Science.gov

Sample records for gyrating dust particles

  1. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  2. An optimized watermarking scheme using an encrypted gyrator transform computer generated hologram based on particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong

    2014-04-21

    In this paper, a novel secure optimal image watermarking scheme using an encrypted gyrator transform computer generated hologram (CGH) in the contourlet domain is presented. A new encrypted CGH technique, which is based on the gyrator transform, the random phase mask, the three-step phase-shifting interferometry and the Fibonacci transform, has been proposed to produce a hologram of a watermark first. With the huge key space of the encrypted CGH, the security strength of the watermarking system is enhanced. To achieve better imperceptibility, an improved quantization embedding algorithm is proposed to embed the encrypted CGH into the low frequency sub-band of the contourlet-transformed host image. In order to obtain the highest possible robustness without losing the imperceptibility, particle swarm optimization algorithm is employed to search the optimal embedding parameter of the watermarking system. In comparison with other method, the proposed watermarking scheme offers better performances for both imperceptibility and robustness. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed image watermarking is not only secure and invisible, but also robust against a variety of attacks. PMID:24787882

  3. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  4. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  5. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  6. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  7. Structure of Cometary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.

    2004-11-01

    The recent encounter of Stardust with comet 81P/Wild 2 has provided highly spatially resolved data about dust particles in the coma. They show intense swarms and bursts of particles, suggest the existence of fragmenting low-density particles formed of higher density sub-micrometer components [1], and definitely confirm previous results (inferred from Giotto encounter with comet Grigg-Skjellerup [2] and remote light scattering observations [3]). The light scattering properties (mostly polarization, which does not depend upon disputable normalizations) of dust in cometary comae will be summarized, with emphasis on the spatial changes and on the wavelength and phase angle dependence. Experimental and numerical simulations are needed to translate these observed light scattering properties in terms of physical properties of the dust particles (e.g. size, morphology, albedo, porosity). New experimental simulations (with fluffy mixtures of sub-micron sized silica and carbon grains) and new numerical simulations (with fractal aggregates of homogeneous or core-mantled silicate and organic grains) will be presented. The results are in favor of highly porous particles built up (by ballistic-cluster-cluster agglomeration) from grains of interstellar origin. The perspectives offered by laboratory simulations with aggregates built under conditions representative of the early solar system on board the International Space Station will be presented, together with the perspectives offered by future experiments on board the Rosetta cometary probe. Supports from CNES and ESA are acknowledged [1] Tuzzolino et al., Science, 304, 1776, 2004, [2] N. McBride et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 289, p. 535-553, 1997, [3] Levasseur-Regourd and Hadamcik, J. Quant. Spectros. Radiat. Transfer, 79-80, 903-910, 2003.

  8. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  9. Particle atlas of World Trade Center dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, Heather; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has begun a reassessment of the presence of World Trade Center (WTC) dust in residences, public buildings, and office spaces in New York City, New York. Background dust samples collected from residences, public buildings, and office spaces will be analyzed by multiple laboratories for the presence of WTC dust. Other laboratories are currently studying WTC dust for other purposes, such as health effects studies. To assist in inter-laboratory consistency for identification of WTC dust components, this particle atlas of phases in WTC dust has been compiled.

  10. Dust particles interaction with plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Jepu, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Chiru, P.; Zaroschi, V.

    2009-11-10

    The flow of plasma and particularly the flow of ions play an important role in dusty plasmas. Here we present some instances in laboratory experiments where the ion flow is essential in establishing dust dynamics in strongly or weakly coupled dust particles. The formation of ion wake potential and its effect on the dynamics of dust crystals, or the ion drag force exerted on micron size dust grains are some of the phenomena observed in the presented experiments.

  11. Solar system exposure histories of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, Alfred O.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's); sources of interplanetary dust particles; and solar wind and noble gas isotopic ratios in IDP's.

  12. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  13. Electrostatic disruption of lunar dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that dust particles might explode catastrophically on the lunar surface due to electrostatic charging is examined. For the dark side along the terminator zone, dust balls and compact stony particles of micron and submicron sizes will be blown up if their surface potential is as low as a kilovolt negative. This mechanism does not operate on the sunlit side because the surface potential is only 3.5-20 volts positive.

  14. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  15. Collective excitations and dust particles in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilra, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that observed bands at 2200 A and in the 10 micron region are most probably due to collective excitations of dust particles. The following specific conclusions are drawn: (1) the 2200 A interstellar band is very likely due to graphite particles; (2) these graphite particles should be very small, approximately spherical, and should have no coating whatsoever; (3) the identification of circumstellar and interstellar silicates from the observations in the 10 micron region does not seem to be correct; (4) very valuable information about the shape of the circumstellar and interstellar dust particles can be obtained directly from observations; and (5) narrow band polarization measurements in the spectral regions of these bands will be very helpful in determining the shape of the particles.

  16. Reanalysis of porous chondritic cosmic dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapisinsky, I.; Figusch, V.; Ivan, J.; Izdinsky, K.; Zemankova, M.

    2001-10-01

    The particles reanalysed in this study were obtained from the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Cosmic Dust Collection. The reanalysis of the particle L2008 P9 indicates typical assemblage of olivine - pyroxene. This sample can be classified as a chondritic porous IDP with the metallic phase grain containing essential amount of nickel and copper (the latter element is most probably due to instrumental artefact). The chemical composition of the particle L2011 S5 corresponds mostly to an assemblage of pyroxene phase - (Mg,Fe,Ni)SiO_3 roughly 75 wt.% and a sulphide phase - probably pyrrhotite (Fe,Ni)S about 25 wt.%.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces” and “granules,” fragments...

  18. Plasma-Based Detector of Outer-Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Brinza, David E.; Henry, Michael D.; Clay, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    A report presents a concept for an instrument to be flown in outer space, where it would detect dust particles - especially those associated with comets. The instrument would include a flat plate that would intercept the dust particles. The anticipated spacecraft/dust-particle relative speeds are so high that the impingement of a dust particle on the plate would generate a plasma cloud. Simple electric dipole sensors located equidistantly along the circumference of the plate would detect the dust particle indirectly by detecting the plasma cloud. The location of the dust hit could be estimated from the timing of the detection pulses of the different dipoles. The mass and composition of the dust particle could be estimated from the shapes and durations of the pulses from the dipoles. In comparison with other instruments for detecting hypervelocity dust particles, the proposed instrument offers advantages of robustness, large collection area, and simplicity.

  19. Nitrogen in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, L. P.; Thomas, K. L.; Bradley, J. P.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution and chemical state of nitrogen in IDPs with the exceptions of the isotopic enrichment in 15N displayed by many particles [1-3], and the inferred association of nitrogen with polyaromatic hydrocarbons in some IDPs [4]. Like carbon, nitrogen is strongly fractionated among meteoritic materials and it is well known that the most primitive carbon-rich meteorites also tend to have high nitrogen abundances [5]. Nitrogen-bearing compounds are also a significant component of the carbonaceous material (CHON particles) sampled during the comet Halley encounter [e.g. 6]. We describe here the first reported detection and location of nitrogen concentrations in several IDPs using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Three chondritic, anhydrous IDPs (L2011R11, L2008F13, and a fragment from L2006, cluster 14) were embedded in sulfur [7] and tranmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens were prepared by ultramicrotomy. The IDP thin sections were placed on copper TEM grids with SiO thin film substrates and analyzed using a JEOL 2010 TEM equipped with a thin-window energy-dispersive X-ray detector and a Gatan 666 parallel EELS spectrometer. We also analyzed W7027H14, a carbon-rich, chondritic-porous IDP that was embedded in epoxy. The EELS data from carbon-rich amorphous regions of the analyzed IDPs typically show a small, but distinct nitrogen edge at ~400 eV (Figure 1). The nitrogen is not homogeneously distributed in the carbonaceous material in the four IDPs analyzed to date, but occurs in "hot spots". However, these "hot spots" do not appear to be associated with a distinct N-bearing mineral (e.g. nitrides); the nitrogen is indigenous to the carbonaceous material in these IDPs. Although the quantitative N analyses using EELS are still in progress, the preliminary data from one IDP (L2011R11) indicates an upper N/C atom ratio of ~0.1, which is comparable to the chondritic value (N/C ~0.08, [8]). It should be noted however, that the

  20. Stochastic Acceleration of Dust Particles in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Marmolino, C.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-10-15

    Stochastic heating of dust particles resulting from dust charge fluctuations is considered in the conditions of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) in tokamak plasmas. It is shown that kinetic energies corresponding to velocities of {approx_equal}Km/s can be reached in times of order {approx_equal}1 ms by micron-size dust particles interacting with a background of stochastically heated nano-size dust particles.

  1. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  2. Mineralogy of chondritic interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, I. D. R.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1987-08-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of current investigations on the mineralogy of chondritic micrometeorites obtained from the lower stratosphere using flat-plate collection surfaces attached to high-flying aircraft. A compilation of detailed mineralogical analyses for 30 documented chondritic interplanetary dust particles indicates a wide variety of minerals present in assemblages which, as yet, are poorly defined. Two possible assemblages are: (1) carbonaceous phases and layer silicates and (2) carbonaceous and chain silicates or nesosilicates. Particles with both types of silicate assemblages are also observed.

  3. Interactions of charged dust particles in clouds of charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundienkov, Vladimir; Yakovlenko, Sergey

    2004-03-01

    Two charged dust particles inside a cloud of charges are considered as Debye atoms forming a Debye molecule. Cassini coordinates are used for the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the charged cloud. The electric force acting on a dust particle by the other dust particle was determined by integrating the electrostatic pressure on the surface of the dust particle. It is shown that attractive forces appear when the following two conditions are satisfied. First, the average distance between dust particles should be approximately equal to two Debye radii. Second, attraction takes place when similar charges are concentrated predominantly on the dust particles. If the particles carry a small fraction of total charge of the same polarity, repulsion between the particles takes place at all distances. We apply our results to the experiments with thermoemission plasma and to the experiments with nuclear-pumped plasma.

  4. Dynamical evolution of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Vanzani, V.

    1994-03-01

    We study the orbital evolution of dust particles in the region of exterior mean motion resonances with the Earth. The trajectories of the particles are integrated in the context of a seven-body problem (Sun, five major perturbating planets and the particle) with the solar radiation and wind forces accounted for. Regions of stable resonant trapping are identified in the e-(omega-tilda) plane for a sequence of first order j/(j+1) resonances. On the basis of these maps it comes out that particles reaching the proximity of the Earth with high values of eccentricity are trapped more frequently in low-j resonances. Results for different particle sizes are presented. We have also integrated the orbits of particles for more than 105 yr by a procedure alternative to the direct integration of the many-body problem, i.e. by introducing directly in the equation of motion the position vectors of the planets as obtained from the recent Richardson & Walker (1989) accurate numerical simulation of the full planetary system. A study of the trapping times has been performed for different j/(j+1) resonances for different particle sizes. The duration of the trapping phenomenon is regulated by occurrence of close approaches with the Earth. For the 2/3 and 3/4 resonances, close approaches to Mars can also be important in forcing the particle out of resonance.

  5. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  6. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1989-03-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  7. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  8. The electrical conductivity of weakly ionized plasma containing dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wu, Jian; Yuan, Chengxun; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-07-01

    The effect of charged dust particle on the electrical conductivity of weakly ionized dusty plasma is investigated. It is shown that the additional collision provided by charged dust particles can significantly alter the electrical conductivity of electron-ion plasma. The numerical results indicated that these effects are mainly determined by dust radius, density as well as the charge numbers on dust surface. The obtained results will support an enhanced understanding of the electromagnetic wave propagation processes in dusty plasma.

  9. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory. PMID:25124433

  10. Spectroscopic study of carbonaceous dust particles grown in benzene plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Szetsen; Chen, H.-F.; Chin, C.-J.

    2007-06-01

    Carbonaceous dust particles have been synthesized from benzene using an rf glow discharge. Scanning electron microscope inspection revealed that the plasma-synthesized dust particles can be classified into two types. Shell-structured dust particles showed a wide size distribution from 3 to40 {mu}m. The other type, with different degrees of aggregation, appeared to be dense and spherical with a very distinctive yellow color and size distribution from 100 nm to 2 {mu}m. Analyses using micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared microscopy indicated that the main components of the dust particles are polyphenyls and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). The luminescence background in Raman spectra and the infrared C-H stretching vibrational features observed around 3.4 {mu}m for the dust particles are attributed to HAC. The formation mechanisms and spectroscopic characterization of carbonaceous dust particles are discussed.

  11. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Mark S; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release. PMID:27582221

  12. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  13. Cometary dust particles fragmentation as observed with Rosetta COSIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Hornung, Klaus; Merouane, Sihane

    2016-07-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser - COSIMA - instrument on board ESA's Rosetta mission has collected dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Particles and particle agglomerates have been imaged and analyzed in the inner coma at distances between 400 km and 10 km off the cometary nucleus and between 1.3 to 3.4 AU from the Sun. The particles are collected at low impact velocities and constitute a sample of the cometary dust particles in the inner coma. On impact, most dust particles fragment and larger particles tend to stick, spread out or consist of single or a group of clumps, and the flocculent morphology of the fragmented particles is revealed. We discuss the observed particle size distributions and morphologies after collection and their impact on dust particle agglomeration models in the early solar system.

  14. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  15. Effect of dust particle polarization on scattering processes in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kodanova, S. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.

    2015-06-15

    Screened interaction potentials in dusty plasmas taking into account the polarization of dust particles have been obtained. On the basis of screened potentials scattering processes for ion-dust particle and dust particle-dust particle pairs have been studied. In particular, the scattering cross section is considered. The scattering processes for which the dust grain polarization is unimportant have been found. The effect of zero angle dust particle-dust particle scattering is predicted.

  16. Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution: a new chemodynamical model with live dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photoelectric heating, H2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e. not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e. dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First, we describe a way to include dust-related physical processes in N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution in detail. Then, we show some preliminary results of dust-regulated galaxy evolution. The preliminary results suggest that the evolution of dust distributions driven by radiation pressure of stars is very important for the evolution of star formation rates, chemical abundances, H2 fractions, and gas distributions in galaxies.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  18. Dust Particle Growth in a Sputtering Discharge with Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Tawidian, H.; Mikikian, M.; Lecas, T.; Boufendi, L.

    2011-11-29

    Dust particles are grown in the PKE chamber by sputtering materials. The sputtering efficiency and the gas phase reactions can be affected by the gas type and particularly by the ion mass. Due to the presence of growing dust particles, the huge loss of electrons can trigger many instabilities in the plasma. These instabilities, the growth kinetics and the structure of the dust cloud, are compared by using two different gases: argon and krypton.

  19. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2126 Particles and dust... opening 8/64 of an inch (3.2 mm) in diameter....

  20. A portable optical particle counter system for measuring dust aerosols.

    PubMed

    Marple, V A; Rubow, K L

    1978-03-01

    A portable battery-operated optical particle counter/multichannel analyzer system has been developed for the numbers size distribution and number concentration measurement of light-absorbing irregular-shaped dust particles. An inertial impactor technique has been used to obtain calibration curves by relating the magnitude of the optical counter's signal to the particle's aerodynamic or Stokes' diameter. These calibrations have been made for aerosols of coal, potash, silica, rock (copper ore), and Arizona road dust particles. PMID:645547

  1. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  2. Investigation of Drag and Heat Transfer for Martian Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Takayanagi, H.; Fujita, K.

    2011-05-01

    A Mars non-stop dust sample return project has been going on in a Mars exploration mission at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. In the project, sampling of Martian dust particles is planned between 35 and 45 km, and thus, the survivability of micron-size particles during traveling through a hot-temperature shock is crucial. In this work, the dust particle heating was investigated from macroscopic and microscopic viewpoints. Drag and heat transfer coefficients calculated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method were found to agree well with Koshmarov and Svirshevskii and free-molecule models at both altitudes, and particle heating estimations calculated by these models were validated.

  3. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  4. Cassini RPWS Measurement of Dust Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, S.; Sakai, S.; Morooka, M.; Wahlund, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust impacts when voltage pulses induced by the impact charges are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. Based on the data collected during the E-ring crossings and Enceladus flybys, we show that the size distribution of the dust particles can be characterized as dn/dr ∝ rμ, where μ~-4. We compare the density of dust particles above a certain size threshold calculated from the impact rate with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) High Rate Detector (HRD) data. When the monopole antenna is connected to the wideband receiver, the polarity of the dust impact signal is determined by the spacecraft potential and the location of the impact (on the spacecraft body or the antenna). Because the effective area of the antenna is relatively easy to estimate, we use the polarity ratio of the dust impacts to infer the effective area of the spacecraft body. RPWS onboard dust detection data is analyzed, from which we infer the sign of the spacecraft potential and the dust density within Saturn's magnetosphere. A new phenomenon called dust ringing has been found to reveal the electron density inside the Enceladus plume. The ringing frequencies, interpreted as the local plasma frequencies, are consistent with the values measured by other methods, i.e., Langmuir probe and upper hybrid resonance.

  5. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  6. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  7. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Nabiyev, Sh.

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index-orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  8. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  9. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  10. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  11. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles from Different Dust Source Regions: The Importance of Particle Mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J; Grassian, Vicki H; Cowin, James P; Laskin, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four different dust source regions is investigated on a particle-by-particle basis using state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy techniques including computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/computer-controlled X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid are observed. Clear differences in the reactivity of mineral dusts from these four different dust regions with nitric acid could be observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, such as those found in parts of China and Saudi Arabia, are found to react to the greatest extent. Calcium containing minerals, such as calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), react to form nitrate salt whereas other calcium containing minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) do not react. The importance of particle chemical composition and mineralogy in the heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust aerosols is definitively borne out in this study of individual dust particles.

