST scores greater than five or seven was significantly greater than that of normal control subjects (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009, respectively), but did not differ from that for patients with other gynecological disorders. Endometriosis patients with high MAST scores (> or = 5) tended to consume more alcohol on a yearly basis than normal control subjects with high MAST scores (p = 0.07). Among participants who experienced gynecological symptoms and were not abstainers, 31% of endometriosis patients, 9.5% of normal control subjects, and 14.3% of patients with other gynecological disorders reported increasing their alcohol consumption when experiencing gynecological symptoms. Endometriosis patients tended to differ in this regard from normal control subjects (p = 0.058) and were significantly different from patients with other gynecological disorders (p = 0.039). The evidence suggests that the gynecological problems of endometriosis may be a major medical correlative of alcoholism in women. PMID:8488967

  20. [Legal aspects in pediatric and adolescent gynecology].

    PubMed

    Sowińska-Przepiera, Elzbieta; Jarzabek-Bielecka, Grazyna; Andrysiak-Mamos, Elzbieta; Syrenicz, Anhelli; Friebe, Zbigniew; Kedzia, Witold; Pawlaczyk, Michał

    2013-02-01

    Childhood and adolescent gynecology is an emerging specialty at the intersection of pediatrics, pediatric endocrinology gynecology pediatric surgery dermatology psychiatry, public health medicine and genetics, and in fact addresses many legal issues. Poland lacks a uniform standing of medical and legal environments on how to deal with a juvenile patient who has become sexually active and seeks the advice of a gynecologist, gynecologic examination and requests to be prescribed contraceptives. It needs to be taken into account that in Poland a parent or a legal guardian has legal guardianship, custody and control of a child until 18 years of age but once a juvenile reaches the chronological age of 16 years, and is given full rights of a patient, both parties need to consent to medical care. According to the Act on Health Care Institutions, a patient has the right to self-determination, respect for physical and mental integrity as well as privacy whereas, after the patient reaches the age of 16 years, the legal representative becomes in practice a mere co-decision maker to have medical services performed. Therefore, information obtained from a juvenile patient during physical test and medical interview does not have to be revealed to a legal representative, if the patient requests confidentiality and on condition it does not affect patient health and/or the planned medical procedures (e.g. the need to perform an operation). Knowledge about procedures for juvenile patients shall enable doctors to make conscious choices about conduct and care or in most cases, only advice, without the risk of breaching the Polish law. PMID:23668060

  1. Application of laser in obstetrics and gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ai-Hua

    1998-11-01

    Mainman developed the first ruby laser in 1960 and after 13 Kaplan successfully reported the use of CO2 laser in the treatment of cervicitis. Soon after, Chinese gynecologists started to use the laser for diagnosis and therapy. It had been proved that more than 30 kinds of gynecological diseases could be treated effectively by laser. The remarkable laser treatment technique partially replaced with conventional methods used in that century. However, the application of laser had shown a broad prospect along with its further investigation.

  2. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety. PMID:26333638

  3. Robotic-assisted surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Abdulrahman K; Fader, Amanda N

    2014-10-01

    The quest for improved patient outcomes has been a driving force for adoption of novel surgical innovations across surgical subspecialties. Gynecologic oncology is one such surgical discipline in which minimally invasive surgery has had a robust and evolving role in defining standards of care. Robotic-assisted surgery has developed during the past two decades as a more technologically advanced form of minimally invasive surgery in an effort to mitigate the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and improved patient outcomes. Robotically assisted technology offers potential advantages that include improved three-dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve surgeon dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision. These technological advances may allow the gynecologic oncology surgeon to perform increasingly radical oncologic surgeries in complex patients. However, the platform is not without limitations, including high cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the requirement for additional training to achieve competence. This review describes the role of robotic-assisted surgery in the management of endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancer, with an emphasis on comparison with laparotomy and conventional laparoscopy. The literature on novel robotic innovations, special patient populations, cost effectiveness, and fellowship training is also appraised critically in this regard. PMID:25274485

  4. Virtual Reality Simulation of Gynecologic Laparoscopy

    PubMed

    Bernstein

    1996-08-01

    Realistic virtual simulation of gynecologic laparoscopy would permit the surgeon to practice any procedure, with any degree of pathology, at any time and as many times as necessary to achieve proficiency before attempting it in the operating room. Effective computer simulation requires accurate anatomy, realistic three-dimensional computer graphics, the ability to cut and deform tissue in response to instruments, and an appropriate hardware interface. The Visible Human Project from the National Library of Medicine has made available extremely accurate, three-dimensional, digital data that computer animation companies have begun to transform to three-dimensional graphic images. The problem of tissue deformation and movement is approached by a software package called TELEOS. Hardware consisting of two scissor-grip laparoscopic handles mounted on a sensor can interface with any simulation program to simulate a multiplicity of laparoscopic instruments. The next step will be to combine TELEOS with the three-dimensional anatomy data and configure it for gynecologic surgery. PMID:9074082

  5. Large bowel injuries during gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ülker, Kahraman; Anuk, Turgut; Bozkurt, Murat; Karasu, Yetkin

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopy is one of the most frequently preferred surgical options in gynecological surgery and has advantages over laparotomy, including smaller surgical scars, faster recovery, less pain and earlier return of bowel functions. Generally, it is also accepted as safe and effective and patients tolerate it well. However, it is still an intra-abdominal procedure and has the similar potential risks of laparotomy, including injury of a vital structure, bleeding and infection. Besides the well-known risks of open surgery, laparoscopy also has its own unique risks related to abdominal access methods, pneumoperitoneum created to provide adequate operative space and the energy modalities used during the procedures. Bowel, bladder or major blood vessel injuries and passage of gas into the intravascular space may result from laparoscopic surgical technique. In addition, the risks of aspiration, respiratory dysfunction and cardiovascular dysfunction increase during laparoscopy. Large bowel injuries during laparoscopy are serious complications because 50% of bowel injuries and 60% of visceral injuries are undiagnosed at the time of primary surgery. A missed or delayed diagnosis increases the risk of bowel perforation and consequently sepsis and even death. In this paper, we aim to focus on large bowel injuries that happen during gynecological laparoscopy and review their diagnostic and management options. PMID:25516859

  6. Endometrial aspiration cytology in gynecological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Meenal V.; Phatke, Anjali S.; Kadgi, Nalini Vinayak; Rane, Sharda R.; Kulkarni, Kalpana K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Endometrial aspiration is not a popular modality for the study of the endometrium despite its simplicity and potential utility. Aim: The present study was aimed at evaluating the utility of endometrial aspiration in various gynecological disorders. Materials and Methods: In this diagnostic accuracy study, 55 prospectively registered women with various gynecological disorders were evaluated clinically and subjected to endometrial aspiration cytology and study of endometrial histology. Endometrial aspiration was performed by infant feeding tube in 10 cases and intra cath cannula in 45 cases. The slides were stained with rapid Papanicolaou (PAP) stain and Leishman stain. Results: Endometrial aspiration cytology showed 90% and 94.6% sampling adequacy with infant feeding tube and intra cath cannula, respectively. Intra cath cannula was very convenient to handle and superior to infant feeding tube in aspirating the endometrium. Of the two stains used, rapid PAP stain was less time-consuming and superior to Leishman stain in studying the nuclear details. Leishman stain was helpful in detecting cytoplasmic vacuoles of secretory endometrium. Overall diagnostic accuracy of endometrial cytology was 90.4% while that for morphological hormonal evaluation was 97.6%. It enjoyed a sensitivity of 91.66%, a specificity of 88.23%, positive predictive value of 94.28%, and negative predictive value of 83.33%. Conclusion: Intra cath cannula emerged as an inexpensive, effective, and convenient device for endometrial aspiration. Endometrial aspiration proved to be a fairly effective, simple, and informative diagnostic modality. PMID:27011435

  7. Factors Influencing Same-day Hospital Discharge and Risk Factors for Readmission After Robotic Surgery in the Gynecologic Oncology Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Colleen; Casserly, Kelly; Anderson, Mary; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Teoh, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the factors that allow for a safe outpatient robotic-assisted minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery procedure. Design Retrospective chart review (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). Setting University hospital. Patients All patients (140) undergoing robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery with the gynecologic oncology service from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2013. Interventions Risk factors for unsuccessful discharge within 23 hours of surgery and same-day discharge were assessed using logistic regression models. Measurements and Main Results All patients were initially scheduled for same-day discharge. The outpatient surgery group was defined by discharge within 23 hours of the surgery end time, and a same-day surgery subgroup was defined by discharge before midnight on the day of surgery. One hundred fifteen (82.1%) were successfully discharged within 23 hours of surgery, and 90 (64.3%) were discharged the same day. The median hospital stay was 5.3 hours (range, 1–48 hours). Unsuccessful discharge within 23 hours was associated with a preoperative diagnosis of lung disease and intraoperative complications; unsuccessful same-day discharge was associated with older age and later surgery end time. Only 2 patients (1.4%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of surgery. Conclusions Outpatient robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery is safe and feasible for most gynecologic oncology patients and appears to have a low readmission rate. Older age, preoperative lung disease, and later surgical end time were risk factors for prolonged hospital stay. These patients may benefit from preoperative measures to facilitate earlier discharge. PMID:25304856

  8. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual... Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4530 Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument is one of a group of devices used...

  9. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients’ situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients’ performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  10. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients' situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients' performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  11. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system. 419.21 Section 419.21 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT...

  12. [Grading of gynecological tumors : Current aspects].

    PubMed

    Horn, L-C; Mayr, D; Brambs, C E; Einenkel, J; Sändig, I; Schierle, K

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological assessment of the tumor grade and cell type is central to the management and prognosis of various gynecological malignancies. Conventional grading systems for squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the vulva, vagina and cervix are poorly defined. For endometrioid tumors of the female genital tract as well as for mucinous endometrial, ovarian and seromucinous ovarian carcinomas, the 3‑tiered FIGO grading system is recommended. For uterine neuroendocrine tumors the grading system of the gastrointestinal counterparts has been adopted. Uterine leiomyosarcomas are not graded. Endometrial stromal sarcomas are divided into low and high grades, based on cellular morphology, immunohistochemical and molecular findings. A chemotherapy response score was established for chemotherapeutically treated high-grade serous pelvic cancer. For non-epithelial ovarian malignancies, only Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors and immature teratomas are graded. At this time molecular profiling has no impact on the grading of tumors of the female genital tract. PMID:27379622

  13. Imaging modalities in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin P; Crystal, Chad S

    2003-08-01

    The practicing emergency physician often encounters diagnostic dilemmas involving the choice of the most appropriate radiologic study to evaluate patients in the emergency department. In addition, the uncertainty of potentially harmful fetal effects of radiation in the pregnant patient may add unnecessary delay and concern in the workup of obstetric emergencies. An emergency physician's in-depth understanding of the strengths, limitations, and potentially harmful effects of radiologic studies allows the safest and most appropriate studies to be ordered for the gynecologic and obstetric population. With the explosion of interest and growing level of expertise in focused emergency department ultrasonography during the last decade, the practicing emergency physician should add this skill to his or her armamentarium in the future. Many emergency physicians are already comfortable in using radiologic technologies in their daily practice and have discovered how quickly vital and specific information can be obtained. PMID:12962355

  14. [Adolescent gynecology in the medical office].

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Renate

    2013-09-01

    In the age group of adolescents occur some gynecological problems which present different than in adult women. One is heavy menstrual bleeding, another menstrual problem is life burdening dysmenorrhea. Girls often do not speak about, they do not know what is really normal. Malignant breast masses are very rare, mostly fibroadenoma or cysts are found. With childhood obesity PCOS is a rising hormonal disturbance with impact on future fertility. Counseling adolescents in contraception is another challenge, focused on adherence, chronic disease and disabled teenagers. Together with the risks of unintended pregnancy adolescents have a high risk of sexually transmitted infections. Recommending preservative use and HPV and Hepatitis B vaccination is very important. Cervical cancer screening should start at age 21, girls with special risks (immunodeficiency, very early sexual activity) starting individually at earlier age. PMID:24005072

  15. Patients' Evaluations of Gynecologic Services Provided by Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagener, J. Mark; Carter, Glenna

    1978-01-01

    The development, operating principles, and users' evaluations of a broad based gynecologic program emphasizing effective birth control on a university campus are discussed. A major feature explored is the use of nurse practitioners as the primary service providers. (JMF)

  16. [110 years--University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom"].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V

    2014-01-01

    The first specialized Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital in Bulgaria was founded based on the idea of Queen Maria Luisa (1883). Construction began in 1896 and the official opening of the hospital took place on November 19, 1903. What is unique about the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom" is above all the fact that the Bulgarian school of obstetrics and gynecology was founded within its institution. Currently, the hospital has nearly 400 beds and 600 employees who work at nine clinics and six laboratories, covering the entire spectrum of obstetric and gynecological activities. Its leading specialists still continue to embody the highest level of professionalism and dedication. The future development of the hospital is chiefly associated with the renovation of facilities, resources and equipment and with the enhancement of the professional competence of the staff and of the quality of hospital products to improve the health and satisfaction of the patients. PMID:24919335

  17. Heart Failure Update: Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Wojnowich, Katherine; Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Outpatient management of heart failure (HF) is aimed at treating symptoms and preventing hospitalizations and readmissions. Management is initiated in a stepwise approach. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system is a cornerstone of therapy and should be started, along with beta blockers, as soon as the diagnosis of HF is made. Other drugs, including diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, hydralazine, and nitrates, may be added based on symptoms and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage. Despite a great interest in and theoretical benefit of naturoceutical products in the mitigation of oxidative stress and HF progression, none has been proven to be beneficial, and concerns exist regarding their interactions with standard HF drugs. Other nonpharmacologic interventions, including sodium restriction, regular exercise, and/or cardiac rehabilitation, should be initiated at diagnosis. HF often is progressive, and clinicians should be aware of late stage management options, including implantable devices, cardiac transplantation, and hospice care. PMID:26974001

  18. Robotic surgery applications in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lowery, William J; Leath, Charles A; Robinson, Randal D

    2012-04-01

    This review evaluates the use of robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies and objectively evaluates the use of these systems in performing radical hysterectomies and surgical staging of gynecologic malignancies. The review focuses on surgical length, blood loss, complications, recovery time, and adequacy of surgical staging of robotic-assisted surgery compared to abdominal and non-robotically assisted laparoscopic surgery for malignancies. PMID:22441900

  19. The principles and practice of ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; James, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    This is the latest edition of a reference on diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. Chapters have been added on infertility, legal aspects of ultrasound, and interventional techniques. Descriptions of instrumentation, physics and bioeffects, measurement data and normal anatomy in the fetus are given. There is a section on fetal anomalies and the investigation and management of various obstetrical problems, such as multiple pregnancy and hydatidiform mole. Coverage of gynecological ultrasound includes normal pelvic anatomy, pelvic masses, pelvic inflammatory disease, and breast evaluation.

  20. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  1. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir; Barton, Michael B.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  2. Medical Devices; Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices; Classification of the Gynecologic Laparoscopic Power Morcellation Containment System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-06-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation containment system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation containment system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27328463

  3. Obstetrics and gynecology between clinics and research.

    PubMed

    Eskes, T

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of a 25-year chairmanship at the University of Nijmegen is given. The main tasks were patient care, teaching and research. Patient care was influenced by new techniques later introduced into the various subdisciplines of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Evaluation of patient care was guaranteed by annual reports focussing on avoidable factors for morbidity or mortality. Furthermore the department was visited every five years by a hospital recognition committee for specialist training. There were just two juridical complaints that finally were denied. Clinical teaching involved medical students, interns and residents. The changes in teaching followed an international change from one-person lectures to student study groups. Efficacy of teaching was evaluated by an inter-university comparison of study duration. Nijmegen scored high. The evaluation of teaching for residents was done by the yearly one-day participation in the American CREOG (Council Resident Examination Obstetrics and Gynecology) multiple choice examination. The level of final positions of trained residents can also be seen as a partial result of the quality of training. Twenty out of 128 (15.6%) were nominated as professors. The Ph.D. residents were all working in major teaching hospitals. Research efforts were evaluated by the number of Ph.D.'s acquired by residents. Fifty-three percent of the residents accomplished a Ph.D. thesis. This was ten times the mean of the country. Several new techniques were introduced by the department in the Netherlands: amniotic fluid analysis, chromosomal investigations, fetal monitoring, animal studies, laparoscopy, ultrasound, radio-immuno-assay, gasanalysis of cord blood, genetic counseling, monoclonal antibodies and prolactin-agonists. Four research lines could be considered as an international breakthrough: the silent fetal heart rate pattern, dopamine-agonists, fetal behavioural states and homocysteine metabolism associated with neural tube defects. The

  4. Outpatient competence restoration: A model and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole R; Candilis, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe a model outpatient competence restoration program (OCRP) and provide data on time to restoration of adjudicative competence. METHODS: The authors tracked the process by which individuals are referred for outpatient competence restoration (OCR) by courts in the United States capital, describing the unique requirements of American law, and the avenues available for compelling adherence. Competence to stand trial is a critical gate-keeping function of the judicial and forensic communities and assures that defendants understand courtroom procedures. OCR is therefore an effort to assure fairness and protection of important legal rights. Multi-media efforts are described that educate patients and restore competence to stand trial. These include resources such as group training, use of licensed clinicians, visual aids, structured instruments, and cinema. Aggregate data from the OCRP’s previous 4 years of OCR efforts were reviewed for demographic characteristics, restoration rate, and time to restoration. Poisson regression modeling identified the differences in restoration between sequential 45-d periods after entrance into the program. RESULTS: In the past 4 years, the DC OCRP has been successful in restoring 55 of 170 participants (32%), with an average referral rate of 35 persons per year. 76% are restored after the initial 45 d in the program. Demographics of the group indicate a predominance of African-American men with a mean age of 42. Thought disorders predominate and individuals in care face misdemeanor charges 78% of the time. Poisson regression modeling of the number attaining competence during four successive 45-d periods showed a substantial difference among the time periods for the rate of attaining competence (P = 0.0011). The three time periods after 45 d each showed a significant decrease in the restoration rate when compared to the initial 0 to 45 d period - their relative rates were only 22% to 33% as high as the rate for 0-45 d (all

  5. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics in a group of drug free outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dallaspezia, Sara; van Jaarsveld, Astrid

    2016-07-30

    The combination of Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) and Light Therapy (LT) has been shown to prevent the early relapses characterizing response to TSD. Despite their proved efficacy, TSD and LT are still far from being considered standard therapy in the inpatient units and no study has assessed their efficacy and feasibility in outpatient settings. We studied 27 drug-free out-patients affected by Major Depression, divided in 7 groups according to the date of the wake night. Patients were administered one night of TSD and received LT during consecutive mornings following a predictive algorithm based on Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire scores. Severity of depression was rated on Back Depression Inventory Scale (BDI) at baseline, one week and three months after the end of treatment. BDI scores significantly decreased during treatment with no difference between the seven consecutively treated groups of patients. Significant differences in BDI scores were confirmed between the baseline and both one week and three months after the end of treatment. TSD and LT caused a significant amelioration of depressive symptoms in an outpatient setting. Similar effects were observed in seven independent groups, suggesting that there is repeatability in findings. Chronotherapeutics confirmed their efficacy in the treatment of depression. PMID:27173655

  6. Managing up to maximize medicare reimbursement for outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Bowden, K

    2001-10-01

    An example of managing up through participation in a multidisciplinary team tasked with maximizing reimbursement under the Medicare ambulatory patient classification (APC) system is described. Medicare's new system of payment for hospital outpatient services replaces the cost-based reimbursement model of the past with a technical payment based on the outpatient evaluation and management level. Individual institutions are responsible for developing criteria for defining technical visit levels. Managers at the New England Medical Center formed a team to develop these criteria. The team outlined components of the patient visit that qualified as technical costs, such as the use of space at a facility, medical and surgical supplies, and nonphysician professional services. Team members then contacted each of the center's clinics to identify specific services that met these criteria. After formulating the technical visit level criteria, the team determined who would assign the technical visit level, wrote policies and procedures, and trained staff. The APC team also assessed billing procedures, focusing particularly on the accuracy of the charge master and the use of proper codes and billing units for pass-through drugs. The team continues to monitor its results by reviewing payments received from Medicare and auditing high-risk areas. The APC team used the principles of managing up to maximize Medicare reimbursement for outpatient visits. PMID:11592351

  7. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  8. Interstitial therapy of perineal and gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Herstein, P.; Portnuff, J.

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients, 38 to 88 years of age, were treated with 125-Iodine or 192-Iridium interstitial implants at Stanford University Medical Center between July 1974, and December, 1978. There were 25 primary epithelial malignancies, eight extensions from intrapelvic organs and two metastatic tumors (hypernephroma and Hodgkin's disease). The involved sites were: urethra (6 patients); vulva (9 patients); vagina (8 patients); anus (7 patients); cervix (5 patients). Implantation was usually performed to treat evident or microscopic disease in conjunction with external beam pelvic treatment with or without local excision. Computerized implant preplanning was used.125-Iodine seeds were inserted either directly or within absorbable suture Polyglactin 910; 192-Iridium in nylon carriers was placed by suture or transperineal template. Two patients were lost to follow-up leaving 33 patients, 27 of whom are alive and free of local disease from 37 to 76 months. The overall local control rate was 88%, or 29/33 patients. All four local recurrences appeared before 24 months. Minor complications included: 10 patients with transient mucositis, four with superficial ulcers, and one patient with infection at the implanted site. Two major complications occurred: a necrotic rectal ulcer requiring a colostomy and a contracted, painful bladder necessitating a urinary diversion. It is concluded that in selected cases interstitial irradiation provides good local control of perineal and gynecological malignancies with low morbidity in this elderly and quite often fragile group of patients.

  9. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  10. Clinical benefits of metformin in gynecologic oncology

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, ATSUSHI; ICHIGO, SATOSHI; MATSUNAMI, KAZUTOSHI; TAKAGI, HIROSHI; YASUDA, KEIGO

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has suggested that diabetes may contribute to the initiation and progression of specific types of cancer. Metformin, a biguanide, has become the preferred first-line therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is inexpensive, has a proven safety profile and is able to be safely combined with additional antidiabetic agents. In addition to the well-established antidiabetic effects of metformin, there has also been notable interest in its antitumor properties. The present review discusses the emerging role of metformin as an example of an existing drug, used worldwide in the treatment of diabetes, which has been demonstrated to exert significant in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities and has thus been investigated in clinical trials. In gynecologic oncology, metformin has been suggested to exhibit significant treatment efficacy against endometrial cancer. Three studies have demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of metformin on the survival outcome of patients with ovarian cancer and in ovarian cancer prevention. However, this evidence was based on observational studies. Metformin has been shown to exert no statistically significant beneficial effect on cervical cancer incidence or mortality. By cancer site, the current limited insights highlight the need for clinical investigations and better-designed studies, along with evaluation of the effects of metformin on cancer at other sites. PMID:26622536

  11. [ Ambulatory laparoscopic gynecological surgery in Africa: feasibility].

    PubMed

    Nzoghe Nguema, P; Ogowet Igumu, N; Pither, S; Ngaka Nsafu, D

    2001-09-01

    We report a prospective survey conduced between March 1998 and February 1999 among 100 women classes ASA I and II who underwent laparoscopic surgery for gynecological disorders under general anesthesia. Among these laparoscopies 85 (85%) were performed for operative purposes and 12 (10.7%) for diagnostic purposes. Minimal monitoring was used (no capnography) so prophylacti fluid loading with 0.9% saline was used before insufflation to reduce hemodynamic changes induced by abdominal overpressure and to avoid potential massive air embolism. Insufflation pressure was limited to 14 mmHg. The main agent used for all procedures was propofol. Mean duration of the procedures was 55 minutes. There were no cases of complications or delayed recovery. Complete exsufflation by abdominal compression at the end of the procedures induced minimal abdominal pain and scapulalgia. Ketoprofen as effective postoperatively. Twenty-five patients (25%) complained of nausea and vomiting in the recovery room and were treated effectively with metoclopramide. All patients were discharged and accompanied to their home six hours later after a well-tolerated light meal. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:11598560

  12. [Gynecological Care and Prevention of Gynecological Malignancies in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers].

    PubMed

    Zikán, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge of gynecological care aspects in women with inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer, i.e. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and proposes guidelines for furher management of these women, addressing follow-up recommendations, prophylactic surgery indications and preimplantation genetic conseling. It evaluates cancer risk and severity of ovarian cancer in particular with regards to its high mortality resulting from aggressive biological behavior of the tumor and late detection rates. BRCA-positive women should be enrolled in prevention programs including carefull surveillance, prophylactic surgery or pre-implantation genetic counseling. Follow-up care consists of gynecological examination, expert oncogynecological ultrasound and tumor marker CA125 examination every six months. However, the most effective strategy for mortality reduction in ovarian cancer is prophylactic surgery--salpingo-oophorectomy (and hysterectomy). The optimal age for surgery is between 35 to 40 years. Prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy performed in premenopausal women was proved to reduce the risk of ovarian as well as breast cancer. Symptoms of estrogen deficiency after prophylactic surgery can be suppressed by administration of hormone replacement therapy without increasing the risk of breast cancer. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an effective way to prevent the trans--mission of hereditary predisposition to the next generation. The management of patients with hereditary suspceptibility to ovarian cancer should be confined to specialized centres. PMID:26691939

  13. Subjective psychological symptoms in outpatient asthmatic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, M D; Thompson, H C; Strunk, R C

    1981-12-01

    Outpatient adolescent asthmatics were studied using the Asthma Symptom Checklist (ASC) of Kinsman et al. The study showed that outpatient asthmatic adolescents are similar in many respects to older institutionalized asthmatics, except that in the former, psychological symptoms are more diffuse and recognition of respiratory symptoms is less severe. Further studies are needed to determine which psychological symptoms are most important in predicting prognosis in affected asthmatics or the development of "psychosomatic" asthma. PMID:7338897

  14. Simulation laboratories for training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Macedonia, Christian R; Gherman, Robert B; Satin, Andrew J

    2003-08-01

    Simulations have been used by the military, airline industry, and our colleagues in other medical specialties to educate, evaluate, and prepare for rare but life-threatening scenarios. Work hour limits for residents in obstetrics and gynecology and decreased patient availability for teaching of students and residents require us to think creatively and practically on how to optimize their education. Medical simulations may address scenarios in clinical practice that are considered important to know or understand. Simulations can take many forms, including computer programs, models or mannequins, virtual reality data immersion caves, and a combination of formats. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to a potential role for medical simulation in obstetrics and gynecology. We briefly describe an example of how simulation may be incorporated into obstetric and gynecologic residency training. It is our contention that educators in obstetrics and gynecology should be aware of the potential for simulation in education. We hope this commentary will stimulate interest in the field, lead to validation studies, and improve training in and the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:12907117

  15. European operative registry to avoid complications in operative gynecology.

    PubMed

    Putz, Andreas; Bohlin, Tonje; Rakovan, Martin; Putz, Ariane Maria; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how complications can be avoided in gynecological minimally invasive surgery in Europe. The Norwegian Gynecological Endoscopic Registry (NGER) facilitates medical research over a long duration. Can experiences from the Norwegian registry be used to develop a European registry to avoid complications? To answer this question, we used the NGER data from February 2013 until March 2015 to analyze the complications of gynecological endoscopy. The registry includes sociodemographic factors, related comorbidity, previous surgery, present procedure, and intraoperative complications. Postoperative complications were identified with a questionnaire administered 4 weeks after surgery. The risk factors leading to complications in gynecological endoscopy were found to be obesity, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, hypertension, previous surgery due to cervical carcinoma in situ, and low educational level. Regional differences in the complication rate were noted. National web-based operation registries such as the NGER can identify the risk factors for complications of gynecological endoscopic surgery and can help improve the outcome after surgery. The experience from NGER can be used to establish a European register. PMID:26805611

  16. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention. PMID:27442692

  17. Utilization of Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Training Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Huseyin; Aksoy, Ulku; Ozturk, Mustafa; Ozyurt, Sezin; Acmaz, Gokhan; Karadag, Ozge Idem; Yucel, Burak; Aydin, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Background Overutilization and inappropriate use of emergency departments (EDs) by patients with non-urgent health problems has become a major concern worldwide. This study aims to describe the characteristics of obstetric and gynecologic patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Obstetric and Gynecology. Methods A retrospective and cross-sectional study was designed at our Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital of Medicine between January 1 and December 31, 2013. A total of 30,853 patients applying to emergency service were retrospectively analyzed from the admission charts, patient files and hospital automation system. Patients were assessed in terms of demographic features, presentation times, complaints, admission type (with own facilities, with consultation or with ambulance), diagnoses (urgent or non-ergent), discharge rates, clinical admission, rejection rate of examination, and rejection rate of hospitalization. Results A total of 30,853 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of patients was 27.69 ± 8.44 years; 51% of patients were between 20 and 29 years old. The categories of patients in urgent and non-urgent were 69% and 31% respectively. Most common presentation time period was between 19:00 and 21:00. Labor pain, pain and bleeding during pregnency, routine antenatal control, pelvic pain and menstrual irregularity were the most common complaints. Labor pain with the rate of 21% was the most common cause of ED admission. All patients who presented with labor pain were hospitalized. Patients hospitalized for labor constituted 56% of all hospitalized patients. Among patients, 62% were treated on an outpatient basis and 38% were hospitalized. Of patients, 3.54% refused to hospitalization. The cases using the ambulance to admission constituted 1.07% of all ED patients. Of these patients who have used ambulance 3.65% refused to the patient examination. Conclusions To improve the

  18. Safety considerations for office-based obstetric and gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Punwani, Nathan; Bombaugh, Maryanne; Shapiro, Fred E

    2013-01-01

    The migration of gynecologic procedures to office-based settings provides numerous advantages for patients and providers alike, including reduced patient expenses, improved scheduling convenience, favorable provider reimbursement, and enhanced continuity of care and patient satisfaction. With rising health care costs-a major concern in health care-procedures will continue to shift to practice environments that optimize care, quality, value, and efficiency. It is imperative that gynecologic offices ensure that performance and quality variations are minimized across different sites of care; physicians should strive to provide care to patients that optimizes safety and is at least equivalent to that delivered at traditional sites. The gynecologic community should nonetheless heed the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and embrace continuous quality improvement. By exercising leadership, office-based gynecologists can forge a culture of competency, teamwork, communication, and performance measurement. PMID:23687556

  19. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  20. The Role of Mechanical Bowel Preparation in Gynecologic Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sarah L; Einarsson, Jon I

    2011-01-01

    Various combinations of dietary restriction, antibiotic regimens, and mechanical preparations have become routine in preoperative surgical planning for elective colon surgery. This practice has also become commonplace in the field of gynecology, either for planned bowel surgery or in complex cases that are believed to be high risk for inadvertent bowel injury. As the trend in gynecologic surgery shifts toward more minimally invasive approaches, the complexity of cases being performed by laparoscopy and robotics continues to increase. In addition, laparoscopic surgical techniques have a different set of inherent risks and challenges as compared with open pelvic operations. This review summarizes the available data surrounding the use of mechanical bowel preparations, specifically with regard to gynecologic laparoscopy. PMID:21629496

  1. Single-port approach to benign gynecologic pathology. A review.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, M; Revaux, A; Frydman, R; Yazigi, A; Ayoubi, J M

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopy is the gold standard in gynecological surgery. Single-port laparoscopic surgery, has been developed in order to improve minimally invasive surgery. We analyzed single-port approach in benign gynecologic pathology and made a bibliographic research on Pubmed and Medline from January 2000 to January 2015. From what emerges from the papers taken into consideration, single-port laparoscopy can be used for salpingostomy or salpingectomy to treat tubal ectopic pregnancy, benign adnexal disease (ovarian cystectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy), and for hysterectomy. We do not have enough data for complex procedures like myomectomy or hysteropexy. Robotic single-port laparoscopy seems to be a very attractive perspective and its use in benign gynecology surgery is expanding. More and more ergonomic limitations of single-port laparoscopy are corrected by development of articulated or flexible instruments and camera. Beyond these preliminary results, more ample prospective studies with an adapted and standardized instrumentation are thus essential to highlight real profits. PMID:25714874

  2. Triple simultaneous primary invasive gynecological malignancies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Miura, Yuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sugiyama, Toru

    2014-02-01

    Double gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in two organs) is relatively rare. However, triple gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in three organs) is extremely rare. We experienced a case of triple cancer, with primary cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each showing different histopathological features. A 50-year-old woman with a preoperative diagnosis of cervical cancer stage Ib1 with a pathological diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma underwent radical hysterectomy. The pathological diagnoses of the extracted masses were endometrioid adenocarcinoma in the uterine corpus and serous adenocarcinoma in the left ovary. Consequently, triple cancer was diagnosed. After the operation, six cycles of a paclitaxel/carboplatin regimen were administered, and no relapse of the cancers has been observed to date. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report in the international literature of concurrent gynecologic triple cancers of epithelial origin; that is, invasive cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each with different histopathological features. PMID:24147606

  3. Fertility-sparing options for patients with gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Mario M; Chi, Dennis S

    2005-09-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are most often diagnosed in postmenopausal women, but these malignancies also arise in premenopausal women, in whom issues of fertility can be a major concern. An increasing number of women are delaying childbearing. This has led to a significant increase in the number of women diagnosed with a gynecologic malignancy before desired completion of childbearing. Many of the standard treatments for these malignancies result in permanent sterility; however, there are now options for select young women who desire to preserve fertility. Patients should be told that data on fertility-sparing procedures are limited and that many of these options are of an experimental, nonstandard nature. The care of these patients is challenging and complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach, which should include gynecologic oncologists, reproductive endocrinologists, and perinatologists. PMID:16177285

  4. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1980-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  5. EMT-Inducing Molecular Factors in Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Loredana; Zhang, Catherine; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers are the unregulated growth of neoplastic cells that arise in the cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, and vulva. Although gynecologic cancers are characterized by different signs and symptoms, studies have shown that they share common risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, age, exposure to certain chemicals, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). Despite recent advancements in the preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic interventions for gynecologic cancers, many patients still die as a result of metastasis and recurrence. Since mounting evidence indicates that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process plays an essential role in metastatic relapse of cancer, understanding the molecular aberrations responsible for the EMT and its underlying signaling should be given high priority in order to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26356073

  6. Photodynamic therapy in patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Heinz; Mueller, Elisabeth; Kostron, Herwig

    1993-03-01

    Patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 3 - 6 months. Four patients with recurrent vulva carcinomas, one patient with a recurrent breast cancer, and one with a recurrent cervical carcinoma underwent PDT after parenteral or topical sensitization with Photosan 3. Of those patients two women made a complete recovery with no evidence of disease 27 and 24 months after. One patient responded partially with two recurrences which were retreated twice after topical sensitization, she has survived 16 months. The remaining patients showed partial response and died 3 and 8 months after PDT. The energy delivered by an argon-dye-laser ranged between 225 and 750 J/cm2. Photosan 3 was given intravenously at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight and was tolerated without any allergic reaction. A response rate of nearly 50% in recurrent gynecological malignancies encourages us to pursue PDT in gynecological diseases.

