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Sample records for gypsum board exposed

  1. Gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is the world’s fifth ranked producer and consumer of gypsum. Production of crude gypsum in the United States during 2012 was estimated to be 9.9 Mt (10.9 million st), an increase of 11 percent compared with 2011 production. The average price of mined crude gypsum was $7/t ($6.35/st). Synthetic gypsum production in 2012, most of which is generated as a flue-gas desulphurization product from coal-fired electric powerplants, was estimated to be 11.8 Mt (13 million st) and priced at approximately $1.50/t ($1.36/st). Forty-seven companies produced gypsum in the United States at 54 mines and plants in 34 states. U.S. gypsum exports totaled 408 kt (450,000 st). Imports were much higher at 3.2 Mt (3.5 million st).

  2. Gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, R.D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The United States is the world's fourth leading producer and consumer of gypsum. Production of gypsum in the U.S. during 2011 was estimated to be 9.4 Mt (103 million st), an increase of 6 percent compared with 2010 production. The average price of mined crude gypsum was $7/t ($6.35/st). Synthetic gypsum, most of which is generated as a fluegas desulfurization process from coal-fired electric powerplants, was priced at approximately $1.50/t (1.36/st). Forty-seven companies produced gypsum in the U.S. at 54 mines and plants in 34 states. U.S. gypsum exports totaled about 300 kt (330,000 st). Imports were much higher at approximately 3.3 Mt (3.6 million st).

  3. Test/QA Plan for Mold-Resistant Gypsum Board Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document serves as the test and quality assurance (QA) plan for mold-resistant gypsum board testing. The quality management plan (QMP) under which this work is conducted is the Verification Testing of Air Pollution Control Technology Quality Management Plan, Revision 2.2, Fe...

  4. Quantification of centennial erosion rates in gypsum outcrops based on anatomical modifications in exposed roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Christophe; Lopez Saez, Jerome; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The karstic landscape of Triassic gypsum and anhydrite in the northern French Alps is of a discontinuous nature and is found mainly in the internal zone and high mountain areas, where it is made up of original landforms such as karstic domes. To date, despite intense surface weathering and karstic corrosion which generate karstic forms, gullies and result in the transport of considerable loads by mountain torrents after heavy rains data on the meteorological degradation of gypsum outcrops are yet extermely rare. In the Vanoise Massif (French Alps) erosion rates were obtained with the monitoring of weight and volume losses of calibrated gypsum tablets. Measurements from these sites indicate denudation rates varying between 0.2 and 6 mm yr-1 in the subalpine zone. Erosion is attributed to intense dissolution, seasonal water streams, avalanches and freezethaw cycles weathering. On woody slopes, such continuous denudation processes are sufficient to expose roots while allowing them to keep their tips in the ground. In this study, data from continuous field monitoring of micrometric method and gypsum tablets covering the past 10 years, have, for the first time, been compared with an alternative method based on dendrogeomorphology. A total of 45 exposed roots of Pinus montana were sampled in the gypsum badlands and the anatomical variations in annual growth rings due to exposure caused by denudation were analysed. The first year of exposure was determined via the peculiar size reduction of earlywood tracheids. The medium-term erosion rates (0.5-5 mm.yr-1) as observed in the root-ring series match with erosion rates derived from gypsum tablets. The detailed knowledge of anatomical changes in roots is thus demonstrated a powerful tool for geoscientists to quantify minimal rates of soil erosion in areas where measurements of past processes are not readily available.

  5. Quantifying Mold Biomass on Gypsum Board: Comparison of Ergosterol and Beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase as Mold Biomass Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Reeslev, M.; Miller, M.; Nielsen, K. F.

    2003-01-01

    Two mold species, Stachybotrys chartarum and Aspergillus versicolor, were inoculated onto agar overlaid with cellophane, allowing determination of a direct measurement of biomass density by weighing. Biomass density, ergosterol content, and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase (3.2.1.52) activity were monitored from inoculation to stationary phase. Regression analysis showed a good linear correlation to biomass density for both ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity. The same two mold species were inoculated onto wallpapered gypsum board, from which a direct biomass measurement was not possible. Growth was measured as an increase in ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity. A good linear correlation was seen between ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity. From the experiments performed on agar medium, conversion factors (CFs) for estimating biomass density from ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity were determined. The CFs were used to estimate the biomass density of the molds grown on gypsum board. The biomass densities estimated from ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity data gave similar results, showing significantly slower growth and lower stationary-phase biomass density on gypsum board than on agar. PMID:12839773

  6. Characterizing synthetic gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Henkels, P.J.; Gaynor, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    Each gypsum wallboard manufacturer has developed its own general guidelines for synthetic gypsum. The guidelines vary accordingly for each manufacturer and are often modified to suite a particular source and end use. In addition, the physical and chemical properties of synthetic gypsum are characterized by several proprietary and published test methods. Characterizing a synthetic gypsum and determining its acceptability is a time consuming process and can be confusing, particularly to those outside the gypsum wallboard industry. This paper describes some of the more important characteristics and practical aspects of synthetic gypsum usage based on USG`s extensive experience in wall board manufacture.

  7. COMPARING MOISTURE METER READINGS WITH MEASURED EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT OF GYPSUM BOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Moisture meters routinely used in the field to determine the moisture content in gypsum wallboard are primarily designed and manufactured to measure the moisture content of wood. Often they are used to decide whether to replace wallboard by determining if moisture is qualitativel...

  8. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO{sub 2} concentration fog using x-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Carreño-Márquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO{sub 2} concentration and 51 °C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X’PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations.

  9. The astrobiological mission EXPOSE-R on board of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Parpart, Andre; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Burfeindt, Jürgen; Molter, Ferdinand; Jaramillo, Esther; Pereira, Carlos; Weiß, Peter; Willnecker, Rainer; Demets, René; Dettmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    EXPOSE-R flew as the second of the European Space Agency (ESA) EXPOSE multi-user facilities on the International Space Station. During the mission on the external URM-D platform of the Zvezda service module, samples of eight international astrobiology experiments selected by ESA and one Russian guest experiment were exposed to low Earth orbit space parameters from March 10th, 2009 to January 21st, 2011. EXPOSE-R accommodated a total of 1220 samples for exposure to selected space conditions and combinations, including space vacuum, temperature cycles through 273 K, cosmic radiation, solar electromagnetic radiation at >110, >170 or >200 nm at various fluences up to GJ m-2. Samples ranged from chemical compounds via unicellular organisms and multicellular mosquito larvae and seeds to passive radiation dosimeters. Additionally, one active radiation measurement instrument was accommodated on EXPOSE-R and commanded from ground in accordance with the facility itself. Data on ultraviolet radiation, cosmic radiation and temperature were measured every 10 s and downlinked by telemetry and data carrier every few months. The EXPOSE-R trays and samples returned to Earth on March 9th, 2011 with Shuttle flight, Space Transportation System (STS)-133/ULF 5, Discovery, after successful total mission duration of 27 months in space. The samples were analysed in the individual investigators laboratories. A parallel Mission Ground Reference experiment was performed on ground with a parallel set of hardware and samples under simulated space conditions following to the data transmitted from the flight mission.

  10. Effect of high temperatures on gypsum paste and mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsová, Jitka; Doleželová, Magdalena; Vimmrová, Alena

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the influence of high temperatures on some physical and mechanical properties of gypsum mixtures. Two gypsum mixtures were designed, first one was composed of gypsum and citric acid and the second one contained standardized sand also. The samples were exposed to temperatures from 50°C to 1000°C. Results show, that strength changes caused by high temperatures are significant in both mixtures and that the thermal shrinkage is reduced by adding sand to a gypsum mixture.

  11. MICROBIAL RESISTANT GYPSUM PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsum building materials often become wet, resulting in mold growth that leads to health and productivity impacts. A major source of mold growth is gypsum wallboard since nearly 90% of the interior finished surfaces of buildings are covered with gypsum products. It has been est...

  12. 18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED BEAM AT CEILING IS PAINTED. FLOOR IS VINYL COMPOSITION TILE. WALLS AND CEILING ARE PAINTED GYPSUM BOARD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 26. ROOM 210, VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED TIE BEAMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. ROOM 210, VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. EXPOSED TIE BEAMS AT CEILING ARE BOXED IN PLYWOOD. WAINSCOTING IS PLYWOOD PANELING. CEILING AND UPPER WALL TREATMENT IS GYPSUM BOARD. CLERESTORY WINDOWS LINE BOTH LONG SIDES OF ROOM. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 24. VIEW OF NORTHWEST WALL IN ROOM 209, RESTROOM. EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF NORTHWEST WALL IN ROOM 209, RESTROOM. EXPOSED BEAM RUNS ALONG NORTHWEST WALL. 3X3 LITE WINDOW IS IN THE NORTHEAST WALL. FLOOR TREATMENT IS WOOD, WALLS ARE GYPSUM BOARD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. FGD gypsum issues

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2007-11-15

    The article first explains how gypsum by-product is produced in flue gas desulfurization systems in coal-fired power plants. It goes on to talk about the main markets for gypsum - wallboard manufacture (Plaster of Paris), cement production and soil stabilization. In the USA in 2006 41.6 million tons of gypsum was used by manufacturers of wallboard and plaster products, 3.0 mt for cement production and 1.1 mt for agricultural purposes. A method of determining the by-product gypsum content by thermogravimetric analysis is outlined. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  16. TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM BOARD-FACED PARTITION AND ORIGINAL TIMBER STRUCTURE - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stable, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  17. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  18. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  19. Gypsum at Olympia Undae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) 'targeted image' shows a region of sand dunes surrounding the Martian north polar cap. CRISM, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, acquired the image at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT) on Oct. 1, 2006. The imaged site is near 80.0 degrees north latitude, 240.7 degrees east longitude. It covers an area about 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) square. At the center of the image, the spatial resolution is as good as 20 meters (65 feet) per pixel. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, has spectrally mapped Mars at lower spatial resolution and discovered that several regions of the planet are rich in sulfate minerals formed by liquid water. Surprisingly, one of the sulfate-rich deposits is a part of the giant field of sand dunes surrounding the north polar cap. CRISM is remapping the dune field at about five times higher resolution than OMEGA, and imaging selected regions at 50 times higher resolution. This image is the first of the high-resolution images of the dune field.

    This visualization includes two renderings of the data, both map-projected. The left images are false-color representations showing brightness of the surface at selected infrared wavelengths. The right images show strength of an absorption band at 1900 nanometers wavelength, which indicates the relative abundance of the sulfate mineral gypsum. Brighter areas have more gypsum, and darker areas have less gypsum. The bottom views are enlargements of the central part of the two versions of the image shown at top.

    Gypsum is a light-colored, whitish mineral, so it was anticipated that gypsum-rich parts of the sand dunes would be light in color. In fact, there are light-colored areas in the left images, but the images of the gypsum absorption at right show that the light areas have only low gypsum abundance. The dark sand dunes

  20. 16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED POST EXISTS IN MIDDLE OF ROOM. A SMALL OPENING HAS BEEN CUT INTO THE UPPER PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST WALL THROUGH TO THE ADJOINING ROOM (106). GYPSUM BOARD ON WALLS WITH WOOD TRIM, FLUORESCENT LIGHTING, AND VINYL COMPOSITION TILE ON FLOORS ARE ALL LATER ADDITIONS. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. The future of FGD gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.C.

    2005-09-30

    According to ACAA's 'Coal combustion production and user survey' covering 2003, FGD gypsum utilization in the USA has risen to 70% but with 12 m tons being produced annually there is great opportunity to expand its use in producing wallboard (its primary use) and also in cement and concrete products and agriculture. In 2003 less than 1 mt of FGD gypsum was sold into these latter markets. Although nearly all the 12 newest wallboard plants announced since 1995 have been designed to use this material, only 27% of total gypsum wallboard production in the USA utilizes FGD gypsum. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  2. Linguistic Considerations Pertaining to "Brown v. Board": Exposing Racial Fallacies in the New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, John

    2006-01-01

    "Brown v. Board of Education" reminds this author, a linguist, of the linguistic diversity among black Americans, be they descendants of enslaved Africans--as he is proud to be--or Africans who escaped slavery. There is as much linguistic diversity among their race as among any other racial or ethnic group in the United States. When the Supreme…

  3. Characterizing synthetic gypsum for wallboard manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Henkels, P.J.; Gynor, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    United States Gypsum Company (USGC) has developed specifications and guidelines covering the chemical and physical aspects of synthetic gypsum to help predict end use acceptability in wallboard manufacture. These guidelines are based in part on past experiences with natural and synthetic gypsum. Similarly, most wallboard manufacturers in North America have developed their own guidelines based in part on its unique history and particular experiences with synthetic gypsum. While there are similarities between manufacturers` guidelines, differences do exist. This paper discusses the importance of selected parameters contained in the FGD gypsum guidelines. In most cases, the parameters are equally relevant to other synthetic gypsums and the naturally occurring gypsum mineral as well.

  4. Mineral of the month: gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Founie, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The earliest known use of gypsum as a building material was in Anatolia (in what is now Turkey) around 6000 B.C. It has been found on the interiors of the great pyramids in Egypt, which were erected in about 3700 B.C. Now an average new American home contains more than 7 metric tons of gypsum in the form of more than 6,000 square feet of wallboard.

  5. Applications of gypsum and phosphogypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.P.

    1996-12-31

    Relatively pure gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) is produced in large amounts world-wide by processing of phosphatic fertilizers and SO{sub 2} removal from coal-fired power plant gas streams. There are a number of potential beneficial uses of these materials in both industrial manufacturing, the construction industry, and in agriculture. By-product gypsums may be used in wallboard manufacture to replace mined gypsum, although the supply far exceeds demand for this use. Gypsum may also be used as an additive in cement formulation, and has shown promise as a sub-base material in road construction. In agriculture, the high Ca content is beneficial for a number of crops grown on acidic soils, and gypsum treatments improve the physical conditions of soils by enhancing flocculation of soil colloids. The agricultural market should expand as new experimental results show yield responses on various soils and crops. Environmental questions regarding radioactivity hazards in phosphogypum are still unresolved, however, and use of this material is pending EPA review.

  6. Economics of Gypsum Production in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the economics of gypsum production in Iran. The trend in production cost, selling price and profit are used to investigate economics of gypsum production. In addition, the multivariate time series method is used to determine factors affecting gypsum price in domestic market. The results indicated that due to increase in production and inflation, profitability of gypsum production has decreased during recent years. It is concluded that tariff and non-tariff barriers on mines machinery are among reasons for increasing production cost in Iranian gypsum mines. Decreasing such barriers could increase profitability of gypsum production in Iran.

  7. Measurement of quartz in limestone reagent used in gypsum producing FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luckevich, L.M.; Duffy, K.; Roth, T.

    1995-06-01

    The quartz concentration in limestone used as the reagent in gypsum producing FGD systems contributes to the amount of quartz in the gypsum product. Gypsum from FGD is being used to manufacture gypsum board or plasters and these gypsum based products must comply with legislated limits for respirable quartz. Gypsum from FGD may contain both crystalline silica (usually as quartz) and amorphous silica from coal ash. In addition SiO{sub 2} may be present in other crystalline materials such as clay minerals. The measurement of total SiO{sub 2} in FGD reagent limestone and FGD gypsum will measure SiO{sub 2} from all sources. A preliminary method has been developed to measure the quartz concentration in limestone or gypsum. The method comprises isolation of the acid insoluble residue followed by analysis of the residue by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The energy of the {alpha} to {beta} quartz inversion is measured and used to calculate the quartz content of the sample.

  8. Gypsum market saturation in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Luckevich, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    Pollution control legislation is requiring that sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power generation be reduced (to prevent acid rain). Abatement strategies such as Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) often result in the SO{sub 2} being converted into gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O), resulting in increased production of synthetic gypsum (gypsum from sources other than naturally occuring deposits). Often this gypsum is suitable for utilization, with utilization potential being a function of local economic factors and gypsum quality. Increasingly, power utilities are concluding that the production of wallboard or cement grade gypsum is the best economic and environmental choice. This paper discusses the supply and demand of gypsum and the impact that the production of synthetic gypsum is currently having and may have in the future.

  9. Geology of the Gypsum Gap quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W., Jr.

    1953-01-01

    The Gypsum Gap quadrangle is one eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comparative study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through a arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The core consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  10. Mineral resource of the month: gypsum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    You may not realize it, but the walls of your office are probably made from a mineral: gypsum. Gypsum is an abundant, evaporite-derived sedimentary mineral with deposits located throughout the world. It is often associated with paleoenvironmental lake and marine environments. In its pure form, gypsum consists of calcium sulfate dihydrate, although most crude gypsum naturally occurs in combination with anhydrite, clay, dolomite and/or limestone.

  11. Purification of FGD gypsum product

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.J.; Owens, F.C. II.

    1993-06-01

    A method of purifying a gypsum slurry resulting from an upstream flue gas desulfurization process is described comprising the steps of: (a) delivering the gypsum slurry to a primary dewatering device; (b) separating this gypsum slurry in said primary dewatering device into a coarse solids stream and a fine solids stream, said coarse solids stream primarily containing coarse particle sizes therein and said fine solids stream primarily containing fine particle sizes therein; (c) selectively returning all or a portion of said fine solids stream back to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process or delivering all or a portion of said fine solids stream to downstream separation means for further separation into a thickened fines stream and a process water stream, said process water stream thereafter being selectively delivered, as desired, to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process; (d) delivering said coarse solids stream to a surge/mix tank where it is selectively mixed with a portion of said thickened fines stream prior to being delivered to a secondary dewatering device; and, (e) collecting a purified gypsum product from said secondary dewatering device.

  12. ESR studies of Anatolian gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ülkü

    2004-05-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to date the formation and most recent recrystallization of three types of gypsum samples (massive, bedded and fracture filling gypsum) from the Sakarya Formation at Eskişehir in the middle of Turkey. The ESR spectra had the signals of Fe 3+ and Mn 2+ in addition to those of the G1 and G2 sensitive centers ( g=2.002 and 2.008) to artificial γ-irradiation. ESR intensities of G1 and G2 were enhanced by γ-ray irradiation to give equivalent doses DE for each sample. The ESR ages derived from the annual doses of 238U, 232Th and 40K contents of the samples determined by thermal neutron activation analysis (TNAA) were between 43±18 ka (massive gypsum) and 1100±466 ka (bedded gypsum) as minimal and maximal values. The ages fall into the upper Miocene-Pliocene Epoch of the geological time scale, which agreed with the stratigraphy.

  13. Polymer composites based on gypsum matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Maria; Mróz, Patrycja; Kocemba, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    The role of polymers as retarder additives is to prolong the workability connected with setting time of gypsum. Various cellulose derivatives, soluble in water in concentration up to 1,5% by weight were applied taking different water/binder ratio. The hydration process of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (gypsum binder) into dihydrate (gypsum plaster) was observed by setting and calorimetric techniques. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the gypsum microstructure was varied when polymers are used. The mechanical properties of gypsum plasters were studied by bending strength test and they are correlated with sample microstructure

  14. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  15. The Role of Biofilms in the Sedimentology of Actively Forming Gypsum Deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Turk, Kendra A.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  16. The role of biofilms in the sedimentology of actively forming gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marilyn B; Des Marais, David J; Turk, Kendra A; Parenteau, Mary N; Jahnke, Linda L; Kubo, Michael D Y

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  17. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31

    coal type. In the project, process stacks in the wallboard plant were sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. In every task, the stack locations sampled included a gypsum dryer and a gypsum calciner. In Tasks 1 and 4 through 7, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. These results and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. The results from the project showed a wide range of percentage mercury losses from the synthetic gypsum feedstocks as measured by the Ontario Hydro method at the process stacks, ranging from 2% to 55% of the mercury in the gypsum feedstock. For the tasks exceeding 10% mercury loss across the wallboard plant, most of the loss occurred across the gypsum calciner. When total wallboard emissions remained below 10%, the primary emission location varied with a much less pronounced difference in emission between the gypsum dryer, calciner and board dryer. For all seven tasks, the majority of the mercury emissions were measured to be in the elemental form (Hg{sup 0}). Overall, the measured mercury loss mass rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 grams of mercury per dry ton of synthetic gypsum processed, or 0.01 to 0.4 pounds of mercury released per million square feet of wallboard produced from synthetic gypsum. The Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey from the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) indicate that 7,579,187 short tons of synthetic gypsum were used for wallboard production in 2006. Extrapolating the results of this study to the ACAA industry usage rate, we estimate that mercury releases from wallboard production plants in 2006 ranged between 150 to 3000 pounds for the entire U.S. wallboard industry. With only seven sets of wallboard plant measurements, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about what

  18. New interpretation of vertically aligned gypsum fabrics: Implications for gypsum depositional environments and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.R. ); Warren, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Gypsum and anhydrite fabrics in trenches and deep 500-m cores from Bristol Dry Lake, California, exhibit a vertical alignment of crystals similar to the fabric seen in bottom-nucleated brine pond gypsum. However, geochemical and sedimentologic evidence indicates that the gypsum formed in Bristol Dry Lake precipitated as a diagenetic displacive mineral within the sediment where groundwater saturated with respect to gypsum recharges around the playa margin (groundwater seepage gypsum). Evidence for displacive growth of gypsum comes from (1) the geometry of the deposit, (2) stable isotopic data and the water chemistry of the brine, and (3) inclusions of matrix that follow twin planes and completely surround crystals as they grow. Because the fabrics and textures of this diagenetic gypsum formed by groundwater in playa settings are similar to those of primary gypsum formed in a brine pond, it is necessary to refine the criteria for the distinction between subaerial, groundwater, and subaqueous gypsum. When compared to the features observed in a Holocene subaqueous gypsum deposit (Marion Lake, Australia) and a Holocene subaerial deposit (Abu Dhabi sabkha), the following criteria can be used to distinguish between the three different types of gypsum deposits: (1) amount of matrix, (2) geometry of the deposit, (3) gypsum crystal size and orientation, (4) distribution of matrix and fluid inclusions within individual crystals, and (5) fabric of the matrix around the gypsum. Distinguishing between subaqueous and groundwater gypsum may be difficult. However, sufficient mesoscale differences exist such that, in most cases, the different gypsum types can be resolved from core slabs and thin sections. These criteria may be applied in ancient examples even after gypsum has been converted to anhydrite.

  19. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

    2006-12-01

    to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15

  20. Method Analysis of Microbial Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Several commercially available gypsum products are marketed as microbial-resistant. During previous test method research on a microbial resistant gypsum wallboard study, a common theme from both stakeholders and product vendors was the need for a unified and accepted m...

  1. Influence of sulfate solution concentration on the formation of gypsum in sulfate resistance test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Bellmann, Frank . E-mail: frank.bellmann@bauing.uni-weimar.de; Moeser, Bernd; Stark, Jochen

    2006-02-15

    The sulfate concentration, which is required to form gypsum from portlandite, was derived from thermodynamical calculations and experimental measurements. The obtained results were compared to the sulfate concentrations in laboratory solutions that are commonly used to test the performance of concrete exposed to sulfate attack and also to sulfate concentrations that can be expected under field conditions. It was derived that the formation of gypsum can strongly affect the performance of binders in the tests, but has a less marked impact under most field conditions. An SEM investigation of mortar bars that were exposed to different sulfate concentrations supports the suggestion made.