  12. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, Jochen Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  13. Impact ionization experiments with porous cosmic dust particle analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibration of cosmic dust instruments using a linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Such an accelerator can accelerate conductive dust particles of sizes between ca. a few tens of microns, and a micron in size to speeds up to 80 km/s depending on particle size. Many different materials have been used for instrument calibration, from iron in the earlier days to carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, no comparative analysis has been made yet of compact particles versus porous or fluffy particles of the same material. Porous or fluffy particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system, e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko or aggregate grains from the plumes of Enceladus and recently also indications were found for low-density interstellar dust (ISD) from ISD data and trajectory simulations. These recalibrations are thus relevant for estimations of the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this talk we report about the calibrations being performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge after impact. We use the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser as an impact target. We then explain the experiment set-up, the preparation of the materials and the materials used. We elaborate on the technical challenges, and finally about the current status of the research at this stage. We conclude the talk with the relevance of the study, being the potential influence of such calibrations on the estimates of the mass distributions of interstellar and interplanetary dust.

  14. Characterization of Dust Particles Near Saturn By Dust-Spacecraft Impact Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    The dusty plasma environment around Enceladus and its orbit plays an important role in the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. The characteristics of the dust population, e.g. size distribution and density, are crucial to modeling the interaction between dusty plasma and the magnetosphere. During the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion and many E-ring crossings, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument has demonstrated ability to measure dust particles in the Saturn system via voltage pulses induced by dust impacts on the spacecraft. In this study, we will show characteristics of dust particles derived from Cassini RPWS observations in Saturn's magnetosphere, especially during Enceladus flybys and E-ring crossings. We will present dust density profiles of the E-ring and Enceladus plume based on the impact rates measured by the RPWS wideband receiver. The electron density measurement based on plasma oscillations induced by dust impacts will also be shown. The RPWS dust detection complements the measurement of dusty plasma and neutral particles in the vicinity of Enceladus by various instruments aboard Cassini spacecraft, e.g. Cosmic Dust Analyzer, Cassini Plasma Spectrometer, Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer, and the RPWS Langmuir probe.

  15. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Sriama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA's Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, "mud-like" dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars [1-4]. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet's surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (less than 1 micrometer to 50 micrometers) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time [5]. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  16. Characterization of heavy metal particles embedded in tire dust.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kouji; Tainosho, Yoshiaki

    2004-10-01

    Tire dust is a significant pollutant, especially as a source of zinc in the urban environment. This study characterizes the morphology and chemical composition of heavy metal particles embedded in tire dust and traffic-related materials (brake dust, yellow paint, and tire tread) as measured by a field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FESEM/EDX). In 60 samples of tire dust, we detected 2288 heavy metal particles, which we classified into four groups using cluster analysis according to the following typical elements: cluster 1: Fe, cluster 2: Cr/Pb, cluster 3: multiple elements (Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Pb), cluster 4: ZnO. According to their morphologies and chemical compositions, the possible sources of each cluster were as follows: (1) brake dust (particles rich in Fe and with trace Cu, Sb, and Ba), (2) yellow paint (CrPbO(4) particles), (3) brake dust (particulate Ti, Fe, Cu, Sb, Zr, and Ba) and heavy minerals (Y, Zr, La, and Ce), (4) tire tread (zinc oxide). When the chemical composition of tire dust was compared to that of tire tread, the tire dust was found to have greater concentrations of heavy metal elements as well as mineral or asphalt pavement material characterized by Al, Si, and Ca. We conclude that tire dust consists not only of the debris from tire wear but also of assimilated heavy metal particles emitted from road traffic materials such as brake lining and road paint. PMID:15337346

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Particle Diffusion Coefficient in Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, Radim; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2014-05-01

    During the interaction of ions/neutrals with dust grains, some of the particles are implanted into the grain and, as a consequence, the density gradient induces their diffusion toward the grain surface. Their release can cause a transport of these particles over large distances in space. In our laboratory experiment, measurements of the diffusion coefficient of the particles implanted into the dust grain are carried out in an electrodynamic quadrupole trap. Although experimental setup does not allow an assessment of the dust grain temperature, it can be modified (e.g., by changing thermal radiation from the surrounding walls, laser irradiation, etc.). We present an upgraded laboratory set-up and the resulting temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient estimations and discuss implications for the space dust.

  18. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  19. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  20. Resonance methods for the characterization of dust particles in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Carstensen, Jan; Piel, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The fundamentals of the `resonance method' are presented. The method relies on evaluating the dynamic response of one or more dust particles in the sheath of a laboratory plasma to small external perturbations. It allows one to make in situ high-precision measurements of particle properties. It is shown that the particle mass and charge and the strength of the interaction between two particles can be measured. Technical requirements, limitations and application examples are presented and discussed.

  1. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  2. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-29

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  3. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  4. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  5. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  6. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  7. Dust in Cometary Comae: Present Understanding of the Structure and Composition of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Zolensky, M.; Lasue, J.

    2007-01-01

    In situ probing of a very few cometary comae has shown that dust particles present a low albedo and a low density, and that they consist of both rocky material and refractory organics. Remote observations of solar light scattered by cometary dust provide information on the properties of dust particles in the coma of a larger set of comets. The observations of the linear polarization in the coma indicate that the dust particles are irregular, with a size greater (on the average) than about one micron. Besides, they suggest, through numerical and experimental simulations, that both compact grains and fluffy aggregates (with a power law of the size distribution in the -2.6 to -3 range), and both rather transparent silicates and absorbing organics are present in the coma. Recent analysis of the cometary dust samples collected by the Stardust mission provide a unique ground truth and confirm, for comet 81P/Wild 2, the results from remote sensing observations. Future space missions to comets should, in the next decade, lead to a more precise characterization of the structure and composition of cometary dust particles.

  8. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Okajima, Y; Romero, C F; Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region. PMID:26932116

  9. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  10. A comparison between polarimetric properties of cometary dust and interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Dumont, R.; Renard, J. B.

    1990-07-01

    A comparison is presently conducted between the phase-angle dependence in the local polarization of interplanetary dust particles and the phase-angle dependence in the degree of polarization in cometary dust-scattered light; the latter has previously been noted to exhibit a negative branch, a neutral point near 21 deg, and an approximately linear increase up to 70 deg. While the polarization curves appear to be very similar once a partial inversion of zodiacal light polarization has been obtained, the decrease in interplanetary dust polarization with decreasing heliocentric distance in the ecliptic plane, and with increasing heliocentric latitude toward the ecliptic pole, indicate the presence of various dust particle populations in the zodiacal cloud, which slowely decay along their orbits.

  11. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  12. Dynamics of Charged Dust Particle near Conducting Wall in TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    A substantial amount of dust has been observed to be present near the first walls of fusion devices. The impact of dust on plasma parameters in current and future fusion devices is not clear and may cause a significant safety threat. It is therefore important to understand the dynamics of dust particles after formation. A surface charge is induced on the wall of a conducting material in the presence of a charged particle. The charged particle is then attracted to the wall by this induced charge causing the charge in the wall to redistribute and thus increasing the force of attraction further. In this work we study the dynamics of this attraction and the dissipation of electromagnetic energy via joule heating within the conducting wall.

  13. Fluctuation of charge on dust particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Srivastava, Sweta

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the evaluation of the fluctuation of the charge on the dust particles in a complex plasma. In contrast to earlier analyses, which ignored the effect of dust particles on density and temperature of electrons and ions, the present model takes into account the number and energy balance of electrons and ions. Three cases, viz., (i) no emission, (ii) thermionic emission, and (iii) photoelectric emission of electrons from the dust particles, have been considered. The results have been graphically illustrated for typical parameters. It is seen that the plasma parameters, and hence the fluctuations, are considerably affected by the consideration of number and energy balance of electrons and ions. A comparison of the results of the present analysis with those of earlier works has also been made.

  14. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  15. Distribution of pesticides in dust particles in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jaben; Reif, Ruben; Luo, Yuzhuo; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    In regions with a mild climate, pesticides are often used around homes for pest control. Recent monitoring studies have linked pesticide use in residential areas to aquatic toxicity in urban surface water ecosystems, and suggested dust particles on paved surfaces as an important source of pesticides. To test the hypothesis that dust on hard surfaces is a significant source of pesticides, we evaluated spatial and temporal patterns of current-use insecticides in Southern California, and further explored their distribution as a function of particle sizes. Pyrethroid insecticides were detected in dust from the driveway, curb gutter and street at 53.5-94.8%, with median concentrations of 1-46 ng g(-1). Pyrethroid residues were uniformly distributed in areas adjacent to a house, suggesting significant redistribution. The total levels of pyrethroids in dust significantly (p < 0.01) decreased from October to February, suggesting rainfalls as a major mechanism to move pesticide residues offsite. Fipronil as well as its degradation products, were detected at 50.6-75.5%, and spatial and temporal patterns of fipronil residues suggested rapid transformations of fipronil to its biologically active intermediates. Moreover, pyrethroids were found to be enriched in fine particles that have a higher mobility in runoff than coarse particles. Results from this study highlight the widespread occurrence of pesticides in outdoor dust around homes and the potential contribution to downstream surface water contamination via rain-induced runoff. PMID:27105165

  16. Calibration of impact ionization dust detectors with porous or fluffy dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Hillier, J. K.; Bugiel, S.; Srama, R.; Armes, S. P.; Fielding; L. A.; Lovett, J. R.; Grün, E.

    2013-07-01

    Impact ionization instruments like the ones flying on Cassini, Galileo, Helios and Ulysses have been calibrated using compact particles made of conductive materials like iron, or of minerals (like Olivine, Orthopyroxene, Magnetite, Pyrite) coated with a thin layer of conductive material. These calibrations were performed by shooting cosmic dust analogues with hypervelocity speeds from 1 to 80 km/s onto the flight spares of these instruments, using the Van de Graaff dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg. Here, we perform first measurements with Cassini CDA of the influence of the density of these dust particles on the resulting signal by, for a given impact speed, comparing signals from micron-sized particles made of compact PPy-coated silica to those from (PPy-coated) hollow silica spheres. The degree of impact ionization depends on the ratio of the densities of the target material and the impactor material and hence, different signals may result from impacts with diffe! rent density or porosity.

  17. Dust particles investigation for future Russian lunar missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnikov, Gennady; Horanyi, Mihaly; Esposito, Francesca; Zakharov, Alexander; Popel, Sergey; Afonin, Valeri; Borisov, Nikolay; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Vorobyova, Elena; Petrov, Oleg; Lisin, Evgeny

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On light side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution dust particle by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind, solar

  18. Close Range Remote Sensing of Levitated Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Higgs, A. J.; Pocock, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    A simple technique is highlighted to demonstrate how to detect and establish the coordinates of moving dust particles, in proximity to a single camera. This could be applied to planetary landers and rovers, or used from low orbit around comets and dusty asteroids. The only requirement would be the addition of a LED flash bulb close to the camera lens resulting in near zero phase illumination lighting conditions. Using this simple low cost, low mass setup, the 3D trajectory, colour, and other physical parameters of micron scale dust particles could be determined.

  19. Martian Dust Devils: Laboratory Simulations of Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Balme, Matthew R.; Iverson, James D.; Metzger, Stephen; Mickelson, Robert; Phoreman, Jim; White, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus has been fabricated to simulate terrestrial and Martian dust devils. Comparisons of surface pressure profiles through the vortex core generated in the apparatus with both those in natural dust devils on Earth and those inferred for Mars are similar and are consistent with theoretical Rankine vortex models. Experiments to determine particle threshold under Earth ambient atmospheric pressures show that sand (particles > 60 micron in diameter) threshold is analogous to normal boundary-layer shear, in which the rotating winds of the vortex generate surface shear and hence lift. Lower-pressure experiments down to approx. 65 mbar follow this trend for sand-sized particles. However, smaller particles (i.e., dust) and all particles at very low pressures (w 10-60 mbar) appear to be subjected to an additional lift function interpreted to result from the strong decrease in atmospheric pressure centered beneath the vortex core. Initial results suggest that the wind speeds required for the entrainment of grains approx. 2 microns in diameter (i.e., Martian dust sizes) are about half those required for entrainment by boundary layer winds on both Earth and Mars.

  20. Diffusive Plasma Dechucking Method for Wafers to Reduce Falling Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2013-06-01

    A plasma dechucking method capable of effectively eliminating dust particles created during the plasma process was developed. Referred to as diffusive plasma dechucking (DPD), the method reduces the plasma potential and includes an argon gas purge to remove dust particles floating on top of the sheath after the main process. Experimental results indicate that DPD reduces the amount of falling dust particles after the process by approximately 50-80%. To analyze these results quantitatively, the Coulomb force and the neutral drag force exerted on the dust particles were considered. In addition, dust particle exhaust conditions were proposed with respect to dust particle size, plasma potential, and spatial electric field.

  1. Carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Blanford, G. E.; Keller, L. P.; Klock, W.; McKay, D. S.

    1993-04-01

    We have studied nineteen anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) using analytical electron microscopy. We have determined a method for quantitative light element EDX analysis of small particles and have applied these techniques to a group of IDPs. Our results show that some IDPs have significantly higher bulk carbon abundances than do carbonaceous chondrites. We have also identified a relationship between carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy in our set of anhydrous IDPs. In general, these particles are dominated by pyroxene, olivine, or a subequal mixture of olivine and pyroxene. The pyroxene-dominated IDPs have a higher carbon abundance than those dominated by olivines. Members of the mixed mineralogy IDPs can be grouped with either the pyroxene- or olivine-dominated particles based on their carbon abundance. The high carbon, pyroxene-dominated particles have primitive mineralogies and bulk compositions which show strong similarities to cometary dust particles. We believe that the lower carbon, olivine-dominated IDPs are probably derived from asteroids. Based on carbon abundances, the mixed-mineralogy group represents particles derived from either comets or asteroids. We believe that the high carbon, pyroxene-rich anhydrous IDPs are the best candidates for cometary dust.

  2. Limitation of electrostatic charging of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Ip, W.-H.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in a dusty plasma consisting of a plasma (density n and temperature T) and dust grains (density N and radius a) the charge on a grain is not given by its free-space value. Instead, the charge is reduced by a factor 1 + x. Except for the optically thin E and G rings, this factor is large. Usually electromagnetic forces on dust particles in Saturn's ring system are too small to produce observable effects. The current carried by dust particles moving relative to the plasma with a speed w is to a good approximation given by j = NQw. Thus, magnetic perturbations by the F ring should be much smaller than previously estimated.

  3. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  4. Two high resolution velocity vector analyzers for cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S.

    1975-01-01

    Two new methods are described to measure velocities and angles of incidence of charged cosmic dust particles with precisions of about 1% and 1 deg, respectively. Both methods employ four one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors in series. The first method utilizes a charge-dividing technique while the second utilizes a time-of-flight technique for determining the position of a particle inside the instrument. The velocity vectors are measured although mechanical interaction between the particle and the instrument is completely avoided. Applications to cosmic dust composition and collection experiments are discussed. The range of radii of measurable particles is from about 0.01 to 100 microns at velocities from 1 to 80 km/sec.

  5. Security Analysis of Image Encryption Based on Gyrator Transform by Searching the Rotation Angle with Improved PSO Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Xiang, Zhili; Cai, Bin; Xiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gyrator transform has been widely used for image encryption recently. For gyrator transform-based image encryption, the rotation angle used in the gyrator transform is one of the secret keys. In this paper, by analyzing the properties of the gyrator transform, an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm was proposed to search the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since the gyrator transform is continuous, it is time-consuming to exhaustedly search the rotation angle, even considering the data precision in a computer. Therefore, a computational intelligence-based search may be an alternative choice. Considering the properties of severe local convergence and obvious global fluctuations of the gyrator transform, an improved PSO algorithm was proposed to be suitable for such situations. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed improved PSO algorithm can significantly improve the efficiency of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since gyrator transform is the foundation of image encryption in gyrator transform domains, the research on the method of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform is useful for further study on the security of such image encryption algorithms. PMID:26251910

  6. Security Analysis of Image Encryption Based on Gyrator Transform by Searching the Rotation Angle with Improved PSO Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Xiang, Zhili; Cai, Bin; Xiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gyrator transform has been widely used for image encryption recently. For gyrator transform-based image encryption, the rotation angle used in the gyrator transform is one of the secret keys. In this paper, by analyzing the properties of the gyrator transform, an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm was proposed to search the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since the gyrator transform is continuous, it is time-consuming to exhaustedly search the rotation angle, even considering the data precision in a computer. Therefore, a computational intelligence-based search may be an alternative choice. Considering the properties of severe local convergence and obvious global fluctuations of the gyrator transform, an improved PSO algorithm was proposed to be suitable for such situations. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed improved PSO algorithm can significantly improve the efficiency of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform. Since gyrator transform is the foundation of image encryption in gyrator transform domains, the research on the method of searching the rotation angle in a single gyrator transform is useful for further study on the security of such image encryption algorithms. PMID:26251910

  7. Characterization of biogenic elements in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    Those particles that were designated cometary are aggregates of amorphous materials including carbon, iron-magnesium silicates, sulfides, metal and trace amounts of unusual phases. Most aggregates are carbon-rich with major and minor element abundances similar to a fine grained matrix of carbonaceous chondrites. Several particles were analyzed by a laser microprobe. The negative ionic species identified to date include carbon clusters, protonated carbon clusters, CN-, HCN-, CNO-, PO2-, PO3-, S-, S2- asnd OH-. These species are similar to those observed in cometary spectra and they support the assumption that organic materials are present. The occurance of phosphate ions suggests the presence of apatite or whitlockite. Cometary particle characteristics may indicate that the component grains represent primitive unaltered dust whose overall properties are extremely similar to altered primitive dust in carbonaceous chondrites.

  8. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-03-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  9. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  10. Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to predict the trajectories of blowing lunar regolith (soil) particles when a spacecraft lands on or launches from the Moon. The blown regolith is known to travel at very high velocity and to damage any hardware located nearby on the Moon. It is important to understand the trajectories so we can develop technologies to mitigate the blast effects for the launch and landing zones at a lunar outpost. A mathematical model was implemented in software to predict the trajectory of a single spherical mass acted on by the gas jet from the nozzle of a lunar lander.