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing: Role in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tarra; Matulonis, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has risen to the forefront of tumor analysis and has enabled unprecedented advances in the molecular profiling of solid tumors. Through massively parallel sequencing, previously unrecognized genomic alterations have been unveiled in many malignancies, including gynecologic cancers, thus expanding the potential repertoire for the use of targeted therapies. NGS has expanded the understanding of the genomic foundation of gynecologic malignancies and has allowed identification of germline and somatic mutations associated with cancer development, enabled tumor reclassification, and helped determine mechanisms of treatment resistance. NGS has also facilitated rationale therapeutic strategies based on actionable molecular aberrations. However, issues remain regarding cost and clinical utility. This review covers NGS analysis of and its impact thus far on gynecologic cancers, specifically ovarian, endometrial, cervical, and vulvar cancers. PMID:27587626

  8. 21 CFR 884.4520 - Obstetric-gynecologic general manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic general manual instrument... Surgical Devices § 884.4520 Obstetric-gynecologic general manual instrument. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic general manual instrument is one of a group of devices used to perform...

  9. Quality of life for women living with a gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, F Beryl; Mitchell, Gail J

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to enhance understanding about quality of life from the perspective of women living with a gynecologic cancer. Parse's human becoming theory provided the theoretical perspective and guided the descriptive exploratory methodology that was used. Participants were 14 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer. Through analysis-synthesis processes, four themes were identified, which provide the following unified description: Quality of life is treasuring loving expressions while affirming personal worth, as consoling immersions amid torment emerge with expanding fortitude for enduring. The findings suggest implications for quality care that honors persons' experiences. PMID:15090091

  10. Antibiotic Misuse in Hospital, Outpatient, and Long-Term Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Salman; Cook, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic misuse is common in the United States, but the causes of antibiotic misuse may differ from one health care setting to another. In this commentary, we describe the factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in hospital, outpatient, and long-term care settings, along with specific measures that can help prevent antibiotic misuse. PMID:27621347

  11. Traumatization in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Øhre, Beate; Uthus, Mette Perly; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Falkum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons are at risk for experiencing traumatic events and such experiences are associated with symptoms of mental disorder. We investigated the prevalence of traumatic events and subsequent traumatization in adults referred to specialized psychiatric outpatient units for deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. Sixty-two…

  12. Patient Safety in Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments of two Teaching Hospitals in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Arora, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error. PMID:27385879

  13. Family planning, obstetrical and gynecological health care provision in the Soviet Far East.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, R J

    1992-01-01

    The Soviet model for both obstetrical and gynecological care and family planning provision seems entrenched in the Soviet Far East as found during a July 1991 visit to the Magadan and Chukotka Regions. Modern birth control is minimally practiced, but does include use of the older Soviet Loop intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD), recent introduction of the new Soviet Copper-T IUD and sporadic availability of condoms and foreign made birth control pills. Without male or female surgical sterilizations being performed, the consequence is that the major form of family planning is first trimester abortion. During this visit, I introduced the use of the NORPLANT Subdermal Contraceptive System and the Copper-T380A IUD to physicians at Anadry and Pevek regional hospitals. Gynecological surgery was also performed and fairly typical ob-gyn care units were toured. Ob-Gyn physicians in the Soviet Far East were found to be highly motivated. They look to the West for help in upgrading family planning and ob-gyn health care in the face of severe shortages after a half decade of perestroika. PMID:1605341

  14. Adverse Drug Events in the Outpatient Setting: An 11-Year National Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Florence T; Shannon, Michael W; Valim, Clarissa; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a common complication of medical care resulting in high morbidity and medical expenditure. Population level estimates of outpatient ADEs are limited. Our objective was to provide national estimates and characterizations of outpatient ADEs and determine risk factors associated with these events. Methods Data are from the National Center for Health Statistics which collects information on patient visits to outpatient clinics and emergency departments throughout the United States. We examined visits between 1995 and 2005 and measured the national annual estimates of and risk factors for outpatient ADEs requiring medical treatment. Results The national annual number of ADE-related visits was 4,335,990 (95%CI, 4,326,872–4,345,108). Visits for ADEs to outpatient clinics increased over the study period from 9.0 to 17.0 per 1000 persons (P value for trend<0.001). In multivariate analyses, factors associated with ADE visits included patient age (OR 2.13; 95%CI 1.63–2.79 for 65 years and older), number of medications taken by patient (OR, 1.88; 95%CI, 1.58–2.25 for five medications or more), and female gender (OR, 1.51; 95%CI, 1.34–1.71). Overall, outpatient ADEs resulted in 107,468 (95%CI, 89,011–125,925) hospital admissions annually, with older patients at highest risk for hospitalization (P value for trend<0.001). Conclusions Both patient age and polypharmacy use are risk factors for ADE-related healthcare visits, which have substantially increased in outpatient clinics between 1995 and 2005. The incidence of ADEs has particularly increased among patients 65 years and older with as many as 1 in 20 persons seeking medical care for an ADE. PMID:20623513

  15. Robotics in Gynecology: Why is this Technology Worth Pursuing?

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Yáñez, Rodrigo; Olaya-Guzmán, Emilio José; Haghenbeck-Altamirano, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Robotic laparoscopy in gynecology, which started in 2005 when the Da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in gynecologic procedures, represents today a modern, safe, and precise approach to pathology in this field. Since then, a great deal of experience has accumulated, and it has been shown that there is almost no gynecological surgery that cannot be approached with this technology, namely hysterectomy, myomectomy, sacrocolpopexia, and surgery for the treatment of endometriosis. Albeit no advantages have been observed over conventional laparoscopy and some open surgical procedures, robotics do seem to be advantageous in highly complicated procedures when extensive dissection and proper anatomy reestablishment is required, as in the case of oncologic surgery. There is no doubt that implementation of better logistics in finance, training, design, and application will exert a positive effect upon robotics expansion in gynecological medicine. Contrary to expectations, we estimate that a special impact is to be seen in emerging countries where novel technologies have resulted in benefits in the organization of health care systems. PMID:24453521

  16. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models in Gynecological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska, Paul

    2014-01-01

    OVERVIEW In the era of targeted therapies, patients with gynecological malignancies have not yet been major beneficiaries of this new class of agents. This may reflect the fact that the main tumor types, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers, are a highly heterogeneous group of cancers, with variable response to standard chemotherapies. This is also likely due to poor model development in which to study the diversity of these cancers. Cancer-derived cell lines fail to adequately recapitulate molecular hallmarks of specific cancer subsets and complex microenvironments, which may be critical for sensitivity to targeted therapies. Patient derived xenografts (PDX), using fresh human tumor without prior in vitro culture, combined with whole genome expression, gene copy number and sequencing analyses, could dramatically aid novel therapy development in gynecological malignancies. Gynecological tumors can be engrafted in immunodeficient mice with a high rate of success and within a reasonable time frame. The resulting PDX accurately recapitulate the patient’s tumour in histological, molecular and in vivo treatment response characteristics. Orthotopic PDX develop complications relevant for the clinic, such as ascites and bowel obstruction, providing opportunities for understanding the biology of these clinical problems. Thus, PDX have great promise for delivering improved understanding of gynecological malignancies, serve as better models for designing novel therapies and clinical trials and could underpin individualized, directed therapy for patients from whom PDX models have been established. PMID:24857111

  17. Continuum of Medical Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohner, Charles W.; Hunter, Charles A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past eight years the obstetric and gynecology specialty has applied a system model of instructional planning to the continuum of medical education. The systems model of needs identification, preassessment, instructional objectives, instructional materials, learning experiences; and evaluation techniques directly related to objectives was…

  18. A National Survey of Undergraduate Teaching in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Stenchever, Morton A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of academic departments of obstetrics and gynecology was designed to assess undergraduate educational programs and the impact of efforts made to improve teaching in the specialty. It focuses on instructional patterns, the clinical clerkship, student evaluation, and program administration and evaluation. Prior surveys are noted.…

  19. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  20. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1981-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. Care must be exercised in associating previous therapy and a subsequent malignancy. Naturally occurring second cancers must be separated from those which are iatrogenic. Associations in the literature have been made involving malignancies as a sequelae of prior gynecologic therapy. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. Irradiation therapy, however, has not yet been shown to be related to leukemia in cervical cancer patients. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  1. Changing state of gynecologic oncologist specialty in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takuma

    2016-05-01

    Gynecologic oncologists must have extensive knowledge regarding the methods of treating a diverse range of gynecologic cancers as well as the ability to perform cutting-edge multidisciplinary treatments that frequently involve surgery. Given that coordination with other medical departments is vital for treatment, a high level of interpersonal and technical skills needs to be demonstrated to form the axis for medical treatment. One objective of the specialist certification system is the grooming of leaders as gynecologic oncologists while instructing trainees. The most distinguishing feature of Japanese gynecologic oncologists is that they need experience in more than 150 invasive cancer treatments, including more than 100 operations within the last 3-5 years. As for performance of surgery, at least 30 operations, including 15 radical hysterectomies, are required. Since surgical methods, including laparoscopic surgery, are undergoing a radical change, and increasing numbers of patients are undergoing radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer, a review of the necessary requirements is critical. It is important to foster new leaders who are research-oriented. Now is the time for marked reform with the new specialist certification system being introduced by the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. Japan has the advantage of offering medical services at a much lower cost because of its national health insurance system. However, specialists are currently not receiving clear benefits befitting their efforts, and the question of how to maintain their motivation is an issue for the future. For these purposes, I believe securing incentives is a critical issue for specialists. PMID:26988808

  2. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis: A rare manifestation of gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Sultanik, Elliot; Shell, Roger; Gibbon, Darlene

    2016-08-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare complication of cancer.•NBTE may precede the diagnosis of an occult gynecologic malignancy.•Malignancy-induced NBTE must be considered in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.•The most effective treatment is anticoagulation and treatment of the underlying cancer. PMID:27453927

  3. 3-T MR-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Tina; Egger, Jan; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2012-11-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes external-beam radiation followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is beneficial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article, we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3-T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This methodology has been used in 18 cases from September 2011 to May 2012 in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. AMIGO comprises state-of-the-art tools for MR imaging, image analysis and treatment planning. An MR sequence using three-dimensional (3D)-balanced steady-state free precession in a 3-T MR scanner was identified as the best sequence for catheter identification with ballooning artifact at the tip. 3D treatment planning was performed using MR images. Items in development include software designed to support virtual needle trajectory planning that uses probabilistic bias correction, graph-based segmentation and image registration algorithms. The results demonstrate that 3-T MR image guidance has a role in gynecologic brachytherapy. These novel developments have the potential to improve targeted treatment to the tumor while sparing the normal tissues. PMID:22898699

  4. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  5. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  6. [Dimensional modeling analysis for outpatient payments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-zhong; Guo, Yi-min

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a data warehouse model for outpatient payments, which is designed according to the requirements of the hospital financial management while dimensional modeling technique is combined with the analysis on the requirements. This data warehouse model can not only improve the accuracy of financial management requirements, but also greatly increase the efficiency and quality of the hospital management. PMID:19119657

  7. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  8. Outpatient Treatment for Substance-Abusing Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschel, J. David; Keny, Janet R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses trend towards involving criminal offenders in substance abuse programs and utilizing outpatient settings in treatment. Appraises the treatment performance of both court-referred and voluntary clients and the impacts criminal-justice-referred clients may have upon other persons in treatment programs to which they are admitted. Discusses…

  9. Oncofertility for gynecologic and non-gynecologic cancers: fertility sparing in young women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Polat; Doğan, N Utku; Ayhan, Ali

    2014-12-01

    About ten percent of all female cancer survivors is younger than 40 years of age. For these young women the primary goal is to ensure the highest possibility of cure and to maintain the reproductive functions as well. Oncofertility is a new concept including both oncology and reproductive medicine. By this recently defined concept young women will have maximal chance to make an optimal decision without any significant impact and delay in oncologic outcome. Oncofertility concept could be applied for genital cancer as well as non-genital cancer of reproductive age. Currently sperm and embryo banking are the standard methods used for young patients with cancer whose future fertility is under risk. In contrary oocyte banking, ovarian tissue cryopreservation are all controversial procedures and still accepted as experimental by many authors although American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) consideres oocyte cryopreservation "no longer experimental". For genital cancers procedures for oncofertility depends on the type of the cancer and the treatment of choice. In this review the current data and concepts regarding oncofertility concept including the gynecologic oncologic perspective is reviewed. PMID:25090914

  10. A study of blood cross-matching requirements for surgery in gynecological oncology: improved efficiency and cost saving.

    PubMed

    Foley, C L; Mould, T; Kennedy, J E; Barton, D P J

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and implement a maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) within a specialist gynecological oncology department in a tertiary referral center and evaluate its impact on the cross-match to transfusion ratio (CTR). A retrospective case note audit was undertaken to identify common operations performed within the unit and their transfusion requirements. The efficiency of blood usage was assessed using the CTR, and an MSBOS was devised and implemented. A prospective audit of preoperative blood cross-matching and subsequent blood usage was then performed for consecutive elective operations in the unit, to assess the effect of the MSBOS. The retrospective study of 222 cases demonstrated a CTR of 2.25 equivalent to 44% usage of cross-matched blood. Ninety two percent of operations performed within the unit could be incorporated into an MSBOS. The prospective study of 207 cases demonstrated a significantly reduced CTR of 1.71 or 59% blood usage (chi2 = 12.4, P < 0.001). This equates to a saving of 102 units of blood over the 15 months prospective audit. Protocol adherence was 77%. No patient was adversely affected by the adoption of the MSBOS. We conclude that an MSBOS can be safely introduced into a gynecological oncology department resulting in significant financial savings. PMID:14675329

  11. Anesthetic Considerations in Robotic-Assisted Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Alan D.; Vadivelu, Nalini; Ahuja, Nitin; Mitra, Sukanya; Silasi, Dan; Urman, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic-assisted surgery has evolved over the past 2 decades with constantly improving technology that assists surgeons in multiple subspecialty disciplines. The surgical requirements of lithotomy and steep Trendelenburg positions, along with the creation of a pneumoperitoneum and lack of direct access to the patient all present management challenges in gynecologic surgery. Patient positioning requirements can have significant physiologic effects and can result in many complications. Methods This review focuses on the anesthetic and surgical implications of robot-assisted technology in gynecologic surgery. Conclusion Good communication among team members and knowledge of the nuances of robotic surgery have the potential to improve patient outcomes, increase efficiency, and reduce complications. PMID:24358000

  12. Fertility preserving options in patients with gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Ramez N; Randall, Leslie M; Berman, Michael L; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Disaia, Philip J; Bristow, Robert E

    2011-08-01

    A proportion of reproductive age women are affected by gynecologic malignancies. This patient population is faced with difficult decisions, related to their cancer care and treatment, as well as future childbearing potential. Therefore, it is important for gynecologists to be familiar with fertility sparing management options in patients with cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer. In addition to understanding the surgical approaches available, providers should be able to counsel patients regarding their eligibility for and the indications and limitations of fertility sparing therapy for gynecologic cancer, allowing for appropriate referrals. A comprehensive PUBMED literature search was conducted using the key words "fertility preservation," "cervical cancer," "endometrial cancer," "ovarian cancer," "borderline tumor of the ovary," "germ cell tumor," "obstetrical outcomes," "chemotherapy," and "radiation." The following review summarizes fertility sparing options for patients with cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancer, with an emphasis on appropriate patient selection, oncologic, and obstetric outcomes. PMID:21411052

  13. The Annual Gynecologic Examination Updated for the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Joyce; Levi, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The concept of an annual gynecologic screening visit to identify disease at an early stage has long been an established component of women's health care. Women and their health care providers have historically accepted the schedule of an annual gynecologic examination with cervical cancer screening and a pelvic examination. Recently, researchers questioned the value of the annual breast and pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women and re-established the intervals for Pap test screening with the addition of human papillomavirus co-testing to establish cervical cancer risk. The updated well woman examination is now an opportunity to engage women in health education, screening for chronic disease risks, and health care concerns such as depression and violence. PMID:27287359

  14. [A trial of biweekly paclitaxel administration in consideration of QOL for advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer].

    PubMed

    Fushiki, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Hideo; Ikoma, Tomomi; Ota, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    At present there is no oral medicine available which is effective for advanced or recurrent case of elderly patients with gynecologic cancer. We report that a low-dose biweekly paclitaxel administration preserves quality of life (QOL) and seems to be "tumor dormancy like" therapy of good compliance with few side effects. A total of 11 cases were in ovarian cancer (5), uterine cancer (3), cervical cancer (2), and uterine sarcoma (1). The median age was 68 years old and the age range was 50 to 79 years old. We performed a standard treatment as a first time treatment. Afterwards, we obtained complete informed consent from the patients for progressive or recurrent cancer and administered biweekly paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 (80-100 mg/body) on an outpatient basis. We reviewed the effect, side effect and compliance of the medication. We judged the side effect based on the Japanese cancer treatment society common toxicity criteria. The result was only one patient death from PD and the other 10 patients were PR or a state of NC without side effect. An ovary cancer case patient lived for 67 months at best, an endometrial cancer case patient lived for 62 months at best, a cervical cancer case patient lived for 74 months at best, and a recurrent uterine sarcoma case patient lived for 76 months after recurrence and the QOL was good. In addition, there was no onset of side effect more than grade 2 in all of the cases and a compliance of medical administration was good. In these cases, we thought that a low-dose of biweekly paclitaxel administration was regarded as a therapy to preserve QOL without a serious side effect and a good compliance of medication. Furthermore, we intend to increase more cases and would like to report them in the future. PMID:15918575

  15. [Optimizing performance documentation in gynecology--assistance from the internet].

    PubMed

    Woernle, F; Seufert, R; Brockerhoff, P; Lellé, R J

    1999-01-01

    The documentation of operations in the field of gynecology and obstetrics is regulated by social laws in Germany. Only by optimal encoding of diagnoses and procedures an efficient cashing with the health insurance's can be achieved. This requires profound knowledge of the invoice modalities and usually support by computer systems. The Internet offers in this respect some assistance, which in the following is pointed out and evaluated critically. PMID:10573827

  16. The last fifty years in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Anspaugh, R D

    1993-12-01

    The last fifty years in Obstetrics and Gynecology have been associated with some of the most outstanding changes in the history of this specialty. We have seen the discovery and use of antibiotics, the Pap smear, shortened hospital stays, the Rh factor, and the birth control pill. It is doubtful we shall ever see as many changes in an equal period of time. PMID:8126591

  17. [The internet--possibilities and risk for gynecology].

    PubMed

    Seufert, R; Molitor, N; Knapstein, P G

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is a rapid growing world wide computer cluster using the TCP/IP communication protocol. In case of scientific data exchange Internet communication is of extraordinary value. Low data security and low data transfer rates are still problems for medical data exchange. New Internet tools--specially new cryptological techniques--are able to improve the communication security for obstetrical and gynecological data. PMID:9381842

  18. Pelvic arteriography in obstetrics and gynecology: arteriovenous fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, G.T.

    1984-12-01

    Pelvic arteriography has become an increasingly useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the past decade along with angiography of other areas of the body. A brief historical review of its development in obstetrics and gynecology since 1950 is presented, including placental localization and study of pelvic arterial adequacy. Modern practical uses include (1) diagnosis and therapy of pelvic arteriovenous fistulas, and (2) arterial embolization for intractable recurrent pelvic hemorrhage associated either with malignancy or with trauma or uncontrollable surgical bleeding.

  19. Advances in Suture Material for Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A; Clark, Rachel M

    2009-01-01

    Despite millennia of experience with wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. Tissue characteristics, tensile strength, reactivity, absorption rates, and handling properties should be taken into account when selecting a wound closure suture. This review discusses the wound healing process and the biomechanical properties of currently available suture materials to better understand how to choose suture material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:19826572

  20. Preventing and recognizing venous thromboembolism after obstetric and gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Deedra

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a hypercoagulable disorder that is associated with two potential significant complications-deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE). During pregnancy and the postpartum period, the risk for VTE is increased. Prevention is optimal, but early detection and treatment of VTE in women after obstetric and gynecologic surgery is imperative, as DVT is often asymptomatic and, in many patients, clinical presentation only occurs after a fatal PE occurs. PMID:23957798

  1. The Use of Barbed Sutures in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the multitude of different procedures performed with a host of different wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. In recent years, a new class of suture material—barbed suture—has been introduced into the surgeon’s armamentarium. This review focuses on barbed suture to better understand the role of this newer material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:21364859

  2. Unverifiable Accomplishments and Publications on Applications for Gynecologic Oncology Fellowships

    PubMed Central

    Frumovitz, Michael; Kriseman, Maya L.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; Sood, Anil K.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Soliman, Pamela T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Selection of physicians for fellowships in obstetrics and gynecology subspecialties has become increasingly competitive. The number and quality of research publications is an important factor in the selection process. We sought to estimate the incidence of unverifiable (“ghost”) publications among gynecologic oncology fellowship applicants. Methods We reviewed the applications to a single gynecologic oncology fellowship program during 2004–2008. Articles and book chapters reported as published, “in press”, “submitted”, or “in progress” were systematically searched for by three reviewers using PubMed and Google. Chi-square analysis was used to evaluate associations between demographic factors and unverifiable publications. Results Two hundred forty-three applications met the inclusion criteria. Of the 35 applicants who listed membership in Alpha Omega Alpha, 4 (11%) were not listed on the organization’s website as inductees. Of the 464 articles reported as published or “in press”, only 387 (83%) could be verified. Of the 148 applicants who reported at least 1 published/“in press” article, 44 (30%) had at least 1 unverifiable publication. On multivariable analysis, only male gender increased the likelihood of unverifiable publications (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.1). Of the 282 manuscripts reported as “submitted” or “in progress”, only 126 (44%) were published. Of the 124 applicants who reported at least 1 “submitted”/“in progress” manuscript, 88 (71%) had at least 1 unverifiable manuscript. Conclusion The proportion of unverifiable publications listed on gynecologic oncology fellowship applications is concerning. Stringent review of applications before interview invitations and match list submission is warranted. PMID:22353948

  3. Special issues in fertility preservation for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; Peccatori, Fedro; Del Pup, Lino; Franchi, Dorella; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti; Colombo, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies account for 1,09 million new cancer cases worldwide consisting of about 12% of tumors affecting female population. About 10% of all female cancer survivors are younger than 40 years of age. Since cancers affecting female genital organs are usually treated by radical surgery, chemotherapy or chemoradiation approaches that induce permanent damage of reproductive functions, the development of strategies for fertility preservation represent one of the most important goals for gynecologic oncology. In this scenario, the newly defined oncofertility discipline acquires increasing interest, offering patients maximal chances to make an adequate decision about future fertility, based on their oncologic diagnosis and prognosis. However, the majority of physicians do not pay particular attention to these issues, even if impressive progresses have been made in this field in the last decades. Possibly, it is due to the lack of strong evidences from clinical trials without an adequate number of cases to establish safety and efficacy of these procedures. In this review we will discuss the most recently debated options for fertility preservation in gynecologic oncology, highlighting issues and controversies related to oncofertility. PMID:26358422

  4. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide. PMID:23336154

  5. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis of clear cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract.

    PubMed

    Vang, R; Whitaker, B P; Farhood, A I; Silva, E G; Ro, J Y; Deavers, M T

    2001-07-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract has been defined in terms of its clinical and histologic features; however, its immunophenotypic profile has not been fully characterized. Seventeen cases of primary clear cell carcinoma from various sites within the female genital tract (11 ovary, 5 uterus, 1 vagina) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. These tumors were assessed for the expression of cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), low and high molecular weight cytokeratin, (CAM5.2 and 34 beta E12, respectively), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Leu-M1, vimentin, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), bcl-2, p53, HER-2/neu, and CA-125. The characteristic immunoprofile for all sites was positivity for CK7, CAM5.2, 34 beta E12, CEA, Leu-M1, vimentin, bcl-2, p53, and CA-125; variably positivity for ER and HER-2/neu; and negativity for CK20 and PR. For comparison, two cases of urologic clear cell carcinoma (1 bladder, 1 urethra) were also studied, and their profile was found to be similar to the gynecologic cases. Aside from minor differences, clear cell carcinoma appears to have the same immunophenotype regardless of whether it originates in the endometrium, ovary, or genitourinary tract. Much of its profile is similar to other gynecologic adenocarcinomas, but some of the markers studied may be useful in the differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:11444201

  7. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  8. Gynecologic reconstruction with a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: an update.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Carter, J R; Saltzman, A K; Carson, L F; Fowler, J M; Twiggs, L B

    1996-06-01

    This series reports the outcomes and significant complications associated with the rectus myocutaneous flap when used for pelvic or inguinal reconstruction in patients with gynecologic cancers. Perioperative variables were retrospectively reviewed to identify social and medical risk factors as well as intraoperative and postoperative complications that predisposed to rectus flap failure. Fifteen patients with gynecologic malignancies underwent reconstructive procedures using a vertically oriented rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for either vaginal (n = 14) or inguinal (n = 1) reconstruction. The patients' primary cancers were cervical (n = 11), rectal (n = 1), ovarian (n = 1), vulvar (n = 1), and vaginal (n = 1). The median age was 50 years. The median follow-up was 17 months. All flaps were mobilized in conjunction with a radical salvage operation. There were no cases of vaginal prolapse and no abdominal wound infections. However, 4 patients (27%) had major postoperative morbidity in this small series. There was one wound dehiscence and three episodes of necrosis of the subcutaneous and cutaneous portions of the flap. All 4 of these patients required additional operative intervention or debridement. Eleven patients had complete healing of the flap. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap is a valuable option for gynecologic reconstructive procedures. Perioperative strategies for improving flap viability include the identification of risk factors that may compromise flap perfusions such as prior abdominal incisions, peripheral vascular disease, and obesity. Meticulous surgical technique is required to preserve the vascular pedicle. These strategies may be useful in preoperative counseling, the perioperative evaluation, and the intraoperative management. PMID:8641616

  9. Gynecological Surgery and Low Back Pain in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Jeffery; Pidcoe, Peter E.; Ketchum-McKinney, Jessica M.; Burnet, Evie N.; Huang, Emily; Wilson, James C.; Hoogstad, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine sacroiliac joint compliance characteristics and pelvic floor movements in older women relative to gynecological surgery history and back pain complaints. Design: Single-visit laboratory measurement. Setting: University clinical research center. Participants: Twenty-five women aged 65 years or older. Outcome Measures: Sacroiliac joint compliance measured by Doppler imaging of vibrations and ultrasound measures of pelvic floor motion during the active straight leg raise test. Results: Doppler imaging of vibrations demonstrated test reliability ranging from 0.701 to 0.898 for detecting vibration on the ilium and sacrum sides of the sacroiliac joint. The presence of low-back pain or prior gynecological surgery was not significantly associated with a difference in the compliance or laxity symmetry of the sacroiliac joints. No significant difference in pelvic floor movement was found during the active straight leg raise test between subject groups. All P values were ≥.4159. Conclusions: Prior gynecological surgery and low-back pain were not significantly associated with side-to-side differences in the compliance of the sacroiliac joints or in significant changes in pelvic floor movement during a loading maneuver in a group of older women. PMID:23569659

  10. Recognizing and Alleviating Moral Distress Among Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Aultman, Julie; Wurzel, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstetrics and gynecology residents face difficult clinical situations and decisions that challenge their moral concepts. Objective We examined how moral and nonmoral judgments about patients are formulated, confirmed, or modified and how moral distress may be alleviated among obstetrics-gynecology residents. Methods Three focus groups, guided by open-ended interview questions, were conducted with 31 obstetrics-gynecology residents from 3 academic medical institutions in northeast Ohio. Each focus group contained 7 to 14 participants and was recorded. Two investigators independently coded and thematically analyzed the transcribed data. Results Our participants struggled with 3 types of patients perceived as difficult: (1) patients with chronic pain, including patients who abuse narcotics; (2) demanding and entitled patients; and (3) irresponsible patients. Difficult clinical encounters with such patients contribute to unalleviated moral distress for residents and negative, and often inaccurate, judgment made about patients. The residents reported that they were able to prevent stigmatizing judgments about patients by keeping an open mind or recognizing the particular needs of patients, but they still felt unresolved moral distress. Conclusions Moral distress that is not addressed in residency education may contribute to career dissatisfaction and ineffective patient care. We recommend education and research on pedagogical approaches in residency education in a model that emphasizes ethics and professional identity development as well as the recognition and alleviation of moral distress. PMID:26279769

  11. Dental outpatients: health locus of control correlates.

    PubMed

    Ludenia, K; Donham, G W

    1983-11-01

    Examined relationships between the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scales, Beck Depression Inventory, Trait subscales of the State-Trait Personality Inventory, and dental ratings of oral hygiene and presence of periodontal disease with dental outpatients (N = 101) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center Dental Clinic. Results indicated that this sample of outpatients scored comparably on MHLC Health Internality and Health Externality to a sample reported by Wallston and Wallston. Older dental patients, in the present sample, scored significantly higher on Powerful Others Externality in contrast to younger Ss, which suggests greater reliance on health professionals for dental health. Confirmatory evidence is presented on the negative correlations of depression, anger, and anxiety with Health Internality. Differential approaches to dental treatment are discussed. PMID:6662936

  12. Outpatient Heroin Detoxification with Acupuncture and Staplepuncture

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Forest S.

