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Sample records for h1 nmr spectroscopy

  1. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.); Wind, Robert A.)

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  2. Dynamic High-Resolution H-1 and P-31 NMR Spectroscopy and H-1 T-2 Measurements in Postmortem Rabbit Muscles Using Slow Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Andersen, Henrik J.

    2004-05-05

    Postmortem changes in rabbit muscle tissue with different glycogen status (normal vs low) were followed continuously from 13 min postmortem until 8 h postmortem and again 20 h postmortem using simultaneous magic angle spinning 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy together with measurement of the transverse relaxation time, T2, of the muscle water. The 1H metabolite spectra were measured using the phase-altered spinning sidebands (PASS) technique at a spinning rate of 40 Hz. pH values calculated from the 31P NMR spectra using the chemical shifts of the C-6 line of histidine in the 1H spectra and the chemical shifts of inorganic phosphate in the 31P spectra confirmed the different muscle glycogen status in the tissues. High-resolution 1H spectra obtained from the PASS technique revealed the presence of a new resonance line at 6.8 ppm during the postmortem period, which were absent in muscles with low muscle glycogen content. This new resonance line may originate from the aminoprotons in creatine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH effect on the exchange rate between the amino and the water protons and thereby the NMR visibility. Alternatively, the new resonance line may originate from the aromatic protons in tyrosine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH-induced protein unfolding exposing hydrophobic amino acid residues to the aqueous environment. Further studies are needed to evaluate these hypotheses. Finally, distributed analysis of the water T2 relaxation data revealed three relaxation populations and an increase in the population believed to reflect extramyofibrillar water through the postmortem period. This increase was significantly reduced (p < 0.0001) in samples from animals with low muscle glycogen content, indicating that the pH is controlling the extent of postmortem expulsion of water from myofibrillar structures. The significance of the postmortem increase in the amount extramyofibrillar water on the water-holding capacity was verified by centrifugation, which showed a reduced centrifugation loss in muscles with low preslaughter glycogen status (0.9 vs 1.9%, p 0.07).

  3. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  4. Extended hopane derivatives in sediments - Identification by H-1 NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J.; Wardroper, A. M. K.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sedimentary C32 hopanoic acid, one of the most abundant in nature and of probable bacterial origin, has been isolated for the first time as a single component and characterized by H-1 NMR. The 17 alpha H, 21 beta H configuration of the C31 alkane has been similarly confirmed.

  5. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  6. Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy Nicholas J. Anthis and G. Marius Clore resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as long as the dark state is in dynamic equilibrium with an NMR biology techniques, in particular X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  7. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  8. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  9. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I?1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  10. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of [Ga( phen)(H 1.5PO 4) 2]·H 2O and [Ga( phen)(HPO 4)(H 2PO 4)]·1.5H 2O ( phen=1, 10-phenanthroline), two organic-inorganic hybrid compounds with 1-D chain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen-Jung; Chang, Pai-Ching; Kao, Hsien-Ming; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2005-12-01

    Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, [Ga(phen)(H1.5PO4)2]·H2O (1) and [Ga(phen)(HPO4)(H2PO4)]·1.5H2O (2) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Their structures consist of 1-D chains of strictly alternating GaO4N2 octahedra and phosphate tetrahedra. The phen ligands in both compounds bind in a bidentate fashion to the gallium atoms and the 1-D structures extend into 3-D supramolecular arrays via ?-? stacking interactions of phen ligands and hydrogen bonds. 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy was applied to study the deuterated sample of 1 which contains very short hydrogen bonds with an O⋯O distance of 2.406(2) Å. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15), a=11.077(1) Å, b=21.496(2) Å, c=7.9989(7) Å, ?=127.211(2)°, and Z=4. The crystal symmetry is the same for 2 as for 1 except a=27.555(2) Å, b=6.3501(5) Å, c=21.327(2) Å, ?=122.498(1)°, and Z=8.

  12. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  13. "Shim pulses" for NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Topgaard, Daniel; Martin, Rachel W; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A; Pines, Alexander

    2004-12-21

    A way to use adiabatic radiofrequency pulses and modulated magnetic-field gradient pulses, together constituting a "shim pulse," for NMR spectroscopy and imaging is demonstrated. These pulses capitalize on phase shifts derived from probe gradient coils to compensate for nonlinear intrinsic main magnetic field homogeneity for spectroscopy, as well as for deviations from linear gradients for imaging. This approach opens up the possibility of exploiting cheaper, less-than-perfect magnets and gradient coils for NMR applications. PMID:15591105

  14. “Shim pulses” for NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Topgaard, Daniel; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A way to use adiabatic radiofrequency pulses and modulated magnetic-field gradient pulses, together constituting a “shim pulse,” for NMR spectroscopy and imaging is demonstrated. These pulses capitalize on phase shifts derived from probe gradient coils to compensate for nonlinear intrinsic main magnetic field homogeneity for spectroscopy, as well as for deviations from linear gradients for imaging. This approach opens up the possibility of exploiting cheaper, less-than-perfect magnets and gradient coils for NMR applications. PMID:15591105

  15. NMR Spectroscopy DOI: 10.1002/anie.201210070

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    NMR Spectroscopy DOI: 10.1002/anie.201210070 Multiple Parallel 2D NMR Acquisitions in a Single Scan the boundary separating magnetic resonance imaging from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with all other advances of contemporary NMR spectroscopy promises to open even further synergies in terms

  16. Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805612

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805612 Single-Scan 2D Hadamard NMR, are described. 2D NMR spectroscopy probes molecular structure and dynamics by correlating shifts along acquisitions into a single scan.[3] Single- scan 2D NMR spectroscopy replaces the indirect-domain time variable

  17. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  18. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  19. H-1 NMR study of ternary ammonia-alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Fronko, R. M.; Resing, H. A.; Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    For the first-stage ternary ammonia-alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds M(NH3)(x)C24(x of about 4, M = K, Rb, Cs), three sets of triplet H-1 NMR spectral lines have been observed at various temperatures and orientations due to the H-1 - H-1 and N-14 - H-1 dipolar interactions. The structures of these compounds have been inferred as mobile (liquid-like) intercalant layers of planar M(NH3)4 ions in between the carbon layers. For the intercalated ammonia molecules, the potential barrier is about 0.2 eV and the molecular geometry is very close to the free NH3 in gas phase.

  20. Communication Ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy using a continuous spatial

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Communication Ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy using a continuous spatial encoding of the spin by ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy. It is found that when dealing with 2D NMR experiments involving a t1 NMR spectra within a single scan is introduced and illustrated. The approach relies on applying a pair

  1. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  2. Rapid 3D MAS NMR Spectroscopy at Critical Sensitivity

    E-print Network

    Matsuki, Yoh

    Sensitive SIFTing: Multidimensional non-uniform sampling (NUS) NMR spectroscopy is extended to the severely sensitivity-limited regime typical of MAS NMR of biomacromolecules by the use of spectroscopy by the integration ...

  3. Study of Paramagnetic Chromocenes by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Bluemel, Janet

    Study of Paramagnetic Chromocenes by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Janet Blu¨mel,* Martin Herker-state NMR spectroscopy to polycrystalline paramagnetic sand- wich compounds was tested for chromocene (Cp2Cr to both topics prompted us to further explore solid-state NMR spectroscopy and to select chromocenes

  4. Spatially resolved multidimensional NMR spectroscopy within a single scan

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Spatially resolved multidimensional NMR spectroscopy within a single scan Yoav Shrot and Lucio where the potential of spatially resolved ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy is brought to bear are presented. All rights reserved. Keywords: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 2D 1 H NMR; Spatial localization

  5. Ultrafast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy using constant acquisition gradients

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Ultrafast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy using constant acquisition gradients Yoav Shrot NMR spectroscopy plays an important role in the characterization of molecular structure and dynamics for clinical diagnosis within the context of in vivo NMR spectroscopy.1­3 The information content of multidimen

  6. Quantitative H-1 NMR Analysis of Chemical Stabilities in Anion-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, SA; Hickner, MA

    2013-01-01

    We compared the alkaline stability of three classes of anion exchange membranes that are leading candidates for applications in platinum-free fuel cells. A methodology is presented for the study of chemical stability of anion-exchange polymers in alkaline media that provides clear and quantitative H-1 NMR spectroscopic data of dissolved polymers containing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities. Recent studies have investigated the stabilities of benzimidazolium- and alkylimidazolium-bearing polymers using periodic H-1 NMR sampling. These studies included varying alkaline concentrations, external heating sources, and excessive processing and contained no internal standard for absolute measurements. Key aspects of our time-resolved H-1 NMR method include in situ heating and sampling within the spectrometer, fixed Stoichiometric relationships between the benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities of each polymer and potassium deuteroxide (KOD), and the incorporation of an internal standard for the absolute measurement of the polymer degradation. In addition, our method permits the identification of the degradation products to find the underlying cause of chemical lability. Our results demonstrate that a styrene-based polymer containing benzyltrimethylammonium functional groups is remarkably stable when exposed to 20 equivalents per cation of KOD at 80 degrees C with a half-life (t(1/2)) of 231 h. Under these standard conditions, functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) and poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers, both bearing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities were found to degrade with a half-lives of 57.8 and 2.7 h, respectively.

  7. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  8. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26249041

  9. NMR Spectroscopy Hot Paper DOI: 10.1002/anie.201407869

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    NMR Spectroscopy Hot Paper DOI: 10.1002/anie.201407869 HyperBIRD: A Sensitivity-Enhanced Approach to Collecting Homonuclear-Decoupled Proton NMR Spectra** Kevin J. Donovan and Lucio Frydman* Dedicated to Prof dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enable the detection of NMR spectra from low-g nuclei with outstanding

  10. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips Dongwan Haa

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips Dongwan Haa , Jeffrey Paulsenb , Nan Sunc , Yi-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution applications of modern NMR spectros- copy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve

  11. Order Determinations in Liquid Crystals by Dynamic Director NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Order Determinations in Liquid Crystals by Dynamic Director NMR Spectroscopy Min Zhou, Veronica and preserve this order upon freezing or coagulation. NMR can play an important role in the design of LCP be reliably executed by analyzing the anisotropic displacements observed via natural abundance 13 C NMR,4

  12. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  13. Measuring Molecular Motion Using NMR Spectroscopy to Study Translational Diffusion

    E-print Network

    Loening, Niko

    1 Measuring Molecular Motion Using NMR Spectroscopy to Study Translational Diffusion Jennifer N This chapter demonstrates how to use NMR spectroscopy to measure the rate of translational diffusion. Once of translational diffusion to reveal how the viscosity of a solution varies with the concentration of the solutes

  14. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled ?’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the ? subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  15. Relaxation-Assisted Separation of Chemical Sites in NMR Spectroscopy of Static Solids

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Relaxation-Assisted Separation of Chemical Sites in NMR Spectroscopy of Static Solids Adonis sites in the NMR spectroscopy of powdered or disordered samples. This proposal is motivated when focusing on NMR observations of quadrupolar nuclei possessing different coordination and

  16. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species Stephen J. DeVience, Linh M, implanted with 2.5-keV 14 N+ ions and annealed at 900 C for 8 hours. The NV centre used for the NV NMR simulations. The ensemble Hahn-echo T2 was 3 µs. SiO2 structure: The diamond used for NV ensemble NMR imaging

  17. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  18. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  19. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  20. Localized in vivo13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, Rolf; Adriany, Gregor; Choi, In-Young; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Lei, Hongxia; Öz, Gülin

    2006-01-01

    Localized 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a new investigative tool for studying cerebral metabolism. The application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to living intact humans and animals presents the investigator with a number of unique challenges. This review provides in the first part a tutorial insight into the ingredients required for achieving a successful implementation of localized 13C NMR spectroscopy. The difficulties in establishing 13C NMR are the need for decoupling of the one-bond 13C–1H heteronuclear J coupling, the large chemical shift range, the low sensitivity and the need for localization of the signals. The methodological consequences of these technical problems are discussed, particularly with respect to (a) RF front-end considerations, (b) localization methods, (c) the low sensitivity, and (d) quantification methods. Lastly, some achievements of in vivo localized 13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain are reviewed, such as: (a) the measurement of brain glutamine synthesis and the feasibility of quantifying glutamatergic action in the brain; (b) the demonstration of significant anaplerotic fluxes in the brain; (c) the demonstration of a highly regulated malate-aspartate shuttle in brain energy metabolism and isotope flux; (d) quantification of neuronal and glial energy metabolism; and (e) brain glycogen metabolism in hypoglycemia in rats and humans. We conclude that the unique and novel insights provided by 13C NMR spectroscopy have opened many new research areas that are likely to improve the understanding of brain carbohydrate metabolism in health and disease. PMID:14679498

  1. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110?kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H?1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone. PMID:26153138

  2. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110?kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  3. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  4. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  5. Metabolism of human gliomas: Assessment with H-1 MR spectroscopy and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, J.R.; Frank, J.A.; Bizzi, A.; Fulham, M.J.; DeSouza, B.X.; Duhaney, M.O.; Inscoe, S.W.; Black, J.L.; van Zijl, P.C.; Moonen, C.T. , Bethesda, MD )

    1990-12-01

    Localized hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) were employed to obtain metabolic information from intracranial gliomas. Advantages and difficulties associated with comparison of results from the two modalities were realized. Forty patients were studied with H-1 MR spectroscopy. MR signal intensities from lactate, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine from a volume of interest containing the tumor and a contralateral volume were obtained and evaluated. NAA signal intensities were generally decreased in the tumor spectra, and choline signal intensities were elevated. H-1 MR spectroscopy was unsuccessful in eight patients, and FDG PET scans were not obtained in four of the patients with successful MR spectroscopic examinations. Lactate signal intensity was detected in 10 of the 28 patients who had successful H-1 MR spectroscopic and FDG PET studies. Lactate signal intensities were observed in lesions shown at FDG PET to be hypermetabolic, as well as in lesions found to be hypometabolic.

  6. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  7. Exposing the Moving Parts of Proteins with NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the dynamics of biomolecules since it provides a description of motion that is comprehensive, site-specific, and relatively non-invasive. In particular, the study of protein dynamics has benefited from sustained methodological advances in NMR that have expanded the scope and time scales of accessible motion. Yet, many of these advances may not be well known to the more general physical chemistry community. Accordingly, this Perspective provides a glimpse of some of the more powerful methods in liquid state NMR that are helping reshape our understanding of functional motions of proteins. PMID:22545175

  8. Solid-state 73Ge NMR spectroscopy of simple organogermanes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Margaret A; Sutrisno, Andre; Terskikh, Victor V; Baines, Kim M; Huang, Yining

    2012-10-22

    Germanium-73 is an extremely challenging nucleus to examine by NMR spectroscopy due to its unfavorable NMR properties. Through the use of an ultrahigh (21.1 T) magnetic field, a systematic study of a series of simple organogermanes was carried out. In those cases for which X-ray structural data were available, correlations were drawn between the NMR parameters and structural metrics. These data were combined with DFT calculations to obtain insight into the structures of several compounds with unknown crystal structures. PMID:23023927

  9. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species

    E-print Network

    Stephen J. DeVience; Linh M. Pham; Igor Lovchinsky; Alexander O. Sushkov; Nir Bar-Gill; Chinmay Belthangady; Francesco Casola; Madeleine Corbett; Huiliang Zhang; Mikhail Lukin; Hongkun Park; Amir Yacoby; Ronald L. Walsworth

    2014-06-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well-established techniques that provide valuable information in a diverse set of disciplines but are currently limited to macroscopic sample volumes. Here we demonstrate nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear species, using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond as sensors. With single, shallow NV centres in a diamond chip and samples placed on the diamond surface, we perform NMR spectroscopy and one-dimensional MRI on few-nanometre-sized samples containing $^1$H and $^{19}$F nuclei. Alternatively, we employ a high-density NV layer near the surface of a diamond chip to demonstrate wide-field optical NMR spectroscopy of nanoscale samples containing $^1$H, $^{19}$F, and $^{31}$P nuclei, as well as multi-species two-dimensional optical MRI with sub-micron resolution. For all diamond samples exposed to air, we identify a ubiquitous $^1$H NMR signal, consistent with a $\\sim 1$ nm layer of adsorbed hydrocarbons or water on the diamond surface and below any sample placed on the diamond. This work lays the foundation for nanoscale NMR and MRI applications such as studies of single proteins and functional biological imaging with subcellular resolution, as well as characterization of thin films with sub-nanometre resolution.

  10. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1?T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20?mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  11. September, 2004 (Adapted from Michael Sattler's Lectures at EMBL Heidelberg) Introduction to biomolecular NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Ritort, Felix

    which can provide high-resolution structures of biological molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids to biomolecular NMR spectroscopy Contents Introduction2 History ...................................................................................... 3 Methodological developments for structure determination by NMR ...........4 NMR in structural

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  13. Optimal control in NMR spectroscopy: Numerical implementation in SIMPSON Zdenek Tosner a,b,*, Thomas Vosegaard a

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    Optimal control in NMR spectroscopy: Numerical implementation in SIMPSON Zdenek Tosner a Revised 19 November 2008 Available online 8 December 2008 Keywords: Optimal control NMR spectroscopy Rf, quantum computation, and combinations between NMR and other spectroscopies. Optimal control enables

  14. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  15. Single-Scan NMR Spectroscopy at Arbitrary Dimensions Yoav Shrot and Lucio Frydman*

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Single-Scan NMR Spectroscopy at Arbitrary Dimensions Yoav Shrot and Lucio Frydman* Contribution and of multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.10-13 The first of these methodologies enabled the eventual extension of NMR resonance (NMR) provides one of the foremost analytical tools available to elucidate the structure

  16. Relaxation-Optimized NMR Spectroscopy of Methylene Groups in Proteins and Nucleic Acids

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Relaxation-Optimized NMR Spectroscopy of Methylene Groups in Proteins and Nucleic Acids Emeric that transverse-relaxation- optimized NMR spectroscopy (TROSY) methods can extend the application of NMR acids is of the methylene type. Their detailed study, however, in terms of structure and dynamics by NMR

  17. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species

    E-print Network

    DeVience, Stephen J; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well-established techniques that provide valuable information in a diverse set of disciplines but are currently limited to macroscopic sample volumes. Here we demonstrate nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear species, using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond as sensors. With single, shallow NV centres in a diamond chip and samples placed on the diamond surface, we perform NMR spectroscopy and one-dimensional MRI on few-nanometre-sized samples containing $^1$H and $^{19}$F nuclei. Alternatively, we employ a high-density NV layer near the surface of a diamond chip to demonstrate wide-field optical NMR spectroscopy of nanoscale samples containing $^1$H, $^{19}$F, and $^{31}$P nuclei, as well as multi-species two-dimensional optical MRI with sub-micron resolution. For all diamond samples exposed to air, we identify a ubiquitous $^1$H NMR signal, consistent with a ...

  18. Detection and characterization of serine and threonine hydroxyl protons in Bacillus circulans xylanase by NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    circulans xylanase by NMR spectroscopy Jacob A. Brockerman · Mark Okon · Lawrence P. McIntosh Received: 17 characterized in protein structures determined by both NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crys- tallography. In the case of NMR spectroscopy, this is in large part because hydroxyl proton signals are usually hidden under

  19. Full Length Vpu from HIV-1: Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations with NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Watts, Anthony

    Full Length Vpu from HIV-1: Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations with NMR Spectroscopy http state NMR spectroscopy (4), is combined with a structural model of the cytoplasmic domain, which was resolved by solution NMR spectroscopy (5, 6). Both models are then joined by superimposing overlapping

  20. Real-Time Monitoring of Chemical Transformations by Ultrafast 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Real-Time Monitoring of Chemical Transformations by Ultrafast 2D NMR Spectroscopy Maayan Gal, Mor spectra. And yet, over the years, the limitations of conventional 1D NMR spectroscopy to tackle complex is afforded by higher- dimensional NMR spectroscopy, which in either homo- or heteronuclear acquisition modes

  1. High-field localized 1 H NMR spectroscopy in the anesthetized and in

    E-print Network

    High-field localized 1 H NMR spectroscopy in the anesthetized and in the awake monkey Josef Localized cerebral in vivo 1 H NMR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed in the anesthetized as well as the awake-ml volumes. D 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: In vivo 1 H NMR spectroscopy; Short

  2. Analysis of Molecular Square Size and Purity via Pulsed-Field Gradient NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Analysis of Molecular Square Size and Purity via Pulsed-Field Gradient NMR Spectroscopy William H by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy, a technique that reports on self-diffusion coefficients spectroscopy.1 Notably, PFG-NMR has been used previously to analyze complex mixtures for environ- mental

  3. Human Cardiac High-Energy Phosphate Metabolite Concentrationsby ID-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Atalar, Ergin

    Human Cardiac High-Energy Phosphate Metabolite Concentrationsby ID-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy Paul A metabolite concentrations in humans with 1D re- solved surface-coil NMR spectroscopy. The metabolites are measured by phosphorus e'P) NMR spectroscopy, and the tissue water proton (lH) resonance from the same

  4. MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION OF NMR SPECTROSCOPY METABONOMIC DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with the EPA to evaluate and develop mathematical tools for analysis of the collected NMR spectroscopy data. Initially, we have focused on the use of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) also known as molecular factor analysis (MFA), a tech...

  5. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines--independent of their ability to crystallize-- and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies.

  6. Enhanced resolution and quantitation from `ultrahigh' eld NMR spectroscopy of glasses

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Enhanced resolution and quantitation from `ultrahigh' ®eld NMR spectroscopy of glasses Scott for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (e.g., 14.1 and 18.8 T) can enhance both resolution and sensitivity-®eld NMR can yield structural information not always available from NMR experiments of glasses at lower

  7. Principles and Demonstrations of Quantum Information Processing by NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    T. F. Havel; S. S. Somaroo; C. -H. Tseng; D. G. Cory

    1999-07-03

    This paper surveys our recent research on quantum information processing by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We begin with a geometric introduction to the NMR of an ensemble of indistinguishable spins, and then show how this geometric interpretation is contained within an algebra of multispin product operators. This algebra is used throughout the rest of the paper to demonstrate that it provides a facile framework within which to study quantum information processing more generally. The implementation of quantum algorithms by NMR depends upon the availability of special kinds of mixed states, called pseudo-pure states, and we consider a number of different methods for preparing these states, along with analyses of how they scale with the number of spins. The quantum-mechanical nature of processes involving such macroscopic pseudo-pure states also is a matter of debate, and in order to discuss this issue in concrete terms we present the results of NMR experiments which constitute a macroscopic analogue Hardy's paradox. Finally, a detailed product operator description is given of recent NMR experiments which demonstrate a three-bit quantum error correcting code, using field gradients to implement a precisely-known decoherence model.

  8. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Stephen J. DeVience,1,

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species Stephen J. DeVience,1, Linh M@cfa.harvard.edu; Corresponding author 1 arXiv:1406.3365v1[quant-ph]12Jun2014 #12;Abstract Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear

  9. Ultrafast 2D NMR Spectroscopy Using Sinusoidal Gradients: Principles and Ex Vivo Brain Investigations

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Ultrafast 2D NMR Spectroscopy Using Sinusoidal Gradients: Principles and Ex Vivo Brain TOCSY spectra; sinusoidal gradi- ents NMR spectroscopy has become an increasingly common toolD NMR spectra within a single scan was recently introduced. The re- sulting potential gain in time

  10. Preparation of Uniformly Isotope-labeled DNA Oligonucleotides for NMR Spectroscopy*

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Preparation of Uniformly Isotope-labeled DNA Oligonucleotides for NMR Spectroscopy* (Received and a double-stranded 17-mer DNA uniformly labeled with 15 N and 13 C. Recent advances in NMR spectroscopy have for the large scale preparation of uni- formly isotope-labeled DNA for NMR studies have been developed

  11. Sensitivity Enhancement in 1D Heteronuclear NMR Spectroscopy via Single-Scan Inverse

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Sensitivity Enhancement in 1D Heteronuclear NMR Spectroscopy via Single-Scan Inverse Experiments Mor Mishkovsky and Lucio Frydman*[a] Introduction NMR spectroscopy serves as an important tool for studying the structure and dynamics of molecules.[1] One-dimensional (1D) NMR in particular underlies

  12. Solid-state C-13 and H-1 NMR imaging stdies of the accelerated-sulfur cured high vinyl polybutadiene. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C NMR and [sup 1]H Imaging methods have been used to follow the progress of accelerated-sulfur vulcanization of unfilled high vinyl polybutadiene. Different NMR pulse sequences have been used to characterize the micro-network structures present in the bulk of the finally cured rubber samples. These studies were made as a function of formulation and processing variables. The time-resolved, integrated rubber network. Mono-sulfidic as well as the residual accelerator fragments were differentiated from the polysulfidic crosslinks in a finally cured material. Dynamic studies of these network structures were made using spin-spin relaxation (T[sub 2c]) measurements. The activation energies calculated based on T[sub 2] were used to verify different carbons, directly attached to the sulfur atoms. A swelling method based on Flory-Rehner's equation was also used to determine the crosslink densities and the number-average molecular weight between the nodal junctions in different formulations. Different spatially resolved structural features have been detected in the swollen samples using NMR imaging method. The voids, no-voids and other impurities were differentiated on the basis of magnetic susceptibility differences. Cyclohexane was used as a swelling solvent to probe the morphological defects in these materials. The T[sub 2]-weighted images were used to evaluate the crosslink densities in different samples. The quantitative estimations based on histogram was also employed to determine the average volume per crosslink region. The contrast based on H-1 spin-density or mobility was highlighted in T[sub 2]-weighted images. The variations were found to be closely related to variation in both concentration and mobility of the network.

  13. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  14. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  15. Optimization of THz Wave Coupling into Samples in DNP/NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Alexander

    High power millimeter wave and terahertz sources are used in DNP/NMR spectroscopy to greatly enhance the NMR signal. A key issue is the efficient coupling of the source power to the sample. We present HFSS calculations ...

  16. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  17. Symmetric spatial encoding in ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy Boaz Shapira, Yoav Shrot, Lucio Frydman *

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Symmetric spatial encoding in ultrafast 2D NMR spectroscopy Boaz Shapira, Yoav Shrot, Lucio Frydman; TOCSY; HSQC NMR 1. Introduction Two-dimensional spectroscopy stands at the core of NMRÕs analytical; revised 29 August 2005 Available online 4 October 2005 Abstract Single-scan multidimensional spectroscopy

  18. Magnesium silicate dissolution investigated by S1-29 MAS, H-1 Si-29 CPMAS, Mg-25 QCPMG, and H-1 Mg-25 CP QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M C; Brouwer, Piet W; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M

    2009-07-01

    Olivine-(Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}-has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of the divalent cation with respect to silicon during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon-rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. The pure magnesium end member of the olivine series (forsterite-Mg2SiO4) was chosen for detailed investigations in this study because paramagnetic iron hinders NMR investigations by providing an extra mode of relaxation for neighboring nuclei, causing lineshapes to become significantly broadened and unobservable in the NMR spectrum. For reacting forsterite, spectroscopic interrogations using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced NMR techniques ({sup 29}Si MAS, {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si CP MAS, {sup 25}Mg QCPMG, and {sup 1}H-{sup 25}Mg CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 C.

  19. [1H-NMR spectroscopy of a patient with pachygyria].

    PubMed

    Fuwa, S; Kaminaga, T; Kobayashi, M; Sasaki, Y; Furui, S; Abe, T

    1998-07-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy was performed on a 6-month-old boy with pachygyria. A MRI study demonstrated an abnormally thick cortex localized in the right occipital lobe. 1H-NMR spectrums were collected from the lesion and the contralateral cortex that appeared normal on MRI. The N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cre (creatine) ratio was markedly lower in the abnormal cortex than in the contralateral cortex and the occipital cortex. NAA localizes to neurons, axons, dendrites and synaptic connections and increases with maturation of neurons. Its decrease is considered to represent the decrease in the number of these structures and/or disturbance of neuronal maturation. We conclude that NAA/Cre can be an important index that reflects the pathogenesis of pachygyria. PMID:9695632

  20. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR. PMID:26501900

  1. Interactions of Polyvinylpyrrolidone with Chlorin e6-Based Photosensitizers Studied by NMR and Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hädener, Marianne; Gjuroski, Ilche; Furrer, Julien; Vermathen, Martina

    2015-09-10

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) can act as potential drug delivery vehicle for porphyrin-based photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT) to enhance their stability and prevent porphyrin self-association. In the present study the interactions of PVP (MW 10 kDa) were probed with five different derivatives of chlorin e6 (CE6) bearing either one of the amino acids serine, lysine, tyrosine or arginine, or monoamino-hexanoic acid as substituent. All derivatives of CE6 (xCE) formed aggregates of a similar structure in aqueous buffer in the millimolar range. In the presence of PVP monomerization of all xCE aggregates could be proved by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. xCE-PVP complex formation was confirmed by (1)H NMR T2 relaxation and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY). (1)H(1)H-NOESY data suggested that the xCE uptake into the PVP polymer matrix is governed by hydrophobic interactions. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission bands of xCE in the micromolar range revealed characteristic PVP-induced bathochromic shifts. The presented data point out the potential of PVP as carrier system for amphiphilic derivatives of chlorin e6. The capacity of PVP to monomerize xCE aggregates may enhance their efficiency as possible photosensitizers in PDT. PMID:26291382

  2. Probing coiled-coil assembly by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, TingTing; Boyle, Aimee; Robson Marsden, Hana; Valdink, Dayenne; Martelli, Giuliana; Raap, Jan; Kros, Alexander

    2015-01-28

    Here a new method to determine the oligomeric state and orientation of coiled-coil peptide motifs is described. Peptides K and E, which are designed to form a parallel heterodimeric complex in aqueous solution, were labeled with the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine on the C-terminus respectively as 'fingerprint' residues. One of the peptides was also labeled with the paramagnetic probe MTSL. One dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy was used to study the peptide quaternary structure by monitoring the signal suppression of the aromatic labels due to proximity of the nitroxyl radical. 1D-NMR confirmed that the peptides K and E form a heterodimeric coiled coil with a parallel orientation. In addition, fluorescence emission quenching of the aromatic labels due to electron exchange with a nitroxyl radical confirmed the parallel coiled coil orientation. Thus, paramagnetic nitroxide and aromatic fluorophore labeling of peptides yields valuable information regarding the quaternary structure from 1D-NMR and steady-state fluorescence measurements. This convenient method is useful not only to investigate coiled coil assembly, but can also be applied to any defined supramolecular assembly. PMID:25428174

  3. Principles and Features of Single-Scan Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Principles and Features of Single-Scan Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy Lucio Frydman,*, Adonis resonance (2D NMR) provides one of the foremost contemporary tools available for the elucidation of molecular structure, function, and dynamics. Execution of a 2D NMR experiment generally involves scanning

  4. Monitoring Mechanistic Details in the Synthesis of Pyrimidines via Real-Time, Ultrafast Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy Zulay D. Pardo, Gregory L. Olsen, María Encarnacion Fernandez-Valle,§ Lucio NMR acquisition techniques. This progress could open valuable new opportunities for the elucidation of nitriles to yield alkylpyrimidines. Up to 2500 2D NMR data sets were thus collected over the course

  5. Quantitative Multiple-Quantum Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Spectroscopy of Quadrupolar Nuclei in Solids

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Quantitative Multiple-Quantum Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Spectroscopy of Quadrupolar Nuclei in Solids, 1996X Abstract: We describe a new approach for observation of multiple-quantum (MQ) NMR spectra populations from isotropic MQ NMR spectra. We illustrate the utility of the approach with 23Na (S ) 3/2) MQ

  6. Spatial structure of fibrinopeptide B in water solution with DPC micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Fayzullina, Adeliya R.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinopeptide B (GluFib) is one of the factors of thrombosis. Normal blood protein soluble, fibrinogen (fibrinopeptide A and fibrinopeptide B), is transformed into the insoluble, fibrin, which in the form of filaments adheres to the vessel wall at the site of injury, forming a grid. However, the spatial structure of this peptide has not been established till now. In this article, GluFib peptide is investigated together with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles which were used for mimicking the environment of peptide in blood vessels. The spatial structure was obtained by applying 1D and 2D 1H-1H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY, NOESY). It was shown that the fibrinopeptide B does not have a secondary structure but we can distinguish the fragment Gly 9 - Arg 14 with a good convergence (the backbone RMSD for the Gly9 - Arg14 is 0.18 ± 0.08 Å).

  7. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  8. Broadband adiabatic inversion pulses for cross polarization in wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    strength are often required in UW NMR spectroscopy. One technique for enhancing the S/N re- liesBroadband adiabatic inversion pulses for cross polarization in wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy Kristopher J. Harris a , Adonis Lupulescu b , Bryan E.G. Lucier a , Lucio Frydman b, , Robert W

  9. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  10. Dynamics-based selective 2D 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of 1H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of 1H/1H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  11. In vivo two-dimensional NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The poor resolution of in-vivo one- dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has limited its clinical potential. Currently, only the large singlet methyl resonances arising from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine are quantitated in a clinical setting. Other metabolites such as myo- inositol, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, and ?- amino butyric acid (GABA) are of clinical interest but quantitation is difficult due to the overlapping resonances and limited spectral resolution. To improve the spectral resolution and distinguish between overlapping resonances, a series of two- dimensional chemical shift correlation spectroscopy experiments were developed for a 1.5 Tesla clinical imaging magnet. Two-dimensional methods are attractive for in vivo spectroscopy due to their ability to unravel overlapping resonances with the second dimension, simplifying the interpretation and quantitation of low field NMR spectra. Two-dimensional experiments acquired with mix-mode line shape negate the advantages of the second dimension. For this reason, a new experiment, REVOLT, was developed to achieve absorptive mode line shape in both dimensions. Absorptive mode experiments were compared to mixed mode experiments with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and water suppression. Detailed theoretical and experimental calculations of the optimum spin lock and radio frequency power deposition were performed. Two-dimensional spectra were acquired from human bone marrow and human brain tissue. The human brain tissue spectra clearly reveal correlations among the coupled spins of NAA, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, GABA, aspartate and myo-inositol obtained from a single experiment of 23 minutes from a volume of 59 mL. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  12. 129Xe NMR spectroscopy study of porous cyanometallates.

    PubMed

    Lima, E; Balmaseda, J; Reguera, E

    2007-05-01

    Zinc and cadmium hexacyanocobaltates(III) were prepared, and their porous networks were explored using 129Xe spectroscopy. The crystal structures of these two compounds are representative of porous hexacyanometallates, cubic (Fm-3m) for cadmium and rhombohedral (R-3c) for zinc. In the cubic structure, the porosity is related to systematic vacancies created from the elemental building block (i.e., the hexacyanometallate anion), whereas the rhombohedral (R-3c) structure is free of vacant sites but has tetrahedral coordination for the zinc atom, which leads to relatively large ellipsoidal pores communicated by elliptical windows. According to the Xe adsorption isotherms, these porous frameworks were found to be accessible to the Xe atom. The structure of the higher electric field gradient at the pore surface (Fm-3m) appears and is accompanied by a stronger guest-host interaction for the Xe atoms and a higher capacity for Xe sorption. For cadmium, the 129Xe NMR signal is typical of isotropic movement for the Xe atom, indicating that it remains trapped within a spherical cavity. From spectra recorded for different amounts of adsorbed Xe, the cavity diameter was estimated. For the zinc complex, 129Xe NMR spectra are asymmetric because of the Xe atom movement within an elongated cavity. The line-shape asymmetry changes when the Xe loading within the porous framework increases, which was ascribed to Xe-Xe interactions through the cavity windows. The Xe adsorption revealed additional structural information for the studied materials. PMID:17402762

  13. Metabolomic insight into soy sauce through (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kuk; Ahn, Hyuk-Jin; van den Berg, Frans; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-08-12

    Soy sauce, a well-known seasoning in Asia and throughout the world, consists of many metabolites that are produced during fermentation or aging and that have various health benefits. However, their comprehensive assessment has been limited due to targeted or instrumentally specific analysis. This paper presents for the first time a metabolic characterization of soy sauce, especially that aged up to 12 years, to obtain a global understanding of the metabolic variations through (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate pattern recognition techniques. Elevated amino acids and organic acids and the consumption of carbohydrate were associated with continuous involvement of microflora in aging for 12 years. In particular, continuous increases in the levels of betaine were found during aging for up to 12 years, demonstrating that microbial- or enzyme-related metabolites were also coupled with osmotolerant or halophilic bacteria present during aging. This work provides global insights into soy sauce through a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach that enhances the current understanding of the holistic metabolome and allows assessment of soy sauce quality. PMID:19591484

  14. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  15. Regularized Partial Least Squares with an Application to NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Genevera I.; Peterson, Christine; Vannucci, Marina; Maleti?-Savati?, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    High-dimensional data common in genomics, proteomics, and chemometrics often contains complicated correlation structures. Recently, partial least squares (PLS) and Sparse PLS methods have gained attention in these areas as dimension reduction techniques in the context of supervised data analysis. We introduce a framework for Regularized PLS by solving a relaxation of the SIMPLS optimization problem with penalties on the PLS loadings vectors. Our approach enjoys many advantages including flexibility, general penalties, easy interpretation of results, and fast computation in high-dimensional settings. We also outline extensions of our methods leading to novel methods for non-negative PLS and generalized PLS, an adoption of PLS for structured data. We demonstrate the utility of our methods through simulations and a case study on proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy data. PMID:24511361

  16. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism. PMID:25591456

  17. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, J.; Lafon, O.; Pourpoint, F.; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong 1H-1H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave 1H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of 1H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D 1H-{13C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-13C]-L-histidine?HCl?H2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and ammonium 14N sites in L-histidine?HCl?H2O.

  18. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  19. Preparation, GIAO NMR Calculations and Acidic Properties of Some Novel 4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-one Derivatives with Their Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Yüksek, Haydar; Alkan, Muzaffer; Cakmak, Ismail; Ocak, Zafer; Bahçeci, ?ule; Calapo?lu, Mustafa; Elmasta?, Mahfuz; Kolomuç, Ali; Aksu, Havva

    2008-01-01

    Six novel 3-alkyl(aryl)-4-(p-nitrobenzoylamino)-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5- ones (2a-f) were synthesized by the reactions of 3-alkyl(aryl)-4-amino-4,5-dihydro-1H- 1,2,4-triazol-5-ones (1a-f) with p-nitrobenzoyl chloride and characterized by elemental analyses and IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and UV spectral data. The newly synthesized compounds 2 were titrated potentiometrically with tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in four non-aqueous solvents such as acetone, isopropyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol and N,N-dimethylformamide, and the half-neutralization potential values and the corresponding pKa values were determined for all cases. Thus, the effects of solvents and molecular structure upon acidity were investigated. In addition, isotropic 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic shielding constants of compounds 2 were obtained by the gauge-including-atomic-orbital (GIAO) method at the B3LYP density functional level. The geometry of each compound has been optimized using the 6-311G basis set. Theoretical values were compared to the experimental data. Furthermore, these new compounds and five recently reported 3-alkyl-4-(2-furoylamino)-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ones (3a–c,e,f) were screened for their antioxidant activities. PMID:19325716

  20. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  1. Strategy for the Stereochemical Assignment of Tris-Heteroleptic Ru(II) Complexes by NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Meggers, Eric

    Strategy for the Stereochemical Assignment of Tris-Heteroleptic Ru(II) Complexes by NMR Spectroscopy Xiulan Xie,* Seann P. Mulcahy, and Eric Meggers Philipps-UniVersita¨t Marburg, Hans-1,10-phenanthroline, and pp ) 7,8-dimethyl dipyrido[3,2-a: 2,3-c]phenazine, was studied using NMR

  2. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  3. Magnesium silicate dissolution investigated by Si-29 MAS, H-1-Si-29 CPMAS, Mg-25 QCPMG NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M C; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    Olivine-(Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}-has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of the divalent cation with respect to silicon during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon-rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. The pure magnesium end member of the olivine series (forsterite-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) was chosen for detailed investigations in this study because paramagnetic iron hinders NMR investigations by providing an extra mode of relaxation for neighboring nuclei, causing lineshapes to become significantly broadened and unobservable in the NMR spectrum. For reacting forsterite, spectroscopic interrogations using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced NMR techniques ({sup 29}Si MAS, {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si CP MAS, {sup 25}Mg QCPMG, and {sup 1}H-{sup 25}Mg CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 C.

  4. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Debelouchina, Galia Tzvetanova

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary ...

  5. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN CHEMlSTRY, VOL. 31, 2-6 (1993) NMR Spectroscopy of Paramagnetic Complexes

    E-print Network

    Bluemel, Janet

    1993-01-01

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN CHEMlSTRY, VOL. 31, 2-6 (1993) NMR Spectroscopy of Paramagnetic Complexes and 'H NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance. The 2HNMR signals are narrower by a factor of up to 30 compared with the corresponding 'H NMR signals, thus establishing an inexpensive method and a general

  6. Communication: Phase incremented echo train acquisition in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baltisberger, Jay H; Walder, Brennan J; Keeler, Eric G; Kaseman, Derrick C; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved and general approach for implementing echo train acquisition (ETA) in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, particularly where the conventional approach of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisition would produce numerous artifacts. Generally, adding ETA to any N-dimensional experiment creates an N + 1 dimensional experiment, with an additional dimension associated with the echo count, n, or an evolution time that is an integer multiple of the spacing between echo maxima. Here we present a modified approach, called phase incremented echo train acquisition (PIETA), where the phase of the mixing pulse and every other refocusing pulse, ?(P), is incremented as a single variable, creating an additional phase dimension in what becomes an N + 2 dimensional experiment. A Fourier transform with respect to the PIETA phase, ?(P), converts the ?(P) dimension into a ?p dimension where desired signals can be easily separated from undesired coherence transfer pathway signals, thereby avoiding cumbersome or intractable phase cycling schemes where the receiver phase must follow a master equation. This simple modification eliminates numerous artifacts present in NMR experiments employing CPMG acquisition and allows "single-scan" measurements of transverse relaxation and J-couplings. Additionally, unlike CPMG, we show how PIETA can be appended to experiments with phase modulated signals after the mixing pulse. PMID:22697523

  7. Interaction between DNA and chromosomal proteins HMGB1 and H1 studied by IR/VCD spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanichko, Alexander; Chikhirzhina, Elena

    2013-07-01

    Binary complexes of calf thymus DNA with calf thymus non-histone chromosomal protein HMGB1 and linker histone H1 were studied using FTIR/VCD spectroscopy. The spectroscopic data showed that the interaction of the protein HMGB1 and histone H1 with DNA resulted in formation of two different types of the macromolecular complexes. Histone H1 retained its native structure even at high concentrations and induced DNA condensation upon binding at the protein to DNA ratio r (w/w) in the complex r ? 0.3. HMGB1 demonstrated the ability to form soluble complexes at considerably higher protein to DNA ratios. The obtained data suggest that the HMGB1 also participated in the protein-protein interactions via its C-terminal domain.