  11. Trapping dust particles in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, P.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Dullemond, C. P.; Uribe, A. L.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: We attempt to explain grain growth to mm sized particles and their retention in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, as observed at sub-mm and mm wavelengths, by investigating whether strong inhomogeneities in the gas density profiles can decelerate excessive radial drift and help the dust particles to grow. Methods: We use coagulation/fragmentation and disk-structure models, to simulate the evolution of dust in a bumpy surface density profile, which we mimic with a sinusoidal disturbance. For different values of the amplitude and length scale of the bumps, we investigate the ability of this model to produce and retain large particles on million-year timescales. In addition, we compare the pressure inhomogeneities considered in this work with the pressure profiles that come from magnetorotational instability. Using the Common Astronomy Software Applications ALMA simulator, we study whether there are observational signatures of these pressure inhomogeneities that can be seen with ALMA. Results: We present the conditions required to trap dust particles and the corresponding calculations predicting the spectral slope in the mm-wavelength range, to compare with current observations. Finally, we present simulated images using different antenna configurations of ALMA at different frequencies, to show that the ring structures will be detectable at the distances of either the Taurus Auriga or Ophiucus star-forming regions.

  12. Dust Particle Growth and Application in Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-23

    Dust particle nucleation and growth has been widely studied these last fifteen years in different chemistries and experimental conditions. This phenomenon is correlated with various electrical changes at electrodes, including self-bias voltage and amplitudes of the various harmonics of current and voltage [1]. Some of these changes, such as the appearance of more resistive plasma impedance, are correctly attributed to loss of electrons in the bulk plasma to form negative molecular ions (e.g. SiH{sub 3}{sup -}) and more precisely charged nanoparticles. These changes were studied and correlated to the different phases on the dust particle formation. It is well known now that, in silane argon gas mixture discharges, in the first step of this particle formation we have formation of nanometer sized crystallites. These small entities accumulate and when their number density reaches a critical value, about 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -1}, they start to aggregate to form bigger particles. The different phases are well defined and determined thanks to the time evolution of the different electrical parameter changes. The purpose of this contribution is to compare different chemistries to highlight similarities and/or differences in order to establish possible universal dust particle growth mechanisms. The chemistries we studied concern SiH{sub 4}-Ar, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} and Sn(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}[2]. We also refer to works performed in other laboratories in different discharge configurations [3]. Different applications have already developed or are foreseen for these nanoparticles. The first application concerns the inclusion of nanosized dust crystallites in an amorphous matrix in order to modify the optoelectronic and mechanical properties [4-5]. At the present time a very active research programs are devoted towards single electron devises where nanometer sized crystallites play a role of quantum dots. These nanoparticles can be produced in low pressure cold

  13. New Manganese Silicide Mineral Phase in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.; Kloeck, W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup was identified as a source of an Earth-crossing dust stream with low Earth-encounter velocities, with peak anticipated fluxes during April in 2003 and 2004 [1]. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections using high altitude aircraft to target potential interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream in April 2003. Several IDPs from this collection have shown unusually low noble gas abundances [2] consistent with the predicted short space exposure ages of Grigg-Skjellerup dust particles [1]. High abundances of large D enrichments [3] and presolar grains [4] in IDPs from this collection are also consistent with an origin from the comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Here we report a new mineral from one of the cluster IDPs of the "Grigg-Skjellerup" collection, L2055. Our report focuses on an unusual manganese-iron-chromium silicide phase that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature. This unique phase may also shed light on the genesis of the enigmatic low-Fe,Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine that has been previously reported in IDPs and meteorites [5].

  14. Imaging of high-speed dust particle trajectories on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A. L.; Davis, W.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Maqueda, R.; Nishino, N.

    2006-10-15

    Imaging of high-speed incandescent dust particle trajectories in a tokamak plasma has been accomplished on NSTX using up to three high-speed cameras each viewing the same plasma volume from different locations and operating at speeds up to 68 000 frames/s with exposure times varying from 2 to 300 {mu}s. The dynamics of the dust trajectories can be quite complex exhibiting a large variation in both speed (10-200 m/s) and direction. Simulations of these trajectories will be utilized to ascertain the role dust may play in future machines such as ITER where significant dust production from wall erosion is expected. NSTX has numerous view ports including both tangential as well as radial views in both the midplane and lower divertors. Several vertical ports are also available so that a few specific regions in NSTX may be viewed simultaneously from several different camera positions. The cameras can be operated in the full visible spectrum but near-infrared filters can be utilized to enhance the observation of incandescent particles against a bright background. A description of the cameras and required optics is presented.

  15. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N{sub d} on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N{sub d} leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, discharge current density 10{sup -1}-10{sup 1} mA/cm{sup 2}, and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 mum. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  16. Electrostatic Characteristics of Materials Exposed to Martian Simulant Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, C. I.; Kim, H. S.; Young, S.; Jackson, D.; Lombardi, A. J.

    1998-11-01

    The Pathfinder mission to Mars identified Andesitic rock as the primary type of rock at the landing site. Several experiments were designed at NASA/Kennedy Space Center to determine the charging characteristics of common space materials exposed to small particles derived from those rocks. MARS-1, a Martian soil simulant prepared from Andesitic rocks by NASA/JSC was used in this work. Characterization of this simulant was made using scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy coupled with a carbon-sulfur detector. These results were compared to the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer analysis on Pathfinder. The simulant was found to be a suitable substitute for Martian soil for our purposes. Two experimental designs and methods to simulate the exposure of different materials to wind-blown dust were made. These designs permit dust particle delivery to samples at different speeds. Initial experiments made with these designs to determine their viability were promising.

  17. Ion microprobe isotopic measurements of individual interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.

    1985-09-01

    The results of the first extended ion probe study of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are reported. The analytic procedures and the current limits on the precision and accurary of isotopic measurements of light elements are discussed in considerable detail. It is shown that isotopic measurements of several elements can be made on different individual fragments of a single IDP of 10-15 microns in size. The deuterium enrichments observed in several of the particles are shown to be intrinsic, providing independent proof that the particles are extraterrestrial. Carbon isotopic measurements on fragments of three IDPs give ratios similar to terrestrial values and show a largely uniform isotopic composition for a given particle. Small, but significant, differences in delta C-13 of about 40 percent between particles are seen.

  18. Properties of dust particles near Saturn inferred from voltage pulses induced by dust impacts on Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.-Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, H.-W.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2014-08-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust particles when voltage pulses induced by the dust impacts are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. For the first time, the dust impacts signals measured by dipole and monopole electric antennas are compared, from which the effective impact area of the spacecraft is estimated to be 4 m2. In the monopole mode, the polarity of the dust impact signal is determined by the spacecraft potential and the location of the impact (on the spacecraft body or the antenna), which can be used to statistically infer the charge state of the spacecraft. It is shown that the differential number density of the dust particles near Saturn can be characterized as a power law dn/dr ∝ rμ, where μ ~ - 4 and r is the particle size. No peak is observed in the size distribution, contrary to the narrow size distribution found by previous studies. The RPWS cumulative dust density is compared with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer High Rate Detector measurement. The differences between the two instruments are within the range of uncertainty estimated for RPWS measurement. The RPWS onboard dust recorder and counter data are used to map the dust density and spacecraft charging state within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  19. Effects of plasma particle trapping on dust-acoustic solitary waves in an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Mushtaq, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-03-15

    Dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma containing dust of opposite polarity (adiabatic positive and negative dust), non-isothermal electrons and ions (following vortex like distribution) are theoretically investigated by employing pseudo-potential approach, which is valid for arbitrary amplitude structures. The propagation of small but finite amplitude solitary structures is also examined by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic properties of large (small) amplitude solitary structures are investigated by analyzing the energy integral (modified Korteweg-de Vries equation). It is shown that the effects of dust polarity, trapping of plasma particles (electrons and ions), and temperatures of dust fluids significantly modify the basic features of the dust-acoustic solitary structures that are found to exist in such an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium. The relevance of the work in opposite polarity dust-plasma, which may occur in cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, is briefly discussed.

  20. The impact of dust particle morphological details on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Jeong, Gi Young

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the impact of dust particle surface roughness and internal structure on light scattering. Starting from digital representation of realistically shaped dust particles, we vary the particle morphology, and perform light scattering simulations to both the original and the modified particles. By mapping the changes in morphology to the changes in scattering, we will get information of how strongly and in which way a particular change affects scattering. All investigations have been done with complex, irregular particle shapes. For surface roughness studies we have kept the particle total volume virtually constant during the roughening process, and the roughness element size small enough to keep the overall shape relatively unchanged. For internal structure studies, the size and the external shape are kept constant. These safety measures help ensure that the effects seen are in fact due to the feature studied. The work is notable for model development, because some models can not include surface roughness, for example. In that case, the people who use such models have to adjust for the fact that the results are inaccurate, and by knowing how surface roughness typically changes the scattering results, the adjustment can be made. As a corollary, if it is shown that a particular feature does not change scattering results in any noticeable way, the model developers can confidently ignore or simplify it.

  1. Migration of Dust Particles and Their Collisions with the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    Our review of previously published papers on dust migration can be found in [1], where we also present different distributions of migrating dust particles. We considered a different set of initial orbits for the dust particles than those in the previous papers. Below we pay the main attention to the collisional probabilities of migrating dust particles with the planets based on a set of orbital elements during their evolution. Such probabilities were not calculated earlier.

  2. Influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Coulomb Coupling between Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2005-10-31

    The influence of ultraviolet light on the Coulomb coupling between dust particles was experimentally investigated in Radio-Frequency (RF, 13.56MHz) inductively coupled plasma. Flask shape dust cloud and the filamentary structure of dust particles were observed by adopting two turn ring far from the RF antenna. The ultraviolet radiation seemed to be not easy to pick up the polarization of the dust particles in the laboratory.

  3. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    SciTech Connect

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  4. Erosion of circumstellar particle disks by interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    1989-01-01

    Circumstellar particle disks appear to be a common phenomenon; however, their properties vary greatly. Models of the evolution of such systems focus on internal mechanisms such as interparticle collisions and Poynting-Robertson drag. Herein it is shown that 'sandblasting' by interstellar dust can be an important and even dominant contributor to the evolution of circumstellar particle disks. Stars spend up to about 3 percent of their main-sequence lifetimes within atomic clouds. Among an IRAS sample of 21 nearby main-sequence A stars, beta Pictoris has the brightest disk; it also possesses the smallest random velocity and therefore the slowest predicted erosion rate.

  5. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  6. Dust Particles Alignments and Transitions in a Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, J. D. E.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The alignments and transitions of two dust particles in a plasma sheath have been investigated. It is shown that the Hamiltonian description of a non-Hamiltonian system can be used to predict qualitative features of possible equilibria in a variety of confinement potentials and can provide useful plasma diagnostics. The results compare favorably with simulation and are used to create new experimental hypotheses. In particular, the symmetry breaking transition of the particles as they leave the horizontal plane admits a Hamiltonian description which is used to elucidate the wake parameter.

  7. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  8. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  9. Simple model for fine particle (dust) clouds in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    In the cloud of fine particles (dusts) in plasmas, the charge neutrality can be much enhanced due to large charge numbers of fine particles. The required condition is not difficult to satisfy even when their charge density is substantially smaller than electrons or ions. Based on this fact, a simple model of fine particle clouds is proposed and the cloud radius is related to the half-width, the radius where the density of surrounding plasmas drops by half, in cylindrically and spherically symmetric cases under microgravity. When fine particles are gradually introduced with parameters of surrounding plasma especially the half-width being fixed, the size of clouds first increases and then saturates at the value determined by the plasma half-width, giving a possibility to control the size and density of clouds independently.

  10. Quantification of Spore-forming Bacteria Carried by Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Cholakian, Tanya; Gao, Wenming; Osman, Shariff; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish a biological contamination transport model for predicting the cross contamination risk during spacecraft assembly and upon landing on Mars, it is important to understand the relationship between spore-forming bacteria and their carrier particles. We conducted air and surface sampling in indoor, outdoor, and cleanroom environments to determine the ratio of spore forming bacteria to their dust particle carriers of different sizes. The number of spore forming bacteria was determined from various size groups of particles in a given environment. Our data also confirms the existence of multiple spores on a single particle and spore clumps. This study will help in developing a better bio-contamination transport model, which in turn will help in determining forward contamination risks for future missions.

  11. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-09-07

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r{sup 2}) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F{sub es} (c/r{sup 3})) and shadowing (F{sub shadow} = -(d/r{sup 2})) forces.

  12. Kinetic theory of magnetized dusty plasmas with dust particles charged by collisional processes and by photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.

    2012-09-15

    In this work, we detail the derivation of a plasma kinetic theory leading to the components of the dielectric tensor for a magnetized dusty plasma with variable charge on the dust particles, considering that the dust component of the plasma contains spherical dust particles with different sizes, which are charged both by inelastic collisions of electrons and ions and by photoionization.

  13. Study of vortex flows of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Vortex motion of dust particles in a plasma has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. In the theoretical study, the ion drag force acting on the dust particle is found to be non-conservative and to have a finite curl because the gradient of |ui|and the gradient of ni are not parallel. The finite curl of the ion drag force acts as a source of vorticity; kinematic viscosity dissipates the generated vorticity. We confirm that vortex flows of micron size dust grains are observed where finite curls of the ion drag force are expected to exist in the Caltech ice dusty plasma experiment. The direction and velocity of the vortex flows are in good agreement with the values predicted by our model. We also found that vortex motion is only observed when the ion density exceeds a threshold value. Above the threshold value, the observed vorticity increases as the ion density increases as predicted by the theory. These observations support the conclusion that the vortex flows in the experiment result from the finite curl of the ion drag force (i.e., non-conservative force).

  14. High Precision Oxygen Three Isotope Analysis of Wild-2 Particles and Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Matrajt, G.; Kita, N. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries from comet Wild-2 samples was observation of crystalline silicate particles that resemble chondrules and CAIs in carbonaceous chondrites. Previous oxygen isotope analyses of crystalline silicate terminal particles showed heterogeneous oxygen isotope ratios with delta(sup 18)O to approx. delta(sup 17)O down to -50% in the CAI-like particle Inti, a relict olivine grain in Gozen-sama, and an olivine particle. However, many Wild-2 particles as well as ferromagnesian silicates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) showed Delta(sup 17)O values that cluster around -2%. In carbonaceous chondrites, chondrules seem to show two major isotope reservoirs with Delta(sup 17)O values at -5% and -2%. It was suggested that the Delta(sup 17)O = -2% is the common oxygen isotope reservoir for carbonaceous chondrite chondrules and cometary dust, from the outer asteroid belt to the Kuiper belt region. However, a larger dataset with high precision isotope analyses (+/-1-2%) is still needed to resolve the similarities or distinctions among Wild-2 particles, IDPs and chondrules in meteorites. We have made signifi-cant efforts to establish routine analyses of small particles (< or =10micronsm) at 1-2% precision using IMS-1280 at WiscSIMS laboratory. Here we report new results of high precision oxygen isotope analyses of Wild-2 particles and anhydrous chondritic IDPs, and discuss the relationship between the cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrite chondrules.

  15. Dust particle dynamics in low-pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2006-10-15

    In this paper, the structure of a rf plasma glow discharge in a parallel-plate geometry is revisited through a numerical solution of the well-known local field approximation model equations. The dynamics of a dust particle injected into the plasma is elaborated in a Lagrangian framework by solving the particle equations for its motion and charge. Different ion drag expressions are considered. For particles of three different sizes, magnitudes of various forces such as gravity, electricity, and ion drag acting on a stationary particle are compared to each other. Particle potential energy, together with its possible wells, is demonstrated for each case. Taking into account the neutral drag force, damping oscillations and final locations of the particles, depending on their initial injection position (top or bottom), are captured. The transient characteristic of the charging process of smaller particles with respect to their motion time scale is discussed. The effect of inclusion of ion thermal energy in the calculation of drag force on the motion of the particle is illustrated.

  16. MicroMED: a dust particle counter for the characterization of airborne dust close to the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, Fabio; Esposito, Francesca; Molfese, Cesare; Cortecchia, Fausto; Saggin, Bortolino; D'amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of airborne dust is very important in planetary climatology. Indeed, dust absorbs and scatter solar and thermal radiation, severely affecting atmospheric thermal structure, balance and dynamics (in terms of circulations). Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. Dust is permanently present in the atmosphere of Mars and its amount varies with seasons. During regional or global dust storms, more than 80% of the incoming sunlight is absorbed by dust causing an intense atmospheric heating. Airborne dust is therefore a crucial climate component on Mars which impacts atmospheric circulations at all scales. Main dust parameters influencing the atmosphere heating are size distribution, abundance, albedo, single scattering phase function, imaginary part of the index of refraction. Moreover, major improvements of Mars climate models require, in addition to the standard meteorological parameters, quantitative information about dust lifting, transport and removal mechanisms. In this context, two major quantities need to be measured for the dust source to be understood: surface flux and granulometry. While many observations have constrained the size distribution of the dust haze seen from the orbit, it is still not known what the primary airborne dust (e.g. the recently lifted dust) is made of, size-wise. MicroMED has been designed to fill this gap. It will measure the abundance and size distribution of dust, not in the atmospheric column, but close to the surface, where dust is lifted, so to be able to monitor dust injection into the atmosphere. This has never been performed in Mars and other planets exploration. MicroMED is an Optical Particle Counter, analyzing light scattered from single dust particles to measure their size and abundance. A proper fluid-dynamic system, including a pump and a

  17. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S. Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J.; Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  18. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S.; Kato, Shuichi; Soriano, Maricor N.; Wada, Motoi; Ramos, Henry J.