    1976-01-01

    Eighteen heroin addicts were treated as outpatients with acupuncture, electrical stimulation and staplepuncture. Results of treatment were compared with results in two similar groups of 18 persons in whom detoxification was carried out using methadone and propoxyphene napsylate. Withdrawal symptoms were relieved for about two hours in most of the patients after a treatment episode of acupuncture and electrical stimulation. Staplepuncture, which is the manipulation by hand of a surgical staple implanted in the concha of the ear, was reported to relieve withdrawal symptoms at least partially in approximately 40 percent of subjects. In only one person of the group treated with acupuncture or staplepuncture was complete detoxification achieved, compared with 13 and 10 persons, respectively, in the methadone and propoxyphene napsylate groups (p<.001). Use of acupuncture and staplepuncture in outpatient clinics may be limited unless techniques can be found that will relieve withdrawal symptoms for a longer period than that observed in this study. PMID:1086037

  13. Outpatient commitment and procedural due process.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice Teri-Lowe

    2015-01-01

    A large empirical literature on Kendra's Law has assessed the impact of court ordered outpatient treatment on outcomes such as treatment adherence, psychiatric hospitalization, quality of life, and treatment costs. Missing from the empirical literature, however, is a better understanding of procedural due process under Kendra's Law. Procedural due process concerns the safeguards that must be in place when governments deprive persons of their liberties, for example--notice, the right to a hearing and the right to appeal. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study of procedural due process and assisted outpatient treatment hearings under Kendra's Law. Attorneys reported significant barriers to effective advocacy on behalf of their clients. Further, despite the shift from a medical model of civil commitment to a judicial model in the 1970s, by and large judges continue to accord great deference to clinical testimony. PMID:25748886

  14. HIV prevalence in dental outpatients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, O P; de Souza Filho, F J; Scully, C; Line, S R; Porter, S

    1997-10-01

    A series of dental outpatients in Brazil was anonymously screened for HIV antibodies in whole unstimulated saliva with an immunoglobulin G antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Salivary HIV antibodies were detected in 40 patients in the control group who were known to be HIV-seropositive but were not detected in any of a series of 40 known HIV-seronegative patients in the control group, confirming the very high sensitivity and specificity of the immunoglobulin G antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Only one patient from 84 consecutive dental outpatients of unknown HIV serostatus who were examined anonymously for HIV by immunoglobulin G antibody-capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed HIV positivity (1.2% of the population). PMID:9347499

  15. Conceptualizing services research on outpatient commitment.

    PubMed

    Draine, J

    1997-01-01

    Issues affecting the research of outcomes of involuntary outpatient commitment (OC) of persons with serious mental illness are explored. These issues include the reliance on hospital recidivism as a primary measure of outcome, the role of family members and coercion in the process of outpatient commitment, and the conceptualization and design of studies. A conceptual framework that attempts to incorporate responses to these issues is proposed. Continued research on OC should build on conceptual models that include family role and burden, services delivered, an accounting for varied coercive mechanisms, and client-level outcomes. Rehospitalization should be conceptualized as an intermediate variable between OC and client-level outcomes rather than as an ultimate outcome. PMID:9230572

  16. Pricing commodity outpatient procedures assessing the impact.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, William O

    2015-10-01

    Hospitals should carefully consider all relevant factors before choosing to lower prices and payments for certain outpatient commodity services in an effort to remain competitive in their market. Key steps to take in the evaluation process include: Determining current profitability. Assessing profitability by payer class. Understanding overall cost positions. Assessing the relative payment terms of current commercial contracts. Determining the net revenue effect of proposed changes. PMID:26595979

  17. Incidence of digoxin toxicity in outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, J F; Robbins, L J; Hammermeister, K E; Roth, S C; Hammond, W S

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of digoxin toxicity among patients in hospitals has declined in recent years. To evaluate whether a similar decline has occurred in ambulatory care, we reviewed randomly selected medical records for 183 outpatients receiving ongoing treatment with digoxin at 10 urban and rural Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the Rocky Mountain region. The prevalence of traditional risk factors for digoxin toxicity--elevated serum digoxin and serum creatinine levels, hypokalemia, and a new prescription of an interacting drug-was established from computerized laboratory and pharmacy records. Of the 183 patients, 50 (27.3%) had one or more risk factors for digoxin toxicity: serum digoxin levels were elevated in 13.6% of patients in whom a level was obtained, with hypokalemia in 14.3%, elevated creatinine levels in 17.9%, and possible drug interactions in 5.5% of patients over a 1-year period. Nevertheless, digoxin toxicity occurred in only 2 persons (1.1% or 1.4 per 100 patient-years of treatment). We conclude that digoxin toxicity was rare in this group of outpatients, even in persons presumed to be at high risk because of metabolic abnormalities, increased digoxin concentrations, or the use of interacting drugs. The low rate of digoxin toxicity in outpatients parallels the decline in the incidence of toxicity observed in hospital-based studies. PMID:7810124

  18. Women with gynecologic malignancies have a greater incidence of suicide than women with other cancer types.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kristy K; Roncancio, Angelica M; Plaxe, Steven C

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with gynecologic malignancies. Most suicides occurred within 4 years of diagnosis. Better understanding of the descriptive epidemiology of suicide among women with gynecologic malignancies could lead to improved risk assessment, screening, and prevention of this potentially avoidable cause of death. PMID:23278597

  19. Profiling outpatient workload: practice variations between consultant firms and hospitals in south west England.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, A C; Harvey, I M; Peters, T J; Sharp, D J; Frankel, S J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the variation in outpatient new to old ratios between consultants and between providers for seven high volume specialties (four surgical, three medical). DESIGN: This was a descriptive study at consultant and provider unit level based upon patient administration system data from the South and West Regional Health Authority for the financial year 1992-93. Additional components of variance analysis was used to distinguish individual consultant effects from host institution effects. SETTING: The former South Western Regional Health Authority area from Gloucestershire to Cornwall. SUBJECTS: Altogether 345 consultant firms in seven specialties grouped into 13 provider unit groups. MAIN MEASURES: New to old ratio, omitting elective inpatients followed up as outpatients. RESULTS: Variation between consultants is greater in surgical than in medical specialties, while absolute levels of new to old ratios tend to be higher in surgical specialties than in medical. Variation between provider unit groups is also greater in surgical specialties. Analysis of variance shows that more total variance is attributable to provider unit group in gynaecology than in other specialties. CONCLUSIONS: Within individual specialties there is evidence of substantial variation that is not attributable to underlying differences in morbidity patterns. There is evidence of marked variation in terms of both individual consultants and institutions, a finding that provides the springboard for further analytical work. Published routine outpatient activity statistics should distinguish between new referrals, inpatient follow up, and clinic rebookings. PMID:9229062

  20. The association of gynecological symptoms with psychological distress in women of reproductive age: a survey from gynecology clinics in Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Chaaya, M. M.; Bogner, H. R.; Gallo, J. J.; Leaf, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    To date there has been no previous research into a possible association between psychological distress and gynecologic symptoms in the Arab world. We hypothesized that psychological distress would be associated with specific gynecologic complaints as well as with psychosocial factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study of women attending gynecology clinics in Beirut, Lebanon. The study sample consisted of 355 women aged 18 to 49 years who were seeking healthcare from gynecologists affiliated with two general teaching hospitals in Beirut. Psychological distress was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Gynecologic complaints were assessed by asking women about presenting gynecologic symptoms. Women who visited the gynecologists for specific complaints, for post-surgical follow-up, or for insertion of coils or other services were more likely to be distressed than women who were attending for a general checkup (χ2= 9.466, p = 0.024). About 50% of women who reported abdominal pain or breast pain also reported significant psychological distress. Only bleeding and infertility were not significantly associated with psychological distress. It is concluded that a high proportion of women who attend gynecology clinics with specific complaints report psychological distress. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the psychological component of gynecological morbidity. PMID:14584304

  1. Dedicated outpatient vascular access center decreases hospitalization and missed outpatient dialysis treatments.

    PubMed

    Mishler, R; Sands, J J; Ofsthun, N J; Teng, M; Schon, D; Lazarus, J M

    2006-01-01

    Dedicated outpatient vascular access centers (VAC) specializing in percutaneous interventions (angiography, thrombectomy, angioplasty and catheter placement) provide outpatient therapy that can obviate the need for hospitalization. This paper reports the impact of one VAC staffed by interventional nephrologists on vascular access-related hospitalization and missed outpatient dialysis treatments. We performed a retrospective analysis of vascular access-related hospitalized days and missed vascular access-related outpatient dialysis treatments from 1995 to 2002 in 21 Phoenix Arizona Facilities (5928 cumulative patients) and 1275 cumulative Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) facilities (289,454 cumulative patients) to evaluate the impact of the introduction of a VAC in Phoenix. Vascular access-related hospitalized days/patient year and missed dialysis treatments/patient year declined from 1997 to 2002 across all access types. The decline was greater in Phoenix and coincided with the creation of a VAC in 1998. By 2002, there were 0.57 fewer hospitalized days/patient year and 0.29 fewer missed treatments/patient year than in the national sample (P<0.01). In 2002, the relative risk for vascular access hospitalized days was 0.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-0.5) (P<0.01) and for vascular access-related missed outpatient dialysis treatments was 0.34 (95% CI 0.24-0.49) (P<0.01) in Phoenix vs FMCNA after adjustment for age, gender, diabetic status duration of dialysis and access type. VAC development was associated with a significant decrease in vascular access-related hospitalization and missed outpatient dialysis treatments. Further studies are necessary to demonstrate this effect in other communities. PMID:16408132

  2. Impact of obesity on recovery and pulmonary functions of obese women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A M; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2016-06-01

    To determine impact of obesity on recovery parameters and pulmonary functions of women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries. Eighty women undergoing major gynecological surgeries were included in this study. Anesthesia was induced by remifentanil bolus, followed by propofol and cisatracurium to facilitate oro-tracheal intubation and was maintained by balanced anesthesia of remifentanil intravenous infusion and sevoflurane in oxygen and air. Time from discontinuation of maintenance anesthesia to fully awake were recorded at 1-min intervals and time from discontinuation of anesthesia until patient was transferred to post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and discharged from PACU was also recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before surgery and repeated 4 h, days 1, 2 and 3 post-operative for evaluation of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. Occurrence of post-operative complications, re-admission to ICU, hospital stay and morbidities were also recorded. Induction of anesthesia using remifentanil bolus injection resulted in significant decrease of heart rate and arterial pressures compared to pre-operative and pre-induction values. Recovery times were significantly shorter in obese compared to morbidly obese women. Post-operative pulmonary function tests showed significant deterioration compared to pre-operative measures but showed progressive improvement through first 3 post-operative days. Hospital stay was significantly shorter for obese compared to morbid obese women. Obesity delays recovery from general anesthesia, adversely affects pulmonary functions and increases post-operative complications. Remifentanil infusion and sevoflurane could be appropriate combination for obese and morbidly obese women undergoing major surgeries. PMID:26072156

  3. Patients of internists in hospital outpatient departments and in private practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, P.; Carrier, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    To test the contention that patients in outpatient departments and private practices differ, variables were assessed that might affect both the process and the outcome of medical care. Two groups of 60 patients consulting nine Montreal internists who worked in both private practice and in an outpatient department of a university teaching hospital were surveyed. The internists served as their own controls. The two groups of patients were compared for 57 demographic, socioeconomic, access, utilization, attitudinal and current medical status variables. Financial factors were minimized by the existence of universal health insurance. The outpatient group was found to be older, less fluent in English, less likely to be employed, less educated, less wealthy, more dependent on public transportation, more disabled, more likely to use ambulatory services, more anxious about health, and more sceptical about physicians, yet more dependent on them than the private practice group. The outpatient group tended to have more active, significant medical conditions and to receive more prescriptions for medication than the private practice group, in contrast to the national patterns in the practice of internal medicine in the United States. Medical educators, researchers, administrators and providers of health care who have assumed that these two groups of patients are comparable must re-evaluate their practices. PMID:737639

  4. You Want Me in Outpatient Oncology Nursing? A New Graduate Story.

    PubMed

    Hawley, McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    When I was in nursing school, I was one of a handful of students presented with a unique opportunity to fulfill our medical-surgical nursing requirement: a six-week clinical rotation at a large, outpatient, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. This opportunity was an innovative experiment between the College of Nursing at Seattle University and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA). The collaboration was coined the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by nursing management. PMID:27441521

  5. Feasibility of Outpatient Fully Integrated Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Renard, Eric; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Anderson, Stacey M.; Brown, Sue A.; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Breton, Marc D.; Farret, Anne; Pelletier, Marie-Josée; Place, Jérôme; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Del Favero, Simone; Visentin, Roberto; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Avogaro, Angelo; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of a wearable artificial pancreas system, the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), which uses a smart phone as a closed-loop control platform. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at the Universities of Padova, Montpellier, and Virginia and at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute. Each trial continued for 42 h. The United States studies were conducted entirely in outpatient setting (e.g., hotel or guest house); studies in Italy and France were hybrid hospital–hotel admissions. A continuous glucose monitoring/pump system (Dexcom Seven Plus/Omnipod) was placed on the subject and was connected to DiAs. The patient operated the system via the DiAs user interface in open-loop mode (first 14 h of study), switching to closed-loop for the remaining 28 h. Study personnel monitored remotely via 3G or WiFi connection to DiAs and were available on site for assistance. RESULTS The total duration of proper system communication functioning was 807.5 h (274 h in open-loop and 533.5 h in closed-loop), which represented 97.7% of the total possible time from admission to discharge. This exceeded the predetermined primary end point of 80% system functionality. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that a contemporary smart phone is capable of running outpatient closed-loop control and introduced a prototype system (DiAs) for further investigation. Following this proof of concept, future steps should include equipping insulin pumps and sensors with wireless capabilities, as well as studies focusing on control efficacy and patient-oriented clinical outcomes. PMID:23801798

  6. Margin alert: time to revisit your outpatient strategy.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Steven M; Tyler, David

    2006-04-01

    An increasingly competitive market for outpatient services has made it necessary for acute care hospitals to reevaluate their outpatient, and inpatient, strategies. Many acute care hospitals are in a strong market position to command premium payment for their inpatient services. Under current market conditions, hospitals are in danger of pricing themselves out of the outpatient market. Hospitals can benefit from the increased focus of consumers and payers on quality and the rise of pay for performance by investing in service excellence. PMID:16610436

  7. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter. PMID:25896809

  8. A South African outpatient drug treatment centre.

    PubMed

    Karassellos, C; Wilson, D

    1993-05-01

    The Cape Town Drug Counselling Centre is an outpatient drug treatment service which has been operational since 1985. Statistics obtained from 1990 are detailed, describing patient characteristics in respect of referral sources, age, sex, occupational status, educational level and drugs abused. The typical client profile that emerges is of a young employed male of limited education, referred from a non-professional source, who smokes cannabis alone or with methaqualone (Mandrax). Management of clients, which includes psychotherapy with an emphasis on group-work and medical intervention, is described, and proposed areas for further research are outlined. PMID:8211429

  9. Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Have a Greater Incidence of Suicide than Women with Other Cancer Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristy K.; Roncancio, Angelica M.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with…

  10. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue... recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals. 7628Benign neoplasms of the gynecological system or breast. Rate... entitlement to special monthly compensation under § 3.350 of this chapter. The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems...

  11. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue... recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals. 7628Benign neoplasms of the gynecological system or breast. Rate... entitlement to special monthly compensation under § 3.350 of this chapter. The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems...

  12. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue... recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals. 7628Benign neoplasms of the gynecological system or breast. Rate... entitlement to special monthly compensation under § 3.350 of this chapter. The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems...

  13. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue... recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals. 7628Benign neoplasms of the gynecological system or breast. Rate... entitlement to special monthly compensation under § 3.350 of this chapter. The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems...

  14. 38 CFR 4.116 - Schedule of ratings-gynecological conditions and disorders of the breast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 7627Malignant neoplasms of gynecological system or breast 100 Note: A rating of 100 percent shall continue... recurrence or metastasis, rate on residuals. 7628Benign neoplasms of the gynecological system or breast. Rate... entitlement to special monthly compensation under § 3.350 of this chapter. The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems...

  15. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  16. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 14, 2011 (76 FR 41507). The amendment is being made to reflect a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the...

  17. Evaluation of Students' Clinical and Communication Skills in Performing a Gynecologic Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei Li; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The use of trained gynecologic teaching associates (GTAs) in providing instruction on the gynecologic examination is discussed. GTAs work in pairs; while one provides instruction, the other serves as a model. A study to measure student anxiety and confidence during the examination is described. (MLW)

  18. The Lymphedema and Gynecologic Cancer (LEG) Study: Incidence, Risk Factors, and | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The proposed study, "Lymphedema and Gynecologic cancer (LEG): Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact", will innovatively utilize the cooperative group setting of the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group) to prospectively study 1300 women newly diagnosed with cervical, endometrial, or vulvar cancer to determine the incidence and impact of lower extremity lymphedema following surgical treatment of these diseases. |

  19. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  20. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:25872896

  1. Outcome of the Gynecologic Oncology Patients Surveillance Network Program.

    PubMed

    Suprasert, Prapaporn; Suwansirikul, Songkiat; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Suwansirikul, Songkiat

    2015-01-01

    The gynecologic oncology patients surveillance network program was conducted with the collaboration of 5 provincial hospitals located in the north of Thailand (Chiang Rai, Lamphun Nan, Phayao and Phrae). The aim was to identify ways of reducing the burden and the cost to the gynecologic cancer patients who needed to travel to the tertiary care hospital for follow up. The clinical data of each patient was transferred to the provincial hospital by the internet via the website www.gogcmu.or.th. All the general gynecologists who participated in this project attended the training course set up for the program. From January 2011 to February 2014, 854 patients who were willing to have their next follow-up at the network hospitals close to their home were enrolled this project. Almost of them were residents in Chiang Rai province and the most common disease was cervical cancer. After the project had been running for 1 year, 604 of the enrolled patients and 21 health-care personnel who had participated in this project were interviewed to assess its success. Some 85.3% of the patients and 100% of the health-care personnel were satisfied with this project. However, 60 patients had withdrawn, the most common reason being the lack of confidence in the follow up at the local provincial hospital. In conclusion, it is possible to initiate a gynecologic oncology patients' surveillance network program and the initiation could reduce the problems associated with and the cost the patients incurred as they journeyed to the tertiary care hospital. PMID:26163612

  2. Physician pain and discomfort during minimally invasive gynecologic cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Megan E.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Munsell, Mark F.; Greer, Marilyn; Burke, William M.; Naumann, Wendell T.; Frumovitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing awareness of physical strain to surgeons associated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS), its use continues to expand. We sought to gather information from gynecologic oncologists regarding physical discomfort due to MIS. Methods Anonymous surveys were e-mailed to 1,279 Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) members. Physical symptoms (numbness, pain, stiffness, and fatigue) and surgical and demographic factors were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine risk factors for physical symptoms. Results We analyzed responses of 350 SGO members who completed the survey and currently performed >50% of procedures robotically (n=122), laparoscopically (n=67), or abdominally (n=61). Sixty-one percent of members reported physical symptoms related to MIS. The rate of symptoms was higher in the robotic group (72%) than the laparoscopic (57%) or abdominal group (49%) (p=0.0052). Stiffness (p=0.0373) and fatigue (p=0.0125) were more common in the robotic group. Female sex (p<0.0001), higher caseload, (p=0.0007) and academic practice (p=0.0186) were associated with increased symptoms. On multivariate analysis, robotic surgery (odds ratio [OR] 2.38, 95% CI 1.20-4.69) and female sex (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.13-8.29) were significant predictors of symptoms. There was no correlation between seeking treatment and surgical modality (laparotomy 11%, robotic 20%, laparoscopy 25%, p= 0.12). Conclusions Gynecologic oncologists report physical symptoms due to MIS at an alarming rate. Robotic surgery and female sex appear to be risk factors for physical discomfort. As we strive to improve patient outcomes and decrease patient morbidity with MIS, we must also work to improve the ergonomics of MIS for surgeons. PMID:24887354

  3. Successful incorporation of robotic surgery into gynecologic oncology fellowship training

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Pamela T.; Iglesias, David; Munsell, Mark F.; Frumovitz, Michael; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing role of robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology may impact fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to review the proportion of robotic procedures performed by fellows at the console, and compare operative times and lymph node yields to faculty surgeons. Methods A prospective database of women undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery has been maintained since 2008. Intra-operative datasheets completed include surgical times and primary surgeon at the console. Operative times were compared between faculty and fellows for simple hysterectomy (SH), bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), pelvic (PLND) and paraaortic lymph node dissection (PALND) and vaginal cuff closure (VCC). Lymph nodes counts were also compared. Results Times were recorded for 239 SH, 43 BSOs, 105 right PLNDs, 104 left PLNDs, 34 PALND and 269 VCC. Comparing 2008 to 2011, procedures performed by the fellow significantly increased; SH 16% to 83% (p<0.001), BSO 7% to 75% (p=0.005), right PLND 4% to 44% (p<0.001), left PLND 0% to 56% (p<0.001), and VCC 59% to 82% (p=0.024). Console times (min) were similar for SH (60vs. 63, p= 0.73), BSO (48 vs. 43, p=0.55), and VCC (20 vs. 22, p=0.26). Faculty times (min) were shorter for PLND (right 26 vs. 30, p=0.04, left 23 vs. 27, p=0.02). Nodal counts were not significantly different (right 7 vs. 8, p=0.17 or left 7 vs. 7, p=0.87). Conclusions Robotic surgery can be successfully incorporated into gynecologic oncology fellowship training. With increased exposure to robotic surgery, fellows had similar operative times and lymph node yields as faculty surgeons. PMID:24055616

  4. Position-Related Injury is Uncommon in Robotic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ulm, Michael A.; Fleming, Nicole D.; Rallapali, Vijayashri; Munsell, Mark F.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Schmeler, Kathleen, M.; Soliman, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the rate and risk factors for position-related injury in robotic gynecologic surgery. Methods A prospective database from 12/2006 to 1/2014 of all planned robotic gynecologic procedures was retrospectively reviewed for patients who experienced neurologic injury, musculoskeletal injury, or vascular compromise related to patient positioning in the operating room. Analysis was performed to determine risk-factors and incidence for position-related injury. Results Of the 831 patients who underwent robotic surgery during the study time period, only 7(0.8%) experienced positioning-related injury. The injuries included minor head contusions (n=3), two lower extremity neuropathies (n=2), brachial plexus injury (n=1) and one large subcutaneous ecchymosis on the left flank and thigh (n=1). There were no long term sequelae from the positioning-related injuries. The only statistically significant risk factor for positioning-related injury was prior abdominal surgery (p = 0.05). There were no significant associations between position-related injuries and operative time (P = 0.232), body mass index (P=0.847), age (p = 0.152), smoking history (P = 0.161), or medical comorbidities (P = 0.229 – 0.999). Conclusions The incidence of position-related injury among women undergoing robotic surgery was extremely low (0.8%). Due to the low incidence we were unable to identify modifiable risk factors for position-related injury following robotic surgery. A standardized, team-oriented approach may significantly decrease position-related injuries following robotic gynecologic surgery. PMID:25449565

  5. Fee-for-Service Revenue for School Mental Health through a Partnership with an Outpatient Mental Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lever, Nancy A.; Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Axelrod, Jennifer; Weist, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    School mental health programs are increasingly prominent in the United States and in other countries, but funding remains tentative. This article describes a partnership between a school mental health program and an outpatient mental health center, and considers the larger goal of promoting sustainability and increasing revenue. Issues related to…

  6. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  7. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  8. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Secretary designates as requiring inpatient care. (o) Hospital outpatient services furnished to SNF... comprehensive care plan (and thus included under the SNF PPS) that are furnished by the hospital “under arrangements” but billable only by the SNF, regardless of whether or not the patient is in a Part A SNF...