  8. Monitoring organic reactions by UF-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Fernández-Valle, Encarnación; Martínez-Álvarez, Roberto; Molero-Vílchez, Dolores; Pardo-Botero, Zulay D; Sáez-Barajas, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Standard 2D NMR experiments suffer from the many t1 increments needed for spectra with sufficient digital resolution in the indirect dimension. Despite the different methodological approaches to overcome this problem, these increments have prevented studies of fast reactions. The development of ultrafast NMR (UF-NMR) has decisively speeded up the time scale of standard NMR to allow the study of organic reactions as they happen in real time to reveal mechanistic details. This mini-review summarizes the results achieved in monitoring organic reactions through this exciting technique. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25998506

  9. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  10. Phosphorus speciation in a eutrophic lake by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Read, Emily K; Ivancic, Monika; Hanson, Paul; Cade-Menun, Barbara J; McMahon, Katherine D

    2014-10-01

    For eutrophic lakes, patterns of phosphorus (P) measured by standard methods are well documented but provide little information about the components comprising standard operational definitions. Dissolved P (DP) and particulate P (PP) represents important but rarely characterized nutrient pools. Samples from Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA were characterized using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P NMR) during the open water season of 2011 in this unmatched temporal study of aquatic P dynamics. A suite of organic and inorganic P forms was detected in both dissolved and particulate fractions: orthophosphate, orthophosphate monoesters, orthophosphate diesters, pyrophosphate, polyphosphate, and phosphonates. Through time, phytoplankton biomass, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and water clarity were correlated with changes in the relative proportion of P fractions. Particulate P can be used as a proxy for phytoplankton-bound P, and in this study, a high proportion of polyphosphate within particulate samples suggested P should not be a limiting factor for the dominant primary producers, cyanobacteria. Hypolimnetic particulate P samples were more variable in composition than surface samples, potentially due to varying production and transport of sinking particles. Surface dissolved samples contained less P than particulate samples, and were typically dominated by orthophosphate, but also contained monoester, diester, polyphosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphonate. Hydrologic inflows to the lake contained more orthophosphate and orthophosphate monoesters than in-lake samples, indicating transformation of P from inflowing waters. This time series explores trends of a highly regulated nutrient in the context of other water quality metrics (chlorophyll, mixing regime, and clarity), and gives insight on the variability of the structure and occurrence of P-containing compounds in light of the phosphorus-limited paradigm. PMID:24956605

  11. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), 1H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong 1H-1H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow 1H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) 1H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about 1H-1H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical information for a variety of solid systems that possess high proton density.

  12. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2? 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2?0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2?0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  13. Observations of Quantum Dynamics by Solution-State NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    M. A. Pravia; E. Fortunato; Y. Weinstein; M. D. Price; G. Teklemariam; R. J. Nelson; Y. Sharf; S. Somaroo; C. H. Tseng; T. F. Havel; D. G. Cory

    1999-06-18

    NMR is emerging as a valuable testbed for the investigation of foundational questions in quantum mechanics. The present paper outlines the preparation of a class of mixed states, called pseudo-pure states, that emulate pure quantum states in the highly mixed environment typically used to describe solution-state NMR samples. It also describes the NMR observation of spinor behavior in spin 1/2 nuclei, the simulation of wave function collapse using a magnetic field gradient, the creation of entangled (or Bell) pseudo-pure states, and a brief discussion of quantum computing logic gates, including the Quantum Fourier Transform. These experiments show that liquid-state NMR can be used to demonstrate quantum dynamics at a level suitable for laboratory exercises.

  14. Compression of NMR data. Application to two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolnai, Zsolt; Macura, Slobodan; Markley, John L.

    The important information in a high-resolution two-dimensional NMR spectrum or 2D NMR image is localized in a small fraction of the overall data block. Hence data files should be subject to compression by suitable manipulation. We propose two methods for data compression: elimination of background noise and logarithmic scaling of the data. By combining the two methods, one can obtain a compression factor of 30 or more without significant loss of spectral information content. The method is particularly suitable for the storage of massive data sets. One or more two-dimensional spectra can be reduced and stored on one floppy disk. These methods and their versatility are demonstrated via compression of two-dimensional NMR spectra of a small protein (turkey ovomucoid third domain) and via compression of the NMR image of a phantom.

  15. Metabolic profiling of potential probiotic or synbiotic cheeses by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Dina; Santos, Claudio H; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Gomes, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Freitas, Ana C

    2011-05-11

    To assess ripening of potential probiotic cheeses (containing either Lactobacillus casei -01 or Bifidobacterium lactis B94) or synbiotic cheeses with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) or a 50:50 mix of FOS/inulin, metabolic profiles have been obtained via classical biochemical analyses and by NMR spectroscopy. The addition of prebiotics to the cheeses resulted in lower proteolysis indices, especially in those synbiotic cheeses inoculated with B. lactis B94. Among synbiotic cheeses the combination of FOS and inulin resulted in an increase in lipolytic activity. The metabolic profiles of the cheeses analyzed by NMR spectroscopy, combined with multivariate statistics, allowed profiles to be distinguished by maturation time, added probiotic bacteria, or, in the case of B. lactis B94 cheese, added prebiotic. The NMR results are in agreement with the biochemical analyses and demonstrate the potential of NMR for the study of metabolic processes in probiotic/synbiotic food matrices. PMID:21443163

  16. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments. PMID:14759534

  17. Separate-Local-Field NMR Spectroscopy on Half-Integer Quadrupolar Nuclei Julia Grinshtein, Christopher V. Grant, and Lucio Frydman*

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Separate-Local-Field NMR Spectroscopy on Half-Integer Quadrupolar Nuclei Julia Grinshtein anisotropy affecting these species generally restricts their solid-state NMR study to central anisotropies. During the last years a number of 2D NMR alternatives have been proposed for the acquisition

  18. Solid State Separated-Local-Field NMR Spectroscopy on Half-Integer Quadrupolar Nuclei: Principles and Applications

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Solid State Separated-Local-Field NMR Spectroscopy on Half-Integer Quadrupolar Nuclei: Principles-mail: lucio.frydman@weizmann.ac.il Abstract: New multidimensional NMR methods correlating the quadrupolar and exemplified. The methods extend separated-local-field magic-angle spinning (SLF MAS) NMR techniques that have

  19. Approved Module Information for CH3114, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Advanced NMR Spectroscopy Module Code: CH3114

    E-print Network

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for CH3114, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Advanced NMR Spectroscopy Module- established, modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Module Learning Outcomes: At the end of this module, the student should be able to ? ? describe standard 1- and 2-D NMR experiments and predict

  20. F2-selective two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for the analysis of minor components in foods.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masanori; Furihata, Kazuo; Wei, Feifei; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we propose F(2)-selective 2D NMR spectroscopy as an effective method to obtain high-quality spectra of minor components in complex foodstuffs. Selective excitation along the F(2) axis overcame the problems occurring in the conventional F(1)-selective 2D NMR spectroscopy. The technique was successfully applied to mango juice to provide high-quality TOCSY, DQF-COSY, and NOESY spectra of the minor components for the assignment of their signals. In addition, high-quality TOCSY spectra were obtained for the minor components of Japanese sake and honey. These results indicate that F(2)-selective 2D NMR spectroscopy will be useful for the non-destructive analysis of various foods. PMID:22002587

  1. Structural determination of larger proteins using stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.; Hernandez, G.; Springer, P.; Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.; Lidstrom, M.

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to employ stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy to study protein structures and provide insight into important biochemical problems. A methylotrophic bacterial expression system has been developed for uniform deuterium and carbon-13 labeling of proteins for structural studies. These organisms grow using methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy. Because isotopically labeled methanol is relatively inexpensive, the methylotrophs are ideal for expressing proteins labeled uniformly with deuterium and/or carbon-13. This expression system has been employed to prepare deuterated troponin C. NMR spectroscopy measurements have been made on the inhibitory peptide from troponin I (residues 96--115), both as the free peptide and the peptide complexed with deuterated troponin C. Proton-NMR spectroscopy resonance-signal assignments have been made for the free peptide.

  2. Applications of toroids in high-pressure NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klingler, R.J.; Rathke, J.W.; Woelk, K.; Kramarz, K.W.; Gerald, R.

    1995-12-31

    Toroid detectors have distinct NMR sensitivity and imaging advantages. The magnetic field lines are nearly completely contained within the active volume element of a toroid. This results in high NMR signal sensitivity. In addition, the toroid detector may be placed next to the metallic walls of a containment vessel with minimal signal loss due to magnetic coupling with the metal container. Thus, the toroid detector is ideal for static high pressure or continuous flow monitoring systems. Toroid NMR detectors have been used to follow the hydroformylation of olefins in supercritical fluids under industrial process conditions. Supercritical fluids are potentially ideal media for conducting catalytic reactions that involve gaseous reactants, including H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The presence of a single homogeneous reaction phase eliminates the gas-liquid mixing problem of alternative two-phase systems, which can limit process rates and adversely affect hydroformylation product selectivities. A second advantage of toroid NMR detectors is that they exhibit a well-defined gradient in the rf field. This magnetic field gradient can be used for NMR imaging applications. Distance resolutions of 20 {mu} have been obtained.

  3. Applications of toroids in high-pressure NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klingler, R.J.; Rathke, J.W.; Woelk, K.

    1995-12-01

    Toroid detectors have distinct NMR sensitivity and imaging advantages. The magnetic field lines are nearly completely contained within the active volume element of a toroid. This results in high NMR signal sensitivity. In addition, the toroid detector may be placed next to the metallic walls of a containment vessel with minimal signal loss due to magnetic coupling with the metal container. Thus, the toroid detector is ideal for static high pressure or continuous flow monitoring systems. Toroid NMR detectors have been used to follow the hydroformylation of olefins in supercritical fluids under industrial process conditions. Supercritical fluids are potentially ideal media for conducting catalytic reactions that involve gaseous reactants, including H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The presence of a single homogeneous reaction phase eliminates the gas-liquid mixing problem of alternative two-phase systems, which can limit process rates and adversely affect hydroformylation product selectivities. A second advantage of toroid NMR detectors is that they exhibit a well-defined gradient in the rf field. This magnetic field gradient can be used for NMR imaging applications. Distance resolutions of 20 {mu} have been obtained.

  4. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  5. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  6. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  7. Characterization of the essential oil of Agastache rugosa by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Kiselev, W. P.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Schutova, A. G.; Gonsharova, L. W.; Spiridowish, E. W.; Bovdey, N. A.; Kiselev, P. A.; Gaidukevich, O. A.

    2010-07-01

    The composition of essential oil from Agastache rugosa (Fish. et Mey) O.Kuntze was studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Essential oil was isolated from the aerial part of plants growing in the Central Botanical Garden of the NAS of Belarus during flowering and fruiting. The oil chemical composition was found to depend little on the sampling time. It was shown that NMR spectroscopy could be successfully used to both monitor the content of the hepatotoxic substance (pulegone) and characterize the quality and authenticity of essential oils.

  8. DSP-based on-line NMR spectroscopy using an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.; Bobis, J.P. |

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that uses an adaptive algorithm to carry out real-time NMR spectroscopy. The system employs a digital signal processor (DSP) chip to regulate the transmitted and received signal together with spectral analysis of the received signal to determine free induction decay (FID). To implement such a signal-processing routine for detection of the desired signal, an adaptive line enhancer filter that uses an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm is applied to the FID spectra. The results indicate that the adaptive filter can be a reliable technique for on-line spectroscopy study.

  9. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  10. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16? fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04? (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16? FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in D2O (single scan)) and maximum quantitative flow rates up to 0.3 mL min-1. Thus, a series of single scan 19F and 1H NMR spectra acquired with this simple set-up already presents a valuable basis for quantitative reaction monitoring.

  11. 13C NMR Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Determination of Compound Ratios and Polymer End Groups

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopic integration employing short relaxation delays was evaluated as a quantitative tool to obtain ratios of diastereomers, regioisomers, constitutional isomers, mixtures of unrelated compounds, peptoids, and sugars. The results were compared to established quantitative methods such as 1H NMR spectroscopic integration, gas chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography and were found to be within <3.4% of 1H NMR spectroscopic values (most examples give results within <2%). Acquisition of the spectra took 2–30 min on as little as 10 mg of sample, proving the general utility of the technique. The simple protocol was extended to include end group analysis of low molecular weight polymers, which afforded results in accordance with 1H NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry. PMID:24601654

  12. Characterizing Covalently Sidewall-Functionalized SWCNTs by using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Donna J.; Kumar, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Unambiguous evidence for covalent sidewall functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been a difficult task, especially for nanomaterials in which slight differences in functionality structure produce significant changes in molecular characteristics. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides clear information about the structural skeleton of molecules attached to SWCNTs. In order to establish the generality of proton NMR as an analytical technique for characterizing covalently functionalized SWCNTs, we have obtained and analyzed proton NMR data of SWCNT-substituted benzenes across a variety of para substituents. Trends obtained for differences in proton NMR chemical shifts and the impact of o-, p-, and m-directing effects of electrophilic aromatic substituents on phenyl groups covalently bonded to SWCNTs are discussed. PMID:24009779

  13. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues. PMID:24284435

  14. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues.

  15. Solid-state NMR adiabatic TOBSY sequences provide enhanced sensitivity for multidimensional high-resolution magic-angle-spinning 1H MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Struppe, Jochem; Black, Peter M; Tzika, A Aria

    2008-08-01

    We propose a solid-state NMR method that maximizes the advantages of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) applied to intact biopsies when compared to more conventional liquid-state NMR approaches. Theoretical treatment, numerical simulations and experimental results on intact human brain biopsies are presented. Experimentally, it is proven that an optimized adiabatic TOBSY (TOtal through Bond correlation SpectroscopY) solid-state NMR pulse sequence for two-dimensional 1H-1H homonuclear scalar-coupling longitudinal isotropic mixing provides a 20%-50% improvement in signal-to-noise ratio relative to its liquid-state analogue TOCSY (TOtal Correlation SpectroscopY). For this purpose we have refined the C9(15)1 symmetry-based 13C TOBSY pulse sequence for 1H MRS use and compared it to MLEV-16 TOCSY sequence. Both sequences were rotor-synchronized and implemented using WURST-8 adiabatic inversion pulses. As discussed theoretically and shown in simulations, the improved magnetization-transfer comes from actively removing residual dipolar couplings from the average Hamiltonian. Importantly, the solid-state NMR techniques are tailored to perform measurements at low temperatures where sample degradation is reduced. This is the first demonstration of such a concept for HRMAS metabolic profiling of disease processes, including cancer, from biopsies requiring reduced sample degradation for further genomic analysis. PMID:18556227

  16. Bacterial Expression and Purification of the Amyloidogenic Peptide PAPf39 for Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Bishop, Anthony C.; French, Kinsley C.; McCallum, Scott A.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    PAPf39 is a 39 residue peptide fragment from human prostatic acidic phosphatase that forms amyloid fibrils in semen. These fibrils have been implicated in facilitating HIV transmission. To enable structural studies of PAPf39 by NMR spectroscopy, efficient methods allowing the production of milligram quantities of isotopically labeled peptide are essential. Here, we report the high-yield expression, as a fusion to ubiquitin at the N-terminus and an intein at the C-terminus, and purification of uniformly labeled 13C- and 15N-labeled PAPf39 peptide. This allows the study of the PAPf39 monomer conformational ensemble by NMR spectroscopy. To this end, we performed the NMR chemical shift assignment of the PAPf39 peptide in the monomeric state at low pH. PMID:23314347

  17. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  18. High Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Proteins at Ultra-High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-02-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying protein structure and function, uniquely able to address macroscopically disordered proteins. Insights from SSNMR include atomic-resolution structure, site-specific dynamics, metal center chemistry, and orientation of membrane proteins in bilayers.

  19. Characterization of animal manure using advanced solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of chemical structure of animal manure is necessary for its effective utilization. However, characterization of animal manure is challenging since it is a complex mixture and partially soluble. Solid-state C-13 NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is regarded as the best tool to i...

  20. Single-scan 2D NMR spectroscopy on a 25 T bitter magnet Boaz Shapira a

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Single-scan 2D NMR spectroscopy on a 25 T bitter magnet Boaz Shapira a , Kiran Shetty b , William W of Science, 76100 Rehovot, Israel b National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East, Paul Dirac Drive. The intrinsic multi-scan nature of such protocols implies that resistive and/or hybrid magnets, capable

  1. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  2. NATURAL ABUNDANCE 13C NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF DOUBLE-STRANDED DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although 13C NMR spectroscopy has already proved extremely useful in studies of biopolymers, including t-RNA's, and single-stranded polynucleotides, no successful study of native double-stranded DNA has been reported. This failure is mainly due to extremely unfavorable 13C spin r...

  3. The Palladium Component of an Immobilized Sonogashira Catalyst System: New Insights by Multinuclear HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Bluemel, Janet

    The Palladium Component of an Immobilized Sonogashira Catalyst System: New Insights by Multinuclear: Multinuclear one- and two-dimensional HRMAS NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the palladium of palladium bis(phosphine) complexes are possible,8 the steric demand of the phosphine substituents favors

  4. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  5. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  6. NMR Spectroscopy of Aqueous Extracts of Fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum- graecum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Matveichuk, S. V.; Karankevich, E. G.; Agabalaeva, E. D.; Reshetnikov, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The amino-acid and monosaccharide compositions of aqueous extracts of fenugreek herb were determined using PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The content of identified extract constituents was >70 mol%, of which the dominant amino acid was 4-hydroxyisoleucine (26.5 mol%); the major carbohydrate, glucose (10.1 mol%).

  7. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  8. Introducing High School Students to NMR Spectroscopy through Percent Composition Determination Using Low-Field Spectrometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Pitzer, Joy M.; Frost, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mole to gram conversions, density, and percent composition are fundamental concepts in first year chemistry at the high school or undergraduate level; however, students often find it difficult to engage with these concepts. We present a simple laboratory experiment utilizing portable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to determine the…

  9. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  10. Ghost-peak suppression in ultrafast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Ghost-peak suppression in ultrafast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy Yoav Shrot and Lucio Frydman indirect-domain spectral resolution. Brief mathematical descriptions of the ghost-peak generation and ghost; Ultrafast acquisitions; Ghost-peaks; Artifact suppression; Resolution enhancement 1. Introduction

  11. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manu, V. S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed ? and ? / 2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-13C, 15N NAVL peptide as well as U-13C, 15N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences.

  12. NMRFAM-SPARKY: enhanced software for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: SPARKY (Goddard and Kneller, SPARKY 3) remains the most popular software program for NMR data analysis, despite the fact that development of the package by its originators ceased in 2001. We have taken over the development of this package and describe NMRFAM-SPARKY, which implements new functions reflecting advances in the biomolecular NMR field. NMRFAM-SPARKY has been repackaged with current versions of Python and Tcl/Tk, which support new tools for NMR peak simulation and graphical assignment determination. These tools, along with chemical shift predictions from the PACSY database, greatly accelerate protein side chain assignments. NMRFAM-SPARKY supports automated data format interconversion for interfacing with a variety of web servers including, PECAN , PINE, TALOS-N, CS-Rosetta, SHIFTX2 and PONDEROSA-C/S. Availability and implementation: The software package, along with binary and source codes, if desired, can be downloaded freely from http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html. Instruction manuals and video tutorials can be found at http://www.nmrfam.wisc.edu/nmrfam-sparky-distribution.htm. Contact: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu or markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505092

  13. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  14. Hadamard NMR spectroscopy for two-dimensional quantum information processing and parallel search algorithms

    E-print Network

    T. Gopinath; Anil Kumar

    2006-09-08

    Hadamard spectroscopy has earlier been used to speed-up multi-dimensional NMR experiments. In this work we speed-up the two-dimensional quantum computing scheme, by using Hadamard spectroscopy in the indirect dimension, resulting in a scheme which is faster and requires the Fourier transformation only in the direct dimension. Two and three qubit quantum gates are implemented with an extra observer qubit. We also use one-dimensional Hadamard spectroscopy for binary information storage by spatial encoding and implementation of a parallel search algorithm.

  15. Hadamard NMR spectroscopy for two-dimensional quantum information processing and parallel search algorithms

    E-print Network

    Gopinath, T; Kumar, Anil

    2006-01-01

    Hadamard spectroscopy has earlier been used to speed-up multi-dimensional NMR experiments. In this work we speed-up the two-dimensional quantum computing scheme, by using Hadamard spectroscopy in the indirect dimension, resulting in a scheme which is faster and requires the Fourier transformation only in the direct dimension. Two and three qubit quantum gates are implemented with an extra observer qubit. We also use one-dimensional Hadamard spectroscopy for binary information storage by spatial encoding and implementation of a parallel search algorithm.

  16. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  17. Water Behavior in Bacterial Spores by Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dormant bacterial spores are able to survive long periods of time without nutrients, withstand harsh environmental conditions, and germinate into metabolically active bacteria when conditions are favorable. Numerous factors influence this hardiness, including the spore structure and the presence of compounds to protect DNA from damage. It is known that the water content of the spore core plays a role in resistance to degradation, but the exact state of water inside the core is a subject of discussion. Two main theories present themselves: either the water in the spore core is mostly immobile and the core and its components are in a glassy state, or the core is a gel with mobile water around components which themselves have limited mobility. Using deuterium solid-state NMR experiments, we examine the nature of the water in the spore core. Our data show the presence of unbound water, bound water, and deuterated biomolecules that also contain labile deuterons. Deuterium–hydrogen exchange experiments show that most of these deuterons are inaccessible by external water. We believe that these unreachable deuterons are in a chemical bonding state that prevents exchange. Variable-temperature NMR results suggest that the spore core is more rigid than would be expected for a gel-like state. However, our rigid core interpretation may only apply to dried spores whereas a gel core may exist in aqueous suspension. Nonetheless, the gel core, if present, is inaccessible to external water. PMID:24950158

  18. Alternative determination of blood alcohol concentration by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zailer, Elina; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2016-02-01

    A rapid, accurate and specific proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic method is developed to determine ethanol in blood, known as the blood alcohol concentration (BAC). The limits of detection and quantification are 0.02g/L and 0.07g/L, respectively. The (1)H NMR spectra show linearity for whole blood and serum samples of a concentration range of 0.00-3.00g/L (R(2)>0.9995). The (1)H NMR method is applied and validated for whole blood as the sample media. Real driving under influence case samples are analyzed with the reference enzyme-based alcohol dehydrogenase and headspace gas chromatography techniques by the Forensic Medicine in Bonn. The reference results are compared with the (1)H NMR spectroscopic results. The validation and comparison indicate that (1)H NMR is suitable for the quantification of BAC in whole blood. This technique has the advantages of automated analysis with good measurement precision and fast sample throughput. A drop of blood (V=20?L) is adequate for an analysis leading to a possible simplification of the sample collection. Due to the non-destructive method, follow-up examinations by (1)H NMR spectroscopy or DNA determinations by different techniques (PCR, in situ hybridization) are possible in resolving legal disputes. PMID:26641708

  19. Insights into atomic-level interaction between mefenamic acid and eudragit EPO in a supersaturated solution by high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Mroue, Kamal H; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction between mefenamic acid (MFA), a poorly water-soluble nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and Eudragit EPO (EPO), a water-soluble polymer, is investigated in their supersaturated solution using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stable supersaturated solution with a high MFA concentration of 3.0 mg/mL is prepared by dispersing the amorphous solid dispersion into a d-acetate buffer at pH 5.5 and 37 °C. By virtue of MAS at 2.7 kHz, the extremely broad and unresolved (1)H resonances of MFA in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum of the supersaturated solution are well-resolved, thus enabling the complete assignment of MFA (1)H resonances in the aqueous solution. Two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) under MAS conditions reveal the interaction of MFA with EPO in the supersaturated solution at an atomic level. The strong cross-correlations observed in the 2D (1)H/(1)H NMR spectra indicate a hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic group of MFA and the backbone of EPO. Furthermore, the aminoalkyl group in the side chain of EPO forms a hydrophilic interaction, which can be either electrostatic or hydrogen bonding, with the carboxyl group of MFA. We believe these hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between MFA and EPO molecules play a key role in the formation of this extremely stable supersaturated solution. In addition, 2D (1)H/(1)H RFDR demonstrates that the molecular MFA-EPO interaction is quite flexible and dynamic. PMID:24283196

  20. Insights into Atomic-level Interaction between Mefenamic Acid and Eudragit® EPO in a Supersaturated Solution by High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Mroue, Kamal H.; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction between mefenamic acid (MFA), a poorly water-soluble non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and Eudragit® EPO (EPO), a water-soluble polymer, is investigated in their supersaturated solution using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stable supersaturated solution with a high MFA concentration of 3.0 mg/mL is prepared by dispersing the amorphous solid dispersion into a d-acetate buffer at pH 5.5 and 37 °C. By virtue of MAS at 2.7 kHz, the extremely broad and unresolved 1H resonances of MFA in one-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the supersaturated solution are well resolved, thus enabling the complete assignment of MFA 1H resonances in the aqueous solution. Two-dimensional (2D) 1H/1H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) under MAS conditions reveal the interaction of MFA with EPO in the supersaturated solution at an atomic level. The strong cross-correlations observed in the 2D 1H/1H NMR spectra indicate a hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic group of MFA and the backbone of EPO. Furthermore, the aminoalkyl group in the side chain of EPO forms a hydrophilic interaction, which can be either electrostatic or hydrogen bonding, with the carboxyl group of MFA. We believe these hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between MFA and EPO molecules play a key role in the formation of this extremely stable supersaturated solution. In addition, 2D 1H/1H RFDR demonstrates that the molecular MFA-EPO interaction is quite flexible and dynamic. PMID:24283196

  1. RF Shimming Pulses For Ex-Situ NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging Using B1 Inhomogeneities

    E-print Network

    Bouchard, Louis-S

    2007-01-01

    I describe a method for generating "shim pulses" for NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) by taking advantage of the inherent inhomogeneity in the static and radiofrequency (RF) fields of a one-sided NMR system. The RF inhomogeneity here is assumed, without loss of generality, to be a linear gradient. General polynomials in the spatial variables can be generated using x, y and z RF gradients using trains of hard pulses which result in linear combinations of monomials xy, y^2, xz etc., and any desired scalings of these monomials. The basic shim pulse is constructed using small tip angle approximations.

  2. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy of brain tumors using short-echo time STEAM sequences.

    PubMed

    Frahm, J; Bruhn, H; Hänicke, W; Merboldt, K D; Mursch, K; Markakis, E

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress in localized proton NMR spectroscopy has been utilized to improve the spatial resolution and the metabolic specificity in a study of 19 patients with intracranial tumors. Selected examples demonstrate that short echo time stimulated echo acquisition mode sequences are able (a) to account for macroscopic tissue heterogeneity by reducing the volume of interest to 2-8 ml and (b) to facilitate a reasonable characterization of tumor metabolism by increasing the number of accessible metabolites. Proton NMR spectra were acquired within measuring times of 6.5 min on a 2.0 T whole-body system using the imaging headcoil. PMID:1939768

  3. A system for NMR stark spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Kempf, James G

    2010-05-13

    Electrostatic influences on NMR parameters are well accepted. Experimental and computational routes have been long pursued to understand and utilize such Stark effects. However, existing approaches are largely indirect informants on electric fields, and/or are complicated by multiple causal factors in spectroscopic change. We present a system to directly measure quadrupolar Stark effects from an applied electric (E) field. Our apparatus and applications are relevant in two contexts. Each uses a radiofrequency (rf) E field at twice the nuclear Larmor frequency (2omega(0)). The mechanism is a distortion of the E-field gradient tensor that is linear in the amplitude (E(0)) of the rf E field. The first uses 2omega(0) excitation of double-quantum transitions for times similar to T(1) (the longitudinal spin relaxation time). This perturbs the steady state distribution of spin population. Nonlinear analysis versus E(0) can be used to determine the Stark response rate. The second context uses POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR. Here, coherent, short-time (NMR multiple-pulse line-narrowing sequence. Linear analysis of the Stark response is then possible: a quadrupolar multiplet with splitting proportional to E(0). The POWER sequence converts the 2omega(0) interaction from off-diagonal/nonsecular to the familiar diagonal form (I(z)(2)) of static quadrupole interactions. Meanwhile, background contributions to line width are averaged to zero, providing orders-of-magnitude resolution enhancement for correspondingly high sensitivity to the Stark effect. Using GaAs as a test case with well-defined Stark response, we provide the first demonstration of the 2omega(0) effect at high-field (14.1 T) and room temperature. This, along with the simplicity of our apparatus and spectral approach, may facilitate extensions to a wider array of material and molecular systems. The POWER context, which has not previously been tested, is detailed here with new design insights. Several key aspects are demonstrated here, while complete implementation is to be presented at a later time. At present, we (1) account for finite pulse times in pulse sequence design, (2) demonstrate two-channel phase coherence for magnetic (omega(0)) and electric (2omega(0)) excitation, and (3) provide line narrowing by a factor of 10(3). In addition, we find that certain anomalous contributions to the line shape, observed in previous low-field (250 mT) applications, are absent here. PMID:20394397

  4. Theory and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy Arthur S. Edison

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Spectroscopy Author: Dr. Arthur S. Edison e-Mail: art@ascaris.health.ufl.edu WWW: http. Prerequisites: Graduate student or advanced undergraduate status, physical chemistry, organic chemistry Press, (1995). "Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in One and Two Dimensions" Ernst, Bodenhausen

  5. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the rodent brain after in vivo helium beam irradiation with single doses of 10, 20, 30, and 50 Gy. Two-dimensional Fourier transform spin-echo imaging and saturation recovery with projection reconstruction were used to measure the NMR relaxation parameters. These parameters were correlated with proton spectroscopy and histopathology. Additional high resolution in vitro proton spectroscopy was performed on brain extracts to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. The major findings from these experiments were that at 4-14 days postirradiation, image intensity and T1 relaxation time decreased on the irradiated side and increased on the nonirradiated side relative to nonirradiated control animals. In vivo surface coil proton spectroscopy methods demonstrated changes in lipid and phosphatidylcholine (p-choline) peaks. In vitro studies of the aqueous fraction of brain extracts showed radiation-induced changes in lactate, 4-aminobutyric acid, and p-choline peak areas. In the organic fraction, radiation-induced changes were observed in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alterations were seen as early as 4 days after a dose of 50 Gy.

  6. Single molecule NMR detection and spectroscopy using single spins in diamond

    E-print Network

    Viktor S. Perunicic; Liam T. Hall; David A. Simpson; Charles D. Hill; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2013-07-31

    Nanomagnetometry using the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond has attracted a great deal of interest because of the combined features of room temperature operation, nanoscale resolution and high sensitivity. One of the important goals for nano-magnetometry is to be able to detect nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in individual molecules. Our theoretical analysis shows how a single molecule at the surface of diamond, with characteristic NMR frequencies, can be detected using a proximate NV centre on a time scale of order seconds with nanometer precision. We perform spatio-temporal resolution optimisation and also outline paths to greater sensitivity. In addition, the method is suitable for application in low and relatively inhomogeneous background magnetic fields in contrast to both conventional liquid and solid state NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  8. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified. PMID:24041242

  9. Exploiting periodic first-principles calculations in NMR spectroscopy of disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Dawson, Daniel M

    2013-09-17

    Much of the information contained within solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra remains unexploited because of the challenges in obtaining high-resolution spectra and the difficulty in assigning those spectra. Recent advances that enable researchers to accurately and efficiently determine NMR parameters in periodic systems have revolutionized the application of density functional theory (DFT) calculations in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. These advances are particularly useful for experimentalists. The use of first-principles calculations aids in both the interpretation and assignment of the complex spectral line shapes observed for solids. Furthermore, calculations provide a method for evaluating potential structural models against experimental data for materials with poorly characterized structures. Determining the structure of well-ordered, periodic crystalline solids can be straightforward using methods that exploit Bragg diffraction. However, the deviations from periodicity, such as compositional, positional, or temporal disorder, often produce the physical properties (such as ferroelectricity or ionic conductivity) that may be of commercial interest. With its sensitivity to the atomic-scale environment, NMR provides a potentially useful tool for studying disordered materials, and the combination of experiment with first-principles calculations offers a particularly attractive approach. In this Account, we discuss some of the issues associated with the practical implementation of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters in solids. We then use two key examples to illustrate the structural insights that researchers can obtain when applying such calculations to disordered inorganic materials. First, we describe an investigation of cation disorder in Y2Ti(2-x)Sn(x)O7 pyrochlore ceramics using (89)Y and (119)Sn NMR. Researchers have proposed that these materials could serve as host phases for the encapsulation of lanthanide- and actinide-bearing radioactive waste. In a second example, we discuss how (17)O NMR can be used to probe the dynamic disorder of H in hydroxyl-humite minerals (nMg2SiO4·Mg(OH)2), and how (19)F NMR can be used to understand F substitution in these systems. The combination of first-principles calculations and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy facilitates the investigation of local structure, disorder, and dynamics in solids. We expect that applications will undoubtedly become more widespread with further advances in computational and experimental methods. Insight into the atomic-scale environment is a crucial first step in understanding the structure-property relationships in solids, and it enables the efficient design of future materials for a range of end uses. PMID:23402741

  10. INVESTIGATION INTO HOW WOOD CELL WALLS INTERACT WITH SYNTHETIC ADHESIVES USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the continued growth of the wood adhesive industry and the need to create durable and environmentally friendly adhesive systems, it is still unclear whether covalent bonds contribute to wood adhesive bond strength. In order to investigate this question, solid-state NMR spectroscopy (NMR) has be...

  11. Sub-second 2D NMR Spectroscopy at Sub-millimolar Concentrations Boaz Shapira, Erel Morris, Karol A. Muszkat, and Lucio Frydman*,

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Sub-second 2D NMR Spectroscopy at Sub-millimolar Concentrations Boaz Shapira, Erel Morris, Karol A in NMR rests on two areas that have traditionally defined the capability of a spectroscopic that enhanced NMR's sensitivity was the introduction of pulsed NMR and the time-domain signal-averaging of data

  12. Application of 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics to sera of tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aiping; Ni, Jinjing; Xu, Zhihong; Wang, Ying; Lu, Shuihua; Sha, Wei; Karakousis, Petros C.; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an ideal platform for the metabolic analysis of biofluids, due to its high reproducibility, non-destructiveness, non-selectivity in metabolite detection, and the ability to simultaneously quantify multiple classes of metabolites. Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic wasting inflammatory disease characterized by multi-system involvement, which can cause metabolic derangements in afflicted patients. In this study, we combined multivariate pattern recognition (PR) analytical techniques with 1H NMR spectroscopy to explore the metabolic profile of sera from TB patients. A total of seventy-seven serum samples obtained from patients with TB (n=38) and healthy controls (n=39) were investigated. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was capable of distinguishing TB patients from controls, and establishing a TB-specific metabolite profile. A total of 17 metabolites differed significantly in concentration between the two groups. Serum samples from TB patients were characterized by increased concentrations of 1-methylhistidine, acetoacetate, acetone, glutamate, glutamine, isoleucine, lactate, lysine, nicotinate, phenylalanine, pyruvate, and tyrosine, accompanied by reduced concentrations of alanine, formate, glycine, glycerolphosphocholine, and low-density lipoproteins relative to control subjects. Our study reveals the metabolic profile of sera from TB patients and indicates that NMR-based methods can distinguish TB patients from healthy controls. NMR-based metabolomics has the potential to be developed into a novel clinical tool for TB diagnosis and/or therapeutic monitoring, and could contribute to an improved understanding of disease mechanisms. PMID:23980697

  13. Application of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to metabotyping laboratory Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kee; Kim, Seol Hyun; Nam, Youn-Ki

    2013-10-01

    NMR Spectroscopy has been established as a major tool for identification and quantification of metabolites in a living system. Since the metabolomics era began, one-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been intensively employed due to its simplicity and quickness. However, it has suffered from an inevitable overlap of signals, thus leading to inaccuracy in identification and quantification of metabolites. Two-dimensional (2D) NMR has emerged as a viable alternative because it can offer higher accuracy in a reasonable amount of time. We employed (1) H,(13) C-HSQC to profile metabolites of six different laboratory E. coli strains. We identified 18 metabolites and observed clustering of six strains according to their metabolites. We compared the metabolites among the strains, and found that a) the strains specialized for protein production were segregated; b) XL1-Blue separated itself from others by accumulating amino acids such as alanine, aspartate, glutamate, methionine, proline, and lysine; c) the strains specialized for cloning purpose were spread out from one another; and d) the strains originating from B strain were characterized by succinate accumulation. This work shows that 2D-NMR can be applied to identify a strain from metabolite analysis, offering a possible alternative to genetic analysis to identify E. coli strains. PMID:24130025

  14. Hadamard-encoded high-resolution NMR spectroscopy via intermolecular single-quantum coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hanping; Cai, Honghao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy plays an important role in metabolite studies because it can provide atomic level information critical for understanding biological systems. Nevertheless, NMR investigations on biological tissues are hampered by the magnetic field inhomogeneities originating from variations in macroscopic magnetic susceptibility, which lead to broad spectral lines and subsequently obscure metabolite signals. A new pulse sequence based on intermolecular single-quantum coherences was proposed to obtain one-dimensional high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields via Hadamard encoding. The new method can provide resolution-improved spectra directly through one-dimensional acquisition within a relatively short acquisition time. Theoretical derivation was performed and the conclusion was tested by solution samples in purposely de-shimmed magnetic fields and pig brain tissue sample. The experimental results show that this sequence can yield useful structural information, even when the field inhomogeneity is sufficiently severe to erase almost all spectral information with conventional one-dimensional single-quantum coherence techniques. Moreover, good solvent suppression efficiency can be achieved by this sequence. This sequence may provide a promising way for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissue.

  15. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. [superscript 2]H-DNP-enhanced [superscript 2]H-[superscript 13]C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Maly, Thorsten

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution [superscript 2]H–[superscript 13]C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest ...

  17. Cis-trans isomerisation of azobenzenes studied by NMR spectroscopy with in situ laser irradiation and DFT calculations 

    E-print Network

    Wazzan, Nuha

    2009-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy with in situ laser irradiation has been used to investigate the photo- and thermal isomerisation of eight azobenzene derivatives; diphenyldiazene (azobenzene), p-phenylazoaniline (p-aminoazobenzene), 4-(dimethylamino...

  18. Structural characterization of selenosubtilisin by sup 77 Se-NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    House, K.L.; Dunlap, R.B.; Odom, J.D.; Wu, Z.P.; Hilvert. D. Research Inst. of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA )

    1991-03-15

    Selenosubtilisin is an artificial enzyme containing an active site selenocysteine residue. In this environment the selenium atom is a valuable probe of structure-function relationships and also confers novel redox and hydrolytic properties to the original protease template. The authors have used {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy to characterize different oxidation states of {sup 77}Se isotopically enriched selenosubtilisin. The oxidized form of the enzyme exhibits a {sup 77}Se resonance at 1,189 ppm. This is in good agreement with the {sup 77}Se chemical shifts for model seleninic acids, confirming that the prosthetic group is in the seleninic acid oxidation state. On treatment of the oxidized enzyme with three equivalents of 3-carboxy-4-nitrobenzenethiol at pH 5.0, they observe the enzyme bound selenenyl sulfide at 388.5 ppm. This work demonstrates the utility of {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy for examining structure-function relationships of selenium containing proteins.

  19. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  20. Application of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy in structural investigations of Vinca indole alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Yagudaev, M.R.

    1986-07-01

    This paper considers the laws connecting the parameters of the H 1 and C 13 NMR spectra with the structure of the substances and the use of these laws for solving structural and stereochemical problems of the Vinca indole alkaloids and other compounds of closely related structure. For each type of alkaloid, characteristic features of the PMR and C 13 NMR spectra are given that permit the structures of similar bases to be established and their stereochemical identification to be performed.

  1. Use of NMR spectroscopy for the understanding of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Radda, G.K.

    1986-08-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can now be used to investigate the biochemical energetics of human tissues and organs noninvasively. The method already has increased our understanding of some muscle diseases, has provided information from muscle metabolism about whole-body functions, control, and hormonal status, has helped in the elucidation of hitherto unrecognized causes of disease, and yielded new ideas about the control of bioenergetics in vivo. Studies on the biochemistry of human brain, liver, heart, and kidney are just beginning. Further investigations of well-selected patients are likely to bring biochemistry and clinical practice closer together.