  2. The structural and functional organization of the vestibular apparatus of rats exposed to weightlessness for 20 days on board the Sputnik "Kosmos-782".

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Y A; Gazenko, O G; Titova, L K; Bronstein, A A; Govardovskii, V I; Gribakin, F G; Pevzner, R A; Aronova, M Z; Kharkeevich, T A; Tsirulis, T P; Pyatkina, G A; Lichakov, D V; Pal'mbach, L P; Anichin, V F

    1979-01-01

    This investigation of the vestibular apparatus of rats exposed for 20 days to weightlessness on board an earth satellite and to acceleration during take-off and landing has revealed a set of changes in the structural and functional organization, such as adjoinment of the otolith to the utricle receptor surface and peripheral localization of the nucleoli inside the receptor cells' nuclei. Destruction of some receptor cells, apparently due to increased swelling of the vestibular apparatus tissue and alteration of the shape and structure of the otoconia were observed. In the horizontal crista, detachment of the cupula took place. PMID:32734

  3. Gypsum crystals formed on decomposing calcium citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söhnel, O.; Křivánková, I.; Krčmář, S.; Jurčová, M.

    1991-06-01

    Particle size and the specific surface area of gypsum crystals formed on decomposing an aqueous suspension of solid calcium citrate tetrahydrate by diluted 50% sulphuric acid at 25, 40, 60, 80 and 100°C was studied. The size of the gypsum crystals increases with increasing temperature of decomposition. At a constant temperature within the range of 25 to 100°C the median of gypsum crystal size distribution (PSD) increases for approximately 4 h after commencing decomposition and then reaches a virtually constant value. The specific surface area of gypsum crystals decreases after commencement of the reaction for approximately 6 h before reaching a constant value. Gypsum crystal growth by solute deposition from the liquid is responsible for PSD changes for approximately one hour at the commencement of reaction. Then the growth of larger crystals at the expense of smaller crystals, i.e. ripening, is apparently responsible for further changes in the PSD.

  4. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. Currently a large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO2 from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance c...

  5. Gypsum: A School-Industry Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, P. F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes the British Gypsum, a school-industry science project, designed to link the school with local industry. Teaching strategy, some experiments, and evaluation of the project are also included. (HM)

  6. MOISTURE MOVEMENT (WICKING) WITHIN GYPSUM WALLBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gypsum wallboard with repeated or prolonged exposure to water or excess moisture can lose its structural integrity and provide a growth medium for biological contaminants. Poorly sealed buildings, leaking or failed plumbing systems, or improperly constructed HVAC systems can all ...

  7. FGD gypsum's place in American agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.

    2007-07-01

    Surface cracks and soil clumps form when saline-sodic, high-clay soil dries out. Treatment with FGD gypsum and irrigation water flowing into these cracks leaches salts until the aggregates swell and the cracks close up. The article describes research projects to develop agricultural uses of FGD gypsum from coal-fired power plants that have been conducted by university researchers and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists.

  8. Comparison of Mined Gypsum Pellets and FGD Gypsum on Plant Productivity and Nutrient Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to compare differences between gypsum application from mined sources and FGD gypsum (FGD) on several environmental parameters. The studies objective was to address the fate of Hg and other RCRA metals in a common agricultural system and access its mobility in shallow groundwate...

  9. Consolidation of archaeological gypsum plaster by bacterial biomineralization of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Garcia-Bueno, Ana; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Gypsum plasterworks and decorative surfaces are easily degraded, especially when exposed to humidity, and thus they require protection and/or consolidation. However, the conservation of historical gypsum-based structural and decorative materials by conventional organic and inorganic consolidants shows limited efficacy. Here, a new method based on the bioconsolidation capacity of carbonatogenic bacteria inhabiting the material was assayed on historical gypsum plasters and compared with conventional consolidation treatments (ethyl silicate; methylacrylate-ethylmethacrylate copolymer and polyvinyl butyral). Conventional products do not reach in-depth consolidation, typically forming a thin impervious surface layer which blocks pores. In contrast, the bacterial treatment produces vaterite (CaCO3) biocement, which does not block pores and produces a good level of consolidation, both at the surface and in-depth, as shown by drilling resistance measurement system analyses. Transmission electron microscopy analyses show that bacterial vaterite cement formed via oriented aggregation of CaCO3 nanoparticles (∼20nm in size), resulting in mesocrystals which incorporate bacterial biopolymers. Such a biocomposite has superior mechanical properties, thus explaining the fact that drilling resistance of bioconsolidated gypsum plasters is within the range of inorganic calcite materials of equivalent porosity, despite the fact that the bacterial vaterite cement accounts for only a 0.02 solid volume fraction. Bacterial bioconsolidation is proposed for the effective consolidation of this type of material. The potential applications of bacterial calcium carbonate consolidation of gypsum biomaterials used as bone graft substitutes are discussed. PMID:24657676

  10. Gypsum-hosted endolithic communities of the Lake St. Martin impact structure, Manitoba, Canada: spectroscopic detectability and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhind, T.; Ronholm, J.; Berg, B.; Mann, P.; Applin, D.; Stromberg, J.; Sharma, R.; Whyte, L. G.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that Mars may have once been a habitable environment. Gypsum is targeted in the search for Martian biosignatures because it can host extensive cryptoendolithic communities in extreme terrestrial environments and is widespread on Mars. In this study the viability of using different spectroscopy-based techniques to identify the presence of gypsum endolithic communities was investigated by analysing various cryptoendoliths collected from the Lake St. Martin impact crater (LSM), a Mars analogue site found in Manitoba, Canada. Concurrently, the cryptoendolithic microbial community structure present was also analysed to aid in assigning spectroscopic features to microbial community members. Two main morphologies of endolithic communities were collected from gypsum deposits at LSM: true cryptoendolithic communities and annular deposits on partially buried boulders and cobbles <1 cm below the soil surface. Endolithic communities were found to be visibly present only in gypsum with a high degree of translucency and could occur as deep as 3 cm below the exterior surface. The bacterial community was dominated by a phylum (Chloroflexi) that has not been previously observed in gypsum endoliths. The exterior surfaces of gypsum boulders and cobbles are devoid of spectroscopic features attributable to organic molecules and detectable by reflectance, Raman, or ultraviolet-induced fluorescence spectroscopies. However, exposed interior surfaces show unique endolithic signatures detectable by each spectroscopic technique. This indicates that cryptoendolithic communities can be detected via spectroscopy-based techniques, provided they are either partially or fully exposed and enough photon-target interactions occur to enable detection.

  11. Gypsum and Associated Sulfates in Iani Chaos, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.; Greenwood, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    We have mapped layered deposits in Iani Chaos, part of the Margaritifer - Ares Valles outflow system in the southern hemisphere of Mars. These deposits have high thermal inertia relative to their surroundings and they often appear bright in visible images. Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRise) data show the deposits to typically have a fractured and polygonal texture at the 1 - 10 m scale and preserve few craters. The deposits are commonly layered at the several meter scale and may form cliffs that are actively eroding into blocks and rockfalls. Three primary deposits of these materials are present in Iani covering a total area of ~6000 km2 (approximately the size of Great Salt Lake). The deposits lie in topographic lows within Iani and form mounds of material 100s of meters high (range ~ 0 - 1 km). Bright, layered deposits are recognized within the mounds that comprise the chaos terrain itself. The layered deposits within the mounds are conformable to exposed layered deposits suggesting that the deposits are exposed by differential weathering (likely along fractures) between the chaos mounds. In central Iani, a second generation of layered deposits embay the eroded mounds of the chaos formation. Analysis of Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) data for this site positively identifies gypsum (CaSO4●H2O) in the post-chaos layered deposits. Sulfates also comprise the chaos terrain itself. The spectra of these sulfates are consistent with kieserite (MgSO4●H2O) in a mixture containing additional minerals. The stratigraphy at Iani requires at least two episodes of sulfate formation, separated by an uncomformity. We propose the following geologic sequence for Iani Chaos: 1) Formation of Mg (and possibly other sulfates and evaporite minerals) by evaporation of water. 3) Emplacement of non-evaporite materials in the region. 4) Formation of chaos terrain, presumably due to subsurface failure. 5) Erosion of

  12. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  13. 40 CFR 436.50 - Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gypsum subcategory. 436.50 Section 436.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Gypsum Subcategory § 436.50 Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of gypsum....

  14. 40 CFR 436.50 - Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gypsum subcategory. 436.50 Section 436.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Gypsum Subcategory § 436.50 Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of gypsum....

  15. Diagenetic gypsum related to sulfur deposits in evaporites (Libros Gypsum, Miocene, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortí, Federico; Rosell, Laura; Anadón, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The Libros Gypsum is the thickest evaporite unit of the Miocene infill of the Teruel Basin in NE Spain. During the deposition of this unit, intense bacterial sulfate-reducing (BSR) activity in the lake depocenter generated a native sulfur deposit. Diagenetic gypsum resulted from subsequent sulfur oxidation. The different processes involved in these transformations were first investigated by Anadón et al. (1992). The present paper is concerned with this diagenetic gypsum from the stratigraphic, petrographic, isotopic and genetic points of view. Diagenetic gypsum occurs mainly as continuous or discontinuous layers, individual levels or lenses, irregular masses, nodules and micronodules, and veins. Its main textures are coarse-crystalline anhedral and fine-grained (alabastrine), both of which can replace any former lithology (carbonate, gypsum, and sulfur). The following sequence of processes and mineral/textural transformations is deduced: primary gypsum deposition — BSR and biodiagenetic carbonate/H 2S production — growth of native sulfur — growth of diagenetic gypsum — partial recrystallization of the diagenetic gypsum textures. The gypsification of the native sulfur generated two types of banded structures in the diagenetic gypsum: (1) concentric structures of centripetal growth, and (2) expansive, roughly concentric structures. In the first type, the gypsification operated from the outer boundaries towards the inner parts. In the second type, part of the carbonate hosting the sulfur was also gypsified (replaced/cemented). In the diagenetic gypsum, the δ34S values are in agreement with a native sulfur and H 2S provenance. The δ18O sulfate values, however, enable us to differentiate two main groups of values: one with positive values and the other with negative values. In the group of positive values, interstitial (evaporated) solutions participated in the sulfur oxidation; this process presumably occurred in a first oxidation stage during shallow

  16. Gypsum karst in Italy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Chiarini, Veronica; Columbu, Andrea; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Madonia, Giuliana; Parise, Mario; Piccini, Leonardo; Vattano, Marco; Vigna, Bartolomeo; Zini, Luca; Forti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Although outcropping only rarely in Italy, gypsum karst has been described in detail since the early XXth century (Marinelli, 1917). Gypsum caves are now known from almost all Italian regions (Madonia & Forti, 2003), but are mainly localised along the northern border of the Apennine chain (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions), Calabria, and Sicily, where the major outcrops occur. Recently, important caves have also been discovered in the underground gypsum quarries in Piedmont (Vigna et al., 2010). During the late 80s and 90s several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in many gypsum areas. All this work converged into a comprehensive overview in 2003 (Madonia & Forti, 2003). Further detailed studies focused on the gypsum areas of Emilia Romagna (Chiesi et al., 2010; Forti & Lucci, 2010; Demaria et al., 2012; De Waele & Pasini, 2013; Ercolani et al., 2013; Columbu et al., 2015; Lucci & Piastra, 2015; Tedeschi et al., 2015) and of Sicily (Madonia & Vattano, 2011). Sinkholes related to Permo-Triassic gypsum have been studied in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Zini et al., 2015). This presentation will review the state of the art regarding different aspects of evaporite karst in Italy focusing on the main new results. References Chiesi M., et al. (2010) - Origin and evolution of a salty gypsum/anhydrite karst spring: the case of Poiano (Northern Apennines, Italy). Hydrogeology Journal, 18, pp. 1111-1124. Columbu A. et al. (2015) - Gypsum caves as indicators of climate-driven river incision and aggradation in a rapidly uplifting region. Geology, 43(6), 539-542. Demaria D. et al. (Eds.) (2012), Le Grotte Bolognesi, GSB-USB, 431 p. De Waele J., Pasini G. (2013) - Intra-messinian gypsum palaeokarst in the northern Apennines and its palaeogeographic implications. Terra Nova 25, pp. 199-205. Ercolani M., et al. (Eds.) (2013), I Gessi e la Cave i Monte Tondo. Studio multidisciplinare di un'area carsica nella Vena del Gesso Romagnola. Memorie Ist. It. Spel. II(26), 559 p

  17. Ancient gypsum mortars from Cyprus: characterization and reinvention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, M.; Ioannou, I.

    2012-04-01

    confirms the phenomena of crystallisation and recrystallisation closed to the exposed surfaces due to long-term weathering. As anticipated, the results of this study have proven useful in reinventing gypsum-based materials based on the production technology of the past and the use of local raw materials. It is worth noting that gypsum is a widely available mineral in Cyprus due to the extensive evaporite deposits on the island. In the mortars designed and produced in the laboratory, ratios of binder to aggregates were based on the results of the analysed ancient samples. Gypsum and lime based materials were used in different proportions both as binder and aggregates. The new mixtures were tested in fresh and dry conditions at 7, 28, 56 and 90 days after their production. The results indicated higher mechanical strengths (7.6-9.6 MPa) when only gypsum based materials were used both as binder and aggregates. Porosity and average pore diameter tended to increase as the percentage of calcite increased in the mixtures. The variability of the results enhances the possibility of selecting the appropriate repair mortar depending on the nature of the material which may demand a conservation treatment.

  18. A Whole-Genome Microarray Study of Arabidopsis thaliana Semisolid Callus Cultures Exposed to Microgravity and Nonmicrogravity Related Spaceflight Conditions for 5 Days on Board of Shenzhou 8

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  19. A whole-genome microarray study of Arabidopsis thaliana semisolid callus cultures exposed to microgravity and nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions for 5 days on board of Shenzhou 8.

    PubMed

    Fengler, Svenja; Spirer, Ina; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Nieselt, Kay; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  20. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum agricultural network alabama (cotton)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that can be beneficially used in agriculture. Research was conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration wi...

  1. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  2. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Kost, Dave; Tian, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaolu; Watts, Dexter; Norton, Darrell; Wolkowski, Richard P; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. A large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance crop production. However, information is lacking concerning the potential environmental impacts of trace metals, especially Hg, in the FGD gypsum. Flue gas desulfurization and mined gypsums were evaluated to determine their ability to affect concentrations of Hg and other trace elements in soils and earthworms. The study was conducted at four field sites across the United States (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). The application rates of gypsums ranged from 2.2 Mg ha in Indiana to 20 Mg ha in Ohio and Alabama. These rates are 2 to 10 times higher than typically recommended. The lengths of time from gypsum application to soil and earthworm sampling were 5 and 18 mo in Ohio, 6 mo in Indiana, 11 mo in Alabama, and 4 mo in Wisconsin. Earthworm numbers and biomass were decreased by FGD and mined gypsums in Ohio. Among all the elements examined, Hg was slightly increased in soils and earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the control and the mined gypsum treatments. The differences were not statistically significant except for the Hg concentration in the soil at the Wisconsin site. Selenium in earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments was statistically higher than in the controls but not higher than in the mined gypsum treatments at the Indiana and Wisconsin sites. Bioaccumulation factors for nondepurated earthworms were statistically similar or lower for the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the controls for all elements. Use of FGD gypsum at normal recommended agricultural rates seems not to have a significant impact on concentrations of trace metals in earthworms and soils. PMID:25602559

  3. Plants Living on Gypsum: Beyond the Specialist Model

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Sara; Escudero, Adrián; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Maestro, Melchor; Milla, Rubén; Albert, MarÍa J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants from gypsum habitats are classified as gypsophiles and gypsovags. The former include both narrow endemics limited to small gypsum areas and regionally dominant gypsophiles growing in gypsum areas of large regions, whereas gypsovags are plants that can grow both in gypsum and non-gypsum soils. Factors controlling the distribution of gypsum plants are still not fully understood. Methods To assess how the different types of gypsum plants deal with the stressful conditions of gypsum substrates, comparisons were made of the leaf chemical composition of four gypsovags, five regionally dominant gypsophiles and four narrow gypsum endemics growing in two massive gypsum areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Key Results The chemical composition of gypsovags was clearly different from regionally dominant gypsophiles, while the chemical composition of narrow-gypsophile endemics was more similar to the chemical composition of gypsovags than to that of regionally dominant gypsophiles. Regionally dominant gypsophiles showed higher concentrations of ash, Ca, S, N, Mg P and Na, whereas gypsovags and local gypsophile endemics displayed higher concentrations of C and greater C : N ratios. Conclusions Such differences suggest that the three groups of gypsum plants follow diverse ecological strategies. It is suggested that regionally dominant gypsophiles might fit the ‘specialist’ model, being species specifically adapted to gypsum, whereas both gypsovags and narrow-gypsophile endemics might fit the ‘refuge’ model, being stress-tolerant species that find refuge on gypsum soils from competition. The analysis of the leaf chemical composition could be a good predictor of the degree of plants specialization to gypsum soils. PMID:17204537

  4. Tunisian gypsums: Characteristics and use in cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Salah; Bennour, Ali; Chalwati, Youssef; Souidi, Khouloud; Thabet, Manel; Srasra, Ezzedine; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-09-01

    Gypsum materials of hundred meters thickness and interbedded with marine claystones and limestones from different paleogeographic sectors in the Tunisian territory are studied to assess their suitability for cement production. For this reason, thirty representative samples are analysed by chemical, physical and geotechnical tests. The obtained results for the studied gypsum materials are compared to Tunisian and European norms and with the local cements, currently marketed and which obey international norms. Indeed, for all samples hydraulic modulus HM, silica modulus SM and alumina modulus AM vary from (2.37-2.44), (2.48-2.68) and (1.45-2.5), respectively; whereas the required values for these modulus are (1.5-2.5), (2-3) and (1.5-2.5). The same behavior is observed for mineralogical analyses of C3S, C2S, C3A and C4AF and compressive strength at different ages. Briefly, Tunisia contains important reserves of gypsum scattered and spread over the Tunisian territory and can be used for cement production.

  5. Use of FGD gypsum in fire resistant panels

    SciTech Connect

    Leiva, C.; Garcia Arenas, C.; Vilches, L.F.; Vale, J.; Gimenez, A.; Ballesteros, J.C.

    2010-06-15

    Gypsum from power plant flue gas desulphurization units (FGD gypsum) is a combustion by-product produced in high quantities. In this paper, gypsum panels composed of 100% FGD gypsum from two power plants have been subjected to different physico-chemical (density, pH, humidity), mechanical (flexural and compressive strength, surface hardness, impact resistance), fire resistance and environmental tests (leaching and radioactivity). The results obtained have been compared with the requirements established in some European standards for commercial gypsum and other standards for similar products. In addition, the panels manufactured have been compared with commercial gypsum panels in order to determine the recycling possibilities of this kind of material in this application.

  6. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems. PMID:25602557

  7. Gypsum scaling and cleaning in forward osmosis: measurements and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mi, Baoxia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-03-15

    This study investigates gypsum scaling and cleaning behavior in forward osmosis (FO). The results show that gypsum scaling in FO is almost fully reversible, with more than 96% recovery of permeate water flux following a water rinse without addition of chemical cleaning reagents. Parallel comparisons of fouling and cleaning were made between FO (without hydraulic pressure) and RO (under high hydraulic pressure) modes. The shape of the water flux decline curves during gypsum scaling is similar in the two modes, but the flux recovery in FO mode is higher than that in RO mode by about 10%. This behavior suggests that operating in FO mode may reduce the need for chemical cleaning. The role of membrane materials in controlling gypsum scaling and cleaning was investigated using cellulose acetate (CA) and polyamide (PA) membranes. Gypsum scaling of PA membranes causes more severe flux decline and is harder to clean than that of CA membranes. AFM force measurements were performed between a gypsum particle probe and the membrane surfaces to elucidate gypsum scaling mechanisms. Analysis of adhesion force data indicates that gypsum scaling of the PA membrane is dominated by heterogeneous/surface crystallization, while gypsum scaling of the CA membrane is dominated by bulk crystallization and subsequent particle deposition.This finding implies that membrane surface modification and new material development can be an effective strategy to mitigate membrane scaling. PMID:20151636

  8. Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin Sakai, Etsuo

    2009-05-15

    The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5 wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

  9. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

  10. Mars Opportunity rover finds gypsum veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    Bright linear features about the width of a human thumb that were found on Mars by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity appear to be gypsum veins deposited by groundwater, a team of scientists announced at a 7 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. “To me, this is the single most powerful piece of evidence for liquid water on Mars that has been discovered by the Opportunity rover,” said Steve Squyres, a geoscientist at Cornell University in Ithaca, N. Y., and principal investigator for NASA Mars Exploration Rovers Opportunity and Spirit. “We have found sulfates before. Those sulfates were formed somewhere; we don't know where. They have been moved around by the wind, they've been mixed with other materials. It's a big, jumbled, fascinating mess. This stuff was formed right here. There was a fracture in the rock, water flowed through it, gypsum was precipitated from the water. End of story. Okay, there is no ambiguity about this. This is what makes it so cool.”

  11. Long-term erosion rate measurements in gypsum caves of Sorbas (SE Spain) by the Micro-Erosion Meter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Laura; De Waele, Jo; Calaforra, José Maria; Forti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the results of long-term micro-erosion measurements in the most important gypsum cave of Spain, the Cueva del Agua (Sorbas, Almeria, SE Spain). Nineteen MEM stations were positioned in 1992 in a wide range of morphological and environmental settings (gypsum floors and walls, carbonate speleothems, dry conduits and vadose passages) inside and outside the cave, on gypsum and carbonate bedrocks and exposed to variable degree of humidity, different air flow and hydrodynamic conditions. Four different sets of stations have been investigated: (1) the main cave entrance (Las Viñicas spring); (2) the main river passage; (3) the abandoned Laboratory tunnel; and (4) the external gypsum surface. Data over a period of about 18 years are available. The average lowering rates vary from 0.014 to 0.016 mm yr- 1 near the main entrance and in the Laboratory tunnel, to 0.022 mm - 1 on gypsum floors and 0.028 mm yr- 1 on carbonate flowstones. The denudation data from the external gypsum stations are quite regular with a rate of 0.170 mm yr- 1. The observations allowed the collecting of important information concerning the feeding of the karst aquifer not only by infiltrating rainwater, but under present climate conditions also by water condensation of moist air flow. This contribution to the overall karst processes in the Cueva del Agua basin represents over 20% of the total chemical dissolution of the karst area and more than 50% of the speleogenetically removed gypsum in the cave system, thus representing all but a secondary role in speleogenesis. Condensation-corrosion is most active along the medium walls, being slower at the roof and almost absent close to the floor. This creates typical corrosion morphologies such as cupola, while gypsum flowers develop where evaporation dominates. This approach also shows quantitatively the morphological implications of condensation-corrosion processes in gypsum karst systems in arid zones, responsible for an

  12. Properties study of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guozhong; Yu Yanzhen; Zhao Zhongjian; Li Jianquan; Li Changchun

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript addresses treating cotton stalk fiber surface with styrene acrylic emulsion, which improves the interfacial combined state of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite effectively and improves its mechanical properties notably. Mixes less slag, ordinary Portland cement, etc., to modify gypsum base. The electron microscope was utilized to analyze and research on the effect on composite properties of the abovementioned mixtures.