  9. Gynecologic findings in Goltz syndrome: A case series.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi-Fowode, Oluyemisi A; Mansouri, Roshanak; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    There is limited information available related to the gynecologic findings in Goltz syndrome. We report exclusively on external genitalia findings in 17 girls with a known diagnosis of focal dermal hypoplasia. This is the largest series to date. Some of our findings have been reported previously; however, some novel features including short perineum body not previously mentioned are noted as well. We recommend referral to a pediatric gynecologist for early evaluation of the reproductive tract as this can have an impact on the future fertility of these girls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27001927

  10. Stability and Change of Interest in Obstetrics-Gynecology among Medical Students: Eighteen Years of Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forouzan, Iraj; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    1993-01-01

    A study investigated, first, the percentage of medical students maintaining interest in obstetrics/gynecology during medical school compared to those maintaining interest in other specialties and, second, changes of interest from obstetrics/gynecology to other specialties and other specialties to obstetrics/gynecology. Results indicate instability…

  11. National outpatient medication profiling: medications associated with outpatient fractures in community-dwelling elderly veterans

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Campbell, Robert; Spehar, Andrea; Rubenstein, Laurence Z; Branch, Laurence G; Cunningham, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Polypharmacy, to include a subissue of potentially inappropriate prescribing, in community-dwelling elderly is widespread. The objective of this study was to identify the magnitude of problematic outpatient drug prescribing and its potential association as a risk factor for injuries. What this study adds This is the first national study of outpatient injuries in elderly veterans. The results are consistent with previous published literature highlighting the risks associated with prescribing central nervous system drugs in the elderly. Aims The primary objective of this retrospective case–control study in an elderly veteran population was to assess the impact of specific medications with recognized side-effects that increase the risk of a fall and were prescribed prior to fractures treated in the outpatient setting compared with patients treated for nonspecific chest pain. Methods Two national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) databases were used to identify 17 273 unique patients, aged ≥65 years, treated in outpatient settings with a fracture in fiscal year 2005, and for whom we could link to all of their outpatient prescriptions (809 536). For comparison, we identified other elderly patients with outpatient clinic visits for nonspecific chest pain (N = 62 331) for whom we could link with their 2 987 394 outpatient prescriptions. We categorized the fall-related medications as drugs that primarily affect the cardiovascular (CVS), the central nervous (CNS) or the muscular skeletal system (MSS). Results Significant differences in the two patient groups occurred in the CNS category. Approximately 41% of the patients with fracture-coded encounters were prescribed CNS drugs compared with 31% of the patients in the comparison group (P < 0.0003). Finally, the use of muscle relaxants in the MSS category was significantly higher in the fracture group than in the nonspecific chest pain group. Conclusions Studies using

  12. Laparoscopic sterilization as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, V; Edelman, D A; Goldsmith, A

    1977-05-01

    Since June 1972, more than 2,000 laparoscopic sterilizations have been performed as outpatient procedures using neuroleptanalgesics. Electrocoagulation, spring-loaded clips or tubal rings were the methods used for tubal occlusion. All laparoscopies were performed in a family planning clinic. The surgical facilities were minimal and did not include general anesthesia equipment or a blood bank. The nearest hospital was about one-half mile from the clinic. The procedures were performed by a physician assisted by two paramedical personnel and a technician. Patients were scheduled to be at the clinic on the morning of the procedure and were discharged three to six hours after the procedure. Only one patient required hospitalization for treatment of a complication: her aorta was punctured during placement of the Tuohy needle. The patient was admitted to a local hospital and underwent laparotomy for repair; her subsequent recovery was uneventful. No bowel or bladder burns have occurred. Minor complications (emphysema of the abdominal wall, bleeding from the tubes, infections) have occurred in less than 4% of the patients. The results of this study indicate that laparoscopy in an outpatient clinic is safe and presents minimal additional risks to the patient if the surgeon is experienced. PMID:141515

  13. Impact of music on pediatric oncology outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; Hamilton, Craig A; McLean, Thomas W; Lovato, James

    2008-07-01

    Music is widely used to enhance well-being. We wished to assess music's effect on pediatric oncology outpatients. Patients who had leukemia and were in maintenance or consolidation outpatient treatment served as their own control at two visits. At visit 1, children rested for 20 min; at visit 2, for 20 min they listened to music designed to increase vitality and improve heart rate variability (HRV). At both visits, parents completed before and after treatment visual analog scales (VAS) of their child's relaxation, well-being, vitality, anxiety, stress, and depression; patients' heart rates were monitored during treatments to calculate HRV. The 47 patients with complete VAS data and 34 patients with usable HRV data were similar. At baseline, VAS scores for negative states were low (average <2.5 of 10) and positive states were high (average 7> of 10). Relaxation improved more with music than rest (p < 0.01). The HRV parasympathetic parameter was significantly lower with music than rest. No other differences were significant. Further studies are needed to better delineate the relationship between subjective and objective measures of well-being among patients who are not in severe distress. PMID:18391850

  14. Outpatient provider concentration and commercial colonoscopy prices.

    PubMed

    Pozen, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the magnitude of various contributors to outpatient commercial colonoscopy prices, including market- and provider-level factors, especially market share. We used adjudicated fee-for-service facility claims from a large commercial insurer for colonoscopies occurring in hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center from October 2005 to December 2012. Claims were matched to provider- and market-level data. Linear fixed effects regressions of negotiated colonoscopy price were run on provider, system, and market characteristics. Markets were defined as counties. There were 178,433 claims from 169 providers (104 systems). The mean system market share was 76% (SD = 0.34) and the mean real (deflated) price was US$1363 (SD = 374), ranging from US$169 to US$2748. For every percentage point increase in a system or individual facility's bed share, relative price increased by 2 to 4 percentage points; this result was stable across a number of specifications. Market population and price were also consistently positively related, though this relation was small in magnitude. No other factor explained price as strongly as market share. Price variation for colonoscopy was driven primarily by market share, of particular concern as the number of mergers increases in wake of the recession and the Affordable Care Act. Whether variation is justified by better quality care requires further research to determine whether quality is subsumed in prices. PMID:25870183

  15. Impact of Music on Pediatric Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KEMPER, KATHI J.; HAMILTON, CRAIG A.; MCLEAN, THOMAS W.; LOVATO, JAMES

    2013-01-01

    Music is widely used to enhance well-being. We wished to assess music’s effect on pediatric oncology outpatients. Patients who had leukemia and were in maintenance or consolidation outpatient treatment served as their own control at two visits. At visit 1, children rested for 20 min; at visit 2, for 20 min they listened to music designed to increase vitality and improve heart rate variability (HRV). At both visits, parents completed before and after treatment visual analog scales (VAS) of their child’s relaxation, well-being, vitality, anxiety, stress, and depression; patients’ heart rates were monitored during treatments to calculate HRV. The 47 patients with complete VAS data and 34 patients with usable HRV data were similar. At baseline, VAS scores for negative states were low (average <2.5 of 10) and positive states were high (average 7> of 10). Relaxation improved more with music than rest (p < 0.01). The HRV parasympathetic parameter was significantly lower with music than rest. No other differences were significant. Further studies are needed to better delineate the relationship between subjective and objective measures of well-being among patients who are not in severe distress. PMID:18391850

  16. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  17. The role of routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kew, F M; Roberts, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the evidence base for routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy. Only articles with a survival analysis were included. Relevant articles were identified by a comprehensive literature search of the main biomedical databases, hand searching of references of selected articles, and expert spotting of relevant journals and proceedings of international meetings. A two-stage extraction of data was undertaken. No prospective trials were identified. Twenty-nine retrospective case series analyses and one poster presentation met the inclusion criteria. Eight articles and one letter on endometrial cancer, six articles and one poster presentation on cervical cancer, and two articles in vulval cancer were reviewed. Only one article in endometrial cancer showed any survival benefit from routine follow-up, but it was of very poor methodologic quality. Two articles found a survival benefit from routine follow-up after cervical cancer. The two articles on vulval cancer did not find any survival benefit from routine review. There is no prospective research on the benefits of routine follow-up after gynecological cancer. Retrospective evidence calls in to question the benefit of universal follow-up. Prospective research is urgently needed. PMID:15882163

  18. Ultrasound use in gynecologic brachytherapy: Time to focus the beam.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Schneider, Michal; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    There is wide disparity in the practice of brachytherapy for cervical cancer around the world. Although select well-resourced centers advocate use of MRI for all insertions, planar X-ray imaging remains the most commonly used imaging modality to assess intracavitary implants, particularly where the burden of cervical cancer is high. Incorporating soft tissue imaging into brachytherapy programs has been shown to improve the technical accuracy of implants, which in turn has led to improved local control and decreased toxicity. These improvements have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Finding an accessible soft tissue imaging modality is essential to enable these improvements to be available to all patients. A modality that has good soft tissue imaging capabilities, is widely available, portable, and economical, is needed. Ultrasound fulfils these requirements and offers the potential of soft tissue image guidance to a much wider brachytherapy community. Although use of ultrasound is the standard of care in brachytherapy for prostate cancer, it only seems to have limited uptake in gynecologic brachytherapy. This article reviews the role of ultrasound in gynecologic brachytherapy and highlights the potential applications for use in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25620161

  19. Update on sentinel lymph node evaluation in gynecologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Katina; Holman, Laura L.; Moore, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Sentinel lymph node (SLN) dissections have been shown to be sensitive for the evaluation of nodal basins for metastatic disease and are associated with decreased short-term and long-term morbidity when compared with complete lymph node dissection. There has been increasing interest in the use of SLN technology in gynecologic cancers. This review assesses the current evidence-based literature for the use of SLN dissections in gynecologic malignancies. Recent findings Recent literature continues to support the safety and feasibility of SLN biopsy for early-stage vulvar cancer with negative predictive value approaching 100% and low false-negative rates. Alternatively, for endometrial cancer most studies have reported low false-negative rates, with variable sensitivities and have reported low detection rates of the sentinel node. Studies examining the utility of SLN biopsy in early-stage cervical cancer remain promising with detection rates, sensitivities, and false-negative rates greater than 90% for stage 1B1 tumors. Summary SLN dissections have been shown to be effective and safe in certain, select vulvar cancer patients and can be considered an alternative surgical approach for these patients. For endometrial and cervical cancer, SLN dissection continues to have encouraging results and however needs further investigation. PMID:21235023

  20. Genetic screening for gynecological cancer: where are we heading?

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Jacobs, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of cancer genetics in gynecological oncology is rapidly changing. The traditional family history-based approach has limitations and misses >50% mutation carriers. This is now being replaced by population-based approaches. The need for changing the clinical paradigm from family history-based to population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in Ashkenazi Jews is supported by data that demonstrate population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing does not cause psychological harm and is cost effective. This article covers various genetic testing strategies for gynecological cancers, including population-based approaches, panel and direct-to-consumer testing as well as the need for innovative approaches to genetic counseling. Advances in genetic testing technology and computational analytics have facilitated an integrated systems medicine approach, providing increasing potential for population-based genetic testing, risk stratification, and cancer prevention. Genomic information along-with biological/computational tools will be used to deliver predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) and precision medicine in the future. PMID:26638726

  1. Port-Site Metastases After Robotic Surgery for Gynecologic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Christine L.; Tabbarah, Rami; Wright, Valena

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery is increasingly used for the management of patients with gynecologic malignancies. The rate of port-site metastases in patients undergoing these procedures is unknown. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of a prospective database. A total of 220 women underwent robotic-assisted surgery from 2007 through 2011. Malignancy was detected in 145 cases, and 142 met the inclusion criteria with histologically proven cancer and robotically completed surgery. All women who underwent surgical treatment for their malignancies were followed up at the study site for oncology treatments. Results: There were 710 potential port sites for metastasis. We found that 2 of 142 patients each had a single port-site metastasis, for an overall rate of 1.41%, or 0.28% per trocar site. Recurrent disease was not isolated in the two patients found to have port-site metastases because both had concurrent sites of pelvic recurrence. Conclusion: The rate of port-site metastases in patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for gynecologic malignancies is similar to the published rate in the literature for traditional laparoscopic oncology. PMID:24680146

  2. Hypertension and Subsequent Genitourinary and Gynecologic Cancers Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Kuo, Huang-Tsung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although a relationship between hypertension and the development of renal cancer and other types of cancer have been proposed for decades, the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconclusive. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between hypertension and genitourinary and gynecologic cancers in Taiwan. In this study, we conducted a populated-based retrospective cohort study by using data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program. The study period was from 2000 to 2011, and the cohort comprised 111,704 insurants: 57,961 patients with hypertension and 53,743 patients without hypertension. A Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to estimate the effects of hypertension on genitourinary and gynecologic cancers risk. Among the patients with hypertension, the risks of developing renal and uterine corpus cancers were significantly higher in the hypertension group than they were in the nonhypertension group. Further stratified analyses by sex, age, and hypertension duration revealed distinct cancer-specific patterns. Higher cancer risk appears to be more obvious among younger hypertensive patients with longer follow-up time. The results of this study indicate that Taiwanese patients with hypertension have higher risks for some types of cancer, and cancer-specific patterns vary by sex, age, and hypertension duration. PMID:25906108

  3. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  4. Effectiveness of outpatient percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy replacement using esophagogastroduodenoscopy and propofol sedation

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Akira; Nakayama, Yoshiko; Kajiyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of outpatient percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) replacement using esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and propofol sedation. METHODS: We retrospectively assessed the outcome and complications of consecutive patients referred for PEG replacement which was performed using EGD under propofol sedation in the outpatient setting. The success rate, the mean dose of propofol, procedure time, EGD findings, discharge time from endoscopy unit, respiratory depression, and complications within 72 h of the procedure were evaluated. In a subset of these patients, the blood concentrations of propofol were measured. RESULTS: All 221 patients underwent successful PEG replacement. The mean dose of propofol was 34 mg (range, 20-60 mg) with a mean procedure time of 5.9 min (range, 3-8 min). Reflux esophagitis (12 patients), gastric ulcer (5), gastric neoplasm (2), and duodenal ulcer (1) were newly diagnosed at replacement. Discharge from endoscopy unit was possible in 100% of patients 45 min after the procedure. Only 3.6% (8) required transient supplemental oxygen. No complications occurred within 72 h of the procedure. During EGD the level of sedation and propofol blood concentrations after administration of propofol (30 mg) in these PEG patients corresponded to those of propofol (60 mg) in middle aged subjects (control). CONCLUSION: PEG replacement using EGD and propofol sedationin the outpatient setting was safe and practical. PMID:22347532

  5. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  6. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  7. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  8. A Study of Personality Characteristics of Outpatient Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calaycay, P. R.; Altman, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Tested 60 alcoholic outpatients matched with 60 normals on the Eysenck Personality Inventory and the IPAT-Anxiety Scale Questionniare. The alcoholic outpatients were beyond borderline in anxiety, lack of integrated development of self-sentiment, ego weakness, paranoid insecurity, guilt proneness and frustration tension. Neuroticism and anxiety…

  9. Bypassing the Local Rural Hospital for Outpatient Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles; Bellamy, Gail R.; Menachemi, Nir; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Brooks, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the amount of local rural hospital outpatient department (HOPD) bypass for outpatient procedures. Methods: We analyzed data on colonoscopies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the state of Florida over the period 1997-2004. Findings: Approximately, 53% of colonoscopy and 45% of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy…

  10. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  11. Evaluation of Outpatient Treatment Program on 20 Mental Health Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, M. Wayne; Lloyd, Paul; Johnson, Judith L.; McCuan, Richard A.

    As a component of a consulting engagement with a Midwestern comprehensive mental health center, an Outpatient Assessment Questionnaire (OAQ) was administered pre-post to 124 outpatient clients in a three month time series design. These comparisons yielded significant changes on thirteen of the twenty dimensions, including general affect, positive…

  12. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  13. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of...

  14. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of...

  15. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  16. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of...

  17. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  18. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of...

  19. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  20. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  1. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of...

  2. Outpatient Dialysis for Patients with AKI: A Policy Approach to Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Heung, Michael; Faubel, Sarah; Watnick, Suzanne; Cruz, Dinna N; Koyner, Jay L; Mour, Girish; Liu, Kathleen D; Cerda, Jorge; Okusa, Mark D; Lukaszewski, Mark; Vijayan, Anitha

    2015-10-01

    The rate of AKI requiring dialysis has increased significantly over the past decade in the United States. At the same time, survival from AKI seems to be improving, and thus, more patients with AKI are surviving to discharge while still requiring dialysis. Currently, the options for providing outpatient dialysis in patients with AKI are limited, particularly after a 2012 revised interpretation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, which prohibited Medicare reimbursement for acute dialysis at ESRD facilities. This article provides a historical perspective on outpatient dialysis management of patients with AKI, reviews the current clinical landscape of care for these patients, and highlights key areas of knowledge deficit. Lastly, policy changes that have the opportunity to significantly improve the care of this at-risk population are suggested. PMID:26220818

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  4. Behavioural deviance and maternal depressive symptoms in paediatric outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1985-01-01

    A consecutive series of 95 3 to 4 year old and 43 7 to 11 year old children attending surgical, and medical outpatient clinics was studied, using questionnaires that measured behavioural deviance and had adequate reliability and validity for screening populations of children. A control group was also studied in the 7 to 11 year old sample. Depressive symptoms in the mothers of the children were determined using the Wakefield depression inventory. There was considerable behavioural deviance in children attending the outpatient clinics; 44% of the 7 to 11 year olds who were surgical outpatients had deviant scores. Thirty two per cent of mothers of medical outpatients had deviant scores on the depression inventory. These findings have relevance for the approach paediatricians take to their outpatients. PMID:4015172

  5. Mydriatic solution for outpatient indirect ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, S H; Pelham, V; Giovanoni, R; Regan, C D

    1980-09-01

    A mydriatic used for outpatient indirect ophthalmoscopy should produce prompt, maximal, transient mydrasis after a single instillation. Cycloplegia or systemic side effects should be minimal. A solution of tropicamide with phenylephrine hydrochloride seems to achieve this most effectively. In a general retina clinic population, the percentage of pupils dilated, the degree of dilation, and the resistence of the dilation to intense illumination were used to evaluate various concentrations of the drugs. Eight-tenths percent tropicamide with 5% phenylephrine adequately dilated 98.8% of the eyes, among which 25% had dark irides and 9% were receiving miotic therapy. Reduction of the concentration of either component produced less adequate mydriasis; an increase of the tropicamide concentration resulted in a saturated solution with drug precipitate forming on storage and a less adequate dilation. With the optimal combination, 1 drop adequately dilates the general population; 2 drops appear on more effective than 1. PMID:7425917

  6. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  7. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  8. Outpatient surgery in the cervical spine: is it safe?

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Kalfas, Iain; Holmer, Haley; Skelly, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale As the length of stay after cervical spine surgery has decreased substantially, the feasibility and safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery come into question. Although minimal length of stay is a targeted metric for quality and costs for medical centers, the safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery has not been clearly defined. Objective The objective of this article is to evaluate the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine for adult patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic degenerative disc disease. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken for articles published through February 19, 2014. Electronic databases and the bibliographies of key articles were searched to identify comparative studies evaluating the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine. Spinal cord stimulation, spinal injections, and diagnostic procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Five studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. One study reported low risk of hematoma (0% of outpatients and 1.6% of inpatients). Two studies reported on mortality and both reported no deaths in either group following surgery. Dysphagia risks ranged from 0 to 10% of outpatients and 1.6 to 5% of inpatients, and infection risks ranged from 0 to 1% of outpatients and 2 to 2.8% of inpatients. One study reported that no (0) outpatients were readmitted to the hospital due to a complication, compared with four inpatients (7%). The overall strength of evidence was insufficient for all safety outcomes examined. Conclusion Though the studies in our systematic review did not suggest an increased risk of complication with outpatient cervical spine surgery, the strength of evidence to

  9. To the point: obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Chuang, Alice W; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2014-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an overview of considerations for obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for the medical student. Options for integration of obstetrics and gynecology global health into undergraduate medical curricula are discussed. Specific considerations for global health clinical experiences for medical students, including choosing a clinical location, oversight and mentorship, goals and objectives, predeparture preparation, and evaluation, are reviewed. PMID:24334202

  10. [Textual research on Huang shinüke (Huang's Obstetrics and Gynecology)].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianfang; Wu, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Huang shi nü ke (Huang's Obstetrics and Gynecology), a handwritten copy of the Ming Dynasty passed on by Huang Xiaoyou, Yuanyi and Huang Dongjiu, and sorted out by Huang Yanrong, was a family medical book of Huang's obstetrics and gynecology in Xin'an, being a summary of their clinical experience.There were altogether 44 chapters divided into 4 parts, including general introduction, general principle of treatment, discussions on prenatal conditions and qi acquired from the mother, and gynecological diseases in sequence, with the appendixes of pulse diagnostics for differentiating male and female, and the 10-month methods of protecting the fetus. PMID:26815029

  11. Resident education curriculum in pediatric and adolescent gynecology: the short curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nathalie; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Browner-Elhanan, Karen J; Huguelet, Patricia S; Kaul, Paritosh; Talib, Hina J; Wheeler, Carol; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-04-01

    The degree of exposure to Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (PAG) varies across academic programs in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Adolescent Medicine. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible to train residents and provide opportunities within their training programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by disseminating the Short Curriculum with specific learning objectives and list of essential resources where key concepts in PAG can be covered. PMID:24602305

  12. Sleep quality of women with gynecological and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlani, Renata; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2006-01-01

    Subjective sleep quality has been recognized as a valuable indicator of health and quality of life. This exploratory and descriptive study aimed at describing habitual sleep quality of women suffering from gynecological and breast cancer and comparing habitual versus sleep quality during hospitalization. Twenty-five women admitted in hospital for clinical treatment of cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) within 72 hours after admission and again just before discharge. Fifty-two percent of subjects reported habitual bad sleep quality, and this proportion increased to 80% of subjects during hospital stay. Subjects indicated the following most frequent causes of night sleep disturbance: need to go to the toilet, waking up early and receiving nursing care during the night. Results point to the importance of including careful assessment of sleep quality and environment in nursing care planning for oncology patients, mainly during hospitalization. PMID:17294020

  13. Phytochemicals: A Multitargeted Approach to Gynecologic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Woong; Song, Yong Sang; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers constitute the fourth most common cancer type in women. Treatment outcomes are dictated by a multitude of factors, including stage at diagnosis, tissue type, and overall health of the patient. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, although significant unmet medical needs remain in regard to side effects and long-term survival. The efficacy of chemotherapy is influenced by cellular events such as the overexpression of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors, which together determine apoptotic responses. Phytochemicals are a broad class of natural compounds derived from plants, a number of which exhibit useful bioactive effects toward these pathways. High-throughput screening methods, rational modification, and developments in regulatory policies will accelerate the development of novel therapeutics based on these compounds, which will likely improve overall survival and quality of life for patients. PMID:25093186

  14. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Shigenobu; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakazono, Takahiko; Kamura, Toshiharu; Kudo, Sho

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) reflects changes in proton mobility caused by pathological alterations of tissue cellularity, cellular membrane integrity, extracellular space perfusion, and fluid viscosity. Functional imaging is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of cancer patients because of the limitations of morphologic imaging. DWI is being applied to the detection and characterization of tumors and the evaluation of treatment response in patients with cancer. The advantages of DWI include its cost-effectiveness and brevity of execution, its complete noninvasiveness, its lack of ionizing radiation, and the fact that it does not require injection of contrast material, thus enabling its use in patients with renal dysfunction. In this article, we describe the clinical application of DWI to gynecological disorders and its diagnostic efficacy therein. PMID:22247805

  15. Prevention, Recognition, and Management of Urologic Injuries During Gynecologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Howard T; Adelman, Marisa R

    2016-06-01

    The urethra, bladder, and ureters are particularly susceptible to injury during gynecologic surgery. When preventive measures fail, prompt recognition and management of injury can avoid long-term sequelae such as fistula formation and loss of renal function. Intraoperative identification should be the primary goal when an injury occurs, although this is not always possible. Postoperative injury recognition requires a high level of suspicion and vigilance. In addition to history and physical examination, appropriate radiologic studies can be useful in localizing injury and planning management strategies. Some injuries may require Foley catheter drainage or ureteral stenting alone, whereas others will require operative intervention with ureteral resection and reanastomosis or reimplantation. Prompt restoration of urinary drainage or diversion will avoid further renal compromise. PMID:27159741

  16. Pelvic radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy in geriatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.T.; Jeffrey, J.F.; Fraser, R.C.; Tompkins, M.G.; Filbee, J.F.; Wong, O.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-one patients, aged 75 years or older, who received pelvic radiation therapy as part of primary treatment for a gynecologic malignancy, were reviewed. Ten patients (32%) failed to complete their treatment and 4 patients (13%) died of treatment-related complications. The treatment-related complications were independent of increasing age, but did correlate closely with the patients' pretreatment ECOG performance status. Ten patients with performance levels of 2 or higher had a mortality rate of 30%, while 70% failed to complete treatment. Treatment fractions of greater than 220 cGy per day also resulted in unacceptably high complication rates. Alternative treatment formats should be considered in geriatric patients with poor initial performance levels.

  17. Bone metastasis from gynecologic carcinomas: a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Karim, F W; Kida, M; Wentz, W B; Carter, J R; Sorensen, K; Macfee, M; Zika, J; Makley, J T

    1990-11-01

    Between 1948 and 1984, autopsies were performed on 305 patients with primary carcinomas of the cervix, endometrium, ovaries, fallopian tubes, vulva, and vagina. Skeletal metastases were detected premortem and at autopsy in 49 cases (16.1%): cervix, 20 (40.8%); endometrium, 17 (34.7%); ovary, 7 (14.3%); vulva, 4 (8.2%); fallopian tube, 1 (2%). There were no cases of osseous metastasis from vaginal carcinoma. The incidence and sites of metastasis from these gynecologic carcinomas were correlated with their clinical and histopathologic classifications. This clinicopathologic study, based on autopsy data, demonstrates that osseous metastases are not uncommon, are significantly greater than clinically appreciated, and correlate with advanced anatomic stage and histopathologic type and grade. PMID:2227582

  18. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  19. Committee Opinion No. 657: The Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The term "hospitalist" refers to physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities may include patient care, teaching, research, and inpatient leadership. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the continued development and study of the obstetric and gynecologic (ob-gyn) hospitalist model as one potential approach to improve patient safety and professional satisfaction across delivery settings. Effective patient handoffs, updates on progress, and clear follow-up instructions between ob-gyn hospitalists and patients, nurses, and other health care providers are vital to maintaining patient safety. Hospitals and other health care organizations should ensure that candidates for positions as ob-gyn hospitalists are drawn from those with documented training and experience appropriate for the management of the acute and potentially emergent clinical circumstances that may be encountered in obstetric care. PMID:26942392

  20. Committee Opinion No. 657 Summary: The Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The term "hospitalist" refers to physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities may include patient care, teaching, research, and inpatient leadership. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the continued development and study of the obstetric and gynecologic (ob-gyn) hospitalist model as one potential approach to improve patient safety and professional satisfaction across delivery settings. Effective patient handoffs, updates on progress, and clear follow-up instructions between ob-gyn hospitalists and patients, nurses, and other health care providers are vital to maintaining patient safety. Hospitals and other health care organizations should ensure that candidates for positions as ob-gyn hospitalists are drawn from those with documented training and experience appropriate for the management of the acute and potentially emergent clinical circumstances that may be encountered in obstetric care. PMID:26942385

  1. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules. PMID:25552060

  2. Hypersensitivity reaction to cisplatin during chemoradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Claude; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Katz, Alan; Malik, Hana; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal

    2002-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous cisplatin are rare. The appearance of hypersensitivity reactions in 4 of 25 consecutive patients treated with concomitant pelvic radiation and weekly intravenous cisplatin for gynecologic malignancies is reported. The reactions appeared within hours of cisplatin delivery and included primarily fever, rash, and pruritus. Infection was ruled out by blood cultures and other laboratory studies. Affected patients were treated prophylactically with an antihistamine before subsequent courses of cisplatin, with excellent results. The high rate of hypersensitivity reactions in our series may be attributable to tumor necrosis and cytokine release caused by the pelvic irradiation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect so that early premedication regimens can be instituted to prevent unnecessary toxicity. PMID:12478013

  3. Is managed care closing substance abuse treatment units?

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Harris Lemak, Christy; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Roddy, Brian L; Nahra, Tammie A

    2007-03-01

    Despite high levels of unmet need for outpatient substance abuse treatment, a significant percentage of outpatient units have closed over the past several years. This study drew on 1999-2000 and 2005 national surveys to determine if managed care was associated with outpatient substance abuse treatment units' likelihood of surviving. Each substance abuse unit director was asked about the presence of any managed care contracts, percentage revenues from managed care, percentage of clients for whom prior authorization was required, and percentage of clients for whom concurrent review was required. A multiple logistic regression revealed that none of these factors was associated with substance abuse treatment unit survival. At this point, neither the presence nor the structure of managed care appears to affect the survival of outpatient substance abuse treatment units. Given the need for these facilities, however, and their vulnerability to closure, continued attention to managed care's potential influence is warranted. PMID:17458479

  4. Adenomyosis: A Clinical Review of a Challenging Gynecologic Condition.

    PubMed

    Struble, Jennifer; Reid, Shannon; Bedaiwy, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Adenomyosis is a heterogenous gynecologic condition. Patients with adenomyosis can have a range of clinical presentations. The most common presentation of adenomyosis is heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea; however, patients can also be asymptomatic. Currently, there are no standard diagnostic imaging criteria, and choosing the optimal treatment for patients is challenging. Women with adenomyosis often have other associated gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis or leiomyomas, therefore making the diagnosis and evaluating response to treatment challenging. The objective of this review was to highlight current clinical information regarding the epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, imaging findings, and treatment of adenomyosis. Several studies support the theory that adenomyosis results from invasion of the endometrium into the myometrium, causing alterations in the junctional zone. These changes are commonly seen on imaging studies such as transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The second most common theory is that adenomyosis results from embryologic-misplaced pluripotent mullerian remnants. Traditionally, adenomyosis was only diagnosed after hysterectomy; however, studies have shown that a diagnosis can be made with biopsies at hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. Noninvasive imaging can be used to help guide the differential diagnosis. The most common findings on 2-dimensional/3-dimensional TVUS and MRI are reviewed. Two-dimensional TVUS and MRI have a respectable sensitivity and specificity; however, recent studies indicate that 3-dimensional TVUS is superior to 2-dimensional TVUS for the diagnosis of adenomyosis and may allow for the diagnosis of early-stage disease. Management options for adenomyosis, both medical and surgical, are reviewed. Currently, the only definitive management option for patients is hysterectomy. PMID:26427702

  5. Outpatient provider contact prior to unintentional opioid overdose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lewei (Allison); Bohnert, Amy; Ilgen, Mark; Pfeiffer, Paul Nelson; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prescribed opioid medications are the most commonly implicated substances in unintentional overdoses. Outpatient health care encounters represent a potential opportunity to intervene to reduce opioid overdose risk. This study assessed the timing and type of outpatient provider contacts prior to overdose. Methods This study examined all adult patients nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) who died from unintentional prescription opioid overdose in fiscal years 2004–2007 and used VHA services anytime within two years of their deaths (n=1,813). For those whose last treatment contact was in an outpatient setting (n=1,457), demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were compared among patients categorized by the location of their last contact. Results 33% (N=479) of those last seen in outpatient settings were seen within one week and 62% (N=910) within one month of their overdose. A substantial proportion of patients were last seen within one month of death in mental health or substance disorder outpatient settings (30% N=438). The majority of patients did not fill an opioid prescription on their last outpatient visit prior to unintentional opioid overdose. Conclusions The majority of patients who died by unintentional overdose on prescription opioids were seen within a month of their overdose in outpatient settings. These settings may provide an opportunity to prevent patients from dying from prescription opioid overdoses, and interventions to reduce risk should not be limited to visits that resulted in an opioid prescription. PMID:26129993

  6. Minor burn injuries in children: inpatient versus outpatient treatment?

    PubMed Central

    La Ferla, G. A.; Fyfe, A. H.; Drainer, I. K.

    1983-01-01

    Seventy-two children with minor superficial burns presented at our casualty department over a 5-month period. Half were treated as inpatients and the other half as outpatients. The colonisation rates were similar in the two groups. Colonised and sterile burns treated as inpatients showed no significant difference in healing rates. The healing time, however, was prolonged in colonised outpatient treated burns. Cosmetic results were satisfactory overall. In the absence of a definite benefit from inpatient treatment, outpatient care of a child with a minor burn should therefore be used if circumstances allow. PMID:6357035

  7. Whole Pelvic Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hymel, Rockne; Jones, Guy C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a major role in the treatment of gynecological malignancies. There is increasing interest in the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and its application to treat gynecological malignancies. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art use of IMRT for gynecological malignancies and report how it is being used alone as well as in combination with chemotherapy in both the adjuvant and definitive settings. Based on dosimetric and clinical evidence, IMRT can reduce gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematological toxicities compared with 3D conformal radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. We discuss how these attributes of IMRT may lead to improvements in disease outcomes by allowing for dose escalation of radiation therapy, intensification of chemotherapy, and limiting toxicity-related treatment breaks. Currently accruing trials investigating pelvic IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancers are discussed. PMID:25600840

  8. A National Survey of Medical School Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments, 1965 to 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellacy, William N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Representatives of 108 departments of obstetrics and gynecology completed a written questionnaire in 1976 designed to assess the changes that had occurred in the teaching resources of the departments for the years 1965, 1970, and 1975.

  9. Outpatient management following intensive induction or salvage chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, Roland B; Taylor, Lenise R; Gardner, Kelda M; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-01-01

    Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized "preemptively" until blood count recovery, owing to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include the reduced need for medical resources (eg, transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy), improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower costs. Increasing evidence indicates that select AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped outpatient facility in a safe and costeffective manner. Further demonstration that the current approach of preemptive hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere, resulting in the establishment of a new standard practice that improves cancer care. PMID:24518520

  10. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from women irradiated for benign and malignant gynecological disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Inskip, P.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Littlefield, L.G.; Sayer, A.M.; Cookfair, D.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.