  2. Study of diffusion coefficient of anhydrous trehalose glasses by using PFG-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Takekawa, Reiji; Kawamura, Junichi; Tokuyama, Michio

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the temperature dependent long time self-diffusion coefficient of the anhydrous trehalose supercooled liquids by using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) spectroscopy. At the same temperature ranges, the diffusion coefficient convoluted from the ?-relaxation time as Einstein-Smoluchowski relaxation, measured by using the dielectric loss spectroscopy are well overlapped with diffusion coefficients within experimental error. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficients obtained from different methods are normalized by fictive temperature and well satisfied the single master curve, proposed by Tokuyama.

  3. High resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy of human osteoarthritic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Keerthi; Siddiqui, Sarmad M.; Yoshihara, Hikari; Kurhanewicz, John; Ries, Michael; Li, Xiaojuan

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the joint and results in changes in the biochemical composition of cartilage. Studies have been undertaken in the past that have used high resolution NMR spectroscopy to study the biochemical composition of porcine, canine and bovine cartilage. In this study high resolution magical angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy at 11.7 T has been used to characterize metabolites and detect differences in the spectral signature of human knee articular cartilage from non-OA healthy cadaver knees and samples acquired from severe OA patients at the time of total knee replacement surgery. A statistically significant difference in the alanine (1.47 ppm), N-acetyl (2.04 ppm), choline (3.25 ppm) and glycine (3.55 ppm) metabolite levels is observed between healthy and OA specimens. The results of the study indicate that a decrease in the intensity of N-acetyl resonance occurs in later stages of OA. A positive correlation of the N-acetyl levels as measured by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy with the total proteoglycan content in the same cartilage specimens as measured by the GAG assay was observed. This indicates that N-acetyl can serve as an important bio-marker of OA disease progression. A decrease in the alanine concentration in OA may be attributed to the degradation of the collagen framework with disease progression and eventual loss of the degradation products that are transported from cartilage into the synovial cavity. PMID:21850648

  4. Methodology of H NMR Spectroscopy of the Human Brain at Very High Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Tká?, I; Gruetter, R

    2005-03-01

    An ultrashort-echo-time stimulated echo-acquisition mode (STEAM) pulse sequence with interleaved outer volume suppression and VAPOR (variable power and optimized relaxation delays) water suppression was redesigned and optimized for human applications at 4 and 7 T, taking into account the specific requirements for spectroscopy at high magnetic fields and limitations of currently available hardware. In combination with automatic shimming, automated parameter adjustments and data processing, this method provided a user-friendly tool for routine (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the human brain at very high magnetic fields. Effects of first- and second-order shimming, single-scan averaging, frequency and phase corrections, and eddy currents were described. LCModel analysis of an in vivo (1)H NMR spectrum measured from the human brain at 7 T allowed reliable quantification of more than fifteen metabolites noninvasively, illustrating the potential of high-field NMR spectroscopy. Examples of spectroscopic studies performed at 4 and 7 T demonstrated the high reproducibility of acquired spectra quality. PMID:20179773

  5. NMR Spectroscopy on Heusler Thin Films — a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmehl, Sabine; Kohlhepp, Jürgen T.

    2014-10-01

    Heusler compounds exhibit different electronic ground states and functionalities, making them attractive materials for studies of their fundamental properties and for their technological exploitation. The high spin polarization, predicted in particular for Co2-based Heusler compounds, renders them prime candidates for electrode materials in spintronic devices such as giant magnetoresistance (GMR) elements or magnetic tunnel junctions and requires their implementation in thin film stacks. The growth of high quality Heusler films, however, demands their careful characterization. Typical issues in Heusler thin films are, besides the type and degree of structural order, the control of the film composition and the conservation of smooth interfaces between different layers in the film, e.g., between the Heusler layer and the tunneling barrier, while at the same time enabling high structural order. This review illustrates how nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy contributes to those issues by discussing recent examples of nuclear magnetic resonance studies of Heusler thin films.

  6. Identifying metabolites related to nitrogen mineralisation using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . T McDonald, Noeleen; Graham, Stewart; Watson, Catherine; Gordon, Alan; Lalor, Stan; Laughlin, Ronnie; Elliott, Chris; . P Wall, David

    2015-04-01

    Exploring new analysis techniques to enhance our knowledge of the various metabolites within our soil systems is imperative. Principally, this knowledge would allow us to link key metabolites with functional influences on critical nutrient processes, such as the nitrogen (N) mineralisation in soils. Currently there are few studies that utilize proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) to characterize multiple metabolites within a soil sample. The aim of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of 1H NMR for isolating multiple metabolites that are related to the mineralizable N (MN) capacity across a range of 35 Irish grassland soils. Soils were measured for MN using the standard seven day anaerobic incubation (AI-7). Additionally, soils were also analysed for a range of physio-chemical properties [e.g. total N, total C, mineral N, texture and soil organic matter (SOM)]. Proton NMR analysis was carried on these soils by extracting with 40% methanol:water, lyophilizing and reconstituting in deuterium oxide and recording the NMR spectra on a 400MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer. Once the NMR data were spectrally processed and analysed using multivariate statistical analysis, seven metabolites were identified as having significant relationships with MN (glucose, trimethylamine, glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, 4-aminohippuirc acid and citric acid). Following quantification, glucose was shown to explain the largest percentage variability in MN (72%). These outcomes suggest that sources of labile carbon are essential in regulating N mineralisation and the capacity of plant available N derived from SOM-N pools in these soils. Although, smaller in concentration, the amino acids; 4-aminohippuirc acid, glutamic acid and serine also significantly (P<0.05) explained 43%, 27% and 19% of the variability in MN, respectively. This novel study highlights the effectiveness of using 1H NMR as a practical approach to profile multiple metabolites in soils simultaneously, and increasing the potential to identify those related to various soil processes.

  7. Lithium ion diffusion in Li ?-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li ?-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup ?11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup ?13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the ?-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li ?-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li ?-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li ?–alumina system.

  8. Stationary interphases with extended alkyl chains: a comparative study on chain order by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pursch, M; Brindle, R; Ellwanger, A; Sander, L C; Bell, C M; Händel, H; Albert, K

    1997-12-01

    Stationary interphases with long n-alkyl chains (n = 18, 22, 30, 34) have been examined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The determination of the silane functionality and the degree of cross-linking of silane ligands on the silica surface was performed by 29Si CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. High-speed 1H MAS and 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy were utilized to assess alkyl chain order and mobility of the different bonded phases. For this purpose, 1H NMR line widths and 13C chemical shifts have been evaluated. It is shown that stationary phase order and rigidity increase with alkyl chain length. In addition, the temperature-dependent trans/gauche conformational change occurs at higher temperatures for a polymeric C34 phase compared with a C30 sorbent. This behaviour is discussed in the context of previously reported chromatographic (HPLC) shape selectivity differences. PMID:9477449

  9. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore »of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  10. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR. PMID:25437754

  11. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  12. High resolution sup 27 Al NMR spectroscopy of the aluminophosphate molecular sieve VPI-5

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Chmelka, B.F.; Pines, A. ); Davis, M.E. ); Grobet, P.J.; Jacobs, P.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Aluminium plays an important part in determining the properties of many materials, such as the catalytic behavior of zeolites. Aluminophosphate molecular sieves, in particular, have useful applications as superlattice hosts in the fabrication of quantum-effect devices. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often a sensitive probe of solids, the use of {sup 27}Al NMR to investigate the structure of aluminosilicates and aluminophosphates has been severely limited because anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions, responsible for spectral broadening, cannot be eliminated by conventional magic-angle-spinning or multiple-pulse techniques. Here the authors report the first high-resolution NMR spectra of {sup 27}Al in a solid using double rotation and demonstrate its usefulness for probing subtle structural perturbations in the aluminophosphate molecular sieve VPI-5. From their results, they conclude that high-resolution {sup 27}Al NMR is capable of resolving discrete framework aluminium sites, permitting quantitative investigation of site-specific adsorbate interactions with the VPI-5 host.

  13. The study of transient protein-nanoparticle interactions by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Michael; Ragona, Laura; Pagano, Katiuscia; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Zanzoni, Serena; Tomaselli, Simona; Molinari, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of novel nanoscale materials for applications in biomedicine urges an improved characterization of the nanobio interfaces. Nanoparticles exhibit unique structures and properties, often different from the corresponding bulk materials, and the nature of their interactions with biological systems remains poorly characterized. Solution NMR spectroscopy is a mature technique for the investigation of biomolecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular associations, however its use in protein-nanoparticle interaction studies remains scarce and highly challenging, particularly due to unfavorable hydrodynamic properties of most nanoscale assemblies. Nonetheless, recent efforts demonstrated that a number of NMR observables, such as chemical shifts, signal intensities, amide exchange rates and relaxation parameters, together with newly designed saturation transfer experiments, could be successfully employed to characterize the orientation, structure and dynamics of proteins adsorbed onto nanoparticle surfaces. This review provides the first survey and critical assessment of the contributions from solution NMR spectroscopy to the study of transient interactions between proteins and both inorganic (gold, silver, and silica) and organic (polymer, carbon and lipid based) nanoparticles. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25936778

  14. Qualitative and Quantitative Control of Carbonated Cola Beverages Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D2O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as “fingerprints” and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  15. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kryczka, Tomasz; Wyl?ga?a, Edward; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Midelfart, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years). The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye. PMID:25525621

  16. A Blind Source Separation Method for Nearly Degenerate Mixtures and Its Applications to NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yuanchang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel blind source separation (BSS) method for nonnegative and correlated data, particularly for the nearly degenerate data. The motivation lies in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, where a multiple mixture NMR spectra are recorded to identify chemical compounds with similar structures (degeneracy). There have been a number of successful approaches for solving BSS problems by exploiting the nature of source signals. For instance, independent component analysis (ICA) is used to separate statistically independent (orthogonal) source signals. However, signal orthogonality is not guaranteed in many real-world problems. This new BSS method developed here deals with nonorthogonal signals. The independence assumption is replaced by a condition which requires dominant interval(s) (DI) from each of source signals over others. Additionally, the mixing matrix is assumed to be nearly singular. The method first estimates the mixing matrix by exploiting geometry in data clustering. ...

  17. Design and application of robust rf pulses for toroid cavity NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Thomas E. Skinner; Michael Braun; Klaus Woelk; Naum I. Gershenzon; Steffen J. Glaser

    2010-11-29

    We present robust radio frequency (rf) pulses that tolerate a factor of six inhomogeneity in the B1 field, significantly enhancing the potential of toroid cavity resonators for NMR spectroscopic applications. Both point-to-point (PP) and unitary rotation (UR) pulses were optimized for excitation, inversion, and refocusing using the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm based on optimal control theory. In addition, the optimized parameterization (OP) algorithm applied to the adiabatic BIR-4 UR pulse scheme enabled ultra-short (50 microsec) pulses with acceptable performance compared to standard implementations. OP also discovered a new class of non-adiabatic pulse shapes with improved performance within the BIR-4 framework. However, none of the OP-BIR4 pulses are competitive with the more generally optimized UR pulses. The advantages of the new pulses are demonstrated in simulations and experiments. In particular, the DQF COSY result presented here represents the first implementation of 2D NMR spectroscopy using a toroid probe.

  18. Application of /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy to the study of striated muscle metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Kushmerick, M.J.; Brown, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    This review presents the principles and limitations of phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P-NMR) spectroscopy as applied to the study of striated muscle metabolism. Application of the techniques discussed include noninvasive measurement of high-energy phosphate, intracellular pH, intracellular free Mg/sup 2 +/, and metabolite compartmentation. In perfused cat biceps (fast-twitch) muscles, but not in soleus (slow-twitch), NMR spectra indicate a substantially lower (1 mM) free inorganic phosphate level than when measured chemically (6 mM). In addition, saturation and inversion spin-transfer methods that enable direct measurement of the unidirectional fluxes through creatine kinase are described. In perfused cat biceps muscle, results suggest that this enzyme and its substrates are in simple chemical equilibrium.

  19. Detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents through RSDL: efficacy evaluation by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne

    2015-03-01

    Intoxication by organophosphorus compounds, especially by pesticides, poses a considerable risk to the affected individual. Countermeasures involve both medical intervention by means of antidotes as well as external decontamination to reduce the risk of dermal absorption. One of the few decontamination options available is Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), which was originally developed for military use. Here, we present a (31)P NMR spectroscopy based methodology to evaluate the detoxification efficacy of RSDL with respect to a series of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. Kinetic analysis of the obtained NMR data provided degradation half-lives proving that RSDL is also reasonably effective against organophosphorus pesticides. Unexpected observations of different RSDL degradation patterns are presented in view of its reported oximate-catalyzed mechanism of action. PMID:25597861

  20. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25797010

  1. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy of (13)C methanol at less than 5 ?T.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon-Kyu; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy is one of the most significant applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here, we demonstrate that the 2D NMR can be performed even at a low magnetic field of less than 5?T, which is ten times less than the Earth's magnetic field. The pulses used in the experiment were composed of circularly polarized fields for coherent as well as wideband excitations. Since the excitation band covers the entire spectral range, the simplest two-pulse sequence delivered the full 2D spectrum. At 5?T, methanol with (13)C enriched up to 99% belongs to a strongly coupled regime, and thus its 2D spectrum exhibits complicated spectral correlations, which can be exploited as a fingerprint in chemical analysis. In addition, we show that, with compressive sensing, the acquisition of the 2D spectrum can be accelerated to take only 45% of the overall duration. PMID:25063950

  2. N-15 NMR Spectroscopy as a Method for Comparing the Rates of Imidization of Several Diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. Christopher; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2006-01-01

    The relative rates of the conversion of amide-acid to imide was measured for a series or aromatic diamines that have been identified as potential replacements for 4,4'-methylene dianiline (MDA) in high-temperature polyimides and polymer composites. These rates were compared with the N-15 NMR resonances of the unreacted amines. The initial rates of imidization track with the difference in chemical shift between the amine nitrogens in MDA and those in the subject diamines. This comparison demonstrated that N-15 NMR spectroscopy is appropriate for the rapid screening of candidate diamines to determine their reactivity relative to MDA, and can serve to provide guidance to the process of creating the time-temperature profiles used in processing these materials into polymer matrix composites.

  3. Isotope-Filtered 4D NMR Spectroscopy for Structure Determination of Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholle G A; Michalchuk, Adam A L; Blackburn, John W T; Graham, Margaret C; Uhrín, Dušan

    2015-07-13

    Humic substances, the main component of soil organic matter, could form an integral part of green and sustainable solutions to the soil fertility problem. However, their global-scale application is hindered from both scientific and regulatory perspectives by the lack of understanding of the molecular make-up of these chromatographically inseparable mixtures containing thousands of molecules. Here we show how multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of isotopically tagged molecules enables structure characterization of humic compounds. We illustrate this approach by identifying major substitution patterns of phenolic aromatic moieties of a peat soil fulvic acid, an operational fraction of humic substances. Our methodology represents a paradigm shift in the use of NMR active tags in structure determination of small molecules in complex mixtures. Unlike previous tagging methodologies that focused on the signals of the tags, we utilize tags to directly probe the identity of the molecules they are attached to. PMID:26036217

  4. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Influences of membrane curvature in lipid hexagonal phases studied by deuterium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmond, R.L.; Lindblom, G.; Brown, M.F. )

    1990-12-31

    The presence of reversed hexagonal phase, HII, favoring lipids in membranes has been proposed to be significant in various biological processes. Therefore an understanding of the HII phase and the transition from the lamellar to hexagonal phase is of importance. We have applied deuterium NMR spectroscopy to study the bilayer and reversed hexagonal phases of 1-perdeuteriopalmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. The difference in packing between the HII and L alpha phases leads to smaller segmental order parameters in the former case. Since the order profiles are sensitive to the geometry of the aggregates, they can be used to extract structural information about the phases. We present a new means of calculating the radius of curvature, R1, for the HII phase from 2H NMR data. This method gives a value of R1 = 18.1 A, which is in agreement with current understanding of the structure of the HII phase and with x-ray diffraction data.

  6. Proton to carbon-13 INEPT in solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elena, Bénédicte; Lesage, Anne; Steuernagel, Stefan; Böckmann, Anja; Emsley, Lyndon

    2005-12-14

    A refocused INEPT through-bond coherence transfer technique is demonstrated for NMR of rigid organic solids and is shown to provide a valuable building block for the development of NMR correlation experiments in biological solids. The use of efficient proton homonuclear dipolar decoupling in combination with a direct spectral optimization procedure provides minimization of the transverse dephasing of coherences and leads to very efficient through-bond (1)H-(13)C INEPT transfer for crystalline organic compounds. Application of this technique to 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy leads to up to a factor of 3 increase in sensitivity for a carbon-13 enriched sample in comparison to standard through-bond experiments and provides excellent selectivity for one-bond transfer. The method is demonstrated on a microcrystalline sample of the protein Crh (2 x 10.4 kDa). PMID:16332079

  7. Dynamic processes and chemical composition of Lepidium sativum seeds determined by means of field-cycling NMR relaxometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rachocki, A; Latanowicz, L; Tritt-Goc, J

    2012-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as field-cycling relaxometry, wide-line NMR spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, were applied to study the seeds of cress, Lepidium sativum. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used for the first time to investigate the properties of the whole molecular system of dry cress seeds. This method not only allowed the dynamics to be studied, but was also successful in the differentiation among the solid (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, or fats forming a solid form of lipids) and liquid-like (oil compounds) components of the seeds. The (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion of oils was interpreted as a superposition of intramolecular and intermolecular contributions. The intramolecular part was described in terms of a Lorentzian spectral density function, whereas a log-Gaussian distribution of correlation times was applied for the intermolecular dipole-dipole contribution. The models applied led to very good agreement with the experimental data and demonstrate that the contribution of the intermolecular relaxation to the overall relaxation should not be disregarded, especially at low frequencies. A power-law frequency dependence of the proton relaxation dispersion was used for the interpretation of the solid components. From the analysis of the (1)H wide-line NMR spectra of the liquid-like component of hydrated cress seeds, we can conclude that the contribution of oil protons should always be taken into account when evaluating the spin-lattice relaxation times values or measuring the moisture and oil content. The application of (1)H magic angle spinning NMR significantly improves resolution in the liquid-like spectrum of seeds and allows the determination of the chemical composition of cress seeds. PMID:23001307

  8. Heteronuclear dipolar couplings, total spin coherence, and bilinear rotations in NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    In Chapter 1 a variety of different introductory topics are presented. The potential complexity of the nuclear magnetic resonsnace (NMR) spectra of molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents serves to motivate the development of multiple quantum (MQ) spectroscopy. The basics of MQ NMR are reviewed in Chapter 2. An experimental search procedure for the optimization of MQ pulse sequences is introduced. Chapter 3 discusses the application of MQ NMR techniques to the measurement of dipolar couplings in heteronuclear spin systems. The advantages of MQ methods in such systems are developed and experimental results for partially oriented (1-/sup 13/C) benzene are presented. Several pulse sequences are introduced which employ a two-step excitation of heteronuclear MQ coherence. A new multiple pulse method, involving the simultaneous irradiation of both rare and abundant spin species, is described. The problem of the broadening of MQ transitions due to magnetic field inhomogeneity is considered in Chapter 4. The method of total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy (TSCTES) is presented, with experimets on partially oriented acetaldehyde serving to demonstrate this new technique. TSCTES results in MQ spectra which are sensitive to all chemical shifts and spin-spin couplings and which are free of inhomogeneous broadening. In Chapter 5 the spectroscopy of spin systems of several protons and a /sup 13/C nucleus in the isotropic phase is discussed. The usefulness of the heteronuclear bilinear rotation as a calculational tool is illustrated. Compensated bilinear ..pi.. rotations, which are relatively insensitive to timing parameter missets, are presented. A new technique for homonuclear proton decoupling, Bilinear Rotation Decoupling, is described and its success in weakly coupled systems is demonstrated.

  9. Laser spectroscopy and beta-NMR measurements of short-lived Mg isotopes

    E-print Network

    Kowalska, M

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of studying the neutron-rich 29Mg, 31Mg and 33Mg isotopes has been demonstrated with the laser and beta-NMR spectroscopy setup at ISOLDE/CERN. The values of the magnetic moment and the nuclear spin of 31Mg are reported and reveal an intruder ground state. This proves the weakening of N=20 shell gap and places this nucleus inside the so called "island of inversion". The experimental setup and technique, as well as the results, are presented.

  10. Impact of Hydrophilic Surfaces on Interfacial Water Dynamics Probed with NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hyok; Paranji, Rajan

    2011-01-01

    In suspensions of Nafion beads and of cationic gel beads, NMR spectroscopy showed two water–proton resonances, one representing intimate water layers next to the polymer surface, the other corresponding to water lying beyond. Both resonances show notably shorter spin–lattice relaxation times (T1) and smaller self-diffusion coefficients (D) indicating slower dynamics than bulk water. These findings confirm the existence of highly restricted water layers adsorbed onto hydrophilic surfaces and dynamically stable water beyond the first hydration layers. Thus, aqueous regions on the order of micrometers are dynamically different from bulk water. PMID:22003430

  11. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils for Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Marcus D; Courtney, Joseph M; Barclay, Alexander M; Rienstra, Chad M

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) is an established and invaluable tool for the study of amyloid fibril structure with atomic-level detail. Optimization of the homogeneity and concentration of fibrils enhances the resolution and sensitivity of SSNMR spectra. Here, we present a fibrillization and fibril processing protocol, starting from purified monomeric ?-synuclein, that enables the collection of high-resolution SSNMR spectra suitable for site-specific structural analysis. This protocol does not rely on any special features of ?-synuclein and should be generalizable to any other amyloid protein. PMID:26453212

  12. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (?), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low ? values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched. The Hartmann-Hahn condition can be expressed as ?HB1H = ?CB1C, where ?H and ?C are the gyromagnetic ratios of protons and carbons, whereas B1H and B1C are the 1H and 13C radio-frequency (r.f.) fields applied to the nuclei. The Hartmann-Hahn condition is affected by the H-C dipolar interaction strength (Stejskal & Memory, 1994). All the factors affecting dipolar interactions may mismatch the Hartmann-Hahn condition and prevent a quantitative representation of the NOM chemical composition (Conte et al., 2004). It has been reported that under low speed MAS conditions, broad matching profiles are centered around the Hartmann-Hahn condition....... With increasing spinning speed the Hartmann-Hahn matching profiles break down in a series of narrow matching bands separated by the rotor frequency (Stejskal & Memory, 1994). In order to account for the instability of the Hartmann-Hahn condition at higher rotor spin rates (>10 kHz), variable amplitude cross-polarization techniques (RAMP-CP) have been developed (Metz et al., 1996). So far, to our knowledge, the prevailing way used to obtain quantitative 13C-CPMAS NMR results was to optimize the 1H and 13C spin lock r.f. fields on simple standard systems such as glycine and to use those r.f. field values to run experiments on unknown organic samples. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evidence that the stability of the Hartmann-Hahn condition was different for different samples with a known structure. Moreover, Hartmann-Hahn profiles of four different humic acids (HAs) were also provided in order to show that the 1H/13C r.f. spin lock field strength must also be tested on the HAs prior to a quantitative evaluation of their 13C-CPMAS NMR spectra. Baldock, J.A., Oades, J.M., Nelson, P.N., Skene, T.M., Golchin, A. & Clarke, P., 1997. Assessing the extent of decomposition of natural organic materials using solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Australian Journal of Soil Research, 35, 1061-1083. Conte, P., Piccolo, A., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & de Jager, P.A., 1997. Quantitative Aspects of So

  13. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  14. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Functional group analysis in coal and on coal surfaces by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the oxygen-bearing labile hydrogen functional groups (e.g., carboxylic acids, phenols and alcohols) in coal is required for today's increasingly sophisticated coal cleaning and beneficiation processes. Phospholanes (compounds having the general structure -POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O (1)) are being investigated as reagents for the tagging of liable hydrogen functional groups in coal materials with the NMR-active {sup 31}P nucleus. Of twelve such reagents investigated so far, 2 (2-chloro-1,3-dioxaphospholane, ClPOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O) and 8 (2-chloro-1,3-dithiaphospholane, ClPSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}S) have been found to be useful in identifying and quantitating, by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, labile hydrogen functional groups in an Illinois No. 6 coal condensate. Reagent 2 has also been used to quantitate moisture in pyridine extracts of Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Preliminary {sup 119}Sn NMR spectroscopic results on model compounds with the new reagent CF{sub 3}C(O)NHSnMe{sub 3} (N-trimethylstannyltrifluoroacetamide, 14) suggest that labile hydrogen functional groups in coal materials may be more precisely identified with 14 than with phospholanes. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy for the analysis of edible oils?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T.; Limer, E.; Watson, A.D.; Defernez, M.; Williamson, D.; Kemsley, E. Kate

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results from a new 60 MHz 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bench-top spectrometer, Pulsar, in a study simulating the adulteration of olive oil with hazelnut oil. There were qualitative differences between spectra from the two oil types. A single internal ratio of two isolated groups of peaks could detect hazelnut oil in olive oil at the level of ?13%w/w, whereas a whole-spectrum chemometric approach brought the limit of detection down to 11.2%w/w for a set of independent test samples. The Pulsar’s performance was compared to that of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Pulsar delivered comparable sensitivity and improved specificity, making it a superior screening tool. We also mapped NMR onto FTIR spectra using a correlation-matrix approach. Interpretation of this heat-map combined with the established annotations of the NMR spectra suggested a hitherto undocumented feature in the IR spectrum at ?1130 cm?1, attributable to a double-bond vibration. PMID:24850979

  17. Oil droplet size determination in complex flavor delivery systems by diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Hafner, Valeria; Normand, Valéry

    2011-04-15

    Droplet size distribution of flavor oils in two different solid flavor delivery systems were determined with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy: yeast encapsulation system, a spray dried flavor encapsulation system based on empty yeast cells, and glassy encapsulation system, an extruded solid water soluble carbohydrate delivery system. The oil droplet sizes are limited by the yeast cell walls in the yeast encapsulation system and the size distribution is unimodal according to images from transmission electron microscopy. The droplet size determination with diffusion NMR is based on the Murday and Cotts theory of restricted diffusion of liquids in geometrical confinements. Good fits of the diffusion data could be obtained by applying a unimodal, log-normal size distribution model and average droplet sizes of about 2 ?m were found that correspond approximately to the inner diameter of the yeast cells. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a multimodal droplet size distribution in the glassy extruded delivery systems. To fit the NMR data a bimodal log-normal distribution function with five independent fitting parameters was implemented that yielded consistent and robust results. The two size populations were found in the micron and sub-micron range, respectively. The method was sufficiently accurate to depict variation of droplet size distributions in glassy encapsulation systems of different formulation. PMID:21316700

  18. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  19. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  20. Analysis of trivalent cation complexation to functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Jennifer; Mason, Harris; Bruchet, Anthony; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B; Nitsche, Heino

    2014-11-28

    Functionalized mesoporous silica has applications in separations science, catalysis, and sensors. In this work, we studied the fundamental interactions of trivalent cations with functionalized mesoporous silica. We contacted trivalent cations of varying ionic radii with N-[5-(trimethoxysilyl)-2-aza-1-oxopentyl]caprolactam functionalized mesoporous silica with the aim of probing the binding mechanism of the metal to the surface of the solid. We studied the functionalized silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy before and after contact with the metals of interest. We collected NMR spectra of the various metals, as well as of (29)Si and (13)C to probe the silica substrate and the ligand properties, respectively. The NMR spectra indicate that the metals bind to the functionalized silica via two mechanisms. Aluminum sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, but with different coordination for each. Scandium also sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, and unlike the aluminum, had the same coordination number. Additionally, the functionalized silica was susceptible to acid hydrolysis and two primary mechanisms of degradation were observed: detachment from the silica surface and opening of the seven-membered ring in the ligand. Opening of the seven-membered ring may be beneficial in that it decreases steric hindrance of the molecule for binding. PMID:25265419

  1. Enhanced sensitivity by nonuniform sampling enables multidimensional MAS NMR spectroscopy of protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Palmer, Melissa; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Rovnyak, David; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-06-28

    We report dramatic sensitivity enhancements in multidimensional MAS NMR spectra by the use of nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduce maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity between the time and frequency domains of the NUS acquired data sets. A systematic analysis of sensitivity and resolution in 2D and 3D NUS spectra reveals that with NUS, at least 1.5- to 2-fold sensitivity enhancement can be attained in each indirect dimension without compromising the spectral resolution. These enhancements are similar to or higher than those attained by the newest-generation commercial cryogenic probes. We explore the benefits of this NUS/MaxEnt approach in proteins and protein assemblies using 1-73-(U-(13)C,(15)N)/74-108-(U-(15)N) Escherichia coli thioredoxin reassembly. We demonstrate that in thioredoxin reassembly, NUS permits acquisition of high-quality 3D-NCACX spectra, which are inaccessible with conventional sampling due to prohibitively long experiment times. Of critical importance, issues that hinder NUS-based SNR enhancement in 3D-NMR of liquids are mitigated in the study of solid samples in which theoretical enhancements on the order of 3-4 fold are accessible by compounding the NUS-based SNR enhancement of each indirect dimension. NUS/MINT is anticipated to be widely applicable and advantageous for multidimensional heteronuclear MAS NMR spectroscopy of proteins, protein assemblies, and other biological systems. PMID:22667827

  2. Novel monosaccharide fermentation products in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus identified using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Isern, Nancy G.; Xue, Junfeng; Rao, Jaya V.; Cort, John R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2013-04-03

    Profiles of metabolites produced by the thermophilic obligately anaerobic cellulose-degrading Gram-positive bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 strain following growth on different monosaccharides (D-glucose, D-mannose, L-arabinose, D-arabinose, D-xylose, L-fucose, and D-fucose) as carbon sources revealed several unexpected fermentation products, suggesting novel metabolic capacities and unexplored metabolic pathways in this organism. Both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to determine intracellular and extracellular metabolite profiles. Metabolite profiles were determined from 1-D 1H NMR spectra by curve fitting against spectral libraries provided in Chenomx software. To reduce uncertainties due to unassigned, overlapping, or poorly-resolved peaks, metabolite identifications were confirmed with 2-D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments. In addition to expected metabolites such as acetate, lactate, glycerol, and ethanol, several novel fermentation products were identified: ethylene glycol (from growth on D-arabinose, though not L-arabinose), acetoin and 2,3-butanediol (from D-glucose and L-arabinose), and hydroxyacetone (from D-mannose and L-arabinose). Production of ethylene glycol from D-arabinose was particularly notable, with around 10% of the substrate carbon converted into this uncommon fermentation product. The novel products have not previously been reported to be produced by C. saccharolyticus, nor would they be easily predicted from the current genome annotation, and show new potentials for using this strain for production of bioproducts.

  3. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Adam F.; Otting, Gottfried; Folmer, Rutger H.A.; Duggin, Iain G.; Wake, R. Gerry; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A. . E-mail: Jackie.Wilce@med.monash.edu.au

    2005-09-23

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlation spectra of a {sup 15}N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C,70% {sup 2}H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectra revealed that the N-termini, {alpha}3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface.

  4. Solid-State (87)Sr NMR Spectroscopy at Natural Abundance and High Magnetic Field Strength.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Alexandra; Terskikh, Victor V; Ye, Eric; Bernard, Guy M; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2015-12-10

    Twenty-five strontium-containing solids were characterized via (87)Sr NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance and high magnetic field strength (B0 = 21.14 T). Strontium nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in these compounds are sensitive to the strontium site symmetry and range from 0 to 50.5 MHz. An experimental (87)Sr chemical shift scale is proposed, and available data indicate a chemical shift range of approximately 550 ppm, from -200 to +350 ppm relative to Sr(2+)(aq). In general, magnetic shielding increased with strontium coordination number. Experimentally measured chemical shift anisotropy is reported for stationary samples of solid powdered SrCl2·6H2O, SrBr2·6H2O, and SrCO3, with ?aniso((87)Sr) values of +28, +26, and -65 ppm, respectively. NMR parameters were calculated using CASTEP, a gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) DFT-based program, which addresses the periodic nature of solids using plane-wave basis sets. Calculated NMR parameters are in good agreement with those measured. PMID:26565918

  5. Structural characterization of lignins isolated from Caragana sinica using FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Mohanty, Amar K

    2011-09-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass, six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic solvents and alkaline solutions. The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). FT-IR spectra revealed that the "core" of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given. The results of 1H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2, isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH, was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit. Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum, the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1, extracted with 70% ethanol, presents a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (61% of total side chains), and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as beta-beta', beta-1', and beta-5') and a lower S/G ratio. Furthermore, a small percentage (ca. 9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the gamma-carbon. PMID:22097829

  6. High-sensitivity multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of a smectite clay and of clay-intercalated polymer.

    PubMed

    Hou, S S; Beyer, F L; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of a smectite clay low in paramagnetic ions, and NMR experiments to detect organic material near the silicate surfaces with high sensitivity, have been explored by 1H, 29Si, and 13C NMR. In oven-dried hectorite clay, 1H NMR reveals a sharp signal at 0.35 ppm that narrows significantly with spinning speed. It is assigned to the "inner" OH protons of the silicate layers. In fluorohectorite, where the OH groups are replaced by fluorines, no such 1H peak is observed. The assignment is further confirmed by the efficient cross-polarization observed in two-dimensional (2D) 1H-29Si HETCOR spectra, and by 29Si-detected REDOR experiments with 1H-dephasing in the 29Si dipolar field, which yield a 1H-29Si distance of 2.9 + 0.4 A. In these 1H-29Si experiments, the sensitivity of the 29Si signal is enhanced at least fivefold by refocusing the decay resulting from the inhomogeneous broadening of the single 29Si peak, stretching the 29Si signal out over 80 ms. The small 1H linewidth of this signal at spinning frequencies exceeding 4 kHz is attributed to the large proton-proton distances in the clay. The upfield isotropic chemical shift of the OH groups is explained by their inaccessibility to hydrogen-bonding partners, as a result of their location in hexagonal "cavities" of the clay structure. The well-resolved, easily selectable OH-proton signal and the high-sensitivity 29Si detection open excellent perspectives for NMR studies of composites of clays with organic molecules. Two-dimensional 1H-29Si and 1H-1H chemical-shift correlation experiments enable efficient detection of the 1H spectrum of organic segments near the clay surface. Combined with 1H spin diffusion, the organic segments at up to several nanometers from the clay surfaces can be probed. A 2D 1H-13C correlation experiment yields the 13C spectrum of the organic species near the clay surfaces. A mobility gradient of intercalated poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, segments is proven in 1H-3Si WISE experiments with spin diffusion. PMID:12469807

  7. Broadband 180 degree universal rotation pulses for NMR spectroscopy designed by optimal control

    E-print Network

    Skinner, Thomas E; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Bermel, Wolfgang; Luy, Burkhard; Glaser, Steffen J

    2011-01-01

    Broadband inversion pulses that rotate all magnetization components 180 degrees about a given fixed axis are necessary for refocusing and mixing in high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The relative merits of various methodologies for generating pulses suitable for broadband refocusing are considered. The de novo design of 180 degree universal rotation pulses using optimal control can provide improved performance compared to schemes which construct refocusing pulses as composites of existing pulses. The advantages of broadband universal rotation by optimized pulses (BURBOP) are most evident for pulse design that includes tolerance to RF inhomogeneity or miscalibration. We present new modifications of the optimal control algorithm that incorporate symmetry principles and relax conservative limits on peak RF pulse amplitude for short time periods that pose no threat to the probe. We apply them to generate a set of pulses suitable for widespread use in Carbon-13 spectroscopy on the majority of available probes.

  8. Directly Decoupled Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy for the Analysis of Compound Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Simon; Zangger, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of compound mixtures by NMR spectroscopy, it is important to assign the different peaks to the individual constituents. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) is often used for the separation of signals based on their self-diffusion coefficient. However, this method often fails in the case of signal overlap, which is a particular problem for 1H-detected DOSY spectra. Herein, an approach that allows the acquisition of homonuclear broadband-decoupled DOSY spectra without the introduction of an additional decoupling dimension, by instant decoupling during acquisition, is presented. It was demonstrated on a mixture of six alcohols, and the investigation of the binding of a dodecapeptide to membrane mimetics. PMID:25059845

  9. Structural investigation of aluminium doped ZnO nanoparticles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Avadhut, Yamini S; Weber, Johannes; Hammarberg, Elin; Feldmann, Claus; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2012-09-01

    The electrical conductivity of aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO, ZnO:Al) materials depends on doping induced defects and grain structure. This study aims at relating macroscopic electrical conductivity of AZO nanoparticles with their atomic structure, which is non-trivial because the derived materials are heavily disordered and heterogeneous in nature. For this purpose we synthesized AZO nanoparticles with different doping levels and narrow size distribution by a microwave assisted polyol method followed by drying and a reductive treatment with forming gas. From these particles electrically conductive, optically transparent films were obtained by spin-coating. Characterization involved energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which provided a basis for a detailed structural solid-state NMR study. A multinuclear ((27)Al, (13)C, (1)H) spectroscopic investigation required a number of 1D MAS NMR and 2D MAS NMR techniques (T(1)-measurements, (27)Al-MQMAS, (27)Al-(1)H 2D-PRESTO-III heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy), which were corroborated by quantum chemical calculations with an embedded cluster method (EEIM) at the DFT level. From the combined data we conclude that only a small part of the provided Al is incorporated into the ZnO structure by substitution of Zn. The related (27)Al NMR signal undergoes a Knight shift when the material is subjected to a reductive treatment with forming gas. At higher (formal) doping levels Al forms insulating (Al, H and C containing) side-phases, which cover the surface of the ZnO:Al particles and increase the sheet resistivity of spin-coated material. Moreover, calculated (27)Al quadrupole coupling constants serve as a spectroscopic fingerprint by which previously suggested point-defects can be identified and in their great majority be ruled out. PMID:22801707

  10. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  11. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  12. The Development of 460 GHz gyrotrons for 700 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-07-01

    Two demountable gyrotrons with internal mode converters were developded as sub-THz radiation sources for 700 MHz DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) enhanced NMR spectroscopy. Experimental study on the DNP-NMR spectroscopy will be carried out in Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research, as a collaboration with FIR UF. Both gyrotrons operate near 460 GHz and the output CW power measured at the end of transmission system made by circular waveguides is typically 20 to 30 watts. One of them named Gyrotron FU CW GVI (we are using "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" as an official name in Osaka University) is designed to have a special function of high speed frequency modulation ? f within 100 MHz band. This will expand excitable band width of ESR and increase the number of electron spins contributing to DNP. The other gyrotron, Gyrotron FU CW GVIA ("Gyrotron FU CW GO-II") has a function of frequency tunability ? f in the range of wider than 1.5 GHz, which is achieved in steady state by changing magnetic field intensity. This function should be used for adjusting the output frequency at the optimal value to achieve the highest enhancement factor of DNP.

  13. High Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Proteins at Ultra-High Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly-13C,15N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla (1H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems—GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein—line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine C?1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies. PMID:19953303

  14. Determination of RNA polymerase binding surfaces of transcription factors by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Jurk, Marcel; Rösch, Paul; Knauer, Stefan H.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP), the central enzyme of transcription, is regulated by N-utilization substance (Nus) transcription factors. Several of these factors interact directly, and only transiently, with RNAP to modulate its function. As details of these interactions are largely unknown, we probed the RNAP binding surfaces of Escherichia coli (E. coli) Nus factors by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Perdeuterated factors with [1H,13C]-labeled methyl groups of Val, Leu, and Ile residues were titrated with protonated RNAP. After verification of this approach with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NusG and RNAP we determined the RNAP binding site of NusE. It overlaps with the NusE interaction surface for the NusG C-terminal domain, indicating that RNAP and NusG compete for NusE and suggesting possible roles for the NusE:RNAP interaction, e.g. in antitermination and direct transcription:translation coupling. We solved the solution structure of NusA-NTD by NMR spectroscopy, identified its RNAP binding site with the same approach we used for NusG-NTD, and here present a detailed model of the NusA-NTD:RNAP:RNA complex. PMID:26560741

  15. Phosphorus Speciation of Sequential Extracts of Organic Amendments using NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinremi, O.