  13. Sustainable uses of FGD gypsum in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil/water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur (S) from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural...

  14. MARKETING OF BYPRODUCT GYPSUM FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the 1985 marketing potential of byproduct gypsum from utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD), for the area east of the Rocky Mountains, using the calculated gypsum production rates of 14 selected power plants. The 114 cement plants and...

  15. Utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur for crops and has been shown to improve soil physical and chemical pr...

  16. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  17. Agricultural applications of FGD gypsum in soil and water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum is a naturally occuring mineral that has unique properties and many uses. The purity of natural deposits vary widely due to the nature of the deposional processes. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is generally of a higher purity and has a consistent fine particle size making it a prefe...

  18. Porosity change after gypsum crust formation on macro-porous limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewanckele, Jan; Cnudde, Veerle; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Boone, Matthieu; van Hoorebeke, Luc; Jacobs, Patric

    2010-05-01

    The deterioration of stone is a complex process in which physical, biological and chemical mechanisms are involved. In this research, pore structure changes inside two types of porous limestone were analyzed before, during and after strong acid tests with SO2. Sulphatation and crust formation phenomena on natural building stones exposed to a polluted environment, are largely described in literature. As far as rocks rich in calcium carbonate are concerned, the main processes involved are the dissolution of the calcium carbonate and the formation of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) in presence of an acid atmosphere. The low mobility of this newly formed salt favours its accumulation in porous materials and at the surface of less porous media. The main actor in the process of gypsum crystallization on limestone is the aggressive sulphur dioxide gas (SO2). In this study, the Savonnières and Euville limestone were subjected to tests with a strong acid. According to the standard EN 13919:2002E, samples were put in acid environment for 21 days. At the bottom of the container a mixture of 500 ± 10 ml H2SO3 and 150 ± 10 ml de-mineralized H2O was added. No airborne particles or oxides of nitrogen (NOx) were added. Before exposure, after 6 days in the polluted environment and at the end of the test, the two samples were scanned with X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) at the Centre for X-ray Tomography at Ghent University, Belgium (UGCT; www.ugct.ugent.be). This visualization technique allows 2D and 3D reconstructions on a micrometer scale of the internal structure of an object without damaging the material. It thus enables to scan the same sample in a sequential way. In order to obtain information about the sample's interior of which the characteristics can be compared before, during and after the test, the same scanning parameters (exposure time, amount of frames, energy, etc.) were used. In addition, the same adjustments like beam hardening correction, normalizing, ring and spot

  19. Enhancing seedling production of native species to restore gypsum habitats.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, E M; Ballesteros, M; Foronda, A; Navarro, F B; Jiménez, M N; Lorite, J

    2015-11-01

    Gypsum habitats are widespread globally and are important for biological conservation. Nevertheless, they are often affected by human disturbances and thus require restoration. Sowing and planting have shown positive results, but these actions are usually limited by the lack of native plant material in commercial nurseries, and very little information is available on the propagation of these species. We address this issue from the hypothesis that gypsum added to a standard nursery growing medium (peat) can improve seedling performance of gypsum species and, therefore, optimise the seedling production for outplanting purposes. We test the effect of gypsum on emergence, survival, and growth of nine native plant species, including gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). We used four treatments according to the proportions, in weight, of gypsum:standard peat (G:S), i.e. high-g (50G:50S), medium-g (25G:75S), low-g (10G:90S), and standard-p (0G:100S). Our results showed that the gypsum treatments especially benefited the emergence stage, gypsophiles as group, and Ononis tridentata as a taxon. In particular, the gypsum treatments enhanced emergence of seven species, survival of three species, and growth of two gypsophiles, while the use of the standard peat favoured only the emergence or growth of three gypsovags. Improving emergence and survival at the nursery can provide a reduction of costs associated with seed harvesting, watering, and space, while enlarging seedlings can favour the establishment of individuals after outplanting. Thus, we suggest adding gypsum to standard peat for propagating seedlings in species from gypsum habitats, thereby potentially cutting the costs of restoring such habitats. Our assessment enables us to provide particular advice by species. In general, we recommend using between 25 and 50% of gypsum to propagate gypsophiles, and between 0 and 10% for gypsovags. The results can benefit not only the production

  20. Drinkable rocks: plants can use crystallization water from gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Some minerals hold water in their crystalline structure. Such is the case of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O), a rock forming mineral present in the arid and semi-arid regions of the five continents, including the dry most areas of the planet. Gypsum is also extensively found on Mars, where it constitutes a targeted substrate for the search of life. Under natural conditions and depending on the temperature, pressure, and dissolved electrolytes or organics, gypsum may lose crystallization water molecules, becoming bassanite (i.e. hemihydrate: CaSO4•½H2O) or anhydrite (CaSO4). As crystallization water can account for up to 20.8% of gypsum weight, it has been suggested that it could constitute a relevant source of water for organisms, particularly during summer. This suggestion is consistent with the phenology observed in some shallow-rooted plants growing on gypsum, which remain active when drought is intense, and with the increased soil moisture of gypsum soils during summer as compared to surrounding non-gypsum soils. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. These results significantly modify the current paradigm on water use by plants, where water held in the crystalline structure of mineral rocks is not regarded as a potential source. Given the existence of gypsum on the surface of Mars and its widespread occurrence on arid and semi-arid regions worldwide, our results have important implications for exobiology, the study of life under extreme conditions and arid land reclamation.

  1. Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement.

    PubMed

    Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Sakai, Etsuo

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC. PMID:19131236

  2. Effect of background electrolytes on gypsum dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the dissolution behaviour of gypsum (CaSO4· 2H2O) in aqueous solutions is of primary importance in many natural and technological processes (Pachon-Rodriguez and Colombani, 2007), including the weathering of rocks and gypsum karst formations, deformation of gypsum-bearing rocks, the quality of drinking water, amelioration of soil acidity, scale formation in the oil and gas industry or measurement of water motion in oceanography. Specific ions in aqueous solutions can play important but very different roles on mineral dissolution. For example, the dissolution rates and the morphology of dissolution features may be considerably modified by the presence of the foreign ions in the solution, which adsorb at the surface and hinder the detachment of the ions building the crystal. Dissolution processes in the aqueous environment are closely related to the rearrangement of water molecules around solute ions and the interaction between the solvent molecules themselves. The rearrangement of water molecules with respect to solute species has been recognized as the main kinetic barrier for crystal dissolution in many systems (Davis, 2000; De Yoreo and Dove 2004; Wasylenki et al. 2005). Current research suggest that the control that electrolytes exert on water structure is limited to the local environment surrounding the ions and is not related to long-range electric fields emanating from the ions but results from effects associated with the hydration shell(s) of the ions (Collins et al. 2007) and the ions' capacity to break or structure water (i.e. chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, respectively). These effects will ultimately affect the kinetics of crystal dissolution, and could be correlated with the water affinity of the respective background ions following a trend known as the lyotropic or Hofmeister series (Kunz et al. 2004; Dove and Craven, 2005). In situ macroscopic and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted at a

  3. Water defluoridation using Malawi’s locally sourced gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamba, W. R. L.; Sajidu, S. M.; Thole, B.; Mwatseteza, J. F.

    Free fluoride levels above the WHO guideline maximum value of 1.5 mg/l have been reported in several parts of Malawi. Dental fluorosis has also been observed in the same areas such that search for local defluoridation techniques has become important in the country. The present research intended to determine the potential of using Malawi gypsum in defluoridation, identify the best pre-treatment of the gypsum and optimum conditions under which effective water defluoridation with the gypsum may be obtained. Laboratory experiments were carried out to explore defluoridation of drinking water using locally sourced gypsum and gypsum calcined at high temperatures. A 400 °C calcined phase of gypsum gave the highest defluoridation capacity of 67.80% compared to raw (uncalcined) gypsum, 200, 300 and 500 °C calcined phases. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern of the 400 °C phase revealed existence of less crystalline CaSO 4 that was thought to be responsible for such relatively high defluoridation capacity. The dependence of the fluoride removal by the 400 °C calcined phase on other drinking water quality parameters was assessed by simple correlation analysis. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of fluoride removal by the materials were also investigated. It was found that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism through which fluoride was removed from water by the materials.

  4. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei Zhao Qinglin Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  5. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  6. Gypsum-karst problems in constructing dams in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Gypsum is a highly soluble rock and is dissolved readily to form caves, sinkholes, disappearing streams, and other karst features that typically are also present in limestones and dolomites. Gypsum karst is widespread in the USA and has caused problems at several sites where dams were built, or where dam construction was considered. Gypsum karst is present (at least locally) in most areas where gypsum crops out, or is less than 30-60 m below the land surface. These karst features can compromise on the ability of a dam to hold water in a reservoir, and can even cause collapse of a dam. Gypsum karst in the abutments or foundation of a dam can allow water to pass through, around, or under a dam, and solution channels can enlarge quickly, once water starts flowing through such a karst system. The common procedure for controlling gypsum karst beneath the dam is a deep cut-off trench, backfilled with impermeable material, or a close-spaced grout curtain that hopefully will fill all cavities. In Oklahoma, the proposed Upper Mangum Dam was abandoned before construction, because of extensive gypsum karst in the abutments and impoundment area. Catastrophic failure of the Quail Creek Dike in southwest Utah in 1989 was due to flow of water through an undetected karstified gypsum unit beneath the earth-fill embankment. The dike was rebuilt, at a cost of US $12 million, with construction of a cut-off trench 600 m long and 25 m deep. Other dams in the USA with severe gypsum-karst leakage problems in recent years are Horsetooth and Carter Lake Dams, in Colorado, and Anchor Dam, in Wyoming. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Gypsum-karst problems in constructing dams in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.

    2008-01-01

    Gypsum is a highly soluble rock and is dissolved readily to form caves, sinkholes, disappearing streams, and other karst features that typically are also present in limestones and dolomites. Gypsum karst is widespread in the USA and has caused problems at several sites where dams were built, or where dam construction was considered. Gypsum karst is present (at least locally) in most areas where gypsum crops out, or is less than 30-60 m below the land surface. These karst features can compromise on the ability of a dam to hold water in a reservoir, and can even cause collapse of a dam. Gypsum karst in the abutments or foundation of a dam can allow water to pass through, around, or under a dam, and solution channels can enlarge quickly, once water starts flowing through such a karst system. The common procedure for controlling gypsum karst beneath the dam is a deep cut-off trench, backfilled with impermeable material, or a close-spaced grout curtain that hopefully will fill all cavities. In Oklahoma, the proposed Upper Mangum Dam was abandoned before construction, because of extensive gypsum karst in the abutments and impoundment area. Catastrophic failure of the Quail Creek Dike in southwest Utah in 1989 was due to flow of water through an undetected karstified gypsum unit beneath the earth-fill embankment. The dike was rebuilt, at a cost of US 12 million, with construction of a cut-off trench 600 m long and 25 m deep. Other dams in the USA with severe gypsum-karst leakage problems in recent years are Horsetooth and Carter Lake Dams, in Colorado, and Anchor Dam, in Wyoming.

  8. Differential comminution of gypsum in cements ground in different mills

    SciTech Connect

    Panigrahy, P.K.; Goswami, G.; Panda, J.D.; Panda, R.K

    2003-07-01

    Identical mixes containing fixed amounts of ordinary Portland cement clinker and gypsum were ground in two types of industrial cement mills - viz. ball mill (BM) and vertical roller mill (VRM) - to identical Blaine fineness to examine the effect of any possible differential comminution of gypsum on cement setting times. The present investigation demonstrates that during comminution of cements, the degree of crystallinity of gypsum, as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), changes with used grinding mills and this causes changes in setting times of similar cements even when ground to identical Blaine fineness.

  9. Evaluation of FGD-gypsum to improve forage production and reduce phosphorus lossed from Piedmont soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGD-gypsum), a byproduct from coal fired electricity generators, has the potential for beneficial use in agricultural systems as a soil amendment. Similar to mined gypsum it can improve soil chemical and physical properties and increase crop productivity. FGD-gypsum ...

  10. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing marketable products, namely fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate, from gypsum produced as part of lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Millions of tons of FGD-gypsum by-product will be produced in this decade. In this study, a literature review and bench-scale experiments were conducted to obtain process data for the production of marketable products from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the process. FGD-gypsum produced at the Abbott power plant in Champaign, IL was used as a raw material. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake product contains 98.36% gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O), and less than 0.01% calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate were tested at temperatures between 60 to 70{degrees}C for a duration of five to six hours. The results of a literature review and preliminary bench-scale experiments are presented in this paper.

  11. Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Li, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibilities for producing marketable products including fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced as part of lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Millions of tone of FGD-gypsum by-product may be produced in this decade as a result of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In this research, bench-scale experiments were conducted to obtain process data for the production of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibilities of the process. The FGD-gypsum sample produced from a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121-FGD process installed on the Abbott power plant in Champaign, EL which was composed of 98.36% gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O) and less than 0.01% calcium sulfite (CaSO) was used. The preliminary results of bench-scale experiments to evaluate the influence of reaction conditions to produce ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum are presented in this paper.

  12. Gypsum under pressure: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzi, Luigi; Scandolo, Sandro

    2010-02-01

    We investigate by means of first-principles methods the structural response of gypsum (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) to pressures within and above the stability range of gypsum-I (P≤4GPa) . Structural and vibrational properties calculated for gypsum-I are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Compression within gypsum-I takes place predominantly through a reduction in the volume of the CaO8 polyhedra and through a distortion of the hydrogen bonds. The distance between CaSO4 layers becomes increasingly incompressible, indicating a mechanical limit to the packing of water molecules between the layers. We find that a structure with collapsed interlayer distances becomes more stable than gypsum-I above about 5 GPa. The collapse is concomitant with a rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network of the water molecules. Comparison of the vibrational spectra calculated for this structure with experimental data taken above 5 GPa supports the validity of our model for the high-pressure phase of gypsum.

  13. Printed circuit board industry.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    The printed circuit board is the platform upon which microelectronic components such as semiconductor chips and capacitors are mounted. It provides the electrical interconnections between components and is found in virtually all electronics products. Once considered low technology, the printed circuit board is evolving into a high-technology product. Printed circuit board manufacturing is highly complicated, requiring large equipment investments and over 50 process steps. Many of the high-speed, miniaturized printed circuit boards are now manufactured in cleanrooms with the same health and safety problems posed by other microelectronics manufacturing. Asia produces three-fourths of the world's printed circuit boards. In Asian countries, glycol ethers are the major solvents used in the printed circuit board industry. Large quantities of hazardous chemicals such as formaldehyde, dimethylformamide, and lead are used by the printed circuit board industry. For decades, chemically intensive and often sloppy manufacturing processes exposed tens of thousands of workers to a large number of chemicals that are now known to be reproductive toxicants and carcinogens. The printed circuit board industry has exposed workers to high doses of toxic metals, solvents, acids, and photolithographic chemicals. Only recently has there been any serious effort to diminish the quantity of lead distributed worldwide by the printed circuit board industry. Billions of electronics products have been discarded in every region of the world. This paper summarizes recent regulatory and enforcement efforts. PMID:16580876

  14. Groundwater changes in evaporating basins using gypsum crystals' isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Bustos, D.; Allwood, A.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    While the dynamics of groundwater evaporation are well known, it is still challenging to reconstruct the water patterns in areas where water is not available anymore. We selected a specific location in White Sands National Monument (WSNM), New Mexico, to validate a method to extract information from hydrated minerals regarding past groundwater evaporation patterns in evaporitic basins. WSNM has gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) dunes and crystals precipitated from the evaporation of an ancient lake. Our approach aims to extract the water of crystallization of gypsum and measure its oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions, in order to reconstruct the groundwater history of the area. The idea is that as the mother brine evaporates its isotopic composition changes continuously, recorded as water of crystallization in successive growth zones of gypsum. To check if the isotopic composition of the salt could effectively differentiate between distinctive humidity conditions, the methodology was tested first on synthetic gypsum grown under controlled humidity and temperature conditions. T and RH% were maintained constant in a glove box and precipitated gypsum was harvested every 24 hours. d2H and d18O of water of crystallization from the synthetic gypsum was extracted using a specially developed technique on a TC/EA. The brine was measured using a Gas Bench II for d18O and an H-Device for d2H on a Thermo Finnigan MAT 253 mass spectrometer. With the method tested, we measured natural gypsum. In order to identify the growth zones we mapped the surface of the crystals using an experimental space flight XRF instrument. Crystals were then sampled for isotopic analyses. Preliminary results suggest that site-specific groundwater changes can be described by the isotopic variations. We will show that the methodology is a reliable and fast method to quantify hydrological changes in a targeted environment. The study is currently ongoing but the full dataset will be presented at the conference.

  15. Morphological biosignatures in gypsum: diverse formation processes of Messinian (∼6.0 Ma) gypsum stromatolites.

    PubMed

    Allwood, A C; Burch, I W; Rouchy, J M; Coleman, M

    2013-09-01

    The ∼5.3-6.0 million-year-old evaporitic gypsum deposits of Cyprus and Crete contain a variety of stromatolites that formed during the Messinian salinity crisis. We recognize four stromatolite morphotypes, including domical, conical, columnar, and flat-laminated structures. Observations of morphological and textural variations among the different morphotypes reveal significant diversity and complexity in the nature of interactions between microorganisms, gypsum deposition, and gypsum crystal growth. Nonbiological processes (detrital gypsum deposition, in situ crust precipitation, syntaxial crystal growth, subsurface crystal growth, and recrystallization) interacted with inferred microbial processes (including localized growth of biofilms, trapping and binding of grains in mats, nucleation of gypsum on cells) to produce distinct morphological-textural assemblages. Evidence for biological origins is clear in some stromatolite morphotypes and can come from the presence of microfossils, the spatial distribution of organic matter, and stromatolite morphology. In one stromatolite morphotype, the presence of the stromatolite, or the biota associated with it, may have determined the morphology of gypsum crystals. In some stromatolite morphotypes, definitive evidence of a microbial influence is not as clear. There are broad similarities between the Messinian gypsum stromatolites and carbonate stromatolites elsewhere in the geologic record, such as the formation of precipitated and granular layers; the development of domed, columnar, and conical morphotypes; the potential for microbes to influence mineral precipitation; and the recrystallization of deposits during burial. However, in detail the array of microbial-sedimentary-diagenetic process interactions is quite distinct in gypsiferous systems due to differences in the way gypsum typically forms and evolves in the paleoenvironment compared to carbonate. Unique aspects of the taphonomy of gypsum compared to carbonate

  16. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The

  17. Experimental deformation tests on natural gypsum in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Burlini, L.; Rutter, E.; Dapiaggi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Gypsum, together with anhydrite and halite, is the main mineral forming evaporitic rocks. These rocks, interlayered within sedimentary sequences, play an important role in structural development in several ways on accounts of their particular physical properties. Evaporites are more plastic and less permeable compared to sandstones, limestones and shales. Moreover, gypsum starts to dehydrate at less than 100 °C. High plasticity at relatively low temperature, together with the possible presence of pressurised water, imply that, when sedimentary sequences are involved in thrust tectonics, deformation is often localised in evaporitic levels (Apennines, South Alpine region, Zagros, Gulf of Mexico, etc.); in some cases the deformation is accompanied by seismicity as in the Northern Apennines extensional systems. Low permeability of evaporitic rocks allow them to be a good sealing rock for oil reservoirs and a very efficient rock to localise waste disposal. In this framework, a set of experiments was performed on gypsum samples from Volterra (Tuscany, Italy) in order to investigate how gypsum behaves at increasing stress/strain conditions. Experimental deformation tests were performed at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, at different temperatures (20, 70, 90 and 130 °C) and at strain rates ranging between 1*10-4 and 5*10-6 s-1. In order to reach high shear strain values (up to gamma = 4), we used: 1) gypsum cores deformed using the newly developed torsion technique in a Paterson-type apparatus and 2) both gypsum slices and powder in sawcut assembly at 35°, deformed in a Heard-type triaxial apparatus. All the deformed samples have been studied both by optical microscopy, to investigate the evolution of the microstructure with strain, and by XRD analysis, to determine if and to what extent gypsum dehydrated during deformation. A peak in the shear stress value (60-120 MPa) was reached at shear strains between gamma = 0.2 and gamma = 1, followed by strain softening or

  18. Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quennoz, Alexandra Scrivener, Karen L.

    2012-07-15

    Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems with different gypsum additions was investigated in terms of the phase assemblage, kinetics and microstructural development. The second stage of the reaction, which begins after the depletion of gypsum, was of particular interest. From in-situ X-ray diffraction results, it was seen that the dissolution of ettringite and C{sub 3}A to form monosulfoaluminate and/or hydroxy-AFm phases is a rapid reaction that occurs right after the depletion of gypsum. The observation of the calorimetric curves obtained for the different gypsum additions leads us to the conclusion that the mechanism controlling the hydration rate during this period is the nucleation and growth of the AFm phases. The microstructural study showed that the formation of AFm phases occurs in the space between the C{sub 3}A grains but also within the boundaries of the original C{sub 3}A grains. Hydrogarnet was observed growing as a shell around the C{sub 3}A grains.

  19. Effect of gypsum content on soil water retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, D.; Herrero, J.

    2015-09-01

    Many gypsiferous soils occur in arid lands, where the water retention capacity of the soil is vital to plant life and crop production. This study investigated the effect of gypsum content on the gravimetric soil water retention curve (WRC). We analyzed calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), equivalent gypsum content (EG), soil organic carbon content (SOC), and electrical conductivity of 43 samples collected from various horizons in soils in the Ebro Valley, NE Spain. The WRC of the fine earth was determined using the pressure-plate method (pressure heads = 0, -33, -100, -200, -500, and -1500 kPa), and the gravimetric water retention curves were fitted to the unimodal van Genuchten function. Soil gypsum content had a significant effect on water retention. Soils that had high gypsum content made WRC with higher water retention at near saturation conditions, and steeper WRC slopes. The EG threshold at which gypsum content had an effect on WRC was about 40%, and EG was positively and negatively correlated with the α and n parameters of the WRC, respectively.

  20. Cost effective management of gypsum by-products from FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    Of the 100 facilities impacted by Phase 1 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), 14 elected to install flue gas desulfurization systems. Ten of these plants chose wet limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) processes creating a gypsum by-product. One major benefit to the limestone forced oxidation system is the relative ease of gypsum management. Significant cost savings are available by utilizing the gypsum by-product for commercial applications, or by using a relatively new method of disposal, gypsum stacking. This paper presents a general discussion of gypsum stacking and a case history example of the design, construction and operation of a gypsum stack at a Phase 1 utility.