    1994-07-01

    Excess leukemias have occurred after partial-body radiotherapy for cervical cancer and benign gynecological disease (BGD). However, the level of risk is nearly the same in both groups, about twofold, despite a tenfold difference in average dose to active bone marrow. High-dose cell killing has been postulated as one explanation for this apparent inconsistency. To examine whether chromosome aberration rates observed in lymphocytes many years after exposure might serve as population markers of cancer risk, blood samples were taken from 60 women treated for BGD (34 with radiation) and cytogenetic data compared with previous results from 96 women irradiated for cervical cancer. Remarkably, the rate of stable aberrations, which reflects nonlethal damage in surviving stem cells, was only slightly higher among the cancer patients. Thus the lower-dose regimens to treat benign disorders resulted in much higher aberration yields per unit dose than those for cervical cancer. Assuming that the fraction of cytogenetically aberrant stem cells that survive radiotherapy contributes to the leukemogenic process, these data are then consistent with the epidemiological observations of comparable overall leukemia risks seen in these two irradiated populations. Accordingly, for patient populations given partial-body radiotherapy, stable aberrations at a long time after exposure appear to serve as biomarkers of effective risk rather than as biomarkers of radiation dose received. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis Vaginitis in Obstetrics and Gynecology Practice: New Concepts and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jenell S.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Witter, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is the most common curable sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Annually, 7.4 million new infections are estimated in the United States, which is greater than combined new cases of Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Serious adverse reproductive health outcomes including pregnancy complications, pelvic inflammatory disease, and an increased risk of HIV acquisition have been linked to TV infection. There are several sensitive and specific diagnostic tests available, including a newly approved nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) that utilizes the same instrumentation platform and clinical sample as Chlamydia and gonorrhea tests. In this article, we review TV pathogenicity, adverse reproductive health outcomes, detection, and treatment followed by clinical scenarios for which TV diagnosis may prove useful in obstetrics and gynecology practice. Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives After completing this CME activity, physicians should be better able to incorporate TV counseling and testing into standard clinical practice, compare and contrast available TV diagnostic tests, and manage TV in pregnant and nonpregnant women. PMID:23322080

  12. Orifice-assisted small-incision surgery: case series in benign and oncologic gynecology.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Jon I; Cohen, Sarah L; Puntambekar, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    This case series describes the feasibility of orifice-assisted small-incision surgery (OASIS), a novel technique that may incorporate benefits of single-incision and natural-orifice surgery while minimizing issues such as instrument crowding and interaction of optical access with operative instrumentation. In our multiple-site series, we included patients from a large academic medical center in the northeastern United States and a private gynecology clinic in India. Between the 2 centers, a total of 14 patients (5 with benign disease and 9 with oncologic disease) underwent the following procedures: OASIS total laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy, laparoscopic myomectomy, or laparoscopic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection. The initial 14 cases were safely completed. Oncologic clearance was consistent with specialty norms. Operating time ranged from 60 to 150 minutes, and estimated blood loss ranged from 10 to 500 mL. Detailed procedure descriptions and videos are provided. Based on preliminary case series experience, OASIS seems to be a safe and feasible addition to the advanced minimally invasive surgeons' armamentarium for both benign and oncologic cases. PMID:22417906

  13. No gynecologist in town: the gynecological care of women in rural Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Li-Jung; Chou, Chia-Lin; Su, H Irene; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Li-Fang; Chou, Yueh-Ching; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Yu, Hann-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Background A shortage of gynecologists exists in many countries. Even within an affluent country, gynecological clinics might not be evenly distributed. The purpose of the study was to investigate the disparity in gynecological care between adult women living in towns with and without gynecologists in Taiwan. Methods Data sources were the cohort datasets of the National Health Insurance Research Database, with claims data of 1 million beneficiaries in 2010. A woman’s residency was operationally inferred from the locations where she had most frequently visited physicians’ clinics or local community hospitals within the year. Results In Taiwan, 145 (39.4%) of 368 towns had no practicing gynecologist. Of 382,167 women with health care use in the datasets, 21,794 (5.7%) lived in towns without a gynecologist. The overwhelming majority of these towns lay in sparsely populated, rural areas. During the year, 132,702 women (34.7%) had sought medical help for gynecological diseases and 113,698 (29.8%) had visited gynecologists for gynecological diseases. Women in towns without a gynecologist were less likely to consult for gynecological diseases (23.8% versus 35.4%; P<0.001) and visit gynecologists (18.7% versus 30.4%; P<0.001) than women in towns with a gynecologist. The disparity existed in each age group. Among 5,189 adult women living in towns without a gynecologist and having gynecological diseases, 78.5% (number [n]=4,074) visited gynecologists out of town, especially for infertility, benign disorders of the uterus and ovaries, gynecological examinations, and contraceptive problems, and by contrast 23.3% (n=1,209) visited nongynecologists in town, most commonly for menopausal disorders, endometriosis and pelvic pain, menstrual disorders and hormonal dysfunction, and genital dysplasia. Conclusion Gynecological care of rural women was adversely affected by the shortage of gynecologists. The consequences of accessibility in underserved areas deserve further

  14. Psychiatric Disorders in Outpatients With Borderline Intellectual Functioning: Comparison With Both Outpatients From Regular Mental Health Care and Outpatients With Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Jannelien; Haan, Sara Kapitein-de; Zitman, Frans G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the Netherlands, patients with borderline intellectual functioning are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility to examine the mix of psychiatric disorders in patients who, in other countries, are treated in regular outpatient mental health care clinics. Our study sought to examine the rates of all main Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning of 2 specialized regional psychiatric outpatient departments and to compare these with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC) and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities (IDs). Method: Our study was a cross-sectional, anonymized medical chart review. All participants were patients from the Dutch regional mental health care provider Rivierduinen. Diagnoses of patients with borderline intellectual functioning (borderline intellectual functioning group; n = 235) were compared with diagnoses of patients from RMHC (RMHC group; n = 1026) and patients with mild ID (mild ID group; n = 152). Results: Compared with the RMHC group, psychotic and major depressive disorders were less common in the borderline intellectual functioning group, while posttraumatic stress disorder and V codes were more common. Compared with the mild ID group, psychotic disorders were significantly less common. Conclusion: Mental health problems in people with borderline intellectual functioning may not be well addressed in general psychiatry, or by standard psychiatry for patients with ID. Specific attention to this group in clinical practice and research may be warranted lest they fall between 2 stools. PMID:25007114

  15. [Materializing interdisciplinary outpatient management of complex situations].

    PubMed

    Perone, Nicolas; Filliettaz, Séverine Schusselé; Budan, Frédéric; Schaller, Philippe; Balavoine, Jean-François; Waldvogel, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Patient management is becoming increasingly complex, particularly because of the growing prevalence ofchronic diseases and ageing populations. The Swiss health care system is fragmented and struggles to coordinate care provided by professionals from multiple disciplines or working for different institutions. Models to improve health care of complex situations are available that particularly advocate a coordinated team approach. This article presents an action-research designed to empower health professionals to manage complex situations in outpatient settings by means of this type of approach. Health professionals - good practice leaders in the medical and nursing fields in the Geneva Canton (Switzerland) - explored complex management situations, as well as facilitating components and obstacles. A team approach is essential to manage all of the patient's issues, to take the patient's priorities into account, and to work on a joint care plan. The legitimate role of each member of this team is highlighted, together with new roles for existing practices: informing and motivating the patient, highlighting and supporting care givers, coordination by nurses. The creation of such teams, and implementation of these roles involve new processes, which require financing of coordination as well as development of new methods of interdisciplinary management, particularly novel information technology tools. PMID:26168620

  16. Behavioral health issue brief: outpatient civil commitment.

    PubMed

    Delaney, T

    1999-07-01

    Civil commitment is a term associated with involuntary treatment of individuals with mental illness. It can be an inpatient admission for treatment in a hospital or other health facility or it can be outpatient treatment that is court ordered. Either way the treatment is considered to be mandated or involuntary. But if a person, who suffers from mental illness, is not able to make appropriate decisions about his or her care and treatment, who will? How can society be assured that person takes the medication a physician says is needed to treat their illness? Opponents of civil commitment argue that it is a violation of a person's civil rights to order treatment. They fear that relaxing commitment standards may, again, lead to institutionalization of our mentally ill. Proponents contend that by not following recommended treatment plans these people can become a danger to themselves or others. Therefore, someone must take responsibility for them, otherwise they may violate the rights of, or fall victim to, others and are likely become incarcerated within the criminal justice system. PMID:11073371

  17. Multidimensional work sampling in an outpatient pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Murray, M D; Rupp, M T; Overhage, J M; Ebbeler, D E; Main, J W; Tierney, W M

    1995-10-01

    Multidimensional work sampling was performed at a hospital-based outpatient pharmacy. Data were collected from nine full-time and five part-time pharmacists over a 45-day baseline period. Pharmacists wore silent, random-signal generators that permitted continuous work sampling. We introduced the concept of quick codes to allow pharmacists to record their work using a single letter for repetitive activities. Pharmacists recorded 4,687 observations, 90 percent using quick codes. The most common activity was checking prescriptions (36.2 percent). Detection and correction of prescribing errors was the most common reason for their work (39.4 percent). Most work-related activities were performed alone (80 percent) with little time in contact with patients or physicians. These baseline measures will be compared with future measures to assess the effect of the implementation of computerized prospective drug utilization review and clinical treatment guidelines on pharmacists' work. It is expected that these technologic and process changes will increase opportunities for pharmacists to educate patients and consult with physicians. PMID:10151712

  18. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, Fran R.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies. PMID:26472948

  19. [The state of outpatient psychotherapy in Germany].

    PubMed

    Zepf, Siegfried; Mengele, Ute; Hartmann, Sebastian

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the state of adult outpatient psychotherapy in Germany after the PTG came into force. 1042 psychotherapists were questioned on certain issues. One result was that patients have to wait 4.6 months for psychotherapy and that every second patient asking for a diagnostic interview and possible treatment was refused. Of those who were given a diagnostic interview 35 % were not taken into treatment, although disturbances were diagnosed--such as tinnitus, pain, organic disturbances with psychic complications, suicidal tendencies, anorexia nervosa, addiction, psychosomatic illnesses, personality disorders, psychotic disorders--would normally demand psychotherapeutic treatment. Furthermore only 56 % of those patients who Löcherbach et al. considered needing and wanting psychotherapeutic treatment were actually in a G IV psychotherapy. Apart from this the possibility of getting psychotherapy as well as the kind of psychotherapy proved to be dependent on the kind of medical insurance. Different payments by the insurance companies caused longer waiting times for patients and determined the choice of psychotherapy by the psychotherapists. PMID:12649759

  20. 38 CFR 17.42 - Examinations on an outpatient basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MEDICAL Examinations and Observation and Examination § 17.42 Examinations on an outpatient basis. Physical... care and to the same categories of persons for whom hospitalization for observation and examination...

  1. 38 CFR 17.42 - Examinations on an outpatient basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MEDICAL Examinations and Observation and Examination § 17.42 Examinations on an outpatient basis. Physical... care and to the same categories of persons for whom hospitalization for observation and examination...

  2. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments AGENCY... hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services for which TRICARE payments were... radiology services specified in the regulation as being reimbursed under the allowable charge...

  3. Outpatient angioplasty: 4-year experience in one practice.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, S. P.; Stanton, A.; Travers, P.; Glenn, D.; Hanel, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    Angioplasty is often performed as an inpatient procedure after preliminary angiography. In order to increase efficiency and patient comfort we introduced a policy of performing angioplasty for chronic leg ischaemia as an outpatient whenever possible, using duplex scanning to select suitable lesions. This paper examines the safety and feasibility of this policy over a 4-year period. We prospectively assessed 168 consecutive cases which were planned for outpatient angioplasty from a total of 190 cases undergoing angioplasty and found full agreement between duplex scanning and angiography in 92%. Six patients (4%) developed complications of angioplasty requiring admission and another five were admitted for unexpected organisational reasons. Thus, the complication rate of outpatient angioplasty was 4%. All complications were noted at the time of angioplasty with no unexpected readmissions. Angioplasty for leg ischaemia is feasible and safe to perform as an outpatient using duplex scanning to select appropriate cases. PMID:9326123

  4. Building a business case for an outpatient pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gregory S; Jorgenson, James A; Stevenson, James G

    2015-06-01

    To be successful, an outpatient prescription pharmacy service built and operated by a hospital should be run as a competitive business, not in the manner of an inpatient operation. The outpatient pharmacy should not be a siloed entity that operates separately from the inpatient pharmacy. A hospital may miss a significant margin opportunity if it runs the pharmacy strictly as a safety net for uninsured or underinsured patients. PMID:26665338

  5. A National Initiative for Women and Healthcare Providers: CDC’s Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Sun Hee; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L.; Gelb, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. This report provides an overview of the development of this national campaign. PMID:21933006

  6. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  7. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  8. Syed-Neblett interstitial template in locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ampuero, F.; Doss, L.L.; Khan, M.; Skipper, B.; Hilgers, R.D.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-eight patients with locally advanced malignancies of the cervix and vagina were treated with a combination of external radiation therapy and after loading Syed-Neblett iridium template. There were 22 patients with squamous cell cancer and two patients with adenocarcinomas of the cervix. Four patients with squamous cell cancer of the vagina were treated with this method. Only patients with locally advanced disease (cervical lesion >4 cm in diameter) and poor vagnal anatomy were selected for this modality of therapy. In this series the incidence of distant failures of 39% seems to confirm the significance of local volume of disease as a prognostic indicator; despite a local control rate of 59%, only 33% of the patients are alive from 25-51 months. Complications occurred in 12 patients (42%). Six patients (22%) developed severe rectal stricture or rectovaginal fistula necessitating diverting sigmoid colostomy; five patients (18%) developed hemorrhagic proctitis with diarrhea and tenesmus; one patient developed vaginal vault necrosis. Complications occurred 7 to 24 months following therapy. Six of the 12 patients developing complications are dead of disease. On the basis of this study and because of the low cure rate and high incidence of complications, the value of the Syed-Neblett template in locally advanced gynecologic malignancies should be reconsidered.

  9. Unusual inflammation in gynecologic pathology associated with defective endometrial receptivity.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yasuo, Tadahiro; Tada, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Terumi; Iwaki, Yuri; Karita, Masako; Funabiki, Miyako; Taguchi, Sagiri; Spillers, Dustin; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Hisao

    2014-09-01

    Human cycling endometrium displays a series of periodic transitions unique to this mucosal tissue, which includes rapid proliferation, secretory transformation, physiological angiogenesis, interstitial edema, and menstrual shedding. Among these properties of the endometrium are the inflammatory changes that occur dynamically across the menstrual cycle. Immunocompetent cell composition and inflammatory gene expression pattern in the human endometrium drastically fluctuate from the proliferative phase to the secretory phase, particularly at the time of ovulation. These local immune responses are fine-tuned by the direct or indirect action of two representative ovarian steroids, estradiol and progesterone, and are essential for successful blastocyst implantation. Meanwhile, studies have been accumulating the evidence that such physiological endometrial inflammatory status is altered in the presence of certain gynecologic pathologies. Given that blastocysts are semi-allografts for maternal tissue, even subtle alterations in endometrial immunity potentially have a negative impact on implantation process. In this article, we aimed to review and discuss the physiological and pathological mucosal inflammatory conditions that can affect endometrial receptivity. PMID:24771248

  10. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Herniorrhaphy After Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsuan; Huang, Lulu; Han, Chien-Min; Huang, Kuan-Gen; Yen, Chih-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Increased interest in laparoendoscopic single-site surgery has instigated research into trials of novel techniques. The procedure we propose may potentially improve patient satisfaction and cosmetic results while diminishing the incidence of trocar-site herniation. We report our initial experience with laparoendoscopic single-site totally extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy for postoperative incisional hernia to determine the procedure's feasibility and safety. Methods: Three patients with incisional hernias after gynecologic surgery underwent laparoendoscopic single-site totally extraperitoneal procedures. We evaluated the patients' preoperative and postoperative condition, as well as the details of their original surgery. We performed the procedure through a 2-cm umbilical incision followed by mesh insertion and transabdominal suture placement in all patients. Results: Laparoendoscopic single-site totally extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy was completed in 80 to 120 minutes. No intraoperative complications were encountered, and surgical blood loss was minimal. The duration of hospital stay ranged from 2 to 4 days. One patient had a postoperative wound infection. The patients have shown no sign of recurrence at 9 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Laparoendoscopic single-site totally extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy appears to be feasible and safe. It may be performed with readily available instruments, although further experience and practice are warranted for a more efficient repair. The procedure has similar advantages to a multiport laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal procedure but yields better cosmetic results. More studies are needed to assess the long-term benefits and complications of this procedure. PMID:25392616

  11. Activity Restrictions after Gynecologic Surgery: Is There Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Hamad, Nadia M.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many surgeons recommend rest and restricting activities to their patients after surgery. The aim of this review is to summarize the literature regarding types of activities gynecologic surgeons restrict and intra-abdominal pressure during specific activities and to provide an overview of negative effects of sedentary behavior (rest). Methods We searched Pubmed and Scopus for years 1970 until present and excluded studies that described recovery of activities of daily living after surgery as well as those that assessed intra-abdominal pressure for other reasons such as abdominal compartment syndrome and hypertension. For our review of intra-abdominal pressure, we excluded studies that did not include a generally healthy population, or did not report maximal intra-abdominal pressures. Results We identified no randomized trial or prospective cohort study that studied the association between post-operative activity and surgical success after pelvic floor repair. The ranges of intra-abdominal pressures during specific activities are large and such pressures during activities commonly restricted and not restricted after surgery overlap considerably. There is little concordance in mean peak intra-abdominal pressures across studies. Intra-abdominal pressure depends on many factors, but not least the manner in which it is measured and reported. Conclusions Given trends towards shorter hospital stays and off work intervals, which both predispose women to higher levels of physical activity, we urge research efforts towards understanding the role of physical activity on recurrence of pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence after surgery. PMID:23340879

  12. Radiation Enterocolitis Requiring Surgery in Patients With Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Iraha, Shiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiko . E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Moromizato, Hidehiko; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Nagai, Yutaka; Samura, Hironori; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Adachi, Genki; Tamaki, Wakana; Hirakawa, Makoto; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Inamine, Morihiko; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Aoki, Yoichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the characteristics, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,349 patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of the patients (88%) were treated with 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionations with anteroposterior fields. Results: Forty-eight patients (3.6%) developed radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery. Terminal ileum was the most frequent site (50%) and most of the lesions had stenosis or perforation. On univariate analysis, previous abdominopelvic surgery, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking and primary site had an impact on the complications, and on multivariate analysis, abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking were independent predictors of the complications requiring surgery. After the surgical intervention, the frequency of Grade 2 or more bleeding was significantly lower in patients treated with intestinal resection in addition to decompression than those treated with intestinal decompression alone. Conclusions: Severe radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery usually occurred at the terminal ileum and was strongly correlated with previous abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking. Concerning the management, liberal resection of the affected bowel appears to be the preferable therapy.

  13. Other Gynecologic Cancers: endometrial, ovarian, vulvar and vaginal cancers.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Franco, Eliane; Franco, Eduardo L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: In Canada, cancers of the endometrium, ovaries, vulva, vagina, placenta and adnexa account for 11% of all malignant neoplasms in women and 81% of all genital cancers. Although the incidence and mortality from vulvar and vaginal cancers are very low, endometrium and ovarian cancer are important public health problems. KEY FINDINGS: In Canada, there has been no appreciable improvement in survival for women with advanced endometrial (EC) or ovarian cancer (OC) over the past 30 years. The prognosis of EC is good for most patients because diagnosis is made at early stages. However, survival of OC is poor; more than 70% of cases are diagnosed at late stages. Up to 10% of OCs is linked to familial aggregation. Cancers of the vulva and of the vagina are very rare. The survival experience for women with the latter is worse than for those with the former. Both share many risk factors with cervical cancer and the recent developments in the study of HPV infection should be applicable to these diseases as well. Of particular interest will be the advent of vaccines for the primary prevention of HPV infection. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: At present, the best available means to diagnose gynecologic malignancies is a detailed clinical examination, considering the totality of information on potential and proven risk factors, such as age, reproductive health, sexual practices, use unopposed estrogens or of oral contraceptives or tubal ligation, obesity, diet, smoking, and the familial clustering of some of these cancers. PMID:15345077

  14. Relaxation and music reduce pain after gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Grass, Jeffrey A; Makii, Michael

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of three nonpharmacologic nursing interventions: relaxation, music, and the combination of relaxation and music on pain following gynecologic (GYN) surgery. A total of 311 patients, ages 18 to 70, from five Midwestern hospitals, were randomly assigned using minimization to either three intervention groups or a control group and were tested during ambulation and rest on postoperative days 1 and 2. Pain sensation and distress were measured using visual analogue scales. Multivariate analysis of covariance of posttest sensation and distress was used with pretest control and a priori contrasts. The intervention groups had significantly less posttest pain than the control group (p =.022-.001) on both days. The three interventions were similar in their effect on pain. Patients who received the interventions plus patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) had 9% to 29% less pain than controls who used PCA alone. Reduced pain was related to amount of activity (ambulation or rest), mastery of the use of the intervention, and decreased pulse and respiration. Those who slept well had less pain the following day. Nurses who care for GYN surgical patients can provide soft music and relaxation tapes and instruct patients to use them during postoperative ambulation and also at rest on days 1 and 2. PMID:12050837

  15. Compassion in Soranus' Gynecology and Caelius Aurelianus' On Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Porter, Amber J

    2016-01-01

    Compassion is considered an important quality for a successful physician today, but did ancient physicians display and value this emotion? How did they feel when faced with the pain and suffering of their patients? How did their patients' emotions affect their own? Many ancient physicians are not well-known for expressions of compassion in their writings; however, this seems to change in the second century AD. One medical writer who exemplifies this change is Soranus of Ephesus (c. 98-138 AD). In his Gynecology, there are a number of passages where compassion is addressed or expressed (such as the chapters on the qualities of the best midwife, the symptom of pica, childbirth, and superstition). The same points can be made of Soranus' On Chronic Diseases, preserved to some extent by the Latin version and adaptation by fifth century AD medical writer Caelius Aurelianus (see, for example, the chapters on chronic headache, mania and elephantiasis). Soranus and Caelius display compassion, understanding, and flexibility of approach when dealing with patient issues; they show themselves willing to change their medical technique when they see that it is doing more harm or discomfort than good. In Soranus and Caelius, we have an image of a physician who acknowledges and is aware of their patients' emotions, beliefs and attitudes, and who exhibits compassion for them. PMID:26946682

  16. Incidence of trocar site herniation following robotic gynecologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Leslie H.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Odetto, Diego; Munsell, Mark F.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Fleming, Nicole; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Trocar site herniation is a recognized complication of minimally invasive surgery, but published data on trocar site herniation after robotic surgery are scarce. We sought to determine the incidence of trocar site herniation in women undergoing robotic surgery for gynecologic disease. Methods A retrospective review of robotic surgeries performed from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2012, was conducted. Postoperative trocar site herniations were identified, along with time to presentation, location of herniation, and management. Patients were excluded if surgery was converted to laparotomy or traditional laparoscopy. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare patients with and without herniation with respect to continuous variables, and Fisher's exact test was used to compare these 2 groups with respect to categorical variables. Results The study included 500 patients, 3 of whom experienced herniation at a single trocar site. The patients with and without herniation did not differ with respect to age, body mass index, smoking status, medical comorbidities, operating time, or estimated blood loss. All 3 herniations occurred at 12-mm trocar sites. Two herniations occurred at assistant port sites, and 1 occurred at the umbilical camera port site. The median time to herniation was 21 days (range, 8-38 days). One patient required immediate surgical intervention; the other 2 patients had conservative management. Conclusions Trocar site herniation is a rare complication following robotic surgery. The most important risk factor for trocar site herniation appears to be larger trocar size, as all herniations occurred at 12-mm port sites. PMID:23988416

  17. Recent Trends in Outpatient Antibiotic Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Kenneth P.; Raebel, Marsha A.; Nordin, James D.; Lakoma, Matthew D.; Dutta-Linn, M. Maya; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine changes in antibiotic-dispensing rates among children in 3 health plans located in New England [A], the Mountain West [B], and the Midwest [C] regions of the United States. METHODS: Pharmacy and outpatient claims from September 2000 to August 2010 were used to calculate rates of antibiotic dispensing per person-year for children aged 3 months to 18 years. Differences in rates by year, diagnosis, and health plan were tested by using Poisson regression. The data were analyzed to determine whether there was a change in the rate of decline over time. RESULTS: Antibiotic use in the 3- to <24-month age group varied at baseline according to health plan (A: 2.27, B: 1.40, C: 2.23 antibiotics per person-year; P < .001). The downward trend in antibiotic dispensing slowed, stabilized, or reversed during this 10-year period. In the 3- to <24-month age group, we observed 5.0%, 9.3%, and 7.2% annual declines early in the decade in the 3 plans, respectively. These dropped to 2.4%, 2.1%, and 0.5% annual declines by the end of the decade. Third-generation cephalosporin use for otitis media increased 1.6-, 15-, and 5.5-fold in plans A, B, and C in young children. Similar attenuation of decline in antibiotic use and increases in use of broad-spectrum agents were seen in other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotic dispensing for children may have reached a new plateau. Along with identifying best practices in low-prescribing areas, decreasing broad-spectrum use for particular conditions should be a continuing focus of intervention efforts. PMID:24488744

  18. Cost of post-stroke outpatient care in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Seyed Majid Akhavan; Mazlan, Mazlina; Abdullah, Saini Jeffery Freddy; Engkasan, Julia Patrick

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to investigate the direct cost of outpatient care for patients with stroke, as well as the relationship between the aforementioned cost and the sociodemographic and stroke characteristics of the patients. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving patients with first-ever stroke who were attending outpatient stroke rehabilitation, and their family members. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire designed to obtain information regarding the cost of outpatient care. Stroke severity was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. RESULTS This study comprised 49 patients (28 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 60.2 (range 35–80) years. The mean total cost incurred was USD 547.10 (range USD 53.50–4,591.60), of which 36.6% was spent on attendant care, 25.5% on medical aids, 15.1% on travel expenses, 14.1% on medical fees and 8.5% on out-of-pocket expenses. Stroke severity, age > 70 years and haemorrhagic stroke were associated with increased cost. The mean cost of attending outpatient therapy per patient was USD 17.50 per session (range USD 6.60–30.60), with travelling expenses (41.8%) forming the bulk of the cost, followed by medical fees (38.1%) and out-of-pocket expenses (10.9%). Multiple regression analysis showed that stroke severity was the main determinant of post-stroke outpatient care cost (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION Post-stroke outpatient care costs are significantly influenced by stroke severity. The cost of attendant care was the main cost incurred during the first three months after hospital discharge, while travelling expenses was the main cost incurred when attending outpatient stroke rehabilitation therapy. PMID:25715857

  19. Predicting Inpatient Readmission and Outpatient Admission in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Pei; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Mao, Hsiu-Chen; Chan, Ding-Cheng (Derrick)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing potentially avoidable hospital readmission and admissions are important health care quality issues. We develop prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admission to hospitals for older adults In the retrospective cohort study with 2 million sampling file of the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, older adults (aged ≥65 y/o) with a first admission in 2008 were enrolled in the inpatient cohort (N = 39,156). The outpatient cohort included subjects who had ≥1 outpatient visit in 2008 (N = 178,286). Each cohort was split into derivation (3/4) and validation (1/4) data set. Primary outcome of the inpatient cohort: 30-day readmission from the date of discharge. The outpatient cohort included hospital admissions within the 1-year follow-up period. Candidate risk factors include demographics, comorbidities, and previous health care utilizations. Series of logistic regression models were applied with area under the receiver operating curves (AUCs) to identify the best model. Roughly 1 of 7 (14.6%) of the inpatients was readmitted within 30 days, and 1 of 5 (19.1%) of the outpatient cohort was admitted within 1 year. Age, education, use of home health care, and selected comorbidities (e.g., cancer with metastasis) were included in the final model. The AUC of the inpatient readmission model was 0.655 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.646–0.664) and outpatient admission model was 0.642 (95% CI 0.639–0.646). Predictive performance was maintained in both validation data sets. The goodness-to-fit model demonstrated good calibration in both groups. We developed and validated practical clinical prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admissions for general older adults with indicators easily obtained from an administrative data set. PMID:27100455

  20. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  1. [Cost per capita in outpatients by gender].