    2009-04-01

    O.O. 1Akinremi Babasola Ajiboye and Donald N. Flaten 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2NT, Canada We carried out this study in order to determine the forms of phosphorus in various organic amendments using state-of-the art spectroscopic technique. Anaerobically digested biosolids (BIO), hog (HOG), dairy (DAIRY), beef (BEEF) and poultry (POULTRY) manures were subjected to sequential extraction. The extracts were analyzed by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of the total P analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) in the sequential extracts of organic amendments were orthophosphate, except POULTRY, which was dominated by organic P. The labile P fraction in all the organic amendments, excluding POULTRY, was mainly orthophosphate P from readily soluble calcium and some aluminum phosphates. In the poultry litter, however, Ca phytate was the main P species controlling P solubility. Such knowledge of the differences in the chemical forms of phosphorus in organic amendments are essential for proper management of these amendments for agro-environmental purposes Key words: organic amendments, solution NMR, sequential fractionation, labile phosphorus

  16. Determination of RNA polymerase binding surfaces of transcription factors by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Jurk, Marcel; Rösch, Paul; Knauer, Stefan H

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP), the central enzyme of transcription, is regulated by N-utilization substance (Nus) transcription factors. Several of these factors interact directly, and only transiently, with RNAP to modulate its function. As details of these interactions are largely unknown, we probed the RNAP binding surfaces of Escherichia coli (E. coli) Nus factors by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Perdeuterated factors with [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl groups of Val, Leu, and Ile residues were titrated with protonated RNAP. After verification of this approach with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NusG and RNAP we determined the RNAP binding site of NusE. It overlaps with the NusE interaction surface for the NusG C-terminal domain, indicating that RNAP and NusG compete for NusE and suggesting possible roles for the NusE:RNAP interaction, e.g. in antitermination and direct transcription:translation coupling. We solved the solution structure of NusA-NTD by NMR spectroscopy, identified its RNAP binding site with the same approach we used for NusG-NTD, and here present a detailed model of the NusA-NTD:RNAP:RNA complex. PMID:26560741

  17. Understanding J-Modulation during Spatial Encoding for Sensitivity-Optimized Ultrafast NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux, Boris; Rouger, Laetitia; Charrier, Benoît; Kuprov, Ilya; Akoka, Serge; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast (UF) NMR spectroscopy is an approach that yields 2D spectra in a single scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool that is used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from an intrinsic low sensitivity, and from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width, and resolution. In particular, the modulation of signal intensities by the spin-spin J-coupling interaction (J-modulation) impacts significantly on the intensities of the spectral peaks. This effect can lead to large sensitivity losses and even to missing spectral peaks, depending on the nature of the spin system. Herein, a general simulation package (Spinach) is used to describe J-modulation effects in UF experiments. The results from simulations match with experimental data and the results of product operator calculations. Several methods are proposed to optimize the sensitivity in UF COSY spectra. The potential and drawbacks of the different strategies are also discussed. These approaches provide a way to adjust the sensitivity of UF experiments for a large range of applications. PMID:26401975

  18. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54?kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F?NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2?times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  19. Dissolution DNP-NMR spectroscopy using galvinoxyl as a polarizing agent

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd L.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Malloy, Craig R.; Sherry, A. Dean; van Tol, Johan; Song, Likai; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work was to test feasibility of using galvinoxyl (2,6-di-tert-butyl-?-(3,5- di-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-p-tolyloxy) as a polarizing agent for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR spectroscopy. We have found that galvinoxyl is reasonably soluble in ethyl acetate, chloroform, or acetone and the solutions formed good glasses when mixed together or with other solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements revealed that galvinoxyl has an ESR linewidth D intermediate between that of carbon-centered free radical trityl OX063 and the nitroxide-based 4-oxo-TEMPO, thus the DNP with galvinoxyl for nuclei with low gyromagnetic ratio ? such as 13C and 15N is expected to proceed predominantly via the thermal mixing process. The optimum radical concentration that would afford the highest 13C nuclear polarization (approximately 6% for [1-13C]ethyl acetate) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K was found to be around 40 mM. After dissolution, large liquid-state NMR enhancements were achieved for a number of 13C and 15N compounds with long spin-lattice relaxation time T1. In addition, the hydrophobic galvinoxyl free radical can be easily filtered out from the dissolution liquid when water is used as the solvent. These results indicate that galvinoxyl can be considered as an easily available free radical polarizing agent for routine dissolution DNP-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23246650

  20. Comparison of I-123 IMP uptake and NMR spectroscopy in the brain following experimental carotid occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Jolesz, F.; Polak, J.F.; Kronauge, J.; Adams, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    Both I-123 IMP scintigraphy and NMR have been suggested as sensitive detectors of changes shortly after acute cerebral infarction. The authors compared the uptake of N-isopropul I-123 p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and NMR spectroscopy of the brain after internal carotid artery ligation. Thirteen gerbils were lightly anesthetized with ether. After neck dissection, an internal carotid artery was occluded. After 2.8 hours, 100 ..mu..Ci I-123 IMP was injected intravenously into the 13 experimental animals plus 3 controls. Seven gerbils remained asymptomatic while 6 developed hemiparesis. At 3 hours after ligation, the animals were killed. The brains were bisected and T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ relaxation times were determined for the right and left hemispheres by NMR spectroscopy immediately after dissection. I-123 IMP uptake was then determined in the samples. Interhemispheric differences in uptake for I-123 IMP uptake was 2.2% +- 0.5% in the control, 33.5% +- 9.6% in the asymptomatic and 54.6% +- 9.7% in the symptomatic animals. Significant differences were seen with I-123 IMP in 6/7 asymptomatic and 6/6 symptomatic animals. Significant differences in T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ were seen in 2/7 of the asymptomatic and 5/6 of the symptomatic animals. The authors conclude that I-123 is more sensitive than T/sub 1/ or T/sub 2/ for the detection of cerebral perfusion abnormalities while T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ more accurately separate symptomatic from asymptomatic animals.

  1. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  2. (77)Se and (125)Te NMR spectroscopy on a selectivity study of organochalcogenanes with L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcio S; Andrade, Leandro H

    2015-06-01

    The hypervalent selenium- and tellurium-containing compounds (halo-organoselenuranes and halo-organotelluranes) were treated with amino acids to evaluate their reactivity and chemoselectivity by (1)H, (13)C, (77)Se and (125)Te NMR spectroscopy. The study of forced thermal stability was performed and analyzed by NMR. The organotelluranes remained stable at temperatures around 60 °C but in the case of organoselenuranes, there was formation of new products at 37 °C as a result of halogen loss. (77)Se and (125)Te NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a very efficient and fast technique to evidence the high selectivity of organochalcogenanes against l-amino acids, specific to l-cysteine. PMID:25923042

  3. Orientational order of two fluoro- and isothiocyanate-substituted nematogens by combination of 13C NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Carignani, Elisa; Geppi, Marco; Macchi, Sara; Mennucci, Benedetta; Urban, Stanislaw

    2014-03-27

    Orientational order properties of two nematogens containing a fluoro- and isothiocyanate-substituted biphenyl moiety have been investigated by means of (13)C NMR spectroscopy. (13)C NMR spectra acquired on static samples under high-power (1)H-decoupling allowed both (13)C chemical shift anisotropies and (13)C-(19)F couplings to be measured. These data were used to determine the local principal order parameter and biaxiality for the different rigid fragments of the molecules. To this aim, advanced DFT methods for the calculation of geometrical parameters and chemical shift tensors were used. The orientational order parameters obtained by NMR have been critically compared with those obtained by dielectric spectroscopy. Trends of order parameters with temperature have been analyzed in terms of both mean field theory and the empirical Haller equation. PMID:24605890

  4. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  5. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of right ventricle in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S K; Weiner, M W; Matson, G B

    1992-06-01

    The energy metabolism of the right ventricle (RV) in vivo has been largely unexplored. The goal of this study was to develop and implement techniques for in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the RV free wall. A two-turn, crossover-design elliptical surface coil was constructed to provide high sensitivity across the thin RV wall but minimal sensitivity in the blood-filled RV cavity. In 36 open-chest, anesthetized pigs, 31P spectroscopy of the RV free wall was performed with this coil at a field strength of 2 Tesla. Spectra were obtained from 800 acquisitions in 24 min with an average signal-to-noise ratio of 13.2 for phosphocreatine (PCr). The PCr-to-ATP (PCr/ATP) ratio of porcine RV was 1.42 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE), uncorrected for saturation at a repetition time of 1.8 s. With the use of literature values of the time constant of longitudinal relaxation (T1) to correct for partial saturation, the RV PCr/ATP was estimated to lie between 1.7 and 2.3. Decreased RV PCr/ATP was observed during RV ischemia and pressure overload. Thus in vivo 31P spectroscopy of the RV is readily accomplished with an appropriate surface coil and can provide new information about RV energy metabolism. PMID:1621852

  6. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  7. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  8. Response to the Letter to the Editor regarding "Determination of the fatty acid profile by 1H-NMR spectroscopy."

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In expansion of previous work (G. Knothe, J.A. Kenar, Determination of the fatty acid profile by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 2004, 106, 88-96), an additional approach is discussed for quantitating saturated fatty acids in the fatty acid profiles of common vegetable oils by 1H-NM...

  9. Low Temperature 1H MAS NMR Spectroscopy Studies of Proton Motion in Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, H.; Peng, L; Grey, C

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy is used to study protonic motion in zeolite HZSM-5 in both samples that have been dried using procedures that are standard in the literature and samples that have been more carefully dehydrated. A significant enhancement of proton mobility is seen for the ''standard'' dehydrated HZSM-5 sample in comparison to that seen for the much drier sample. This is ascribed to a vehicle-hopping mechanism involving the residual water that is present in these zeolites. A gradual change of the framework structure is observed on cooling to approximately 213 K, as monitored via the change in {sup 1}H chemical shift values of the Broensted acid resonances and by X-ray diffraction. A more sudden change in structure is seen by differential scanning calorimetry and NMR at approximately 220?230 K, which is associated with changes in both the mobility and the modes of binding of the residual water to the Broensted acid sites and the zeolite framework.

  10. The dynamic complex of cytochrome c6 and cytochrome f studied with paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Hulsker, Rinske; Skubak, Pavol; Foerster, Johannes M; Cavazzini, Davide; Finiguerra, Michelina G; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Rossi, Gian-Luigi; Ullmann, G Matthias; Pannu, Navraj S; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2014-08-01

    The rapid transfer of electrons in the photosynthetic redox chain is achieved by the formation of short-lived complexes of cytochrome b6f with the electron transfer proteins plastocyanin and cytochrome c6. A balance must exist between fast intermolecular electron transfer and rapid dissociation, which requires the formation of a complex that has limited specificity. The interaction of the soluble fragment of cytochrome f and cytochrome c6 from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119 was studied using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of wild type, M58H and M58C cytochrome c6 were determined. The M58C variant is an excellent low potential mimic of the wild type protein and was used in chemical shift perturbation and paramagnetic relaxation NMR experiments to characterize the complex with cytochrome f. The interaction is highly dynamic and can be described as a pure encounter complex, with no dominant stereospecific complex. Ensemble docking calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations suggest a model in which charge-charge interactions pre-orient cytochrome c6 with its haem edge toward cytochrome f to form an ensemble of orientations with extensive contacts between the hydrophobic patches on both cytochromes, bringing the two haem groups sufficiently close to allow for rapid electron transfer. This model of complex formation allows for a gradual increase and decrease of the hydrophobic interactions during association and dissociation, thus avoiding a high transition state barrier that would slow down the dissociation process. PMID:24685428

  11. In Situ and Ex Situ Low-Field NMR Spectroscopy and MRI Endowed by SABRE Hyperpolarization**

    PubMed Central

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A.; Best, Quinn A.; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 105-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  12. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  13. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  14. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to ?-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota. PMID:26211820

  15. Authentication of beef versus horse meat using 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jakes, W.; Gerdova, A.; Defernez, M.; Watson, A.D.; McCallum, C.; Limer, E.; Colquhoun, I.J.; Williamson, D.C.; Kemsley, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a candidate screening protocol to distinguish beef from horse meat based upon comparison of triglyceride signatures obtained by 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, we obtained classic low-field triglyceride spectra from typically a 10 min acquisition time. Peak integration was sufficient to differentiate samples of fresh beef (76 extractions) and horse (62 extractions) using Naïve Bayes classification. Principal component analysis gave a two-dimensional “authentic” beef region (p = 0.001) against which further spectra could be compared. This model was challenged using a subset of 23 freeze–thawed training samples. The outcomes indicated that storing samples by freezing does not adversely affect the analysis. Of a further collection of extractions from previously unseen samples, 90/91 beef spectra were classified as authentic, and 16/16 horse spectra as non-authentic. We conclude that 60 MHz 1H NMR represents a feasible high-throughput approach for screening raw meat. PMID:25577043

  16. Separating chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropies via multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jason T; Trease, Nicole M; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2008-08-20

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has been an invaluable probe of structure and dynamics for a variety of systems in NMR spectroscopy. Unfortunately, the presence of strong quadrupolar couplings has severely limited the ability to measure CSA in nuclei with spins I > 1/2. Here we show that these two interactions can be refocused at different times in a 2D multiple-quantum NMR experiment on polycrystalline samples. Combining this experiment with appropriate affine transformations allows these interactions to be cleanly separated into orthogonal dimensions. The 1D projection onto each axis can be fit to extract the respective principal tensor components. These components can then be used to fit the 2D spectrum for the relative orientation between the CSA and quadrupolar-coupling tensors. The necessary affine transformation parameters are given for all possible I values. Illustrative examples of spectra and analyses are given for 63Cu in K3[Cu(CN)4], 59Co in K3[Co(CN)6], and 87Rb in RbCrO4. PMID:18652455

  17. Photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy of a heme-containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Iain J.; Wain, Rachel; Tozawa, Kaeko; Smith, Lorna J.; Hore, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    There are relatively few examples of the application of photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy to chromophore-containing proteins. The most likely reason for this is that simultaneous absorption of light by the photosensitiser molecule and the protein chromophore reduces the effectiveness of the photochemical reaction that produces the observed nuclear polarisation. We present details of experiments performed on the air-oxidised form of a small cytochrome, from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, using both the wild-type protein and apo and holo forms of a double alanine b-type mutant. We show that, along with the apo state, it is possible to generate CIDNP in the air-oxidised form of the b-type mutant, but not in the corresponding c-type cytochrome. This finding is supported by control experiments using horse-heart cytochrome c.

  18. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11?,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components. PMID:20837387

  19. Reconsidering the activation entropy for anomerization of glucose and mannose in water studied by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Ami; Aida, Misako; Katsumoto, Yukiteru

    2015-08-01

    The anomerization of monosaccharides is a very important process to understand how their stereoisomers are stabilized in aqueous solutions. For glucose and mannose, it has been known that ?- and ?-anomers of hexopyranose exist as the major components. In order to examine the anomerization pathway for glucose and mannose in aqueous solutions, it is indispensable to determine the thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy, the activation Gibbs free energy (?G‡), enthalpy (?H‡), and entropy (?S‡). Although several research groups reported these quantities in aqueous solution, they have still been controversial especially for ?S‡. In this paper, we employ 1H NMR spectroscopy for monitoring the population of both ?- and ?-anomers of glucose and mannose. The contribution of ?S‡ to ?G‡ for glucose in water is estimated to be ca. 30%, while that for mannose is 8.0%. The large difference in ?S‡ suggests that the anomerization pathway is not the same for glucose and mannose.

  20. Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Excited Conformational States of Nucleic Acids by CEST NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acids undergo structural transitions to access sparsely populated and transiently lived conformational states—or excited conformational states—that play important roles in diverse biological processes. Despite ever-increasing detection of these functionally essential states, 3D structure determination of excited states (ESs) of RNA remains elusive. This is largely due to challenges in obtaining high-resolution structural constraints in these ESs by conventional structural biology approaches. Here, we present nucleic-acid-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), which provide unique long-range angular constraints in ESs of nucleic acids. We demonstrate these approaches on a fluoride riboswitch, where one-bond 13C-1H RDCs from both base and sugar moieties provide direct structural probes into an ES of the ligand-free riboswitch. PMID:26462068

  1. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  2. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to study candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) membrane interactions. Comparative study with the AT1R antagonist drug olmesartan

    PubMed Central

    Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Kellici, Tahsin; Tzakos, Andreas; Kolokotroni, Pinelopi; Tselios, Theodore; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Glaubitz, Clemens; Lin, Sonyan; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AT1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists exert their antihypertensive effects by preventing the vasoconstrictive hormone AngII to bind to the AT1 receptor. It has been proposed that these biological effects are mediated through a two-step mechanism reaction. In the first step, they are incorporated in the core of the lipid bilayers and in the second step they reach the active site of the receptor through lateral diffusion. In this model, drug/membrane interactions are key elements for the drugs achieving inhibition at the AT1 receptor. In this work, the interactions of the prodrug candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) with lipid bilayers are studied at molecular detail. Solid-state 13C-CP/MAS, 2D 1H-1H NOESY NMR spectroscopy and in silico calculations are used. TCV-116 and olmesartan, another drug which acts as an AT1R antagonist are compared for their dynamic effects in lipid bilayers using solid-state 2H-NMR. We find a similar localization of TCV-116 compared to other AT1 antagonists in the intermediate polar region. In addition, we can identify specific local interactions. These interactions may be associated in part with the discrete pharmacological profiles observed for different antagonists. PMID:24946142

  3. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2015-12-01

    (1)H-detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic (1)H-detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the (1)H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid-? aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current (13)C-detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping. PMID:26580064

  4. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- ? aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  5. Monitoring bound HA1(H1N1) and HA1(H5N1) on freely suspended graphene over plasmonic platforms with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Chakraborty, Sumit; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Grebel, Haim

    2013-09-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides fingerprinting of the energy and orientation of molecular bonds. The IR signals are generally weak and require amplification. Here we present a new plasmonic platform, made of freely suspended graphene, which was coating periodic metal structures. Only monolayer thick films were needed for a fast signal recording. We demonstrated unique IR absorption signals of bound proteins: these were the hemagglutinin area (HA1) of swine influenza (H1N1) and the avian influenza (H5N1) viruses bound to their respective tri-saccharides ligand receptors. The simplicity and sensitivity of such approach may find applications in fast monitoring of binding events.

  6. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  7. Consortium to develop the medical uses of NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pohost, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of this work is to, perform clinically relevant studies using a new whole-body 4.1 T NMR imaging spectrometer. Initially we will develop and approach for the assessment of the severity of skeletal muscle involvement in ischemic peripheral vascular disease.

  8. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude ? f of frequency. The amplitude ? f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage ? V a. At the ? V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude ? f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (?,?) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue ?-amyloid (A?1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of A?1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ? and ? angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ? and ? uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of A?1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  10. Higher order amyloid fibril structure by MAS NMR and DNP spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Debelouchina, Galia T; Bayro, Marvin J; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T; Caporini, Marc A; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Bajaj, Vikram S; Rosay, Melanie; Macphee, Cait E; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E; Dobson, Christopher M; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-26

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure, and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide ?-strands into ?-sheets but also the ?-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The ?-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the residues buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  11. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide ?-strands into ?-sheets but also the ?-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The ?-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  12. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  13. Enhanced detection of aldehydes in Extra-Virgin Olive Oil by means of band selective NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugo, Giacomo; Rotondo, Archimede; Mallamace, Domenico; Cicero, Nicola; Salvo, Andrea; Rotondo, Enrico; Corsaro, Carmelo

    2015-02-01

    High resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for comprehensive food analyses and especially for Extra-Virgin Olive Oils (EVOOs). We use the NMR technique to study the spectral region of aldehydes (8-10 ppm) for EVOOs coming from the south part of Italy. We perform novel experiments by using mono and bidimensional band selective spin-echo pulse sequences and identify four structural classes of aldehydes in EVOOs. For the first time such species are identified in EVOOs without any chemical treatment; only dilution with CDCl3 is employed. This would allow the discrimination of different EVOOs for the aldehydes content increasing the potentiality of the NMR technique in the screening of metabolites for geographical characterization of EVOOs.

  14. QUANTITATIVE SOLID-STATE 13C NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF ORGANIC MATTER FRACTIONS IN LOWLAND RICE SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spin counting on solid-state **13C cross-polarization (CP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two humic fractions isolated from tropical lowland soils showed that only 32-81% of potential **13C NMR signal was detected. The observability of **13C NMR signal (Cobs) was higher in the mobile h...

  15. Silicon carbide polytype characterisation in coated fuel particles by Raman spectroscopy and 29Si magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Honorato, E.; Brigden, C.; Shatwell, R. A.; Zhang, H.; Farnan, I.; Xiao, P.; Guillermier, P.; Somers, J.

    2013-02-01

    The silicon carbide layer of a batch of as-produced TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles with zirconia kernels was characterised by Raman spectroscopy and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). The techniques were evaluated as a probe for the evolution of SiC local structure as a function of chemical vapour deposition processing. Nuclear magnetic resonance resolved 29Si resonances for multiple hexagonal or cubic silicon local environments, consistent with a mixture of 6H, 15R and 4H polytypes, within a majority (36%) 3C-SiC target structure. Polarised Raman spectroscopy by contrast, showed some evidence of hexagonal and cubic local environments but no evidence for clearly defined hexagonal or orthorhombic polytypes. It was clear from the Raman that there was significant scattering from q > 0 regions of the Brillouin zone, consistent with a loss of translational symmetry associated with stacking faults. Simulation and TEM images suggested that the signals observed in Raman and NMR correspond closer to a random arrangement of SiC layers in which structures similar to the various polytypes occur over short distances. As NMR is a probe of local environment, the signals obtained were similar to those that would come from a mixture of crystallites, each of a well-defined polytype. The NMR data was analysed quantitatively by fitting the spectra of known polytypes and by using a simple model to represent the random arrangement of layers in a heavily faulted crystal.

  16. Metabolic profiling for studying chemotype variations in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal fruits using GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh K; Tewari, Shri K; Sidhu, Om P; Roy, Raja

    2013-09-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is one of the most valued Indian medicinal plant with several pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. Metabolic profiling was performed by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy on the fruits obtained from four chemotypes of W. somnifera. A combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS identified 82 chemically diverse metabolites consisting of organic acids, fatty acids, aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, polyols, sugars, sterols, tocopherols, phenolic acids and withanamides in the fruits of W. somnifera. The range of metabolites identified by GC-MS and NMR of W. somnifera fruits showed various known and unknown metabolites. The primary and secondary metabolites observed in this study represent MVA, DOXP, shikimic acid and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic metabolic pathways. Squalene and tocopherol have been rated as the most potent naturally occurring compounds with antioxidant properties. These compounds have been identified by us for the first time in the fruits of W. somnifera. Multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on GC-MS and NMR data revealed clear distinctions in the primary and secondary metabolites among the chemotypes. The variation in the metabolite concentration among different chemotypes of the fruits of W. somnifera suggest that specific chemovars can be used to obtain substantial amounts of bioactive ingredients for use as potential pharmacological and nutraceuticals agents. PMID:23578960

  17. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  18. The Stoichiometry of Synthetic Alunite as a Function of Hydrothermal Aging Investigated by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Powder X-ray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1–31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7–10 % impurities in the samples.

  19. The stoichiometry of synthetic alunite as a function of hydrothermal aging investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1-31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7-10 % impurities in the samples.

  20. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners. PMID:25946616

  1. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (? 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. PMID:25842325

  2. Prooressin NMR Spectroscopy,VoL 23, pp. 43-92, 1991. 0079-6565/91 $0.00+.50 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. 1991PergamonPress plc~

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Prooressin NMR Spectroscopy,VoL 23, pp. 43-92, 1991. 0079-6565/91 $0.00+.50 Printed in Great-DIMENSIONAL HETERONUCLEAR NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO PROTEIN STRUCTURE DETERMINATION G. MARIUSCLORE and ANGELAM. GRONENBORN 1. Introduction 2. Basic Principles of Multi-DimensionalNMR 2.1. Homonuclear 3DNMR 2

  3. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of layered niobates and their chemical or physical properties, and provide insights into further modifications and improvements. The primary objectives of this work are summarized below: I. Synthesis of series of layered niobates (ALaNb2O7 , A = Cs, Rb, K; KNb3O8; K4Nb 6O17; RbLa2NbTi2O10 and RbCaLaNb2TiO10) by microwave heating or cation exchange methods, their protonated forms by acid exchange (HLaNb2O 7, H3ONb3O8 and HNb3O 8, H4Nb8O17, HLa2NbTi 2O10 and HCaLaNb2TiO10), and three nanosheet niobates by exfoliation (HNb3O8, H4Nb 6O17 and HLaNb2O7 nanosheets). II. Structural characterizations of all niobates by powder XRD and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Powder XRD is used to determine lattice constants and long-range structural ordering. Solid-state NMR is used to determine the electric field gradient parameters, chemical shift anisotropy parameters and dipolar coupling constants. Solid-state NMR techniques include 93Nb MQMAS, wide-line VOCS echo and WURST-echo; 1H{93Nb} CP, TRAPDOR, S-RESPDOR and iS-RESPDOR experiments. III. Understanding the trends of changes in NMR parameters with respect to cation exchange, exfoliation and compositional alteration, and correlation of the NMR parameters with local environments and possible structural rearrangements. IV. Identification of proton locations in the acid-exchanged niobates and surface acidity for the exfoliated nanosheets, based on 1H chemical shifts and dipolar coupling information from CP, S-RESPDOR and iS-RESPDOR experiments.

  4. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi

    2011-08-15

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in {sup 1}H detected 2D {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional {sup 13}C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear {sup 1}H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5{sub m}{sup {bar x}}, PMLG5{sub mm}{sup {bar x}x} and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLG{sub m}{sup {bar x}} during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the {sup 1}H resolution during t{sub 1} evolution in the traditional, {sup 13}C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted {sup 29}Si direct polarization and {sup 29}Si{sup 19}F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements. Furthermore, conformational details of two types of PFP were confirmed by theoretical calculation, operated by Dr. Takeshi Kobayashi. Finally, the arrangement of two surfactants, cetyltrimetylammoium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), mixed inside th

  5. Encoded loop-lanthanide-binding tags for long-range distance measurements in proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Dominic; Gränz, Markus; Barthelmes, Katja; Allen, Karen N; Imperiali, Barbara; Prisner, Thomas; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-11-01

    We recently engineered encodable lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) into proteins and demonstrated their applicability in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and luminescence studies. Here, we engineered two-loop-LBTs into the model protein interleukin-1? (IL1?) and measured (1)H, (15)N-pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) by NMR spectroscopy. We determined the ??-tensors associated with each Tm(3+)-loaded loop-LBT and show that the experimental PCSs yield structural information at the interface between the two metal ion centers at atomic resolution. Such information is very valuable for the determination of the sites of interfaces in protein-protein-complexes. Combining the experimental PCSs of the two-loop-LBT construct IL1?-S2R2 and the respective single-loop-LBT constructs IL1?-S2, IL1?-R2 we additionally determined the distance between the metal ion centers. Further, we explore the use of two-loop LBTs loaded with Gd(3+) as a novel tool for distance determination by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy and show the NMR-derived distances to be remarkably consistent with distances derived from Pulsed Electron-Electron Dipolar Resonance. PMID:26341230

  6. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, R; Novotny, E J; Boulware, S D; Rothman, D L; Mason, G F; Shulman, G I; Shulman, R G; Tamborlane, W V

    1992-01-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, we used 13C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-[1-13C]glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia (range, 4.5-12.1 mM) in six healthy children (13-16 years old). Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 +/- 0.1 mumol/ml at euglycemia (4.7 +/- 0.3 mM plasma) and 1.8-2.7 mumol/ml at hyperglycemia (7.3-12.1 mM plasma). Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated to be Kt = 6.2 +/- 1.7 mM and Tmax = 1.2 +/- 0.1 mumol/g.min from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels greater than 3 mM. PMID:1736294

  7. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea.

    PubMed

    De Pascali, Sandra A; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2015-06-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  8. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  9. Analysis of Ascarosides from Caenorhabditis elegans Using Mass Spectrometry and NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxing; Noguez, Jaime H.; Zhou, Yue; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes a family of water-soluble small molecules, known as the ascarosides, into its environment and uses these ascarosides in chemical communication. The ascarosides are derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, modified with different fatty acid-derived side chains. C. elegans uses specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In addition, C. elegans uses specific ascarosides to control certain behaviors, including mating attraction, aggregation, and avoidance. Although in general the concentration of the ascarosides in the environment increases with population density, C. elegans can vary the types and amounts of ascarosides that it secretes depending on the culture conditions under which it has been grown and its developmental history. Here, we describe how to grow high-density worm cultures and the bacterial food for those cultures, as well as how to extract the culture medium to generate a crude pheromone extract. Then, we discuss how to analyze the types and amounts of ascarosides in that extract using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24014355

  10. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Assessment of Radiation Dose in Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Seong Hyeon, Jin; Ra Kim, So; Kyeong Lee, Eun; Jin Yun, Hyun; Young Kim, Sun; Kee Chae, Young

    2015-11-01

    We employed the primary cell model system as a first step toward establishing a method to assess the influence of ionizing radiation by using a combination of common and abundant metabolites. We applied X-ray irradiation amounts of 0, 1, and 5 Gy to the cells that were harvested 24, 48, or 72?h later, and profiled metabolites by 2D-NMR spectroscopy to sort out candidate molecules that could be used to distinguish the samples under different irradiation conditions. We traced metabolites stemming from the input (13) C-glucose, identified twelve of them from the cell extracts, and applied statistical analysis to find out that all the metabolites, including glycine, alanine, and gluatamic acid, increased upon irradiation. The combinatorial use of the selected metabolites showed promising results where the product of signal intensities of alanine and lactate could differentiate samples according to the dose of X-ray irradiation. We hope that this work can form a base for treating radiation-poisoned patients in the future. PMID:26567947

  11. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  12. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  13. Molecular areas of phospholipids as determined by 2H NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylcholines

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmond, R.L.; Dodd, S.W.; Brown, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The role of lipid diversity in biomembranes is one of the major unsolved problems in biochemistry. One parameter of possible importance is the mean cross-sectional area occupied per lipid molecule, which may be related to formation of nonbilayer structures and membrane protein function. We have used {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy to compare the properties of 1,2-diperdeuteriopalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE-d62) and 1,2-diperdeuteriopalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC-d62) in the L alpha phase. We find that DPPE has greater segmental order than DPPC, and that this increase in order is related to the smaller area per acyl chain found for DPPE. Values of the mean cross-sectional chain area are calculated using a simple diamond lattice model for the acyl chain configurational statistics, together with dilatometry data. The results obtained for the mean area per molecule are comparable with those from low angle x-ray diffraction studies.

  14. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea

    PubMed Central

    De Pascali, Sandra A.; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P.

    2015-01-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  15. Near constant loss regime in fast ionic conductors analyzed by impedance and NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bucheli, Wilmer; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Kamba, Stanislav; Várez, Alejandro; Jimenez, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    Universal dielectric response (UDR) and nearly constant loss (NCL) dispersive regimes have been investigated in fast ion conductors with perovskite and NASICON structure by using NMR and impedance spectroscopy (IS). In this study, the electrical behavior of La(0.5)Li(0.5)TiO3 (LLTO-05) perovskite and Li(1.2)Ti(1.8)Al(0.2)(PO4)3 (LTAP0-02) NASICON compounds was investigated. In both systems a three-dimensional network of conduction paths is present. In the Li-rich LLTO-05 sample, lithium and La are randomly distributed on A-sites of perovskites, but in LTAP0-02 Li and cation vacancies are preferentially disposed at M1 and M2 sites. In perovskite compounds, local motions produced inside unit cells are responsible for the large "near constant loss" regime detected at low temperatures, however, in the case of NASICON compounds, local motions not participating in long-range charge transport were not detected. In both analyzed systems long-range correlated motions are responsible for dc-conductivity values of ceramic grains near 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature, indicating that low-temperature local motions, producing large NCL contribution, are not required to achieve the highest ionic conductivities. PMID:24944081

  16. Improving Assessment of Lipoprotein Profile in Type 1 Diabetes by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brugnara, Laura; Mallol, Roger; Ribalta, Josep; Vinaixa, Maria; Murillo, Serafín; Casserras, Teresa; Guardiola, Montse; Vallvé, Joan Carles; Kalko, Susana G.; Correig, Xavier; Novials, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) present increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to improve the assessment of lipoprotein profile in patients with T1D by using a robust developed method 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR), for further correlation with clinical factors associated to CVD. Thirty patients with T1D and 30 non-diabetes control (CT) subjects, matched for gender, age, body composition (DXA, BMI, waist/hip ratio), regular physical activity levels and cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2peak), were analyzed. Dietary records and routine lipids were assessed. Serum lipoprotein particle subfractions, particle sizes, and cholesterol and triglycerides subfractions were analyzed by 1H NMR. It was evidenced that subjects with T1D presented lower concentrations of small LDL cholesterol, medium VLDL particles, large VLDL triglycerides, and total triglycerides as compared to CT subjects. Women with T1D presented a positive association with HDL size (p<0.005; R = 0.601) and large HDL triglycerides (p<0.005; R = 0.534) and negative (p<0.005; R = -0.586) to small HDL triglycerides. Body fat composition represented an important factor independently of normal BMI, with large LDL particles presenting a positive correlation to total body fat (p<0.005; R = 0.505), and total LDL cholesterol and small LDL cholesterol a positive correlation (p<0.005; R = 0.502 and R = 0.552, respectively) to abdominal fat in T1D subjects; meanwhile, in CT subjects, body fat composition was mainly associated to HDL subclasses. VO2peak was negatively associated (p<0.005; R = -0.520) to large LDL-particles only in the group of patients with T1D. In conclusion, patients with T1D with adequate glycemic control and BMI and without chronic complications presented a more favourable lipoprotein profile as compared to control counterparts. In addition, slight alterations in BMI and/or body fat composition showed to be relevant to provoking alterations in lipoproteins profiles. Finally, body fat composition appears to be a determinant for cardioprotector lipoprotein profile. PMID:26317989

  17. The aluminum ordering in aluminosilicates: a dipolar 27Al NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Gee, Becky A

    2004-01-01

    The spatial ordering of aluminum atoms in CsAl(SiO3)2 and 3Al2O3.2SiO2 was probed by 27Al dipolar solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The 27Al response to a Hahn spin-echo pulse sequence in a series of aluminum-containing model crystalline compounds demonstrates that quantitative 27Al homonuclear dipolar second moments can be obtained to within +/-20% of the theoretical values, if evaluation of the spin-echo response curve is limited to short evolution periods (2t1 < or = 0.10 ms). Additionally, selective excitation of the central transition m = 1/2 --> -1/2 is necessary in order to ensure quantitative results. Restriction of spin exchange affecting the dephasing of the magnetization may decelerate the spin-echo decay at longer evolution periods. Considering these restraints, the method was used to probe the spatial distribution of aluminum atoms among the tetrahedral sites in two aluminosilicate materials. Experimental 27Al spin-echo response data for the aluminosilicates CsAl(SiO3)2 (synthetic pollucite) and 3Al2O3.2SiO2 (mullite) are compared with theoretical data based on (I) various degrees of aluminum-oxygen-aluminum bond formation among tetrahedrally coordinated aluminum atoms (Al(T(d) )-O-Al(T(d) )) and (II) the maximum avoidance of Al(T(d) )-O-Al(T(d) ) bonding. Analysis of the second moment values and resulting echo decay responses suggests that partial suppression of spin exchange among aluminum atoms in crystallographically distinct sites may contribute to the 27Al spin echo decay in 3Al2O3.2SiO2, thus complicating quantitative analysis of the data. Silicon-29 and aluminum-27 magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of 3Al2O3.2SiO2 are consistent with those previously reported. The experimental 27Al spin-echo response behavior of CsAl(SiO3)2 differs from the theoretical response behavior based on the maximum avoidance of Al-O-Al bonding between tetrahedral aluminum sites in CsAl(SiO3)2. A single unresolved resonance is observed in both the silicon-29 and aluminum-27 MAS spectra of CsAl(SiO3)2. PMID:14745814

  18. Exploring abiotic stress on asynchronous protein metabolism in single kernels of wheat studied by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Winning, H.; Viereck, N.; Wollenweber, B.; Larsen, F. H.; Jacobsen, S.; Søndergaard, I.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Extreme climate events are being recognized as important factors in the effects on crop growth and yield. Increased climatic variability leads to more frequent extreme conditions which may result in crops being exposed to more than one extreme event within a growing season. The aim of this study was to examine the implications of different drought treatments on the protein fractions in grains of winter wheat using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy followed by chemometric analysis. Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vinjett was studied in a semi-field experiment and subjected to drought episodes either at terminal spikelet, during grain-filling or at both stages. Principal component trajectories of the total protein content and the protein fractions of flour as well as the 1H NMR spectra of single wheat kernels, wheat flour, and wheat methanol extracts were analysed to elucidate the metabolic development during grain-filling. The results from both the 1H NMR spectra of methanol extracts and the 1H HR-MAS NMR of single kernels showed that a single drought event during the generative stage had as strong an influence on protein metabolism as two consecutive events of drought. By contrast, a drought event at the vegetative growth stage had little effect on the parameters investigated. For the first time, 1H HR-MAS NMR spectra of grains taken during grain-filling were analysed by an advanced multiway model. In addition to the results from the chemical protein analysis and the 1H HR-MAS NMR spectra of single kernels indicating that protein metabolism is influenced by multiple drought events, the 1H NMR spectra of the methanol extracts of flour from mature grains revealed that the amount of fumaric acid is particularly sensitive to water deficits. PMID:19213725

  19. Dissolution mechanism of crystalline cellulose in H3PO4 as assessed by high-field NMR spectroscopy and fast field cycling NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Maccotta, Antonella; De Pasquale, Claudio; Bubici, Salvatore; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2009-10-14

    Many processes have been proposed to produce glucose as a substrate for bacterial fermentation to obtain bioethanol. Among others, cellulose degradation appears as the most convenient way to achieve reliable amounts of glucose units. In fact, cellulose is the most widespread biopolymer, and it is considered also as a renewable resource. Due to extended intra- and interchain hydrogen bonds that provide a very efficient packing structure, however, cellulose is also a very stable polymer, the degradation of which is not easily achievable. In the past decade, researchers enhanced cellulose reactivity by increasing its solubility in many solvents, among which concentrated phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) played the major role because of its low volatility and nontoxicity. In the present study, the solubilization mechanism of crystalline cellulose in H(3)PO(4) has been elucidated by using high- and low-field NMR spectroscopy. In particular, high-field NMR spectra showed formation of direct bonding between phosphoric acid and dissolved cellulose. On the other hand, molecular dynamics studies by low-field NMR with a fast field cycling (FFC) setup revealed two different H(3)PO(4) relaxing components. The first component, described by the fastest longitudinal relaxation rate (R(1)), was assigned to the H(3)PO(4) molecules bound to the biopolymer. Conversely, the second component, characterized by the slowest R(1), was attributed to the bulk solvent. The understanding of cellulose dissolution in H(3)PO(4) represents a very important issue because comprehension of chemical mechanisms is fundamental for process ameliorations to produce bioenergy from biomasses. PMID:19769370

  20. Combining 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate regression techniques to quantitatively determine falsification of porcine heparin with bovine species.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2015-11-10

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to distinguish pure porcine heparin and porcine heparin blended with bovine species and to quantify the degree of such adulteration. For multivariate modelling several statistical methods such as partial least squares regression (PLS), ridge regression (RR), stepwise regression with variable selection (SR), stepwise principal component regression (SPCR) were utilized for modeling NMR data of in-house prepared blends (n=80). The models were exhaustively validated using independent test and prediction sets. PLS and RR showed the best performance for estimating heparin falsification regarding its animal origin with the limit of detection (LOD) and root mean square error of validation (RMSEV) below 2% w/w and 1% w/w, respectively. Reproducibility expressed in coefficients of variation was estimated to be below 10% starting from approximately 5% w/w of bovine adulteration. Acceptable calibration model was obtained by SPCR, by its application range was limited, whereas SR is least recommended for heparin matrix. The developed method was found to be applicable also to heparinoid matrix (not purified heparin). In this case root mean square of prediction (RMSEP) and LOD were approximately 7% w/w and 8% w/w, respectively. The simple and cheap NMR method is recommended for screening of heparin animal origin in parallel with official NMR test of heparin authenticity and purity. PMID:26319747

  1. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  2. Analyzing the adsorption of blood plasma components by means of fullerene-containing silica gels and NMR spectroscopy in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melenevskaya, E. Yu.; Mokeev, M. V.; Nasonova, K. V.; Podosenova, N. G.; Sharonova, L. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    The results from studying the adsorption of blood plasma components (e.g., protein, triglycerides, cholesterol, and lipoproteins of low and high density) using silica gels modified with fullerene molecules (in the form of C60 or the hydroxylated form of C60(OH) x ) and subjected to hydration (or, alternatively, dehydration) are presented. The conditions for preparing adsorbents that allow us to control the adsorption capacity of silica gel and the selectivity of adsorption toward the components of blood plasma, are revealed. The nature and strength of the interactions of the introduced components (fullerene molecules and water) with functional groups on the silica surface are studied by means of solid state NMR spectroscopy (NMR-SS). Conclusions regarding the nature of the centers that control adsorption are drawn on the basis of NMR-SS spectra in combination with direct measurements of adsorption. The interaction of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of silica gel with fullerene, leading to the formation of electron-donor complexes of C60-H, C60-OH, or C60-OSi type, is demonstrated by the observed changes in the NMR-SS spectra of silica gels in the presence of fullerene.

  3. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurement of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.

  4. In vivo1H NMR spectroscopy of the human brain at 9.4 T: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Moortele, Pierre-François Van de; Adriany, Gregor; Iltis, Isabelle; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John P.; Thomas Vaughan, J.; U?urbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-09-01

    In vivo proton NMR spectroscopy allows non-invasive detection and quantification of a wide range of biochemical compounds in the brain. Higher field strength is generally considered advantageous for spectroscopy due to increased signal-to-noise and increased spectral dispersion. So far 1H NMR spectra have been reported in the human brain up to 7 T. In this study we show that excellent quality short echo time STEAM and LASER 1H NMR spectra can be measured in the human brain at 9.4 T. The information content of the human brain spectra appears very similar to that measured in the past decade in rodent brains at the same field strength, in spite of broader linewidth in human brain. Compared to lower fields, the T1 relaxation times of metabolites were slightly longer while T2 relaxation values of metabolites were shorter (<100 ms) at 9.4 T. The linewidth of the total creatine (tCr) resonance at 3.03 ppm increased linearly with magnetic field (1.35 Hz/T from 1.5 T to 9.4 T), with a minimum achievable tCr linewidth of around 12.5 Hz at 9.4 T. At very high field, B0 microsusceptibility effects are the main contributor to the minimum achievable linewidth.