  1. Using stable isotopes (δ^{18}O and δ$D) of gypsum hydration water to unravel the mode of gypsum speleothem formation in semi-arid caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Calaforra, Jose Maria; Evans, Nicholas P.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Subaerial gypsum speleothems form during the evaporation of calcium-sulfate-rich solutions in caves. The evaporation of infiltration water is the widely accepted mechanism to explain precipitation of gypsum speleothems; i.e., the dissolution of gypsum host-rock (e.g. Messinian marine gypsum) supplies Ca2+ and SO42- ions to cave waters and subsequent evaporation leads to gypsum saturation. However, water condensation actively occurs in caves of semi-arid regions and plays a key role in subaerial cave speleogenesis and recharge of aquifers in low-rainfall environments. To date, water condensation in karstic environments has not been considered as an important factor in gypsum speleothem formation. We collected speleothem samples from the upper passages of Covadura Cave in the gypsum karst of Sorbas (Almeria, SE Spain). This cave is located in a temperate (annual mean temperature of 19.5oC), semi-arid region (

  2. Using Management Advisory Boards in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad; Manning, Michael R.; Burchett, O'Neill; Wieters, C. David; Wright, Charles Roger; Powers, Tom L.

    2001-01-01

    Advisory boards in management classes expose students to experienced businesspeople and add realism. They give students insight into project work and experience working with senior management. However, boards complicate instructors' role, board members' and teachers' beliefs may conflict, and board members may give students contradictory advice.…

  3. Gypsum scaling in pressure retarded osmosis: experiments, mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Hou, Dianxun; She, Qianhong; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2014-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is an osmotically-driven membrane process that can be used to harvest salinity-gradient power. The PRO performance (both water flux and power density) can be severely limited by membrane fouling. The current study, for the first time, investigates PRO scaling in a bench-scale pressurized system using calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) as a model scalant. In addition to the bulk feed solution (FS) saturation index (SI bulk), gypsum scaling was found to be strongly affected by the draw solution (DS) type and concentration, the applied hydraulic pressure, and the membrane orientation. The commonly recommended active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) orientation was highly prone to internal scaling. In this orientation, severe internal concentration polarization (ICP) of scaling precursors induced gypsum clogging in membrane support layer even when the FS was undersaturated (e.g., SI bulk = 0.8). At higher SI bulk values, external gypsum crystal deposition occurred in addition to internal scaling. More severe scaling was observed when the DS contained scaling precursors such as Ca(2+) or SO4(2-), suggesting that the reverse diffusion of these precursors into the FS can significantly enhanced gypsum scaling. Increasing applied hydraulic pressure could enhance reverse solute diffusion and thus result in more severe gypsum scaling when the DS contained scaling precursors. A conceptual model, capturing the two important PRO scaling mechanisms (ICP of scaling precursors from FS and reverse diffusion of scaling precursors from the DS), is presented to rationalize the experimental results. Our results provide significant implications for PRO scaling control. PMID:24156948

  4. Calcium isotopic fractionation in microbially mediated gypsum precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Mansor, Muammar; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2016-07-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) precipitation experiments were carried out at low pH in the presence of the sulfur oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The observed Ca isotopic fractionation (expressed as Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid-δ44/40Cafluid) at the end of each experimental time period (∼50 to 60 days) was -1.41‰ to -1.09‰ in the biotic experiments, -1.09‰ in the killed control, and -1.01‰ to -0.88‰ in the abiotic controls. As there were no strong differences in the solution chemistry and the rate at which gypsum precipitated in the biotic and abiotic controls, we deduce a biological Ca isotope effect on the order of -0.3‰. The isotope effect correlates with a difference in crystal aspect ratios between the biotic experiments (8.05 ± 3.99) and abiotic controls (31.9 ± 8.40). We hypothesize that soluble and/or insoluble organic compounds selectively inhibit crystal growth at specific crystal faces, and that the growth inhibition affects the fractionation factor associated with gypsum precipitation. The experimental results help explain Ca isotopic variability in gypsum sampled from a sulfidic cave system, in which gypsum crystals exhibiting a diversity of morphologies (microcrystalline to cm-scale needles) have a broad range of δ44/40Ca values (∼1.2-0.4‰) relative to the limestone wall (δ44/40Ca = 1.3‰). In light of the laboratory experiments, the variation in Ca isotope values in the caves can be interpreted as a consequence of gypsum precipitation in the presence of microbial organic matter and subsequent isotopic re-equilibration with the Ca source.

  5. Comparison of soil applied flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and agricultural gypsum on soil physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum can come from different sources. Agricultural gypsum is typically mined and used to supply calcium to crops. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a by-product of coal power plants. Although their chemical formulas are the same, different trace elements and materials are present in them....

  6. Physicochemical Properties and Cellular Responses of Strontium-Doped Gypsum Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Pouria, Amir; Bandegani, Hadis; Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Hesaraki, Saeed; Alizadeh, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes some physical, structural, and biological properties of gypsum bioceramics doped with various amounts of strontium ions (0.19–2.23 wt%) and compares these properties with those of a pure gypsum as control. Strontium-doped gypsum (gypsum:Sr) was obtained by mixing calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and solutions of strontium nitrate followed by washing the specimens with distilled water to remove residual salts. Gypsum was the only phase found in the composition of both pure and gypsum:Sr, meanwhile a shift into lower diffraction angles was observed in the X-ray diffraction patterns of doped specimens. Microstructure of all gypsum specimens consisted of many rod-like small crystals entangled to each other with more elongation and higher thickness in the case of gypsum:Sr. The Sr-doped sample exhibited higher compressive strength and lower solubility than pure gypsum. A continuous release of strontium ions was observed from the gypsum:Sr during soaking it in simulated body fluid for 14 days. Compared to pure gypsum, the osteoblasts cultured on strontium-doped samples showed better proliferation rate and higher alkaline phosphatase activity, depending on Sr concentration. These observations can predict better in vivo behavior of strontium-doped gypsum compared to pure one. PMID:22719270

  7. 40 CFR 436.50 - Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gypsum subcategory. 436.50 Section 436.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gypsum Subcategory § 436.50 Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  8. Erodibility of a sodic soil amended with FGD gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils with high sodium concentrations are a serious management problem in the coastal plain regions of the lower Mississippi River valley due to salt toxicity and their dispersive nature. The primary method of remediation of sodic soils in arid regions is naturally occurring gypsum, however, due to ...

  9. GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  10. EVALUATION OF GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  11. FGD gypsum filters remove soluble phosphorus from agricultural drainage waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decades of chicken litter applications has led to phosphorus (P) levels up to ten times the agronomic optimum in soils of the Delmarva Peninsula. This legacy P is a major source of P entering drainage ditches that eventually empty into the Chesapeake Bay. A Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum ditc...

  12. Evaluation of gypsum rates on greenhouse crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was to determine the potential of an added value distribution channel for gypsum waste by evaluating various greenhouse crops with captious pH and calcium needs. Three studies consisting of: Zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum) and petunia (Petunia x hybrida); tomato (Solanum lycoper...

  13. Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum ProductsD.A. Betancourt1, T.R.Dean1, A. Evans2, and G.Byfield2 1. US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory; RTP, NC 277112. RTI International, RTP, NCSeveral...

  14. MOLD GROWTH ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD--A RESEARCH SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing occupant exposure to mold growing on damp gypsum wallboard is a research objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed but instead surface cleaners are used and then paint is applied in an attem...

  15. Use of soil electrical conductivity to determine gypsum movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been renewed interest in the land application of industrial by-products, such as flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. Some of these materials can be beneficial to crop production under certain circumstances. However, recent findings show that annual applications might be needed to provid...

  16. The potential for FGD gypsum use in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for land application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on agricultural lands in the South has been promoted for several years. Some on-farm research has shown consistent yield benefits from its use. Recent experiments on hybrid bermudagrass hayfields and with cotton on Coastal...

  17. Erodibility of a sodic soil amended with FGD gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High sodium concentrations in coastal plain soils of the lower Mississippi River valley are a serious management problem due to salt toxicity and their dispersive nature. Remediation of sodic soils with mined gypsum in the southeastern region is not often considered due to its relatively high cost. ...

  18. Wide distribution and glacial origin of polar gypsum on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Spiga, A.; Le Deit, L.

    2012-02-01

    The North Polar Cap of Mars is associated with different kinds of superficial sediments, including the Circumpolar Dune Field, interior dune fields and sedimentary veneers scattered over the ice cap. In order to resolve the mineralogical composition and the regional distribution of these sediments, we processed OMEGA and CRISM hyperspectral data with an original method based on spectral derivation. We find that gypsum is present in all areas where undefined hydrated minerals had been previously detected, including superficial sedimentary veneers covering the North Polar Cap, interior dune fields and the whole Circumpolar Dune Field. Morphological and structural analyses reveal that these gypsum crystals derive directly from the interior of the ice cap. The source of superficial sedimentary veneers is the dust that was previously contained in the upper part of the ice cap, the ice-rich North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). This gypsum-bearing dust was released, on south-facing slopes of spiral troughs and arcuate scarps, by ice ablation controlled by katabatic winds. By the analysis of all associations of erosional scarps and dune fields over the North Polar Cap, we also demonstrate that the polar dunes are composed of sand-sized particles that were previously contained in the sediment-rich Basal Unit (BU), corresponding to the lower part of the ice cap. These particles contain gypsum and were released from the BU, by regressive ablation of ice at marginal scarps that border the North Polar Cap and by vertical ablation of ice on Olympia Planum. From a reconstruction of wind streamlines over and around the ice cap, we infer that katabatic winds descending from the polar high and rotating around the North Polar Cap control the release of these gypsum-bearing particles by ice ablation and the redistribution of these particles in the Circumpolar Dune Field.

  19. Chemical prosperity of various chemical gypsums from viewpoint of particle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafu, M.; Toshima, T.; Manaka, A.; Chohji, T.; Irie, M.

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution rate of various chemical gypsums in the water was investigated by using batch experiment. The rate of the dissolution of the gypsum had good agreement for explanation of dissolution of plate particle. The rate constants of the experimental formula were different with particle morphology of the gypsums. When morphology of the particle was sheet-liked, the dissolution rate was 10 timed large than it of block-shaped particle. From result of observation of dissolution phenomena of the in the water, it was find that dissolution of the gypsum was preceded on long axis. From these results, particle morphology is seems to be important parameter for using chemical gypsums.

  20. Ca Isotope Fractionation During Gypsum Precipitation in a Sulfidic Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantle, M. S.; Macalady, J. L.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2009-12-01

    In sulfidic caves, limestone dissolution above the water table is assocated with sulfuric acid corrosion and attendant precipitation of CaSO4 crusts. Since sulfuric acid is produced by microbially-mediated sulfide oxidation, such systems present unique opportunities to study the effects of microbial processes on Ca isotope systematics. The current study presents preliminary measurements of the Ca isotopic composition of gypsum, calcite, and water samples collected in and around Grotta Bella cave in the Frasassi cave system (central Italy). The environment sampled in this limestone-hosted cave is situated close to flowing sulfidic groundwater (air [H2S]meas ~3 ppm) and is actively forming gypsum in close association with microbial communities ("snottites") dominated by Acidithiobacillus sp [1]. The pH ranges from >2.3 in gypsum crust accumulating on the cave walls to 0-2 at the surface of snottites, while pH in waters sampled outside the cave is between 7 and 8. The current rate of limestone dissolution is ~0.15 mmol CaCO3/cm2/a [2]. This study reports the Ca isotopic composition (δ44Ca, rel. to bulk Earth) of stream and seep water, limestone, and gypsum samples in and around Grotta Bella. Calcium isotopes were measured on a Finnigan Triton TI thermal ionization mass spectrometer at GEOMAR using a 43Ca-48Ca double spike. Field-acidified stream waters and dissolved gypsum were chromatographically purified using MCI Gel (Biorad) while bulk limestone samples were dissolved in nitric acid and loaded onto single Re filaments without additional purification. The δ44Ca values of stream waters and springs are relatively restricted (~0.2‰) and generally the same as bulk limestone. Actively-precipitating CaSO4 minerals, however, show a range of δ44Ca values from limestone-like to values almost 1‰ lighter than corresponding wallrock. Decreasing δ44Ca values in these gypsum minerals correspond to gradients in pH and mineral grain size. The smallest gypsum grains

  1. The crystallization water of gypsum rocks is a relevant water source for plants.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Sara; Azorín, José; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Some minerals, like gypsum, hold water in their crystalline structure. Although still unexplored, the use of such crystallization water by organisms would point to a completely new water source for life, critical under dry conditions. Here we use the fact that the isotopic composition of free water differs from gypsum crystallization water to show that plants can use crystallization water from the gypsum structure. The composition of the xylem sap of gypsum plants during summer shows closer values to gypsum crystallization water than to free soil water. Crystallization water represents a significant water source for organisms growing on gypsum, especially during summer, when it accounts for 70-90% of the water used by shallow-rooted plants. Given the widespread occurrence of gypsum in dry lands throughout the Earth and in Mars, these results may have important implications for arid land reclamation and exobiology. PMID:25130772

  2. Fibrous gypsum veins as diffuse features and within fault zones: the case study of the Pisco Basin (Ica desert, southern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    New knowledge on patterns of fibrous gypsum veins, their genetic mechanisms, deformation style and weathering are provided by a field- and laboratory-based study carried out on the Neogene to Quaternary Pisco Basin sedimentary strata (porous sandstones, siltstones and diatomites) exposed in the Ica desert, southern Peru. Gypsum veins vary considerably in dimensions, attitudes and timing and can develop in layered and moderately fractured rocks also in the absence of evaporitic layers. Veins occur both as diffuse features, confined to certain stratigraphic levels, and localised within fault zones. Arrays formed by layer-bounded, mutually orthogonal sets of steeply-dipping gypsum veins are reported for the first time. Vein length, height and spacing depend on the thickness of the bed packages in which they are confined. Within fault zones, veins are partly a product of faulting but also inherited layer-bounded features along which faults are superimposed. Due to the different petrophysical properties with respect to the parent rocks and their susceptibility to textural and mineralogical modifications, water dissolution and rupture, gypsum veins may have a significant role in geofluid management. Depending on their patterns and grade of physical and chemical alteration, veins may influence geofluid circulation and storage, acting as barriers to flow and possibly also as conduits.

  3. Experimental investigation of Ca isotopic fractionation during abiotic gypsum precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Eisenhauer, Anton; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2014-03-01

    Experiments investigating Ca isotopic fractionation during gypsum precipitation were undertaken in order to elucidate the mechanisms and conditions that govern isotopic fractionation during mineral precipitation. Both stirred and unstirred free drift gypsum precipitation experiments were conducted at constant initial ionic strength (0.6 M) and variable initial saturation states (4.8-1.5) and Ca2+:SO42- ratios (3 and 0.33). Experimental durations varied between 0.5 and 190 h, while temperature (25.9-24.0 °C), pH (5.8-5.4) and ionic strength (0.6-0.5) were relatively constant. In all experiments, 20-80% of the initial dissolved Ca reservoir was precipitated. Isotopically light Ca preferentially partitioned into the precipitated gypsum; the effective isotopic fractionation factor (Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid - δ44/40Cafluid) of the experimental gypsum ranged from -2.25‰ to -0.82‰. The log weight-averaged, surface area normalized precipitation rates correlated with saturation state and varied between 4.6 and 2.0 μmol/m2/h. The crystal size and aspect ratios, determined by SEM images, BET surface area, and particle size measurements, co-varied with precipitation rate, such that fast growth produced small (10-20 μm), tabular crystals and slow growth produced larger (>1000 μm), needle shaped crystals. Mass balance derived δ44Cas and Δ44Cas-f, calculated using the initial fluid δ44Ca and the mass fraction of Ca removed during precipitation (fCa) as constraints, suggest that the precipitate was not always sampled homogeneously due to the need to preserve the sample for SEM, surface area, and particle size analyses. The fractionation factor (αs-f), derived from Rayleigh model fits to the fluid and calculated bulk solid, ranged from 0.9985 to 0.9988 in stirred experiments and 0.9987 to 0.9992 in unstirred experiments. The αs-f demonstrated no clear dependence on either precipitation rate or initial saturation state in stirred reactors, but exhibited a positive

  4. Uranium minerals in Oligocene gypsum near Chadron, Dawes County, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, R.J.

    1955-01-01

    Carnotite, sabugalite [HAI(UO2)4(PO4)4 • 16H2O] and autunite occur in the basal 25 feet of a 270-foot sequence of nonmarine bedded gypsum and gypsiferous clay in the Brule formation of Oligocene age about 12 miles northeast of Chadron in northeastern Dawes County, Nebraska. Uranium minerals are visible at only two localities and are associated with carbonaceous matter. Elsewhere the basal 25 feet of the gypsum sequence is interbedded with carbonate rocks and is weakly but persistently uraniferous. Uranium probably was emplaced from above by uranyl solutions rich in sulfate.

  5. Dehydration Kinetics of Volterra Gypsum: Experiments and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llana-Funez, S.; Wheeler, J.; Faulkner, D.

    2007-12-01

    Dehydration reactions are often envisaged as a triggering mechanism for seismicity in rocks under tectonic loads due to the reduction in effective pressure during the release of fluids that may eventually produce mechanical embrittlement. Understanding of metamorphic transformation in deforming rocks is even more important in fault zones where periods of seismic slip are reported. Dehydration of gypsum under controlled conditions, in laboratory experiments and in numerical models, provides information on deformation processes operating in seismically active regions and may be of help in understanding their cyclicity and their evolution. Two series of simple heating experiments of Volterra gypsum samples at room pressure, using intact and powdered specimens, provide reference data for further experiments under confining and differential stress during dehydration. Heating experiments were run at constant temperature between 80 degC and 140 °C in intact specimens and at 86 °C and 97 °C using powders with five different grain size fractions: <0.063, 0.063-0.125, 0.125-0.25, 0.25-0.5 and >0.5 mm. The complete dehydration of 1 mol of gypsum produces 1 mol of anhydrite and two moles of water generating a porosity of about 38% and implying a weight loss of 21% upon removal of water. The progressive loss of weight during dehydration was used as the method to estimate the progress of the reaction. The reaction is characterized by an initial stage under 10% reaction were reaction rate accelerates, which is followed by a linear stage for about 50 to 70% of the reaction and a final third stage with decelerating reaction rates. All tests run above 85 °C reached about 90% reaction. Those below 85 °C seem to converge to a lower final fraction (75%) suggesting partial dehydration, very likely to bassanite. The temperature dependence of the linear rates indicates in an Arrhenius plot that the full dehydration of gypsum has an activation enthalpy of 96 kJ/mol. The two

  6. Karstification without carbonic acid: bedrock dissolution by gypsum- driven dedolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Julia, R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary karst-forming process at Lake Banyoles is dedolomitization of basement rocks driven by gypsum dissolution. Karstification takes place along the subsurface contact between the gypsiferous Beuda Formation and the dolomitic Perafita Formation. This process is here recognized for the first time to cause karstification on a large scale; this is significant because it proceeds without the addition of soil-generated carbonic acid. -from Authors

  7. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  8. Does gypsum formation during sulfate attack on concrete lead to expansion?

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, B.; Cohen, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfate attack on Portland cement concrete is often said to arise from each of two major sulfate reactions: (1) The sulfate ions react with C{sub 3}A and its hydration products to form ettringite with an increase in volume that results in expansion and subsequent cracking of the concrete; (2) The sulfate ions react with calcium hydroxide (CH) to form gypsum. Even though gypsum formation is generally accepted to be harmful, the specific mechanism is not well established. Especially, the idea that gypsum formation leads to any expansion is controversial. This paper covers an investigation carried out to study the gypsum formation during sulfate attack and its consequences. Two parts are included: Part 1 consists of the results of a literature review describing different theories supporting and contradicting the idea that gypsum formation is expansive. Part 2 describes the laboratory investigation carried out by the authors. The results suggested that gypsum formation during sulfate attack may cause expansion.

  9. Carbonate replacement of lacustrine gypsum deposits in two Neogene continental basins, eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anadón, P.; Rosell, L.; Talbot, M. R.

    1992-07-01

    Bedded nonmarine gypsum deposits in the Miocene Teruel and Cabriel basins, eastern Spain, are partly replaced by carbonate. The Libros gypsum (Teruel Graben) is associated with fossiliferous carbonate wackestones and finely laminated, organic matter-rich mudstones which accumulated under anoxic conditions in a meromictic, permanent lake. The gypsum is locally pseudomorphed by aragonite or, less commonly, replaced by calcite. Low δ 13C values indicate that sulphate replacement resulted from bacterial sulphate reduction processes that were favoured by anacrobic conditions and abundant labile organic matter in the sediments. Petrographic evidence and oxygen isotopic composition suggest that gypsum replacement by aragonite occurred soon after deposition. A subsequent return to oxidising conditions caused some aragonite to be replaced by diagenetic gypsum. Native sulphur is associated with some of these secondary gypsum occurrences. The Los Ruices sulphate deposits (Cabriel Basin) contain beds of clastic and selenitic gypsum which are associated with limestones and red beds indicating accumulation in a shallow lake. Calcite is the principal replacement mineral. Bacterial sulphate reduction was insignificant in this basin because of a scarcity of organic matter. Stable isotope composition of diagenetic carbonate indicates that gypsum replacement occurred at shallow burial depths due to contact with dilute groundwaters of meteoric origin. Depositional environment evidently has a major influence upon the diagenetic history of primary sulphate deposits. The quantity of preserved organic matter degradable by sulphate-reducing bacteria is of particular importance and, along with groundwater composition, is the main factor controlling the mechanism of gypsum replacement by carbonate.

  10. On the origin of gypsum in the Mars north polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbaugh, Kathryn E.; Poulet, François; Chevrier, Vincent; Langevin, Yves; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2007-07-01

    We describe the distribution and concentration of the largest Martian gypsum deposit discovered to date by the Mars Express OMEGA (Observatoire pour le Mineralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité) imaging spectrometer, its relationship to the late Amazonian-aged north polar dunes in which it is found, and its likely origin. Gypsum has not been discovered anywhere within the north polar region outside of the Olympia Undae dune sea. In the areas of highest gypsum a concentration, 35% pure gypsum grains of a few tens of micrometers in size, mixed with 65% millimeter-sized gypsum grains containing, dark, spectrally featureless inclusions best fit the OMEGA observations. The gypsum-rich dunes contain no significant average albedo, temperature, or morphological anomalies. We propose that water emanating from nearby channels, carved during melting of the polar layered deposits, infiltrated the eastern end of the polar dune sea, percolating through the dunes. Deposits of gypsum resulted from a combination of direct, in situ alteration of sulfide- and high-calcium-pyroxene-bearing dunes and from formation of evaporitic gypsum crystals in the pore spaces of these dunes. This gypsum deposit formed in a unique local environment and is disconnected from sulfate-forming events elsewhere on Mars which are thought to have occurred much earlier, during the late Noachian and Hesperian, by various means. Sulfates have not been discovered in any other collection of dunes on Mars.