    2014-02-01

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  19. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  20. Enrichment of Mineral Dust Storm Particles with Sea Salt Elements - Using bulk and Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Y.; Perrino, C.; Yossef, O.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral aerosol emitted from African and Asian deserts plays an important role in the atmosphere. During their long-range transport, the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust particles change due to heterogeneous reactions with trace gases, coagulation with other particles, and in-cloud processing. These processes affect the optical and hygroscopic properties of dust particles, and in general influencing the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Four African and Arabian dust storm episodes affecting the East Mediterranean Coast in the spring of 2006 have been characterized, to determine if atmospheric natural dust particles are enriched with sea salt and anthropogenic pollution. Particle samplers included PM10 and manual dichotomous sampler that collected fine and coarse particles. Three sets of filters were used: Teflon filters for gravimetric, elemental and ionic analyses; Pre-fired Quartz-fiber filters for elemental and organic carbon; and Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (Philips XL 30 ESEM) was used to analyze single particle, for morphology, size and chemistry of selected filter samples. A detailed chemical and microscopical characterization has been performed for the particles collected during dust event days and during clear days. The Saharan and Arabian air masses increased significantly the daily mass concentrations of the coarse and the fine particle fractions. Carbonates, mostly as soil calcites mixed with dolomites, and silicates are the major components of the coarse fraction, followed by sea salt particles. In addition, the levels of anthropogenic heavy metals and sea salt elements registered during the dust episode were considerably higher than levels recorded during clear days. Sea salt elements contain Na and Cl, and smaller amounts of Mg, K, S and Br. Cl ranges from 300 to 5500 ng/m3 and Na from 100 to almost 2400 ng/m3. The Cl to Na ratio on dusty days in

  1. Sea salt, sulfate, nitrate, chloride in Asian dust particles observed in Japan: results of individual particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daizhou; Yamada, Maromu; Tobo, Yutaka; Ogata, Hiroko; Hara, Kazutaka; Nagatani, Tetsuji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Lieke, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric particles were collected in Japan during Asian dust storm events from 2000 to 2007. Dust particles were analyzed by using electron microscopes and the mixture state of individual dust particles with sea salt, sulfate, nitrate and chloride were investigated. About 60~85% of dust particles were internally mixed with sea salt, 91% or more dust particles contained sulfate, and 27% or less contained nitrate. Besides the coagulation of sea-salt and dust particles, chlorine could deposit onto dust particles through the absorption of chlorine-containing gases when the particles passed through the marine atmosphere between China and Japan. The quantitative estimation revealed that the chlorine deposition on many particles was not negligible compared to sulfur deposition. The preferential formation of chloride in Ca-rich dust particles in cases when the particles contain little or no sulfate was found. Most of the particles were in an amorphous state and nearly spherical even under high vacuum, implying the potential enhancement of dust hygroscopicity. Comparisons of the relative weight ratios of sodium, sulfur and chlorine in mixture particles and in sea salt particles showed that mineral materials could enhance particulate sulfate and nitrate formation and restrain chlorine depletion from the sea salt components in mixture particles. Size distributions of the particles segregated by the mixture degrees of mineral and sea salt in different dust storm events were similar and all distributions showed a diameter range of 1~8 μm with maximum mode around 3 μm. Out of 1~8 μm, dust particles were rarely detected. It is confirmed that the size increase of dust particles had a strong correlation with their sea salt content but was independent from their non-sea-salt sulfur content, suggesting that the growth of dust particles in size during their dispersion in the marine atmosphere was dominated by the combination with sea salt rather than by other processes such as

  2. Dynamical and Collisional Evolution of Asteroidal Dust Particles and the Structure of the Solar System Dust Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Kehoe, T. J. J.; Mahoney-Hopping, L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent modeling of the solar system dust bands has shown a significant discrepancy between the mean proper inclinations of the "ten-degree" band and the Eos asteroid family, its putative source. This has led to the suggestion that the dust bands did not result from the gradual comminution of large, ancient asteroid families but were instead produced by recent catastrophic disruptions of asteroids, such as those that generated the Karin cluster and the Veritas family. The small particles produced in such collisional events spiral rapidly into the Sun under the effect of Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag. Larger particles have correspondingly longer P-R drag lifetimes but are more likely to be fragmented by inter-particle collisions. It is these large particles and their collisional fragments that we observe today as the dust bands, the decaying remnant of a much larger influx of material. The structure of the dust bands is therefore determined by the combined dynamical and collisional behavior of a realistic size distribution of particles. We present the results of numerical simulations showing the evolution of asteroidal dust particles under the effects of radiation pressure, P-R drag, solar wind drag, planetary perturbations, and stochastic size changes due to particle fragmentation. These results reveal that: (i) the orientation of the mean plane of symmetry of the dust bands outside 2AU is dominated by the effect of Jupiter as it evolves through its secular cycle and it is for this reason that we are able to observe the bands; (ii) the effect of inter-particle collisions introduces dispersion in the distribution of the particle orbits; and (iii) the inner edge to the dust bands at 2AU is a consequence of the effect of secular resonances dispersing particle orbits to the extent that the dust band signal merges into the flux from the background zodiacal cloud.

  3. Instrumentation for near-Earth measurement of orbital debris and cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Dust instrumentation based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust sensor arrays is described which will measure the masses, fluxes, velocities, and trajectories of orbital debris particles and natural micrometeoroids. Orbital debris particles are distinguished from natural particles (cosmic dust) by means of the velocity/trajectory information. The instrumentation will measure particle trajectory with a mean error of approximately 7 degrees (for isotropic flux) and is designed for measurements over the particle diameter range of approximately 2 to 200 micro-m. For future missions having Earth-return capabilities, arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the PVDF trajectory system would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust.

  4. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Nittler, Larry R.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.; aff14

    2014-08-01

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  5. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  6. Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Leibovitz, B.; Donathan, R.; Fisher, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The ciliated protozoan Paramecium was used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nickel particles. The biological response of these eukaryotic cells to pure nickel powder and iron-nickel powder was assayed and compared to the effect of the inorganic carcinogen nickel subsulfide. Cytotoxicity was determined by the percent survival of treated cells. Genotoxicity was indicated by significant increases in the fraction of nonviable offspring (presumed index of lethal mutations) found after self-fertilization (autogamy) in parents from the nickel-treated versus neutral control groups. The cells were exposed to the dusts and the biological effects determined. Only the nickel subsulfide consistently showed a significant increase in offspring lethality.

  7. Parameters of Dust Particles in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Zh. M.; Morozhenko, A. V.

    2001-11-01

    A critical analysis of the methods and results of estimating the optical thickness of the dust component in the Martian atmosphere τ_0, the particle size r_0, and the imaginary part of the refractive index n_ihas shown the following. (1) Observational data on the brightness distribution over the Martian disk as well as the phase dependences of diffusely reflected light and the azimuthal dependences of diffusely transmitted light are most appropriate to use only for verifying the reliability of the aerosol parameters determined by other methods. (2) If the morning and evening fogs in the atmosphere are disregarded, the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer method used to analyze the solar-brightness attenuation measured on the planetary surface yields overestimated extraatmospheric solar intensity I_0and atmospheric optical depth τ_0. At the Viking 1landing site, I_0and τ_0could be overestimated by a factor of 1.7 and by 0.35, respectively. (3) The aerosol size determined by analyzing measurements of the azimuthal dependences for the Martian sky brightness at low elevations of the Sun most likely corresponds to the fog particles. (4) If overestimated values of I_0were used to standardize the observations of the solar radiation transmitted by the Martian atmosphere, then n_iwere also overestimated; using overestimated τ_0also affected the reliability of the latter. (5) The problem of reliability of the available τ_0and r_0estimates for periods of high atmospheric transparency is yet to be solved. For the highest activity of the dust storm in 1971, it was found that 4.5 <= r_0<= 7.5 μm for the lognormal particle size distribution with σ^2= 0.2 and the optical thickness of a dust cloud τ_0>= 15. (6) The spectral values of the apparent albedo of Mars measured in October 1971 at a phase angle of 42° in the spectral range 0.250 <= λ <= 0.717 allowed the imaginary part of the refractive index to be estimated in terms of a model of a dust cloud composed of spherical particles with

  8. Trace Element Abundance Measurements on Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1996-01-01

    The X-Ray Microprobe on beamline X-26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to determine the abundances of elements from Cr through Sr in individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere and the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) on beamline X-1A at the NSLS was used to determine the carbon abundances and spatial distributions in IDPs. In addition, modeling was performed in an attempt to associate particular types of IDPs with specific types of parent bodies, and thus to infer the chemistry, mineralogy, and structural properties of those parent bodies.

  9. Gyrator-type circuits replace ungrounded inductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Gyrator circuits using only transistors, capacitors, and resistors which can replace both grounded and ungrounded inductors have been developed to permit complete microminiaturization of circuitry by integration of the components.

  10. Mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles from the 'olivine' infrared class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy observations establish that olivine is abundant and the predominant silicate phase in three interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from the 'olivine' infrared spectra category. Two of the particles have microstructures resembling those of most nonhydrous chondritic IDPs, consisting of micron to submicron grains together with a matrix composed of amorphous carbonaceous material and sub-500 A grains. In addition to olivine these particles respectively contain enstatite and magnetite, and pentlandite plus Ca-rich clinopyroxene. The third IDP consists mostly of olivine and pyrrhotite with little or no matrix material. Olivine grains in this particle contain prominent solar-flare ion tracks with densities corresponding to a space-exposure age between 1000 to 100,000 years. Although the three particles have olivine-rich mineralogies in common, other aspects of their mineralogies and microstructures suggest that they experienced different formation histories. The differences between the particles indicate that the olivine infrared spectral category is a diverse collection of IDPs that probably incorporates several genetic groups.

  11. Migration of Dust Particles from Comet 2P Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets (except for Pluto), radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag for Beta equal to 0.002, 0.004, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of Beta correspond to diameters equal to about 200, 100, 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively. We used the Bulirsh-Stoer method of integration, and the relative error per integration step was taken to be less than lo-'. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbit of Comet 2P Encke. We considered initial particles near perihelion (runs denoted as Delta tsub o, = 0), near aphelion (Delta tsub o, = 0.5), and also studied their initial positions when the comet moved for Pa/4 after perihelion passage (such runs are denoted as Delta tsub o, =i 0.25), where Pa is the period of the comet. Variations in time T when perihelion was passed was varied with a step 0.1 day for series 'S' and with a step 1 day for series 'L'. For each Beta we considered N = 101 particles for "S" runs and 150 particles for "L" runs.

  12. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  13. Hygroscopicity of mineral dust particles: Roles of chemical mixing state and hygroscopic conversion timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Moore, M. J.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Roberts, G. C.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2009-05-01

    Our laboratory investigations of mineral dust particle hygroscopicity are motivated by field observations of the atmospheric processing of dust. During ACE-Asia we observed sulphate and nitrate to be strongly segregated from each other in individual aged Asian dust particles. CCN activation curves of pure calcium minerals as proxies for fresh (calcium carbonate) and aged (calcium sulphate, nitrate, chloride) dust indicate that this mixing state would cause a large fraction of aged dust particles to remain poor warm cloud nucleation potential, contrary to previous assumptions. The enrichment of oxalic acid in calcium-rich dust particles could have similar effects due to the formation of insoluble calcium oxalate. Soluble calcium nitrate and chloride reaction products are hygroscopic and will transform mineral dust into excellent CCN. Generating insoluble mineral particles wet by atomization produced particles with much higher hygroscopicity then when resuspended dry. The atomized particles are likely composed of dissolved residuals and do not properly reflect the chemistry of dry mineral powders. Aerosol flow tube experiments were employed to study the conversion of calcium carbonate into calcium nitrate via heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, with simultaneous measurements of the reacted particles' chemistry and hygroscopicity. The timescale for this hygroscopic conversion was found to occur on the order of a few hours under tropospheric conditions. This implies that the conversion of non-hygroscopic calcite- containing dust into hygroscopic particles will be controlled by the availability of nitric acid, and not by the atmospheric residence time. Results from recent investigations of the effect of secondary coatings on the ice nucleation properties of dust particles will also be presented. The cloud formation potential of aged dust particles depends on both the quantity and form of the secondary species that have reacted or mixed with the dust. These results

  14. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  15. Nonstationary stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shotorban, B.

    2011-06-15

    Stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle that are due to discreteness of electrons and ions in plasmas can be described by a one-step process master equation [T. Matsoukas and M. Russell, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 4285 (1995)] with no exact solution. In the present work, using the system size expansion method of Van Kampen along with the linear noise approximation, a Fokker-Planck equation with an exact Gaussian solution is developed by expanding the master equation. The Gaussian solution has time-dependent mean and variance governed by two ordinary differential equations modeling the nonstationary process of dust particle charging. The model is tested via the comparison of its results to the results obtained by solving the master equation numerically. The electron and ion currents are calculated through the orbital motion limited theory. At various times of the nonstationary process of charging, the model results are in a very good agreement with the master equation results. The deviation is more significant when the standard deviation of the charge is comparable to the mean charge in magnitude.

  16. Contribution of airborne dust particles to HONO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Moussa, S. G.; El Tayyar, G.

    2014-02-01

    HONO is a major precursor for OH radicals in early mornings. Its formation has been mainly attributed to the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces such as soot, glass, mineral oxides and aerosol surfaces. In particular, dust events which are loaded with mineral oxide aerosols have been associated with higher HONO concentrations in the gas phase. In order to understand the mechanism of reactions related to this process, samples during dusty and non-dusty days were collected between October 2009 and April 2011. Based on HYSPLIT backward trajectories, data were divided between wind trajectories originating from Arabian or African deserts. In this study an increase of HONO levels was observed during dusty days. The increase in the acidic gas concentrations was accompanied by an increase in the PM nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations. During high relative humidity (African dusty days), it is proposed that the mechanism of NO2 hydrolysis predominates whereas during Arabian dusty days, where the air is relatively dry, a synergistic mechanism of adsorption and reaction between NO2 and SO2 on dust particles to produce HONO and sulfate in the particle phase is suggested. This study implies that the NOx reactivity on mineral oxide surfaces leads to a higher mixing level of OH. An increase in the sulfate forming capacity could account for the underestimation of sulfates in aerosols when the reactive uptake of SO2 alone is considered.

  17. Layer-like Structure of Radio-Frequency Discharge with Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. Y.; Vakulenko, A. V.; Lisitchenko, T. Y.; Levada, G. I.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper we are carried out the computer simulation of the dust particles dynamics in the radio frequency discharges at the microgravity conditions using PIC/MCC method for electrons and ions and hydrodynamics model for dust particles. The moving of dust particles is governed by the electrostatic force, ion and neutral drag forces, which are averaged over period of RF discharge. The obtained results show that dust particles form layers with sharp boundaries in the discharge chamber that is response on the instability of the radio-frequency discharge.

  18. Optical Investigations of Dust Particles Distribution in RF and DC Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V.

    2008-09-07

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to study dust particles movement and conditions of a formation of ordered plasma-dust structures in a capacitively coupled RF discharge. 3D binocular diagnostics of plasma-dust structures in dc discharge was made.

  19. Cosmic dust or other similar outer-space particles location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aver, S.

    1973-01-01

    Cosmic dust may be serious radiation hazard to man and electronic equipment caught in its path. Dust detector uses two operational amplifiers and offers narrower areas for collection of cosmic dust. Detector provides excellent resolution as result of which recording of particle velocities as well as positions of their impact are more accurately determined.

  20. Seasonal and Particle Size-Dependent Variations of Hexabromocyclododecanes in Settled Dust: Implications for Sampling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhiguo; Xu, Fuchao; Li, Wenchao; Sun, Jianhui; Shen, Mohai; Su, Xianfa; Feng, Jinglan; Yu, Gang; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-09-15

    Particle size is a significant parameter which determines the environmental fate and the behavior of dust particles and, implicitly, the exposure risk of humans to particle-bound contaminants. Currently, the influence of dust particle size on the occurrence and seasonal variation of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) remains unclear. While HBCDs are now restricted by the Stockholm Convention, information regarding HBCD contamination in indoor dust in China is still limited. We analyzed composite dust samples from offices (n = 22), hotels (n = 3), kindergartens (n = 2), dormitories (n = 40), and main roads (n = 10). Each composite dust sample (one per type of microenvironment) was fractionated into 9 fractions (F1-F9: 2000-900, 900-500, 500-400, 400-300, 300-200, 200-100, 100-74, 74-50, and <50 μm). Total HBCD concentrations ranged from 5.3 (road dust, F4) to 2580 ng g(-1) (dormitory dust, F4) in the 45 size-segregated samples. The seasonality of HBCDs in indoor dust was investigated in 40 samples from two offices. A consistent seasonal trend of HBCD levels was evident with dust collected in the winter being more contaminated with HBCDs than dust from the summer. Particle size-selection strategy for dust analysis has been found to be influential on the HBCD concentrations, while overestimation or underestimation would occur with improper strategies. PMID:26301772

  1. Investigation of the dynamics of nanometer-size dust particles in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'brien, L.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and size distribution of submicron-sized interplanetary dust particles at 1 AU is highly variable due to the nature of its production and transport through the solar system. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009]. Simulations of nano-dust dynamics are performed to gain an understanding of their transport in the inner heliosphere and distribution near 1 AU where they can potentially be detected. Simulations show that the temporal variation in nano-dust detection, as suggested by the STEREO observations, can be described by the dust's interaction with the complex structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) [Juhasz and Horanyi, 2013]. The dust trajectories and their distribution near Earth's orbit is a function of the initial conditions of both nano-dust particles and the IMF. Le Chat et al. (2015) reported on the correlation between high nano-dust fluxes observed by STEREO and the observed Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). We present the results from simulating nano-dust interaction with ICMEs that are modeled as magnetic clouds, and report that the dust trajectories and, thus, their distribution and velocities at 1 AU are significantly altered.

  2. Dynamical behaviour of interstellar dust particles in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Klačka, Jozef

    2004-11-01

    Motion and possible capture of interstellar dust particles (ISDPs) in the Solar System are investigated. Gravitational force of the Sun, solar electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation and interplanetary magnetic field are considered. The effect of solar electromagnetic radiation plays an important role in the sense that nonspherical ISDPs can be captured (and survive) much more effectively than spherical particles. It turns out that particles of effective radii ≈ 0.4 μm, moving initially near the solar equatorial plane and with impact parameter 400 RS ≲ b ≲ 500 RS (solar radii) exhibit a high probability of capture and survival in the Solar System. Only a very small number of spherical particles can be captured. Survived nonspherical ISDPs orbiting around the Sun are characterized by a quantity analogous to the Kepler's third law: /T2, where T is orbital period and is time average of cubed solar distance over the period T. The value of the quantity /T2 is 0.673 ± 0.002 [AU3 /year2 ].

  3. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  4. 40Ar-39Ar Analyses of Antarctic Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, S. F.; Turner, G.; Maurette, M.