  5. Dynamics of guest molecules in PHTP inclusion compounds as probed by solid-state NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, G; Villanueva-Garibay, J A; Müller, K; Oelkrug, D; Milian Medina, B; Beljonne, D; Cornil, J; Wykes, M; Viani, L; Gierschner, J; Martinez-Alvarez, R; Jazdzyk, M; Hanack, M; Egelhaaf, H-J

    2009-07-01

    Partially deuterated 1,4-distyrylbenzene () is included into the pseudohexagonal nanochannels of perhydrotriphenylene (PHTP). The overall and intramolecular mobility of is investigated over a wide temperature range by (13)C, (2)H NMR as well as fluorescence spectroscopy. Simulations of the (2)H NMR spectral shapes reveal an overall wobble motion of in the channels with an amplitude of about 4 degrees at T = 220 K and 10 degrees at T = 410 K. Above T = 320 K the wobble motion is superimposed by localized 180 degrees flips of the terminal phenyl rings with a frequency of 10(6) Hz at T = 340 K. The activation energies of both types of motions are around 40 kJ mol(-1) which imply a strong sterical hindrance by the surrounding PHTP channels. The experimental vibrational structure of the fluorescence excitation spectra of is analyzed in terms of small amplitude ring torsional motions, which provide information about the spatial constraints on by the surrounding PHTP host matrix. Combining the results from NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as of time-dependent density functional calculations yields the complete potential surfaces of the phenyl ring torsions. These results, which suggest that intramolecular mobility of is only reduced but not completely suppressed by the matrix, are corroborated by MD simulations. Unrealistically high potential barriers for phenyl ring flips are obtained from MD simulations using rigid PHTP matrices which demonstrate the importance of large amplitude motions of the PHTP host lattice for the mobility of the guest molecules. PMID:19562129

  6. Observation of the keto tautomer of D-fructose in D2O using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Thomas; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Johnston, Martin R.; Cooper, Peter; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    D-Fructose was analysed by NMR spectroscopy and previously unidentified 1H NMR resonances were assigned to the keto and ?-pyranose tautomers. The full assignment of shifts for the various fructose tautomers enabled the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy in studies of the mutarotation (5 – 25 °C) and tautomeric composition at equilibrium (5 – 50 °C). The mutarotation of ?-pyranose to furanose tautomers in D2O at a concentration of 0.18 M was found to have an activation energy of 62.6 kJ.mol?1. At tautomeric equilibrium (20 °C in D2O) the distribution of the ?-pyranose, ?-furanose, ?-furanose, ?-pyranose and the keto tautomers was found to be 68.23%, 22.35%, 6.24%, 2.67% and 0.50%, respectively. This tautomeric composition was not significantly affected by varying concentration between 0.089 and 0.36 M or acidification to pH 3. Upon equilibrating at 6 temperatures between 5 and 50 °C there was a linear relationship between the change in concentration and temperature for all forms. PMID:22129837

  7. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication. PMID:26495154

  8. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory: Utilizing IR and NMR in the Identification of an Unknown Substance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glagovich, Neil M.; Shine, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that emphasizes the interpretation of both infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in the elucidation of the structure of an unknown compound was developed. The method helps students determine [to the first power]H- and [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR spectra from the structures of compounds and to…

  9. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets. PMID:26723664

  10. 1020 MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020 MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  11. Solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated troponin C monomer determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Slupsky, C. M.; Reinach, F. C.; Smillie, L. B.; Sykes, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    The solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated skeletal troponin C (TnC) in the presence of 15% (v/v) trifluoroethanol (TFE), which has been shown to exist predominantly as a monomer (Slupsky CM, Kay CM, Reinach FC, Smillie LB, Sykes BD, 1995, Biochemistry 34, forthcoming), has been investigated using multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR chemical shift values for TnC in the presence of TFE are very similar to values obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC (residues 1-90 of skeletal TnC), calmodulin, and synthetic peptide homodimers. Moreover, the secondary structure elements of TnC are virtually identical to those obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC, calmodulin, and the synthetic peptide homodimers, suggesting that 15% (v/v) TFE minimally perturbs the secondary and tertiary structure of this stably folded protein. Comparison of the solution structure of calcium-saturated TnC with the X-ray crystal structure of half-saturated TnC reveals differences in the phi/psi angles of residue Glu 41 and in the linker between the two domains. Glu 41 has irregular phi/psi angles in the crystal structure, producing a kink in the B helix, whereas in calcium-saturated TnC, Glu 41 has helical phi/psi angles, resulting in a straight B helix. The linker between the N and C domains of calcium-saturated TnC is flexible in the solution structure. PMID:7670371

  12. Natural Abundance 17O NMR Spectroscopy of Rat Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Brown, Peter B.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen is an abundant element that is present in almost all biologically relevant molecules. NMR observation of oxygen has been relatively limited since the NMR-active isotope, oxygen-17, is only present at a 0.037% natural abundance. Furthermore, as a spin 5/2 nucleus oxygen-17 has a moderately strong quadrupole moment which leads to fairly broad resonances (T2* = 1 - 4 ms). However, the similarly short T1 relaxation constants allow substantial signal averaging, whereas the large chemical shift range (> 300 ppm) improves the spectral resolution of 17O NMR. Here it is shown that high-quality, natural abundance 17O NMR spectra can be obtained from rat brain in vivo at 11.74 T. The chemical shifts and line widths of more than 20 oxygen-containing metabolites are established and the sensitivity and potential for 17O-enriched NMR studies are estimated. PMID:18456525

  13. Metabolite Characterization in Peritoneal Dialysis Effluent Using High-resolution 1H and 1H-13C NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Guleria, Anupam; Rawat, Atul; Khetrapal, C L; Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite analysis of peritoneal dialysis (PD) effluent may provide information regarding onset and progression of complications associated with prolonged PD therapy. In this context, the NMR detectable small metabolites of PD effluent samples were characterized using high resolution 1H and 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. The various spectra were recorded (at 800 MHz proton frequency) on PD effluent samples obtained after 4 hour (intraperitoneal) dwell time from patients with end stage renal failure (ESRF) and continuing normally on PD therapy. Inspite of devastating spectral feature of PD effluent due to the presence of intense resonances from glucose and lactate, we were able to identify about 53 small endogenous metabolites (including many complex coupled spin systems) and more than 90 % of the total CH cross peaks of 1H-13C HSQC spectrum were identified specific to various metabolites of PD effluent. We foresee that the characteristic fingerprints of various metabolites of control PD effluent samples will be us...

  14. ¹H NMR spectroscopy reveals the effect of genotype and growth conditions on composition of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.) berries.

    PubMed

    Kortesniemi, Maaria; Sinkkonen, Jari; Yang, Baoru; Kallio, Heikki

    2014-03-15

    ¹H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis were applied to the metabolic profiling and discrimination of wild sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.) berries from different locations in Finland (subspecies (ssp.) rhamnoides) and China (ssp. sinensis). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) showed discrimination of the two subspecies and different growth sites. The discrimination of ssp. rhamnoides was mainly associated with typically higher temperature, radiation and humidity and lower precipitation in the south, yielding higher levels of O-ethyl ?-d-glucopyranoside and d-glucose, and lower levels of malic, quinic and ascorbic acids. Significant metabolic differences (p<0.05) in genetically identical berries were observed between latitudes 60° and 67° north in Finland. High altitudes (> 2,000 m) correlated with greater levels of malic and ascorbic acids in ssp. sinensis. The NMR metabolomics approach applied here is effective for identification of metabolites, geographical origin and subspecies of sea buckthorn berries. PMID:24206697

  15. Conformational analysis of 3-(trimethylsilyl)propionic acid by NMR spectroscopy: an unusual expression of the beta-silyl effect.

    PubMed

    Nkansah, Richard A; Gerken, James B; Roberts, John D

    2007-08-31

    The rotational freedom of the carbon-carbon single bonds of 1,2-disubstituted ethanes affords the possibility of these compounds existing as a rapidly interconverting mixture of conformers in solution. The conformational preferences of one such compound, 3-(trimethylsilyl)propionic acid, and its anion were studied in water, dimethyl sulfoxide, methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, and toluene with 1H NMR spectroscopy. The conformational preferences were determined from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants between the hydrogen nuclei of the CH(2)CH(2) group with the aid of the Altona equations to derive the equilibrium anti and gauche percentages of rotamers from the averaged NMR-time scale couplings. Conformational analyses of 4,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and its anion as well as 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethanesulfonate anion were also conducted to compare the relative structural influences on the conformational preferences of silicon and carbon. PMID:17676905

  16. Analysing the effects of frozen storage and processing on the metabolite profile of raw mullet roes using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristina; Scano, Paola; Locci, Emanuela; Sanna, Roberta; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare

    2014-09-15

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate changes in the low molecular weight metabolic profile of raw mullet (Mugil spp.) roes during frozen storage and upon processing. NMR data were analysed by Principal Component Analyses (PCA). In the model constructed using frozen roes, no statistical significant metabolic modifications were observed in the first six months of storage, while choline derivatives, dimethylamine, lactate, and most of the free amino acids were identified as changing with statistical significance (p<0.05) in response to frozen storage time of twelve months. The PCA model comparing the metabolic profiles of roes before and after processing showed that the major modifications occurring upon manufacturing were the increase of the choline derivative compounds, uracil, and free amino acids, and a large decrease of taurine, glucose, lactate, and creatine/phosphocreatine. All of the above mentioned modifications reflect the occurrence of chemical/biochemical reactions arising from degradation processes such as lipolysis and proteolysis. PMID:24767028

  17. The origin of molecular mobility during biomass pyrolysis as revealed by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Anthony; Castro-Diaz, Miguel; Brosse, Nicolas; Bouroukba, Mohamed; Snape, Colin

    2012-07-01

    The thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks offers an important potential route for the production of biofuels and value-added green chemicals. Pyrolysis is the first phenomenon involved in all biomass thermochemical processes and it controls to a major extent the product composition. The composition of pyrolysis products can be affected markedly by the extent of softening that occurs. In spite of extensive work on biomass pyrolysis, the development of fluidity during the pyrolysis of biomass has not been quantified. This paper provides the first experimental investigation of proton mobility during biomass pyrolysis by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The origin of mobility is discussed for cellulose, lignin and xylan. The effect of minerals on cellulose mobility is also investigated. Interactions between polymers in the native biomass network are revealed by in situ (1)H NMR analysis. PMID:22573541

  18. Si-29 NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked quartz from Meteor Crater, Arizona: Correlation to Kieffer's classification scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Cygan, R. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have applied solid state Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to five naturally-shocked Coconino Sandstone samples from Meteor Crater, Arizona, with the goal of examining possible correlations between NMR spectral characteristics and shock level. This work follows our observation of a strong correlation between the width of a Si-29 resonance and peak shock pressure for experimentally shocked quartz powders. The peak width increase is due to the shock-induced formation of amorphous silica, which increases as a function of shock pressure over the range that we studied (7.5 to 22 GPa). The Coconino Sandstone spectra are in excellent agreement with the classification scheme of Kieffer in terms of presence and approximate abundances of quartz, coesite, stishovite, and glass. We also observe a new resonance in two moderately shocked samples that we have tentatively identified with silicon in tetrahedra with one hydroxyl group in a densified form of amorphous silica.

  19. Structure and ionic interactions of organic-inorganic composite polymer electrolytes studied by solid-state NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Chan Gyu; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Karlinsey, Robert L; Zwanziger, Josef W

    2002-01-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of composite polymer electrolytes are reported. The materials consist of polyethylene oxide and an organic inorganic composite, together with a lithium salt, and are candidates for electrolytes in solid-state lithium ion batteries. Silicon and aluminum MAS and multiple quantum MAS are used to characterize the network character of the organic-inorganic composite, and spin diffusion measurements are used to determine the nanostructure of the polymer/composite blending. Multiple quantum spin counting is used to measure the ion aggregation. The NMR results are supported by Raman spectra, calorimetry, and impedance spectroscopy. From these experiments it is concluded that the composite suppresses polymer crystallization without suppressing its local mobility, and also suppresses the tendency for the ions to aggregate. This polymer composite thus appears very promising for application in lithium ion batteries. PMID:12469813

  20. Studies of carbon-13 n.m.r. spectroscopy in pharmaceutical analysis: the composition of commercial samples of gentamicin sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kountourellis, J; Parfitt, R T; Casy, A F

    1983-05-01

    Two procedures for applying 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy to the quantitative analysis of the C1, C1a, and C2 components of gentamicin sulphate samples are described. One is based on the use of calibration plots of peak height ratios of analyte to standard (dioxan) resonance intensities recorded under conditions of full relaxation, the other upon a steady-state experiment and the use of weighting factors. Spectrometer operating conditions are discussed, and the need for measurement of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) data described. Results for seven commercial samples are given and comparisons made between the two n.m.r. methods and an h.p.l.c. procedure in terms of accuracy, specificity and convenience. PMID:6134794

  1. Conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites LaNaY and HY investigated by gas chromatography and in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, M.; Horvath, T.

    1997-04-01

    The conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites HY and LaNaY has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions using a new MAS NMR microreactor with cylindrical catalyst bed. At reaction temperatures of T = 373 K and T = 393 K a propan-2-ol conversion of 50 and 100%, respectively, and the formation of propene, diisopropyl. ether, and small amounts of acetone was determined by GC. Applying in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy, the initial step of the reaction was found to be the physisorption of propan-2-ol on Bronsted acid sites. A formation of isopropoxy species could be excluded by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy indicated that the Bronsted acid sites of the zeolites LaNaY and HY were hydrated by water molecules in the first part of the induction period. These water molecules were formed in result of the propan-2-ol dehydration. The strong low-field shift of the {sup 1}H MAS NMR signals of the hydrated Bronsted acid sites is due to a partial protonation of adsorbed water molecules. At T = 393 K, a significant {sup 13}C MAS NMR signal of strongly bonded acetone molecules appeared at 220 ppm in the spectra of zeolites LaNaY and HY. As demonstrated by propan-2-ol conversion on a partially dealuminated zeolite HY, this by-reaction is promoted by extra-framework aluminium species. The formation of coke precursors which caused {sup 13}C MAS NMR signals at 10-50 ppm is explained by an oligomerization of propene. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR experiments carried out under a continuous flow of propene showed that the above-mentioned coke precursors are also formed on partially rehydrated zeolite HY. 25 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Method for accurate measurements of nuclear-spin optical rotation for applications in correlated optical-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I M; Chen, H-Y; Karaulanov, T; Hilty, C

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear-spin optical rotation (NSOR) effect recently attracted much attention due to potential applications in combined optical-NMR spectroscopy and imaging. Currently, the main problem with applications of NSOR is low SNR and accuracy of measurements. In this work we demonstrate a new method for data acquisition and analysis based on a low-power laser and an emphasis on software based processing. This method significantly reduces cost and is suitable for application in most NMR spectroscopy laboratories for exploration of the NSOR effect. Despite the use of low laser power, SNR can be substantially improved with fairly simple strategies including the use of short wavelength and a multi-pass optical cell with in-flow pre-polarization in a 7 T magnet. Under these conditions, we observed that NSOR signal can be detected in less than 1 min and discuss strategies for further improvement of signal. With higher SNR than previously reported, NSOR constants can be extracted with improved accuracy. On the example of water, we obtained measurements at a level of accuracy of 5%. We include a detailed theoretical analysis of the geometrical factors of the experiment, which is required for accurate quantification of NSOR. This discussion is particularly important for relatively short detection cells, which will be necessary to use in spectroscopy or imaging applications that impose geometrical constraints. PMID:23685716

  3. Cationic complexation with dissolved organic matter: Insights from molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Xu, X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in soil and surface water and plays many important geochemical and environmental roles acting as a proton donor/acceptor and pH buffer and interacting with metal ions, minerals and organic species to form water-soluble and water-insoluble complexes of widely differing chemical and biological stabilities. There are strong correlations among the concentration of DOM and the speciation, solubility and toxicity of many trace metals in soil and water due to metal-DOM interaction. DOM can also significantly negatively affect the performance of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used industrially for water purification and desalination, being one of the major causes of a so-called `membrane bio- fouling'. The molecular scale mechanisms and dynamics of the DOM interactions with metals and membranes are, however, quite poorly understood. Methods of computational molecular modeling, combined with element- specific nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can serve as highly effective tools to probe and quantify on a fundamental molecular level the DOM interactions with metal cations in aqueous solutions, and to develop predictive models of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metal-DOM complexation in the environment. This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of the interaction of DOM with dissolved Na+, Cs+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. Na+ forms only very weak outer-sphere complexes with DOM. These results and the results of other recent molecular modeling efforts (e.g., Sutton et al., Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 24, 1902-1911, 2005), clearly indicate that both the structural and dynamic aspects of the cation-DOM complexation follow a simple trend in terms of the charge/size ratio for the ions. Due to the competition between ion hydration in bulk aqueous solution and adsorption of these cations by the negatively charged DOM functional groups (primarily carboxylate), larger ions of the same charge (Cs+ vs Na+, or Ca2+ vs Mg2+) have a stronger tendency for DOM association. However, for ions of approximately the same size, higher charge results in a stronger association with DOM. Thus, in contrast to Mg2+, Ca2+ forms strong inner-sphere complexes with DOM carboxylate groups, whereas the association of Na+ with DOM is even weaker than the outer-sphere metal- DOM complexing observed for Cs+. Taken together, these results support the idea of supramolecular, Ca- mediated DOM aggregation in aqueous environment. Cation-DOM binding occurs principally with carboxylate groups, and to a lesser extent with phenolic and other R-OH groups. The contributions of other DOM functional groups are minimal. The diffusional mobility of DOM-bound cations can decrease from ~20% (DOM- Na+ outer-sphere complex) to ~2000% (DOM-Ca2+ inner-sphere complex) compared with neat aqueous solutions (without DOM). The MD simulation results are in good agreement with NMR spectroscopic measurements for Cs-DOM solutions. The case of Cs+ complexation is particularly interesting, because Cs+ readily occurs as inner-sphere complexes on the surfaces of silica gel and many common soil minerals, including illite, kaolinite, and boehmite. The weaker interaction with DOM may be due to the occurence of relatively isolated carboxylic and phenolic groups on the DOM compared to densely packed structural oxygens and hydroxyl groups on the mineral surfaces.

  4. Area per Lipid and Cholesterol Interactions in Membranes from Separated Local-Field 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive. PMID:25418296

  5. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of GNNQQNY Nanocrystals and Amyloid Fibrils

    E-print Network

    Debelouchina, Galia Tzvetanova

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) utilizes the inherently larger polarization of electrons to enhance the sensitivity of conventional solid-state NMR experiments at low temperature. Recent advances in instrumentation ...

  6. Nuclear spin singlet states as a contrast mechanism for NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    signals overlap weaker peaks. In this article we demon- strate a quantum filter utilizing nuclear spin- nents. However, in mixtures of biomolecules, such as blood, urine and brain tissue, strong and broad NMR

  7. Acyl group migration and cleavage in selectively protected beta-d-galactopyranosides as studied by NMR spectroscopy and kinetic calculations.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Aitio, Olli; Wärnå, Johan; Maaheimo, Hannu; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Leino, Reko

    2008-07-01

    The migration of acetyl, pivaloyl, and benzoyl protective groups and their relative stabilities at variable pH for a series of beta- d-galactopyranoses were studied by NMR spectroscopy. The clockwise and counterclockwise migration rates for the different ester groups were accurately determined by use of a kinetic model. The results presented provide new insights into the acid and base stabilities of commonly used ester protecting groups and the phenomenon of acyl group migration and may prove useful in the planning of synthesis strategies. PMID:18543925

  8. Nodal inhomogeneity mapping by localized excitation--the "NIMBLE" shimming technique for high-resolution in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Doddrell, D M; Galloway, G J; Brereton, I M; Brooks, W M

    1988-07-01

    A method (NIMBLE) for obtaining optimum B0 field homogeneity at voxels located away from the magnet isocenter for use in volume-selected NMR spectroscopy is described. Voxels may be shimmed using only first-order X, Y, and Z shims to produce three-dimensional shim current maps, thus avoiding shim coupling problems. NIMBLE shimming prior to volume selection ensures optimum spectral resolution and improves the efficiency and accuracy of the volume-selection experiment. The benefits of the technique are illustrated by a high-resolution volume-selected spectrum of human tibia marrow. PMID:3205151

  9. Probing Transient Conformational States of Proteins by Solid-State R1? Relaxation-Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy**

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peixiang; Haller, Jens D; Zajakala, Jérémy; Macek, Pavel; Sivertsen, Astrid C; Willbold, Dieter; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Schanda, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The function of proteins depends on their ability to sample a variety of states differing in structure and free energy. Deciphering how the various thermally accessible conformations are connected, and understanding their structures and relative energies is crucial in rationalizing protein function. Many biomolecular reactions take place within microseconds to milliseconds, and this timescale is therefore of central functional importance. Here we show that R1? relaxation dispersion experiments in magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy make it possible to investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of such exchange process, and gain insight into structural features of short-lived states. PMID:24644028

  10. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Co?a, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  11. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-CO increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-CO, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. PMID:26624522

  12. Structure and assembly of the mouse ASC inflammasome by combined NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Ravotti, Francesco; Dandey, Venkata P.; Dick, Mathias S.; Mazur, Adam; Reckel, Sina; Chami, Mohamed; Scherer, Sebastian; Huber, Matthias; Böckmann, Anja; Egelman, Edward H.; Stahlberg, Henning; Broz, Petr; Meier, Beat H.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that control the innate immune response by activating caspase-1, thus promoting the secretion of cytokines in response to invading pathogens and endogenous triggers. Assembly of inflammasomes is induced by activation of a receptor protein. Many inflammasome receptors require the adapter protein ASC [apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD)], which consists of two domains, the N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and the C-terminal CARD. Upon activation, ASC forms large oligomeric filaments, which facilitate procaspase-1 recruitment. Here, we characterize the structure and filament formation of mouse ASC in vitro at atomic resolution. Information from cryo-electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy is combined in a single structure calculation to obtain the atomic-resolution structure of the ASC filament. Perturbations of NMR resonances upon filament formation monitor the specific binding interfaces of ASC-PYD association. Importantly, NMR experiments show the rigidity of the PYD forming the core of the filament as well as the high mobility of the CARD relative to this core. The findings are validated by structure-based mutagenesis experiments in cultured macrophages. The 3D structure of the mouse ASC-PYD filament is highly similar to the recently determined human ASC-PYD filament, suggesting evolutionary conservation of ASC-dependent inflammasome mechanisms. PMID:26464513

  13. Quality assurance in the pre-analytical phase of human urine samples by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Budde, Kathrin; Gök, Ömer-Necmi; Pietzner, Maik; Meisinger, Christine; Leitzmann, Michael; Nauck, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches investigate changes in metabolite profiles, which may reflect changes in metabolic pathways and provide information correlated with a specific biological process or pathophysiology. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy is used to identify metabolites in biofluids and tissue samples qualitatively and quantitatively. This pre-analytical study evaluated the effects of storage time and temperature on (1)H NMR spectra from human urine in two settings. Firstly, to evaluate short time effects probably due to acute delay in sample handling and secondly, the effect of prolonged storage up to one month to find markers of sample miss-handling. A number of statistical procedures were used to assess the differences between samples stored under different conditions, including Projection to Latent Structure Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), non-parametric testing as well as mixed effect linear regression analysis. The results indicate that human urine samples can be stored at 10 °C for 24 h or at -80 °C for 1 month, as no relevant changes in (1)H NMR fingerprints were observed during these time periods and temperature conditions. However, some metabolites most likely of microbial origin showed alterations during prolonged storage but without facilitating classification. In conclusion, the presented protocol for urine sample handling and semi-automatic metabolite quantification is suitable for large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:26264917

  14. Structure and assembly of the mouse ASC inflammasome by combined NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Ravotti, Francesco; Dandey, Venkata P; Dick, Mathias S; Mazur, Adam; Reckel, Sina; Chami, Mohamed; Scherer, Sebastian; Huber, Matthias; Böckmann, Anja; Egelman, Edward H; Stahlberg, Henning; Broz, Petr; Meier, Beat H; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-10-27

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that control the innate immune response by activating caspase-1, thus promoting the secretion of cytokines in response to invading pathogens and endogenous triggers. Assembly of inflammasomes is induced by activation of a receptor protein. Many inflammasome receptors require the adapter protein ASC [apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD)], which consists of two domains, the N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and the C-terminal CARD. Upon activation, ASC forms large oligomeric filaments, which facilitate procaspase-1 recruitment. Here, we characterize the structure and filament formation of mouse ASC in vitro at atomic resolution. Information from cryo-electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy is combined in a single structure calculation to obtain the atomic-resolution structure of the ASC filament. Perturbations of NMR resonances upon filament formation monitor the specific binding interfaces of ASC-PYD association. Importantly, NMR experiments show the rigidity of the PYD forming the core of the filament as well as the high mobility of the CARD relative to this core. The findings are validated by structure-based mutagenesis experiments in cultured macrophages. The 3D structure of the mouse ASC-PYD filament is highly similar to the recently determined human ASC-PYD filament, suggesting evolutionary conservation of ASC-dependent inflammasome mechanisms. PMID:26464513

  15. In-situ annotation of carbohydrate diversity, abundance, and degradability in highly complex mixtures using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Many functions of carbohydrates depend on the detection of short structural motifs, approximately up to hexasaccharide length, by receptors or catalysts. This study investigates the usefulness of state-of-the-art (1)H-(13)C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterizing the diversity, abundance, and degradability of such short structural motifs in plant-derived carbohydrates. Assignments of carbohydrate signals for (1)H-(13)C NMR spectra of beer, wine, and fruit juice yield up to >130 assignments in situ, i.e. in individual samples without separation or derivatization. More than 500 structural motifs can be resolved over a concentration range of ~10(3) in experiments of a few hours duration. The diversity of carbohydrate units increases according to power laws at lower concentrations for both cereal and fruit-derived samples. Simple graphs resolve the smaller overall contribution of more diverse but less abundant motifs to carbohydrate biomass. Susceptibility to enzymatic degradation is probed simultaneously for hundreds of structural motifs to reduce uncertainties in the identification of motifs and to probe enzyme specificity with assigned motifs. Several properties of fundamental biotechnological importance can thus be assessed in situ by heteronuclear NMR methods. PMID:25342297

  16. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  17. Characterization of Non-Innocent Metal Complexes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: o-Dioxolene Vanadium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Goncharov-Zapata, Olga; Quinn, Laurence L.; Hou, Guangjin; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W.; Polenova, Tatyana; Crans, Debbie C.

    2012-01-01

    51V solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of a series of non-innocent vanadium(V) catechol complexes have been conducted to evaluate the possibility that 51V NMR observables, quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropies, and electronic structures of such compounds can be used to characterize these compounds. The vanadium(V) catechol complexes described in these studies have relatively small quadrupolar coupling constants, which cover a surprisingly small range from 3.4 to 4.2 MHz. On the other hand, isotropic 51V NMR chemical shifts cover a wide range from ?200 ppm to 400 ppm in solution and from ?219 to 530 ppm in the solid state. A linear correlation of 51V NMR isotropic solution and solid-state chemical shifts of complexes containing non-innocent ligands is observed. These experimental results provide the information needed for the application of 51V SSNMR spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic properties of a wide variety of vanadium-containing systems, and in particular those containing non-innocent ligands and that have chemical shifts outside the populated range of ?300 ppm to ?700 ppm. The studies presented in this report demonstrate that the small quadrupolar couplings covering a narrow range of values reflect the symmetric electronic charge distribution, which is also similar across these complexes. These quadrupolar interaction parameters alone are not sufficient to capture the rich electronic structure of these complexes. In contrast, the chemical shift anisotropy tensor elements accessible from 51V SSNMR experiments are a highly sensitive probe of subtle differences in electronic distribution and orbital occupancy in these compounds. Quantum chemical (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for [VO(hshed)(Cat)] yield 51V CSA tensor in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but surprisingly, the calculated quadrupolar coupling constant is significantly greater than the experimental value. The studies demonstrate that substitution of the catechol ligand with electron donating groups results in an increase in the HOMO-LUMO gap and can be directly followed by an upfield shift for the vanadium catechol complex. In contrast, substitution of the catechol ligand with electron withdrawing groups results in a decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap and can directly be followed by a downfield shift for the complex. The vanadium catechol complexes were used in this work because the 51V is a half-integer quadrupolar nucleus whose NMR observables are highly sensitive to the local environment. However, the results are general and could be extended to other redox active complexes that exhibit similar coordination chemistry as the vanadium catechol complexes. PMID:21842875

  18. Structural implications of water dissolution in haplogranitic glasses from NMR spectroscopy: influence of total water content and mixed alkali effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. C.; Riemer, T.; Kohn, S. C.; Holtz, F.; Dupree, R.

    2001-09-01

    To study the effects of total water content and alkali substitution on the structure of aluminosilicate glasses, two series of glasses belonging to the ternary system Quartz (Qz)-Albite (Ab)-Orthoclase (Or) were synthesized and investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Series I consisted of seven glasses with normative composition Ab 39Or 32Qz 29 (AOQ) and water contents ranging from 0 to 6 wt%. Series II consisted of dry and hydrous glasses (˜2.0 wt% H 2O) with five compositions along the join Qz 37Ab 63-Qz 34Or 66 (AQ-OQ) varying the alkali content (Na/K) at constant Si/Al ratio. All glasses were investigated with 1H, 23Na, 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. 29Si MAS spectra of AOQ glasses showed no change upon hydration, suggesting little variation of the Si environments although the large linewidth of the 29Si signal may hide the presence of some Si Q 3-OH. The isotropic chemical shift (? iso) of 27Al showed no change upon hydration, regardless of the amount of dissolved water. The 27Al mean quadrupolar coupling constant (C q) decreased with increasing water content, indicating a general increase of symmetry of the charge distribution around Al, which suggests the absence of significant amounts of Al Q 3-OH. Nonetheless, the evolution of C q upon hydration suggests a correlation with OH concentration in the quenched glass. The evolution of 23Na isotropic chemical shifts upon hydration appears to be correlated with total water content or with the concentration of dissolved H 2O molecules. In general, the NMR data are consistent with the water solubility model of Kohn et al. (1989), involving the exchange of charge balancing cations by protons. However, in addition to the presence of molecular water, 1H-NMR results showed at least two types of OH groups of which one may be related to Al-OH. Although the small intensity of this signal indicates that only a minor fraction of OH groups is present in this species, it demonstrates that water dissolution in aluminosilicate glasses might involve several mechanisms of hydroxyl formation. NMR data for Series II showed only a significant mixed alkali effect (nonlinear behaviour) on NMR parameters for 23Na but not for 29Si or 27Al. Therefore, these data suggest that the mixed alkali effect is related to the charge balancing cation rather than a modified aluminosilicate network.

  19. Structural investigations of flavonol glycosides from sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) pomace by NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-ESI-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Rösch, Daniel; Krumbein, Angelika; Mügge, Clemens; Kroh, Lothar W

    2004-06-30

    Four flavonol glycosides were isolated from an extract of sea buckthorn pomace (Hippophaë rhamnoides) by Sephadex LH-20 gel chromatography and semipreparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by hydrolysis studies, ESI-MS(n), UV, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The occurrence of the major flavonol glycoside kaempferol 3-O-beta-sophoroside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside in sea buckthorn is described here for the first time. A further 21 flavonol glycosides of Sephadex LH-20 fractions of sea buckthorn pomace were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. The characteristic MS-MS and MS(3) fragmentation pattern of flavonol glycosides previously identified in sea buckthorn juice and of flavonol glycosides identified by NMR spectroscopy gave valuable indications for their identification. The results demonstrate that loss of the sugar moiety from C-7 of the aglycon is more favored than fission of the glycosidic linkage at the C-3 position. Thus, most of the compounds identified were 7-rhamnosides of isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, which exhibit different substitution patterns at the C-3 position, mainly glucosides, rutinosides, and sophorosides. In addition, numerous flavonol glycosides were detected lacking a sugar moiety at C-7. Finally, eight flavonol derivatives were identified that are acylated by hydroxybenzoic or hydoxycinnamic acids. PMID:15212446

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  1. Characterization of bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction of organic waste by NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leonardis, Irene; Chiaberge, Stefano; Fiorani, Tiziana; Spera, Silvia; Battistel, Ezio; Bosetti, Aldo; Cesti, Pietro; Reale, Samantha; De Angelis, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Solid wastes of organic origins are potential feedstocks for the production of liquid biofuels, which could be suitable alternatives to fossil fuels for the transport and heating sectors, as well as for industrial use. By hydrothermal liquefaction, the wet biomass is partially transformed into a water-immiscible, oil-like organic matter called bio-oil. In this study, an integrated NMR spectroscopy/mass spectrometry approach has been developed for the characterization of the hydrothermal liquefaction of bio-oil at the molecular level. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy were used for the identification of functional groups and gauging the aromatic carbon content in the mixture. GC-MS analysis revealed that the volatile fraction was rich in fatty acids, as well as in amides and esters. High-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) has been applied in a systematic way to fully categorize the bio-oil in terms of different classes of components, according to their molecular formulas. Most importantly, for the first time, by using this technique, and for the liquefaction bio-oil characterization in particular, FT-MS data have been used to develop a methodology for the determination of the aromatic versus aliphatic carbon and nitrogen content. It is well known that, because they resist hydrogenation and represent sources of polluting species, both aromatic molecules and nitrogen-containing species raise concerns for subsequent upgrading of bio-oil into a diesel-like fuel. PMID:23139164

  2. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J R

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotrophus is grown on 13C-methanol, which is more economical than 13C-glucose. To demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this method, uniformly 13C-labeled ribonucleotides were used to synthesize a 31 nucleotide HIV TAR RNA that was analyzed by 3D-NMR. This method should find widespread use in the structural analysis of RNA by NMR. Images PMID:1383928

  3. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (< 25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem’ can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  4. Methods for Increasing Sensitivity and Throughput of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Pharmaceutical Solids

    E-print Network

    Schieber, Loren

    2010-01-22

    for probe repair, soldering, and bad movies. Joe and I spent a great deal of time together in the lab troubleshooting NMR breakdowns, taking probes apart, and playing yahtze. I wil always appreciate the friendship that Joe and I forged in the basement... compound is most commonly determined by the lack of microscopic birefringence, and/or a broad (or no) powder patern by powder X-ray difraction. Additionaly, the peaks in a solid-state NMR spectrum of an amorphous solid can be 10 times broader than...

  5. NMR Spectroscopy and Structural Characterization of Dithiophosphinates Relevant to Minor Actinide Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Daly; Kevin S. Boland; John R. Klaehn; Stosh A. Kozimor; Molly M. MacInnes; Dean R. Peterman; Brian L. Scott

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic routes to alkyl and aryl substituted dithiophosphinate salts that contain non-coordinating PPh{sub 4}{sup 1+} counter cations are reported. In general, these compounds can be prepared via a multi-step procedure that starts with reacting secondary phosphines, i.e. HPR{sub 2}, with two equivalents elemental S. This transformation proceeds in two steps - first oxidation of the phosphine and second insertion of S into the H-P bond - and has been used to synthesize a series of dithiophoshinic acids, which were fully characterized, namely HS{sub 2}P(p-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, HS{sub 2}P(m-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, HS{sub 2}P(o-MeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, and HS{sub 2}P(o-MeOC{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}. Although the insertion step was found to be much slower than the oxidation reaction, the formation of (NH{sub 4})S{sub 2}PR{sub 2} from HPSR{sub 2} occurs almost instantaneous upon addition of NH{sub 4}OH. Subsequent cation exchange reactions proceed readily with PPh{sub 4}Cl in water, under air, and at ambient conditions to provide analytically pure samples of [PPh{sub 4}][S{sub 2}PR{sub 2}] (R = p-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, m-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-MeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-MeOC{sub 6}H{sub 4}, Ph, and Me, 1b-7b, respectively), which were characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR, and IR spectroscopy. In addition the S{sub 2}PMe{sub 2}{sup 1-}, S{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}{sup 1-}, and dithiophosphinates with ortho-substituted arene rings were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Structural analysis show that, as opposed to the acids which have short P=S double bonds and long P-SH single bonds, the metric parameters for the S atoms in S{sub 2}PR{sub 2}{sup 1-} are equivalent. In addition, the presence of large non-coordinating PPh{sub 4}{sup 1+} cations guard against intermolecular P-S {hor_ellipsis} X interactions and insure that the P-S bond is isolated. Overall, this synthetic procedure provides high-purity S{sub 2}PR{sub 2}{sup 1-} compounds necessary for subsequent spectroscopic and theoretical studies.

  6. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Reilly, Anne

    , and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent are fabricated with low elastic modulus but with high strength and high elastic recovery.1,2 Early work on aBonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15 N, 13 C, and 1 H

  7. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations. PMID:24274637

  8. Self-Association of N-Methylacetamide Examined by Infrared and NMR Spectroscopies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, Heather L.; Hui, KaWai

    2011-01-01

    These spectroscopic experiments investigate polarity and concentration effects on self-association behavior in N-methylacetamide. Inquiry can be limited to the concentration dependence of hydrogen bonding and estimation of dimerization constant (NMR studies) or to the effect of solvent polarity on extent of hydrogen bonding (IR studies). The…

  9. Microtesla NMR J-coupling spectroscopy with an unshielded atomic magnetometer

    E-print Network

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Baranga, Andrei Ben-Amar; Dancheva, Yordanka; Rossi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical interpretation of NMR spectra of remotely magnetized samples, detected in an unshielded environment by means of a differential atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed in an ultra-low-field at an intermediate regime, where the J-coupling and the Zeeman energies have comparable values and produce rather complex line sets, which are satisfactorily interpreted.

  10. Nuclear spin singlet states as a contrast mechanism for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Devience, Stephen J; Walsworth, Ronald L; Rosen, Matthew S

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of complex chemical mixtures often contain unresolved or hidden spectral components, especially when strong background signals overlap weaker peaks. In this article we demonstrate a quantum filter utilizing nuclear spin singlet states, which allows undesired NMR spectral background to be removed and target spectral peaks to be uncovered. The quantum filter is implemented by creating a nuclear spin singlet state with spin quantum numbers j?=?0,?mz ?=?0 in a target molecule, applying a continuous RF field to both preserve the singlet state and saturate the magnetization of undesired molecules and then mapping the target molecule singlet state back into an NMR observable state so that its spectrum can be read out unambiguously. The preparation of the target singlet state can be carefully controlled with pulse sequence parameters, so that spectral contrast can be achieved between molecules with very similar structures. We name this NMR contrast mechanism 'Suppression of Undesired Chemicals using Contrast-Enhancing Singlet States' (SUCCESS) and we demonstrate it in vitro for three target molecules relevant to neuroscience: aspartate, threonine and glutamine. PMID:23606451

  11. In Situ NMR Spectroscopy of Supercapacitors: Insight into the Charge Storage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode–electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations. PMID:24274637

  12. De novo determination of peptide structure with solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Robert G.

    and proteins have relied on site-specific incorporation of a pair of spin-1 /2 nuclei, such as 13 C­13 C and 13* , Michael T. McMahon* , Bruce Tidor*§ ** , Toma´s Lozano-Pe´rez§ , and Robert G. Griffin*, *Department (NMR) methods have been developed which permit determinations of globular protein structures

  13. Isomers and conformers of two push pull hydrazines studied by NMR and vibrational spectroscopy and by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gróf, M.; Polovková, J.; Gatial, A.; Milata, V.; ?ernuchová, P.; Prónayová, N.; Mat?jka, P.

    2007-05-01

    The isomers and conformers of two push-pull hydrazines: 3- N, N-dimethylhydrazino-2-acetyl propenenitrile [(H 3C) 2N sbnd NH sbnd CH dbnd C(CN)(COCH 3)] (DMHAP) and 3- N, N-dimethylhydrazino-2-methylsulfonyl propenenitrile [(H 3C) 2N sbnd NH sbnd CH dbnd C(CN)(SO 2CH 3)] (DMHSP) have been studied experimentally by NMR and vibrational spectroscopy and theoretically by the ab initio calculations at MP2 level in 6-31G** basis set. The IR and Raman spectra of both compounds as a solid and solute in various solvents have been recorded. The NMR spectra were obtained in chloroform and DMSO at room temperature. Both compounds have been prepared by the same way. NMR spectra revealed that DMHAP was prepared as a pure Z-isomer whereas in the case of DMHSP a pure E-isomer was obtained. Due to the low barrier for both compounds practically free isomerisation process occurred in the solutions but in opposite directions. Whereas DMHAP exists in the solid state and in the less polar solvent as Z-isomer, in more polar solvents the appearance of next two conformers of E-isomer was observed. On the contrary DMHSP exists in the solid state and in the more polar solvent as E-isomer only but in less polar solvent the presence of Z-isomer was observed as well. Conformational possibilities of both studied compounds are given by the rotation of dimethylhydrazino group with its anti- or syn-orientation towards the olefinic double bond. Moreover, by the rotation of the acetyl group with Z- and E-orientation of carbonyl bond towards olefinic double bond can occur in DMHAP. Vibrational and NMR spectra revealed the existence of single conformer with intramolecular hydrogen bond for Z-isomer in less polar solvent and next two conformers for E-isomer of DMHAP with Z-orientation of acetyl group and anti and syn orientation of dimethylhydrazine group in more polar solvents. For E-isomer of DMHSP two conformers with anti or syn orientations of dimethylhydrazino group have been also confirmed by NMR spectra in more polar solvents. Additionally the third DMHSP conformer with anti orientation of dimethylhydrazino group originating from Z-isomer was detected in less polar solvents. These experimental findings have been supported by ab initio calculations with solvent effect inclusion.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a huge carbon pool, specifically in boreal ecosystems. Warming-induced release of large amounts of CO2 from the soil carbon pool might become a significant exacerbating feedback to global warming, if decomposition rates of boreal soils were more sensitive to increased temperatures. Despite a large number of studies dedicated to the topic, it has proven difficult to elucidate how the organo-chemical composition of SOM influences its decomposition, or its quality as a substrate for microbial metabolism. A great part of this challenge results from our inability to achieve a detailed characterization of the complex composition of SOM on the level of molecular structural moieties. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and the chemical shift regions distinguished in the 13C NMR spectra often represent many different molecular fragments. For example, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. We applied two-dimensional (2D) NMR to characterize SOM with highly increased resolution. We directly dissolved finely ground litters and forest floors'fibric and humic horizons'of both coniferous and deciduous boreal forests in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a 2D 1H-13C NMR experiment. In the 2D planes of these spectra, signals of CH groups can be resolved based on their 13C and 1H chemical shifts, hence the resolving power and information content of these NMR spectra is hugely increased. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra, so that hundreds of distinct CH groups could be observed and many molecular fragments could be identified. For instance, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to relate signal patterns in the 2D spectra and intensities of identifiable molecular moieties to variability in the temperature response of organic matter decomposition, as assessed by Q10. In conclusion, the characterization of SOM composition at the molecular level by solution-state 2D NMR spectroscopy is highly promising; it offers unprecedented possibilities to link SOM molecular composition to ecosystem processes, and their responses to environmental changes.