  11. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.; Reyes-Cortes, M.

    2015-07-23

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), β-MnO{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO and/or MnCO{sub 3}, PbS, PbCO{sub 3} and/or PbSO4, ZnO{sub 4}, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  12. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Reyes-Cortes, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe2O3), β-MnO2, Mn2O3, MnO and/or MnCO3, PbS, PbCO3 and/or PbSO4, ZnO4, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO3), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  13. Low-temperature dehydration of gypsum single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanov, R. A.; Nizamutdinov, N. M.; Khasanova, N. M.; Gubaidullin, A. T.; Vinokurov, V. M.

    2008-09-15

    On the basis of the analysis of the electron spin resonance spectrum of the SO{sub 3}{sup -} radical ion, it is established that the transformation of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} . 2H{sub 2}O) into bassanite (CaSO{sub 4} . 0.5H{sub 2}O) with partial removal of water molecules occurs through the formation of an anhydrous metastable phase. This phenomenon, reflecting the processes of recrystallization of materials of this class, serves as the scientific basis for the production of binders from sulfate mineral associations.

  14. A system for digital reconstruction of gypsum dental casts.

    PubMed

    Goshtasby, A A; Nambala, S; deRijk, W G; Campbell, S D

    1997-10-01

    A range scanner is developed that can scan a gypsum dental cast and reconstruct the cast digitally for display and storage purposes. The scanner is based on subtractive light and computes the range values using optical triangulation. A fiducial marker is introduced that, when attached to a dental cast at the time of image acquisition, makes it possible to integrate multiview range images of the cast without image registration. A method for calibrating the scanner is described and experimental results showing the accuracy of the scanner are presented. PMID:9368122

  15. The optical constants of gypsum particles as analog of Martian sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzo, G. A.; Blanco, A.; de Carlo, F.; D'Elia, M.; Fonti, S.; Marra, A. C.; Orofino, V.; Politi, R.

    2004-01-01

    Various indications seem to suggest that in the past the Martian climate allowed the presence of liquid water on the surface of the planet. It is therefore reasonable to think that bodies of standing water were once present in basins such as craters or depressions and that evaporite deposits of sulfates could have formed in these basins. The identification of such deposits, which might have survived in some regions of the planet, could confirm the present hypothesis about the ancient climate on Mars. Recent analyses of Mars spectra, obtained by ground-based observations, show bands consistent with sulfate features. If such data have to be interpreted with the aid of synthetic spectra, the knowledge of the complex refractive index of some sulfate is necessary. In this work we present the optical constants of submicron particles of gypsum (a typical hydrate-sulfate very common on Earth), derived by means of the dispersion theory from transmission spectra. We have performed the calculation of the optical constants in the wavelength range 2-70 μm, also in view of the wide spectral range covered by the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) on board of the ESA space mission Mars Express. The data have been compared with optical constants obtained by other authors from reflectance measurements of particulate samples.

  16. The optical constants of gypsum particles as analog of Martian sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzo, G.; Blanco, A.; Colangeli, L.; Esposito, F.; Fonti, S.; Marra, A.; Orofino, V.; Palomba, E.

    Various indications suggest that in the past the Martian climate allowed the presence of liquid water on the surface of the planet. It is therefore reasonable to think that bodies of standing water were once present in basins such as craters or depressions and that evaporite deposits of sulphates could have formed in these basins. The identification of such deposits, which might have survived in some regions of the planet, could confirm the present hypothesis about the ancient climate on Mars. Recent analyses of Mars spectra, obtained by the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) as well as by instruments in Martian orbit, show bands consistent with sulphate features. If such data have to be interpreted with the aid of synthetic spectra, the knowledge of the complex refractive index of some sulphate is necessary. In this work we present the optical constants of submicron particles of gypsum (a typical hydrate-sulphate very common on Earth), derived by means of the dispersion theory from transmission spectra. These data are compared with optical constants obtained by other groups from reflectance measurements of particulate samples. At the same time we plan to extend the calculation of the optical constants in the far infrared, also in view of the wide spectral range covered by the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) to be launched in 2003 on board of the ESA space mission Mars Express.

  17. Bacterial life and dinitrogen fixation at a gypsum rock.

    PubMed

    Boison, Gudrun; Mergel, Alexander; Jolkver, Helena; Bothe, Hermann

    2004-12-01

    The organisms of a bluish-green layer beneath the shards of a gypsum rock were characterized by molecular techniques. The cyanobacterial consortium consisted almost exclusively of Chroococcidiopsis spp. The organisms of the shards expressed nitrogenase activity (C2H2 reduction) aerobically and in light. After a prolonged period of drought at the rock, the cells were inactive, but they resumed nitrogenase activity 2 to 3 days after the addition of water. In a suspension culture of Chroococcidiopsis sp. strain PCC7203, C2H2 reduction required microaerobic conditions and was strictly dependent on low light intensities. Sequencing of a segment of the nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) indicated that Chroococcidiopsis possesses the alternative molybdenum nitrogenase 2, expressed in Anabaena variabilis only under reduced O2 tensions, rather than the widespread, common molybdenum nitrogenase. The shards apparently provide microsites with reduced light intensities and reduced O2 tension that allow N2 fixation to proceed in the unicellular Chroococcidiopsis at the gypsum rock, unless the activity is due to minute amounts of other, very active cyanobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH sequences tends to suggest that molybdenum nitrogenase 2 is characteristic of those unicellular or filamentous, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria fixing N2 under microaerobic conditions only. PMID:15574902

  18. Radiological properties of a wax-gypsum compensator material

    SciTech Connect

    Plessis, F.C.P. du; Willemse, C.A.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper the radiological properties of a compensator material consisting of wax and gypsum is presented. Effective attenuation coefficients (EACs) have been determined from transmission measurements with an ion chamber in a Perspex phantom. Measurements were made at 80 and 100 cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) for beam energies of 6, 8, and 15 MV, for field sizes ranging from narrow beam geometries up to 40x40 cm{sup 2}, and at measurement depths of maximum dose build-up, 5 and 10 cm. A parametrization equation could be constructed to predict the EAC values within 4% uncertainty as a function of field size and depth of measurement. The EAC dependence on off-axis position was also quantified at each beam energy and SSD. It was found that the compensator material reduced the required thickness for compensation by 26% at 8 MV when compared to pure paraffin wax for a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field. Relative surface ionization (RSI) measurements have been made to quantify the effect of scattered electrons from the wax-gypsum compensator. Results indicated that for 80 cm SSD the RSI would exceed 50% for fields larger than 15x15 cm{sup 2}. At 100 cm SSD the RSI values were below 50% for all field sizes used.

  19. A novel Antarctic microbial endolithic community within gypsum crusts.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin A; Lawley, Blair

    2003-07-01

    A novel endolithic microbial habitat is described from a climatically extreme site at Two Step Cliffs, Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula (71 degrees 54'S, 68 degrees 13'W). Small endolithic colonies (<3 mm in diameter) are found within the translucent gypsum crust that forms on the surface of sandstone boulders. Gypsum crusts are found on ice-free rocks throughout the Antarctic and therefore offer potential colonization sites at more inhospitable locations, including sites at higher latitudes. Cyanobacterial, bacterial and fungal components were cultured from the crust material and have been identified as Chloroglea sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Verticillium sp. respectively. A non-cultured, black-pigmented fungus was also found. Cyanobacterial primary productivity is low: at depths of 1.2 and 2.5 mm within the crust, estimates of possible cell divisions per year were < 38 and four respectively. This microniche is proposed to provide protection from desiccation, rapid temperature variation and UV radiation flux while allowing penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for utilization by phototrophs. The endolithic communities are less extensive than those of the Dry Valleys, continental Antarctica, probably owing to only recent deglaciation (<7000 year ago). PMID:12823188

  20. Filtering dissolved phosphorus from drainage waters using synthetic gypsum: water quality impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following decades of chicken litter applications to soils of the Delmarva Peninsula, legacy phosphorus (P) is a major source of soluble P entering drainage ditches that eventually empty into the Chesapeake Bay. In April, 2007, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, also called synthetic gypsum, was ...

  1. Impact of FGD gypsum soil amendment applications on soil and environmental quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for improving soil quality and other environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur- for crops and has been shown to i...

  2. Use of industry by-product gypsum to reduce soluble P in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus transport from land-applied manure could potentially threaten water quality. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum use as soil amendment could potentially minimize P loss. Thus, field studies were conducted to evaluate if FGD gypsum could reduce surface water runoff as well as the extract...

  3. Environmental evaluation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum as a BMP for erosion control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) is produced from pollution control systems reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from thermo-electric coal-fired power plants. Natural gypsum and FGDG both have been shown to be useful in control of soil erosion. However, concerns have been raised recently by envir...

  4. FGD gypsum use as a soil amendment to reduce soluble P in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus loss from land-applied manure can be a major threat to water quality. Use of gypsum as a soil amendment could potentially minimize the water quality threat by reducing P loss from manured soils. Thus, a field study was conducted to evaluate if gypsum and lime amendment would reduce the ex...

  5. Effects of fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on non-target freshwater and sediment dwelling organims

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluidized gas desulfurization gypsum is a popular agricultural soil amendment used to increase calcium and sulfur contents, and reduce aluminum toxicity. Due to its surface application in conservation tillage systems and high solubility, the soluble components of gypsum may be transferred with agri...

  6. Effect of gypsum application on mineral composition in peanut pod walls and seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alleviation of soil-Ca deficiency through gypsum amendment increases the yield potential and ensures high seed quality in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The effects of gypsum treatment, plant life cycle stage, and the fruit development stages on the accrual of several essential minerals (Ca, S, Mg, P...

  7. Use of FGD gypsum on a bermudagrass pasture in the Appalachian Plateau Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of industrial by-products from coal fired power plants (FGD gypsum and FGD gypsum + fly ash) are thought to increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of industrial by-products as a soil amendment on bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) yield. The study was...

  8. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    Summary In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours. PMID:25161860

  9. View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing spikes and flooring nails (Lower board layer exposed) - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  10. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Craig W.; Telesca, Antonio; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  11. Gypsum blocks produced from TiO2 production by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Fan; Huang, Hongwei; Guo, Yuxi; Li, Baoying; Liu, Yangyang; Chu, Paul K

    2016-01-01

    Calcined titanium gypsum was investigated by the ways of XRD (powder X-ray diffraction), XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and TG-DTA (thermogravimetric-differential thermal analyses). It was employed as raw material for making lightweight materials. The influence of cement, amount of water/solid (W/S) ratio, water-reducing agent, citric acid content and the hydration age on the gypsum blocks was investigated. The results showed that the optimum W/S ratio, cement content and water-reducing agent are 0.9, 10% and 2 wt% for the calcined gypsum from titanium gypsum, respectively. The 5.96 MPa was attained after 7 days of ageing. It was also found that the citric acid is inappropriate to be used in the production of gypsum blocks from TiO2 production by-products. PMID:26495867

  12. Environmental impacts of the gypsum mining operation at Maqna area, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Harthi, Abbas

    2001-11-01

    The impacts of quarrying of the gypsum deposits on the environment at Maqna, Tabuk, were evaluated by intensive field studies including in situ testing, mapping and sampling of gypsum and well water. Field and laboratory tests were made to determine the engineering properties including tensile and compressive strengths, unit weight, fracture spacing and the rock quality designation (RQD) values. Results were used to determine the most suitable method for quarrying and extraction. Chemical analyses of gypsum and water well samples were conducted along with mineralogical analysis using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results show that there are no harmful impacts on the environment of the studied area associated with the extraction and quarrying of the gypsum deposits at the Maqna area. They also revealed that the gypsum can be quarried using a ripping technique, which does not create noise and/or vibration in the surrounding areas.

  13. Gypsophile Chemistry Unveiled: Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Provides New Insight into Plant Adaptations to Gypsum Soils

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Sara; Aitkenhead, Matt; Escudero, Adrián; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel; Maestro, Melchor; Robertson, A. H. Jean

    2014-01-01

    Gypsum soils are among the most restrictive and widespread substrates for plant life. Plants living on gypsum are classified as gypsophiles (exclusive to gypsum) and gypsovags (non-exclusive to gypsum). The former have been separated into wide and narrow gypsophiles, each with a putative different ecological strategy. Mechanisms displayed by gypsum plants to compete and survive on gypsum are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the main chemical groups in the leaves of plants with different specificity to gypsum soils and to explore the ability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analyzed with neural network (NN) modelling to discriminate groups of gypsum plants. Leaf samples of 14 species with different specificity to gypsum soils were analysed with FTIR spectroscopy coupled to neural network (NN) modelling. Spectral data were further related to the N, C, S, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg and ash concentrations of samples. The FTIR spectra of the three groups analyzed showed distinct features that enabled their discrimination through NN models. Wide gypsophiles stood out for the strong presence of inorganic compounds in their leaves, particularly gypsum and, in some species, also calcium oxalate crystals. The spectra of gypsovags had less inorganic chemical species, while those of narrow gypsum endemisms had low inorganics but shared with wide gypsophiles the presence of oxalate. Gypsum and calcium oxalate crystals seem to be widespread amongst gypsum specialist plants, possibly as a way to tolerate excess Ca and sulphate. However, other mechanisms such as the accumulation of sulphates in organic molecules are also compatible with plant specialization to gypsum. While gypsovags seem to be stress tolerant plants that tightly regulate the uptake of S and Ca, the ability of narrow gypsum endemisms to accumulate excess Ca as oxalate may indicate their incipient specialization to gypsum. PMID:25222564

  14. Effects of FGD-gypsum, used-wallboard and calcium sulfate on corn and soybean root growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum production has increased 44 percent from 2007 to 2008. The major use of FGD-gypsum today is in the wallboard industry. Reduction in the construction, however, reduces the demand for wallboard. Agriculture could become the second largest user of FGD-gypsum. F...

  15. XRD and mineralogical analysis of gypsum dunes at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico and applications to gypsum detection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, B.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; King, S. J.; Blake, D.; Sarrazin, P.; Downs, R.; Horgan, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    A field portable X-ray Diffraction (XRD) instrument was used at White Sands National Monument to perform in-situ measurements followed by laboratory analyses of the gypsum-rich dunes and to determine its modal mineralogy. The field instrument is a Terra XRD (Olympus NDT) based on the technology of the CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity which is providing the mineralogical and chemical composition of scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale Crater [1]. Using Terra at White Sands will contribute to 'ground truth' for gypsum-bearing environments on Mars. Together with data provided by VNIR spectra [2], this study clarifies our understanding of the origin and history of gypsum-rich sand dunes discovered near the northern polar region of Mars [3]. The results obtained from the field analyses performed by XRD and VNIR spectroscopy in four dunes at White Sands revealed the presence of quartz and dolomite. Their relative abundance has been estimated using the Reference Intensity Ratio (RIR) method. For this study, particulate samples of pure natural gypsum, quartz and dolomite were used to prepare calibration mixtures of gypsum-quartz and gypsum-dolomite with the 90-150μm size fractions. All single phases and mixtures were analyzed by XRD and RIR factors were calculated. Using this method, the relative abundance of quartz and dolomite has been estimated from the data collected in the field. Quartz appears to be present in low amounts (2-5 wt.%) while dolomite is present at percentages up to 80 wt.%. Samples from four dunes were collected and prepared for subsequent XRD analysis in the lab to estimate their composition and illustrate the changes in mineralogy with respect to location and grain size. Gypsum-dolomite mixtures: The dolomite XRD pattern is dominated by an intense diffraction peak at 2θ≈36 deg. which overlaps a peak of gypsum, This makes low concentrations of dolomite

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. PMID:20447939

  17. Carbonate speleothems from western Mediterranean gypsum karst: palaeoclimate implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Columbu, Andrea; Drysdale, Russell; Woodhead, Jon; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Hellstrom, John; Forti, Paolo; Sanna, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Gypsum caves are uncommon environments for carbonate speleothems (cave deposits). Contrary to limestone caves, the only source of non-atmospheric carbon is from biogenic CO2 produced by the overlying soils. Enhanced CO2 content in soils is in turn related with climate, where warm temperatures and high humidity favour plant activity .().....(Fairchild and Baker, 2012). Although poorly decorated, the exploration of northern Italian and Spanish gypsum karst systems reveals the existence of several generations of carbonate speleothems, which have been dated with the U-Th series method .()......(Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). Their ages coincide with current and previous two interglacials (MIS 1, 5e and 7e and Greenland interstadials (GIS) 19, 20, 21 and 24. Considering that these periods are amongst the most pronounced warm-wet pulsations over the last 250,000 ...(Martrat et al., 2007; NGRIP, 2004), and that CO2 has a fundamental role in this karst process, this study explores the climate-driven hydrogeological conditions necessary to trigger carbonate deposition in gypsum voids. The further correlation with sapropel events 5, 4, 3 and 1, considered symptomatic of enhanced rainfall across the whole Mediterranean basin .(.)(Emeis et al., 1991), highlights the importance of flow-rate in the fracture network and infiltration of meteoric water into the caves. The combination of high CO2 and a phreatic status of the fracture network is thus indispensable for the formation of carbonate speleothems in gypsum karst. This condition appears to be triggered by periods of orbital precession minimum, when the monsoonal activity peaked in the Atlantic area. Stable oxygen isotope signatures suggest that the speleothems did not grow during any interglacial-glacial or main interstadial-stadial transitions, confirming that variations from optimum climate conditions may hamper the formation of this category of speleothems. New speleological exploration and sampling campaign

  18. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  19. Testing Carbon Sequestration in Soil Through the Addition of Gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Wan, J.; Conrad, M. E.; Salve, R.

    2011-12-01

    In order to help control adverse effects of increased atmospheric concentrations of CO2, effective methods for fixing carbon need to be developed. Given the large C inventories and fluxes associated with soils, it is important to identify cost- and energy-effective means for increasing long-term C retention within soil profiles. This study investigates the alternative strategy of increasing carbon retention in soils through accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. With the addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8 often found in arid and semi-arid regions, the slow process of calcite precipitation may be accelerated. Calcium also promotes SOC binding onto mineral surfaces, diminishing leaching of SOC. Addition of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) represents an inexpensive source of calcium to natural, slightly alkaline soil surfaces which might promote the fixation of CO2 as calcite and decrease leaching losses of organic carbon. To test this hypothesis, we prepared laboratory soil columns (7.5 cm in diameter and 85 cm in height) with and without calcium sulfate-amended layers. The distribution of carbon in the columns was monitored in gaseous, aqueous and solid phases over a period of several months to test the effect of adding calcium ions. In some columns, a relatively high fraction of 13C-labeled bicarbonate was injected to differentiate the newly precipitated calcite from the initial calcite present in the soil. The potential for more distinct calcite precipitation within the soil root zone will be investigated in vegetated soil columns. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere.

  20. Enhanced gypsum scaling by organic fouling layer on nanofiltration membrane: Characteristics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxuan; Wang, Lei; Miao, Rui; Lv, Yongtao; Wang, Xudong; Meng, Xiaorong; Yang, Ruosong; Zhang, Xiaoting

    2016-03-15

    To investigate how the characteristics of pregenerated organic fouling layers on nanofiltration (NF) membranes influence the subsequent gypsum scaling behavior, filtration experiments with gypsum were carried out with organic-fouled poly(piperazineamide) NF membranes. Organic fouling layer on membrane was induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA), humic acid (HA), and sodium alginate (SA), respectively. The morphology and components of the scalants, the role of Ca(2+) adsorption on the organic fouling layer during gypsum crystallization, and the interaction forces of gypsum on the membrane surface were investigated. The results indicated that SA- and HA-fouled membranes had higher surface crystallization tendency along with more severe flux decline during gypsum scaling than BSA-fouled and virgin membranes because HA and SA macromolecules acted as nuclei for crystallization. Based on the analyses of Ca(2+) adsorption onto organic adlayers and adhesion forces, it was found that the flux decline rate and extent in the gypsum scaling experiment was positively related to the Ca(2+)-binding capacity of the organic matter. Although the dominant gypsum scaling mechanism was affected by coupling physicochemical effects, the controlling factors varied among foulants. Nevertheless, the carboxyl density of organic matter played an important role in determining surface crystallization on organic-fouled membrane. PMID:26799710

  1. Initiation and growth of gypsum piercement structures in the Zechstein Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Stroud, S. C.; Paul, J.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of tectonic processes in initiating halite diapirs has become much better understood in recent years. Less well understood is the development of diapiric structures involving rocks composed predominantly of gypsum. Below about 1000 m, gypsum dehydrates to anhydrite, which often obscures primary sedimentary textures. If the strain associated with diapiric rise in the rock induces the transition to anhydrite, obliteration of primary features in the gypsum can be expected. In our study, we infer that the diapiric movement in the Werra Anhydrite member of cycle 1 of the Zechstein Formation of Europe occurred before the initial transition of gypsum to anhydrite based on the presence of pseudomorphs of bedded primary gypsum crystals, the overburden lithologies and depositional environment, and the mechanical properties of gypsum, anhydrite and carbonate rocks. Faulting and differential loading of a shallow overburden were the key components in initiating the gypsum diapirism. The transition to anhydrite occurred after burial and after cessation of diapirism. In comparison, the diapirism of calcium sulfate of the Leine Anhydrite into the Leine Halite members of cycle 3 of the Zechstein Formation probably occurred much later after burial and appears to have been triggered by halite diapirism, which in turn triggered the dehydration reaction, causing the calcium sulfate to become the incompetent phase relative to the halite. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Elucidating the mechanism by which Gypsum fibrosum, a traditional Chinese medicine, maintains cutaneous water content.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Ogiue, Naoki; Toyoda, Eri; Nakamura, Marina; Kon, Risako; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Aburada, Takashi; Ishii, Makoto; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Machida, Yoshiaki; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) plays an important role in maintaining the normal water content of the skin. Previously, we revealed that the expression of cutaneous AQP3 increased following oral administration of Gypsum fibrosum (main component: CaSO₄) to mice. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which Gypsum fibrosum increases the expression of cutaneous AQP3 in a keratinocyte cell line. Gypsum fibrosum or CaSO₄ was added to keratinocytes, and the expression level of AQP3, the Ca concentration, the activity of protein kinase C (PKC), and the degrees of phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) were measured. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AQP3 increased significantly 6 h-post addition of Gypsum fibrosum. In keratinocytes treated with Gypsum fibrosum, increases in the concentration of intracellular Ca, PKC activity, and the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB were observed. Pre-treatment with GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, suppressed the mRNA expression levels of AQP3. Similarly to treatment with Gypsum fibrosum, the addition of CaSO₄ led to the same observations in keratinocytes. It is hypothesized that Gypsum fibrosum causes an increase in the intracellular Ca concentration, PKC activity, and the phosphorylation levels of ERK and CREB, resulting in increased AQP3 expression in keratinocytes. In addition, it is possible that the effect of Gypsum fibrosum is attributable to CaSO₄, based on the results demonstrating that the mechanisms of action of Gypsum fibrosum and CaSO₄ were nearly identical. PMID:23912684

  3. Origin of the gypsum-rich silica nodules, Moghra Formation, Northwest Qattara depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoriby, Essam M.