    1993-07-01

    Eleven particles from the 100-400-micrometer-sized fraction of a sample of dust (vial G1-35) retrieved from Antarctica early in 1991 [1] have been analyzed using high-sensitivity noble gas mass spectrometry and, where possible, SEM/EDX techniques. The bulk sample was possibly heavily contaminated with terrestrial material but an attempt was made to preselect angular unmelted grains of extraterrestrial origin. Particles were examined optically and then split, where possible, into three parts to provide samples for 40Ar-39Ar, SEM, and He isotope analysis. Samples for 40Ar-39Ar studies were irradiated in the University of Michigan reactor, where they received a fast neutron fluence of approximately 10^18 cm^-2 (J = 0.0097, beta = 3.16). SEM analyses indicated that three particles (SK64, SK69, and SK72) have chondritic compositions, while a fourth (SK71) was thought to be extraterrestrial on the basis of its morphology. Two particles (SK65 and SK73) appeared to be terrestrial based on their location on an Mg-Fe-Si plot [2]. No SEM analyses are available for five of the samples (SK63, SK66, SK67, SK70, and SK71), and their origins are unknown. Gas was extracted from the samples for the argon analyses using a pulsed Nd laser. Step-heating was performed on each particle by defocusing the laser beam to reduce the heating effect. The laser delivered about 200 mJ per pulse; the initial heating was done with the beam covering approximately 150 micrometers. A broad overview of the data from nine particles analyzed in a seven-day sequence is shown in Fig. 1. Gas release, in units of 10^-12 ccSTP, is plotted as a function of run number with sample analyses interspersed with system blanks. Only two terrestrial particles, with well-defined ages of 200 Ma and 1000 Ma, released large amounts of gas and are omitted from the plot. The remaining particles analyzed so far released very little 40Ar and contrast sharply with the much larger amounts observed by Saxton et al. [3] in a suite

  5. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Yabushita, A.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.

    2006-04-13

    Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

  6. Temporal variations in PM 10 and particle size distribution during Asian dust storms in Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Funk, Roger; Sommer, Michael; Li, Yong

    Two types of increased atmospheric dust concentration could be distinguished in the Xilingele grassland in the Chinese Province of Inner Mongolia, based on the dust origin i.e. local versus supra-regional type. While the local type is characterized by dust emission, dust events of the supra-regional type cause high dust passages and deposition rates. During dust events the temporal variability of the PM 10- and PM 1-concentrations, the particle size distribution and the friction velocity u* were measured in 5 min intervals using a Laser Dust Monitor (by GRIMM Aerosol GmbH). The threshold friction velocity for local dust emission u*t, at which dust of local soils origin was measured, was above 0.6 m s -1. The total suspended particles (TSP) was collected by MWAC catchers and measured by a Laser Particle Sizer (Analysette 22 by Fritsch GmbH). The average D[4/3] particle diameter of the TSP was 23.0 μm and the greatest particles measured had sizes of up to 100 μm. While fine dust of the PM 10 category contained between 58% and 63% of the TSP-mass, coarser particles (>30 μm) contributed to about a fourth of the TSP-mass. At the end of some strong dust storms, the dust concentrations remained at a high level even though wind speeds had already slowed down and u* was below 0.3 m s -1. These phases were characterized by high deposition rates for dust particles greater than 60 μm.

  7. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; MacKinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  8. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. PMID:23712117

  9. Growth, sedimentation, heating and charging of dust particles in the polar summer mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Klumov, B. A.

    2009-11-10

    Some peculiarities of the Earth's dusty ionosphere are considered using as an example the polar summer mesosphere. We discuss in detail growth and sedimentation of nanosized dusty/smoke particles in the upper atmosphere; the impact of nano/micro-particles optical properties on their heating and charging; for instance, it has been shown that oppositely charged dust particles may present in the polar summer mesosphere. We present a simple one-dimensional growth-sedimentation model; the model predicts the size and altitude distributions of dust particles in the mesosphere; e.g, the model predicts the bimodal size distribution of the dust particles.

  10. Origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Lee, Wei

    1994-01-01

    Using experiments as a basis, we have developed a scenario for the origin of the hydrocarbon material of carbonaceous chondrites. This scenario can also serve as an explanation for the origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the atmospheres of C stars undergoing a late stage of stellar evolution is indicated by the observed unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. Those molecules are then transported through interstellar space where they become enriched with D through ion molecule reactions when passing through cold, dark clouds. Many of those PAH molecules are subsequently hydrogenated and cracked in a H-dominated plasma such as would have occurred in the solar nebula. The resulting mixture of alkanes and residual D-rich PAH molecules was then incorporated into the mineral fraction of the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites and IDP's.

  11. Aqueous alteration in five chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1991-02-01

    Results are presented on AEM observations carried out on chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which include data on alkali-rich layer silicates and new observations of nonstoichiometric plagioclase and alkali feldspars in individual CP IDPs. The compositional similarities found between the feldspar minerals and the layer silicates suggest that the latter have formed from these feldspars during low-temperature aqueous alterations at a stage of diagenesis in the CP IDP parent bodies. Small, but persistent, amounts of layer silicates, carbonates, and barite found in several nominally anhydrous CP IDPs support the suggestion of incipient aqueous alterations in their parent bodies, which may include short-period comet nuclei and outer-belt asteroids.

  12. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Fujita, D.

    2008-09-07

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  13. Unequilibrated, equilibrated, and reduced aggregates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    Track-rich anhydrous IDP's are probably the most primitive IDP's because they have escaped significant post-accretional alteration; they exhibit evidence of (nebular) gas phase reactions; their mineralogy is similar to comet Halley's dust; and some of them exhibit comet-like IR spectral characteristics. However, basic questions about the mineralogy and petrography of anhydrous IDP's remain unanswered, because they contain aggregated components that can be heterogeneous on a scale of nanometers. In some IDP's, aggregates account for greater than 75 percent of the volume of the particle. The aggregates have been systematically examined using an analytical electron microscope (AEM), which provides probe-forming optics and (x-ray and electron) spectrometers necessary to analyze individual nanometer-sized grains. The AEM results reveal at least three mineralogically distinct classes of aggregates in an hydrous IDP's, with mineralogies reflecting significantly different formation/aggregation environments.

  14. Aqueous alteration in five chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on AEM observations carried out on chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which include data on alkali-rich layer silicates and new observations of nonstoichiometric plagioclase and alkali feldspars in individual CP IDPs. The compositional similarities found between the feldspar minerals and the layer silicates suggest that the latter have formed from these feldspars during low-temperature aqueous alterations at a stage of diagenesis in the CP IDP parent bodies. Small, but persistent, amounts of layer silicates, carbonates, and barite found in several nominally anhydrous CP IDPs support the suggestion of incipient aqueous alterations in their parent bodies, which may include short-period comet nuclei and outer-belt asteroids.

  15. Halley comet dust particle classification according to the data obtained by mass spectrometer Puma-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikov, Yu. P.; Evlanov, E. N.; Fomenkova, M. N.; Mukhin, L. M.; Nazarov, M. A.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Zubkov, B. V.

    Nonzero mode spectra of the dust component of Comet Halley obtained by the dust particle impact mass-spectrometer, Puma-1, on Vega, are used to examine the origin of the mineral phase. The element compositions of 511 cometary particles are studied, using data on ions of Na, Ca, C, H, N, S, Si, Mg, Fe, Cr, and Al. The results are used to determine the mineral composition of the dust of Comet Halley.

  16. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  18. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Maechling, C. R.; Zare, R. N.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the first definitive measurements of specific organic molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's)) in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). An improved version of the microbeam-two-step laser mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two IDP's gave similar mass spectra showing an abundance of PAH's. Control samples, including particles of probable terrestrial origin from the same stratospheric collector, gave either null results or quite different spectra. We conclude that the PAH's are probably indigenous to the IDP's and are not terrestrial contaminants. The instrument used to study the particles is a two-step laser mass spectrometer. Constituent neutral molecules of the sample are first desorbed with a pulsed infrared laser beam focussed to 40 micrometers. In the second step, PAH's in the desorbed plume are preferentially ionized by a pulsed UV laser beam. Resulting ions produced by resonant absorption are extracted into a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This instrument has high spatial resolution, high ion transmission, unlimited mass range, and multichannel detection of all ion masses from a single laser shot.

  19. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Close-up on Dust Particle Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Kissel, J.; Langevin, Y.; Briois, C.; von Hoerner, H.; Koch, A.; Schulz, R.; Silén, J.; Altwegg, K.; Colangeli, L.; Cottin, H.; Engrand, C.; Fischer, H.; Glasmachers, A.; Grün, E.; Haerendel, G.; Henkel, H.; Höfner, H.; Hornung, K.; Jessberger, E. K.; Lehto, H.; Lehto, K.; Raulin, F.; Le Roy, L.; Rynö, J.; Steiger, W.; Stephan, T.; Thirkell, L.; Thomas, R.; Torkar, K.; Varmuza, K.; Wanczek, K.-P.; Altobelli, N.; Baklouti, D.; Bardyn, A.; Fray, N.; Krüger, H.; Ligier, N.; Lin, Z.; Martin, P.; Merouane, S.; Orthous-Daunay, F. R.; Paquette, J.; Revillet, C.; Siljeström, S.; Stenzel, O.; Zaprudin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser instrument on board ESA's Rosetta mission has collected dust particles in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. During the early-orbit phase of the Rosetta mission, particles and particle agglomerates have been imaged and analyzed in the inner coma at distances between 100 km and 10 km off the cometary nucleus and at more than 3 AU from the Sun. We identified 585 particles of more than 14 μm in size. The particles are collected at low impact speeds and constitute a sample of the dust particles in the inner coma impacting and fragmenting on the targets. The sizes of the particles range from 14 μm up to sub-millimeter sizes and the differential dust flux size distribution is fitted with a power law exponent of -3.1. After impact, the larger particles tend to stick together, spread out or consist of single or a group of clumps, and the flocculent morphology of the fragmented particles is revealed. The elemental composition of the dust particles is heterogeneous and the particles could contain typical silicates like olivine and pyroxenes, as well as iron sulfides. The sodium to iron elemental ratio is enriched with regard to abundances in CI carbonaceous chondrites by a factor from ˜1.5 to ˜15. No clear evidence for organic matter has been identified. The composition and morphology of the collected dust particles appear to be similar to that of interplanetary dust particles.

  20. Sungrazing dust particles against the sporadic meteor background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubaev, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    From the results of the statistical study, the genetic relation between some meteors (from -5 m to +5 m ) of the sporadic background and the comets of the Kreutz, Marsden, and Kracht families has been revealed. The radiants of sporadic meteors are concentrated at the geocentric ecliptic latitudes 7°-10° northward and southward of the ecliptic. The radiants of the sungrazing meteoroids, that were detected on their heliocentric orbits "before" and "after" the perihelion passage, are concentrated in the elongation intervals of approximately 120°-165° and 20°-60° from the Sun, respectively. Each of the specified radiant regions, in its turn, breaks up into two groups. The group of radiants with elongations of about 30° and 155° from the Sun belongs to the Marsden and Kracht cometary families, while the group with 50° and 135°, to the Kreutz cometary family. In the distribution by perihelion distance, a sharp decrease of the number of observed dust particles with q < 0.08 AU was found. This corresponds to the heliocentric distances (20-30 R ⊙), where the production of microscopic dust due to sublimation of cometary nuclei, while approaching the Sun, terminates. The number of sporadic sungrazing meteoroids detected after their passage in the vicinity of the Sun is approximately 20 times smaller than the number of similar particles in the preperihelion part of the trajectory. This result is of special importance for studying the thermodesorption effect of meteoroids (i.e., the change in the content of chemical elements in meteoroids as a function of the perihelion distance).

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction of dust particle trajectories in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Boeglin, W. U.; Roquemore, A. L.; Maqueda, R.

    2008-10-15

    Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed.

  2. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    W.U. Boeglin, A.L. Roquemore, and R. Maqueda

    2009-03-06

    Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed. 2008 American Institute of Physics. __________________________________________________

  3. Laboratory Studies of Optical Characteristics and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.

    2000-01-01

    Information about the optical characteristics and physical processes involving cosmic dust particles is vital for interpretation of astronomical observations and an understanding of the formation and processing of dust in the evolutionary cycle of matter in the interstellar medium. Cosmic dust particles are formed in a variety of astrophysical environments such as in cool stellar outflows and circumstellar envelopes. Definitive knowledge of the nature, composition, and physical processes of cosmic dust grains, however, can only be inferred from astronomical observations through laboratory experiments on the analogs of hypothesized dust particles and with modeling calculations. Laboratory investigations of the nature, composition, and optical characteristics of cosmic dust particles are being, carried out at many institutions with a variety of experimental techniques. Despite a wealth of available data, however, many basic issues remain unresolved. An experimental facility based on suspension of dust particles in electrodynamic balance in a pressure/temperature controlled environment in a cavity has been operational at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and is currently being employed for studies of dust particle charging mechanisms using electron beams and with UV radiation. In this paper, we discuss two general classes of experiments under planning stages that may be simultaneously carried out on this facility for cosmic dust investigations (i) Infrared optical characteristics (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) of the analogs of hypothesized of cosmic dust particles, such as natural and synthetic amorphous silicates with varying compositions, amorphous carbon grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and icy core-mantle particles etc. The initial spectral range under consideration is 1-25 micrometers, to be extended to the far infrared region in the future (ii) Condensation of volatile gases on nucleus dust particles to be

  4. Interplanetary Dust Particles of Micron Size Probably Associated with the Leonid Meteor Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. M.; McCracken, C. W.; LaGow, H. E.

    1961-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle event, coincident with the Leonid meteor shower and lasting approximately 70 hours, was recorded by a sensor on the Vanguard III satellite. During this interval the satellite's microphone system registered impacts of approximately 2800 dust particles with momenta exceeding 10(exp -2) dyne-second. The impact rate varied by as much as two orders of magnitude within a few hours. The microphone system was almost omnidirectional, so the radiants of the dust particles cannot be defined. Association of these dust particles with the Leonid meteor stream is suggested by the coincidence in time and by the location of the satellite. Vanguard III traversed five major meteor streams, but the impact rates significantly exceeded the background rate only during this one interval. This is the first case in which a significant increase in the directly measured impact rate of dust particles possibly can be associated with a major meteor stream.

  5. The effect of mechanical vibration on the dust particle kinetic temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    An important parameter in governing the self-assembly of structures in a complex (dusty) plasma is the coupling parameter Γ, the ratio of the electrostatic energy of the charged dust to the dust thermal energy. In a GEC rf reference cell, the dust thermal energy can come from collisions with the neutral gas, fluctuations of the confining electric field or changes in the charge on the dust particle itself. Experimentally, the kinetic energy of the dust can be determined using the Gaussian thermal velocity probability distribution. However, recent measurements of the dust particle velocity probability distribution function have shown that external mechanical vibrations of the plasma chamber can have a significant effect on the result. This investigation compares measurements of the dust kinetic temperature with and without external vibrations to the GEC cell. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Spatio-temporal evolution of the dust particle size distribution in dusty argon rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killer, Carsten; Mulsow, Matthias; Melzer, André

    2015-04-01

    An imaging Mie scattering technique has been developed to measure the spatially resolved size distribution of dust particles in extended dust clouds. For large dust clouds of micrometre-sized plastic particles confined in an radio frequency (rf) discharge, a segmentation of the dust cloud into populations of different sizes is observed, even though the size differences are very small. The dust size dispersion inside a population is much smaller than the difference between the populations. Furthermore, the dust size is found to be constantly decreasing over time while the particles are confined in an inert argon plasma. The processes responsible for the shrinking of the dust in the plasma have been addressed by mass spectrometry, ex situ microscopy of the dust size, dust resonance measurements, in situ determination of the dust surface temperature and Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR). It is concluded that both a reduction of dust size and its mass density due to outgassing of water and other volatile constituents as well as chemical etching by oxygen impurities are responsible for the observations.

  7. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  8. The influence of dust particles on electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in a bi-Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, C.; Varughese, J.K.; Antony, S.; Anilkumar, C.P.; Renuka, G.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of dust particles on electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, in a plasma where the hot ions are modelled by a bi-Lorentzian or Kappa distribution has been studied. The electrons and dust particles have been treated as cold. Expressions for the dispersion relations and growth/damping rates in both high- and low-{beta} plasmas have been derived. For the low-{beta} case temperature anisotropy is the source of instability in an electron{endash}ion plasma. This instability is strongly influenced by the temperature anisotropy of the hot ions and the charge and density of the dust particles; the instability increases with these parameters. However, in high-{beta} plasmas, the instability is driven by the dust. The growth rate increases with the charge on the dust; but with increasing dust densities the EMIC wave propagates almost freely. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  10. Interplanetary Dust Particles as Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Brunetto, R.; Demeo, F. E.; Djouadi, Z.; Dumas, C.; Merouane, S.; Mousis, O.; Zanda, B.

    2015-06-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  11. Interplanetary Dust Particles As Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, Pierre; Marsset, Michael; Beck, Pierre; Binzel, Richard; Birlan, Mirel; Brunetto, Rosario; DeMeo, Francesca; Djouadi, Zahia; Dumas, Christophe; Merouane, Sihane; Mousis, Olivier; Zanda, Brigitte

    2015-11-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  12. Shielding of a Moving Charged Dust Particle in the Nonequilibrium Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Momot, A. I.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2008-09-07

    Study of shielding of a moving charged dust particle in the nonequilibrium plasma was performed. It is known that in the collisionless so-called Vlasov plasma the electric field of a slowly moving charged particle at high distances corresponds to quadrupole [1, 2, 3]. It was found that in the collisional plasma the electric field of a moving dust particle had the dipole component and the long distance behavior of the electric fields was defined by this component. Therefore the interaction of dust particles in plasma flow became dependent on the relative orientation of the interpaticle radius-vector and the flow velocity vector.