  15. The Solid Solution Sr1-x Bax Ga2 : Substitutional Disorder and Chemical Bonding Visited by NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Pecher, Oliver; Mausolf, Bernhard; Lamberts, Kevin; Oligschläger, Dirk; Niewieszol Née Merkens, Carina; Englert, Ulli; Haarmann, Frank

    2015-09-28

    Complete miscibility of the intermetallic phases (IPs) SrGa2 and BaGa2 forming the solid solution Sr1-x Bax Ga2 is shown by means of X-ray diffraction, thermoanalytical and metallographic studies. Regarding the distances of Sr/Ba sites versus substitution degree, a model of isolated substitution centres (ISC) for up to 10?% cation substitution is explored to study the influence on the Ga bonding situation. A combined application of NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations proves the electric field gradient (EFG) to be a sensitive measure of different bonding situations. The experimental resolution is boosted by orientation-dependent NMR on magnetically aligned powder samples, revealing in first approximation two different Ga species in the ISC regimes. EFG calculations using superlattice structures within periodic boundary conditions are in fair agreement with the NMR spectroscopy data and are discussed in detail regarding their application on disordered IPs. PMID:26272697

  16. Determination of Kinetic Parameters within a Single Nonisothermal On-Flow Experiment by Nanoliter NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M Victoria; Rodriguez, Antonio M; de la Hoz, Antonio; Jimenez-Marquez, Francisco; Fratila, Raluca M; Barneveld, Peter A; Velders, Aldrik H

    2015-10-20

    Conventional methods to determine the kinetic parameters for a certain reaction require multiple, separate isothermal experiments, resulting in time- and material-consuming processes. Here, an approach to determine the kinetic information within a single nonisothermal on-flow experiment is presented, consuming less than 10 ?mol of reagents and having a total measuring time of typically 10 min. This approach makes use of a microfluidic NMR chip hyphenated to a continuous-flow microreactor and is based on the capabilities of the NMR chip to analyze subnanomole quantities of material in the 25 nL detection volume. Importantly, useful data are acquired from the microreactor platform in specific isothermal and nonisothermal frames. A model fitting the experimental data enables rapid determination of kinetic parameters, as demonstrated for a library of isoxazole and pyrazole derivatives. PMID:26383715

  17. Design and application of robust rf pulses for toroid cavity NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Skinner, Thomas E; Woelk, Klaus; Gershenzon, Naum I; Glaser, Steffen J

    2010-01-01

    We present robust radio frequency (rf) pulses that tolerate a factor of six inhomogeneity in the B1 field, significantly enhancing the potential of toroid cavity resonators for NMR spectroscopic applications. Both point-to-point (PP) and unitary rotation (UR) pulses were optimized for excitation, inversion, and refocusing using the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm based on optimal control theory. In addition, the optimized parameterization (OP) algorithm applied to the adiabatic BIR-4 UR pulse scheme enabled ultra-short (50 microsec) pulses with acceptable performance compared to standard implementations. OP also discovered a new class of non-adiabatic pulse shapes with improved performance within the BIR-4 framework. However, none of the OP-BIR4 pulses are competitive with the more generally optimized UR pulses. The advantages of the new pulses are demonstrated in simulations and experiments. In particular, the DQF COSY result presented here represents the first implementation of 2D NMR sp...

  18. Determination of carbon dioxide transport coefficients in liquids and polymers by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Julio; Garrido, Leoncio

    2012-05-24

    In liquids and in polymeric membranes, a precise determination of their transport properties is of paramount importance. In this work, an NMR method to measure sequentially the solubility and diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in liquids (n-alkanes and 1-alkanols) and in polymer membranes (polyethylene, polybutadiene, and polycarbonate) is described. The results show that NMR measurements are very reproducible and in good agreement with those determined by other methods. Considering that the gas permeability is defined as the product of the solubility and diffusion coefficients, the method allows the determination of all transport parameters in an accurate manner. The influence of chain length, viscosity, and solubility parameters on the transport coefficients of [(13)C]O(2) in alkanes and 1-alkanols was also analyzed and compared to those measured in polyethylene. PMID:22537229

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Mixtures by 2D 13C-Constant-Time TOCSY NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of organisms can be fully 13C-labeled, which has the advantage that their metabolomes can be studied by high-resolution 2D NMR 13C–13C constant-time (CT) TOCSY experiments. Individual metabolites can be identified via database searching or, in the case of novel compounds, through the reconstruction of their backbone-carbon topology. Determination of quantitative metabolite concentrations is another key task. Because significant peak overlaps in 1D NMR spectra prevents straightforward quantification through 1D peak integrals, we demonstrate here the direct use of 13C–13C CT-TOCSY spectra for metabolite quantification. This is accomplished through the quantum-mechanical treatment of the TOCSY magnetization transfer at short and long mixing times or by the use of analytical approximations, which are solely based on the knowledge of the carbon-backbone topologies. The methods are demonstrated for carbohydrate and amino-acid mixtures. PMID:23773204

  20. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (?100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  1. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (?100K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. PMID:26363582

  2. SIMPSON: A General Simulation Program for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2000-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tcl scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple 1D experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  3. SIMPSON: A general simulation program for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tel scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple ID experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  4. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  5. Effect of relative weight group change on NMR spectroscopy derived lipid particle size and concentrations among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jago, Russell; Drews, Kimberley L.; Otvos, James D.; Foster, Gary D.; Marcus, Marsh D.; Buse, John B.; Mietus-Snyder, Michele; Willi, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether longitudinal changes in relative weight category (as indicated by change in BMI classification group) were associated with changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) derived lipoprotein particles among US youth. Study design Secondary analysis of data from clustered RCT. BMI and fasting blood samples were obtained from 2069 participants at the start of 6th grade and end of 8th grade. BMI was categorized as normal weight, overweight or obese at both time points. Lipoprotein particle profiles were measured using NMR spectroscopy at both time points. Regression models were used to examine changes in relative weight group and change in lipoprotein variables. Results 38% of participants changed relative weight category (BMI group) over the 2.5 year study period. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased almost universally, but more with improved BMI category. There were adverse effects on LDL size and total LDL particles, high density lipoprotein size and cholesterol for participants who remained obese or whose relative weight group worsened. Changes in relative category had no impact on HDL particles. Conclusion Improvement in relative weight group from 6th to 8th grade was associated with favorable changes in non-HDL-C, VLDL size, LDL size, HDL size and LDL particles, but had no effect on HDL particles. Findings indicate that an improvement in relative weight group between 6th and 8th grade had an effect on NMR derived particles sizes and concentrations among a large group of adolescents, which overrepresented low-income minorities. PMID:24508445

  6. Conformational Analysis of Oxidized Peptide Fragments of the C-terminal Redox Center in Thioredoxin Reductases by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggles, Erik L.; Deker, P. Bruce; Hondal, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Vicinal disulfide rings (VDRs) occur when a disulfide bond forms between adjacent cysteine residues in a protein and results in a rare eight-membered ring structure. This eight-membered ring has been found to exist in four major conformations in solution, divided between cis and trans conformers. Some selenoenzymes use a special type of VDR in which selenium replaces sulfur, generating a vicinal selenosulfide ring (VSeSR). Here we provide evidence that this substitution reduces ring strain, resulting in a strong preference for the trans conformation relative to cis in a VSeSR (cis:trans – 9:91). This was determined by using the “?-gauche effect” which makes use of both 1H-NMR and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques for determining the amide bond conformeric ratio. The presence of selenium in a VSeSR also lowers the dihedral strain energy (DSE) of the selenosulfide bond relative to the disulfide bond of VDRs. While cis amide geometry decreases strain on the amide bond, it increases strain on the scissile disulfide bond of the VDR found in thioredoxin reductase from D. melanogaster (DmTR). We hypothesize that the cis conformation of the VDR is the catalytically competent conformer for thiol/disulfide exchange. This hypothesis was investigated by computing the DSE of VDR and VSeSR conformers, the structure of which was determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy and energy minimization. The computed values of the VDR from DmTR are 16.5 kJ/mol DSE and 14.3 kJ/mol for the C+ and T? conformers, respectively, supporting the hypothesis that the enzyme uses the C+ conformer for thiol/disulfide exchange. PMID:24599608

  7. Mechanism for microwave heating of 1-(4?-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane characterized by in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasei, Yugo; Yamakami, Takuya; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Ushida, Kiminori; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating is widely used to accelerate organic reactions and enhance the activity of enzymes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for the effect of microwave on chemical reactions is not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of microwave heating on organic compounds, we have developed an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR spectra of 1-(4?-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane (PCH3) in the liquid crystalline and isotropic phases were observed under microwave irradiation. When the temperature was regulated at slightly higher than the phase transition temperature (Tc = 45 °C) under a gas flow temperature control system, liquid crystalline phase mostly changed to the isotropic phase. Under microwave irradiation and with the gas flow temperature maintained at 20 °C, which is 25 °C below the Tc, the isotropic phase appeared stationary as an approximately 2% fraction in the liquid crystalline phase. The temperature of the liquid crystalline state was estimated to be 38 °C according to the line width, which is at least 7 °C lower than the Tc. The temperature of this isotropic phase should be higher than 45 °C, which is considered to be a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by microwave irradiation. Microwaves at a power of 195 W were irradiated to the isotropic phase of PCH3 at 50 °C and after 2 min, the temperature reached 220 °C. The temperature of PCH3 under microwave irradiation was estimated by measurement of the chemical shift changes of individual protons in the molecule. These results demonstrate that microwave heating generates very high temperature within a short time using an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectrometer.

  8. The cadmium binding domains in the metallothionein isoform Cd(7)-MT10 from Mytilus galloprovincialis revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Giuseppe; Bracco, Chiara; Vergani, Laura; Botta, Mauro; Osella, Domenico; Viarengo, Aldo

    2009-02-01

    The metal-thiolate connectivity of recombinant Cd(7)-MT10 metallothionein from the sea mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis has been investigated for the first time by means of multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The internal backbone dynamics of the protein have been assessed by the analysis of (15)N T (1) and T (2) relaxation times and steady state {(1)H}-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs. The (113)Cd NMR spectrum of mussel MT10 shows unique features, with a remarkably wide dispersion (210 ppm) of (113)Cd NMR signals. The complete assignment of cysteine Halpha and Hbeta proton resonances and the analysis of 2D (113)Cd-(113)Cd COSY and (1)H-(113)Cd HMQC type spectra allowed us to identify a four metal-thiolate cluster (alpha-domain) and a three metal-thiolate cluster (beta-domain), located at the N-terminal and the C-terminal, respectively. With respect to vertebrate MTs, the mussel MT10 displays an inversion of the alpha and beta domains inside the chain, similar to what observed in the echinoderm MT-A. Moreover, unlike the MTs characterized so far, the alpha-domain of mussel Cd(7)-MT10 is of the form M(4)S(12) instead of M(4)S(11), and has a novel topology. The beta-domain has a metal-thiolate binding pattern similar to other vertebrate MTs, but it is conformationally more rigid. This feature is quite unusual for MTs, in which the beta-domain displays a more disordered conformation than the alpha-domain. It is concluded that in mussel Cd(7)-MT10, the spacing of cysteine residues and the plasticity of the protein backbone (due to the high number of glycine residues) increase the adaptability of the protein backbone towards enfolding around the metal-thiolate clusters, resulting in minimal alterations of the ideal tetrahedral geometry around the metal centres. PMID:18855021

  9. Mechanism for microwave heating of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane characterized by in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tasei, Yugo; Yamakami, Takuya; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Ushida, Kiminori; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating is widely used to accelerate organic reactions and enhance the activity of enzymes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for the effect of microwave on chemical reactions is not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of microwave heating on organic compounds, we have developed an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy. (1)H NMR spectra of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane (PCH3) in the liquid crystalline and isotropic phases were observed under microwave irradiation. When the temperature was regulated at slightly higher than the phase transition temperature (Tc=45 °C) under a gas flow temperature control system, liquid crystalline phase mostly changed to the isotropic phase. Under microwave irradiation and with the gas flow temperature maintained at 20 °C, which is 25 °C below the Tc, the isotropic phase appeared stationary as an approximately 2% fraction in the liquid crystalline phase. The temperature of the liquid crystalline state was estimated to be 38 °C according to the line width, which is at least 7 °C lower than the Tc. The temperature of this isotropic phase should be higher than 45 °C, which is considered to be a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by microwave irradiation. Microwaves at a power of 195 W were irradiated to the isotropic phase of PCH3 at 50 °C and after 2 min, the temperature reached 220 °C. The temperature of PCH3 under microwave irradiation was estimated by measurement of the chemical shift changes of individual protons in the molecule. These results demonstrate that microwave heating generates very high temperature within a short time using an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectrometer. PMID:25771526

  10. TSNo s02-hunger124547-O On the Use of 31-P NMR Spectroscopy to Determine Chemical Forms of Phosphorus in Soils.

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    TSNo s02-hunger124547-O Title On the Use of 31-P NMR Spectroscopy to Determine Chemical Forms in the soil environment. D.L. Authors SPARKS S. HUNGER* UNIV. OF DELAWARE For more information, please contact: Stefan Hunger 302 831-1595 hunger@udel.edu PaperType O Keywords PHOSPHORUS SPECIATION ALUMINUM HYDROXIDES

  11. J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992,114, 8579-8590 8579 More generally, the sensitivity of 77SeNMR spectroscopy to the

    E-print Network

    Hendrich, Mike

    J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992,114, 8579-8590 8579 More generally, the sensitivity of 77SeNMR spectroscopy: The molybdenum-iron protein of nitrogenase contains 2 Mo atoms and ca. 28-30 Fe atoms. Approximately 16 Fe atoms

  12. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of
    biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene
    (TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvic
    acids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. A
    silylation p...

  13. Structure-Based Design of a Novel, Potent, and Selective Inhibitor for MMP-13 Utilizing NMR Spectroscopy and Computer-Aided

    E-print Network

    Powers, Robert

    Spectroscopy and Computer-Aided Molecular Design James M. Chen,*, Frances C. Nelson, Jeremy I. Levin, DominickStructure-Based Design of a Novel, Potent, and Selective Inhibitor for MMP-13 Utilizing NMR of the catalytic fragment of human collagenase-3 (MMP- 13) was used as a starting point for structure-based design

  14. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  15. [superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Configurational Analysis of Mono- and Disaccharides and Detection of ß-Glucosidase Activity: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Periyannan, Gopal R.; Lawrence, Barbara A.; Egan, Annie E.

    2015-01-01

    A [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy-based laboratory experiment explores mono- and disaccharide structural chemistry, and the enzyme-substrate specificity of glycosidic bond cleavage by ß-glucosidase towards cellobiose (ß-linked gluco-disaccharide) and maltose (a-linked gluco-disaccharide). Structural differences between cellobiose, maltose, and…

  16. Use of NMR Spectroscopy in the Synthesis and Characterization of Air-and Water-Stable Silicon Nanoparticles from Porous Silicon

    E-print Network

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Use of NMR Spectroscopy in the Synthesis and Characterization of Air- and Water-Stable Silicon Nanoparticles from Porous Silicon R. S. Carter, S. J. Harley, P. P. Power, and M. P. Augustine* Department. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed February 23, 2005 Air- and water-stable silicon nanocrystals were

  17. A Study of Quantum Error Correction by Geometric Algebra and Liquid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Yehuda Sharf; David G. Cory; Shyamal S. Somaroo; Timothy F. Havel; Emanuel Knill; Raymond Laflamme

    2000-04-07

    Quantum error correcting codes enable the information contained in a quantum state to be protected from decoherence due to external perturbations. Applied to NMR, quantum coding does not alter normal relaxation, but rather converts the state of a ``data'' spin into multiple quantum coherences involving additional ancilla spins. These multiple quantum coherences relax at differing rates, thus permitting the original state of the data to be approximately reconstructed by mixing them together in an appropriate fashion. This paper describes the operation of a simple, three-bit quantum code in the product operator formalism, and uses geometric algebra methods to obtain the error-corrected decay curve in the presence of arbitrary correlations in the external random fields. These predictions are confirmed in both the totally correlated and uncorrelated cases by liquid-state NMR experiments on 13C-labeled alanine, using gradient-diffusion methods to implement these idealized decoherence models. Quantum error correction in weakly polarized systems requires that the ancilla spins be prepared in a pseudo-pure state relative to the data spin, which entails a loss of signal that exceeds any potential gain through error correction. Nevertheless, this study shows that quantum coding can be used to validate theoretical decoherence mechanisms, and to provide detailed information on correlations in the underlying NMR relaxation dynamics.

  18. Mesh size analysis of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels using solute exclusion and PFG-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jowkarderis, Leila; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-11-25

    The pore structure of TEMPO-mediated oxidized CNF hydrogels, chemically cross-linked with water-soluble diamines, is studied. A solute exclusion method and pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used to estimate the mesh size distribution in the gel network in its hydrated state. Dextran fractions with the nominal molecular weights in the range of 10-2000 kDa are used as probes. The results show a nonuniform network structure, consisting of a group of large openings that contain ?50% of water, and regions with a more compact structure and smaller mesh units that restrict the diffusivity of the dextran molecules. A biexponential model is proposed for the NMR echo amplitude decay due to the probe diffusion into the gel network. A typical single exponential model does not fit the experimental data when the probe molecular size is comparable to the network mesh size. The results obtained with NMR, using the proposed biexponential model, are in very good agreement with those determined with solute exclusion. Precise mesh size estimation with solute exclusion using pore models is subject to restrictions, and vary with the assumed pore geometry. The average mesh size obtained using a spherical pore model, ?35 nm, in the compact regions of the hydrogel, is in good agreement with the theoretical value in a network of rodlike particles. Neglecting the wall effects leads to underestimation of the mesh size with both techniques. PMID:26417984

  19. Analysis of SNARE complex/Synaptotagmin-1 Interactions by One-dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Amy; Brewer, Kyle D.; Rizo, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release depends critically on the Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin-1 and the SNARE proteins syntaxin-1, synaptobrevin and SNAP-25, which mediate membrane fusion by forming tight SNARE complexes that bridge the synaptic vesicle and plasma membranes. Interactions between the SNARE complex and the two C2 domains of synaptotagmin-1 (the C2A and C2B domains) are believed to play a key role in coupling Ca2+ sensing to membrane fusion, but the nature of these interactions is unclear, in part because of a paucity of data obtained by quantitative biophysical methods. Here we have analyzed synaptotagmin-1/SNARE complex interactions by monitoring the decrease in the intensities of one-dimensional 13C-edited 1H-NMR spectra of 13C-labeled fragments of synaptotagmin-1 upon binding to unlabeled SNARE complex. Our results indicate that there is a primary binding mode between synaptotagmin-1 and the SNARE complex that involves a polybasic region in the C2B domain and has a submicromolar affinity. Our NMR data, combined with precipitation assays, show that there are additional SNARE complex/synaptotagmin-1 interactions that lead to aggregation and that involve in part two arginines at the bottom of the C2B domain. Overall, this study shows the importance of disentangling the contributions of different types of interactions to SNARE complex/synaptotagmin-1 binding, and illustrate the usefulness of one-dimensional NMR methods to analyze intricate protein interactions. PMID:23617808

  20. Mg/Al Ordering in Layered Double Hydroxides Revealed by Multinuclear NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sideris, Paul J.; Nielsen, Ulla G.; Gan, Zhehong; Grey, Clare P.

    2008-07-04

    The anion-exchange ability of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has been exploited to create materials for use in catalysis, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. The specific cation arrangements in the hydroxide layers of hydrotalcite-like LDHs, of general formula Mg2+1–xAl3+xOH2(Anionn– x/n)·yH2O, have, however, remained elusive, and their elucidation could enhance the functional optimization of these materials. We applied rapid (60 kilohertz) magic angle spinning (MAS) to obtain high-resolution hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra and characterize the magnesium and aluminum distribution. These data, in combination with 1H-27Al double-resonance and 25Mg triple-quantum MAS NMR data, show that the cations are fully ordered for magnesium:aluminum ratios of 2:1 and that at lower aluminum content, a nonrandom distribution of cations persists, with no Al3+-Al3+ close contacts. The application of rapid MAS NMR methods to investigate proton distributions in a wide range of materials is readily envisaged.

  1. Metabolomic Investigations of American Oysters Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tikunov, Andrey P.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Lee, Haakil; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    The Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a useful, robust model marine organism for tissue metabolism studies. Its relatively few organs are easily delineated and there is sufficient understanding of their functions based on classical assays to support interpretation of advanced spectroscopic approaches. Here we apply high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis to C. virginica to investigate the differences in the metabolic profile of different organ groups, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively identify the well separated organs. Metabolites were identified in perchloric acid extracts of three portions of the oyster containing: (1) adductor muscle, (2) stomach and digestive gland, and (3) mantle and gills. Osmolytes dominated the metabolome in all three organ blocks with decreasing concentration as follows: betaine > taurine > proline > glycine > ß-alanine > hypotaurine. Mitochondrial metabolism appeared most pronounced in the adductor muscle with elevated levels of carnitine facilitating ß-oxidation, and ATP, and phosphoarginine synthesis, while glycogen was elevated in the mantle/gills and stomach/digestive gland. A biochemical schematic is presented that relates metabolites to biochemical pathways correlated with physiological organ functions. This study identifies metabolites and corresponding 1H NMR peak assignments for future NMR-based metabolomic studies in oysters. PMID:21116407

  2. Analysis of the hydration process and rotational dynamics of water in a Nafion membrane studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Chihiro; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2013-08-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy is employed to reveal the hydration process of a Nafion membrane by measuring both the chemical shift and the spin-lattice relaxation time. In a former study, the hydration process was suggested to comprise two steps: the molecular adsorption of water on the sulfonic acid groups and wetting with liquid water. The present study has revealed the first step can further be divided into two steps. By introducing a new experimental technique, the quantitatively reliable NMR measurements of protons ((1)H) of water involved in the polymer membrane are realized. In addition, a new analytical procedure is developed using a reciprocal concentration on a saturation-adsorption model, and the hydration is clearly revealed to have three individual steps. Both the chemical shift and the relaxation time plots against the reciprocal concentration exhibit three linear parts with apparently different slopes. Of great interest is that the initial hydration is divided into two stages: the first hydration is a very strong adsorption of water probably on the hydroxyl group of the sulfonic acid group, and the second one is a relatively weak adsorption on another site of the sulfonic acid group. The third hydration is readily assigned to excess bulk (liquid-like) water as expected. These adsorption processes are readily correlated with the rotational motion of water by converting the spin-lattice relaxation time to the rotational correlation time. PMID:23845052

  3. High-Resolution (1)H NMR Spectroscopy Discriminates Amniotic Fluid of Fetuses with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia from Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Croitor-Sava, Anca; Beck, Veronika; Sandaite, Inga; Van Huffel, Sabine; Dresselaers, Tom; Claus, Filip; Himmelreich, Uwe; Deprest, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Lung hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a life-threatening birth defect. Severe cases can be offered tracheal occlusion to boost prenatal lung development, although defining those to benefit remains challenging. Metabonomics of (1)H NMR spectra collected from amniotic fluid (AF) can identify general changes in diseased versus healthy fetuses. AF embodies lung secretions and hence might contain pulmonary next to general markers of disease in CDH fetuses. AF from 81 healthy and 22 CDH fetuses was collected. NMR spectroscopy was performed at 400 MHz to compare AF from fetuses with CDH against controls. Several advanced feature extraction methods based on statistical tests that explore spectral variability, similarity, and dissimilarity were applied and compared. This resulted in the identification of 30 spectral regions, which accounted for 80% variability between CDH and controls. Combination with automated classification discriminates AF from CDH versus healthy fetuses with up to 92% accuracy. Within the identified spectral regions, isoleucine, leucine, valine, pyruvate, GABA, glutamate, glutamine, citrate, creatine, creatinine, taurine, and glucose were the most concentrated metabolites. As the metabolite pattern of AF changes with fetal development, we have excluded metabolites with a high age-related variability and repeated the analysis with 12 spectral regions, which has resulted in similar classification accuracy. From this analysis, it was possible to distinguish between AF from CDH fetuses versus healthy controls independent of gestational age. PMID:26348471

  4. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Senesi, N.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  5. Freezing of Dynamics of a Methyl Group in a Protein Hydrophobic Core at Cryogenic Temperatures by Deuteron NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Ford, Joseph J.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2010-03-31

    Proteins undergo a number of changes when their temperature is dropped from the physiological range to much lower values. One of the most well-known dynamical changes undergone by proteins in a solid state is a so-called protein glass-transition, which is a dynamic transition occurring at about 200-230K leading to a loss of biological activity.1,2 X-ray diffraction, neutron scattering studies, and dielectric spectroscopy, as well as evidence from NMR relaxation measurements, indicate freezing of slow collective modes of motion below the glass transition temperature.3-8 Various arguments have been presented that connect the transition to solvent participation.1,4,8-10 In addition to the solvent-related modes that are frozen below the glass-transition temperature, there are anharmonic motions at temperatures below 200K which are likely to be dominated by methyl group dynamics down to about 100K.2,5,7 Recent neutron-scattering and NMR studies emphasize the role of these modes in low temperature dynamics. 2,5,7,11,12 One of the latest works on the subject by Bajaj et al.11 has reported a structural transition associated with dynamic processes in a solvent-free polypeptide. Thus, protein dynamics at low temperatures are complex and more studies are required to discern their pattern.

  6. Studying a Ligand Substitution Reaction with Variable Temperature 1H NMR Spectroscopy: An Experiment for Undergraduate Inoganic Chemistry Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvis, Jeffery A.; Dimetry, Basant; Winge, Jeffery; Corbin Mullis, T.

    2003-07-01

    The study of ligand substitution reactions of transition metal complexes is often a significant component of undergraduate courses in inorganic chemistry. In the laboratory, many undergraduates have studied the aquation of [Co(NH3)5Cl]2+at elevated temperatures, taking aliquots of the reaction mixture, and obtaining a series of UV vis spectra. Recently, an improved synthesis of a similar complex, trans-[Co(NH3)4Cl2]+ was reported. This complex undergoes aquation in less than an hour at room temperature, much faster than [Co(NH3)5Cl]2+, and is readily monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This reaction forms the basis of an instructive, multi-week laboratory experience in inorganic synthesis, followed by an analysis of a reaction mechanism using a classical activation parameter determination.

  7. The study of cyclododecane as a temporary coating for marble by NMR profilometry and FTIR reflectance spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, C.; Presciutti, F.; Doherty, B.; Brunetti, B. G.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2011-07-01

    This contribution focuses on an analytical evaluation of the use of cyclododecane (CDD) (C12H24) as a temporary protective coating for non-porous stone materials of cultural heritage interest. A facile solvent spray application technique for the production of an adherent continuous film has been assessed. The criterion for monitoring the sublimation of the cyclododecane film on marble has been established through the use of non-invasive analytical techniques so as to avoid any interaction with the process under study, where results serve to integrate and enhance knowledge into the use of cyclododecane in this discipline. Research is directed towards testing the applicability of portable infrared reflectance spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance profilometry systems to follow the in-situ behavior of temporary consolidants. In particular, the coupling of two spectroscopic techniques such as IR and NMR has been possible, enabling the descriptions of both the formation of the film and its kinetics of sublimation.

  8. Multiple-pulse and magic-angle spinning aided double-quantum proton solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, P. K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Vega, Shimon

    2004-08-01

    We here report on a high-resolution pulse scheme for double-quantum (DQ) proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid-state. The pulse scheme employs a combination of multiple-pulses and magic-angle spinning (MAS) for both the excitation and conversion of DQ coherences and their evolution under homonuclear dipolar decoupling. This is made possible in this two-dimensional experiment by an effective combination of homonuclear dipolar decoupling method of phase modulated Lee-Goldburg and symmetry adapted sequence for homonuclear dipolar recoupling under MAS. DQ spectra of monoethyl fumaric acid, glycine, and histidine are presented to highlight the utility of the pulse scheme together with some of the existing drawbacks.

  9. Solution structures of psoralen monoadducted and cross-linked DNA oligomers by NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Dwyer, T.J.; Hearst, J.E. |

    1995-10-10

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structures of the 4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) furanside monoadducted (MAf) and the photoisomeric HMT interstrand cross-linked (XL) DNA oligonucleotide d(t{prime}-GCGTACGC-3{prime}){sub 2}. The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for both the MAf and XL from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. 80 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Conformational studies of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, K.; Stawikowski, M.; ?lusarz, R.; Sikorska, E.; Lesner, A.; ??gowska, A.; Rolka, K.

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 is the smallest and the most potent among BBI inhibitors. It is also an interesting object for SAR studies since it is cyclic 14 amino acid molecule which additionally contains disulfide bridge. We showed that elimination of head-to-tail cycliztion did not influence its activity. Moreover peptoid monomers of Nlys and Nphe introduced in the substrate specificity P1 position of monocyclic SFTI-1 preserved trypsin and chymotripsin inhibitory activity respectively and made P1-P1? bond proteolytically stable. These findings motivated us to perform conformational analysis of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations. Obtained structure occurred to be in a good agreement with published structures for wild-type SFTI-1, its monocyclic analog with disulfide bridge only as well as one containing Nlys peptoid monomer in P1 position.

  11. NMR Spectroscopy of the Hydrated Layer of Composite Particles Based on Nanosized Al2O3 and Vitreous Humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turov, V. V.; Gerashchenko, I. I.; Markina, A. I.

    2013-11-01

    The hydrated layer of composite particles prepared using Al2O3 and cattle vitreous humor was investigated using NMR spectroscopy. It was found that water bound to Al2O3 nanoparticles was present in the form of clusters with different degrees of association and energies of interaction with the surface. Water bound to the surface of the Al2O3/vitreous humor composite became more uniform upon immobilization of vitreous humor components on the surface of the Al2O3. With this, the clusters of adsorbed water had characteristics that were close to those found in air and weakly polar CHCl3 media. Addition of polar CH3CN led to the formation of very small water clusters. PMR spectra of the surface of the Al2O3/vitreous humor composite in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid differentiated four types of hydrated structures that differed in the degree of water association.

  12. Nepheline crystallization in boron-rich alumino-silicate glasses as investigated by multi-nuclear NMR, Raman, & Mössbauer spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Mccloy, John S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Gassman, Paul L.; Marcial, Jose; Weaver, Jamie L.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.

    2015-02-01

    A spectroscopic study was conducted on 6 complex simulant nuclear waste glasses using multi-nuclear NMR, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopies to explore the role of glass-forming elements Si, Al, B, along with Na and Fe and to understand their connectivity with the goal of understanding melt structure precursors to deleterious feldspathoid nepheline-like crystals formation. NMR showed the appearance of two sites for Al, Si, and Na in the samples which crystallized significant amounts of nepheline, and B speciation changed, typically resulting in more B(IV) after nepheline crystallization. Raman spectroscopy suggested a major part of the glass structure is composed of metaborate chains or rings, thus significant numbers of non-bridging oxygens and a separation of the borate from the alumino-silicate network. Mössbauer combined with Fe redox chemical measurements showed that Fe plays a minor role in these glasses, mostly as Fe3+, but that iron oxide spinel forms with nepheline in all cases. Models of the glass network, speciation of B, and allocation of non-bridging oxygens were computed. The Yun-Dell-Bray model failed to predict the observed high concentration of NBO necessary to explain the metaborate features in the Raman spectra, and it largely over-estimated B(IV) fraction. The model assuming Na-Al-Si moieties and using experimental B(IV) fraction predicted a large amount of NBO consistent with Raman spectra. An alternative notation for appreciating the glass network is suggested and then used to investigate the changes the glass due to crystallization of sodium nepheline and the residual glass network. From a theoretical standpoint, it may be preferred to picture nuclear waste glasses by the Lebedev theory of glass structure where “microcrystallites” of ordered nuclei (or embryos) exist in the matrix of more disordered glass.

  13. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Ni, Qing Zhe

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning ...

  14. Application of RDC enhanced NMR spectroscopy in structural analysis of thiacalix[4]arene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, L; Kratochvílová-Šimánová, M; Landovský, T; Polívková, K; Budka, J; Dvo?áková, H; Lhoták, P

    2015-10-01

    Thiacalix[4]arene spirodienone was rearranged into the corresponding phenoxathiin-based macrocycle. Alkylation of this inherently chiral system to achieve its immobilization led to a mixture of only two (out of four theoretically possible) stereoisomers. As standard NOE and dynamic NMR experiments did not lead to unambiguous determination of the structures we applied the Residual Dipolar Coupling constant (RDC) method. Poly-?-ethyl-l-glutamate (PELG) and poly-?-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG) were found to be easily applicable lyotropic liquid crystalline alignment media for the conformational analysis of thiacalixarene derivatives. Using these media the 1,2-alternate and the partial cone conformations were determined unequivocally. PMID:26257213

  15. Backbone motion in elastin's hydrophobic domains as detected by (2) H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumashiro, Kristin K; Ohgo, Kosuke; Elliott, Douglas W; Kagawa, Todd F; Niemczura, Walter P

    2012-11-01

    The elasticity of vertebrate tissue originates from the insoluble, cross-linked protein elastin. Here, the results of variable-temperature (2) H NMR spectra are reported for hydrated elastin that has been enriched at the H? position in its abundant glycines. Typical powder patterns reflecting averaged quadrupolar parameters are observed for the frozen protein, as opposed to the two, inequivalent deuterons that are detected in a powder sample of enriched glycine. The spectra of the hydrated elastin at warmer temperatures are dominated by a strong central peak with features close to the baseline, reflective of both isotropic and very weakly anisotropic motions. PMID:22899363

  16. Solvent effect in NMR spectroscopy: Methoxyl resonance shifts induced by trifluoroacetic acid in isoflavones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Hirday N.; Sanduja, Sudershan K.; Sanduja, Radhika; Parmar, Virinder S.

    1H NMR spectra of eight different methoxylated isoflavones have been measured in deuterated chloroform and in a mixture (1 : 1) of deuterated chloroform and trifluoroacetic acid. The TFA-induced shifts of the methoxyl resonances have been interpreted and can serve as a guide in inferring the structures of natural or new isoflavones. This study is particularly useful in distinguishing a C-5 methoxyl from a C-7 methoxyl and a C-2' methoxyl from C-3' or C-4' methoxyl groups in an isoflavone. The steric, electronic and conformational factors are discussed to explain the different shift values.

  17. Hadamard-encoded localized high-resolution NMR spectroscopy via intermolecular double-quantum coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hanping; Cai, Honghao; Lin, Yanqin; Lin, Liangjie; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-02-01

    A scheme based on Hadamard encoding and intermolecular double-quantum coherences is designed to obtain localized one-dimensional high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Brief theoretical derivation was performed to illuminate its principle. Experiments were carried out on phantom solution and biological tissues to verify its effectiveness in yielding useful spectral information and efficiency in suppressing solvent signal even when the field inhomogeneity is sufficiently severe to erase almost all spectral information. This sequence may provide a promising way for analyzing heterogeneous biological tissues and chemical systems.

  18. Analysis of Interaction of Estradiol with Estrogen Receptor by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thakur, M K; Paramanik, V

    2016-01-01

    Following binding to estradiol, estrogen receptors (ER) ? and ER? recruit a number of interacting proteins and mediate a plethora of functions. The binding of estrogen with the receptors shows changes in the resonance structure and movement of protons. We cloned ER? and its trans-activation domain (TAD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD), expressed them in prokaryotic expression vectors, purified them, and studied their interaction with estradiol. In this chapter, a detailed method of preparation of recombinant proteins, SDS-PAGE, silver staining, and NMR are described. Such methods are useful to check the biological activity of bacterially expressed proteins and are applicable to basic and applied research. PMID:26585139

  19. Rapid identification of ergot derivatives by 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Casy, A F

    1994-01-01

    The 400 MHz 1H-NMR spectra of some therapeutically important ergot derivatives (three bases, four protonated bases and four dihydroergoline salts) are analysed in terms of the low field chemical shift region (above 5 ppm), common resonances of rings C and D (below 5 ppm) and C-8 substituent features. Attention is drawn to data of specific analytical value, and a scheme for the rapid identification of members of this group of ergots proposed. Features which provide evidence of the solute conformation of ring D, and isomerization to less active C-8 epimers are also emphasized. PMID:8161604

  20. Metabolic characterization of natural and cultured Ophicordyceps sinensis from different origins by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianshuang; Zhong, Xin; Li, Shaosong; Zhang, Guren; Liu, Xin

    2015-11-10

    Ophicordyceps sinensis is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine and cultured mycelium is a substitute for wild O. sinensis. Metabolic profiles of wild O. sinensis from three geographical locations and cultivated mycelia derived from three origins were investigated using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis combined with multivariate statistical analysis. A total of 56 primary metabolites were identified and quantified from O. sinensis samples. The principle component analysis (PCA) showed significant differences between natural O. sinensis and fermentation mycelia. Seven metabolites responsible for differentiation were screened out by orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The concentrations of mannitol, trehalose, arginine, trans-4-hydroxyproline, alanine and glucitol were significantly different between wild and cultured groups. The variation in metabolic profiling among artificial mycelia was greater than that among wild O. sinensis. Furthermore, wild samples from different origins were clearly distinguished by the levels of mannitol, trehalose and some amino acids. This study indicates that (1)H NMR-based metabolomics is useful for fingerprinting and discriminating O. sinensis of different geographical regions and cultivated mycelia of different strains. The present study provided an efficient approach for investigating chemical compositions and evaluating the quality of medicine and health food derived from O. sinensis. PMID:26279370

  1. Insight into the Functionality of Microbial Exopolysaccharides by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Flemming H.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent an important class of microbial polymers with diverse functions such as biofilm formation, thickening, and gelling properties as well as health-promoting properties. The broad range of exopolysaccharide (EPS) functionalities has sparked a renewed interest in this class of molecules. Chemical, enzymatic as well as genetic modifications by metabolic engineering can be used to create large numbers of analogous EPS variants with respect to EPS functionality. While this top–down approach is effective in finding new candidates for desired functionality, there seems to be a lack of the corresponding bottom–up approach. The molecular mechanisms of the desired functionalities can be established from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and molecular models and it is proposed that these models can be fed back into the biotechnology by using a quantitative structure–property approach. In this way it will be possible to tailor specific functionality within a given design space. This perspective will include two well-known commercial microbial EPS examples namely gellan and diutan and show how even a limited use of multiphase NMR and molecular modeling can increase the insight into their different properties, which are based on only minor structural differences. PMID:26696983

  2. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  3. Structural Analysis of Nanoscale Self-Assembled Discoidal Lipid Bilayers by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Kijac, Aleksandra Z.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiscs are an example of discoidal nanoscale self-assembled lipid/protein particles similar to nascent high-density lipoproteins, which reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. The major protein component of high-density lipoproteins is human apolipoprotein A-I, and the corresponding protein component of Nanodiscs is membrane scaffold protein 1 (MSP1), a 200-residue lipid-binding domain of human apolipoprotein A-I. Here we present magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR studies of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled MSP1 in polyethylene glycol precipitated Nanodiscs. Two-dimensional MAS 13C-13C correlation spectra show excellent microscopic order of MSP1 in precipitated Nanodiscs. Secondary isotropic chemical shifts throughout the protein are consistent with a predominantly helical structure. Moreover, the backbone conformations of prolines derived from their 13C chemical shifts are consistent with the molecular belt model but not the picket fence model of lipid-bound MSP1. Overall comparison of experimental spectra and 13C chemical shifts predicted from several structural models also favors the belt model. Our study thus supports the belt model of Nanodisc structure and demonstrates the utility of MAS NMR to study the structure of high molecular weight lipid-protein complexes. PMID:16905610

  4. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²?(bpy)? solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹?F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²?(bpy)? solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²?(bpy)? solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  5. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²?(bpy)? solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹?F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²?(bpy)? solute is rather different from the bulkmore »IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²?(bpy)? solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  6. Identification of lithium-sulfur battery discharge products through 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS and 7Li solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Laura A.; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Baughman, Jessi A.; Rinaldi, Peter L.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    6Li and 33S solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify the discharge products in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery cathodes. Cathodes were stopped at different potentials throughout battery discharge and measured ex-situ to obtain chemical shifts and T2 relaxation rates of the products formed. The chemical shifts in the spectra of both 6Li and 33S NMR demonstrate that long-chain, soluble lithium polysulfide species formed at the beginning of discharge are indistinguishable from each other (similar chemical shifts), while short-chain, insoluble polysulfide species that form at the end of discharge (presumably Li2S2 and Li2S) have a different chemical shift, thus distinguishing them from the soluble long-chain products. T2 relaxation measurements of discharged cathodes were also performed which resulted in two groupings of T2 rates that follow a trend and support the previous conclusions that long-chain polysulfide species are converted to shorter chain species during discharge. Through the complementary techniques of 1-D 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy, solution 7Li and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and T2 relaxation rate measurements, structural information about the discharge products of Li-S batteries is obtained.