    2005-06-01

    Gypsum rich-silica nodules appear in two shale horizons of the Moghra Formation (early Miocene) northwestern Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt. These nodules are gray to milky white in colour, mostly botroidal and rose-like in shape and range in diameter from 2 to 7.5 cm. The silica nodule-bearing shale is composed mainly of smectite with a little minor kaolinite. The silica nodules consist mainly of quartz and are composed of gypsum-free matrix and gypsum-rich megacrystalline quartz. The matrix consists of microflamboyant quartz (less than 36 μm in diameter) and chalcedony. The megacrystalline quartz occurs as lenticular and prismatic forms (length: 90-250 μm; width: 30-90 μm). The microprobe, petrographic and SEM examinations confirmed the occurrence of gypsum relics (diameter; 2-16 μm) within the megacrystalline quartz. The chalcedony and mosaic microcrystalline quartz occurs as pore-lining and pore-filling cements. The structure of the silica nodules begins with quartzine in its outer rim, then gypsum-free microcrystalline quartz in the middle part and ends with gypsum-rich lenticular to prismatic megaquartz in the center. Field study, petrographic examination and microprobe analysis reveal that the silica nodules were formed by silicification of precursor gypsum nodules deposited in a marginal sabkha environment under an arid climate. The silicification selectively affected the gypsum nodules rather than the surrounding shale and occurred both through gypsum replacement and void filling. Transformation of isopachous chalcedony into mosaic microcrystalline quartz also occurred. The texture of the silica minerals reflects the different physico-chemical conditions under which they crystallized. Spherical nodules grew chiefly by the diffusive supply of the silica, and elongated ones grew by pore water advection. The integrated effect of climate, pH, salinity, crack systems within the sediment and oscillation in the groundwater level and its chemical

  4. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  5. Enhancing board effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Curran, Connie R; Totten, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Like any other job, board work is associated with specific competencies. Competencies are the combination of knowledge, skills, personal characteristics, and behaviors needed to perform a job or task effectively. Boards are only as strong as their weakest member. Board education should focus on improving the knowledge and skills of the board and individual members and on overall board performance. Assessment of individual board member performance is designed to evaluate the trustee's knowledge of board roles and responsibilities and the expectations of board members. Board effectiveness is built through competency-based board member recruitment and selection; board member education and development; and evaluation of board, board member, and meeting performance. PMID:21291066

  6. Mass and momentum interface equilibrium by molecular modeling. Simulating AFM adhesion between (120) gypsum faces in a saturated solution and consequences on gypsum cohesion

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanna, Paul Pedesseau, Laurent; Pepe, Gerard; Mainprice, David

    2008-03-15

    Properties of composite materials depend on interatomic phenomena occurring between binder crystals. Experimental information of Atomic Force Microscopy (A.F.M.) is of prime importance; however understanding is helped by molecular modeling. As underlined in Section 1, the present study is able to simulate crystal interfaces in presence of a solution within apertures less than 1 Nanometer at a full atomic scale. Section 2 presents the case study of a gypsum solution between (120) gypsum faces, with related boundary conditions and atomic interactions. Section 3 deals with the mass equilibrium of the solution within interfaces < 5 A, using the original Semi Analytical Stochastic Perturbations (SASP) approach. This information becomes in Section 4 the key for explaining the peak of adhesion obtained in A.F.M. around an aperture of 3 A and gives enlightenments on gypsum cohesion. In conclusion, this illustration shows the potentialities of full atomic modeling which could not be attained by any numerical approach at a mesoscopic scale.

  7. Rehabilitation of gypsum-mined lands in the Indian desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, K.D.; Kumar, S.; Gough, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    The economic importance of mining in the Indian Desert is second only to agriculture. Land disturbed by mining, however, has only recently been the focus of rehabilitation efforts. This research assesses the success of rehabilitation plans used to revegetate gypsum mine spoils within the environmental constraints of the north-west Indian hot-desert ecosystem. The rehabilitation plan first examined both mined and unmined areas and established assessments of existing vegetative cover and the quality of native soils and mine spoils. Tests were made on the effect of the use, and conservation, of available water through rainwater harvesting, amendment application (for physical and chemical spoil modification), plant establishment protocols, and the selection of appropriate germ plasm. Our results show that the resulting vegetative cover is capable of perpetuating itself under natural conditions while concurrently meeting the needs of farmers. Although the mine spoils are deficient in organic matter and phosphorus, they possess adequate amounts of all other nutrients. Total boron concentrations (>5.0 mg kg-1) in both the topsail and mine spoil indicate potentially phytotoxic conditions. Electrical conductance of mine spoil is 6-10 times higher than for topsail with a near-neutral pH. Populations of spoil fungi, Azotobactor, and nitrifying bacteria are low. The soil moisture storage in rainwater harvesting plots increased by 8% over the control and 48% over the unmined area. As a result of rehabilitation efforts, mine spoils show a steady buildup in organic carbon, and P and K due to the decomposition of farmyard manure and the contribution of nitrogen fixation by the established leguminous plant species. The rehabilitation protocol used at the site appears to have been successful. Following revegetation of the area with a mixture of trees, shrubs, and grasses, native implanted species have become established. Species diversity, measured in terms of species richness

  8. Hydration of anhydrite of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.II) in a ball mill

    SciTech Connect

    Sievert, T.; Wolter, A.; Singh, N.B

    2005-04-01

    The hydration of an anhydrite of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.II) in a ball mill was studied as a function of time and temperature. The amount of gypsum formed at different intervals of time was determined by weight loss method and powder X-ray diffraction technique. Specific surface area at different time intervals was determined by LASER granulometric method. The results showed that the maximum rate of formation of gypsum was at a longer time than the time for the development of maximum specific surface area. In the presence of activators, the time for maximum rate of gypsum formation and maximum specific surface area shifted towards lower hydration time. Morphological changes during the course of hydration have been studied by the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) technique. A mechanism of hydration has been proposed.

  9. Crystallization kinetics of gypsum from dense suspension of hemihydrate in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amathieu, L.; Boistelle, R.

    1988-04-01

    The crystallization kinetics of gypsum from a dense suspension of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (weight ratio water/hemihydrate = 20) are followed by a conductimetric method. All stages of the process are investigated. The dissolution of hemihydrate is very fast, achieving in a few seconds a supersaturation of 5.4 times the solubility product of gypsum. The dissolution rate varies as a quadratic function of undersaturation. The crystals of gypsum form immediately, due to heterogeneous nucleation onto the hemihydrate particles. Later, secondary or even homogeneous nucleation may occur. There is no steady state between hemihydrate dissolution and gypsum growth even in the first stages of the hydration process. The growth rate laws are either quadratic or linear according to whether supersaturation is small or large.

  10. The role and implications of bassanite as a stable precursor phase to gypsum precipitation.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, A E S; Benning, L G; Rodriguez-Blanco, J D; Ossorio, M; Bots, P; García-Ruiz, J M

    2012-04-01

    Calcium sulfate minerals such as gypsum play important roles in natural and industrial processes, but their precipitation mechanisms remain largely unexplored. We used time-resolved sample quenching and high-resolution microscopy to demonstrate that gypsum forms via a three-stage process: (i) homogeneous precipitation of nanocrystalline hemihydrate bassanite below its predicted solubility, (ii) self-assembly of bassanite into elongated aggregates co-oriented along their c axis, and (iii) transformation into dihydrate gypsum. These findings indicate that a stable nanocrystalline precursor phase can form below its bulk solubility and that in the CaSO(4) system, the self-assembly of nanoparticles plays a crucial role. Understanding why bassanite forms prior to gypsum can lead to more efficient anti-scaling strategies for water desalination and may help to explain the persistence of CaSO(4) phases in regions of low water activity on Mars. PMID:22491851

  11. Primary Evaporites for the Messinian Salinity Crisis: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Krijgsman, Wout

    2014-05-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, and resulted in the deposition of 0.3-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable and long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation. During the CIESM Almeria Workshop a consensus was reached on several aspects. In addition, remaining issues to be solved were identified, such as for the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal settings, while dolomite containing rocks have been reported from deeper settings. A range of potential explanations have been reported, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are poorly understood and commonly neglected. These may, however, explain that different deposits formed in shallow versus deep environments without needing exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. We present here a unifying mechanism in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is mostly limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes in the deep basin result in the formation of dolomite. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always largely oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is thought to be inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus the conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for the formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process that links the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, oxygen is rapidly depleted through OM degradation, then sulphate becomes the main oxidant for OM

  12. Gypsum Optical Constants in the Visible and Near-infrared: Real and Imagined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, T. L.; Esposito, F.; Rossman, G. R.; Colangeli, L.

    2006-03-01

    We compare gypsum optical constants (n and k), derived via two radiative transfer models (rtms), to independent and previously reported values. The rtms provide estimates of n and k in regions of weak absorptions, where previous models are insensitive.

  13. An Fourier transform-Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum neoformation by lichens growing on granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, B.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Rivas, T.; Silva, B.

    1998-12-01

    Samples of various lichen species considered as representative of the lichen flora colonizing granitic monuments in Galicia (NW Spain) were examined by Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy in order to investigate the implications of gypsum neoformation. FT-Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a very useful technique for the nondestructive analysis of lichen encrustations, showing the presence of gypsum in samples where this mineral had not been detected by other analytical methods. The capacity of lichens to participate in the chemical disturbance of granite through gypsum neoformation was demonstrated since gypsum occurs even in the case of samples where mortars are not present. This fact implies the ability of lichens to catalyse the neoformation of this mineral from granite in environments with a low SO 42- concentration.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of spontaneous capillary water imbibition in aerated gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we investigate both capillary water imbibition and the sorptivity of aerated gypsum plaster, and how these sorption characteristics are related to the pore structure of the material. These characteristics are examined by monitoring mass change using the conventional gravimetric method and by obtaining water content profiles using non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques during capillary imbibition of water. Here, three different gypsum samples are investigated: one non-aerated reference gypsum sample and two aerated gypsum samples produced with different volumetric air fractions. The capillary water absorption into the reference sample follows t1/2 kinetics (Fickian diffusion), where t is the time of ingress. However, in the aerated gypsum samples there are deviations from t1/2 kinetics. The MRI results show unambiguously that two wetting fronts advance through the aerated structure; an observation that cannot be made from the gravimetric data alone. The water content profiles of the aerated gypsum samples are therefore analysed by treating them as the sum of two separate absorption processes using sharp front analysis. The capillary water absorption properties of this material are well described as a parallel combination of fast absorption into fine matrix pores and slow absorption into a modified structure of matrix pores inter-connected to air voids introduced into the slurry by aeration.

  15. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  16. Hydrology of marginal evaporitic basins during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: isotopic investigation of gypsum deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kilany, Aida; Caruso, Antonio; Dela Pierre, Francesco; Natalicchio, Marcello; Rouchy, Jean-Marie; Pierre, Catherine; Balter, Vincent; Aloisi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of gypsum in Messinian Mediterranean marginal basins is controlled by basin restriction and the local hydrological cycle (evaporation/precipitation rates and relative importance of continental vs marine water inputs). We are using the stable isotopic composition of gypsum as a proxy of the hydrological cycle that dominated at the moment of gypsum precipitation. We studied the Messinian Caltanissetta (Sicily) and Tertiary Piedmont (north western Italy) basins where we carried out a high-resolution isotopic study of gypsum layers composing gypsum-marl cycles. These cycles are thought to be the sedimentary expression of astronomical precession cycles, lasting approximately 20 kyr, during which the marginal basins experienced a succession of arid and a wet conditions. We determined the isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water (18O and D), of the sulphate ion (34S, 18O) and of Strontium (87/86Sr), all of which are potentially affected by the hydrological cycle. In our samples, the mother water from which gypsum precipitated is considerably lighter (-4.0 < 18OH2O ‰ vs SMOW < 3.1; -34.8 < DH2O ‰ vs SMOW < 25.3) than evaporated marine waters from which gypsum precipitates (18OH2O  6-7 ‰ vs SMOW; DH2O  30-40‰ vs SMOW), suggesting that the marginal basins were receiving an input of continental water during gypsum precipitation. Moreover, the degree of 18O and D-depletion is basin-specific, which is consistent with the geographical distance between the two basins and their independent local climates and watersheds. Continental water inputs are consistent also with most of the Sr data (0.70861 < 87/86Sr < 0.70897), and with previously published low-salinity fluid inclusion data from the same gypsum layers in the Tertiary Piedmont basin (suggesting a salinity lower than 35 ‰ in many cases). However, in the samples from the Caltanissetta basin, the sulphate ion suggests a marine water source (20.7 < δ34S ‰ vs CTD

  17. Seeking Election: Evaluating a Campaign for Public School Board Trusteeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Canadian public school board trustees are generally chosen by way of public ballot in civic elections. A comparison of board governance literature to a local narrative account of public school board elections exposes several gaps between espoused democratic ideals and the realities of public engagement in trustee selection. I investigate the…

  18. Meteoric Water Influx, Gypsum and Halite Dissolution, and Fluid Mixing on the Flanks of the South Liberty Salt Dome, Texas Gulf Coast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banga, T.; Capuano, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    Brine samples were collected from non-geopressured oil-bearing horizons of the Frio, Yegua and Cook Mountain Formations along the flanks of the South Liberty Dome, Liberty County, Texas. The dome is capped with gypsum, anhydrite and minor calcite. Twenty six water samples were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, Si, Al, HCO3, CO3, Cl, SO4, Br, I, P, Li, B, Ba, Mn, acetate, δ D and δ ^{18}O. Data from several 2-D seismic lines were used for interpretation of sequence stratigraphy and structure of the sediments in the area. The water is a Na-Cl brine with dissolved solids ranging from 68,000 to 208,000 mg/L. The fluid source as indicated by chemical and isotopic tracers is brine from the surrounding geopressured sediments mixing with the local meteoric water. This brine shows a mixing trend, with increased meteoric water fraction with decreased depth. This mixing trend occurs across formations and in some areas it appears to follow a migration pathway. All of the samples, excepting one, show evidence of halite dissolution with elevated Na and Cl concentrations; nine of these samples also show evidence of gypsum dissolution, with SO_{4}$ up to 2,000 mg/L. Samples with the greatest gypsum dissolution are located very near the dome and show the greatest fraction of meteoric water, suggesting that meteoric water influx to depth is the greatest at the margins of the salt/host rock contact. [The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Advanced Research Program supported this research.

  19. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  20. Physical properties of salt, anhydrite and gypsum : preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Robie, Richard A.; Books, Kenneth G.

    1958-01-01

    This summary is the result of a search of the available literature. Emphasis is placed on the mechanical and calorimetric properties of salt; the measurements of elastic, thermal, magnetic, and mass properties of salt are merely tabulated. Under hydrostatic pressure 100 percent at a nearly constant stress difference of about 300 kg/cm2. Similarily, under temperatures > 400?C at one atmosphere, salt deforms plastically to strains > 100 percent under stress differences of about 100 kg/cm2. Entha1pies were calculated for various temperatures to 2,000? C from the low temperature and high temperature heat capacities and the heats of solution of the following minerals: salt (or halite), NaCl; anhydrite, CaS04; quartz, Si02; and calcite, CaC03. Three combinations of these minerals were assumed to represent three possible natural salt beds, and the heats required to raise the temperature of each to 1,500?C and to 2,000?C were calculated. For a half and half mixture of salt and anhydrite, 1,300 cal/gm were required to raise the temperature to 2,000?C. For an evaporite containing 60 percent salt and about equal amounts of anhydrite, calcite, and quartz, 1,100 cal/gm are required to raise the temperature to 2,OOO?C. Most of the measurements of the elastic moduli were made on single crystals of salt, anhydrite, and gypsum. For the most part, the measurements of density, magnetic susceptibility, and other properties were made on natural salt samples.

  1. Distinctive Accessory Minerals, Textures and Crystal Habits in Biofilm Associated Gypsum Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M.; Des Marais, D.; Jahnke, L.; Parenteau, M.

    2008-12-01

    Gypsum-depositing environments near Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico were investigated in order to differentiate the influence of microbial activity versus nonbiological processes upon sedimentary fabrics and minerals. Field sites were located in sabkhas (mudflats and anchialine pools) and in seawater concentration ponds in the salt production facility operated by Exportadora de Sal, S. A. Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) was classified according to sedimentary environment (e.g., mudflats, anchialine pools, saltern ponds, surface and subsurface sediments), sedimentary texture, mineral composition, crystal habit, brine composition and other geochemical and biological factors. Gypsum types that develop in the absence of biofilms include water column precipitates (pelagic grains) and subsedimentary crystalline discs that form from phreatic brine ripening. Subsedimentary gypsum forming in sabkha environments had a sinuous axial microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles whereas water column precipitates exhibited euhedral prismatic habits and extensive penetrative twinning. Gypsum that was influenced by biofilms included cumulate crusts and gypsooids / gypsolite developing in anchialine pools and in saltern concentration ponds. Gypsum precipitating within subaqueous benthic microbial mats, or biofilm/sediment surfaces offered compelling evidence of biofilm influence on crystal textures and habits. Biofilm effects include irregular high relief surface textures, accessory minerals (elemental sulfur, Ca-carbonate, Sr/Ca-sulfate, Mg-oxide and Mg- sulfate) and distinctive crystal habits. Elemental sulfur, Ca-carbonate, and Sr/Ca-sulfate are known byproducts of bacterially mediated sulfate reduction (BSR). Populations of gypsum crystals within biofilms exhibited euhedral to lensoidal morphologies with unique equant and distorted prismatic forms. These forms had been shown to arise from form- and face-specific inhibition by bioorganic functional groups (Cody

  2. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum. PMID:22440404

  3. Messinian Salinity Crisis' Primary Evaporites: the shallow gypsum vs. deep dolomite formation paradox solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, G. J.; Krijgsman, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) is a dramatic event that took place ~ 5.9 Ma ago, resulting in deposition of 1-3 km thick evaporites at the Mediterranean seafloor. A considerable, long-lasting controversy existed on the modes of their formation, including the observed shallow gypsum versus deep dolostone deposits for the early phase of MSC. The onset of MSC is marked by deposition of gypsum/sapropel-like alternations, thought to relate to arid/humid climate conditions at a precessional rhythm. Gypsum precipitation only occurred at marginal- and dolomite formation at deeper settings. A range of potential explanations was given, most of which cannot satisfactorily explain all observations. Biogeochemical processes during MSC are commonly neglected but may explain that different deposits formed in shallow vs deep environments without exceptional physical boundary conditions for each. A unifying mechanism is presented in which gypsum formation occurs at all shallow water depths but its preservation is limited to shallow sedimentary settings. In contrast, ongoing deep-basin anoxic organic matter (OM) degradation processes result in dolomite formation. Gypsum precipitation in evaporating seawater takes place at 3-7 times concentrated seawater; seawater is always oversaturated relative to dolomite but its formation is inhibited by the presence of dissolved sulphate. Thus conditions for formation of gypsum exclude those for formation of dolomite and vice versa. Another process linking the saturation states of gypsum and dolomite is that of OM degradation by sulphate reduction. In stagnant deep water, ongoing OM-degradation may result in reducing the sulphate and enhancing the dissolved carbonate content. Such low-sulphate / high carbonate conditions in MSC deepwater are. unfavorable for gypsum preservation and favorable for dolomite formation, and always coincide with anoxic, i.e. oxygen-free conditions. Including dynamic biogeochemical processes in the thusfar static

  4. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hoeft, R.; Blevins, F.Z.; Achron, F.

    1994-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing commercial-grade ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economical feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of the produced ammonium sulfate on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD-gypsum for the project. In this quarter, a literature study that should give detailed insight into the chemistry, process schemes, and costs of producing ammonium sulfate from gypsum is in progress at the ISGS. Acquisition of a high quality FGD-gypsum sample was completed. Collecting of the other lower grade sample was scheduled to be conducted in December. Characterization of these feed materials is in progress.

  5. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss.

    PubMed

    Adeli, Ardeshir; Sheng, J; Jenkins, J N; Feng, G

    2015-03-01

    The effect of composted litter relative to fresh litter on leaching losses of nutrients has not been well documented. Fresh and composted broiler litter was surface-applied to bermudagrass (hay) [ (L.) Pers.] established in undisturbed soil columns based on N need of the grass in the presence or absence of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to evaluate an approach to reduce broiler litter nutrient leaching potential. Columns were periodically leached and biomass was harvested during the 60-d experiment. Total N applied to bermudagrass from broiler litter was 320 kg ha. Gypsum was mixed with fresh and composted litter at the rate based on 20% of litter weight. For composted broiler litter, NO-N, P, K, Cu, and Zn contents in the leachate obtained from the first leaching event were 58, 50, 40, 32, and 38% less than fresh broiler litter, respectively. Significant decreases in NO-N (13%), P (53%), Cu (17%), and Zn (28%) in leachate were obtained when gypsum was mixed with fresh broiler litter. Fresh broiler litter and composted broiler litter applications increased bermudagrass growth compared with the control and gypsum significantly increased yields when mixed with broiler litter. Composted broiler litter application significantly increased N and organic C in the soil compared with fresh litter. Results demonstrate that coapplication of composted broiler litter with FGD gypsum provide the most effective management option for minimizing leaching losses of nutrients while sustaining crop productivity. PMID:26023985

  6. Reactive-transport modelling of gypsum dissolution in a coastal karst aquifer in Puglia, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Claudia; Fidelibus, Maria Dolores

    2015-11-01

    The gypsum coastal aquifer of Lesina Marina (Puglia, southern Italy) has been affected by sinkhole formation in recent decades. Previous studies based on geomorphologic and hydrogeological data ascribed the onset of collapse phenomena to the erosion of material that fills palaeo-cavities (suffosion sinkholes). The change in the hydrodynamic conditions of groundwater induced by the excavation of a canal within the evaporite formation nearly 100 years ago was identified as the major factor in triggering the erosion, while the contribution of gypsum dissolution was considered negligible. A combined reactive-transport/density-dependent flow model was applied to the gypsum aquifer to evaluate whether gypsum dissolution rate is a dominant or insignificant factor in recent sinkhole formation under current hydrodynamic conditions. The conceptual model was first defined with a set of assumptions based on field and laboratory data along a two-dimensional transect of the aquifer, and then a density-dependent, tide-influenced flow model was set up and solved using the numerical code SEAWAT. Finally, the resulting transient flow field was used by the reactive multicomponent transport model PHT3D to estimate the gypsum dissolution rate. The validation tests show that the model accurately represents the real system, and the multi-disciplinary approach provides consistent information about the causes and evolution time of dissolution processes. The modelled porosity development rate is too low to represent a significant contribution to the recent sinkhole formation in the Lesina Marina area, although it justifies cavity formation and cavity position over geological time.