  13. Floating surface potential of spherical dust grains in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dennie

    2016-01-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation study of the charging processes of spherical dust grains in a magnetized plasma environment is presented. Different magnetic field strengths with corresponding electron/ion gyration radii of smaller, the same or larger size than the grain radius and the plasma Debye length are examined. The magnetized plasma is created by overlapping the simulation box with a homogeneous, constant magnetic field. The charging currents are significantly reduced in the presence of a magnetic field, resulting in a more negative grain floating potential. Indeed, the most probable electron gyration radius is always smaller than that of ions in a Maxwellian plasma: however, it is demonstrated that the situation of simultaneous magnetized electron but an unmagnetized ion charging current never exists. The simulation results do not fit with a modified orbital motion limited (OML) theory approach for this situation, since the ion current is significantly reduced due to the increase of the gyration radius in the potential field of the dust grain. For very small gyration radii, the simulation results are in good agreement with a modified OML approach for both magnetized electron and ion charging currents.

  14. Automated SIMS Isotopic Analysis Of Small Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gyngard, F.; Morgand, A.; Zinner, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of sub-μm to μm sized dust grains are of increasing interest in cosmochemistry, nuclear forensics and terrestrial aerosol research. Because of its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the tool of choice for measuring isotopes in such small samples. Indeed, SIMS has enabled an entirely new sub-field of astronomy: presolar grains in meteorites. In recent years, the development of the Cameca NanoSIMS ion probe has extended the reach of isotopic measurements to particles as small as 100 nm in diameter, a regime where isotopic precision is strongly limited by the total number of atoms in the sample. Many applications require obtaining isotopic data on large numbers of particles, necessitating the development of automated techniques. One such method is isotopic imaging, wherein images of multiple isotopes are acquired, each containing multiple dispersed particles, and image processing is used to determine isotopic ratios for individual particles. This method is powerful, but relatively inefficient for raster-based imaging on the NanoSIMS. Modern computerized control of instrumentation has allowed for another approach, analogous to commercial automated SEM-EDS particle analysis systems, in which images are used solely to locate particles followed by fully automated grain-by-grain analysis. The first such system was developed on the Carnegie Institution’s Cameca ims-6f, and was used to generate large databases of presolar grains. We have recently developed a similar system for the NanoSIMS, whose high sensitivity allows for smaller grains to be analyzed with less sample consumption than is possible with the 6f system. The 6f and NanoSIMS systems are functionally identical: an image of dispersed grains is obtained with sufficient statistical precision for an algorithm to identify the positions of individual particles, the primary ion beam is deflected to each particle in turn and rastered in a small

  15. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  16. Particle pair diffusion of inertial particles such as dust in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem; Tereda, Yoseph; Usama, Syed

    2016-04-01

    The transport of particles in turbulent flows is ubiquitous in industrial applications and also in nature such as in dust storms and pollens. The mathematical equations that describe the motion of individual inertial particles (i.e. particles with weight and friction) is not fully developed yet, although simplified descriptions in specific contexts have been proposed, such as by Maxey and Riley [1]. The relative motion of groups of particles is equally important to understand, and this can usually be related to the relative motion of two particles, or pair diffusion. In 1926 Richardson [2] proposed a pioneering theory of pair diffusion of fluid particles based upon the idea of a separation dependent pair diffusivity, K(l), where l is the distance between two particles. Richardson advanced the theory based on a locality hypothesis in which only energy in the turbulent scales similar to the pair separation l is effective in further increasing the pair separation, leading to the famous 4/3-scaling, K˜ l4/3. Recent studies in turbulent particle pair diffusion [3] has suggested that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process inside the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number turbulence containing generalised power-law energy spectra, E(k)˜ k-p with 1

  17. The nature of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust particles detected with MIDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannel, T.; Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.; Schmied, R.

    2015-10-01

    The MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) onboard Rosetta collects dust particles and produces three-dimensional images with nano- to micrometre resolution. To date, several tens of particles have been detected, allowing determination of their properties at the smallest scale. The key features will be presented, including the particle size, their fragile character, and their morphology. These findings will be compared with the results of other Rosetta dust experiments.

  18. Motions of dust particles in a complex plasma with an axisymmetric nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the motions of dust particles in a complex plasma by applying an axisymmetric nonuniform magnetic field, B , introduced with a permanent magnet. The magnetic field changes its direction from upward to downward within the experimental area. The distribution of dust particles is conical in the meridional plane, and its central area is a void. The dust particles are generally stagnant in the vertical direction and distributed in multiple layers. The horizontal plane is separated into two regions where the vertical component of B can and cannot be regarded as zero. The distribution of the dust particles in the horizontal plane is concentric. The dust particles along the inner and outer edges rotate in opposite directions due to the direction of the vertical component of B and generate shear flow at a certain height. The rotation velocities of the particles at the edges are compared with the theory of Kaw et al. [Phys. Plasmas 9, 387 (2002)]. The vortex-like structure is not easy to observe even in the presence of a shear flow because of the influence of the other dust particles as well as the small Reynolds number of the dust fluid.

  19. Plasmonic spectra of individual subwavelength particles under the infrared microscope: cells and airborne dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, James V.; Lioi, David B.; Shaffer, Lindsey; Malone, Marvin A.; Luthra, Antriksh; Ravi, Aruna

    2014-03-01

    A plasmonic metal film with a subwavelength hole array (a mesh) is used to capture an individual subwavelength particle, like a single yeast cell or airborne dust particle, and an imaging infrared (IR) microscope, records a scatterfree, IR absorption spectrum of the particle. Individual spectra of wavelength scale particles usually suffer from large scattering effects. This paper starts by demonstrating the plasmonic nature of the mesh in the infrared, proceeds to how this special form of light (surface plasmon polariton mediated transmission resonance) leads to scatter-free IR absorption spectra of individual, subwavelength particles, and ends with work on yeast cells and dust particles from our laboratory air and a household filter.

  20. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 μm, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0-2.5 μm. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters. PMID:26367704

  1. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  2. Effect of non-Maxwellian particle trapping and dust grain charging on dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.; Mushtaq, A.

    2006-11-15

    The role of adiabatic trapped ions on a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic wave, including the effect of adiabatic dust charge variation, is investigated in an unmagnetized three-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions and massive micron sized negatively charged dust particulates. We have assumed that electrons and ions obey (r,q) velocity distribution while the dust species is treated fluid dynamically. It is found that the dynamics of dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified r dependent Korteweg-de Vries equation. Further, the spectral indices (r,q) affect the charge fluctuation as well as the trapping of electrons and ions and consequently modify the dust acoustic solitary wave.

  3. Ice Nucleating Particle Properties in the Saharan Air Layer Close to the Dust Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Y.; Garcia, I. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Linke, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Nickovic, S.; Lohmann, U.; Kanji, Z. A.; Sierau, B.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2013 and 2014 measurements of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations, aerosol particle size distributions, chemistry and fluorescence were conducted at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory located at 2373 m asl on Tenerife, west off the African shore. During summer, the observatory is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to dust. Absolute INP concentrations and activated fractions at T=-40 to -15°C and RHi=100-150 % were measured. In this study, we discuss the in-situ measured INP properties with respect to changes in the chemical composition, the biological content, the source regions as well as transport pathways and thus aging processes of the dust aerosol. For the first time, ice crystal residues were also analyzed with regard to biological content by means of their autofluorescence signal close to a major dust source region. Airborne dust samples were collected with a cyclone for additional offline analysis in the laboratory under similar conditions as in the field. Both, in-situ and offline dust samples were chemically characterized using single-particle mass spectrometry. The DREAM8 dust model extended with dust mineral fractions was run to simulate meteorological and dust aerosol conditions for ice nucleation. Results show that the background aerosol at Izaña was dominated by carbonaceous particles, which were hardly ice-active under the investigated conditions. When Saharan dust was present, INP concentrations increased by up to two orders of magnitude even at water subsaturated conditions at T≤-25°C. Differences in the ice-activated fraction were found between different dust periods which seem to be linked to variations in the aerosol chemical composition (dust mixed with changing fractions of sea salt and differences in the dust aerosol itself). Furthermore, two biomass burning events in 2014 were identified which led to very low INP concentrations under the investigated temperature and relative humidity

  4. Dust Devils on Mars: Effects of Surface Roughness on Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neakrase, Lynn D.; Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.; Balme, Matthew L.; Foley, Daniel J.; Eddlemon, Eric E.

    2005-01-01

    Dust devils have been proposed as effective mechanisms for lofting large quantities of dust into the martian atmosphere. Previous work showed that vortices lift dust more easily than simple boundary layer winds. The aim of this study is to determine experimentally the effects of non-erodable roughness elements on vortex particle threshold through laboratory simulations of natural surfaces. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  5. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  6. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  7. Numerical investigation of the coagulation mixing between dust and hygroscopic aerosol particles and its impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Chung-Kuang Chou, Charles; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2015-05-01

    A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization was incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to study the coagulation mixing process focusing on a dust storm event that occurred over East Asia. Simulation results show that the coagulation mixing process tends to decrease aerosol mass, surface area, and number concentrations over the dust source areas. Over the downwind oceanic areas, aerosol concentrations generally increased due to enhanced sedimentation as particles became larger upon coagulation. The mixture process can reduce the overall single-scattering albedo by up to 10% as a result of enhanced core with shell absorption by dust and reduction in the number of scattering particles. The enhanced dry deposition speed also altered the vertical distribution. In addition, the ability of aerosol particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased from around 107 m-3 to above 109 m-3 over downwind areas because a large amount of mineral dust particles became effective CCN with solute coating, except over the highly polluted areas where multiple collections of hygroscopic particles by dust in effect reduced CCN number. This CCN effect is much stronger for coagulation mixing than by the uptake of sulfuric acid gas on dust, although the nitric acid gas uptake was not investigated. The ability of dust particles to serve as ice nuclei may decrease or increase at low or high subzero temperatures, respectively, due to the switching from deposition nucleation to immersion freezing or haze freezing.

  8. Observation of Asian Mineral Dust Particles in Japan by a Single-Particle Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Sugimoto, N.; Matsui, I.; Shimizu, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Asian mineral dust (Kosa) particles, emitted from the desert area of inland China, are characteristic of East Asian aerosols. The Kosa particles are important as regional carriers of various materials, especially in spring when the stormy dusts are transported to Japan and Pacific Ocean. In this study, the chemical mixing state of each atmospheric aerosol was measured individually by a laser-based time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to discuss chemical changes of Kosa particles during the transport. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba (36.05°N, 140.12°E) in April and May 2004. The LIDAR measurement was also carried out to determine the Kosa events. To classify the source of the air mass, the NOAA-HYSPLIT backward trajectory was applied. For the TOFMS instrument, particles with μm and sub-μm diameters were detected. The polarity of ion detection was altered every minute. During 30 days, the numbers of logged mass spectra (MS) were 5993 and 4382 for positive and negative ions, respectively. When the MS of ambient aerosols were compared with that of the standard Kosa sample, sulfate- and nitrate-mixed Kosa particles were found. To explore the mixing state of particles further, classification of the particles by the ART-2a algorithm was adopted. NO2-, NO3-, HSO4-, SiO2-, SiO3-, Cl- and NaCl2- were focused. Finally, particles were classified to 4 categories as A: sulfate and sulfate-rich mineral; B: sulfate-poor mineral; C: sea salt; D: unidentified. The relative fractions of A were 30 % and 1 % for a Kosa event and a maritime air mass, respectively. Note that the air mass for Kosa event case passed over the coast region of China, where SOx emission was intensive. It was reasonable that sulfate was internally mixed with Kosa particles and transported to Japan. Consequently, it was confirmed experimentally that Kosa particles are important as carriers of pollutants in the rim region of Pacific Ocean. Comparison with the observation in 2005 is also shown.

  9. Mass spectra of organic and inorganic dust particles measured by an impact ionization mass analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, J. G.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Kempf, S.; Armes, S. P.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Westphal, A.

    2009-12-01

    The composition of individual cosmic dust particles can be measured in-situ using existing techniques and instrumentations. The dust particle impacting on a solid surface with hypervelocity (> 1 km/s) is vaporized and partially ionized. The generated ions are extracted and analyzed using time-of-flight methods. Laboratory calibration measurements are possible at the dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg, Germany. The accelerator is limited to using conductive dust that was limited in the past to Fe, Al or graphite samples. In the recent years, however, dust samples of organic materials and inorganic minerals of cosmic interest were developed that are suitable for application in the accelerator. This is achieved by coating micron and submicron sized dust particles by conductive polymers. Here we present the comparison of spectra measured using organic and inorganic dust samples (polystyrene, poly-[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulphide], Phyrotite). The particles were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km/s. Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 Daltons. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds.

  10. A detailed petrological analysis of hydrated, low-nickel, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed petrological analysis of three low-Ni, K-bearing, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles is performed, and these particles are compared to products of high-energy, explosive (Plinian-type) volcanic events. The analytical electron microscope (AEM) analyses show pervasive layer silicates, carbonate and goethite, and chemical fractionation in the matrix of these particles similar to hydrothermal alteration in volcanic ejecta. Along with low Ni content and the presence of potassium, the texture and mineralogy of particles L2001-18, L2001-20, and L2002 C2 are similar to at least two nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles of the igneous subgroup for which an extraterrestrial origin has been suggested based on their minor- and trace-element abundances. The petrological characteristics of some low-Ni, K-bearing nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles supports a probable terrestrial volcanic origin, but the AEM data alone cannot exclude an extraterrestrial origin for these particles.

  11. Comparison of Contributions of Wind-blown and Anthropogenic Fugitive Dust Particles to Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Gong, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new wind-blown-dust emissions module was recently implemented into AURAMS, a Canadian regional air quality model (Park et al., 2009; Park et al., 2007), to investigate the relative impact of wind-blown dust vs. anthropogenic fugitive dust on air quality in North America. In order to apply the wind-blown dust emissions module to the entire North American continent, a soil-grain-size-distribution map was developed using the outputs of four monthly runs of AURAMS for 2002 and available PM2.5 dust-content observations. The simulation results using the new soil-grain-size-distribution map showed that inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions is essential to predict the impact of dust aerosols on air quality in North America, especially in the western U.S.. The wind-blown dust emissions varied widely by season, whereas the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions did not change significantly. In the spring (April), the continental monthly average emissions rate of wind-blown dust was much higher than that of anthropogenic fugitive dust. The total amount of wind-blown dust emissions in North America predicted by the model for 2002 was comparable to that of anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions. Even with the inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions, however, the model still had difficulty simulating dust concentrations. Further improvements are needed, in terms of both limitations of the wind-blown-dust emission module and uncertainties in the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions inventories, for improved dust modelling. References Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C.A. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Sensitivity of surface characteristics on the simulation of wind-blown dust source in North America, Atmospheric Environment, 43 (19), 3122-3129, 2009. Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, T.L. Zhao, R.J. Vet, V.S. Bouchet, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Simulation of entrainment and transport of dust particles within North America in April 2001 ("Red

  12. On the height variation of the E-region cowling conductivity - effect of charged dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, P.; Kulkarni, V. H.

    2006-11-01

    Height profiles of the Cowling conductivity in the electrojet region, estimated using the atmospheric parameters given by the existing models like CIRA or MSIS and measured electron density profiles, consistently show the heights of the electrojet current intensity peak to be more than 3 km below those estimated from in-situ measurements using magnetometers on board sounding rockets. Kulkarni and Muralikrishna (2005) attempted to explain this to be due to the effect of neutral dust particles. They reported that neutral dust particles, when they exist in sufficient numbers, can modify the collision parameters, especially in the lower E-region, where dust particles of meteoric origin are known to exist in large numbers, and thereby can modify the Cowling conductivity profile in the electrojet region. This work is extended here to include the effect of charged dust particles. Dust particles can become charged negatively by the attachment of ambient free electrons, and can thus reduce the number density of free electrons especially below the electrojet peak. This can alter the vertical profile of the east-west Hall current driven by the vertical Hall polarization field, thereby causing a net reduction in the electrojet current. Such a decrease in the electrojet current may be observed on the ground magnetograms. This mechanism, as proposed here, can operate only during periods of strong meteor shower activity, when the dust particle density at the assumed deposit height of 103 km can reach extreme values (for example, 5×104 cm-3 of 1-µm diameter dust particles). Such a dense dust layer may even cause a reversal in the normally upward vertical Hall polarization field, within the dust layer, causing a reversal of the electrojet currents below the current peak.

  13. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2013-10-10

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, τ{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of τ{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ∼< St ∼< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with τ{sub p} ≅ 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with τ{sub p} ∼> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ≅ 1, reaches a maximum at τ{sub p} ≅ 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as τ{sub p}{sup -1/2} for τ{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

  14. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B S; Said, Syed A M; Al-Aqeeli, N; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  15. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  16. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  17. Magnetic vortex gyration affected by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. M.; Zhou, C.; Won, C.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on magnetic vortex gyration is investigated systematically through micromagnetic simulations. Our results show that the DMI can lift the degeneracy of vortex gyration eigenfrequencies for vortices with left- and right-handedness. For vortex gyration excited by an in-plane AC resonant field, the DMI can strongly influence the gyration amplitude and the critical field for core switching, depending on the sign of the DMI and the vortex handedness. The DMI-induced edge state has a strong effect on the vortex core gyration as the core approaches the disk edge.