  7. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant N-Terminally Pyroglutamate-Modified Amyloid-? Variants and Structural Analysis by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dammers, Christina; Gremer, Lothar; Neudecker, Philipp; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Schwarten, Melanie; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by memory loss and cognitive decline. Pathological hallmark of AD brains are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques. The major component of these plaques is the highly heterogeneous amyloid-? (A?) peptide, varying in length and modification. In recent years pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-? (pEA?) peptides have increasingly moved into the focus since they have been described to be the predominant species of all N-terminally truncated A?. Compared to unmodified A?, pEA? is known to show increased hydrophobicity, higher toxicity, faster aggregation and ?-sheet stabilization and is more resistant to degradation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly powerful method to investigate the conformations of pEA? isoforms in solution and to study peptide/ligand interactions for drug development. However, biophysical characterization of pEA? and comparison to its non-modified variant has so far been seriously hampered by the lack of highly pure recombinant and isotope-enriched protein. Here we present, to our knowledge, for the first time a reproducible protocol for the production of pEA? from a recombinant precursor expressed in E. coli in natural isotope abundance as well as in uniformly [U-15N]- or [U-13C, 15N]-labeled form, with yields of up to 15 mg/l E. coli culture broth. The chemical state of the purified protein was evaluated by RP-HPLC and formation of pyroglutamate was verified by mass spectroscopy. The recombinant pyroglutamate-modified A? peptides showed characteristic sigmoidal aggregation kinetics as monitored by thioflavin-T assays. The quality and quantity of produced pEA?40 and pEA?42 allowed us to perform heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in solution and to sequence-specifically assign the backbone resonances under near-physiological conditions. Our results suggest that the presented method will be useful in obtaining cost-effective high-quality recombinant pEA?40 and pEA?42 for further physiological and biochemical studies. PMID:26436664

  8. Laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy on neutron-rich magnesium isotopes

    E-print Network

    Kowalska, M; Blaum, K; Borremans, D; Himpe, P; Lievens, P; Mallion, S; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Vermeulen, N

    2005-01-01

    Ground state properties of neutron-rich $^{29,31}$Mg have been recently measured at ISOLDE/CERN in the context of shell structure far from stability. By combining the results of $\\beta$-NMR and hyperfine structure measurements unambiguous values of the nuclear spin and magnetic moment of $^{31}\\!$Mg are obtained. $\\scriptstyle\\textrm{I}$$^\\pi$ = 1/2$^{+}$ and $\\mu$ = -0.88355(15) $\\mu\\scriptstyle_\\textrm{N}$ can be explained only by an intruder ground state with at least 2p-2h excitations, revealing the weakening of the N = 20 shell gap in this nucleus. This result plays an important role in the understanding of the mechanism and boundaries of the so called “island of inversion”.

  9. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (?=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (?=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process. PMID:25974673

  10. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  11. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  12. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; ?ojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance.

  13. Essential Parameters for Structural Analysis and Dereplication by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the ? and J parameters of frequency domain 1H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting ?? and ?J values at the 0.1–1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen (1H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  14. Probing the interaction of polyphenols with lipid bilayers by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueting; Chu, Shidong; Hagerman, Ann E.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols are bioactive natural products that appear to act against a wide range of pathologies. Mechanisms of activity have not been established, but recent studies have suggested that some polyphenols bind to membranes. We examined the interaction between lipid bilayers and three structurally diverse polyphenols. We hypothesized that features of the polyphenols such as polarity, molecular size, molecular geometry, and number and arrangement of phenol hydroxyl groups would determine the tendency to interact with the bilayer. We examined a mixed polyphenol, (?) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg); a proanthocyanidin trimer comprising catechin-(4?8)-catechin-(4?8)-catechin (cat3); and a hydrolysable tannin, 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-?-D-glucopyranose (PGG). These polyphenols were incorporated at different levels into 2H labeled 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) multi-lamellar vesicles (MLVs). 31P and 2H solid-state NMR experiments were performed to determine the dynamics of the headgroup region and the hydrophobic acyl chain region of the lipid bilayer upon addition of polyphenols. The chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) width of the 31P NMR spectra decreased upon addition of polyphenols. Addition of PGG induces a dramatic reduction on the CSA width compared with the control lipid bilayer sample, while addition of cat3 barely reduces the CSA width. The 2H quadupolar splitting of the lipids also decreased upon addition of polyphenols. At the same concentration, PGG substantially reduced the quadrupolar splitting while cat3 barely reduced it when compared with the control sample. By calculating the order parameters of the acyl chain region of the lipid bilayer, we concluded that the hydrophobic part of the lipid bilayer was perturbed by PGG while cat3 did not cause large perturbations. The data suggest that the polarity of the polyphenols affects the interaction between tannins and membranes. The interactions may relate to the biological activities of polyphenols. PMID:21574575

  15. Nonaromatic core-shell structure of nanodiamond from solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, XiaoWen; Mao, JingDong; Levin, E M; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    The structure of synthetic nanodiamond has been characterized by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral editing combined with measurements of long-range (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings and (13)C relaxation times. The surface layer of these approximately 4.8-nm diameter carbon particles consists mostly of sp(3)-hybridized C that is protonated or bonded to OH groups, while sp(2)-hybridized carbon makes up less than 1% of the material. The surface protons surprisingly resonate at 3.8 ppm, but their direct bonding to carbon is proved by fast dipolar dephasing under homonuclear decoupling. Long-range (1)H-(13)C distance measurements, based on (13)C{(1)H} dipolar dephasing by surface protons, show that seven carbon layers, in a shell of 0.63 nm thickness that contains approximately 60% of all carbons, predominantly resonate more than +8 ppm from the 37-ppm peak of bulk diamond (i.e., within the 45-80 ppm range). Nitrogen detected in (15)N NMR spectra is mostly not protonated and can account for some of the high-frequency shift of carbon. The location of unpaired electrons (approximately 40 unpaired electrons per particle) was studied in detail, based on their strongly distance-dependent effects on T(1,C) relaxation. The slower relaxation of the surface carbons, selected by spectral editing, showed that the unpaired electrons are not dangling bonds at the surface. This was confirmed by detailed simulations, which indicated that the unpaired electrons are mostly located in the disordered shell, at distances between 0.4 and 1 nm from the surface. On the basis of these results, a nonaromatic core-shell structural model of nanodiamond particles has been proposed. PMID:19133766

  16. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  17. High-resolution molecular structure of a peptide in an amyloid fibril determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.; MacPhee, Cait E.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; McMahon, Michael T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled filamentous structures associated with protein deposition conditions including Alzheimer's disease and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the immense medical importance of amyloid fibrils, no atomic-resolution structures are available for these materials, because the intact fibrils are insoluble and do not form diffraction-quality 3D crystals. Here we report the high-resolution structure of a peptide fragment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin, TTR(105–115), in its fibrillar form, determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. The structure resolves not only the backbone fold but also the precise conformation of the side chains. Nearly complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for TTR(105–115) formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance and dihedral angle restraints. A total of 76 self-consistent experimental measurements, including 41 restraints on 19 backbone dihedral angles and 35 13C–15N distances between 3 and 6 Å were obtained from 2D and 3D NMR spectra recorded on three fibril samples uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled in consecutive stretches of four amino acids and used to calculate an ensemble of peptide structures. Our results indicate that TTR(105–115) adopts an extended ?-strand conformation in the amyloid fibrils such that both the main- and side-chain torsion angles are close to their optimal values. Moreover, the structure of this peptide in the fibrillar form has a degree of long-range order that is generally associated only with crystalline materials. These findings provide an explanation of the unusual stability and characteristic properties of this form of polypeptide assembly. PMID:14715898

  18. Determination of neo- and D-chiro-inositol hexakisphosphate in soils by solution 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L; Cheesman, Alexander W; Godage, H Yasmin; Riley, Andrew M; Potter, Barry V L

    2012-05-01

    The inositol phosphates are an abundant but poorly understood group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the environment. Four stereoisomers of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP(6)) occur, although for three of these (scyllo, neo, and D-chiro) the origins, dynamics, and biological function remain unknown, due in large part to analytical limitations in their measurement in environmental samples. We synthesized authentic neo- and D-chiro-IP(6) and used them to identify signals from these compounds in three soils from the Falkland Islands. Both compounds resisted hypobromite oxidation and gave quantifiable (31)P NMR signals at ? = 6.67 ppm (equatorial phosphate groups of the 4-equatorial/2-axial conformer of neo-IP(6)) and ? = 6.48 ppm (equatorial phosphate groups of the 2-equatorial/4-axial conformer of D-chiro-IP(6)) in soil extracts. Inositol hexakisphosphate accounted for 46-54% of the soil organic phosphorus, of which the four stereoisomers constituted, on average, 55.9% (myo), 32.8% (scyllo), 6.1% (neo), and 5.2% (D-chiro). Reappraisal of the literature based on the new signal assignments revealed that neo- and D-chiro-IP(6) occur widely in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. These results confirm that the inositol phosphates can constitute a considerable fraction of the organic phosphorus in soils and reveal the prevalence of neo- and D-chiro-IP(6) in the environment. The hypobromite oxidation and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy procedure allows the simultaneous quantification of all four IP(6) stereoisomers in environmental samples and provides a platform for research into the origins and ecological significance of these enigmatic compounds. PMID:22489788

  19. Efficient resonance assignment of proteins in MAS NMR by simultaneous intra- and inter-residue 3D correlation spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Daviso, Eugenio

    Resonance assignment is the first step in NMR structure determination. For magic angle spinning NMR, this is typically achieved with a set of heteronuclear correlation experiments (NCaCX, NCOCX, CONCa) that utilize SPECIFIC-CP ...

  20. High-resolution ¹H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of intact Arctic char (Salvelinus Alpinus) muscle. Quantitative analysis of n-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Gustav; Bankefors, Johan; Schlechtriem, Christian; Brännäs, Eva; Pickova, Jana; Sandström, Corine

    2010-10-27

    The lipid and small metabolite profiles from intact muscles of Arctic char were investigated using (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning ((1)H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Not only the total n-3 fatty acid content but also the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) contents of the muscle were obtained from the (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra without pretreatment of the tissue or lipophilic extraction. A number of small metabolites could also be observed, where creatine/phosphocreatine, anserine and taurine were the most abundant. Thus, the use of (1)H HR-MAS NMR led to simplified analysis techniques that can give direct information on the nutritional value of the fish. PMID:20873863

  1. Structural features of the protoporphyrin-apomyoglobin complex: a proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J T; Cocco, M J

    1990-12-18

    The structural properties of the complex formed by apomyoglobin and protoporphyrin IX (des-iron myoglobin) were studied to probe the influence of iron-to-histidine coordination on the native myoglobin fold and the heme binding site geometry. Standard two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods were applied to identify porphyrin and protein signals. A pronounced spectral resemblance between carbonmonoxymyoglobin and des-iron myoglobin was noticed that could be exploited to assign a number of resonances by nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy. Protoporphyrin IX was determined to bind in the same orientation as the heme. Most residues in contact with the prosthetic group were found in the holomyoglobin conformation. Several tertiary structure features were also characterized near the protein termini. It was concluded that the protoporphyrin-apomyoglobin interactions are capable of organizing the binding site and the unfolded region of the apoprotein into the native holoprotein structure. PMID:2176891

  2. Characterization of hydrophobic cores in apomyoglobin: a proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cocco, M J; Lecomte, J T

    1990-12-18

    A proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of horse apomyoglobin was undertaken in order to define the regions of myoglobin that are and that are not structurally affected by the binding of the prosthetic group. It was found that, in spite of the poor spectral resolution, a number of spin systems could be identified by using standard correlated methods. Four clusters consisting mostly of hydrophobic residues were detected by nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy, two of which involved the tryptophan side chains. Extensive similarities to nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy data collected on the carbonmonoxy form of holomyoglobin suggested tentative assignments for several residues. It appeared that distinct cores of side chains on the distal side of the binding pocket and between the A, B, G, and H helices maintain the same packing as they do in holomyoglobin and apomyoglobin reconstituted with protoporphyrin IX. PMID:2176892

  3. Characterization of hydrophobic cores in apomyoglobin: A proton NMR spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Cocco, M.J.; Lecomte, J.T.L. )

    1990-12-01

    A proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of horse apomyoglobin was undertaken in order to define the regions of myoglobin that are and that are not structurally affected by the binding of the prosthetic group. It was found that, in spite of the poor spectral resolution, a number of spin systems could be identified by using standard correlated methods. Four clusters consisting mostly of hydrophobic residues were detected by nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy, two of which involved the tryptophan side chains. Extensive similarities to nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy data collected on the carbonmonoxy form of holomyoglobin suggested tentative assignments for several residues. It appeared that distinct cores of side chains on the distal side of the binding pocket and between the A, B, G, and H helices maintain the same packing as they do in holomyoglobin and apomyoglobin reconstituted with protoporphyrin IX.

  4. Structural features of the protophorphyrin-apomyoglobin complex. A proton NMR spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, J.T.J.; Cocco, M.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The structural properties of the complex formed by apomyoglobin and protoporphyrin IX (des-iron myoglobin) were studied to probe the influence of iron-to-histidine coordination on the native myoglobin fold and the heme binding site geometry. Standard two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods were applied to identify porphyrin and protein signals. A pronounced spectral resemblance between carbonmonoxymyoglobin and des-iron myogobin was noticed that could be exploited to assign a number of resonances by nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy. Protoporphyrin IX was determined to bind in the same orientation as the heme. Most residues in contact with the prosthetic group were found in the holomyoglobin conformation. Several tertiary structure features were also characterized near the protein termini. It was concluded that the protoporphyrin-apomyoglobin interactions are capable of organizing the binding site and the unfolded region of the apoprotein into the native holoprotein structure.

  5. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (?1) or second-rank (?2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen ?-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these ?-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the ?1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the ?-encoded symmetry sequences for ?2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in systems with strong homonuclear dipolar couplings, such as uniformly-13C labeled biological solids. We demonstrate RNCSA NMR experiments and numerical simulations establishing the utility of this approach to the measurements of 13C and 15N CSA parameters in model compounds, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine (NAV), [U-13C, 15N]-alanine, [U-13C,15N]-histidine, and present the application of this approach to [U-13C/15N]-Tyr labeled C-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA protein.

  6. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Grill, P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Non target high resolution organic structural spectroscopy of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated on 27 November 2008 by means of solid phase extraction (SPE) from four different depths in the South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3.1° E; -17.7° S; Angola basin) provided molecular level information of complex unknowns with unprecedented coverage and resolution. The sampling was intended to represent major characteristic oceanic regimes of general significance: 5 m (FISH; near surface photic zone), 48 m (FMAX; fluorescence maximum), 200 m (upper mesopelagic zone) and 5446 m (30 m above ground). 800 MHz proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 1H NMR, spectra were least affected by fast and differential transverse NMR relaxation and produced at first similar looking, rather smooth bulk NMR envelopes reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap. Visibly resolved NMR signatures were most abundant in surface DOM but contributed at most a few percent to the total 1H NMR integral and were mainly limited to unsaturated and singly oxygenated carbon chemical environments. The relative abundance and variance of resolved signatures between samples was maximal in the aromatic region; in particular, the aromatic resolved NMR signature of the deep ocean sample at 5446 m was considerably different from that of all other samples. When scaled to equal total NMR integral, 1H NMR spectra of the four marine DOM samples revealed considerable variance in abundance for all major chemical environments across the entire range of chemical shift. Abundance of singly oxygenated CH units and acetate derivatives declined from surface to depth whereas aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) derived molecules increased in abundance. Surface DOM contained a remarkably lesser abundance of methyl esters than all other marine DOM, likely a consequence of photodegradation from direct exposure to sunlight. All DOM showed similar overall 13C NMR resonance envelopes typical of an intricate mixture of natural organic matter with noticeable peaks of anomerics and C-aromatics carbon whereas oxygenated aromatics and ketones were of too low abundance to result in noticeable humps at the S/N ratio provided. Integration according to major substructure regimes revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to deep marine DOM, reflecting a progressive oxygenation of marine DOM, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Isolation of marine DOM by means of SPE likely discriminated against carbohydrates but produced materials with beneficial NMR relaxation properties: a substantial fraction of dissolved organic molecules present allowed the acquisition of two-dimensional NMR spectra with exceptional resolution. JRES, COSY and HMBC NMR spectra were capable to depict resolved molecular signatures of compounds exceeding a certain minimum abundance. Here, JRES spectra suffered from limited resolution whereas HMBC spectra were constrained because of limited S/N ratio. Hence, COSY NMR spectra appeared best suited to depict organic complexity in marine DOM. The intensity and number of COSY cross peaks was found maximal for sample FMAX and conformed to about 1500 molecules recognizable in variable abundance. Surface DOM (FISH) produced a slightly (~25%) lesser number of cross peaks with remarkable positional accordance to FMAX (~80% conforming COSY cross peaks were found in FISH and FMAX). With increasing water depth, progressive attenuation of COSY cross peaks was caused by fast transverse NMR relaxation of yet unknown origin. However, most of the faint COSY cross peak positions of deep water DOM conformed to those observed in the surface DOM, suggesting the presence of a numerous set of identical molecules throughout the entire ocean column even if the investigated water masses belonged to different oceanic regimes and currents. Aliphatic chemical environments of methylene (CH2) and methyl (CH3) in marine DOM were nicely discriminated in DEPT HSQC NMR spectra. Classical methyl gro

  7. High-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of the paramagnetic metal-organic frameworks, STAM-1 and HKUST-1.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Daniel M; Jamieson, Lauren E; Mohideen, M Infas H; McKinlay, Alistair C; Smellie, Iain A; Cadou, Romain; Keddie, Neil S; Morris, Russell E; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2013-01-21

    Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the Cu(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and STAM-1, and the structural changes occurring within these MOFs upon activation (dehydration). NMR spectroscopy is an attractive technique for the investigation of these materials, owing to its high sensitivity to local structure, without any requirement for longer-range order. However, interactions between nuclei and unpaired electrons in paramagnetic systems (e.g., Cu(II)-based MOFs) pose a considerable challenge, not only for spectral acquisition, but also in the assignment and interpretation of the spectral resonances. Here, we exploit the rapid T(1) relaxation of these materials to obtain (13)C NMR spectra using a spin-echo pulse sequence at natural abundance levels, and employ frequency-stepped acquisition to ensure uniform excitation of resonances over a wide frequency range. We then utilise selective (13)C isotopic labelling of the organic linker molecules to enable an unambiguous assignment of NMR spectra of both MOFs for the first time. We show that the monomethylated linker can be recovered from STAM-1 intact, demonstrating not only the interesting use of this MOF as a protecting group, but also the ability (for both STAM-1 and HKUST-1) to recover isotopically-enriched linkers, thereby reducing significantly the overall cost of the approach. PMID:23202442

  8. The Fantastic Four: A plug 'n' play set of optimal control pulses for enhancing nmr spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nimbalkar, Manoj; Skinner, Thomas E; Neves, Jorge L; Gershenzon, Naum I; Kobzar, Kyryl; Bermel, Wolfgang; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-01-01

    We present highly robust, optimal control-based shaped pulses designed to replace all 90{\\deg} and 180{\\deg} hard pulses in a given pulse sequence for improved performance. Special attention was devoted to ensuring that the pulses can be simply substituted in a one-to-one fashion for the original hard pulses without any additional modification of the existing sequence. The set of four pulses for each nucleus therefore consists of 90{\\deg} and 180{\\deg} point-to-point (PP) and universal rotation (UR) pulses of identical duration. These 1 ms pulses provide uniform performance over resonance offsets of 20 kHz (1H) and 35 kHz (13C) and tolerate reasonably large radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneity/miscalibration of (+/-)15% (1H) and (+/-)10% (13C), making them especially suitable for NMR of small-to-medium-sized molecules (for which relaxation effects during the pulse are negligible) at an accessible and widely utilized spectrometer field strength of 600 MHz. The experimental performance of conventional hard-pulse ...

  9. The Fantastic Four: A plug 'n' play set of optimal control pulses for enhancing nmr spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Manoj Nimbalkar; Burkhard Luy; Thomas E. Skinner; Jorge L. Neves; Naum I. Gershenzon; Kyryl Kobzar; Wolfgang Bermel; Steffen J. Glaser

    2012-09-01

    We present highly robust, optimal control-based shaped pulses designed to replace all 90{\\deg} and 180{\\deg} hard pulses in a given pulse sequence for improved performance. Special attention was devoted to ensuring that the pulses can be simply substituted in a one-to-one fashion for the original hard pulses without any additional modification of the existing sequence. The set of four pulses for each nucleus therefore consists of 90{\\deg} and 180{\\deg} point-to-point (PP) and universal rotation (UR) pulses of identical duration. These 1 ms pulses provide uniform performance over resonance offsets of 20 kHz (1H) and 35 kHz (13C) and tolerate reasonably large radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneity/miscalibration of (+/-)15% (1H) and (+/-)10% (13C), making them especially suitable for NMR of small-to-medium-sized molecules (for which relaxation effects during the pulse are negligible) at an accessible and widely utilized spectrometer field strength of 600 MHz. The experimental performance of conventional hard-pulse sequences is shown to be greatly improved by incorporating the new pulses, each set referred to as the Fantastic Four (Fanta4).

  10. Metabolomics study of Saw palmetto extracts based on 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Combarieu, Eric; Martinelli, Ernesto Marco; Pace, Roberto; Sardone, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Preparations containing Saw palmetto extracts are used in traditional medicine to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. According to the European and the American Pharmacopoeias, the extract is obtained from comminuted Saw palmetto berries by a suitable extracting procedure using ethanol or supercritical carbon dioxide or a mixture of n-hexane and methylpentanes. In the present study an approach to metabolomics profiling using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a finger-printing tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. The phytochemical analysis coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) showed the same composition of the Saw palmetto extracts obtained with carbon dioxide and hexane with minor not significant differences for extracts obtained with ethanol. In fact these differences are anyhow lower than the batch-to-batch variability ascribable to the natural-occurring variability in the Saw palmetto fruits' phytochemical composition. The fingerprinting analysis combined with chemometric method, is a technique, which would provide a tool to comprehensively assess the quality control of Saw palmetto extracts. PMID:25707588

  11. NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields with non-linear correlation.

    PubMed

    Topgaard, Daniel; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-01

    Resolved NMR spectra from samples in inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields can be obtained with the so-called "ex situ" methodology, employing a train of composite or adiabatic z-rotation RF pulses to periodically refocus the inhomogeneous broadening during the detection of the time-domain signal. Earlier schemes relied on a linear correlation between the inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields. Here the pulse length, bandwidth, and amplitude of the adiabatic pulses of the hyperbolic secant type are adjusted to improve the refocusing for a setup with non-linear correlation. The field correlation is measured using a two-dimensional nutation experiment augmented with a third dimension with varying RF carrier frequency accounting for off-resonance effects. The pulse optimization is performed with a computer algorithm using the experimentally determined field correlation and a standard adiabatic z-rotation pulse as a starting point for the iterative optimization procedure. The shape of the z-rotation RF pulse is manipulated to provide refocusing for the conditions given by the sample-, magnet-, and RF-coil geometry. PMID:15949743

  12. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C?, 13C? and 13C? sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13C? T2? times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  13. First solid-state NMR spectroscopy evaluation of complexes of benznidazole with cyclodextrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Priotti, Josefina; Ferreira, M João G; Lamas, Maria C; Leonardi, Darío; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-10-20

    Complexation of benznidazole (BZL), a drug of choice for the treatment of Chagas'neglected disease, with cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives was analyzed by solid-state NMR. (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning spectra were recorded from BZL and from BZL:?-CD, BZL:methyl ?-CD and BZL:hydroxypropyl ?-CD complexes, which were obtained by the solvent evaporation technique. No significant evidence was obtained on BZL inclusion complexes involving either ?-CD or hydroxypropyl ?-CD. Conversely, BZL:methyl ?-CD displayed BZL resonances characteristic of an amorphous drug and data analysis confirmed the presence of stable BZL:methyl ?-CD inclusion complexes, with benzene encapsulated into the host cavity. Further evidences on complex structure and dynamics were obtained from proton and carbon spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame. These data are consistent with a common guest-host spin reservoir. The BZL interaction with methyl ?-CD provided a route to stabilize amorphous BZL. Physical mixtures with identical BZL and CD compositions were also studied for comparison. PMID:26256164

  14. NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields with non-linearcorrelation

    SciTech Connect

    Topgaard, Daniel; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Resolved NMR spectra from samples in inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields can be obtained with the so-called ''ex situ'' methodology, employing a train of composite or adiabatic z-rotation RF pulses to periodically refocus the inhomogeneous broadening during the detection of the time-domain signal. Earlier schemes relied on a linear correlation between the inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields. Here the pulse length, bandwidth, and amplitude of the adiabatic pulses of the hyperbolic secant type are adjusted to improve the refocusing for a setup with non-linear correlation. The field correlation is measured using a two-dimensional nutation experiment augmented with a third dimension with varying RF carrier frequency accounting for off-resonance effects. The pulse optimization is performed with a computer algorithm using the experimentally determined field correlation and a standard adiabatic z-rotation pulse as a starting point for the iterative optimization procedure. The shape of the z-rotation RF pulse is manipulated to provide refocusing for the conditions given by the sample-, magnet-, and RF coil geometry.

  15. Accurate determination of reference materials and natural isolates by means of quantitative (1)h NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frank, Oliver; Kreissl, Johanna Karoline; Daschner, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-03-26

    A fast and precise proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) method for the quantitative determination of low molecular weight target molecules in reference materials and natural isolates has been validated using ERETIC 2 (Electronic REference To access In vivo Concentrations) based on the PULCON (PULse length based CONcentration determination) methodology and compared to the gravimetric results. Using an Avance III NMR spectrometer (400 MHz) equipped with a broad band observe (BBO) probe, the qHNMR method was validated by determining its linearity, range, precision, and accuracy as well as robustness and limit of quantitation. The linearity of the method was assessed by measuring samples of l-tyrosine, caffeine, or benzoic acid in a concentration range between 0.3 and 16.5 mmol/L (r(2) ? 0.99), whereas the interday and intraday precisions were found to be ?2%. The recovery of a range of reference compounds was ?98.5%, thus demonstrating the qHNMR method as a precise tool for the rapid quantitation (~15 min) of food-related target compounds in reference materials and natural isolates such as nucleotides, polyphenols, or cyclic peptides. PMID:24559241

  16. Chemical curing in alkyd paints: An evaluation via FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, G.; Marchiafava, V.; Mirabello, V.; Peruzzini, M.; Picollo, M.

    2014-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the time necessary for an alkyd paint to attain chemical curing is presented. In particular, the object of our investigation was an oil paint made by Winsor & Newton, namely French ultramarine (PB29) in the Griffin Alkyd “fast drying oil colour” series. Using this paint, we prepared several mock-ups on glass. These were left in the laboratory at room temperature in a piece of furniture with glass doors for a total of 70 days. Samples were taken at different times, and the changes in their composition were monitored by means of FT-IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic analyses. Since the cross-linking reactions involved in the formation of the pictorial film mainly affect the amount of carbon-carbon double bonds, we monitored the decrease in allyl, diallyl and vinyl protons and carbons. The data obtained from the use of both techniques led us to conclude that, in our particular experimental conditions, the chemical curing of the paint layer is reached within the first 70 days, thus establishing the beginning of the ageing phenomena.

  17. Comparison of single-shot localization methods (STEAM and PRESS) for in vivo proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moonen, C T; von Kienlin, M; van Zijl, P C; Cohen, J; Gillen, J; Daly, P; Wolf, G

    1989-12-01

    Two single-shot localization techniques, STEAM and PRESS, are analyzed with regard to specifications for in vivo localized proton NMR. In particular, attention is paid to optimum signal intensity per unit volume, sensitivity to motion and diffusion, shortest attainable echo time, water suppression and editing possibilities. Experimental results are shown for cat brain at 4.7 T and human brain at 1.5 T. Both STEAM and PRESS are highly effective localization methods. For long echo times, PRESS is the method of choice, because it offers a factor of two gain in signal intensity. In addition, the method is less sensitive to motion and diffusion, and not susceptible to multiple-quantum effects. STEAM offers advantages for observation of (coupled) metabolites with short T2, because (a) shorter TEs can be attained and (b) effective water suppression sequences can be implemented without penalty in echo time. Differences relating to editing possibilities and B1 dependence, possibly important in choosing a method, are discussed. PMID:2641894

  18. Metabolic response of LLC xenografted mice to oxythiamine, as measured by [1H] NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Lan, W X; Bo, L; Niu, C; Zhou, J J; Zhu, H L

    2015-01-01

    Oxythiamine (OT) has been proven to be a potential anticancer drug. With the help of NMR-based metabonomics, we studied the metabolic changes within tumor-bearing mice with different levels of OT administration using a C57BL/6 mouse Lewis lung carcinoma tumor transplantation model. We administered different concentrations of OT (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg?kg(-1)?day(-1)) to the mice orally for 2 weeks, recorded animal weights and tumor volumes, sacrificed the animals, and collected blood and tumor mass samples for nuclear magnetic resonance determination. Compared with the findings for the control (untreated) group, the tumor weights and volumes of the 150, 300, and 600 mg?kg-1?day-1 groups decreased with no difference among these OT groups. A large metabolite difference was observed in plasma metabolites between the blank and control groups, which indicated the success of the tumor-bearing model. The metabolites in tumor associated with thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) underwent considerable change between the OT and control groups, exhibiting concentration dependence and enzyme specificity. The restriction of TDEs by OT may be a major mechanism underlying its anticancer effect. The role of OT as a potential anticancer drug and a dehydrogenase inhibitor should therefore be taken into consideration in future tumor research. PMID:26400334

  19. Chemical curing in alkyd paints: an evaluation via FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, G; Marchiafava, V; Mirabello, V; Peruzzini, M; Picollo, M

    2014-01-24

    A study aimed at determining the time necessary for an alkyd paint to attain chemical curing is presented. In particular, the object of our investigation was an oil paint made by Winsor & Newton, namely French ultramarine (PB29) in the Griffin Alkyd "fast drying oil colour" series. Using this paint, we prepared several mock-ups on glass. These were left in the laboratory at room temperature in a piece of furniture with glass doors for a total of 70 days. Samples were taken at different times, and the changes in their composition were monitored by means of FT-IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic analyses. Since the cross-linking reactions involved in the formation of the pictorial film mainly affect the amount of carbon-carbon double bonds, we monitored the decrease in allyl, diallyl and vinyl protons and carbons. The data obtained from the use of both techniques led us to conclude that, in our particular experimental conditions, the chemical curing of the paint layer is reached within the first 70 days, thus establishing the beginning of the ageing phenomena. PMID:24084480

  20. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy of complex technical mixtures using a virtual reference: chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of formaldehyde-water-1,3,5-trioxane.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Grützner, Thomas; Ströfer, Eckhard; Hasse, Hans

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to study chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of both the formation and decomposition of 1,3,5-trioxane in aqueous formaldehyde solutions. The reaction was homogeneously catalyzed with up to 0.10 g g(-1) sulfuric acid at temperatures between 360 and 383 K so that most of the experiments had to be carried out pressurized. The studied mixtures were complex due to the formation of methylene glycol and poly(oxymethylene) glycols in aqueous formaldehyde and the presence of considerable amounts of ionized species. Most common internal standards are decomposed by the hot sulfuric acid and external standards were not applicable using the flow NMR probe or pressurizable NMR sample tubes. Therefore, for the quantification of the small trioxane signals, a novel procedure was applied, in which electronically generated NMR signals were used as highly stable Virtual References (VR). The NMR decoupler channel with wave-form generator was used as the source of the reference signal, which was irradiated into the probe using the lock coil. Details on the experimental procedure are presented. It is shown that the presented method yields reliable quantitative reaction data for the complex studied mixtures. PMID:16773212

  1. Use of diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR to identify undeclared synthetic drugs in medicines illegally sold as phytotherapies.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena M A; Filho, Elenilson G A; Thomasi, Sérgio S; Silva, Bianca F; Ferreira, Antonio G; Venâncio, Tiago

    2013-09-01

    The informal (and/or illegal) e-commerce of pharmaceutical formulations causes problems that governmental health agencies find hard to control, one of which concerns formulas sold as natural products. The purpose of this work was to explore the advantages and limitations of DOSY and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR. These techniques were used to identify the components of a formula illegally marketed in Brazil as an herbal medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. DOSY was able to detect the major components present at higher concentrations. Complete characterization was achieved using HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR, and 1D and 2D NMR analyses enabled the identification of known synthetic drugs. These were ranitidine and a mixture of orphenadrine citrate, piroxicam, and dexamethasone, which are co-formulated in a remedy called Rheumazim that is used to relieve severe pain, but it is prohibited in Brazil because of a lack of sufficient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information. PMID:23818305

  2. Direct observation of DME carbonylation in the different channels of H-MOR zeolite by continuous-flow solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Ren, Pengju; Liu, Xianchun; Xu, Shutao; Han, Xiuwen; Bao, Xinhe

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of acetyl intermediates in the two different channels of H-mordenite (H-MOR) zeolite during dimethyl ether (DME) carbonylation is tracked by using in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions. Thus, the reaction path via methyl acetate produced over active sites in 8 member ring (MR) channels, followed by diffusion into 12 MR channels, is proposed. PMID:26451500

  3. Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes of the Multidrug Resistance Transporter EmrE Probed by Oriented Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Anindita; Banigan, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We used oriented solid-state NMR spectroscopy and biochemical cross-linking experiments to demonstrate that the ligand-free membrane protein transporter EmrE forms anti-parallel dimers with different monomer tilt angles relative to the lipid bilayer. Our results also show the subtle conformational changes efflux pumps experience in response to drug binding and emphasize the importance of studying membrane proteins in a fluid bilayer environment. PMID:23939862

  4. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Line B.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2014-11-01

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides (LDH’s), [Mg1-xGax(OH)2(NO3)x yH2O], was determined using solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy. Depletion of Ga in these LDH’s is demonstrated to be the result of soluble [Ga(OH)4]-complexes formed during synthesis.

  5. Determination of Unsaturation Level, Halogen Content, and Main Forms of Isoprene Units in Halogenated Butyl Rubbers by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolentseva, I. I.; Mashukov, V. I.; Korotkova, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    We have used 1 H NMR spectroscopy to study commercial samples of chloro-substituted and bromo-substituted butyl rubbers. We propose calculation formulas for quantitative determination of the main forms in halobutyl rubber (1,4-isoprene, exo form) and its characteristics: unsaturation level, halogen content in the isoprene units. We show that it is possible to determine the main structural characteristics of bromobutyl rubber in the presence of filler.

  6. Coherent ultrafast core-hole correlation spectroscopy: x-ray analogues of multidimensional NMR

    E-print Network

    Igor V. Schweigert; Shaul Mukamel

    2007-08-29

    We propose two dimensional x-ray coherent correlation spectroscopy (2DXCS) for the study of interactions between core-electron and valence transitions. This technique might find experimental applications in the future when very high intensity x-ray sources become available. Spectra obtained by varying two delay periods between pulses show off-diagonal cross-peaks induced by coupling of core transitions of two different types. Calculations of the N1s and O1s signals of aminophenol isomers illustrate how novel information about many-body effects in electronic structure and excitations of molecules can be extracted from these spectra.

  7. Coherent ultrafast core-hole correlation spectroscopy: x-ray analogues of multidimensional NMR

    E-print Network

    Schweigert, Igor V

    2007-01-01

    We propose two dimensional x-ray coherent correlation spectroscopy (2DXCS) for the study of interactions between core-electron and valence transitions. This technique might find experimental applications in the future when very high intensity x-ray sources become available. Spectra obtained by varying two delay periods between pulses show off-diagonal cross-peaks induced by coupling of core transitions of two different types. Calculations of the N1s and O1s signals of aminophenol isomers illustrate how novel information about many-body effects in electronic structure and excitations of molecules can be extracted from these spectra.

  8. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer; Ni, Qing Zhe; Barnes, Alexander; Guss, William; Daviso, Eugenio; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert; Temkin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz is easily achieved at a fixed magnetic field of 9.24 T and a beam current of 95 mA producing an average output power of >10 W over the entire tuning band. This tube incorporates a double disk output sapphire window in order to maximize the transmission at 250.58 GHz. DNP Signal enhancement of >125 is achieved on a 13C-Urea sample using this gyrotron. PMID:23539422

  9. Multipole NMR. VI. application to coherence transfer and 2-D spectroscopy in a spin-1 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanctuary, B. C.; Halstead, T. K.

    Using the multipole formulation the recent experiments of H. Hatanaka and C. S. Yannoni ( J. Magn. Reson.42, 330 (1981)) are interpreted. It is shown how transfer of nuclear coherence between levels in a spin- I system corresponds to a transfer of polarization between single quantum dipole character and single quantum quadrupole character. Also discussed in the multipole formulation are the recent experiments of L. Müller ( J. Magn. Reson.42, 324 (1981)) in which 2-D spectroscopy is used to extract the double quantum spectrum. Some comments are made regarding a spin I = {3}/{2}.

  10. Membrane structure and conformational changes of the antibiotic heterodimeric peptide distinctin by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Bertani, Philippe; Cesar, Amary; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    The heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin is composed of 2 linear peptide chains of 22- and 25-aa residues that are connected by a single intermolecular S-S bond. This heterodimer has been considered to be a unique example of a previously unrecorded class of bioactive peptides. Here the 2 distinctin chains were prepared by chemical peptide synthesis in quantitative amounts and labeled with 15N, as well as 15N and 2H, at selected residues, respectively, and the heterodimer was formed by oxidation. CD spectroscopy indicates a high content of helical secondary structures when associated with POPC/POPG 3:1 vesicles or in membrane-mimetic environments. The propensity for helix formation follows the order heterodimer >chain 2 >chain 1, suggesting that peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions both help in stabilizing this secondary structure. In a subsequent step the peptides were reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers and investigated by 2H and proton-decoupled 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Whereas chain 2 stably inserts into the membrane at orientations close to perfectly parallel to the membrane surface in the presence or absence of chain 1, the latter adopts a more tilted alignment, which further increases in the heterodimer. The data suggest that membrane interactions result in considerable conformational rearrangements of the heterodimer. Therefore, chain 2 stably anchors the heterodimer in the membrane, whereas chain 1 interacts more loosely with the bilayer. These structural observations are consistent with the antimicrobial activities when the individual chains are compared to the dimer. PMID:19805350

  11. Structural characterization of the divalent cation sites of bacterial phosphotriesterase by 113Cd NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omburo, G A; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M

    1993-09-01

    The phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate esters. The isolated native protein contains zinc, and removal of this metal abolishes the enzymatic activity. Reconstitution of the apoenzyme requires 2 mol of cadmium per mol of protein for full catalytic activity. The kcat and Km values for the hydrolysis of paraoxon for the cadmium-substituted enzyme are 4300 s-1 and 390 microM, respectively. These values compare favorably with the kinetic constants observed for the zinc-substituted enzyme (2300 s-1 and 78 microM). A hybrid enzyme containing one zinc and one cadmium ion is catalytically active, and the kinetic constants are nearly identical to the values obtained with the all-zinc-containing enzyme. The NMR spectrum of protein reconstituted with two 113Cd2+ ions per enzyme molecule exhibits cadmium resonances at 212 and 116 ppm downfield from Cd(ClO4)2. The two metal ions are, therefore, in significantly different chemical environments. These two binding sites have been designated the M alpha and M beta sites for the low- and high-field signals, respectively. Protein substituted with a single cadmium ion also shows two cadmium resonances, and thus one site is not completely filled prior to the binding of metal to the other site. The Cd/Zn hybrid protein shows a single cadmium resonance at 115 ppm, and thus the cadmium is occupying the M beta site while zinc is occupying the M alpha site. The positions of the observed chemical shifts for the two cadmium signals indicate that the ligands to both metals are composed of a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen atoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8396425

  12. Recent Progresses in Studying Helix-Helix Interactions in Proteins by Incorporating the Wenxiang Diagram into the NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Ping; Chen, Dong; Liao, Siming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2016-01-01

    All residues in an alpha helix can be characterized and dispositioned on a 2D the wenxiang diagram, which possesses the following features: (1) the relative locations of the amino acids in the ?-helix can be clearly displayed regardless how long it is; (2) direction of an alphahelix can be indicated; and (3) more information regarding each of the constituent amino acid residues in an alpha helix. Owing to its intuitionism and easy visibility, wenxiang diagrams have had an immense influence on our understanding of protein structure, protein-protein interactions, and the effect of helical structural stability on protein conformational transitions. In this review, we summarize two recent applications of wenxiang diagrams incorporating NMR spectroscopy in the researches of the coiled-coil protein interactions related to the regulation of contraction or relaxation states of vascular smooth muscle cells, and the effects of ?-helical stability on the protein misfolding in prion disease, in hopes that the gained valuable information through these studies can stimulate more and more widely applications of wenxiang diagrams in structural biology. PMID:26286215

  13. Conformational change study of dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease using 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Jing; Li, Hua; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Junfeng

    2015-06-12

    The dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease (NS2B-NS3p), an important antiviral target for drug development, has been reported to adopt an open or closed conformation in crystal structures with different NS2B C-terminus (NS2Bc) positioning. In solution, nevertheless, NS2B-NS3p forms a mixture of open, closed and maybe other intermediate conformations, which is difficult to characterize using conventional biophysical and biochemical techniques. In this study, we developed a new strategy to analyze these conformational changes using (19)F NMR spectroscopy. Low pH or bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) binding promote the conformation change from open to closed, showing the importance of charge forces in the interaction between NS2Bc and NS3p. The mutation H51A impairs the charge interaction and the pH dependence of the conformational changes. It stabilizes the open conformation, while the addition of BPTI still converts NS2B-NS3p from open to closed conformation. PMID:25918021

  14. Refocused continuous-wave decoupling: A new approach to heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Nielsen, Anders B.; Bjerring, Morten; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Kentgens, Arno P. M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-12-01

    A novel strategy for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented, which eliminates residual static high-order terms in the effective Hamiltonian originating from interactions between oscillating dipolar and anisotropic shielding tensors. The method, called refocused continuous-wave (rCW) decoupling, is systematically established by interleaving continuous wave decoupling with appropriately inserted rotor-synchronized high-power ? refocusing pulses of alternating phases. The effect of the refocusing pulses in eliminating residual effects from dipolar coupling in heteronuclear spin systems is rationalized by effective Hamiltonian calculations to third order. In some variants the ? pulse refocusing is supplemented by insertion of rotor-synchronized ?/2 purging pulses to further reduce the residual dipolar coupling effects. Five different rCW decoupling sequences are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art decoupling methods. The rCW decoupling sequences benefit from extreme broadbandedness, tolerance towards rf inhomogeneity, and improved potential for decoupling at relatively low average rf field strengths. In numerical simulations, the rCW schemes clearly reveal superior characteristics relative to the best decoupling schemes presented so far, which we to some extent also are capable of demonstrating experimentally. A major advantage of the rCW decoupling methods is that they are easy to set up and optimize experimentally.