  7. Tri-calcium phosphate (ß-TCP) can be artificially synthesized by recycling dihydrate gypsum hardened.

    PubMed

    Han-Cheol, Cho; Hori, Masaharu; Yoshida, Takakazu; Yamada, Naoko; Komada, Yuko; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate is known as a major component of biological hard tissues. This study aimed to produce calcium phosphate by recycling kneaded surplus gypsum. β-dihydrate gypsum was derived from commercial dental β-hemihydrate gypsum, which was mechanically powdered and mixed with the liquid component of a commercial zinc phosphate cement. This mixture was fired at 1,200°C and evaluated by XRD analysis, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An acceptable ratio of mixing was 4 g of β-dihydrate gypsum powder to 1.5 mL of phosphoric acid liquid. XRD peaks were monotonic below 800°C, but new ß-TCP was formed by firing at 900°C or more, although TG-DTA analysis of synthetic ß-TCP suggested that some residual dihydrate gypsum remained in the sample. SEM images indicated a fused-block bone-like structure covered with phosphorus and calcium. These results suggest that production of synthetic β-TCP is possible through ecological techniques using recycled materials. PMID:25483384

  8. Gypsum-permineralized microfossils and their relevance to the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Schopf, J William; Farmer, Jack D; Foster, Ian S; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Gallardo, Victor A; Espinoza, Carola

    2012-07-01

    Orbital and in situ analyses establish that aerially extensive deposits of evaporitic sulfates, including gypsum, are present on the surface of Mars. Although comparable gypsiferous sediments on Earth have been largely ignored by paleontologists, we here report the finding of diverse fossil microscopic organisms permineralized in bottom-nucleated gypsums of seven deposits: two from the Permian (∼260 Ma) of New Mexico, USA; one from the Miocene (∼6 Ma) of Italy; and four from Recent lacustrine and saltern deposits of Australia, Mexico, and Peru. In addition to presenting the first report of the widespread occurrence of microscopic fossils in bottom-nucleated primary gypsum, we show the striking morphological similarity of the majority of the benthic filamentous fossils of these units to the microorganisms of a modern sulfuretum biocoenose. Based on such similarity, in morphology as well as habitat, these findings suggest that anaerobic sulfur-metabolizing microbial assemblages have changed relatively little over hundreds of millions of years. Their discovery as fossilized components of the seven gypsiferous units reported suggests that primary bottom-nucleated gypsum represents a promising target in the search for evidence of past life on Mars. Key Words: Confocal laser scanning microscopy-Gypsum fossils-Mars sample return missions-Raman spectroscopy-Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument-Sulfuretum. PMID:22794252

  9. Use of flue gas desulfurization gypsum for leaching Cd and Pb in reclaimed tidal flat soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Li, Xian; Tong, Ze-Jun; Li, Qu-Sheng; He, Bao-Yan; Wang, Li-Li; Guo, Shi-Hong; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-04-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to eliminate heavy metals from reclaimed tidal flat soil. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum was used for leaching. The highest removal rates of Cd and Pb in the upper soil layers (0-30 cm) were 52.7 and 30.5 %, respectively. Most of the exchangeable and carbonate-bound Cd and Pb were removed. The optimum FGD gypsum application rate was 7.05 kg·m(-2), and the optimum leaching water amount for the application was 217.74 L·m(-2). The application of FGD gypsum (two times) and the extension of the leaching interval time to 20 days increased the heavy metal removal rate in the upper soil layers. The heavy metals desorbed from the upper soil layers were re-adsorbed and fixed in the 30-70 cm soil layers. PMID:26758303

  10. Compartmentalization of gypsum and halite associated with cyanobacteria in saline soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Canfora, Loredana; Vendramin, Elisa; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Jungblut, Anne D; Pinzari, Flavia

    2016-06-01

    The interface between biological and geochemical components in the surface crust of a saline soil was investigated using X-ray diffraction, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mineral compounds such as halite and gypsum were identified crystallized around filaments of cyanobacteria. A total of 92 genera were identified from the bacterial community based on 16S gene pyrosequencing analysis. The occurrence of the gypsum crystals, their shapes and compartmentalization suggested that they separated NaCl from the immediate microenvironment of the cyanobacteria, and that some cyanobacteria and communities of sulfur bacteria may had a physical control over the distinctive halite and gypsum structures produced. This suggests that cyanobacteria might directly or indirectly promote the formation of a protective envelope made of calcium and sulfur-based compounds. PMID:27090760

  11. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. PMID:26067895

  12. Board Saver for Use with Developmental FPGAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A device denoted a board saver has been developed as a means of reducing wear and tear of a printed-circuit board onto which an antifuse field programmable gate array (FPGA) is to be eventually soldered permanently after a number of design iterations. The need for the board saver or a similar device arises because (1) antifuse-FPGA design iterations are common and (2) repeated soldering and unsoldering of FPGAs on the printed-circuit board to accommodate design iterations can wear out the printed-circuit board. The board saver is basically a solderable/unsolderable FPGA receptacle that is installed temporarily on the printed-circuit board. The board saver is, more specifically, a smaller, square-ring-shaped, printed-circuit board (see figure) that contains half via holes one for each contact pad along its periphery. As initially fabricated, the board saver is a wider ring containing full via holes, but then it is milled along its outer edges, cutting the via holes in half and laterally exposing their interiors. The board saver is positioned in registration with the designated FPGA footprint and each via hole is soldered to the outer portion of the corresponding FPGA contact pad on the first-mentioned printed-circuit board. The via-hole/contact joints can be inspected visually and can be easily unsoldered later. The square hole in the middle of the board saver is sized to accommodate the FPGA, and the thickness of the board saver is the same as that of the FPGA. Hence, when a non-final FPGA is placed in the square hole, the combination of the non-final FPGA and the board saver occupy no more area and thickness than would a final FPGA soldered directly into its designated position on the first-mentioned circuit board. The contact leads of a non-final FPGA are not bent and are soldered, at the top of the board saver, to the corresponding via holes. A non-final FPGA can readily be unsoldered from the board saver and replaced by another one. Once the final FPGA design

  13. Marketable products from gypsum, a coal combustion byproduct derived from a wet flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Ghiassi, K.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    For two years the authors have been developing a process to produce two marketable products, ammonium sulfate fertilizer and precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), from wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product gypsum. Phase I of the project focused on the process for converting FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with PCC produced as a by-product during the conversion. Early cost estimates suggested that the process was economically feasible when granular size ammonium sulfate crystals were produced. However, sale of the by-product PCC for high-value commercial application could further improve the economics of the process. The results of our evaluation of the market potential of the PCC by-product are reported in this paper. The most significant attributes of carbonate fillers that determine their usefulness in industry are particle size (i.e. fineness) and shape, whiteness (brightness), and mineralogical and chemical purity. The PCC produced from the FGD gypsum obtained from the Abbott Power Plant at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus are pure calcite with a CaCO{sub 3} content greater than 98%, 3% higher than the minimum requirement of 95%. However, the size, shape, and brightness of the PCC particles are suitable only for certain applications. Impurities in the gypsum from Abbott power plant influence the whiteness of the PCC products. Test results suggested that, to obtain gypsum that is pure enough to produce a high whiteness PCC for high value commercial applications, limestone with minimum color impurities should be used during the FGD process. Alternatively, purification procedures to obtain the desired whiteness of the FGD-gypsum can be used. Further improvement in the overall qualities of the PCC products should lead to a product that is adequate for high-value paper applications.

  14. Testing CO2 Sequestration in an Alkaline Soil Treated with Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying effective and economical methods for increasing carbon storage in soils is of interest for reducing soil CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere in order to partially offset anthropogenic CO2 contributions to climate change This study investigates an alternative strategy for increasing carbon retention in soils by accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. The addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8, often found in arid and semi-arid regions, may accelerate the slow process of calcite precipitation. Increased ionic strength from addition of a soluble Ca source also suppresses microbial activity which oxidizes SOC to gaseous CO2. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to identify conditions in which inorganic and organic C sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils by gypsum treatment. As an inexpensive calcium source, we proposed to use flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), a byproduct of fossil fuel burning electric power plants. To test the hypothesis, laboratory column experiments have been conducted in calcite-buffered soil with addition of gypsum and FGDG. The results of several months of column monitoring are demonstrating that gypsum-treated soil have lowered amounts of soil organic carbon loss and increased inorganic carbon (calcite) production. The excess generation of FGDG relative to industrial and agricultural needs, FGDG, is currently regarded as waste. Thus application of FGDG application in some soils may be an effective and economical means for fixing CO2 in soil organic and inorganic carbon forms.Soil carbon cycle, with proposed increased C retention by calcite precipitation and by SOC binding onto soil mineral surfaces, with both processes driven by calcium released from gypsum dissolution.

  15. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The shock behavior of gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Paleogene event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets (e.g., Mars Exploration Rover Spirit detected sulfate at Gusev crater, [1]). Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of SO2 to better understand its role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [2,3]. Kondo and Ahrens [4] measured induced radiation emitted from single crystal gypsum shocked to 30 and 40 GPa. They observed greybody emission spectra corresponding to temperatures in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 K that are a factor of 2 to 10 times greater than calculated pressure-density energy equation of state temperatures (Hugoniot) and are high enough to melt gypsum. Chen et al. [5] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of these phases with silica. Their observations indicated little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, Badjukov et al. [6] observed only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa but have not experimentally shocked gypsum in a step-wise manner to constrain possible incipient transformation effects. Schmitt and Hornemann [7] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa and report the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggested that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid-state transformation. They concluded that significant decomposition of anhydrite requires shock pressures higher than 60 GPa. Gupta et al. [8

  16. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  17. Kinetics of gypsum formation and growth during the dissolution of colemanite in sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, E.; Eroğlu, İ.; Özkar, S.

    2001-11-01

    One of the most important boron minerals, colemanite, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid whereby gypsum is formed as byproduct. Filtration of gypsum has an important role in boric acid production because gypsum affects the efficiency, purity and crystallization of boric acid. The formation and growth kinetics of gypsum during the dissolution of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied in a batch reactor by varying the temperature (60-90°C), stirring rate (150-400 rpm), and initial concentrations of the reactants. The initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio was varied between 0.21-0.85 by keeping the initial concentration of sulfate ion at [SO 42-] o=0.623 mol/l, and 0.85-3.41 by keeping the initial concentration of colemanite at [B 2O 3] o=0.777 mol/l. The crystallization of gypsum from the solution was followed by monitoring the calcium ion concentration in the solution as it is decreased by the formation of calcium sulfate precipitate. The calcium ion concentration in the liquid phase first undergoes a rapid exponential decay and then slowly approaches an asymptotic value of the saturation concentration at the respective temperature. The saturation concentration decreases with the increasing temperature from 5.2 mmol/l at 60°C to 3.1 mmol/l at 80°C, however, further increase in the temperature up to 90°C causes an increase in the saturation concentration to 5.1 mmol/l. The stirring rate was found to have no significant effect on dissolution in the range of 150-400 rpm. The minimum saturation concentration of the calcium ion was obtained at 80°C when the initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio is 0.85. The boric acid concentration in the solution decreases with the decreasing initial concentration of sulfuric acid. After the fast dissolution reaction of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid, the nucleation of the gypsum crystals first occurs from the supersaturated solution and then the crystals grow on these nuclei. The needle like crystals

  18. Constraining the origin of the Messinian gypsum deposits using coupled measurement of δ^{18}O$/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nicholas P.; Gázquez, Fernando; McKenzie, Judith A.; Chapman, Hazel J.; Hodell, David A.

    2016-04-01

    We used oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water (GHW) coupled with salinity deduced from ice melting temperatures of primary fluid inclusions in the same samples (in tandem with 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S and other isotopic measurements) to determine the composition of the mother fluids that formed the gypsum deposits of the Messinian Salinity Crisis from shallow and intermediate-depth basins. Using this method, we constrain the origin of the Messinian Primary Lower Gypsum (PLG) of the Sorbas basin (Betic foreland) and both the Upper Gypsum (UG) and the Lower Gypsum of the Sicilian basin. We then compare these results to measurements made on UG recovered from the deep Ionian and Balearic basins drilled during DSDP Leg 42A. The evolution of GHW δ18O/δD vs. salinity is controlled by mixing processes between fresh and seawater, coupled with the degree of evaporation. Evaporation and subsequent precipitation of gypsum from fluids dominated by freshwater will result in a depressed 87Sr/86Sr values and different trajectory in δ18O/δD vs. salinity space compared to fluids dominated by seawater. The slopes of these regression equations help to define the end-members from which the fluid originated. For example, salinity estimates from PLG cycle 6 in the Sorbas basin range from 18 to 51ppt, and after correction for fractionation factors, estimated δ18O and δD values of the mother water are low (-2.6 < δ18O < 2.7‰ ; -16.2 < δD < 15.8‰). The intercepts of the regression equations (i.e. at zero salinity) are within error of the average isotope composition of the modern precipitation and groundwater in this region of SE Spain. This indicates there was a significant contribution of meteoric water during gypsum deposition, while 87Sr/86Sr (0.708942 < 87Sr/86Sr < 0.708971) indicate the ions originated from the dissolution of previously marine evaporites. Gypsum from cycle 2 displays similar mother water values (-2.4 < δ18O < 2.4‰ ; -13.2 < δD < 17.0‰) to

  19. Building on previous OSL dating techniques for gypsum: a case study from Salt Basin playa, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Kay, John

    2012-01-01

    The long term stability and reliability of the luminescence signal for gypsum has not been well documented or systematically measured until just recently. A review of the current literature for luminescence dating of gypsum is compiled here along with original efforts at dating an intact and in-situ bed of selenite gypsum at Salt Basin Playa, New Mexico and Texas. This effort differs from other documented luminescence dating efforts because the gypsum is not powdery or redistributed from its original growth patterns within the playa basin but is instead of a crystalline form. Sixteen ages from eight cores were ultimately produced with seven of the ages coming from rare detrital quartz encased in or with the gypsum crystals while the remaining ages are from the crystalline gypsum. As far as can be ascertained, the quartz was measured separately from the gypsum and no contaminants were noted in any of the aliquots. Some basic and preliminary tests of signal stability were measured and found to be mitigated by lessening of pre-heat protocols. Ages ranged from 8 ka to 10 ka in the shallow cores and 16 ka to 22 ka in the deeper cores. These ages will be useful in determining rates of gypsum growth within a sequence of evaporates which, in turn, will help to better document historic rates of evaporation and thus estimate, with more precision, the corresponding annual evaporation rates.

  20. FEASIBILITY OF PRODUCING AND MARKETING BYPRODUCT GYPSUM FROM SO2 EMISSION CONTROL AT FOSSIL-FUEL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to identify fossil-fuel-fired power plants that might, in competition with existing crude gypsum sources and other power plants, lower the cost of compliance with SO2 regulations by producing and marketing abatement gypsum. In the Eastern U.S.,...

  1. The Aspects About of Objectively Appraisals of Modeling Gypsum Quality and Composites of Phonic-Absorbent and Orthopedic on Base of Gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, P. A.; Ungur, P. A.; Lazar, L.; Marcu, F.

    2009-11-01

    The EU Norms about of protection environment, outside and inside ambient, and human health demands has lead at obtain of new materials on the base of airborne material, with high thermo and phonic-absorbent properties, porous and lightweight. The α and β-modeling gypsum plaster quality and lightweight depend on many factors as: fabrication process, granulation, roast temperature, work temperature, environment, additives used, breakage, etc. Also, the objectively appraisal of modeling gypsum quality depends of proper tests methods selection, which are legislated in norms, standards and recommendations. In Romanian Standards SR EN 13279-1/2005 and SR EN 13279-2/2005, adaptable from EU Norms EN 13279-1/2004 and EN 13279-2/2004, the characteristics gypsum family tests are well specification, as: granule-metric analysis, determination of water/plaster ratio, setting time, mechanical characteristics, adhesions and water restrain. For plaster with special use (phonic-absorbent and orthopedic materials, etc.) these determinations are not concluding, being necessary more parameters finding, as: elastic constant, phonic-absorbent coefficient, porosity, working, etc., which is imposed the completion of norms and standards with new determinations.

  2. Recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum and utilization for remediation of acid mine drainage from coal mines.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Radebe, V

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum (a waste product of the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process) was tested using sodium carbonate. Batch recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum slurries by reacting with sodium carbonate under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of CaCO(3) recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effect of key process parameters, such as the slurry concentration (%) and the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum were considered. It was observed that batch waste gypsum conversion significantly increased with decrease in the slurry concentration or increase in the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench-scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3). PMID:22828309

  3. Biosignatures in modern sulfates: texture, composition and depositional environments of gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Turk, K.; Kubo, M.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·H2O) is an important phase in biogeochemistry and sedimentology as a mineral sink for sulfur, a paleoclimatic indicator, and an endolithic niche for phototrophic and chemotrophic bacteria. Sulfate deposits are also important targets of exploration for evidence of habitable environments and life on Mars. Gypsum deposits from a range of sedimentary environments at the Guerrero Negro crystallizer ponds and sabkha settings were investigated for microscale structure and composition to differentiate fabrics formed under microbial influence from those formed under abiogenic conditions. Sub-sedimentary gypsum forms in sabkha environments as mm to cm scale selenite discs (termed bird beak gypsum; Warren, 2006) and selenite disc aggregates. Selenite discs and other sub-sedimentary gypsum are characterized by a sinuous axial microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles. Sub-aqueous gypsum forms as cements, granules (termed gypsooids), and massive botryoidal crusts that line the sediment water interface and margins of managed crystallizer ponds and natural anchialine pools. Sub-aqueous gypsum exhibits a wide range of textures and mineral/biofilm associations that include amorphous to euhedral, tabular, needle and lensoidal morphologies. Elemental sulfur forms rinds on prismatic, growth aligned gypsum twins and reticulate magnesian carbonate is interspersed with both twinned crystals and rosette aggregates in stratified sub-aqueous environments. Intracrystalline biofilms and cell material was observed in association with nearly all sub-aqueous morphologies but only scarce evidence has been found for intercrystalline microbial communities. Columnar microbial communities living in anchialine pools were found to host precipitation of mm scale gypsum granules in their EPS matrix. Fine scale gypsum textures are unlikely to persist through diagenetic alteration, but understanding their primary associations with sulfur and carbonates is necessary for

  4. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, Ml; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C.; Hoeft, R.; Dewey, S.; Achorn, F.

    1995-12-31

    Goal is to assess technical and economic feasibility for producing fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced in limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This is the 1st year of a 2-year program among Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), Allied-Signal, Marketing Chem. Process Inc., Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co., and Central Illinois Public Services. In previous quarter, chemistry and process conditions were reviewed and a reactor system set up and used to conduct laboratory tests. FGD-gypsum from Abbott power plant was used. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake (98.36% gypsum and < 0.01% CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD- gypsum to ammonium sulfate was tested at 60-70{degree}C for 5-6 hr. Yield up to 82% and purity up to 95% were achieved for the ammonium sulfate production. During this quarter, more bench-scale experiments including a mass balance analysis were conducted; a yield up to 83% and up to 99% purity were achieved. A literature survey was completed and a preliminary process flow sheet was developed. Economics of the process is being estimated.

  5. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 17. THE GYPSUM AND WALLBOARD INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The gypsum and w...

  6. 40 CFR 436.50 - Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the gypsum subcategory. 436.50 Section 436.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  7. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  8. Hydrologic transport of fecal bacteria attenuated by flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. As a soil amendment for crop and pasture production it may increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, and decrease nutrient losses from applications of animal manures. Broiler litter is used as a source of plan...

  9. Hydrologic transport of fecal bacteria attenuated by flu gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. As a soil amendment for crop production it has the potential of improving soil water infiltration, soil conservation, and decreasing nutrient losses from broiler litter applications. Because broiler litter is a ...

  10. Broiler litter ash and flue gas desulfurization gypsum effects on peanut yield and uptake of nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important crop that requires large amounts of soluble calcium and phosphorus. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) and super phosphate (SP) have been used for calcium and phosphorus fertilizer for peanut. Broiler litter ash (BLA), a high phosphorus byproduct pr...

  11. The coprecipitation of strontium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride ions with gypsum. An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Jacob

    1980-10-01

    The coprecipitation of Sr 2+, Mg 2+, Na +, K + and Cl - into gypsum was studied as a function of temperature, brine concentration and growth rate. The concentrations of the studied cations in the gypsum increase with growth rate (kinetic effect), with a tendency to reach a limiting value at high growth rates. The partition coefficients of Sr tend to increase with brine concentration and decrease with temperature. The partition coefficients of the other cations also decrease with temperature but depend only very slightly on brine concentration. The concentrations of coprecipitated chloride are negligibly small. The coprecipitation behavior is explained in terms of the relation between the rate of desorption of the coprecipitating ions from the surface of the growing crystal, and the rate of growth. The studied cations may substitute for Ca 2+ in its normal lattice sites and/or reside in interstitial positions among the structural water molecules. The relative amount of foreign cations occupying interstitial positions increases with increasing growth rate. The elucidation of the behavior of coprecipitated ions in gypsum given here forms a basis for the utilization of these ions as geochemical indicators for the environment of deposition of gypsum. These indicators may help in reconstructing important parameters such as temperature, brine concentration and growth rate.

  12. Potassium leaching in undisturbed soil cores following surface applications of gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, M.; Rowell, D. L.

    2009-03-01

    Displacement studies on leaching of potassium (K+) were conducted under unsaturated steady state flow conditions in nine undisturbed soil columns (15.5 cm in diameter and 25 cm long). Pulses of K+ applied to columns of undisturbed soil were leached with distilled water or calcium chloride (CaCl2) at a rate of 18 mm h-1. The movement of K+ in gypsum treated soil leached with distilled water was at a similar rate to that of the untreated soil leached with 15 mM CaCl2. The Ca2+ concentrations in the leachates were about 15 mM, the expected values for the dissolution of the gypsum. When applied K+ was displaced with the distilled water, K+ was retained in the top 10-12.5 cm depth of soil. In the undisturbed soil cores there is possibility of preferential flow and lack of K+ sorption. The application of gypsum and CaCl2 in the reclamation of sodic soils would be expected to leach K+ from soils. It can also be concluded that the use of sources of water for irrigation which have a high Ca2+ concentration can also lead to leaching of K+ from soil. Average effluent concentration of K+ during leaching period was 30.2 and 28.6 mg l-1 for the gypsum and CaCl2 treated soils, respectively. These concentrations are greater than the recommended guideline of the World Health Organisation (12 mg K+ l-1).

  13. Assessment of Mercury in Soils, Crops, Earthworms, and Water when Soil is Treated with Gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from fossil fuel combustion has many potential uses in agriculture, but there is concern about the potential environmental effects of its elevated mercury (Hg) concentration. The wet limestone scrubbing process that removes sulfur from flue gas (and produces gyp...

  14. Framework of risk assessment in relation to FGD-gypsum use as agricultural amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the concerns by EPA of air pollution from coal fired power plants, the industry are building and retrofitting existing facilities to remove more impurities from the environment. Industry has introduced removal of fly ash contaminates before SO2 removal, allowing generation of FGD-gypsum with...