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Campos Esparza, Maribel; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana; Martínez González, Lidia; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Torres Labra, Guadalupe; Patiño Vega, Adolfo; Rivera Martínez, María Teresa; Aparicio Rojas, Raúl; Juárez Durán, Martín

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the annual cost per capita by gender in first level of attention. It is a cost study in Family Physician Units in Mexico. The information corresponded to the year of 2004 and the study divided in the use profile and cost attention. USE PROFILE OF SERVICES: it was studied 1,585 clinical registries of patients, use profile defined by average and attention reasons by department, gender and age group. COST ATTENTION: considered in American dollars it included fixed unit cost (departmentalization adjusted by productivity), variable unit cost (micro cost technical), department unite cost by type attention, and department unit cost by age and gender. The life expectancy was of 73 years for men and 78 for women. Three scenes were identified. The annual cost per capita is superior among woman [US$73.24 (IC 95% $11.38 - $197.49)] than in man [$ 53.11 (IC 95% 2.51 - 207.71)]. The conclusion found that in the first level of attention the cost per capita is greater in woman than in man. PMID:21519684

  2. Working and Training Conditions of Gynecology Residents in North Rhine-Westfalia, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, D.; Rein, D.; Fehm, T.; Fleisch, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In 2002, gynecology residents in North Rhine-Westfalia (NRW) were asked how satisfied they were with their working and training conditions. A new extended survey of gynecology residents aimed to evaluate whether changes to specialist training regulations had affected residentsʼ levels of job satisfaction and to identify areas where training conditions still urgently required improvement. Material and Methods: A total of 1223 questionnaires with 52 questions were sent to the 159 gynecology clinics in NRW. Responses could be dichotomous, multi-level or quantitative. The results were analyzed with regard to age, gender, family status and type of clinic and were additionally compared with the results of a previous survey. Results: The percentage of women residents has increased to 84.6 %. A workload of more than 48 hours per week has resulted in decreased motivation and lower levels of satisfaction during training, although overall levels of satisfaction have clearly improved compared to the previous survey. Use of a logbook to create a more structured training program has not achieved the desired effect. Nevertheless, seven of eight gynecology residents would study medicine again, although 28 % of the budding gynecologists are considering working abroad or in private industry. Conclusion: Both training and overall satisfaction with working conditions must be improved to preserve the appeal of gynecology for young academics. This survey aims to identify key factors which are responsible for (dis)satisfaction with working conditions. PMID:24741128

  3. Pre-participation gynecological evaluation of female athletes: a new proposal

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiano, Tathiana Rebizzi; Zucchi, Eliana Viana Monteiro; de Araujo, Maíta Poli; Guindalini, Camila Santa Cruz; Castro, Rodrigo de Aquino; Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin de Jármy Di; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Cohen, Moisés; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective To propose the inclusion of a gynecological investigation during the evaluation of athletes before competitions, using a specific instrument called the Pre-participation Gynecological Examination (PPGE). Methods The study assessed 148 athletes, mean age of 15.4±2.0 years, who engaged in eight different sports modalities, and who responded to a questionnaire named Pre-Participation Gynecological Examination (PPGE), to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form (for urinary loss), and to the Eating Attitudes Test (for eating disorders). Results Fifty percent of the participants reported irregular menstrual intervals, 23.0% did not know about sexually transmitted diseases, and 72.4% denied having, at least, an annual gynecological appointment. The study identified 18.2% who had urinary loss, and 15% presented with an increased risk of eating disorders. Moreover, 89.9% were not familiar with the occurrence of urinary incontinence in athletes and did not know that they were susceptible to the female athlete triad. A total of 87.1% of them stated that would not mention these issues to their coaches even if this would improve their health or performance. Conclusion The Pre-Participation Gynecological Examination can be considered an easy-to-apply instrument that allowed the diagnosis of alterations often underestimated by the athletes themselves. After its application, the alterations were identified, and determined the athletes’ referral to appropriate evaluation and treatment. PMID:25628197

  4. Physical Sequelae and Depressive Symptoms in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors: Meaning in Life as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Laura E.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Continuing symptoms and poor health following cancer treatments may alter meaning in life for cancer survivors. Gynecologic cancer survivors are particularly troubled with physical sequelae. In addition, for the most common sites of disease, such as breast and gynecologic cancers, the prevalence of depression is also high. Purpose This study tests meaning in life as a mechanism for the relationship between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Methods Gynecologic cancer survivors (N=260) participated. Measures of physical sequelae (nurse rated symptoms/signs, patient-reported gynecologic symptoms), meaning in life (harmony, life purpose, spirituality, and conversely, confusion and loss), and depressive symptoms were obtained at the time of a routine clinical follow-up visit 2–10 years following the completion of treatment. Latent variables were defined, and structural equation modeling tested a mediator model. Results Analyses support partial mediation. That is, survivors with more physical sequelae also reported lower levels of meaning in life, which was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusions Gynecologic cancer patients have been neglected in psychosocial research, and findings highlight the importance of existential issues in their lives. While many adjust well, those with persistent physical functioning deficits may experience depressive symptoms. By appreciating the role of meaning in their experience, we may help survivors foster their own growth and perspectives important for their future. PMID:18386113

  5. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000-¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden. PMID:25060622

  6. Prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in Chinese gastroenterological outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Jing; He, Yan-Ling; Ma, Hong; Liu, Zhe-Ning; Jia, Fu-Jun; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Lan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and physicians’ detection rate of depressive and anxiety disorders in gastrointestinal (GI) outpatients across China. METHODS: A hospital-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in the GI outpatient departments of 13 general hospitals. A total of 1995 GI outpatients were recruited and screened with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The physicians of the GI departments performed routine clinical diagnosis and management without knowing the HADS score results. Subjects with HADS scores ≥ 8 were subsequently interviewed by psychiatrists using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to make further diagnoses. RESULTS: There were 1059 patients with HADS score ≥ 8 and 674 (63.64%) of them undertook the MINI interview by psychiatrists. Based on the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), the adjusted current prevalence for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and comorbidity of both disorders in the GI outpatients was 14.39%, 9.42% and 4.66%, respectively. Prevalence of depressive disorders with suicidal problems [suicide attempt or suicide-related ideation prior or current; module C (suicide) of MINI score ≥ 1] was 5.84% in women and 1.64% in men. The GI physicians’ detection rate of depressive and anxiety disorders accounted for 4.14%. CONCLUSION: While the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders is high in Chinese GI outpatients, the detection rate of depressive and anxiety disorders by physicians is low. PMID:22654455

  7. Lifestyle of Hemodialysis Patients in Comparison with Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Moghadasian, Sima; Sahebi Hagh, Mohammad Hasan; Aghaallah Hokmabadi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, the chronic diseases are known to be associated with lifestyle risk factors. Hemodialysis patients encounter considerable amount of physical, mental and social pressure. Lifestyle is important because it affects quality of life and has important role in prevention. This study aimed to compare the lifestyle of hemodialysis patients and outpatients in health clinics of Tabriz. Methods: This was a case-control study on 155 hemodialysis patients and 155 outpatients referring to five dialysis centers and clinics, who met the inclusion criteria. Demographic data and some questions about lifestyle in nutrition, stress, physical activity and smoking were asked. Results: The history of hypertension among hemodialysis patients was 34.6% greater than outpatients. High daily salt consumption (more than two tablespoons a day) was 40.5% higher among hemodialysis patients than outpatients. In terms of saturated oil intake, it was 30.8%higher among hemodialysis patients. Problem in communicating with family members was 69.8% higher in hemodialysis patients. In terms of physical activity, 46.4% of outpatients had higher physical activity like walking. Conclusion: Lifestyle in different dimensions was associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD); therefore, the officials of health system are recommended to develop a program to combat chronic diseases and integrate it with providing the first-level health services. It seems that public education can have a major role in life-style modification and in chronic kidney diseases prevention. PMID:25276683

  8. Association between human resources and risk of hospitalisation in end-stage renal disease outpatients receiving haemodialysis: a longitudinal cohort study using claim data during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon-Hee; Han, Kyu-Tae; Nam, Chung Mo; Moon, Ki Tae; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective The number of patients requiring haemodialysis has gradually increased in South Korea. Owing to this growth, concerns have been raised regarding haemodialysis quality of care, and healthcare professionals must consider alternatives for appropriate management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, we investigated the association between risk of hospitalisation of outpatients who received haemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the human resources of the haemodialysis unit. Setting We used data from National Health Insurance (NHI) claims during October 2013 to September 2014. Participants These data comprised 40 543 outpatients with ESRD (4 751 047 outpatient cases) who received haemodialysis. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measure We performed Poisson regression analysis using a generalised estimating equation that included both patient and haemodialysis unit characteristics to examine the factors associated with hospitalisation of outpatients with ESRD. Results Among 4 751 047 outpatient cases, 27 997 (0.59%) were hospitalised during the study period. A higher proportion of haemodialysis patient care specialists and a higher number of nurses experienced in haemodialysis were inversely associated with the risk of hospitalisation (per 10% increase in haemodialysis patient care specialists: relative risk (RR)=0.987, 95% CI 0.981 to 0.993; per 10-person increase in nurses who provided haemodialysis: RR=0.876, 95% CI 0.833 to 0.921). In addition, such associations were greater in severe patients. Conclusions Our findings suggest that haemodialysis units with high-quality, haemodialysis-specialised human resources could positively affect the outcomes of outpatients with ESRD. Based on our findings, health policymakers and professionals should implement strategies for the optimal management of patients with CKD. PMID:27534988

  9. Relevance of Health Economics in the Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer: The View of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO)

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Georg; Hans-Joachim, Hindenburg; Schilling, Jörg; Klare, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this article, the position of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO) on the health economics of medical breast cancer therapy is presented. The BNGO unites professionals and employees whose principal activity lies in highly specialized gynecologic oncology. In Germany, 139 specialists are united in 128 professional practices. According to § 12 of the Social Code, the oncological services provided by members must be ‘sufficient, effective and economical; they must not exceed what is necessary’. People who are covered by statutory health insurance in Germany are entitled to sufficient benefits. Sufficient measures are measures that benefit the patient with breast cancer and have a positive effect on the course of the disease. In § 35b of the Social Code, the benefit of the patient is defined as ‘improvement in health, shortening of the duration of illness, lengthening of lifespan, reduction of side effects and an improvement in the quality of life’. In the adjuvant situation, the ideal goal is healing; in the palliative situation, the most basic marker is overall survival, while surrogate markers are the progression-free interval, improved quality of life, or diminished symptoms. At the same time, the law on economic assessment stipulates ‘appropriateness and reasonableness of reimbursement by the insured community’. PMID:24715840

  10. Abnormal vaginal flora in low-risk pregnant women cared for by a public health service: prevalence and association with symptoms and findings from gynecological exams.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Danielle Cristina Alves Feitosa; Duarte, Marli Teresinha Cassamassimo; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; de Lima Parada, Cristina Maria Garcia

    2010-01-01

    This study identifies the prevalence of vaginal flora alterations in low-risk pregnant women and their association with reported symptoms and gynecological exams. This quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in public primary care service units in Botucatu, SP, Brazil from 2006 to 2008 with 289 pregnant women from a stratified sample obtained by sampling by care unit. Tests of vaginal content were performed using Gram's method and testing for Trichomonas vaginalis using Diamond's medium. The prevalence of altered vaginal flora was 49.5%, of which bacterial vaginosis (20.7%), vaginal candidiasis (11.8%) and intermediate flora (11.1%) were the most frequent, not considering associations. Results revealed a high prevalence of vaginal flora alterations with little relation to symptoms, but in agreement with findings from the gynecological exams. Considering undesirable maternal and perinatal outcomes and feasible laboratory practices, the establishment of a routine for diagnosing vaginal flora alterations in low-risk pregnant women is suggested. PMID:21120411

  11. Appropriate international measures for outpatient antibiotic prescribing and consumption: recommendations from a national data comparison of different measures

    PubMed Central

    Coenen, Samuel; Gielen, Birgit; Blommaert, Adriaan; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel; Goossens, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Many European countries have engaged in awareness campaigns to decrease outpatient antibiotic use and several measures have been proposed, e.g. the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) or packages per 1000 inhabitants per day, producing conflicting findings. Therefore, we set out to explore what measure is most appropriate. Methods Outpatient data on each dispensed and reimbursed medicinal package in Belgium between 2002 and 2009 were aggregated at the level of the active substance in accordance with the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification and expressed as the numbers of DDDs (WHO, version 2010), packages, treatments and insured individuals per 1000 inhabitants, insured individuals and patient contacts, per day, and in July–June years. Using these measures, time trends of outpatient antibiotic use were compared and explored in detail. Results Expressed per 1000 inhabitants per day, outpatient antibiotic use increased between 2002–03 and 2008–09 in DDDs, whereas in packages, treatments and insured individuals it decreased. The same was true for use expressed per 1000 insured individuals or when allowing for the decreasing number of patient contacts. Increasing numbers of DDDs per package (more items per package and higher doses per unit for amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav) explain these discrepancies. Conclusions The number of packages is a more appropriate measure than the number of DDDs when assessing outpatient antibiotic use over time and the impact of awareness campaigns in countries dispensing ‘complete packages’. We recommended the use of different complementary measures or caution when interpreting trends based only on DDDs. PMID:24084641

  12. Chinese Obstetrics & Gynecology journal club: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ilene K; Dodson, William C; Kunselman, Allen R; Kuang, Hongying; Han, Feng-Juan; Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether a journal club model could improve comprehension and written and spoken medical English in a population of Chinese medical professionals. Setting and participants The study population consisted of 52 medical professionals who were residents or postgraduate master or PhD students in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, China. Intervention After a three-part baseline examination to assess medical English comprehension, participants were randomised to either (1) an intensive journal club treatment arm or (2) a self-study group. At the conclusion of the 8-week intervention participants (n=52) were re-tested with new questions. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in score on a multiple choice examination. Secondary outcomes included change in scores on written and oral examinations which were modelled on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Results Both groups had improved scores on the multiple choice examination without a statistically significant difference between them (90% power). However, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in mean improvement in scores for both written (95% CI 1.1 to 5.0; p=0.003) and spoken English (95% CI 0.06 to 3.7; p=0.04) favouring the journal club intervention. Conclusions Interacting with colleagues and an English-speaking facilitator in a journal club improved both written and spoken medical English in Chinese medical professionals. Journal clubs may be suitable for use as a self-sustainable teaching model to improve fluency in medical English in foreign medical professionals. Trial registration number NCT01844609. PMID:26823180

  13. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  14. Robotic Trachelectomy After Supracervical Hysterectomy for Benign Gynecologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Joelle; Hanna, Rabbie; Papalekas, Eleni; Schiff, Lauren; Theoharis, Evan; Eisenstein, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A renewed interest in the supra cervical approach to hysterectomy has created a cohort of patients with a retained cervix at risk of persistent symptoms requiring a subsequent trachelectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of robotic trachelectomy after a previous supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of women who had robotic trachelectomy after supracervical hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease from January 2009 through October 2014. Results: Eleven patients underwent robotic trachelectomy for benign conditions during the observed period. Prior supracervical hysterectomy had been performed for pelvic pain (8/11, 73%), abnormal uterine bleeding (7/11, 64%), and dysmenorrhea (5/11, 45%). In 10 of 11 patients, the symptoms leading to robotic trachelectomy were the same as those leading to supracervical hysterectomy. The time from hysterectomy to recurrence of symptoms ranged from 0.5 to 26 months (median, 6), whereas the time interval from previous surgery to robotic trachelectomy ranged from 1 to 57 months (median, 26). Mean age and body mass index at robotic trachelectomy were 42 ± 5.4 years and 32 ± 6.1 kg/m2. Mean length of surgery was 218 ± 88 minutes (range, 100–405). There was 1 major postoperative complication involving bladder perforation and subsequent vesicovaginal fistula (VVF). Endometriosis was seen in 27% of pathologic specimens and cervicitis in another 27%; 45% showed normal tissue histology. In 6 (55%) cases, symptoms leading to trachelectomy resolved completely after surgery, and the other 5 (45%) patients reported a significant improvement. Conclusions: Although trachelectomy can be a challenging surgery, our experience suggests that the robotic approach may be a valuable means of achieving safe and reproducible outcomes. PMID:27493470

  15. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  16. Can we maximize both value and quality in gynecologic cancer care? A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Havrilesky, Laura J; Fountain, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Value is defined as desirable health outcomes achieved per monetary unit spent. Comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness research are methods that have been developed to quantify effectiveness and value to inform management decisions. In this article we review the comparative and cost-effectiveness literature in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Studies have shown that improved ovarian cancer survival is associated with complete primary surgical cytoreduction, with treatment at high volume facilities by subspecialist providers (gynecologic oncologists) and with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-adherent care in both surgical staging and chemotherapy regimens. Intraperitoneal/intravenous chemotherapy (compared with intravenous alone) has been associated with improved survival and cost-effectiveness. Bevacizumab for primary and maintenance therapy has been found to not be cost-effective (even in selective subsets) despite a small progression-free survival (PFS) advantage. For platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, secondary cytoreduction and platinum-based combinations are associated with improved overall survival (OS); several platinum-based combinations have also been found cost-effective. For platinum-resistant recurrence, single agent therapy and supportive care are cost-effective compared with combination therapies. Although little prospective clinical research has been done around end-of-life care, one study reported that for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, palliative intervention would potentially reduce costs and increase quality adjusted life years compared with usual care (based on improvement in quality of life [QOL]). Overall, cost comparisons of individual chemotherapy regimens are highly dependent on market prices of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24857112

  17. Korean and American music reduces pain in Korean women after gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Ahn, Sukhee

    2008-09-01

    American music has been found to relieve pain in adults in several countries but has not been tested in Korea. Korean women have reported that they would like American music as well as Korean folk songs and religious music sung in Korean. The study purpose was to pilot-test the effects of music on pain after gynecologic surgery in Korean women and to compare pain relief between those who chose American or Korean music. Using a quasiexperimental pretest-posttest design, 73 South Korean women on a preoperative unit were assigned by day of the week to receive music (n = 34; 47%) or no music (n = 39; 53%). The music group chose among Korean (ballads and religious and popular songs) and American (soft slow piano and orchestra) music and heard it for 15 minutes at four time points (postoperatively), whereas the controls rested in bed. They marked VAS Sensation and Distress of Pain scales before and after each test. The two groups were similar on pretest pain. When controlling for pretest pain, MANCOVA indicated that there was significantly less posttest pain in those with music plus analgesics than those with analgesics alone at three of the four tests: p = .04 to .001. Two-thirds in the music group (n = 21; 62%) chose Korean music and one-third (n = 13; 38%) chose American, with no difference in pain: both were effective. In addition to analgesics, music can be used to reduce postoperative pain in Korean women. Patients selected music that was appealing to them. Nurses in many countries can consider music of the country and seek individual preferences to use in addition to analgesics for postoperative pain. PMID:18706380

  18. Assessing Old Order Amish outpatients with the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Knabb, Joshua J; Vogt, Ronald G

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examined Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III; Millon, 2009) characteristics in an Old Order Amish outpatient sample (n = 166), with a comparison group of Old Order Amish who were not receiving mental health treatment at the time of testing (n = 80). We also graphically compared the 2 Amish groups to a non-Amish psychiatric sample in the literature. Consistent with our hypotheses, the Old Order Amish outpatients scored significantly higher than the Old Order Amish comparison group on the majority of MCMI-III scales, with mostly medium effect sizes, suggesting that the MCMI-III is a useful personality instrument in discriminating between Old Order Amish clinical and nonclinical groups. In addition, the Amish outpatients scored similar to a non-Amish psychiatric sample in the literature on most personality scales. Future MCMI-III studies with the Amish are needed to replicate and generalize our findings. PMID:21516588

  19. An outpatient program for laparoscopic sterilization.

    PubMed

    Mercer, J P; Lefler, H T; Hulka, J F; Fishburne, J I

    1973-05-01

    This is a report of a pilot program for laparoscopic sterilization with emphasis on surgical and anesthetic technics. In 1971 the program was developed at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital. Subjects were 129 private patients, mostly white, of middle income with 2 or more children, and from 19 to 47 years of age. Follow up of over 90% indicated high patient satisfaction. Complications were few but may occasionally require surgical management and the method should not be considered a minor procedure. At first patients were handled as inpatients for 1 day preceding surgery. Later an outpatient status was adopted. At an earlier visit a history is taken, instructions given by a nurse, the assigned physician (who may be a physician in training) reviews the history, performs a physical examination, and explains the operation to both the patient and her husband. Laboratory work is performed, operative permits are signed, and patients are asked at this time to agree to sterilization by laparotomy if the laparoscopic approach proves infeasible. On the morning of surgery suitable intravenous medication (Valium 5 mg), fentanyl, and atropine are given and followed by pure oxygen inhalation for 3-5 minutes. Pentothal followed by succinylcholine are given and the patient intubated. Anesthesia is maintained by succinylcholine drip and inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen. After surgical preparation with Betadine solution, a combination tenaculum-sound is placed in the cervical canal. Pneumoperitoneum is established with carbon dioxide gas through a Verres needle inserted through a small subumbilical incision. The laparoscopic trocar is introduced by enlarging the same incision. After inspection a second 6 mm trocar is inserted just about the tubes and biopsy forceps introduced. The tenaculum in the cervix is used to position the uterus and tubes. After cauterization tubes are divided with the biopsy forceps and a biopsy specimen obtained if possible without undue action on

  20. Gynecologic pain related to occupational stress among female factory workers in Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Kristin K; Harlow, Siobán D; Burgard, Sarah A; Wang, Yanrang; Han, Cheng; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and non-cyclic pelvic pain are health concerns for factory workers in China and may be increased by occupational stress. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and demographic and occupational factors associated with three types of gynecologic pain among female factory workers in Tianjin. Methods: The study included 651 female workers from three factories in Tianjin, China. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine associations between occupational stress and gynecologic pain. Results: Occupational stress including high job strain, exhaustion, and stress related to working conditions was a risk factor for gynecologic pain. High job strain and poor job security were associated with an increased risk for dysmenorrhea. Compulsory overtime and exhaustion were associated with increased non-cyclic pelvic pain. Working overtime and exhaustion were associated with increased dyspareunia. Conclusions: As China’s population of female factory workers grows, research on the reproductive health of this population is essential. PMID:24804338

  1. Cancer and the world's poor: What's a gynecologic cancer specialist to do?

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Goodman, AnneKathryn; Schmeler, Kathleen; Durfee, John; Pareja, Rene; Munkarah, Adnan; Rulisa, Stephen; Ghebre, Rahel; Trimble, Edward L; Chuang, Linus

    2016-07-01

    Women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a drastically increased burden of cervical cancer and the same burden of other gynecologic cancers as do women in high-income countries, yet there are few resources or specialists to meet their needs. 85% of deaths from cervical cancer occur in LMICs. As the population of these regions age, and as death from infectious diseases decrease, this burden will increase further without strong intervention. There are few cancer specialists in LMICs and training in gynecologic cancer care is rare. Gynecologic cancer specialists are uniquely positioned to meet this challenge as advocates, educators and experts. On behalf of the SGO International Committee, we call on our colleagues to meet this historic challenge. PMID:27210817

  2. Professional leadership in obstetrics and gynecology and its contribution to Millennium Development Goal 5.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David J

    2012-10-01

    National professional associations of obstetrics and gynecology characteristically begin as learned societies holding regular conferences for the presentation and discussion of new research results, and progress to regulating the activities of their members in the public interest (e.g. admission examinations, setting standards). However, they can offer much more to their nation's health by contributing directly to improvements in health care and influencing governmental decisions in favor of the health of women and babies. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), through the Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) initiative, is developing the capacity of national professional associations in Africa and Asia, so that they can contribute to improving clinical practice and influence national health policy toward achieving Millennium Development Goal 5. PMID:22884822

  3. Factors Affecting Gynecologic and Sexual Assessment in Older Women: A Lesson for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Ayasha; Capps, Natalie; Lefler, Leanne; Richard-Davis, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines for screening of cervical cancer and pelvic exams for older women have recently changed. These changes may have unexpected sequelae in women over 65 years of age. This manuscript provides a review of gynecologic screening recommendations for older women in the U.S. and potential ramifications of these recent changes. Peer reviewed guidelines from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. Preventative Task Force Services, the American Cancer Society, The Centers for Disease Control, and multiple original research articles and reviews were reviewed for this manuscript. Women over 65 are at greatest risk to develop late stage diagnoses of cancers, pelvic organ disease, incontinence, and infections. Clinicians will need to acutely consider this fact when communicating and screening this population. We conclude that practitioners should be aware of the new guidelines and should consider including gynecologic health history and symptom analysis as part of annual exams in women of all ages.

  4. CT, MRI, PET, PET/CT, and ultrasound in the evaluation of obstetric and gynecologic patients.

    PubMed

    Gjelsteen, Andrew C; Ching, Brian H; Meyermann, Mark W; Prager, Douglas A; Murphy, Thomas F; Berkey, Bryan D; Mitchell, Lex A

    2008-04-01

    The role of imaging in obstetrics and gynecology has undergone a revolution over the past few decades. Well-established methods such as endovaginal ultrasound have had a central role in the evaluation of nongravid patients with pelvic pain, as well as in the workup for ectopic pregnancy and evaluation of adnexal masses. Additional tools include MRI in the evaluation of appendicitis and other potentially surgical conditions in pregnant patients and MRI and CT in the evaluation of surgical complications. Newer tools in the radiology armamentarium include PET scanning which, alongside MRI and CT, are often helpful in staging gynecologic malignancy. The role of imaging in the obstetric and gynecology patient will continue to change as new modalities and techniques are introduced. PMID:18381118

  5. Post-operative intravenous patient-controlled analgesic efficacy of morphine with ketorolac versus nefopam after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery: a randomized non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji-Uk; Cheon, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Yoon-Mi; Ri, Hyun-Su; Baik, Seong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a non-opioid non-steroidal centrally acting analgesic. This study was conducted to assess the analgesic efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using nefopam alone, compared with a combination of morphine and ketorolac, after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Methods Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received IV-PCA. Group A (n = 30) received IV-PCA with a combination of morphine 60 mg and ketorolac 180 mg, while group B (n = 30) received nefopam 200 mg (basal rate 1 ml/h, bolus 1 ml, and lockout time 15 min for both). The primary outcome evaluated was analgesic efficacy using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Other evaluated outcomes included the incidence rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), patient satisfaction of pain control, percentage of patients requiring additional opioids, and incidence rate of postoperative adverse effects. Results Group B was not inferior to group A in relation to the VAS in the post-anesthesia care unit, and at 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery (mean difference [95% confidence interval], 0.50 [–0.43 to 1.43], -0.30 [-1.25 to 0.65], -0.05 [-0.65 to 0.55], and 0.10 [-0.55 to 0.75], respectively). The incidence rate of nausea was lower in group B than in group A at 12 and 24 h after surgery (P = 0.004 and P = 0.017, respectively). There were no significant differences in the other outcomes between groups. Conclusions IV-PCA using nefopam alone has a non-inferior analgesic efficacy and produces a lower incidence of PONV in comparison with IV-PCA using a combination of morphine and ketorolac after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:27066208

  6. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang; Liu, Zi-Xian; Guo, Jin-Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  7. Walking a tightrope: case management services and outpatient commitment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, W Patrick; Carpenter, Jenneth; Floyd, Destinee F

    2014-01-01

    Effective case managers in community mental health are successful at forging a working alliance with recipients. This article explores one key aspect of case management practice, serving involuntary clients, specifically those on outpatient commitment orders. In 19 intensive interviews, a subset of a larger study, case managers shared their perceptions of the utility of outpatient commitment with a focus on how such orders impacted the professional relationship. We argue that the use of advance psychiatric directives and shared decision-making processes can reduce the need for coercive practice. PMID:25222837

  8. Poor elevated-blood-pressure recognition in the outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Tammy M.

    2016-01-01

    Question Among pediatric outpatient care centers, what is the rate of elevated blood pressure recognition? Design Retrospective single cohort study. Setting Single tertiary-care pediatric outpatient center. Participants 20 000 patients (2–17 years old). Intervention Blood pressure measurement. Outcomes Recognition rate of elevated blood pressures. Main Results Among those with ≥3 elevated blood pressure measurements, the median frequency of identification by division/service was 17%. Conclusions The identification of patients with elevated blood pressure measurements was low. PMID:26319926

  9. Work Satisfaction and Performance of Physicians in Pediatric Outpatient Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, Constance A.; Becker, Marshall H.

    1973-01-01

    The sources and consequences of variations in work satisfaction are investigated in a study of approximately 100 physicians in six pediatric outpatient clinics, half of them associated with teaching hospitals and half with community hospitals. Measures of work satisfaction, role conflict, and performance are related to physicians' perceived internal and external reward values, controlling for clinic attributes and physicians' background characteristics, and differences between the two clinic types are documented. Implications of the study results for potential conflict between outpatient care and academic aims in teaching hospitals are discussed and avenues of possible further research are suggested. PMID:4705214

  10. A Study to Evaluate the Cause of Bone Demineralization in Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Maclaran, Kate; Gabra, Hani; Agarwal, Roshan; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Taylor, Alexandra; Dhillo, Waljit S.; Panay, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between treatment for gynecological cancers and risk of osteoporosis has never been formally evaluated. Women treated for these cancers are now living longer than ever before, and prevention of treatment-induced morbidities is important. We aimed to distinguish, in gynecological cancer survivors, whether cancer therapy has additional detrimental effects on bone health above those attributable to hormone withdrawal. Methods. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan results from 105 women; 64 had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) followed by chemotherapy or radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies, and 41 age-matched women had undergone BSO for benign etiologies. All were premenopausal prior to surgery. Results. The median age at DEXA scan for the cancer group was 42 years, and 66% had received hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) following their cancer treatment. For the benign group, the median age was 40 years, and 87% had received HRT. Thirty-nine percent of cancer survivors had abnormal DEXA scan results compared to 15% of the control group, with the majority demonstrating osteopenia. The mean lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral densities (BMDs) were significantly lower in cancer patients. A history of gynecological cancer treatment was associated with significantly lower BMD in a multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions. Women treated for gynecological malignancies with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy have significantly lower BMDs than age-matched women who have undergone oophorectomy for noncancer indications. Prospective evaluation of BMD in gynecological cancer patients is recommended to facilitate interventions that will reduce the risk of subsequent fragility fractures. PMID:23363808

  11. [On the 100th anniversary of the Gynecology-Obstetrical Clinic in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Simić, S

    1994-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century the Viennese Gynecology-Obstetrics Clinics with professors Semmelweiss, Schauta, Wertheim created the synecology and obstetrics science in the scientific and professional world. Doz. Dr Otto Weiss was the first chief of the Gynecology and Obstetrics Department of the Regional Hospital (Landesspital) in Sarajevo. Direct and energetic in his manners, he introduced the Viennese clinics protocols in the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The well kept diseases histories are undoubtedly, of a high world level of the gynecological doctrine. Even now, in the library, one can find the well bound journals: Monatsschrift fur Geburtskunde, Archiv für Gynekologie (1869), American Journal of Obstetrics (1879). Dr Weiss had died in 1900, 15 chief doctors (primarius) applied for the job. All of them belonged to the clinics in Vienna, a fact speaking in favour of the attractiveness of the Department. In addition to the professional qualities the chief should master one of the Slavic languages. It was necessary, because, simultaneously, the midwives' school was organized to give a proper education, primarily to decrease mothers' mortality in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Later, the Department was headed by Dr Mikucki, Dr Bokonjić and Dr Bazala. The Gynecology Obstetrics Clinic was established in April, 1947, headed by Prof. Szabo. In April, 1960, the Gynecology Department was joined to the Clinic, had 320 beds. Afterwards, the Clinic was headed by Prof. Berić, Prof. Knezević, Prof. Simić and Prof. Idrizbegović. The Clinic with the Obstetrics (Secondary) School became a centre of staff education (various types)--Internship, specialization, postgraduate level, doctorship of the gynecological perinatal service of the Republic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752706

  12. Designing a Standardized Laparoscopy Curriculum for Gynecology Residents: A Delphi Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Eliane M.; Lefebvre, Guylaine G.; Husslein, Heinrich; Bjerrum, Flemming; Sorensen, Jette Led; Grantcharov, Teodor P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that simulation leads to improved operative skill, shorter operating room time, and better patient outcomes. Currently, no standardized laparoscopy curriculum exists for gynecology residents. Objective To design a structured laparoscopy curriculum for gynecology residents using Delphi consensus methodology. Methods This study began with Delphi methodology to determine expert consensus on the components of a gynecology laparoscopic skills curriculum. We generated a list of cognitive content, technical skills, and nontechnical skills for training in laparoscopic surgery, and asked 39 experts in gynecologic education to rate the items on a Likert scale (1–5) for inclusion in the curriculum. Consensus was predefined as Cronbach α of ≥ 0.80. We then conducted another Delphi survey with 9 experienced users of laparoscopic virtual reality simulators to delineate relevant curricular tasks. Finally, a cross-sectional design defined benchmark scores for all identified tasks, with 10 experienced gynecologic surgeons performing the identified tasks at basic, intermediate, and advanced levels. Results Consensus (Cronbach α = 0.85) was achieved in the first round of the curriculum Delphi, and after 2 rounds (Cronbach α = 0.80) in the virtual reality curriculum Delphi. Consensus was reached for cognitive, technical, and nontechnical skills as well as for 6 virtual reality tasks. Median time and economy of movement scores defined benchmarks for all tasks. Conclusions This study used Delphi consensus to develop a comprehensive curriculum for teaching gynecologic laparoscopy. The curriculum conforms to current educational standards of proficiency-based training, and is suggested as a standard in residency programs. PMID:26221434

  13. Association of hospital ownership with patient transfers to outpatient care under a prospective payment system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Herng-Ching; Xirasagar, Sudha; Kao, Senyeong