  18. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented. PMID:27250421

  19. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  20. Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

    Mineral dust particles are a major component of tropospheric aerosol mass and affect regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Dust particles experience heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric gases that alter the gas and particle-phase chemistry. These in turn influence the warm and cold cloud nucleation ability and optical properties of the dust particles. This dissertation investigates the atmospheric chemistry of mineral dust particles and their role in warm cloud nucleation through a combination of synergistic field measurements, laboratory experiments, and theoretical modeling. In-situ measurements made with a single-particle mass spectrometer during the ACE-Asia field campaign in 2001 provide the motivation for this work. The observed mixing state of the individual ambient particles with secondary organic and inorganic components is described in Chapter 2. A large Asian dust storm occurred during the campaign and produced dramatic changes in the aerosol's composition and mixing state. The effect of particle size and mineralogy on the atmospheric processing of individual dust particles is explored in Chapters 3 & 4. Sulfate was found to accumulate preferentially in submicron iron and aluminosilicate-rich dust particles, while nitrate and chloride were enriched in supermicron calcite-rich dust. The mineral dust (and sea salt particles) were also enriched in oxalic acid, the dominant component of water soluble organic carbon. Chapter 5 explores the roles of gas-phase photochemistry and partitioning of the diacids to the alkaline particles in producing this unique behavior. The effect of the dust's mixing state with secondary organic and inorganic components on the dust particles' solubility, hygroscopicity, and thus warm cloud nucleation properties is explored experimentally and theoretically in Chapter 6. Cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activation curves revealed that while calcium nitrate and calcium chloride particles were very hygroscopic

  1. The origin of low mass particles within and beyond the dust coma envelopes of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Ksanfomality, L. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements from the Dust Counter and Mass Analyzer (DUCMA) instruments on VEGA-1 and -2 revealed unexpected fluxes of low mass (up to 10 to the minus 13th power g) dust particles at very great distances from the nucleus (300,000 to 600,000 km). These particles are detected in clusters (10 sec duration), preceded and followed by relatively long time intervals during which no dust is detected. This cluster phenomenon also occurs inside the envelope boundaries. Clusters of low mass particles are intermixed with the overall dust distribution throughout the coma. The clusters account for many of the short-term small-scale intensity enhancements previously ascribed to microjets in the coma. The origin of these clusters appears to be emission from the nucleus of large conglomerates which disintegrate in the coma to yield clusters of discrete, small particles continuing outward to the distant coma.

  2. Toward a complete inventory of stratospheric dust particles with implications and their classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.; Mckay, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    As the Earth travels about the Sun it continuously sweeps up material laying in its path. The material includes dust-sized fragments of the meteors, comets and asteroids that have passed by as well as much older particles from out between the stars. These grains first become caught in the mesosphere and then slowly pass down through the stratosphere and the troposphere, finally raining down upon the Earth's surface. In the stratosphere the cosmic dust particles encounter increasing amounts of contaminants from the Earth. At the highest reaches of Earth's atmosphere these contaminants consists mainly of dust from the most explosive volcanoes, rocket exhaust, and other manmade space debris. In the troposphere windborne particles and pollen become an increasingly larger fraction of the atmospheric dust load. An increased knowledge of the nature of cosmic particles is suggested.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  4. Impact of radiatively interactive dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 climate model: Sensitivity to dust particle shape and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward P.; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The radiative effects of Saharan dust aerosols are investigated in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. A sectional aerosol microphysics model (CARMA) is run online in GEOS-5. CARMA treats the dust aerosol lifecycle, and its tracers are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5. A series of AMIP-style simulations are performed, in which input dust optical properties (particle shape and refractive index) are varied. Simulated dust distributions for summertime Saharan dust compare well to observations, with best results found when the most absorbing dust optical properties are assumed. Dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increased dust lofting to higher altitudes, and a strengthening of the African easterly jet, resulting in increased dust atmospheric lifetime and farther northward and westward transport. We find a positive feedback of dust radiative forcing on emissions, in contrast with previous studies, which we attribute to our having a relatively strong longwave forcing caused by our simulating larger effective particle sizes. This longwave forcing reduces the magnitude of midday net surface cooling relative to other studies, and leads to a nighttime warming that results in higher nighttime wind speeds and dust emissions. The radiative effects of dust particle shape have only minor impact on transport and emissions, with small (~5%) impact on top of atmosphere shortwave forcing, in line with previous studies, but relatively more pronounced effects on shortwave atmospheric heating and surface forcing (~20% increase in atmospheric forcing for spheroids). Shape effects on longwave heating terms are of order ~10%.

  5. Particle size effect for metal pollution analysis of atmospherically deposited dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rajhi, M. A.; Al-Shayeb, S. M.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    The metallic compositions of 231 atmospherically deposited dust samples obtained from widely-differing environments in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia, have been investigated in relation to the particle size distributions. Sample data are presented which show that particle size classification is very important when analysing dust samples for atmospheric metal pollution studies. By cross-correlation and comparison, it was found that the best way to express the results of the metal concentration trend was as an average of particle ratios. Correlations between the six metals studied, namely Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Li, were found for every particle size (eight categories) and reveal that the metal concentrations increased as the particle size decreased. On the basis of this work, it is strongly recommended that future international standards for metal pollutants in atmospherically deposited dusts should be based on particle size fractions.

  6. Solar Heating of Suspended Particles and the Dynamics of Martian Dust Devils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    The heat input to Martian dust devils due to solar warming of suspended particles is assessed based on a prior estimate of dust loading and from an analysis of shadows cast by dust devils in images taken from orbit. Estimated values for solar heating range from 0.12 to 0.57 W/m3 with associated temperature increases of 0.011 to 0.051(deg)C per second. These warming rates are comparable to the adiabatic cooling rate expected for a gas parcel rising on Mars with a vertical velocity of 10 m/s. Solar warming of suspended dust serves to maintain buoyancy in a rising dust plume and may be one cause for the large scale of dust devils observed on Mars.

  7. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-08-01

    The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s-1) particles.

  8. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo‐Sánchez, J. D.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s−1) particles. PMID:27478282

  9. Interparticle Forces Between Dust Particles Confined within a Glass Box in a GEC Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Hyde, Truell; Matthews, Lorin; Qiao, Ke; Zhang, Zhuanhao; Harris, Brandon; Shetler, Gary; Rapp, Steve; Schmoke, Jimmy; Cook, Mike

    2009-11-01

    The additional confinement provided by a glass box placed on the lower electrode of a GEC rf reference cell easily allows the generation of individual long vertical dust chains. This extended 1D vertical dust structure is ideal for the investigation of dust crystal vertical dispersion relations. It can also be used as a probe to allow the investigation of plasma parameters within the sheath. In this work, the oscillation spectrum of an extended 1D dust particle chain, driven through the addition of an external DC bias applied to the lower electrode, was examined. The vertical oscillation spectrum obtained using this experimental setup will be discussed and shown to exhibit significant differences as compared to the spectrum obtained for a dust particle pair without the glass box confinement.

  10. Charging of dust particles in an illuminated open complex plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the charging of dust particles in a dusty plasma, irradiated by white light in near space at satellite altitudes. In deference to the recent emphasis on the character of openness in a dusty plasma, the investigation is based on the balance of the number density and energy of electrons, ions, and neutral particles as well as the energy balance of the dust particles and the charge neutrality condition. The accretion of electrons/ions and the emission of electrons by the dust particles, the ionization of neutral particles and the recombination of electrons and ions, and binary collisions between electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are the processes considered herein; the energy exchange associated with these processes has also been considered. The formulation is applicable to dusty plasmas in space and laboratory, where the photoemission of electrons is the dominant mechanism for electron generation. As an illustration a parametric study of the charging of the dust of Cs (cesium) coated bronze, LaB{sub 6}, and CeO{sub 2}, illuminated by solar radiation in a plasma environment, characteristic of day time ionosphere at an altitude of 150 km has been made. The theory is valid when the mean free path of electrons for accretion by the dust particles is less than the dimensions of the dust clouds.

  11. On the effect of dust particles on global cloud condensation nuclei and cloud droplet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  12. On the Effect of Dust Particles on Global Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Cloud Droplet Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  13. Note: Electrostatic detection of stainless steel dust particles for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Landy, P.; Skinner, C. H.; Schneider, H.

    2014-03-15

    Dust accumulation inside next-step fusion devices poses a significant safety concern and dust diagnostics will be needed to assure safe operations. An electrostatic dust detection device has been successfully demonstrated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, Tore Supra, and the Large Helical Device, and the detector's response to carbon particles was previously characterized in laboratory experiments. This paper presents laboratory results showing that detection of stainless steel particles at levels as low as several μg/cm{sup 2} is also possible.

  14. Porosity of an Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, M. M.; Thomas, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Determination of the density and porosity of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) is important in the dynamics of collisional and orbital evolution of small-sized particles. These measurements are also useful to suggest possible sources for IDPs based on comparisons with known extraterrestrial materials (e.g., chondrites). Previous work on IDPs shows a wide range of densities from very low (0.08 g/cm3 [1]) through low (0.3 g/cm3 [2]) to high (6.2 g/cm3 [3]), with an average density at 2.0 g/cm3 for 150 particles [2]. In another study, IDPs fall into two distinct density groups with mean values of 0.6 g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 [3]. In general, chondritic IDPs with lower density values most likely have appreciable porosity, suggesting they are primitive, uncompacted particles. It is believed that porosities greater than 70% are rare [2]. Sample In this study, porosity measurements were determined for one IDP, Clu17. This chondritic particle is a fragment of a large-sized IDP (L2008#5) known as a cluster particle. The cluster is composed of 53 fragments >5 micrometers in diameter; a detailed description of the cluster is given in [4]. IDP Clu17 has ~12 wt.% C and contains chondritic abundances (within 2xCI) for major elements. This fragment is dominated by fine-grained aggregates, also known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide [5]), and contains some olivine, pyroxene, Fe-Ni sulfides, and carbonaceous material. Methods IDP Clu17 was analyzed for light elements quantitatively analysis using scanning electron microscopy and thin-window energy dispersive spectrometry [details of technique in 4]. Following the initial bulk chemical analysis, the particle was embedded in epoxy, thin sectioned using an ultramicrotome, and examined with a JEOL 2000 FX transmission electron microscope. Many of the sections were not complete; individual grains in some sections are lost during microtoming. Photos from nine of the best sections were digitized by scanning at 1200 dpi. The

  15. Effect of turbulence on collisions of dust particles with planetesimals in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, H.; Guillot, T.; Bec, J.; Ormel, C. W.; Ida, S.; Tanga, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Planetesimals in gaseous protoplanetary disks may grow by collecting dust particles. Hydrodynamical studies show that small particles generally avoid collisions with the planetesimals because they are entrained by the flow around them. This occurs when St, the Stokes number, defined as the ratio of the dust stopping time to the planetesimal crossing time, becomes much smaller than unity. However, these studies have been limited to the laminar case, whereas these disks are believed to be turbulent. Aims: We want to estimate the influence of gas turbulence on the dust-planetesimal collision rate and on the impact speeds. Methods: We used three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of a fixed sphere (planetesimal) facing a laminar and turbulent flow seeded with small inertial particles (dust) subject to a Stokes drag. A no-slip boundary condition on the planetesimal surface is modeled via a penalty method. Results: We find that turbulence can significantly increase the collision rate of dust particles with planetesimals. For a high turbulence case (when the amplitude of turbulent fluctuations is similar to the headwind velocity), we find that the collision probability remains equal to the geometrical rate or even higher for St ≳ 0.1, i.e., for dust sizes an order of magnitude smaller than in the laminar case. We derive expressions to calculate impact probabilities as a function of dust and planetesimal size and turbulent intensity.

  16. Wind tunnel study of twelve dust samples by large particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannak, B.; Corsmeier, U.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Al-azab, T.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the lack of data by large dust and sand particle, the fluid dynamics characteristics, hence the collection efficiencies of different twelve dust samplers have been experimentally investigated. Wind tunnel tests were carried out at wind velocities ranging from 1 up to 5.5 ms-1. As a large solid particle of 0.5 and 1 mm in diameter, Polystyrene pellets called STYRO Beads or polystyrene sphere were used instead of sand or dust. The results demonstrate that the collection efficiency is relatively acceptable only of eight tested sampler and lie between 60 and 80% depending on the wind velocity and particle size. These samplers are: the Cox Sand Catcher (CSC), the British Standard Directional Dust Gauge (BSD), the Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE), the Suspended Sediment Trap (SUSTRA), the Modified Wilson and Cooke (MWAC), the Wedge Dust Flux Gauge (WDFG), the Model Series Number 680 (SIERRA) and the Pollet Catcher (POLCA). Generally they can be slightly recommended as suitable dust samplers but with collecting error of 20 up to 40%. However the BSNE verify the best performance with a catching error of about 20% and can be with caution selected as a suitable dust sampler. Quite the contrary, the other four tested samplers which are the Marble Dust Collector (MDCO), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Inverted Frisbee Sampler (IFS) and the Inverted Frisbee Shaped Collecting Bowl (IFSCB) cannot be recommended due to their very low collection efficiency of 5 up to 40%. In total the efficiency of sampler may be below 0.5, depending on the frictional losses (caused by the sampler geometry) in the fluid and the particle's motion, and on the intensity of airflow acceleration near the sampler inlet. Therefore, the literature data of dust are defective and insufficient. To avoid false collecting data and hence inaccurate mass flux modeling, the geometry of the dust sampler should be considered and furthermore improved.

  17. Dust particles from comets and asteroids collected at the Earth's orbit: Parent-daughter relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. A.; Zook, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The relative contributions of comets and asteroids to the reservoir of dust in the interplanetary medium is not well known. There are direct observations of dust released from comets and there is evidence to associate the IRAS dust bands with possible collisions of Asteroids in the main belt. It is believed that one may combine lab analysis of the physics and chemistry of captured particles with orbital data in order to identify comet and asteroid parent bodies. It is possible to use the collected orbits of the dust to connect with its source in two ways. One is to consider the long time orbit evolution of the dust under Poynting-Robertson drag. The other is to look at the prompt orbit change of dust from comets onto trajectories that intersect the earth's orbit. In order to characterize the orbits of dust particles evolved over a long period of time, a study of its orbital evolution was undertaken. Various parameters associated with these dust orbits as they cross the Earth's orbit were considered in order to see if one may discriminate between particles evolved from comets and asteroids. The method was to calculate by a numerical procedure the orbits of dust particles after they left their parent bodies. It appears that as the particles pass the Earth's orbit, asteroidal grains and cometary grains can be differentiated on the basis of their measured orbital eccentricities even after much planetary perturbation. Broad parent daughter associations can be made on this basis from measurement of their trajectories intercepted in earth orbit.

  18. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  19. Back-trajectory model of the Saharan dust flux and particle mass distribution in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, Albert; Resch, Francois; Afeti, George

    2013-06-01

    A back trajectory model of the Sahara dust flux toward the Gulf of Guinea has been studied. First, the atmospheric circulation over North and West Africa in winter is obtained by the backward trajectory plots with NOAA HYSPLIT to establish the winds responsible for the dust transport. The 'box' model derived by Resch et al. (2007) is used to develop the back trajectory model equations. The dust particle mass distributions at various locations traced back from Kumasi and Tamale to the Harmattan dust origin in the Chad basin can be obtained. The model is first tested with the particle mass concentrations at Tamale in Harmattan 2002 and 2005, which are easily deduced. Sample calculations are shown to illustrate the use of the model to estimate the particle mass concentration distributions at Kano and Maiduguri in Nigeria during the Harmattan 2002 and 2005.

  20. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  3. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  4. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  5. Latex allergens in tire dust and airborne particles.

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, A G; Cass, G R; Weiss, J; Glovsky, M M

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of latex allergy has increased dramatically in the last 15 years due to exposure to natural rubber products. Although historically this health risk has been elevated in hospital personnel and patients, a recent survey has indicated a significant potential risk for the general population. To obtain a wide-spread source for latex exposure, we have considered tire debris. We have searched for the presence of latex allergens in passenger car and truck tire tread, in debris deposited from the atmosphere near a freeway, and in airborne particulate matter samples representative of the entire year 1993 at two sites in the Los Angeles basin (California). After extraction of the samples with phosphate buffered saline, a modified-ELISA inhibition assay was used to measure relative allergen potency and Western blot analyses were used to identify latex allergens. The inhibition studies with the human IgE latex assay revealed inhibition by the tire tread source samples and ambient freeway dust, as well as by control latex sap and latex glove extracts. Levels of extractable latex allergen per unit of protein extracted were about two orders of magnitude lower for tire tread as compared to latex gloves. Western blot analyses using binding of human IgE from latex-sensitive patients showed a band at 34-36 kDa in all tire and ambient samples. Long Beach and Los Angeles, California, air samples showed four additional bands between 50 and 135 kDa. Alternative Western blot analyses using rabbit IgG raised against latex proteins showed a broad band at 30-50 kDa in all samples, with additional bands in the urban air samples similar to the IgE results. A latex cross-reactive material was identified in mountain cedar. In conclusion, the latex allergens or latex cross-reactive material present in sedimented and airborne particulate material, derived from tire debris, and generated by heavy urban vehicle traffic could be important factors in producing latex allergy

  6. Clusters of the charged dust particles in a magnetic trap at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Statsenko, K. B.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of cryogenic colloid of charged particles in static magnetic traps was studied for the first time. We presented experimental results of formation of strongly correlated structures consisting of about 103 particles. Ordered structures were formed by particles with a diameter of 30-60 microns with a charge up to 107e. Estimates of mean interparticle distance, dust particle charges, coupling parameter and Lindemann parameter, which turned out to be typical for strongly coupled crystalline or glass-like systems.

  7. Composition of Dust Particles Collected in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Kissel, Jochen; Langevin, Yves; Briois, Christelle; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Rynö, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA) is a dust particle composition analyzing instrument onboard the ROSETTA spacecraft orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. COSIMA is collecting cometary particles on metal targets in the inner coma, identifies the collected particle on microscopic images and analyses their composition by secondary ion mass spectrometry. We will report on the high resolution mass spectra containing positive or negative ions of elements, organic molecules and molecular fragments originating from the cometary particle surfaces.

  8. Dust acoustic soliton and double layers with streaming dust and superthermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, S. Ali; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-07-01

    Dust acoustic waves are investigated in plasma system containing dynamic and streaming dust, supertherrmal electrons and ions. Linear and nonlinear studies are carried out and elaborated with the help of parameters taken for Saturn's F-ring. An energy integral equation is obtained by using the Sagdeev potential approach, and results are displayed by solving it analytically and numerically. The dependence of nonlinear structures on κ values, the ratio of electron to dust equilibrium densities μ ed , Mach number M, and dust streaming speed v d0 have been presented. The streaming speed appears as a destructive partner for the Mach number M in the pseudoenergy equation and hence plays a dominant modifying role in the formation of nonlinear structures. It plays a destructive role for some of the solitons and works as a source, for the emergence of new solitons (region). Formation of double layers are also investigated and shown that the amplitude, width and existence of double layers structures are predominantly affected by the presence of superthermal electrons, ions, and streaming dust beam.