  15. Effect of land application of phosphorus-saturated gypsum on soil phosphorus in a laboratory incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural drainage ditches can deliver high loads of phosphorus (P) to surface water. Installation of filter structures containing P sorbing materials (PSMs), including gypsum, is an emerging practice that has shown promise to reduce these P loads. The objective of this study was to evaluate what...

  16. Nitrogen and phosphorus leaching as affected by gypsum amendment and exchangeable calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The movement of N and P from the soil by leaching contributes to losses from agricultural land and represents an important environmental and human health concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum amendment and the resultant impact of different levels of exchangeable C...

  17. Animal waste and FGD gypsum effects on bermudagrass and soil leachate nutrient contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous experiments on newly relcaimed coal mine soils in northeastern Mississippi, applying poultry litter at 22.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 enhanced bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) biomass and selected soil quality parameters. Additionally, co-application of 11.2 Mg ha-1 FGD gypsum and litter reduced so...

  18. Incorporation of arsenic into gypsum: Relevant to arsenic removal and immobilization process in hydrometallurgical industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danni; Yuan, Zidan; Wang, Shaofeng; Jia, Yongfeng; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-12-30

    Gypsum precipitates as a major secondary mineral during the iron-arsenate coprecipitation process for the removal of arsenic from hydrometallurgical effluents. However, its role in the fixation of arsenic is still unknown. This work investigated the incorporation of arsenic into gypsum quantitatively during the crystallization process at various pHs and the initial arsenic concentrations. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the coprecipitated solids. The results showed that arsenate was measurably removed from solution during gypsum crystallization and the removal increased with increasing pH. At lower pH where the system was undersaturated with respect to calcium arsenate, arsenate ions were incorporated into gypsum structure, whereas at higher pH, calcium arsenate was formed and constituted the major arsenate bearing species in the precipitated solids. The findings may have important implications for arsenic speciation and stability of the hydrometallurgical solid wastes. PMID:26188870

  19. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to fresh broiler litter, little is known about the dynamics of composted litter derived-nutrient in the ecosystem. In this study, the potential leaching losses of nutrients from compost relative to fresh broiler litter along with flue gas desulfurization (FGD gypsum), as a nutrient immobil...

  20. Reduction of Interrill Erosion by different application methods of Polyacrylamide and Gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion has been studied from different perspectives. This paper presents results on interrill erosion for three different application methods of Polyacrylamide (PAM) and Gypsum. Small interrill plots (0.74 m2) were packed with a highly erodible sieved soil and surface was prepared for it to ha...

  1. Application of gypsum to control P runoff from poultry litter fertilization of pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) to reduce P losses from surface runoff when poultry litter is used as a fertilizer source in agriculture. Utilization of poultry litter as a fertilizer source is common in regions with intense poultry production. While poultry litter ...

  2. Impact of FGD gypsum application on water quality in a coastal plain soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are growing concerns regarding the fate of nutrients, especially P, from land application of animal waste. One approach to reduce runoff losses of P is to treat manure or the soil receiving manure with chemical amendments such as gypsum. This study used rainfall simulations to examine the im...

  3. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  4. Ambient air-quality survey: Canadian Gypsum Company, Weston, Ontario: report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.

    1990-01-01

    A mobile air monitoring unit from the Air Resources Branch conducted an air quality survey in the vicinity of the Canadian Gypsum Company plant in northwest Toronto during the period July 24 to August 4, 1989. Survey objectives were to measure the ambient concentration of total reduced sulfur compounds (rotten egg odour) and various organic and chlorinated organic compounds.

  5. Decreasing phosphorus loss in tile-drained landscapes using flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural non-point source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P...

  6. Field studies on the use of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a product of precipitation of sulfur from stack gases from coal-fired electric power plants. This material is produced in increasingly large quantities by electric power companies to meet clean air standards. We have evaluated this material for beneficial us...

  7. Gypsum soil amendment as a management practice in no-till to improve water quality.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No-tillage agriculture has been promoted as a viable means of controlling soil erosion in many regions of the USA. In no-tillage, manures are largely surface applied and soluble forms of nutrients can easily be removed by water during a runoff event. Gypsum has been shown to improve infiltration i...

  8. Effect of surface application of FGD gypsum on infiltration rates in a Coastal Plain soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poorly drained cultivated soils on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland are often subject to excessive runoff. Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of a process used by utility companies to prevent SO**2 release into the atmosphere, is expected to be in large supply as increasing ...

  9. Soil test and bermudagrass forage yield responses to animal waste and FGD gypsum ammendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil and plant responses to animal or industrial byproducts is needed for effective use of these potential amendments on reclaimed mine soil. This study compared seven treatments of 11.2 Mg ha-1 flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum (control), 896 kg ha-1 NPK fertilizer (13-13-13), 22.4 M...

  10. Potential use of FGD gypsum for overcoming environmental problems in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural productivity is constrained by unfavorable soil, climate and management factors in the southeastern USA. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has the potential for alleviating some of these problems but its effectiveness in southeastern environments needs to be established by addition...

  11. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  12. Can isotopic variations in structural water of gypsum reveal paleoclimatic changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Bustos, D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Water of crystallization in gypsum can be used as paleo-environmental proxy to study large scale climatic variability in arid areas. This is because changes in the isotopic composition of water of crystallization are due to isotopic variations in the mother brine from which the mineral precipitated, and the brine isotopic composition is linked to evaporation processes and humidity. This is particularly important when the salts are the only traces left of the original water, i.e. in modern arid areas. This study aims to prove that the 2-D/18-O compositions of the water of crystallization extracted from successive precipitates or even different growth zones of natural gypsum (CaSO4·H2O) can reconstruct the evaporation history and paleo-humidity of the source water basin. The method was tested in a laboratory experiment that evaporated CaSO4 brines under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The brine was left to evaporate for five days at two different humidities (45 and 75 RH%); subsequently, brines and precipitated gypsum were sampled at 24 hour intervals. In this way we simulated zoned growth of gypsum. The samples were then analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition using a Thermo Scientific TC/EA with modified column, coupled to a MAT 253 Thermo Finnigan mass spectrometer at JPL. If preliminary results validate the novel hypothesis that changes in mineral composition can reveal details of paleo-environmental conditions the theory will be tested on natural gypsum collected from selected areas in White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. The study is currently ongoing but the full dataset will be presented at the conference.

  13. Quantitative FT-IR spectroscopy of gypsum raw material for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendtner, K.; Libowitzky, E.; Götzinger, M. A.; Koss, S.

    2003-04-01

    Today quality control (QC) is a big issue for being competitive in the gypsum industry. Knowledge and understanding of the raw material help to enhance the quality and permanence of products. Therefore a rapid, precise and user-friendly FT-IR spectroscopic method for quantitative analysis of gypsum, anhydrite, magnesite and dolomite from the gypsum deposit of Puchberg, Austria is being developed. There are decisive advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy compared to thermogravimetric methods (TG, DTA, DSC) or XRD, which are commonly used for QC, e.g. it is frequently available in industry labs and a spectrum can be obtained in a few minutes, with a minimum of sample preparation. The effects of particle size and ratio of dilution with KBr were investigated in transmission mode, using KBr pellets, as well as in diffuse reflexion mode. Little differences in particle size lead to enormous differences in peak height in transmission mode, but show only little effects in diffuse reflexion. The small amounts of sample used in KBr pellets (e.g. 2 mg sample : 500 mg KBr) also turned out to be disadvantageous, just like the time consuming sample preparation. Measurements in diffuse reflexion with a sample to KBr ratio of 1:10 show promising results for use in standardization, whereas higher dilutions hardly improve the quality, and ratios of 1:5 still show components of specular reflection. The calibration model for quantitative analysis is being constructed measuring various defined mixtures of >98% pure natural minerals (gypsum, magnesite, dolomite), and synthetic materials (anhydrite). The latter was obtained by heating gypsum at 350^oC for 10 h. The synthetic material was chosen, because natural material was not available in sufficient amounts with high purity. The IR method is compared with results achieved with XRD-Rietveld and thermogravimetric methods. Advantages of chemometrical software based on multivariate statistical techniques will be investigated and compared with

  14. Dynamic controls on accretion and lithification of modern gypsum-dominated thrombolites, Los Roques, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrash, Daniel A.; Gingras, Murray K.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Orange, François; Pecoits, Ernesto; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2012-03-01

    Meter-sized thrombolites coated by well developed zonally differentiated microbial mats have been found growing in the shallow waters (depth < 1 m) of a restricted hypersaline lagoon on the Archipelago Los Roques in Venezuela. By contrast, within the deeper parts of the studied lagoon, sedimentation is characterized by several decimeters of organic-rich material containing gypsum granules lacking carbonate cementation. The lithification of the thrombolites is thought to have proceeded as follows. First, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) comprising the microbial mat concentrate Ca2 + and other metal cations by adsorption from the hypersaline waters. Second, some of these bound metals then serve as nucleation sites for primary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Third, while carbonate phases are forming in some zones of the mat, in others zones they are being re-dissolved due to the acidity generated through the metabolism of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, Fourth, as the dissolved sulfide is oxidized into sulfate, the pore-water become saturated with respect to gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Fifth, as primary gypsum precipitates within the structures, endolithic sulfate-reducing bacteria metabolize the sulfate moiety in the mineral phase, while simultaneously oxidizing the EPS trapped during accretion. Sixth, as microbial EPS degradation proceeds, the anaerobic oxidation of specific protein fractions of the EPS matrix leads to increased alkalinity, the partial dissolution of gypsum, supersaturation with respect to calcium carbonate, and ultimately pseudomorphic aragonite replacement; this differs from secondary calcite cements in being enriched in 12C, and depleted in minor and trace metals initially associated with the EPS. The biogeochemical processes occurring in this thrombolite-constructing lagoon represent a novel field site for studying the chemical and isotopic processes characterizing early diagenetic gypsum and the role microbes play in its precipitation

  15. Using flue gas desulfurization gypsum to remove dissolved phosphorus from agricultural drainage waters.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Ray B; Buda, Anthony R; Kleinman, Peter J A; Church, Clinton D; Saporito, Louis S; Folmar, Gordon J; Bose, Salil; Allen, Arthur L

    2012-01-01

    High levels of accumulated phosphorus (P) in soils of the Delmarva Peninsula are a major source of dissolved P entering drainage ditches that empty into the Chesapeake Bay. The objective of this study was to design, construct, and monitor a within-ditch filter to remove dissolved P, thereby protecting receiving waters against P losses from upstream areas. In April 2007, 110 Mg of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a low-cost coal combustion product, was used as the reactive ingredient in a ditch filter. The ditch filter was monitored from 2007 to 2010, during which time 29 storm-induced flow events were characterized. For storm-induced flow, the event mean concentration efficiency for total dissolved P (TDP) removal for water passing through the gypsum bed was 73 ± 27% confidence interval (α = 0.05). The removal efficiency for storm-induced flow by the summation of load method was 65 ± 27% confidence interval (α = 0.05). Although chemically effective, the maximum observed hydraulic conductivity of FGD gypsum was 4 L s(-1), but it decreased over time to <1 L s(-1). When bypass flow and base flow were taken into consideration, the ditch filter removed approximately 22% of the TDP load over the 3.6-yr monitoring period. Due to maintenance and clean-out requirements, we conclude that ditch filtration using FGD gypsum is not practical at a farm scale. However, we propose an alternate design consisting of FGD gypsum-filled trenches parallel to the ditch to intercept and treat groundwater before it enters the ditch. PMID:22565248

  16. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V.; Baig, M. Arif Ali

    2011-02-15

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

  17. Biological Responses of Raw 264.7 Macrophage Exposed to Two Strains of Stachybotrys chartarum Spores Grown on Four Different Wallboard Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this research was to provide a better understanding of the health impacts caused by Stachybotrys chartarum (Houston and 51-11) spores grown on four gypsum products two of which were resistant to microbes. Raw 264.7 cells were exposed to whole spores and fragmented 51...

  18. Permian paleogeography of west-central Pangea: Reconstruction using sabkha-type gypsum-bearing deposits of Parnaíba Basin, Northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, Francisco R.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Soares, Joelson L.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme aridity during Late Permian - Early Triassic period was the main factor for resetting the entire paleoclimate of the planet. Permian evaporite basins and lacustrine red beds were widely distributed along the supercontinent of Pangea. Sulphate deposits in Western Pangea, particularly in Northern Brazil, accumulated in an extensive playa lake system. Outcrop-based facies and stratigraphic analysis of up to 20 m thick evaporite-siliciclastic deposits reveal the predominance of laminated reddish mudstone with subordinate limestone, marl and lenses of gypsum. The succession was deposited in shallow lacustrine and inland sabkha environments associated with saline pans and mudflats. Gypsum deposits comprise six lithofacies: 1) bottom-growth gypsum, 2) nodular/micronodular gypsum, 3) mosaic gypsum, 4) fibrous/prismatic gypsum, 5) alabastrine gypsum, and 6) rosettes of gypsum. Gypsum types 1 and 2 are interpreted as primary deposition in saline pans. Bottom-growth gypsum forms grass-like crusts while nodular/micronodular gypsum indicates displacive precipitation of the crust in shallow water and the groundwater capillary zone. Types 3 and 4 are early diagenetic precipitates. Abundant inclusions of tiny lath-like anhydrite crystals suggest a primary origin of anhydrite. Alabastrine gypsum, fibrous gypsum (satinspar) and rosettes of gypsum probably derived from near-surface hydration of anhydrite. The gypsum-bearing deposits in the Parnaíba Basin contribute towards understanding paleogeographic changes in Western Pangea. A progressive uplift of East Pangea, culminated in the forced regression and retreat of epicontinental seas to the West. Restricted seas or large lakes were formed before the definitive onset of desert conditions in Pangea, leading to the development of extensive ergs.

  19. Formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum in marine methane hydrate settings: Evidence from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Algeo, Thomas J.; Su, Pibo; Hu, Gaowei

    2016-09-01

    During the last decade, gypsum has been discovered widely in marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments. However, whether this gypsum is an in-situ authigenic precipitate remains controversial. The GMGS2 expedition carried out in 2013 by the Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS) in the northern South China Sea provided an excellent opportunity for investigating the formation of authigenic minerals and, in particular, the relationship between gypsum and methane hydrate. In this contribution, we analyzed the morphology and sulfur isotope composition of gypsum and authigenic pyrite as well as the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonate in a drillcore from Site GMGS2-08. These methane-derived carbonates have characteristic carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C: -57.9‰ to -27.3‰ VPDB; δ18O: +1.0‰ to +3.8‰ VPDB) related to upward seepage of methane following dissociation of underlying methane hydrates since the Late Pleistocene. Our data suggest that gypsum in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) of this core precipitated as in-situ authigenic mineral. Based on its sulfur isotopic composition, the gypsum sulfur is a mixture of sulfate derived from seawater and from partial oxidation of authigenic pyrite. Porewater Ca2+ ions for authigenic gypsum were likely generated from carbonate dissolution through acidification produced by oxidation of authigenic pyrite and ion exclusion during methane hydrate formation. This study thus links the formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum with the oxidation of authigenic pyrite and evolution of underlying methane hydrates. These findings suggest that authigenic gypsum may be a useful proxy for recognition of SMTZs and methane hydrate zones in modern and ancient marine methane hydrate geo-systems.

  20. 46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards for exposed hazards. 28.215 Section 28.215 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL....215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a) Each space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of...

  1. The Vanishing School Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Donald M.; Haynes, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Now that school boards have been replaced by parent advisory councils, there is virtually no local school governance in New Brunswick, Canada. Factors leading to school boards' demise include neglected democratic institutions, failure to understand local boards' needs, less qualified members, boards' failure to protect their special…

  2. EXPOSE-R cosmic radiation time profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, Tsvetan; Horneck, Gerda; Häder, Donat-Peter; Schuster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the time profile of cosmic radiation exposure obtained by the radiation risks radiometer-dosimeter (R3DR) during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-R mission (EXPOSE-R) in the EXPOSE-R facility outside the Russian Zvezda module of the International Space Station (ISS). Another aim is to make the obtained results available to other EXPOSE-R teams for use in their data analysis. R3DR is a low mass and small dimensions automated device, which measures solar radiation in four channels and in addition cosmic ionizing radiation. The main results of cosmic ionizing radiation measurements are: three different radiation sources were detected and quantified: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), energetic protons from the inner radiation belt (IRB) in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly and energetic electrons from the outer radiation belt (ORB). The highest daily averaged absorbed dose rate of 506 μGy day-1 came from IRB protons; GCR delivered much smaller daily absorbed dose rates of 81.4 μGy day-1 on average, and ORB source delivered on average a dose rate of 89 μGy day-1. The IRB and ORB daily averaged absorbed dose rates were higher than those observed during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-E mission (EXPOSE-E), whereas the GCR rate was smaller than that measured during the EXPOSE-E mission. The reason for this difference is much less surrounding constructions shielding of the R3DR instrument in comparison with the R3DE instrument.

  3. How Boards Can Improve Teacher Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grande, Alexander

    Effective school board leadership based on involvement and example can effectively enhance teacher performance. The first of five strategies presented to encourage maximum performance is the "Science of Teaching Program," allowing staff members, in a six-day seminar format, the opportunity to be exposed to a framework for making wise professional…

  4. Phase transitions induced by shock compression on a gypsum mineral: X-ray and micro-Raman analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucio, L.; Rosales, I.; Thions, C.; Soullard, J.; Orozco, E.

    2015-10-01

    As a part of systematic researches of phase transitions induced by shock compression in phosphates, silicates, germanates and sulfates, in this article we report preliminary results obtained from shock recovery experiments on powders of a gypsum mineral. The shock experiment was performed in a light gas gun until a pressure close to 14 GPa reached. The experimental techniques employed to analyze the shock effects on recovered samples were: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (MRS). The SEM observations show a high plasticity in the impacted sample composed mainly by gypsum and bassanite quantified by Rietveld analysis of the XRD. The results indicate the partial dehydration of gypsum as a result of impact. The MRS analysis suggests the presence of micro-mixtures of gypsum, bassanite and anhydrite heterogeneously distributed throughout the recovered sample.

  5. Endolithic cyanobacteria in soil gypsum: Occurrences in Atacama (Chile), Mojave (United States), and Al-Jafr Basin (Jordan) Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hailiang; Rech, Jason A.; Jiang, Hongchen; Sun, Henry; Buck, Brenda J.

    2007-06-01

    Soil sulfates are present in arid and hyperarid environments on Earth and have been found to be abundant in soils on Mars. Examination of soil gypsum from the Atacama Desert, Chile, the Mojave Desert, United States, and Al-Jafr Basin, Jordan, revealed endolithic cyanobacteria communities just below the surface of soil gypsum samples. Optical and scanning electron microscope observations of the colonized layers indicated that the unicellular Chroococcidiopsis is the dominant cyanobacterium in all studied communities. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that in addition to Chroococcidiopsis, a few other cyanobacteria are present. Heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant in the colonized zones of the fine-grained gypsum from the Atacama and Mojave Desert, but insignificant in the fibrous gypsum from the Jordan Desert. Endolithic life forms similar to these described here may exist or have existed on Mars and should be targeted by the Mars Science Laboratory and future in situ missions.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility. PMID:15491828

  7. Holographic interferometry study of the dissolution and diffusion of gypsum in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, Jean; Bert, Jacques

    2007-04-01

    We have performed holographic interferometry measurements of the dissolution of the (0 1 0) plane of a cleaved gypsum single crystal in pure water. These experiments have provided the value of the dissolution rate constant k of gypsum in water and the value of the interdiffusion coefficient D of its aqueous species in water. D is 1.0 × 10 -9 m 2 s -1, a value close to the theoretical value generally used in dissolution studies. k is 4 × 10 -5 mol m -2 s -1. It directly characterizes the microscopic transfer rate at the solid-liquid interface, and is not an averaged value deduced from quantities measured far from the surface as in macroscopic dissolution experiments. It is found to be two times lower than the value obtained from macroscopic experiments.

  8. Fate of mercury in flue gas desulfurization gypsum determined by Temperature Programmed Decomposition and Sequential Chemical Extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenwu; Zhuo, Yuqun; Fan, Yaming; Wang, Zhipeng

    2016-05-01

    A considerable amount of Hg is retained in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (WFGD) systems. For this reason, it is important to determine the species of Hg in FGD gypsum not only to understand the mechanism of Hg removal by WFGD systems but also to determine the final fate of Hg when FGD gypsum is disposed. In this study, Temperature Programmed Decomposition (TPD) and Sequential Chemical Extraction (SCE) were applied to FGD gypsum to identify the Hg species in it. The FGD gypsum samples were collected from seven coal-fired power plants in China, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.19 to 3.27μg/g. A series of pure Hg compounds were used as reference materials in TPD experiments and the results revealed that the decomposition temperatures of different Hg compounds increase in the order of Hg2Cl2gypsums identified by TPD included HgCl2, Hg2Cl2, Hg2SO4, black HgS and red HgS, of which mercury sulfides were the primary compounds. The results of SCE indicated that Hg was mainly distributed in the strongly complexed phase. The low Hg content in FGD gypsum increases the ambiguity of assigning extraction fractions to certain Hg species by SCE. The fact that the primary compounds in FGD gypsum are HgS phases leads the leaching of Hg in the natural environment to be quite low, but a considerable amount of Hg may be released during the industrial heating process. PMID:27155422

  9. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum on Reducing Soluble Phosphorus in Successive Runoff Events from a Coastal Plain Bermudagrass Pasture.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dexter B; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the threat that pastures intensively managed with poultry litter (PL) pose to accelerating eutrophication is a major issue in the southeastern United States. Gypsum (CaSO) has been identified as a promising management tool for ameliorating litter P losses to runoff. Thus, research was conducted to elucidate gypsum's residual effects on P losses from a bermudagrass ( L.) pasture. Runoff events (60 min) were created using rainfall simulations. Treatments consisted of applying four flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum rates (0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.9 Mg ha) to bermudagrass fertilized with 13.4 Mg ha PL plus a nonfertilized check (no litter or gypsum) and 8.9 Mg ha FGD gypsum only as controls. Rainfall simulations (∼ 85 mm h) were conducted immediately, 5 wk, and 6 mo (i.e., at the end of growing season) after PL application to determine gypsum's effectiveness at controlling P loss over successive runoff events. The greatest dissolved P (DP) in runoff occurred immediately after PL application. Gypsum effectively reduced cumulative DP concentration losses (54%) compared with PL alone in initial runoff events. Gypsum reduced DP concentrations in succeeding runoff events also regardless of timing, suggesting that its effect is persistent and will not diminish over a growing season. Generally, maximum DP reductions were achieved with 8.9 Mg ha. However, it was surmised from this study that optimal P reduction in a bermudagrass pasture can be achieved with 4.4 Mg ha. Information ascertained from this study may be useful in aiding land managers making prescriptions for management practices that reduce DP losses from agricultural fields. PMID:27136176

  10. The Short, Productive Board Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    Board meetings are the time and place where school boards act. In fact, only when coming together as a body in a legal meeting do school board members become a board. Effective board meetings are the first prerequisite for an effective board. Furthermore, what parents and voters see at board meetings determines largely what they think about their…