    2004-07-01

    Case payment, a prospective payment system akin to diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) has in-built incentives for hospitals to transfer inpatients to their own ambulatory care units following early discharge. This study used nation-wide inpatient claims data on a total of 100,730 patients treated in 2000 in (Taiwan): cesarean section (59,364 cases), femoral/inguinal hernia operation (18,675 cases), and hemorrhoidectomy (22,691 cases), all reimbursed by case payment, to explore the relationship between hospital ownership and patient transfers to outpatient treatment. For all three diagnoses, for-profit (FP) hospitals not only had lower lengths of stay (LOS) compared to public hospitals, but also showed very high odds of patient transfer to their own outpatient units, after controlling for institutional variables, (hospital level, teaching status, and geographic location), hospital competitive environment (the Herfindal-Hirschman index), and patient variables (gender, age, length of stay, and number of secondary diagnoses, a proxy for severity of illness). Similar, though slightly lower odds were observed with not-for-profit (NFP) hospitals relative to public hospitals. The findings support the property rights theory, suggesting that in Taiwan, institutional profit maximization motives may be driving patient transfers under the case payment diagnoses, rather than medical care needs. In NFP hospitals, their physician compensation mechanism, driven largely by care volumes provided by each physician, appears to be driving the disproportionately greater likelihood of patient transfer to outpatient care. PMID:15484603

  14. Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Gynecologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Yuquan; Huang, Yan; Yang, Yingli; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of a class of nuclear hormone receptors intimately involved in the regulation of expression of myriad genes that regulate energy metabolism, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Although originally discovered as a pivotal regulator of adipocyte differentiation, the roles that PPARγ plays in gynecological disorders are still unknown. There are a number of studies on the functions of PPARγ and its agonists in gynecological disorders. In this mini-review, we provide a brief summary of the advances in recent years. PMID:25987855

  15. The Emerging Role of PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Ponisio, Maria Rosana; Fowler, Kathryn J; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-10-01

    This article summarizes recent advances in PET/MR imaging in gynecologic cancers and the emerging clinical value of PET/MR imaging in the management of the 3 most common gynecologic malignancies: cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PET/MR imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast, improved assessment of primary tumor involvement because of high-resolution multiplanar reformats, and functional MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. This article discusses the challenges, future directions, and technical advances of PET/MR imaging, and the emerging new multimodality, multiparametric imaging techniques for integrating morphologic, functional, and molecular imaging data. PMID:27593247

  16. Role of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology: An updated survey of members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Lesley B.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Burke, William; Naumann, R. Wendel; Ring, Kari L.; Munsell, Mark F.; Frumovitz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the current patterns of use of minimally invasive surgical procedures, including traditional, robotic-assisted, and single-port laparoscopy, by Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) members and to compare the results to those of our 2004 and 2007 surveys. Methods SGO members were surveyed through an online or mailed-paper survey. Data were analyzed and compared with results of our prior surveys. Results Four hundred six (32%) of 1279 SGO members responded. Eighty-three percent of respondents (n = 337) performed traditional laparoscopic surgery (compared to 84% in 2004 and 91% in 2007). Ninety-seven percent of respondents performed robotic surgery (compared to 27% in 2007). When respondents were asked to indicate procedures that they performed with the robot but not with traditional laparoscopy, 75% indicated radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer. Overall, 70% of respondents indicated that hysterectomy and staging for uterine cancer was the procedure they most commonly performed with a minimally invasive approach. Only 17% of respondents who performed minimally invasive surgery performed single-port laparoscopy, and only 5% of respondents indicated that single-port laparoscopy has an important or very important role in the field. Conclusions Since our prior surveys, we found a significant increase in the overall use and indications for robotic surgery. Radical hysterectomy or trachelectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer and total hysterectomy and staging for endometrial cancer were procedures found to be significantly more appropriate for the robotic platform in comparison to traditional laparoscopy. The indications for laparoscopy have expanded beyond endometrial cancer staging to include surgical management of early-stage cervical and ovarian cancers, but the use of single-port laparoscopy remains limited. We also found that, since our 2007 survey, robotic surgical training significantly

  17. Outpatient Palliative Care for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Susan; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Rosenberg, Sharon R.; Kalhan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have well-documented symptoms that affect quality of life. Professional societies recommend palliative care for such patients, but the optimal way of delivering this care is unknown. Objective: To describe an outpatient palliative medicine program for patients with COPD. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting/Subjects: Thirty-six patients with COPD followed in a United States academic outpatient palliative medicine clinic. Measurements: Descriptive analysis of sociodemographic data, disease severity and comorbidities, treatments, hospitalizations, mortality, topic discussion, and symptom assessment. Results: Thirty-six patients (representing 5% of the total number of patients with COPD seen in a specialty pulmonary clinic) were seen over 11 months and followed for 2 years. Seventy-seven percent of patients were Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 3–4 and 72% were on oxygen at home. No patients had documented advanced directives at the initial visit but documentation increased to 61% for those who had follow-up appointments. The most commonly documented topics included symptoms (100%), social issues (94%), psychological issues (78%), and advance care planning (75%). Of symptoms assessed, pain was the least prevalent (51.6%), and breathlessness and fatigue were the most prevalent (100%). Symptoms were often undertreated prior to the palliative care appointment. During the 3-year study period, there were 120 hospital admissions (median, 2) and 12 deaths (33%). Conclusions: The patients with COPD seen in the outpatient palliative medicine clinic had many comorbid conditions, severe illness, and significant symptom burden. Many physical and psychological symptoms were untreated prior to the palliative medicine appointment. Whether addressing these symptoms through a palliative medicine intervention affects outcomes in COPD is unknown but represents an

  18. Strategies for the modification of risk factors in gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Benedet, J L; Cabero-Roura, L

    2002-01-01

    Strategies to modify risk for female or gynecological cancers will vary with our knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, and specific molecular mechanisms for each individual cancer. In general, cancer preventive strategies have been divided into primary and secondary prevention with primary prevention directed toward the causative factors for a disease. Secondary prevention is classically used in cervical cancer cytology screening programs and is essentially an attempt to identify individuals in a population with preclinical phases of the disease where intervention will impact mortality the most. A vast literature has evolved regarding the epidemiology of most of the common cancers in women. While the specific molecular mechanisms are not completely understood at this time knowledge of contributing factors for many of these tumors is well known. The association of cigarette smoking with lung cancer has been well established and the increasing rates of lung cancer, particularly in women, are directly linked to the increasing number of female smokers in the population. Indeed in many western countries lung cancer deaths have overtaken breast cancer as the most common cause of death from malignant disease in women. Excessive sun exposure without adequate skin protection is another lifestyle activity that is related to the high incidence of skin cancer in certain areas. Epidemiologically, cervical cancer has been studied extensively with the current data indicating a causal role of exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly at an early age in this disease. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndromes are well understood and as more information on human genomics becomes available a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of these diseases will be possible and hopefully will result in effective strategies for their control. Unfortunately, in spite of the vast knowledge that is available regarding risk factors for many of these

  19. Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus in a Gynecological Surgery Setting

    PubMed Central

    Massari, Marco; Petrosillo, Nicola; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Solforosi, Laura; Bonazzi, Lucio; Clementi, Massimo; Manzin, Aldo

    2001-01-01

    A cluster of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among gynecological patients who underwent surgical intervention in the same setting is described. An epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the cases, the likely source of infection, and the route of transmission. Four recent HCV infections were identified. Based on molecular fingerprinting analysis and epidemiological investigation, transmission between the putative source patient (an HCV-positive woman who was the first patient of the surgical session) and outbreak patients was highly suggestive. All patients, including the source patient, were infected with HCV type 1b. Molecular characterization of HCV clones by sequence analysis of both structural envelope regions (20 clones from the source patient and 58 from the outbreak patients) and the nonstructural NS5 region of the viral genome (12 clones from the source patient and 32 from the outbreak patients) showed close homology between the viral isolates from the source and those from the outbreak patients that was higher than that observed between the viral isolates from the source and those from four unrelated, HCV type 1b-infected patients from the same geographical area (in the latter case, 33 clones were sequenced for the envelope regions and 30 were sequenced for the NS5 region). The mean percent divergence between clones was 4.69 for the envelope and 3.71 for the NS5 region in the source patient and the outbreak patients compared with 6.76 (P = 0.001) and 5.22 (P = 0.01) in the source patient and control patients, respectively. Among the risk factors investigated, only that of having undergone surgery in the morning session of the same day reached statistical significance (P = 0.003). The investigation showed that the source patient and outbreak patients shared only the administration of propofol in multidose vials. The study documents the risk of nosocomial transmission of HCV and the importance of infection control procedures in the

  20. The Changing Scenario of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Natasha; Dragovic, Kristina; Trester, Richard; Blankstein, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant changes have been noted in aspects of obstetrics-gynecology (ob-gyn) training over the last decade, which is reflected in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative case logs for graduating ob-gyn residents. Objective We sought to understand the changing trends of ob-gyn residents' experience in obstetric procedures over the past 11 years. Methods We analyzed national ACGME procedure logs for all obstetric procedures recorded by 12 728 ob-gyn residents who graduated between academic years 2002–2003 and 2012–2013. Results The average number of cesarean sections per resident increased from 191.8 in 2002–2003 to 233.4 in 2012–2013 (17%; P < .001; 95% CI −47.769 to −35.431), the number of vaginal deliveries declined from 320.8 to 261 (18.6%; P < .001; 95% CI 38.842–56.35), the number of forceps deliveries declined from 23.8 to 8.4 (64.7%; P < .001; 95% CI 14.061–16.739), and the number of vacuum deliveries declined from 23.8 to 17.6 (26%; P < .001; 95% CI 5.043–7.357). Between 2002–2003 and 2007–2008, amniocentesis decreased from 18.5 to 11 (P < .001, 95% CI 6.298–8.702), and multifetal vaginal deliveries increased from 10.8 to 14 (P < .001, 95% CI −3.895 to −2.505). Both were not included in ACGME reporting after 2008. Conclusions Ob-gyn residents' training experience changed substantially over the past decade. ACGME obstetric logs demonstrated decreases in volume of vaginal, forceps, and vacuum deliveries, and increases in cesarean and multifetal deliveries. Change in experience may require use of innovative strategies to help improve residents' basic obstetric skills. PMID:26457146

  1. Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in Paediatric Outpatients in Northern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the paediatric outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…

  2. Outpatient Assessment of Neurovisual Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barca, Laura; Cappelli, Francesca R.; Di Giulio, Paola; Staccioli, Susanna; Castelli, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of the Atkinson Battery for Child Development for Examining Functional Vision (Atkinson, Anker, Rae, et al., 2002) to evaluate neurovisual functions of children with neurodevelopmental disorders in outpatient setting. A total of 90 patients underwent a comprehensive evaluation. Among these, a group of 33…

  3. Outpatient treatment of uncomplicated diverticulitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Grande, Luis; Pera, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Acute diverticulitis occurs in up to 25% of patients with diverticulosis. The majority of cases are mild or uncomplicated and it has become a frequent reason for consultation in the emergency department. On the basis of the National Inpatient Sample database from the USA, 86% of patients admitted with diverticulitis were treated with medical therapy. However, several recent studies have shown that outpatient treatment with antibiotics is safe and effective. The aim of this systematic review is to update the evidence published in the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. We performed a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines and searched in MEDLINE and Cochrane databases all English-language articles on the management of acute diverticulitis using the following search terms: 'diverticulitis', 'outpatient', and 'uncomplicated'. Data were extracted independently by two investigators. A total of 11 articles for full review were yielded: one randomized controlled trial, eight prospective cohort studies, and two retrospective cohort studies. Treatment successful rate on an outpatient basis, which means that no further complications were reported, ranged from 91.5 to 100%. Fewer than 8% of patients were readmitted in the hospital. Intolerance to oral intake and lack of family or social support are common exclusion criteria used for this approach, whereas severe comorbidities are not definitive exclusion criteria in all the studies. Ambulatory treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis is safe, effective, and economically efficient when applying an appropriate selection in most reviewed studies. PMID:26891198

  4. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  5. Laparoscopic Greater Curve Plication as an Outpatient Weight Loss Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Ilvia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic greater curve plication is emerging as a weight loss procedure that avoids many of the complications of other surgeries that require gastrointestinal division, amputation, or use of a foreign body. Cost savings and affordability have also been promoted, as plication does not require the use of stapling devices, adjustable gastric bands, or prolonged hospitalization. The ability to predictably perform plication as an outpatient surgery may further define its role as a therapeutic option for treating morbid obesity. We present the 30-day outcomes and supplementary 12-month data in a series of 141 laparoscopic greater curve plication surgeries performed as outpatient procedures. Methods: Laparoscopic greater curve plication was performed as outpatient surgery in 141 consecutive patients. Outcomes including perioperative complications, incidental 12-month follow-up for weight loss, and change in diabetic and hypertensive medication are reported. Results: Of the 141 plications performed, 138 patients were discharged from the recovery room and 6 were readmitted. There was no conversion to open surgery and no mortality. Conclusions: The ability to reliably perform greater curve plication as an outpatient surgery may further define its role as an additional weight loss surgery technique. PMID:26508824

  6. Evidence-Based Practice for Outpatient Clinical Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This column focuses on evidence-based practice (EBP) within multidisciplinary outpatient settings, but first provides some definitions. Besides EBP (Burns and Hoagwood, 2005; Guyatt and Rennie, 2002), there are also evidence-based medicine (EBM; March et al., 2005), evidence-based service (EBS; Chorpita et al., 2002), and evidence-based treatment…

  7. Effectiveness of Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in a Clinical Outpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Elisabeth Kuhn; Tiellet Nunes, Maria Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of child psychoanalytic psychotherapy in a clinical outpatient setting in a city in southern Brazil. Three psychological tests (Rorschach, Bender and WISC III) were administered to 23 children, aged 6-11 years old, and the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) was completed by the parents. All…

  8. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and…

  9. [Prevention of complications of colonic diverticular disease in outpatient practice].

    PubMed

    Levchenko, S V; Komissarenko, I A; Lazebnik, L B

    2016-01-01

    The literature review gives an update on the frequency and risk factors of complications of colonic diverticular disease, the results of recent investigations, which suggest the success and safety of outpatient treatment for uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. It evaluates the efficacy of pharmacological agents from different groups in preventing complications of colonic diverticular disease. PMID:27014782

  10. Azacitidine in outpatient treatment – single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Stefanko, Ewa; Bogucka-Fedorczuk, Aleksandra; Butrym, Aleksandra; Poręba, Rafał; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Wróbel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent which is used in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes, acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Because of good tolerance to the drug, azacitidine can be administered both during hospitalization and in an outpatient setting. The aim of our retrospective analysis was to assess the efficacy of azacitidine treatment in patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome and with acute myeloid leukemia who had received treatment in hospital and in an ambulatory care setting. Offsets in the course of azacitidine administration and discontinuations of treatment have a negative impact on patients’ response to the therapy. Material and methods The study included 31 patients. Sixteen patients received azacitidine in an ambulatory care setting, 15 patients within their hospitalization. Results A hematologic response was achieved in 48% of the patients. Forty-one percent of the cycles were delayed. In an outpatient setting, 62% of the cycles were administered systematically, while during hospitalization the patients received 54% of cycles on time. Administrative problems caused the delay of 26% of the cycles. Conclusions Azacitidine has a high tolerance level and a high safety profile which allows for its use in an outpatient care setting. Outpatient administration of azacitidine is feasible and safe without compromising efficacy. PMID:26843844

  11. Initiation of lactation and establishing relactation in outpatients.

    PubMed

    Banapurmath, Shobha; Banapurmath, C R; Kesaree, Nirmala

    2003-04-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate whether mothers with babies less than 6 weeks of age can be helped to initiate or establish lactation in outpatient department. One thousand mothers with babies less than 6 weeks of age who completed 10 days of follow-up in outpatient have been analyzed. Mothers who had either stopped breastfeeding or were not able to initiate breastfeeding were helped with establishing lactation at outpatient clinic. Sick babies and mothers having breast problem and systemic illness were excluded. 91.6% of mothers succeeded in establishing lactation within 10 days. 83.4% mothers achieved complete lactation and 8.2% of mothers achieved partial lactation in 10 days. However, 8.4% of mothers could not be helped in this study. They had to be hospitalized because of various reasons. It is possible to help majority of mothers with lactation difficulties at the outpatient when the baby is less than 6 weeks of age. Helping mothers with proper attachment at the breast appears to be crucial for success. PMID:12736408

  12. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  13. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 1712(b) and 38 CFR 17.93 to the extent prescribed and in accordance with the applicable classification... of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... outpatient dental treatment. 17.161 Section 17.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...

  14. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 1712(b) and 38 CFR 17.93 to the extent prescribed and in accordance with the applicable classification... of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... outpatient dental treatment. 17.161 Section 17.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...

  15. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 1712(b) and 38 CFR 17.93 to the extent prescribed and in accordance with the applicable classification... of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... outpatient dental treatment. 17.161 Section 17.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...

  16. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  17. Efficacy of promethazine suppositories dispensed to outpatient surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. D.; Jilka, J.; Gentry, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting frequently complicate outpatient anesthesia and surgery. The duration of treatment for this complication must occasionally extend beyond discharge from the hospital. In this study, we evaluated the commonly used anti-emetic promethazine for its efficacy in the post-discharge period. Adult outpatient surgical patients who had excessive postoperative nausea and vomiting in the recovery room, or who were at risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting following discharge were given two promethazine suppositories (25 mg) for home use. All patients were contacted by our recovery room nurses on the first business day after their surgery and questioned as to their use of the suppositories and, if used, their efficacy. We found that 55 percent of patients given promethazine suppositories for home use had nausea and vomiting in the post-discharge period. Of the patients given promethazine, 89 percent used the suppositories. All of these patients reported improvement in their symptoms following use of the suppositories. None reported adverse effects from the promethazine suppositories. In conclusion, we found promethazine suppositories to be an inexpensive and efficacious treatment for nausea and vomiting in adult outpatient surgical patients following discharge from the hospital. Side-effects were minimal, and our patients voiced no complaints about this mode of therapy. We recommend this therapy for treatment of nausea and vomiting after hospital discharge following adult outpatient surgery. PMID:10527366

  18. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  19. Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Process Scale: A Replication with Adult Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windholz, Michael J.; Silberschatz, George

    1988-01-01

    Replicated two earlier studies undertaken by the Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Research Group to investigate relation between process and outcome of brief psychotherapy. Rated audiotaped segments of 38 brief psychodynamic psychotherapies with adult outpatients. Found significant correlations between therapist ratings of outcome and two process…

  20. Dysfunctional Attitudes and Suicidal Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Self-Concept Test (BST), and Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) to 908 psychiatric outpatients. Found that none of DAS subscales discriminated ideators and nonideators or was significantly related to SSI total scores of suicide ideators after…

  1. Patient Satisfaction in Malaysia's Busiest Outpatient Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Perianayagam, Wilson; Abdul Manaf, Rizal; Ali Jadoo, Saad Ahmed; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly “technical quality” and “accessibility and convenience,” but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the “time spent with doctor,” “interpersonal manners,” and “communication” during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction. PMID:25654133

  2. Outpatient Treatment of Primary Anorexia Nervosa in Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziesat, Harold A., Jr.; Ferguson, James M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three cases of adult-onset primary anorexia nervosa in males. For each case, the history and diagnostic patterns are considered, followed by a discussion of the course of outpatient treatment. The therapy was multimodal and included elements of behavioral contingency management, cognitive therapy, and dynamic psychotherapy. (JAC)

  3. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy. PMID:27210089

  4. [Follow-up of patients at home after outpatient surgery].

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The patient's discharge and return home are important stages in outpatient surgery. In addition to the call the following day and the support of a family caregiver, a visit by a private practice nurse and a healthcare network can offer extra safeguards. PMID:25065192

  5. Patient satisfaction in Malaysia's busiest outpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Perianayagam, Wilson; Manaf, Rizal Abdul; Jadoo, Saad Ahmed Ali; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly "technical quality" and "accessibility and convenience," but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the "time spent with doctor," "interpersonal manners," and "communication" during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction. PMID:25654133

  6. ADHD Prevalence in Adult Outpatients with Nonpsychotic Psychiatric Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida Montes, Luis Guillermo; Hernandez Garcia, Ana Olivia; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of ADHD in the general adult population has been estimated to be about 4.4%. However, few studies exist in which the prevalence of ADHD in psychiatric adult outpatient samples has been estimated. These studies suggest that the prevalence is higher than in the general population. The objective of this study is to estimate…

  7. Resident Physicians' Perspectives on Effective Outpatient Teaching: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisiel, John B.; Bundrick, John B.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Learning theories, which suggest that experienced faculty use collaborative teaching styles, are reflected in qualitative studies of learners in hospital settings. However, little research has used resident focus groups to explore characteristics of successful teachers in outpatient clinics. Therefore, focus group discussions with first through…

  8. Behavioral Treatments During Outpatient Methadone Maintenance: A Controlled Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, George; And Others

    The Treatment Evaluation Project was established to evaluate the feasibility of using behavioral treatment in conjunction with methadone maintenance to improve the effectiveness of methadone treatment. Over 100 outpatients were accepted into treatment and randomly assigned to one of four behavioral treatment modalities in addition to the usual…

  9. Gynecological diseases in rural India: A critical appraisal of indications and route of surgery along with histopathology correlation of 922 women undergoing major gynecological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chanderdeep; Sharma, Manupriya; Raina, Rashmi; Soni, Anjali; Chander, Bal; Verma, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to generate baseline data for indications of gynecological surgeries, and to assess route of surgery and histopathology correlation in women undergoing major gynecological surgery in a rural tertiary level teaching hospital in India. Materials and Methods: Surgical indications, route of surgery and histopathology findings were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively, in 922 patients (≥35 years age) who underwent gynecological surgery at Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College, Kangra, Himachal Pradesh, India from January 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013. Results: Of 922 surgeries, 65 had malignancy (7%). Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) (32.3%) and leiomyoma uterus (29%) were two most common benign indications for hysterectomy. Ovarian tumors were present in 13% (25% of these were malignant). Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) was seen in 5.5% (55% of these were malignant). Conclusions: All except 10% surgeries were done in the absence of definite histopathology diagnosis that is dysfunctional uterine bleeding (n = 42 [45%]), chronic pelvic pain/severe dysmenorrhea (n = 34 [36%]) and recurrent PMB (n = 17 [19%]). Majority of surgeries had histopathological correlation except for six cases (0.6%) of malignancy, which were missed on initial work-up. Majority of the surgeries were done abdominally. In rural areas of developing countries poverty, lack of regular follow-up, resource constraints and lack of technical skills (with respect to laparoscopic/robotic surgeries) pose major challenge in providing quality health care. PMID:24970982

  10. Can we see more outpatients without more doctors?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle L; Leslie, Stephen J; McInnes, Gordon K; McCormac, Kathleen; Peden, Norman R

    2003-07-01

    A reduction in the number of return patients attending general cardiology clinics, if achievable without harm, would improve access for newly referred patients. Outpatient clinic letters (525) sent to general practitioners over a three-month period were reviewed. Simultaneously, physicians' opinions were collected by questionnaire. A subset of 30 clinic patients who attended three local general practitioners were studied to identify how many were assessed in primary care, and how often, in a six-month period. The hospital records of these patients were reviewed to determine whether information about these visits to the general practitioner was documented in the hospital notes. From the outpatient clinics the discharge rates were only 26% and the reason for further clinic review was often not clear. The fact that many patients had no intervention or treatment change performed at the clinic (42%) indicates that patients are reviewed to assess symptom change rather than to receive further interventions. The use of fixed times for review appointment (six months or 1 year) suggests that the intervals are determined by habit rather than clinical indication. A high proportion of patients (28/30) were reviewed at least once in primary care by general practitioners between hospital clinic visits and 20/30 were seen three or more times. There was poor documentation of these consultations in the hospital case notes, and so hospital physicians may be unaware that symptoms are under regular review in primary care. This study suggests that a substantial proportion of current cardiology return outpatients do not require regular outpatient review. However, alternative management demands good communication and exchange of information between secondary and primary care, development of formal written discharge planning in outpatient letters and other forms of follow-up. PMID:12835445

  11. Intensive OutPatient Therapy for Clergy Burnout: How Much Difference Can a Week Make?

    PubMed

    Muse, Stephen; Love, Milton; Christensen, Kyle

    2016-02-01

    A pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental matched pairs design was used to assess the effectiveness of a week-long multi-therapist intensive outpatient intervention process with clergy suffering from depression and burnout. Participants (n = 23) in the "Clergy in Kairos" program of the Pastoral Institute (Muse in J Pastor Care Couns 61(3):183-195, 2007) constituted the experimental variable. Clergy surveyed from United Methodist and Presbyterian denominations (n = 121) provided a control group from which 23 respondents were selected whose pre-test scores in depression and burnout were statistically equivalent to those in the experimental group. The treatment group consisted of clergy from three denominations who self-selected (or in some cases were referred by denominational officials) into the program. At the outset, clergy in both groups reported equivalent levels of conflict, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and depression. At the 6-months follow-up, clergy in the experimental group showed significant improvement of depression, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization scores. By contrast, there was no change in the burnout and depression scores in the control group at 6-months post-test. Findings suggest the usefulness of a week-long multi-therapist intensive outpatient intervention in reducing burnout and depression. PMID:25682015

  12. A Posterior TAP Block Provides More Effective Analgesia Than a Lateral TAP Block in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Sakatoshi; Ueshima, Hironobu; Sakai, Ryomi; Otake, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are a few papers that compared the lateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with the posterior TAP block. Our study aimed to compare retrospectively the quality of analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery using the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia versus the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia. Method. Sixty-seven adult female patients were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, thirty-four patients received the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia (lat. TAP group), and the rest of thirty-three patients received the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia (pos. TAP group). Pain scores both at rest and at movement and the use of additional analgesic drugs were recorded in the postoperative care unit within twenty-four hours after the operation. Postoperative complications were noted. Results. Patients who received pos. TAP reported lower visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in all points, within twenty-four hours after the operation, than patients who received lat. TAP. Moreover, with the use of additional analgesic drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting during the first twenty-four hours after surgery was lower in the pos. TAP group than in the lat. TAP group. Conclusion. The posterior TAP block provided more effective analgesia than the lateral TAP block in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:26941794

  13. Are the CMS Hospital Outpatient Quality Measures Relevant for Rural Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Prasad, Shailendra; Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Context: Quality measures focused on outpatient settings are of increasing interest to policy makers, but little research has been conducted on hospital outpatient quality measures, especially in rural settings. Purpose: To evaluate the relevance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) outpatient quality measures for rural hospitals,…

  14. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  15. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment...

  16. 38 CFR 17.36 - Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital and outpatient care to veterans. 17.36 Section 17.36 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...—provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans. (a) Enrollment requirement for veterans. (1) Except... agreed to make any applicable copayment is eligible for VA hospital and outpatient care as provided...

  17. 38 CFR 17.36 - Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital and outpatient care to veterans. 17.36 Section 17.36 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...—provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans. (a) Enrollment requirement for veterans. (1) Except... agreed to make any applicable copayment is eligible for VA hospital and outpatient care as provided...

  18. 42 CFR 414.1105 - Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) Services § 414.1105 Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services. (a)...

  19. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  20. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  1. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  2. 42 CFR 413.198 - Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient maintenance dialysis. 413.198 Section 413.198 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 413.198 Recordkeeping and cost reporting requirements for outpatient maintenance dialysis. (a) Purpose... will enable CMS to determine the costs incurred in furnishing outpatient maintenance dialysis...

  3. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  4. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  5. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  6. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  7. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  8. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  9. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  10. Factors Associated with Deliberate Self-Harm Behaviour among Depressed Adolescent Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuisku, Virpi; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Ruuttu, Titta; Marttunen, Mauri

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether depressed adolescent outpatients with deliberate self-harm behaviour (DSH) differed from non-suicidal depressed adolescent outpatients in depressive and anxiety symptoms, alcohol use, perceived social support and number of negative life-events. Depressed adolescent outpatients (n = 155) aged 13-19 years were interviewed…

  11. Factors that Affect Treatment Expectations of Outpatients with Substance Use Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raylu, Namrata; Kaur, Inderjit

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed treatment expectations (TE) of outpatients with substance use problems as well as factors that affect their TE. Participants were 200 outpatients presenting at three community based substance abuse treatment services. Results of general linear modelling analyses showed that outpatients with substance use problems have higher…

  12. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  13. Prevalence of Burnout in residents of obstetrics and gynecology: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Yousef; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Yazdandoost, Maryam; Atrak, Shahla; Kashanian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burnout is currently a major concern among physicians due to their high level of stress at work. There are several reports on various levels of burnout in residency programs due to several predisposing factors. The aim of this systematic review was to estimate a more precise prevalence of burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus were searched to identify peer-reviewed Englishlanguage studies published from January 1974 to 2005 reporting burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. The key words used in the search were as follows: Residents, gynecology and obstetrics, professional burnout, depersonalization, distress, anxiety, or emotional exhaustion. Relevant additional articles were identified from the lists of the retrieved articles. Results: We identified 12 studies which met our criteria. A total of 2509 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The overall prevalence rate of burnout on all the three subscales was 44% (95% CI: 30 - 57) in this group of residents. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a high prevalence of burnout syndrome in residents during obstetrics and gynecology residency program. Therefore, it is recommended to consider and address this important issue to develop solutions and interventions which could improve the work condition of the medical residents. PMID:26793673

  14. Investigating Compliance with Standard Precautions During Residency Physicians in Gynecology and Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Milton Jorge; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir; Lam, Simon Ching; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Physician compliance with standard precautions is important in the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics because of the high frequency of invasive procedures. The current study investigated compliance with standard precautions among resident physicians working in gynecology and obstetrics. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among resident physicians in gynecology and obstetrics in their first (R1), second (R2) and third (R3) years of residency at a teaching hospital in a city in São Paulo. A structured questionnaire that included demographic and professional aspects and the Standard Precautions Adherence Scale were used to collect data. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM® SPSS version 20. Ethical aspects were considered. RESULTS: Fifty-eight resident physicians participated in the study. Of the enrolled participants, 27 (46.6%) were in R1, 12 (20.7%) were in R2 and 19 (32.8%) were in R3. The standard precautions compliance score was 4.1, which was classified as intermediate. There were no significant differences in the compliance scores of the resident physicians across the three years of residency (H=2.34, p=0.310). CONCLUSION: Compliance with standard precautions among resident physicians was intermediate. Preventive measures in clinical practice are not fully adopted in the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics. More important, many professionals claimed lack of sufficient training in standard precautions in the workplace. Such circumstances should draw the attention of hospital management with regard to occupational health risks. PMID:27464295

  15. The case for HER2/neu as a therapeutic target for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Goyne, Hannah E; Cannon, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Evaluation of: Guzzo F, Bellone S, Buza N et al. HER2/neu as a potential target for immunotherapy in gynecological carcinosarcomas. Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol. 31, 211-221 (2012). Trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)) is a human monoclonal antibody that is US FDA-approved for the treatment of HER2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer and metastatic gastric cancer. HER2/neu expression has also been observed in other malignancies, notably in subsets of endometrial and ovarian cancers, raising the possibility that trastuzumab may be a viable treatment option in these settings. The current paper reveals that HER2/neu may also be expressed in gynecologic carcinosarcomas, which are rare but aggressive tumors with a high rate of resistance to chemotherapy. Cell lines derived from ovarian carcinosarcomas expressed HER2/neu and were sensitive to trastuzumab ADCC. By contrast, cell lines derived from uterine carcinosarcomas were HER2/neu-negative and insensitive to trastuzumab ADCC. These observations indicate that at least a subset of gynecologic carcinosarcoma patients may benefit from trastuzumab treatment. However, trastuzumab monotherapy typically has relatively low response rates, which in part may be related to impaired NK cell function in patients with advanced disease. Accordingly, treatments that boost NK cell activity may improve response rates to trastuzumab treatment, not only for gynecologic carcinosarcomas, but also for other HER2/neu-positive malignancies. PMID:22947006

  16. Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention versus Supportive Counseling for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas; Winkel, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were…

  17. Use of an Information Retrieval Service in an Obstetrics/Gynecology Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gunning, John E.