  9. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust. PMID:19065389

  10. Investigation of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klemens, R.; Kapuscinski, M.; Wolinski, M.; Wolanski, P. . Instytut Techniki Cieplnej); Sichel, M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles are presented. Tests were carried out using a vertical detonation tube, and direct streak pictures showing the flame acceleration and pressure and temperature records were obtained. Flax dust, dispersed in an oxygen atmosphere, was used as the fuel, and two kinds of quartz sand were introduced as nonreacting particles. It was found that addition of inert particles caused a linear decrease of the detonation wave velocity but had no special influence on the transition distance. Calculations using the Gordon McBride Code showed that propagation of the detonation wave in a dust-oxygen mixture requires that the dust particles burnout at a level of about 70% but addition of inert particles increased the necessary burnout level to over 80% (with a significant decrease of the detonation wave velocity). The aim of this work was to investigate the processes of flame self acceleration and transition to detonation in mixtures of organic dust with oxygen and to investigate the influence of chemically neutral particles (used as a flame inhibiting agent) on these processes.

  11. Laboratory Experiments with the Concordia College High-Speed Dust Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    During the Apollo Era, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center built a 2MeV high-speed, dust particle accelerator. This facility was used to test and calibrate the LEAM instrument which was flown to the lunar surface by Apollo 17. As the Apollo project wound down, NASA no longer had need of the dust particle accelerator, and in 1975, it was move to Concordia College in Moorhead, MN. Through the years, it has been maintained and some modifications and improvements have been made to it. In the past decade, the facility has been revived and used by several collaborating institutions to study dust detector instrumentation as well as the effects of dust impacts on various materials. We have tested a prototype, space-flight dust particle detector. Also, piezoelectric pins which can be used as dust detectors were studied to learn the pin's response to single particle impacts of different energies and momenta, and then those measured responses were compared with theoretical models. The effects of high speed impacts on ultra-high temperature ceramics, aerogel, and several different thin films have also been studied at our facility. The results of these experiments will be presented.

  12. Ballistic motion of dust particles in the Lunar Roving Vehicle dust trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Horányi, Mihály

    2012-05-01

    We have selected video images from the Apollo 16 mission and analyzed the motion of dust clouds kicked up by the wheels of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). Applying the equations of ballistic motion, we estimate both the velocity of the dust and the gravitational field strength at the lunar surface. From measurements of the rotation of an LRV wheel, we estimate the speed of the LRV. Such exercises can be useful when discussing ballistic trajectories and angular motion in a high school or introductory level college physics class.

  13. On saturation of betatron acceleration of dust particles behind shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukova, L. V.; Prudskikh, V. V.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2010-01-01

    Possible saturation of betatron acceleration of dust particles behind strong shock fronts from supernovae is considered. It is argued that the efficiency of the nonthermal dust destruction should be substantially lower than the value estimated from a traditional description of betatron acceleration of dust grains behind radiative shock waves. The inhibition of the nonthermal destruction can be connected with the mirror instability developed in the dust component behind strong shocks with the velocity 3 times exceeding the Alfvén speed. The instability develops on characteristic time scales much shorter than the age of a supernova remnant, thus its influence on the efficiency of dust destruction can be substantial: in the range of shock velocities 100 km s-1 < ν s < 300 km s-1 the destruction efficiency can be an order of magnitude lower that normally estimated.

  14. Interplanetary dust - Trace element analysis of individual particles by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although micrometeorites of cometary origin are thought to be the dominant component of interplanetary dust, it has never been possible to positively identify such micrometer-sized particles. Two such particles have been identified as definitely micrometeorites since their abundances of volatile and nonvolatile trace elements closely match those of primitive solar system material.

  15. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1986-01-01

    An understanding of carbonaceous matter in primitive extraterrestrial materials is an essential component of studies on dust evolution in the interstellar medium and the early history of the Solar System. Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) on carbonaceous material in two Chondritic Porous (CP) aggregrates is presented. The study suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may also be preserved in these materials.

  16. Development of a Charged Particle Detector for Windborne Martian Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Mantovani, J. G.; Groop, E. E.; Buehler, M. G.; Buhler, C. R.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of an aerodynamic electrometer to measure the electrostatic properties of Martian atmospheric dust has been constructed. The instrument will enable a more thorough understanding of the potential for electrostatic discharge of different materials on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Comparison of Morphologies of Apollo 17 Dust Particles with Lunar Simulant, JSC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Hill, Eddy; Kihm, Kenneth D.; Day, James D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar dust (< 20 microns) makes up approx.20 wt.% of the lunar soil. Because of the abrasive and adhering nature of lunar soil, a detailed knowledge of the morphology (size, shape and abundance) of lunar dust is important for dust mitigation on the Moon. This represents a critical step towards the establishment of long-term human presence on the Moon (Taylor et al. 2005). Machinery design for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on the Moon also requires detailed information on dust morphology and general physical/chemical characteristics. Here, we report a morphological study of Apollo 17 dust sample 70051 and compare it to lunar soil stimulant, JSC-1. W e have obtained SEM images of dust grains from sample 70051 soil (Fig. 1). The dust grains imaged are composed of fragments of minerals, rocks, agglutinates and glass. Most particles consist largely of agglutinitic impact glass with their typical vesicular textures (fine bubbles). All grains show sub-angular to angular shapes, commonly with sharp edges, common for crushed glass fragments. There are mainly four textures: (1) ropey-textured pieces (typical for agglutinates), (2) angular shards, (3) blocky bits, and (4) Swiss-cheese grains. This last type with its high concentration of submicron bubbles, occurs on all scales. Submicron cracks are also present in most grains. Dust-sized grains of lunar soil simulant, JSC-1, were also studied. JSC-1 is a basaltic tuff with relatively high glass content (approx.50%; McKay et al. 1994). It was initially chosen in the early 90s to approximate the geotechnical properties of the average lunar soil (Klosky et al. 1996). JSC-1 dust grains also show angular blocky and shard textures (Fig. 2), similar to those of lunar dust. However, the JSC-1 grains lack the Swiss-cheese textured particles, as well as submicron cracks and bubbles in most grains.

  18. Dynamic Behavior of Nano-Size Dust Particles in a Magnetic Field Channel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Park, Haewoo; Jo, Youngmin

    2016-05-01

    Removal of very small dust from indoor public spaces, such as metro subway stations, is a challenge. A large proportion of subway dust, particularly that of submicron sizes, contains iron compounds. This study sought to understand the dynamic behavior of such fine iron dust in a magnetic field. The computer aided fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation revealed that the design and configuration of a rectangular flow channel with magnets determine the dynamic motion of particles. An attractive magnetic emitter arrangement produced higher magnetic flux density than a repulsive arrangement. Additional ferromagnetic wire mesh inserted into the duct channel could provide a more systematic magnetic field and collect more dust. The field gradient for 0.3 mm thick wire was more than twice that of 0.5 mm wire. The provision of a magnetic field could contribute a 20% increase in 100 nm particle collection and an increase of 5% in 10 nm. PMID:27483753

  19. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Craven, Paul D.; Spann, James F.; Tankosic, Dragana; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamics balance has been developing at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting a variety of experimental, of astrophysical interest. The objective of this research is to employ this innovative experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of cosmic grains of 0.2-10 micron size in a chamber with controlled pressure/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to investigate the microphysics of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. These measurements will provide the much-needed photoelectric emission data relating to individual particles as opposed to that for the bulk materials available so far. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles obtained by irradiating the particles with radiation from tunable infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. Specifically, the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1-25 micron spectral region will be determined. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The increase in the mass or m/q ratio due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data wild permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Preliminary results based on photoelectric emission experiments on 0.2-6.6 micron

  20. Transport control of dust particles via the electrical asymmetry effect: experiment, simulation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Shinya; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-06-01

    The control of the spatial distribution of micrometre-sized dust particles in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges is relevant for research and applications. Typically, dust particles in plasmas form a layer located at the sheath edge adjacent to the bottom electrode. Here, a method of manipulating this distribution by the application of a specific excitation waveform, i.e. two consecutive harmonics, is discussed. Tuning the phase angle θ between the two harmonics allows one to adjust the discharge symmetry via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE). An adiabatic (continuous) phase shift leaves the dust particles at an equilibrium position close to the lower sheath edge. Their levitation can be correlated with the electric field profile. By applying an abrupt phase shift the dust particles are transported between both sheaths through the plasma bulk and partially reside at an equilibrium position close to the upper sheath edge. Hence, the potential profile in the bulk region is probed by the dust particles providing indirect information on plasma properties. The respective motion is understood by an analytical model, showing both the limitations and possible ways of optimizing this sheath-to-sheath transport. A classification of the transport depending on the change in the dc self-bias is provided, and the pressure dependence is discussed.

  1. COSIMA - Composition and morphology of dust particles from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Rita; Hilchenbach, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Since August 2014, the ROSETTA spacecraft has been escorting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko along its orbit around the Sun. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA) is the instrument onboard ROSETTA that determines the composition of comet dust. COSIMA is collecting the dust particles in the inner coma onto metal targets, identifies the individual particles on microscopic images and analyses their composition by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The particle collection commenced when the comet was at a pre-perihelion distance of about 3.6 AU and has continued ever since. Thousands of particles have been collected. Moreover, samples of dust particles are available that have been collected at different positions along the pre- and post-perihelion orbit. This permits to study the comet dust properties not just as a snapshot in time, but also in view to how the compositional and physical properties have evolved as the comet moved towards perihelion and now back into the outer solar system. An overview will be given on the results obtained so far by COSIMA in view to compositional and morphological dust analysis.

  2. Atmospheric aging of dust ice nucleating particles - a combined laboratory and field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Yvonne; Rodríguez, Sergio; García, M. Isabel; Linke, Claudia; Schnaiter, Martin; Zipori, Assaf; Crawford, Ian; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Sierau, Berko

    2016-04-01

    We present INP data measured in-situ at two mostly free tropospheric locations: the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ) in the Swiss Alps, located at 3580 m above sea level (asl) and the Izaña observatory on Tenerife, off the West African shore (2373 m asl). INP concentrations were measured online with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, PINC, at the Jungfraujoch in the winters of 2012, 2013 and 2014 and at Izaña in the summers of 2013 and 2014. Each measurement period lasted between 2 to 6 weeks. During summer, Izaña is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to Saharan dust events. Saharan dust also reaches the Jungfraujoch mainly during spring. For offline ice nucleation analysis in the laboratory under similar thermodynamic conditions, airborne dust was collected a) at Izaña with a cyclone directly from the air and b) collected from the surface of the Aletsch glacier close to the JFJ after deposition. Supporting measurements of aerosol particle size distributions and fluorescence were conducted at both locations, as well as cloud water isotope analysis at the Jungfraujoch and aerosol chemistry at Izaña. For both locations the origin of the INPs was investigated with a focus on dust and biological particles using back trajectories and chemical signature. Results show that dust aerosol is the dominant INP type at both locations at a temperature of 241 K. In addition to Saharan dust, also more local, basaltic dust is found at the Jungfraujoch. Biological particles are not observed to play a role for ice nucleation in clouds during winter at Jungfraujoch but are enriched in INP compared to the total aerosol at Izaña also during dust events. The comparison of the laboratory and the field measurements at Izaña indicates a good reproducibility of the field data by the collected dust samples. Field and laboratory data of the dust samples from both locations show that the dust arriving at JFJ is less ice nucleation active

  3. Dust survey following the final shutdown of TEXTOR: metal particles and fuel retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna-Zaleśna, E.; Weckmann, A.; Grzonka, J.; Rubel, M.; Esser, H. G.; Freisinger, M.; Kreter, A.; Sergienko, G.; Ström, P.

    2016-02-01

    The work presents results of a broad TEXTOR dust survey in terms of its composition, structure, distribution and fuel content. The dust particles were collected after final shutdown of TEXTOR in December 2013. Fuel retention, as determined by thermal desorption, varied significantly, even by two orders of magnitude, dependent on the dust location in the machine. Dust structure was examined by means of scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Several categories of dust have been identified. Carbon-based stratified and granular deposits were dominating, but the emphasis in studies was on metal dust. They were found in the form of small particles, small spheres, flakes and splashes which formed ‘comet’-like structures, clearly indicating directional effects in the impact on surfaces of plasma-facing components. Nickel-rich alloys from the Inconel liner and iron-based ones from various diagnostic holders were the main components of metal-containing dust, but also molybdenum and tungsten debris were detected. Their origin is discussed.

  4. On Meteoric Dust Particles in the Near-Earth Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Farahani, Majid Mazraeh Ei; Mohebalhojeh, Ali R.; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Over 40 metric tons of meteoric dust enters the earth's atmosphere every day. This dust settles and creates natural dust layers in the altitude ranges between 80 and 100 kilometers which spans the earth's upper mesosphere to lower thermosphere. The dust layers in the lower atmosphere have a great impact on climate, human health as well as communication and navigation signals. The main goal of this study is the role of meteoric smoke particles on the formation of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). Recent rocket experiments have detected the presence of these particles. Since these dust layers are immersed in the earth's upper atmosphere, they become charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth's ionospheric plasma. Noctilucent Clouds NLCs are a fascinating visual manifestation of these dust layers. So-called Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs are radar echoes that are a direct consequence of the sub-visible charged dust that exists at altitudes above NLC regions. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) are strong echoes that have been typically observed in the frequency range from 50MHz to 1.3GHz and in the altitude about 85km. Unlike PMSE, Polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are less known. PMWE appear at a lower altitude and is weaker in comparison with PMSE. The focus of this study is on meteoric smoke particles and how they affect PMWE source region. Parameters associated with smoke dust particles such as size distribution, charging characteristics, density and positive or negative charge will be considered. The second part of this presentation will be on the effect of gravity waves on PMC. Full coupling to a turbulent neutral field with a statistical analysis will be discussed. Impact of a neutral turbulence driving field on small amplitude plasma fluctuations in such a configuration and some of the important consequences will be also presented. This has important consequences for electric field and potential measurements on rocket probes as

  5. Measuring the Dust Flux and Dust Particle Mass Distribution in the Saturn Rings with HRD Dust Instrument on the Cassini Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    In July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft will go into the Saturn orbit and start a 4 year intensive investigation of the planet itself, its multiple satellites and its rings with a multinational instrument payload. The High Rate Detectors (HRD) instrument provided by the Laboratory of Astrophysics and Space Research of the University of is part of the German Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and its main scientific objective is to provide quantitative measurements and mass distributions of dust particles in the rings of Saturn in the 10-11 to 10-4 grams mass range. The HRD instrument consists of two dust detectors -- a 20 and a 200 cm2 polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors -- and an electronic box that contains all the analog and digital electronics and in addition provides interface between the HRD and CDA instrument. The CDA stores all the HRD data in its memory and transmits the data to Earth. The HRD weighs 1.7 kg and consumes 1.8 W of power [1]. The HRD instrument was fully calibrated through the entire mass range using two dust particle accelerators at Heidelberg and Munich in Germany. The HRD electronics is very fast and it will provide spatial and time distributions of up to 0.1 second. It can handle rates up to 104 counts/sec expected to be encountered during the Saturn ring crossings without any dead time. The HRD instrument operated successfully during all of the time that it was under power and detected many interplanetary dust particles. Almost all of these particles were close to the lowest mass threshold. References 1 A.J. TUZZOLINO, T.E. ECONOMOU, R.B. MCKIBBEN, J.A. SIMPSON, J.A.M. MCDONNELL, M.J. BURCHELL, B.A.M. VAUGHAN, P. TSOU, M.S. HANNER, B.C. CLARK AND D.E. BROWNLEE. THE DUST FLUX MONITOR INSTRUMENT FOR THE STARDUST MISSION TO COMET WILD-2, J. GEOPHYS. RES., 108, DOI:10.1029/2003JE002091, 2003.

  6. Trajectory-capture cell instrumentation for measurement of dust particle mass, velocity and trajectory, and particle capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detector for space missions--such as the Halley Comet Missions where the impact velocity was very high as well as for missions where the impact velocity is low was extended to include: (1) the capability for impact position determination - i.e., x,y coordinate of impact; and (2) the capability for particle velocity determination using two thin PVDF sensors spaced a given distance apart - i.e., by time-of-flight. These developments have led to space flight instrumentation for recovery-type missions, which will measure the masses (sizes), fluxes and trajectories of incoming dust particles and will capture the dust material in a form suitable for later Earth-based laboratory measurements. These laboratory measurements would determine the elemental, isotopic and mineralogical properties of the captured dust and relate these to possible sources of the dust material (i.e., comets, asteroids), using the trajectory information. The instrumentation described here has the unique advantages of providing both orbital characteristics and physical and chemical properties--as well as possible origin--of incoming dust.

  7. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-11-01

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived κ values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had κ~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had κ=0.001. SD (κ=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (κ=0.007) and ATD (κ=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of

  8. The dynamics of submicron-sized dust particles lost from Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Tatrallyay, M.; Juhasz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of submicron-sized dielectric particles lost from the Martian moon Phobos are studied in connection with the possible detection of dust by the Phobos 2 spacecraft. The motion of these small dust grains is influenced not only by gravity but also by solar radiation pressure and electromagnetic forces. The plasma environment of Mars is described by applying a hybrid gasdynamic-cometary model. Some of the submicron-sized grains ejected at speeds on the order of a few tens meters per second can stay in orbit around Mars for several months forming a nonuniform and time-dependent dust halo.

  9. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  10. Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome; Berg, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles caused by a coating of nitric acid are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coatings on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the ice nucleation ability of Arizona Test Dust, illite, K-feldspar, and quartz as a function of temperature (-25°C to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75% to 110%). The particles (bare or nitric acid coated) were size selected at 250 nm, and the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and saturation conditions was determined. All of the dust species nucleated ice at subsaturated conditions, although the coated particles (except quartz) showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability relative to bare particles. However, at supersaturated conditions, bare and coated particles had nearly equivalent ice nucleation characteristics. The results of a single-column model showed that simulated ice crystal number concentrations are mostly dependent upon the coated particle fraction, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and competition among ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, coatings were observed to modify ice-cloud properties, and the complexity of ice-cloud and mixed-phase-cloud evolution when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms compete for fixed water vapor budgets was supported.