    1980-01-01

    A program that uses the clinical librarian as a member of the patient care team has been developed by an obstetrics and gynecology department of a university medical center to keep faculty and hospital house staff knowledgeable about current developments and research. Program objectives, methodology, costs, evaluation, and information utilization…

  18. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  19. Introductory Course in Biomedical Ethics in the Obstetrics-Gynecology Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    Information used in a brief lecture that introduces a biomedical ethics curriculum in an obstetrics and gynecology residency is described. Major components include theories of philosophic ethics (formalist and consequentialist) and principles of biomedical ethics (honesty, contract-keeping, nonmaleficence, justice, autonomy, beneficence,…

  20. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  1. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  2. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  3. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  4. 21 CFR 884.4530 - Obstetric-gynecologic specialized manual instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... umbilical cord. (4) A uterine curette is an instrument used to scrape and remove material from the uterus... cervical os by stretching the cervix. (6) A uterine elevator is an instrument inserted into the uterus used to lift and manipulate the uterus. (7) A gynecological surgical forceps is an instrument with...

  5. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  6. Advances in clinical research in gynecologic radiation oncology: an RTOG symposium.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, David; Mundt, Arno; Schwarz, Julie; Eifel, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    There have been inexorable improvements in gynecologic radiation oncology through technologically advances, 3-dimensional imaging, and clinical research. Investment in these 3 critical areas has improved, and will continue to improve, the lives of patients with gynecologic cancer. Advanced technology delivery in gynecologic radiation oncology is challenging owing to the following: (1) setup difficulties, (2) managing considerable internal organ motion, and (3) responding to tumor volume reduction during treatment. Image guidance is a potential route to solve these problems and improve delivery to tumor and sparing organs at risk. Imaging with positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are contributing significantly to improved accuracy in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in cancer of the cervix. Functional imaging by exploiting tumor biology may improve prognosis and treatment. Clinical trials have been the greatest mechanism to improve and establish standards of care in women with vulvar, endometrial, and cervical cancer. There have been multiple technological advances and practice changing trials within the past several decades. Many important questions remain in optimizing care for women with gynecologic malignancies. The performance of clinical trials will be advanced with the use of consistent language (ie, similar staging system and criteria), eligibility criteria that fit the research question, end points that matter, adequate statistical power, complete follow-up, and prompt publication of mature results. PMID:22398709

  7. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. PMID:26697822

  8. [Gender stereotypes in gynecology and obstetrics: obstacles for young male physicians?].

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara

    2003-10-01

    Up to the mid 1990s, a 'feminization' of medicine took place that was especially pronounced in the field of gynecology. The present paper looks into the reasons for this change based on the literature and results from a study conducted by the author. In 2001, two thirds of the new qualifications in gynecology/obstetrics were awarded to women. The feminist movement has led to the emancipation of women and the assertion that women should be treated by female doctors only. Parallel to this development, gender roles also underwent a change: nowadays, the ideal woman or man is 'androgynous'. Young physicians are both highly instrumental and highly expressive. The increasing similarities between the sexes exert an influence on lifestyle and biographical planning. An increasing number of young physicians no longer prioritize their profession. Male physicians with high expressiveness are often family oriented and consciously refrain from choosing to specialize in gynecology/obstetrics because of the long hours and heavy workload. On the other hand, quite a few women physicians are more instrumental and prioritize their professional commitment. If more male physicians are not attracted into gynecology/obstetrics over the next few years, a process of 'horizontal segregation' could occur, with women physicians accomplishing the patient-focused work while their male colleagues take over the surgery and scientific part of the specialty. It is the very differences between the sexes, however, and the exchange between them, which allow a medical discipline to thrive. PMID:14526155

  9. Female Patient and Physician Communication and Discussion of Gynecological Health Care Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeless, Virginia Eman

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that a female patient's trust in, receptivity to, and communication apprehension regarding her physician constitute significant predictors of her (1) likelihood of discussing health care issues, (2) knowledge of gynecological health needs, and (3) feelings toward the gynecologist during examination. Finds that the physician's gender does…

  10. Using buprenorphine for outpatient opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Manlandro, James J

    2007-09-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) was established to create a new paradigm for medication-assisted treatment of persons with opiate addiction in the United States. Before enactment of DATA 2000, the use of opioid medications to treat patients with opioid addiction was permissible only in federally approved treatment programs, ie, "methadone clinics." The only medications permitted were Schedule II drugs (eg, methadone hydrochloride and l-alpha-acetylmethadol [LAAM]), which could only be dispensed, not prescribed. Under provisions of DATA 2000, qualified physicians in a medical office and other appropriate settings outside the opioid treatment program system may prescribe and/or dispense Schedule III, IV, and V opioid medications for treating persons with opioid addiction if such medications have been specifically approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for that indication. Opioid addiction treatment programs were commonly known as methadone clinics. Such programs now may also dispense buprenorphine hydrochloride and the buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone combination. PMID:17908825

  11. Internalizing the impossible: anorexic outpatients' experiences with women's beauty and fashion magazines.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, S R; McCoy, J K; Williams, M

    2001-01-01

    A growing body of research has linked the readership of women's beauty and fashion magazines with the development and perpetuation of anorexic behaviors in some young women. Although we know the link exists, little is known about the actual cognitive processes and the ways in which at risk women "use" these magazines to internalize the impossible thin ideal that appears to drive the illness. To understand this phenomenon and the process of internalization in greater depth, the authors conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 28 outpatients at an eating disorder treatment facility in the western United States. Using a grounded theory approach, the authors' analysis provides a detailed description drawn from the patients' personal accounts of how the magazines have influenced their lives and eating-disordered behaviors. PMID:16864373

  12. Cancer patients’ use of pharmaceutical patient assistance programs in the outpatient pharmacy at a large tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Tisha M.; Lal, Lincy S.; Bennett, Charles L.; Hung, Frank; Franzini, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report on the use of pharmaceutical patient assistance programs (PAPs) in the outpatient pharmacy at the largest tertiary cancer center in the United States. Methods We conducted a retrospective (July 1, 2006–Dec 31,2007) cross-sectional analysis of outpatient pharmacy, medical, and cancer registry records at the cancer center. The cancer center identified 104 medications available through PAPs. Study-eligible patients received at least one of these medications, either as a PAP case patient or as a PAP control non-user. Binary logit regression models predicted PAP use, and descriptive statistics compared PAP user and non-user medication fills. Results Of 25,552 cancer patients at who received an outpatient medication during the study period, 1,929 met study criteria (n=950 PAP users, 979 PAP non-users). In comparison to controls, PAP users were more likely to be uninsured (odds ratio (OR)=4.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.118, 9.970), indigent (OR=16.95, 95% CI: 6.845, 41.960), and < 65 years old (OR=2.31, 95% CI: 1.517, 3.509). Of the most frequently dispensed medications to PAP users from PAPs (n=5,271), 88% (n=4,936) were for supportive care (e.g., nausea/vomiting). PAPs provided 35% (n=842) of the most common anticancer agents administered to PAP users (n=1,296), accounting for a monthly mean of $55,000 in pharmaceutical expenditures. Conclusions In the cancer center’s outpatient pharmacy, PAPs provided financial support for about a third of the most commonly used therapies, primarily for supportive care indications, for a small percentage of eligible cancer patients. PMID:22879815

  13. Outpatient palliative care effectiveness: both patients and caregivers can gain.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina

    2013-10-01

    Outpatient palliative care services are increasing in their effectiveness worldwide, because they can better focus on both patients' and caregivers' needs at all stages of the disease requiring this type of interventions. This was demonstrated before by various studies that,however, were performed mostly on patients with malignancies and thatyielded encouraging results about the severity of the symptoms and about the burden of care in the caregivers. In this analysis performed on a mixture of patients with malignant and nonmalignant diseases, Groh et al. demonstrate that the outpatient team intervention was able to reduce the severity of symptoms such as pain or digestive symptoms and were able to minimize the burden of care of the primary caregivers. PMID:24138644

  14. Outpatient Mental Health Services in Mozambique: Use and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Bradley H; Cumbe, Vasco; Raunig-Berhó, Manuela; Rao, Deepa; Kohrt, Brandon A; Stergachis, Andy; Napúa, Manuel; Sherr, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    To describe current outpatient mental health service use and treatments in Mozambique, the authors reviewed registry entries for 2,071 outpatient psychiatric visits at the Beira Central Hospital in Sofala Province from January 2012 to September 2014. Service use was most common for schizophrenia, followed by epilepsy, delirium, and organic behavioral disorders. Only 3% of consultations for schizophrenia were first-visit patients. Treatment seeking among women was more likely for mood and neurotic disorders and less likely for substance use disorders and epilepsy. First-generation antipsychotics, most often paired with promethazine, dominated treatment regimens. Evidence-based reforms are needed to improve identification of mood disorders and broaden care beyond severe mental disorders. PMID:26828400

  15. Childhood maltreatment in adult female psychiatric outpatients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Fosse, Gunilla Klensmeden; Holen, Are

    2006-11-01

    To explore possible relations between maltreatment in childhood and subsequent eating disorders in adult life, 107 consecutive adult psychiatric female outpatients were screened for eating disorders. They also completed questionnaires about harassment by adults and bullying by peers in childhood. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire measured childhood abuse by parents or other adults, and the Parental Bonding Instrument captured parental coldness and overprotection. Bullying by peers was measured by an inventory used in schools. Outpatients who met the criteria for bulimia nervosa reported far more bullying by peers, more coldness and overprotection from fathers, and more childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse. The findings suggest associations between childhood maltreatment, especially bullying by peers, and bulimia nervosa. PMID:17056418

  16. Impact of Animal-Assisted Therapy for Outpatients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Dawn A.; Bernstein, Cheryl D.; Constantin, Janet M.; Kunkel, Frank A.; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Animal-assisted therapy using dogs trained to be calm and provide comfort to strangers has been used as a complementary therapy for a range of medical conditions. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits for fibromyalgia patients attending a tertiary outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. Design Open-label with waiting room control Setting Tertiary care, university-based, outpatient pain management clinic Subjects A convenience sample of fibromyalgia patients was obtained through advertisements posted in the clinic. Interventions Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Outcome measures Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Results Data were evaluated from 106 therapy dog visits and 49 waiting room controls, with no significant between-group demographic differences in participants. Average intervention duration was 12 minutes for the therapy dog visit and 17 minutes for the waiting room control. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control. Clinically meaningful pain relief (≥2 points pain severity reduction) occurred in 34% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Outcome was not affected by the presence of comorbid anxiety or depression. Conclusions Brief therapy dog visits may provide a valuable complementary therapy for fibromyalgia outpatients. PMID:23170993

  17. Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act) pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs (CODs). This final rule also revises other requirements related to CODs, including key aspects of their Medicaid coverage and payment and the Medicaid drug rebate program. PMID:26859897

  18. Using a computerized patient record to reengineer an outpatient clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Borowitz, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    By employing process flow analysis and work redesign techniques during the design and implementation of a computerized patient record in the pediatric outpatient clinics at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, we have developed a database of clinical observations while simultaneously shortening the time that patients spend waiting in the pediatric clinics and decreasing the number of support staff employed within the clinics. PMID:7949936

  19. Outpatient triple chronotherapy for bipolar depression: case report.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, John F; Terman, Michael

    2012-09-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid, effective, and safe treatments for bipolar depression. Triple chronotherapy is a combination of sleep deprivation, sleep phase advance, and bright light therapy that has been shown to induce accelerated and sustained remissions in bipolar depression. This case report describes the first outpatient program designed to administer triple chronotherapy and reviews the organizational and clinical requirements for providing such care. PMID:22995965

  20. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  1. Intensive outpatient comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Tabatha H; Lockhart, Ann-Louise T; Garcia, Rocio V; Raj, Jeslina J; Peterson, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    Recent randomized clinical trials have established the efficacy of Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) in treating children and adults with Tourette syndrome and persistent tic disorders. However, the standard CBIT protocol uses a weekly outpatient treatment format (i.e., 8 sessions over 10 wk), which may be inconvenient or impractical for some patients, particularly patients, who are required to travel long distances in order to receive care. In contrast, an intensive outpatient program may increase accessibility to evidence-based behavioral treatments for Tourette syndrome and other persistent tic disorders by eliminating the necessity of repeated travel. This case series evaluated the use of an intensive outpatient program CBIT (IOP CBIT) for the treatment of 2 preadolescent males (ages 10 and 14 years) with Tourette syndrome. The IOP CBIT treatment protocol included several hours of daily treatment over a 4-d period. Both children evidenced notable reductions in their tics and maintained treatment gains at follow-up. Moreover, both patients and their parents expressed treatment satisfaction with the IOP CBIT format. This case series addresses an important research gap in the behavioral treatment of tic disorders literature. The patients’ treatment outcomes indicate that IOP CBIT is a promising treatment that warrants more systematic investigation. PMID:25325069

  2. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, p<.001), the Objective Structured Clinical Examination physical examination (r=.236, p=.011), and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination patient note (r=.238, p=.010). Breadth of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. PMID:26896906

  3. Possibly Impossible Patients: Management of Difficult Behavior in Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.; Meyer, Fremonta L.; Miovic, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Angry, threatening, or otherwise disruptive behavior by patients can interfere with necessary oncologic treatment, sometimes to the point of rendering continued care impossible. We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology setting. We review the existing literature on dealing with difficult patients and present clinical experience at a comprehensive cancer center where a formalized, institutional process for responding to disruptive outpatients has been developed. A structured, multidisciplinary approach to deal with difficult behavior in oncology outpatients can improve care and staff morale. Staff using this approach can identify causes of treatment-disrupting behavior, develop and implement appropriate behavior plans, facilitate communication, address mental health issues, and ensure that decisions to terminate a relationship with a patient are ethical, clinically justified, and supported by due process. In the future, clinical recommendations and institutional guidelines for dealing with difficult patients should be evaluated with more structured, quantitative research. PMID:22043189

  4. Determinants of HIV outpatient service utilization: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Aline; Morley, Deirdre; O'Leary, Aisling C; Bergin, Colm J; Horgan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Demands on HIV services are increasing as a consequence of the increased life-expectancy of HIV patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Understanding the factors that influence utilization of ambulatory HIV services is useful for planning service provision. This study reviewed factors associated with utilization of hospital based HIV out-patient services. Studies reporting person-based utilization rates of HIV-specific outpatient services broken down by patient or healthcare characteristics were eligible for inclusion. The Andersen Behavioral Model was used to organize the information extracted into pre-disposing, enabling and need components. Ten studies were included in the final review. Older age, private insurance, urban residence, lower CD4 counts, a diagnosis of AIDS, or anti-retroviral treatment were associated with higher utilization rates. The results of this review are consistent with existing knowledge regarding HIV patients' use of health services. Little information was identified on the influence of health service characteristics on utilization of out-patient services. PMID:24907780

  5. Medicaid outpatient utilization for waterborne pathogenic illness following Hurricane Floyd.

    PubMed Central

    Setzer, Christian; Domino, Marisa Elena

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Flooding provides an opportunity for epidemics of waterborne viral, protozoan, or bacterial diseases to develop in affected areas. Epidemic levels of disease may translate into higher than average levels of health services use, depending in part on help-seeking behaviors. The authors investigated whether the flooding that occurred as a result of Hurricane Floyd in September 1999 was associated with an increase in outpatient visits for waterborne diseases among Medicaid enrollees in eastern North Carolina. METHODS: Using a difference-in-differences estimation technique, the authors examined the change in outpatient visits by North Carolina Medicaid enrollees for selected waterborne diseases following the hurricane. The study focused on counties with high concentrations of hog farming that were mildly/moderately or severely affected by the hurricane, using unaffected counties and the year before the hurricane as controls. RESULTS: Small increases in Medicaid-covered outpatient visits were found in severely affected counties for two of the six pathogens selected for analysis, relative to unaffected counties. Larger increases in visits were found for nonspecific intestinal infections in both severely and moderately affected counties following the hurricane, relative to unaffected counties. CONCLUSIONS: The large increase in visits for ill-defined intestinal infection is noteworthy. The relative lack of increase in visits with specific pathogenic diagnoses may be attributable, at least in part, to a number of factors, including incomplete diagnostic information provided by treating clinicians, low treatment-seeking behavior, and use of non-Medicaid-funded emergency services. PMID:15313110

  6. Is outpatient brain tumor surgery feasible in India?

    PubMed

    Turel, Mazda K; Bernstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The current trend in all fields of surgery is towards less invasive procedures with shorter hospital stays. The reasons for this change include convenience to patients, optimal resource utilization, and cost saving. Technological advances in neurosurgery, aided by improvements in anesthesia, have resulted in surgery that is faster, simpler, and safer with excellent perioperative recovery. As a result of improved outcomes, some centers are performing brain tumor surgery on an outpatient basis, wherein patients arrive at the hospital the morning of their procedure and leave the hospital the same evening, thus avoiding an overnight stay in the hospital. In addition to the medical benefits of the outpatient procedure, its impact on patient satisfaction is substantial. The economic benefits are extremely favorable for the patient, physician, as well as the hospital. In high volume centers, a day surgery program can exist alongside those for elective and emergency surgeries, providing another pathway for patient care. However, due to skepticism surrounding the medicolegal aspects, and how radical the concept at first sounds, these procedures have not gained widespread popularity. We provide an overview of outpatient brain tumor surgery in the western world, discussing the socioeconomic, medicolegal, and ethical issues related to its adaptability in a developing nation. PMID:27625225

  7. A Pilot Study Using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a Clinical Care Tool to Identify Lower Extremity Lymphedema in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Raviv, Leigh; Appollo, Kathleen; Baser, Raymond E.; Iasonos, Alexia; Barakat, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a symptom scale for lymphedema of the lower extremity (LLE). Methods Twenty-eight gynecologic cancer survivors with documented LLE and 30 without a history or presence of lymphedema completed the GCLQ and provided feedback about their satisfaction with and feasibility of using the GCLQ at their oncology follow-ups. The study survey took approximately 5–10 minutes to complete, and it was easily understood by the majority of the sample. Results Participants had a mean age of 59.6 years (range, 28–80 years). Twenty-eight women (48%) had LLE and 30 (52%) had no history or presence of LLE (confirmed by limb volume [LV] measurements at assessment). Type of cancer history included: endometrial, 38 (66%); cervical, 13 (22%); and vulvar, 7 (12%). GCLQ scores differed significantly by lymphedema diagnosis; LLE patients had higher scores (P<0.01). The large area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–1.000) suggests that the GCLQ can distinguish between patients with and without LLE. Although all 28 (100%) of the LLE patients were aware of their LLE diagnosis, only 23 (82%) underwent treatment. The GCLQ was easily understood by most (55/58, 95%); and overall, patients showed a high willingness (56/58, 96%) to complete the questionnaire at future appointments. Twenty-five (88%) of the LLE patients found the GCLQ to be helpful in identifying symptoms of lymphedema. Conclusions The GCLQ effectively distinguished between gynecologic cancer survivors with and those without LLE, with good sensitivity and specificity. The patients, particularly those with LLE, showed high confidence in the GCLQ’s ability to detect LLE symptoms. PMID:20163847

  8. Annual report of the Women's Health Care Committee, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2015.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Akihiko; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The activity of the Women's Health Care Committee over a two year period up to June 2015 focused upon: (i) management of breast diseases in obstetrics and gynecology; (ii) investigation of lifestyle-related disease and bone mineral density after gynecologic cancer therapy; (iii) postoperative women's health care; (iv) current surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse among gynecologists in Japan; (v) cesarean indication for pregnant women with active/inactive genital viral lesions; (vi) health care of young female athletes concerned about menstrual cycle abnormalities, stress fractures and premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder; (vii) a training program for women's health care advisers; and (viii) a new edition of the oral contraceptive and low-dose estrogen-progestogen guideline. Detailed activities of the eight subcommittees are described in the text. PMID:26694692

  9. Preliminary Experience With Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Staging of Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Burke, William M.; Advincula, Arnold P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of integrating robot-assisted technology in the performance of laparoscopic staging of gynecologic malignancies. Methods: Seven patients underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic staging procedures for gynecologic cancers. Data were collected and analyzed as a retrospective case series analysis. Results: We attempted 7 robot-assisted laparoscopic staging procedures with no conversions to laparotomy. The median lymph node count for lymphadenectomy was 15 (range, 4 to 29). Mean operating time was 257 minutes (range, 174 to 345). The average estimated blood loss was 50 mL. One patient developed sinusitis and required intravenous antibiotics. The median hospital stay was 2 days. Conclusion: Robot-assisted laparoscopic staging is a feasible technique that may overcome the surgical limitations of conventional laparoscopy. PMID:15984701

  10. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  11. Prevention of iatrogenic ureteral injuries during robotic gynecologic surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ziho; Kaplan, Joshua; Giusto, Laura; Eun, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Iatrogenic ureteral injuries, more than half of which occur during gynecologic surgery, may have devastating consequences for both patients and physicians. Gynecologists have employed various techniques such as cystoscopy, ureteral stents, and lighted ureteral stents to prevent ureteral injuries. The emergence and increasing prevalence of robotic surgery necessitates that we not only reevaluate the utility of these techniques, but also develop new ones specific for the robotic modality. In the robotic setting, the surgeon lacks tactile feedback and must rely primarily on visual cues. The use of intraureteral indocyanine green and subsequent visualization under near-infrared fluorescence appears to be a promising technique to primarily and secondarily prevent ureteral injuries during robotic gynecologic surgery. PMID:26519785

  12. Metformin: A candidate for the treatment of gynecological tumors based on drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    IRIE, HARUKO; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; ADACHI, MASATAKA; NAKAMURA, KANAKO; UMENE, KIYOKO; NOGAMI, YUYA; MASUDA, KENTA; KOBAYASHI, YUSUKE; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a first-line drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recently, metformin has been reported to reduce the carcinogenic risk and inhibit tumor cell growth in glioma and breast cancer. The anticancer action of metformin involves the enhancement of phosphorylation of liver kinase B1, activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which reduces cell growth. Metformin is anticipated to exert antitumor effects in gynecological cancer, and its efficacy for the treatment of endometrial, breast and ovarian cancer has been suggested in preclinical studies and clinical trials. Although the effect of metformin on cervical cancer remains to be examined in clinical trials, its antitumor effects have been reported in preclinical studies. Thus, the use of metformin for the treatment of gynecological cancer may become a successful example of drug repositioning, following establishment of the drug's antitumor effects, risk evaluation, screening and validation of efficacy. PMID:26893732

  13. The past, present and future of minimally invasive endoscopy in gynecology: a review and speculative outlook.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Liselotte; Clevin, Lotte; Ternamian, Artin; Puntambekar, Shailesh; Schollmeyer, Thoralf; Alkatout, Ibrahim

    2013-08-01

    Over the last twenty-five years, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has evolved in a relatively short period of time to overtake the centuries-old visionary and pioneering groundwork of our outstanding colleagues in all surgical disciplines. This overview on the development of gynecological endoscopy, at the invitation of SMIT, highlights past achievements and describes present challenges. It emphasizes future opportunities and possibilities to foster interdisciplinary collaboration and integrate emerging endoscopic, imaging and stereotactic surgical technologies to improve patient safety, enhance quality of care and advance surgical education. This article will introduce younger colleagues to the exciting world of contemporary gynecologic endoscopy and help them appreciate the immense technology-laden opportunities that the future holds for those who are prepared to follow in the footsteps and aspirations of our founding surgical colleagues. PMID:23964793

  14. Capabilities of OCT in diagnosing pathological processes, functional states, and treatment adequacy in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) as one of the diagnostic methods at the Department of Gynecology of the Nizhny Novgorod Regional Hospital. An endoscopic OCT device adjusted for gynecological examinations with colposcopy, hysteroscopy and laparoscopy has been developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. It provides clinicians with sharp (up to 15 - 20 micron resolution) images of 1.5 mm thick superficial mucosa layers in the female genital tract, that are recorded at the 0.83 micron wavelength with approximately 1 frame/second rate for a 200 X 200 pixel image. Data obtained during examination of more than 100 patients demonstrate the capability of OCT in estimation of structural alterations in organs, connected with different types of pathologies and functional states of the female genital system. We present first results of OCT application to assess the adequacy of cervical pathologies treatment (electro-, laser surgery and cryotherapy) and to control the healing process.

  15. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: evolution of a new surgical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Boggess, John F

    2007-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms were first developed with telesurgery in mind. Conceptualized by NASA and the military to provide surgical expertise to remote locations, some telesurgical success has been documented, but progress has been held back by communication bandwidth limitations. Telepresence surgery, where the surgeon is in proximity to the patient but is provided with an ergonomic console equipped with three-dimensional vision and autonomous control of wristed laparoscopic surgical instruments and energy sources, has shown efficacy first in cardiac and then urologic cancer surgery. Interest is currently focused on the application of this technology in the field of gynecology, with techniques being described to perform simple hysterectomy, myomectomy, tubal anastomosis, and pelvic reconstruction procedures. This article will review the application of robotic- and computer-assisted surgery in the specialty of gynecologic oncology. PMID:25484936

  16. Representing Mutually Exclusive Knowledge in a Property Hierarchy for a Reasoning System in Clinical Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Small, Steven L.; Muechler, Eberhard K.

    1985-01-01

    The education and practice of clinical medicine can benefit significantly from the use of computational assistants. This article describes the development of a prototype system called SURGES (Strong/University of Rochester Gynecological Expert System) for representing medical knowledge and then applying this knowledge to suggest diagnostic procedures in medical gynecology. The paper focuses on the representation technique of property inheritance, which facilitates the simple common sense reasoning required to enable execution of the more complex medical inferences. Such common sense can be viewed as a collection mundane inferences, which are the simple conclusions drawn from knowledge that an exclusive or (XOR) relation (i.e., mutual exclusion) holds among a number of facts. The paper discusses the use of a property hierarchy for this purpose and shows how it simplifies knowledge representation in medical artificial intelligence (AIM) computer systems.

  17. Contemporary issues in obstetrics and gynecology for the consultation-liaison psychiatrist.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1985-10-01

    Medical advances in obstetrics and gynecology, combined with the depersonalization of health care and changes in sexual and reproductive behaviors in the general population, lead to challenging new problems for the psychiatric consultant who deals with reproductive issues. The author describes contemporary issues encountered in consultation-liaison work with the obstetrics and gynecology service in a general hospital. They include the reproductive implications of medical illnesses, the stress of deciding whether to continue a pregnancy known to carry genetic risk, the intrusiveness of certain options for dealing with infertility, parental expectations for a perfect baby, and the difficulties some traditional practitioners have in adapting their practice styles to the changing needs of the patient population. PMID:4054867

  18. [The appearance of ciprofloxacin resistance in the microbial strains isolated from gynecologic patients].

    PubMed

    Shopova, E

    1997-01-01

    The sensitivity of 415 microbial strains isolated from clinically taken samples from gynecologically diseased women was determined. The urine strains showed sensitivity up to 93.3%, but 7 Gram/-/ strains isolated in the last 3 months of the study were resistant to Ciprofloxacin. The cervical secretion strains, those of CD aspirates, of IUP and wound secretions were found sensitive up to 81.2%. The 50 Enterococcus strains isolated in gynecological infections were found in 28% resistant to Ciprofloxacin, with 7 of the 19 resistant strains were isolated in the last 3 months of the study. The appearance of resistant strains in some microbial species, pointed out in the literature as markedly sensitivity to Ciprofloxacin, as well as the data of a fast developed resistance Ciprofloxacin in the course of treatment, allowed us to recommend their application in the infections caused by microorganisms resistant to the habitual antibiotics. PMID:9289951

  19. The role of obstetrics and gynecology national societies during natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, André; Adrien, Lauré

    2015-07-01

    When a natural disaster occurs, such as an earthquake, floods, or a tsunami, the international response is quick. However, there is no organized strategy in place to address obstetric and gynecological (ob/gyn) emergencies. International organizations and national ob/gyn societies do not have an organized plan and rely on the good will of volunteers. Too often, local specialists are ignored and are not involved in the response. The massive earthquake in Haiti in 2010 exemplifies the lack of coordinated response involving national organizations following the disaster. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) engaged rapidly with Haitian colleagues in response to the obstetric and gynecological emergencies. An active strategy is proposed. PMID:25935475

  20. The Important Roles of Steroid Sulfatase and Sulfotransferases in Gynecological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological diseases such as endometriosis, adenomyosis and uterine fibroids, and gynecological cancers including endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer, affect a large proportion of women. These diseases are estrogen dependent, and their progression often depends on local estrogen formation. In peripheral tissues, estrogens can be formed from the inactive precursors dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrone sulfate. Sulfatase and sulfotransferases have pivotal roles in these processes, where sulfatase hydrolyzes estrone sulfate to estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate to dehydroepiandrosterone, and sulfotransferases catalyze the reverse reactions. Further activation of estrone to the most potent estrogen, estradiol, is catalyzed by 17-ketosteroid reductases, while estradiol can also be formed from dehydroepiandrosterone by the sequential actions of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-Δ4-isomerase, aromatase, and 17-ketosteroid reductase. This review introduces the sulfatase and sulfotransferase enzymes, in terms of their structures and reaction mechanisms, and the regulation and different transcripts of their genes, together with the importance of their currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms. Data on expression of sulfatase and sulfotransferases in gynecological diseases are also reviewed. There are often unchanged mRNA and protein levels in diseased tissue, with higher sulfatase activities in cancerous endometrium, ovarian cancer cell lines, and adenomyosis. This can be indicative of a disturbed balance between the sulfatase and sulfotransferases enzymes, defining the potential for sulfatase as a drug target for treatment of gynecological diseases. Finally, clinical trials with sulfatase inhibitors are discussed, where two inhibitors have already concluded phase II trials, although so far with no convincing clinical outcomes for patients with endometrial cancer and endometriosis. PMID:26924986