  15. (1) H NMR spectroscopy of glioblastoma stem-like cells identifies alpha-aminoadipate as a marker of tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Antonella; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Biffoni, Mauro; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Palma, Alessandra; Runci, Daniele; Cappellari, Marianna; De Maria, Ruggero; Guidoni, Laura; Pallini, Roberto; Viti, Vincenza

    2015-03-01

    Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) face a poor prognosis with median survival of about 14 months. High recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are attributed to the presence of GBM cells with stem-like properties (GSCs). Metabolite profiles of 42 GSC lines established from the tumor tissue of adult GBM patients were screened with (1) H NMR spectroscopy and compared with human neural progenitor cells from human adult olfactory bulb (OB-NPCs) and from the developing human brain (HNPCs). A first subset (n=12) of GSCs exhibited a dramatic accumulation of the metabolite ?-aminoadipate (?AAD), product of the oxidation of ?-aminoadipic semialdehyde catalyzed by the ALDH7A1 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family in lysine catabolism. ?AAD was low/not detectable in a second GSC subset (n=13) with the same neural metabolic profile as well as in a third GSC subset (n=17) characterized by intense lipid signals. Likewise, ?AAD was not detected in the spectra of OB-NPCs or HNPCs. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by oligomycin treatment revealed that the lysine degradative pathway leading to ?AAD formation proceeds through saccharopine, as usually observed in developing brain. Survival curves indicated that high ?AAD levels in GSCs significantly correlated with poor patient survival, similarly to prostate and non-small-cell-lung cancers, where activity of ALDH7A1 correlates with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25581615

  16. Peach fruit: metabolic comparative analysis of two varieties with different resistances to insect attacks by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Tomassini, Alberta; Sciubba, Fabio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa; Delfini, Maurizio

    2013-02-27

    The metabolite profile of aqueous extracts of two peach varieties, Percoca Romagnola 7 and Flaminia, with different susceptibilities to Ceratitis capitata attack was investigated by means of 1D and 2D high-field NMR spectroscopy. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as organic acids (citric, fumaric, malic, quinic, shikimic, and succinic acids), sugars (fucose, fructose, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, rhamnose, sucrose, and xylose), amino acids (alanine, asparagine, isoleucine, threonine, and valine) and other metabolites such as myo-inositol, choline, trigonelline, catechin, chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, orthophosphate, and ?-l-glycerophosphorylcholine were identified. The metabolite profile together with a suitable statistical analysis was used to make a comparison between the two varieties. The levels of glucose, xylose, myo-inositol, choline, isoleucine, and valine were found to be higher in Flaminia than in Percoca Romagnola 7 samples, whereas the levels of fumaric acid, alanine, quinic acid, sucrose, fucose, and chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acid were found to be higher in Percoca Romagnola 7 than in Flaminia samples. PMID:23116201

  17. [Effect of ethanol on synthesis of serine and exchange of methyl groups in hepatocytes by NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Kholmukhamedov, E L; Teplova, V V; Johnson, C B; MacDonald, J

    2010-01-01

    The method of NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the role of voltage-dependent anion channels in the outer mitochondrial membrane in the mechanism of ethanol hepatotoxicity using the synthesis of serine and exchange of methyl groups in hepatocytes metabolizing 13C-labeled glycine. Here we present and describe a methodological approach developed for the independent monitoring of the synthesis of serine in two intracellular compartments: the cytoplasm and mitochondria of intact hepatocytes, and quantification of different serine isotopomers synthesized in hepatocytes from 13C-labeled glycine. The data obtained indicate that the treatment of cells with ethanol as well as cysteamine (specific inhibitor of mitochondrial synthesis of serine) suppressed the level of mitochondria but not cytoplasmic serine isotopomers. It is concluded that the decrease in the production of mitochondrial serine isotopomers in hepatocytes exposed to ethanol can be caused not only by decreased permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane due to the closure of voltage-dependent anion channels and suppression of the exchange of substrates of serine synthesis in mitochondria but also by the restoration of the cytoplasmic and/or mitochondrial pool of pyridine nucleotides (NADH) during the oxidation of ethanol. Our work reveals a new mechanism of action of ethanol (alcohol intoxication) in hepatocytes through the regulation of glycine metabolism and opens new possibilities in the treatment of alcohol poisoning. PMID:21268350

  18. Detection of Butter Adulteration with Lard by Employing (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fadzillah, Nurrulhidayah Ahmad; Man, Yaakob bin Che; Rohman, Abdul; Rosman, Arieff Salleh; Ismail, Amin; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Khatib, Alfi

    2015-01-01

    The authentication of food products from the presence of non-allowed components for certain religion like lard is very important. In this study, we used proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of butter adulterated with lard by simultaneously quantification of all proton bearing compounds, and consequently all relevant sample classes. Since the spectra obtained were too complex to be analyzed visually by the naked eyes, the classification of spectra was carried out.The multivariate calibration of partial least square (PLS) regression was used for modelling the relationship between actual value of lard and predicted value. The model yielded a highest regression coefficient (R(2)) of 0.998 and the lowest root mean square error calibration (RMSEC) of 0.0091% and root mean square error prediction (RMSEP) of 0.0090, respectively. Cross validation testing evaluates the predictive power of the model. PLS model was shown as good models as the intercept of R(2)Y and Q(2)Y were 0.0853 and -0.309, respectively. PMID:25994556

  19. Estimates of Oil and Gas Potential of Source Rock by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Boling, K. S.; Dworkin, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen is defined as the insoluble fraction of organic matter preserved in sediments. Due to its structural complexity, kerogen is poorly understood, yet it holds vast economic importance as petroleum source rock, and represents the largest organic carbon pool on earth. Kerogen originates from a mixture of organic biomolecules and tends to be dominated by the polymeric components of cell walls and cellular membranes, which undergo interactions with sedimentary minerals at elevated temperature and pressure upon burial. Due to the importance of burial diagenesis to petroleum formation, much of our knowledge of chemical properties of kerogens is related to diagenetic and catagenetic effects. The more common geochemical evaluations of the oil and gas potentials of source rock are based upon proximate analyses such as hydrogen and oxygen indices and thermal stability indices, such as those provided by Fisher assay and Rock Eval®. However, proximate analyses provide limited information regarding the chemical structure of kerogens, and therefore provide little insight to the processes of kerogen formation. NMR spectra of kerogen have been previously shown to be useful in estimating oil and gas potential, and the proposed study seeks to refine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool in kerogen characterization, specifically for the purpose of oil and gas potential calculations.

  20. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - ? and ? states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral ? and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  1. Speciation of inositol phosphates in lake sediments by ion-exchange chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paraskova, Julia V; Jørgensen, Charlotte; Reitzel, Kasper; Pettersson, Jean; Rydin, Emil; Sjöberg, Per J R

    2015-03-01

    A method for the detection and speciation of inositol phosphates (InsP(n)) in sediment samples was tested, utilizing oxalate-oxalic acid extraction followed by determination by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative mode. The chromatographic separation was carried out using water and ammonium bicarbonate as mobile phase in gradient mode. Data acquisition under MS/MS was attained by multiple reaction monitoring. The technique provided a sensitive and selective detection of InsP(n) in sediment samples. Several forms of InsP(n) in the oxalate-oxalic acid extracted sediment were identified. InsP6 was the dominating form constituting 0.250 mg P/g DW (dry weight); InsP5 and InsP4 constituted 0.045 and 0.014 mg P/g DW, respectively. The detection limit of the LC-ESI-MS/MS method was 0.03 ?M InsP(n), which is superior to the currently used method for the identification of InsP(n), (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P NMR). Additionally sample handling time was significantly reduced. PMID:25649303

  2. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  3. Rapid screening for structural integrity of expressed proteins by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gronenborn, A. M.; Clore, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    A simple and rapid method based on 15N labeling and 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy is presented to directly assess the structural integrity of overexpressed proteins in crude Escherichia coli extracts without the need for any purification. The method is demonstrated using two different expression systems and two different proteins, the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (56 residues) and human interleukin-1 beta (153 residues). It is shown that high quality 1H-15N correlation spectra, recorded in as little as 15 min and displaying only cross-peaks arising from the overexpressed protein of interest, can be obtained from crude E. coli extracts. PMID:8771212

  4. Method And Apparatus For High Resolution Ex-Situ Nmr Spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Meriles, Carlos A. (El Cerrito, CA); Heise, Henrike (Goettingen, DE); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Oakland, CA); Moule, Adam (Berkeley, CA)

    2004-01-06

    A method and apparatus for ex-situ nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for use on samples outside the physical limits of the magnets in inhomogeneous static and radio-frequency fields. Chemical shift spectra can be resolved with the method using sequences of correlated, composite z-rotation pulses in the presence of spatially matched static and radio frequency field gradients producing nutation echoes. The amplitude of the echoes is modulated by the chemical shift interaction and an inhomogeneity free FID may be recovered by stroboscopically sampling the maxima of the echoes. In an alternative embodiment, full-passage adiabatic pulses are consecutively applied. One embodiment of the apparatus generates a static magnetic field that has a variable saddle point.

  5. Cadmium-substituted skeletal troponin C: cadmium-113 NMR spectroscopy and metal binding investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.D.; Strang, P.; Potter, J.D.

    1984-08-25

    The binding of cadmium to skeletal troponin C (STnC) has been measured in two ways. Equilibrium binding experiments have shown two cadmium binding sites on STnC with a high affinity for Cd/sup 2 +/ and two with a lower affinity for Cd/sup 2 +/. The former binding constant is comparable to Ca/sup 2 +/ binding to the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ (structural) sites of STnC; the latter is about a factor of one hundred less than Ca/sup 2 +/ binding to the Ca/sup 2 +/-specific (regulatory) sites of STnC. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ the affinity of Cd/sup 2 +/ for the higher affinity sites was lowered. These data clearly suggest that the sites with high affinity for Cd/sup 2 +/ are the same as the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ sites. The /sup 113/Cd NMR is temperature-dependent. At room temperature two resonances at -107.8 and -112.7 ppm are seen. Lowering the temperature to 4/sup 0/C alters the cadmium exchange dynamics, and results in a four line /sup 113/Cd spectrum. The two new resonances probably arise from cadmium binding to the Ca/sup 2 +/-specific sites on STnC; whereas, the resonances at -107.8 and -112.7 ppm correspond to cadmium binding at the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/-sites, respectively. When the /sup 113/Cd/sup 2 +/-substituted protein was titrated with Ca/sup 2 +/, the two resonances of the high affinity sites were reduced, followed by a reduction of the lower affinity Cd/sup 2 +/ sites. Since the direct binding experiments demonstrate that the high affinity Cd/sup 2 +/ sites are the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ sites, it is concerned that Cd/sup 2 +/ binding to the protein dramatically alters the affinity of the Ca/sup 2 +/-Mg/sup 2 +/ sites for Ca/sup 2 +/ possibly with allosteric coupling network between binding sites.

  6. 31P NMR spectroscopy of hypertrophied rat heart: effect of graded global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K; Sunn, N; Willis, R J

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the cause for the greater susceptibility of hypertrophied hearts to ischemic injury, we determined the interrelations of total work output, contractile function and energy metabolism in isolated, perfused normal and hypertrophied rat hearts subjected to graded global ischemia. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by giving rats seven daily injections of either triiodothyronine (0.2 mg/kg) or isoproterenol (5 mg/kg). All hearts were perfused at an aortic pressure of 100 mmHg in the isovolumic mode in an NMR spectrometer (7.05 Tesla). Heart rate, developed pressure, and coronary flow were monitored simultaneously with changes in pH, creatine phosphate, ATP and inorganic phosphate. During pre-ischemic perfusion, the total work output (rate-pressure product) of hyperthyroid hearts was 28% higher than that of control hearts, whereas hearts from isoproterenol-treated animals showed no difference. However, when related to unit muscle mass, work was normal in hyperthyroid hearts and 26% lower after isoproterenol. Contractile function per unit myocardium (developed pressure/g wet weight) was lower in the hypertrophied hearts. ATP content was the same in all groups. Creatine phosphate decreased 41% after triiodothyronine and 25% after isoproterenol. Inorganic phosphate levels and intracellular pH were similar in control and isoproterenol-treated rat hearts, but were higher in the hyperthyroid rat hearts. The phosphorylation potential and the free energy change of ATP hydrolysis were lowered by hypertrophy, the levels correlating with the depressed contractile function. At each ischemic flow rate, both work and contractile function per unit myocardium were the same for all hearts, but the relations between flow and phosphorylation potential were different for each type of heart. Thus, at low flow rates, hypertrophied hearts perform the same amount of work and have the same contractile function as control hearts, but with abnormal changes in energy metabolism, indicating that the relations of energy status to coronary flow, total work output and contractile function are altered during the process of hypertrophy. PMID:2632814

  7. Internuclear 31P-51V Distance Measurements in Polyoxoanionic Solids Using REAPDOR NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenlin; Vega, Alexander J.; Gullion, Terry; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results establishing REAPDOR experiments for distance measurements between a spin-1/2 (31P) and spin-7/2 (51V) pair in a series of vanadium-substituted polyoxoanionic solids from the Keggin and Wells-Dawson families. We have quantitatively measured 31P-51V distances in mono-vanadium substituted K4PVW11O40, 1-K7P2VW17O62, and 4-K7P2VW17O62. Numerical simulations of the experimental data yield very good agreement with the averaged P-W/P-V distances determined from the X-ray diffraction measurements in the same or related compounds. REAPDOR is therefore a very sensitive P-V distance probe anticipated to be especially useful in the absence of long-range order. Our results suggest that REAPDOR spectroscopy could be broadly applicable for interatomic distance measurements in other spin-7/2-spin-1/2 nuclear pairs. PMID:17918932

  8. Kinetic analysis of glycogen turnover: relevance to human brain 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    DiNuzzo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A biophysical model of the glycogen molecule is developed, which takes into account the points of attack of synthase and phosphorylase at the level of the individual glucose chain. Under the sole assumption of steric effects governing enzyme accessibility to glucosyl residues, the model reproduces the known equilibrium structure of cellular glycogen at steady state. In particular, experimental data are reproduced assuming that synthase (1) operates preferentially on inner chains of the molecule and (2) exhibits a faster mobility than phosphorylase in translocating from an attacked chain to another. The model is then used to examine the turnover of outer versus inner tiers during the labeling process of isotopic enrichment (IE) experiments. Simulated data are fitted to in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements obtained in the human brain under resting conditions. Within this experimental set-up, analysis of simulated label incorporation and retention shows that 7% to 35% of labeled glucose is lost from the rapidly turning-over surface of the glycogen molecule when stimulation onset is delayed by 7 to 11.5?hours after the end of [1-13C]glucose infusion as done in actual procedures. The substantial label washout before stimulation suggests that much of the subsequent activation-induced glycogenolysis could remain undetected. Overall, these results show that the molecular structure significantly affects the patterns of synthesis and degradation of glycogen, which is relevant for appropriate design of labeling experiments aiming at investigating the functional roles of this glucose reserve. PMID:23756693

  9. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermillion, Karl; Price, Neil P. J.

    2009-06-01

    The feasibility of obtaining high quality homonuclear or heteronuclear diffusion-ordered 13C NMR data is shown to be greatly improved by using 13C isotopically-enriched samples. Stable isotope-enhanced diffusion ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates, and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, and a disaccharide and trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acquisition time. Fully resolved 3D DOSY-HMQC NMR spectra of [U- 13C]xylose, [U- 13C]glucose, and [1- 13C gal]lactose were obtained in 5 h. Sample derivatization with [ carbonyl- 13C]acetate (peracetylation) extends the usefulness of the technique to included non-labeled sugars; the 13C-carbonyl - carbohydrate ring proton 1H- 13C correlations also provide additional structural information, as shown for the 3-D DOSY-HMQC analysis of a mixture of maltotriose and lactose per-[ carbonyl- 13C]acetates.

  10. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Line Boisen; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2014-11-01

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium (MgGa) layered double hydroxides (LDHs), [Mg1-xGax(OH)2(NO3)x·yH2O] was investigated using solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy as well as powder X-ray diffraction. Three different proton environments from Mg3sbnd OH, Mg2Gasbnd OH and intergallery water molecules were assigned and quantified using {1H,71Ga} HETCOR and 1H MAS NMR. A single 71Ga site originating from the unique Ga site in the MgGa LDH's was observed in 71Ga MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra. Both 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at 21.1 T (900 MHz) and elemental analysis show that the synthesized MgGa LDH's had a lower Mg:Ga ratio than that of the starting reactant solution. The origin of this is the formation of soluble [Ga(OH)4]- complexes formed during synthesis, and not due to formation of insoluble gallium (oxy)hydroxides. No sign of Gasbnd Osbnd Ga connectivities or defects were detected for the MgGa LDH's.

  11. Structure and Membrane Interactions of the Antibiotic Peptide Dermadistinctin K by Multidimensional Solution and Oriented 15N and 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça de; Resende, Jarbas M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C.L.; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    DD K, a peptide first isolated from the skin secretion of the Phyllomedusa distincta frog, has been prepared by solid-phase chemical peptide synthesis and its conformation was studied in trifluoroethanol/water as well as in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles or small unilamellar vesicles. Multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy indicates an ?-helical conformation in membrane environments starting at residue 7 and extending to the C-terminal carboxyamide. Furthermore, DD K has been labeled with 15N at a single alanine position that is located within the helical core region of the sequence. When reconstituted into oriented phosphatidylcholine membranes the resulting 15N solid-state NMR spectrum shows a well-defined helix alignment parallel to the membrane surface in excellent agreement with the amphipathic character of DD K. Proton-decoupled 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide creates a high level of disorder at the level of the phospholipid headgroup suggesting that DD K partitions into the bilayer where it severely disrupts membrane packing. PMID:19289046

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF NON-DERIVATIZED PLANT CELL WALLS USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been logically modified to utilize perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-nmr-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent ...

  13. Organophosphates in agrogray soils with periodic water logging according to the data of 31P NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Kovaleva, N. O.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of organic phosphorus compounds was studied using the 31P NMR spectroscopy method in agrogray soils with periodic water logging. The phosphorus content was determined by the specific difference between the hydrological and the redox regimes of these soils. The phosphorus of the organic compounds in the agrogray soils with contrasting water regimes is composed mostly of phosphoric monoesters and diesters, including nucleic and teichoic acids. The relative distribution of the monoesters and inorganic orthophosphates is shown depending on the climate and the soil's position in the relief. The area of the monoester peaks increases by two times and that of the mineral orthophosphate decreases by six times in the agro-gray soils of Bryansk opolie with an optimal regime of moistening and evaporation in comparison with the agro-gray gleyed soils of Kolomna opolie. As the degree of the soil hydromorphism in the sequence of deeply gleyed soils and gleyic soils increased, the portion of monoesters decreased. Favorable conditions for the microbial activity are formed in soils with a contrasting redox regime, and this is expressed in the accumulation of labile diesters. Inverse relationships were found between the distributions of the mono- and diesters in iron-manganic nodules and in the soils enclosing them; this was caused by the different mechanisms of the stabilization of the stable and labile phosphorus containing compounds. A high percentage of mineral orthophosphate in the nodules allows assuming the presence of chemisorbed orthophosphate ions in organomineral phosphate-metal-humus complexes. The transformation of iron-manganic nodules under the influence of drying demonstrates the more direct participation of microorganisms in the nodules' formation than the contribution of the physicochemical processes.

  14. High-yield expression and purification of isotopically labeled cytochrome P450 monooxygenases for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Duan, Hui; Frericks Schmidt, Heather L.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Schuler, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), which represent the major group of drug metabolizing enzymes in humans, also catalyze important synthetic and detoxicative reactions in insects, plants and many microbes. Flexibilities in their catalytic sites and membrane associations are thought to play central roles in substrate binding and catalytic specificity. To date, E. coli expression strategies for structural analysis of eukaryotic membrane-bound P450s by X-ray crystallography have necessitated full or partial removal of their N-terminal signal anchor domain (SAD) and, often, replacement of residues more peripherally associated with the membrane (such as the F-G loop region). Even with these modifications, investigations of P450 structural flexibility remain challenging with multiple single crystal conditions needed to identify spatial variations between substrate-free and different substrate-bound forms. To overcome these limitations, we have developed methods for the efficient expression of 13C- and 15N-labeled P450s and analysis of their structures by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy. In the presence of co-expressed GroEL and GroES chaperones, full-length (53 kDa) Arabidopsis 13C,15N-labeled CYP98A3 is expressed at yields of 2–4 mg per liter of minimal media without the necessity of generating side chain modifications or N-terminal deletions. Precipitated CYP98A3 generates high quality SSNMR spectra consistent with a homogeneous, folded protein. These data highlight the potential of these methodologies to contribute to the structural analysis of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:18005930

  15. Broadband Polarization Transfer under Magic-Angle Spinning: Application to Total Through-Space-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldus, M.; Meier, B. H.

    1997-10-01

    A pulse sequence is described that leads to a broadband recoupling of the dipolar interaction in magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR experiments of13C spins. The sequence is based on a combination of rotating frame and laboratory frame transfer periods. The recovered dipolar interaction is only weakly dependent on spectral parameters but is a faithful measure for the internuclear distances. Furthermore, a pure zero-quantum term is recovered (of the type found in static "spin-diffusion" experiments). This makes the pulse sequence particularly suited for incorporation into two-dimensional total through-space correlation experiments that deliver simultaneous information about all dipolar couplings in a single 2D experiment. It is found that the necessary decoupling from abundant protons is best performed in two steps: first, the strong homonuclear couplings between the high-? spins are averaged by Lee-Goldburg irradiation and, second, the heteronuclear dipolar interaction is averaged by the combined application of an RF field to the low-? spins and magic-angle sample spinning. Phase-inversion and amplitude attenuation in the rotating frame and refocusing pulses in the laboratory frame part of the pulse sequence are introduced to achieve an optimum chemical-shift offset-independence and for the suppression of unwanted double-quantum transitions. The design principles are explained in detail. Finally, the pulse scheme is applied to total-correlation spectroscopy of a uniformly labeled amino acid. The experimental cross-peak intensities are in qualitative agreement with the known crystal structure of the model compound.

  16. Nontarget analysis of Murchison soluble organic matter by high-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertkorn, N; Harir, M; Schmitt-Kopplin, Ph

    2015-09-01

    High-field NMR spectra of Murchison meteorite methanolic extracts revealed primarily aliphatic extraterrestrial organic matter (EOM) with near statistical branching of commonly C(3-5) units separated by heteroatoms and aromatic units. The ratios of CCH, OCH and C(sp2)H units were 89?:?8?:?3, whereas carbon-based aliphatic chain termination was in the order methyl >? -COOH?>? -CH(CH3)COOH. Aliphatic methine carbon was abundant, but its weak NMR signatures were primarily deduced from JRES (J-resolved) NMR spectra. Carbon NMR spectra were dominated by methylene and methyl carbon; strong apodization revealed methine carbon, of which about 20% was aromatic. Extrapolation provided 5-7% aromatic carbon present in Murchison soluble EOM. Compositional heterogeneity in Murchison methanolic extracts was visible in NMR and Fourier transform ion cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectra obtained from a few cubic millimeters of solid Murchison meteorite; increasing sample size enhanced uniformity of NMR spectra. Intrinsic chemical diversity and pH-dependent chemical shift variance contributed to the disparity of NMR spectra. FTICR mass spectra provided distinct clustering of CHO/CHOS and CHNO/CHNOS molecular series and confirmed the prevalence of aliphatic/alicyclic (73%) over single aromatic (21%) and polyaromatic (6%) molecular compositions, suggesting extensive aliphatic substitution of aromatic units as proposed by NMR. Murchison soluble EOM molecules feature a center with enhanced aromatic and heteroatom content, which provides rather diffuse and weak NMR signatures resulting from a huge overall chemical diversity. The periphery of Murchison EOM molecules comprises flexible branched aliphatic chains and aliphatic carboxylic acids. These project on narrow ranges of chemical shift, facilitating observation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra. The conformational entropy provided by these flexible surface moieties facilitates the solubility of EOM. PMID:26275226

  17. H-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    H-1 engine major components with callouts (chart 1). The H-1 engine was used in a cluster of eight on the the first stage of Saturn I (S-I stage) and Saturn IB (S-IB stage). The engines were arranged in a double pattern: four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern and each outer engine was gimbaled. Each H-1 engine had a thrust of 188,000 pounds for a combined thrust of over 1,500,000 pounds.

  18. H-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    H-1 Engine major components with callouts (chart 1): The H-1 engine was used in a cluster of eight on the the first stage of Saturn I (S-I stage) and Saturn IB (S-IB stage). The engines were arranged in a double pattern: four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern and each outer engine was gimbaled. Each H-1 engine had a thrust of 188,000 pounds for a combined thrust of over 1,500,000 pounds.

  19. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and ?-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed ?-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  20. Phosphorus speciation in agro-industrial byproducts: sequential fractionation, solution (31)P NMR, and P K- and L(2,3)-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Negassa, Wakene; Kruse, Jens; Michalik, Dirk; Appathurai, Narayana; Zuin, Lucia; Leinweber, Peter

    2010-03-15

    Little is known about P species in agro-industrial byproducts from developing countries, which may be either pollutants or valuable soil amendments. The present study speciated P in dry (COD) and wet (COW) coffee, sisal (SIS), barley malt (BEB) and sugar cane processing (FIC) byproducts, and filter cakes of linseed (LIC) and niger seed (NIC)with sequential fractionation, solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and P K- and L(2,3)-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The sequential P fractionation recovered 59% to almost 100% of total P (P(t)), and more than 50% of P(t) was extracted by H(2)O and NaHCO(3) in five out of seven samples. Similarly, the NaOH + EDTA extraction for solution (31)P NMR recovered 48-94% of P(t). The (31)P NMR spectra revealed orthophosphate (6-81%), pyrophosphate (0-10%), and orthophosphate monoesters (6-94%). Orthophosphate predominated in COD, COW, SIS, and FIC, whereas BEB, UC, and NIC were rich in orthophosphate monoesters. The concentrations of P(i), and P(o) determined in the sequential and NaOH + EDTA extractions and (31)P NMR spectra were strongly and positively correlated (r = 0.88-1.00). Furthermore, the P K- and L(2,3)-edge XANES confirmed the H(2)SO(4)--P(i) detected in the sequential fractionation by unequivocal identification of Ca--P phases in a few samples. The results indicate that the combined use of all four analytical methods is crucial for comprehensive P speciation in environmental samples and the application of these byproducts to soil. PMID:20146464

  1. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ?107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504?6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  2. Atomic Description of the Interface between Silica and Alumina in Aluminosilicates through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of amorphous aluminosilicates (ASA) in various industrial catalysts, the nature of the interface between silica and alumina and the atomic structure of the catalytically active sites are still subject to debate. Here, by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that on silica and alumina surfaces, molecular aluminum and silicon precursors are, respectively, preferentially grafted on sites that enable the formation of Al(IV) and Si(IV) interfacial sites. We also link the genesis of Brønsted acidity to the surface coverage of aluminum and silicon on silica and alumina, respectively. PMID:26244620

  3. Crystal Structures and Vibrational and Solid-State (CPMAS) NMR Spectroscopy of Some Bis(triphenylphosphine)silver(I) Sulfate, Selenate and Phosphate Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowmaker, Graham A.; Hanna, John V.; Rickard, Clifton E.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2001-01-01

    The complexes [Ag2(PPh3)4EO4].2H2O(E=S, Se) (1,2), [Ag(PPh3)2HEO4].H2O (E=S, Se)(3,4) and [Ag9PPh3)2H2PO4].2EtOH (5) have been prepared and studied by X-ray crystallography and by infrared and solid-state 13C and 31 P cross-polarization, magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Constant time INEPT CT-HSQC (CTi-CT-HSQC) - A new NMR method to measure accurate one-bond J and RDCs with strong 1H-1H couplings in natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bingwu; van Ingen, Hugo; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Strong 1H-1H coupling can significantly reduce the accuracy of 1JCH measured from frequency differences in coupled HSQC spectra. Although accurate 1JCH values can be extracted from spectral simulation, it would be more convenient if the same accurate 1JCH values can be obtained experimentally. Furthermore, simulations reach their limit for residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurement, as many significant, but immeasurable RDCs are introduced into the spin system when a molecule is weakly aligned, thus it is impossible to have a model spin system that truly represents the real spin system. Here we report a new J modulated method, constant-time INEPT CT-HSQC (CTi-CT-HSQC), to accurately measure one-bond scalar coupling constant and RDCs without strong coupling interference. In this method, changing the spacing between the two 180° pulses during a constant time INEPT period selectively modulates heteronuclear coupling in quantitative J fashion. Since the INEPT delays for measuring one-bond carbon-proton spectra are short compared to 3JHH, evolution due to (strong) 1H-1H coupling is marginal. The resulting curve shape is practically independent of 1H-1H coupling and only correlated to the heteronuclear coupling evolution. Consequently, an accurate 1JCH can be measured even in the presence of strong coupling. We tested this method on N-acetyl-glucosamine and mannose whose apparent isotropic 1JCH values are significantly affected by strong coupling with other methods. Agreement to within 0.5 Hz or better is found between 1JCH measured by this method and previously published simulation data. We further examined the strong coupling effects on RDC measurements and observed an error up to 100% for one bond RDCs using coupled HSQC in carbohydrates. We demonstrate that RDCs can be obtained with higher accuracy by CTi-CT-HSQC, which compensates the limitation of simulation method.

  5. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton (1H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong 1H/1H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size 1H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for 1H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate ?-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple 1H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D 1H/1H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D 1H/1H correlation spectrum without decoupling 1H/1H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable 1H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions.

  6. Composite-180° Pulse-Based Symmetry Sequences to Recouple Proton Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors under Ultrafast MAS Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton (1H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong 1H/1H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size 1H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for 1H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate ?-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple 1H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D 1H/1H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D 1H/1H correlation spectrum without decoupling 1H/1H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (< 200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable 1H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  7. Structure of keratan sulfate from bonefish (Albula sp.) larvae deduced from NMR spectroscopy of keratanase-derived oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Peña, M; Williams, C; Pfeiler, E

    1998-06-01

    Structural details of keratan sulfate (KS) glycosaminoglycan, isolated from early-metamorphosing larvae (leptocephali) of bonefish (Albula sp.), are described. Bonefish KS was analyzed by first hydrolyzing the purified compound with KS endo-beta-galactosidase (keratanase) from Pseudomonas spp., and then examining the resulting oligosaccharides with reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at 400 MHz. Spectral analyses were performed by COSY and HMQC. The results showed that a single oligosaccharide was produced whose structure is consistent with that of a tetrasaccharide containing two, beta-linked, N-acetyllactosamine units. Enzymic evidence indicated that the internal galactose of the tetrasaccharide was O-sulfated at C-6, and that the reducing-end galactose was unsulfated. Spectral data for C-1 of the two galactose residues were consistent with the proposed sulfation pattern. In addition, spectral evidence confirmed that a C-6 on one of the sugars was sulfated: this sulfate was tentatively assigned to the internal galactose. Chemical studies have shown that an additional sulfate group is present, but its assignment could not be confirmed, owing to the complexity of the spectral data. The known specificities of keratanase, and the production of a single tetrasaccharide, however, require that the additional sulfate reside on C-6 of either of the two available N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, and that it cannot alternate between the two. The inability of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from beef kidney to liberate GlcNAc from the tetrasaccharide provided preliminary support for the view that this sulfate is located on the nonreducing-end GlcNAc. We conclude that the native, high molecular weight (M(r) = 55,000) KS polymer from bonefish larvae consists of a disulfated disaccharide alternating with an unsulfated disaccharide in the adjacent N-acetyllactosamine unit, with this pattern repeating itself in a regular fashion along most, or all, of the chain. This structure could provide an explanation for the ability of bonefish KS chains to self-associate into dimers. Although the N-acetyllactosamine repeat is characteristics of KS in general, the sulfation pattern is different from that postulated for the well-characterized KS chains of lower molecular weight obtained from mammalian cornea and cartilage. An additional difference was the inability to demonstrate sialic acid in bonefish KS. PMID:9720242

  8. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2013-03-01

    High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM) isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin) and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone), 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum), 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone) and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor) and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed exceptional resolution and depicted resolved molecular signatures in excess of a certain minimum abundance. Classical methyl groups terminating aliphatic chains represented ~15% of total methyl in all samples investigated. A noticeable fraction of methyl (~2%) was bound to olefinic carbon. Methyl ethers were abundant in surface marine SPE-DOM, and the chemical diversity of carbohydrates was larger than that of freshwater and soil DOM. In all samples, we identified sp2-hybridized carbon chemical environments with discrimination of isolated and conjugated olefins and ?,?-unsaturated double bonds. Olefinic proton and carbon atoms were more abundant than aromatic ones; olefinic unsaturation in marine SPE-DOM will be more directly traceable to ultimate biogenic precursors than aromatic unsaturation. The abundance of furan, pyrrol and thiophene derivatives was marginal, whereas benzene derivatives, phenols and six-membered nitrogen heterocycles were prominent; a yet unassigned set of six-membered N-heterocycles with likely more than one single nitrogen occurred in all samples. Various key polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon substructures suggested the presence of thermogenic organic matter at all water depths. Progressive NMR cross-peak attenuation from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM was particularly strong in COSY NMR spectra and indicated a continual disappearance of biosignatures as well as entropy gain from an ever increased molecular diversity. Nevertheless, a specific near-seafloor SPE-DOM signature of unsaturated molecules recognized in both NMR and Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS) possibly originated from sediment leaching. The conformity of key NMR and FTICR/MS signatures suggested the presence of a large set of identical molecules throughout the entire ocean column even though the investigated water masses belonged to different oceanic regimes and currents. FTICR/MS showed abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks and average mass from surface to bottom SPE-DOM. The proportion of CHO and CH

  9. Pulsed NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.

    1978-01-01

    Method gives results approximating those of classical continuous-irradiation method but in less time. Method also makes it possible to measure chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times with improved sensitivity. Equipment can be used for adiabatic demagnetization experiments, measurements of rotating-frame spin/lattice relaxation times, and accurate measurements of exact resonance points. When measuring relaxation times, pulse technique can be very effective since pulses may be limited in amplitude and length to prevent spin system from being driven into saturation.

  10. Two dimensional fluoride ion conductor RbSn {2}F {5} studied by impedance spectroscopy and {19}F, {119}Sn, and {87}Rb NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Ahmad, M. M.; Ogiso, Y.; Okuda, T.; Chikami, J.; Miehe, G.; Ehrenberg, H.; Fuess, H.

    2004-07-01

    RbSn2F5 is a two-dimensional fluoride ion conductor. It undergoes a first-order phase transition to a superionic state at 368 K. The structure of the low temperature phase has been determined from the Rietveld analysis of the X-ray powder diffraction. The dynamic properties of the fluoride ions in RbSn2F5 have been studied by impedance spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The dc ionic conductivity of this sample shows an abrupt increase at the phase transition temperature. We have obtained the hopping frequency and the concentration of the charge carriers (F- ions) at different temperatures from the analysis of the conductivity spectra using Almond-West formalism. The estimated values of the charge carriers’ concentration agree well with that determined from the structure and were found to be independent of temperature. The relatively small value of the power-law exponent, n ? 0.55, supports the two-dimensional property of the investigated material. Furthermore, 19F NMR with simulation has suggested the diffusive motions of the fluoride ions between different sites. In contrast, 119Sn and 87Rb NMR spectra below 250 K supported the intrinsic disordered nature due to the random distribution of the fluoride ion vacancies.

  11. Selective Host-Guest Interaction between Metal Ions and Metal-Organic Frameworks using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-08

    The host–guest interaction between metal ions (Pt2+ and Cu2+) and a zirconium metal–organic framework (UiO-66-NH2) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 15N{1H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt2+ coordinates with two NH2 groups from the MOF and two Cl? from the metal precursor, whereas Cu2+ do not form chemical bonds with the NH2 groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt2+ prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations.

  12. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio compared to that measured for AMS BBOA. The comparison between the two techniques substantially improves when adding factors tracing possible contributions from biomass burning SOA, showing that the operational definitions of biomass burning organic aerosols are more consistent between techniques when including more factors tracing chemical classes over a range of oxidation levels. Overall, the non-fossil total carbon fraction was 50-57%, depending on the assumptions on the 14C content of non-fossil carbon, and the fraction of organic carbon estimated to be oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) from HR-TOF-AMS measurements was 73-100% modern.

  13. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio compared to that measured for AMS BBOA. The comparison between the two techniques substantially improves when adding factors tracing possible contributions from biomass burning SOA, showing that the operational definitions of biomass burning organic aerosols are more consistent between techniques when including more factors tracing chemical classes over a range of oxidation levels. Overall, the non-fossil total carbon fraction was 50-57%, depending on the assumptions about the 14C content of non-fossil carbon, and the fraction of organic carbon estimated to be oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) from HR-TOF-AMS measurements was 73-100% modern.

  14. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  15. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion - this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30ms and nutation frequency 725Hz at 70kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments. PMID:26432398

  16. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional 1H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Aiden J.; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P.

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+ kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional 1H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl 1H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion - this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional 1H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear 1H-1H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and 14N-1H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  17. Solid state 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO4 and H3PO4 composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-01

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO4) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H3PO4 contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, 31P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H3PO4 takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO4 and H3PO4 has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb2P4O15). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10-3 S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H3PO4. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO4 has no significant conductivity of its own.

  18. Evidence for a dipolar-coupled AM system in carnosine in human calf muscle from in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Bachert, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Spin systems with residual dipolar couplings such as creatine, taurine, and lactate in skeletal muscle tissue exhibit first-order spectra in in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T because the coupled protons are represented by (nearly) symmetrized eigenfunctions. The imidazole ring protons (H2, H4) of carnosine are suspected to form also a coupled system. The ring's stiffness could enable a connectivity between these anisochronous protons with the consequence of second-order spectra at low field strength. Our purpose was to study whether this deviation from the Paschen-Back condition can be used to detect the H2-H4 coupling in localized 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained at 1.5 T (64 MHz) from the human calf in a conventional whole-body scanner. As for the hydrogen hyperfine interaction, a Breit-Rabi equation was derived to describe the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime for two dipolar-coupled protons. The ratio of the measurable coupling strength ( Sk) and the difference in resonance frequencies of the coupled spins (? ?) induces quantum-state mixing of various degree upon definition of an appropriate eigenbase of the coupled spin system. The corresponding Clebsch-Gordan coefficients manifest in characteristic energy corrections in the Breit-Rabi formula. These additional terms were used to define an asymmetry parameter of the line positions as a function of Sk and ? ?. The observed frequency shifts of the resonances were found to be consistent with this parameter within the accuracy achievable in in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Thus it was possible to identify the origin of satellite peaks of H2, H4 and to describe this so far not investigated type of residual dipolar coupling in vivo.

  19. Critical Effect of Segmental Dynamics in Polybutadiene / Clay Nanocomposites Characterized by Solid State 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Rongchun; Sun, Pingchuan; Winter, H. Henning; Xue, Gi

    2014-03-01

    The segmental dynamics of rigid, intermediate, and mobile molecular components in end-functionalized polybutadiene (PB) / organo-clay systems was characterized by fully refocused 1H NMR FID. In addition, 1H DQ NMR experiments allowed to semi- quantitatively monitor changes in segmental dynamics near the interface. Both methods suggested a critical concentration of end-functionalized polybutadiene, indicating a saturation effect for the surface-adsorbed polymer. The critical concentration depended on molecular weight of PB and PB-clay interaction. Based on the 1H NMR results, a tentative model was proposed to illustrate the evolution of the structure and segmental dynamics in PB/organo-clay nanocomposites. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants: 21174062).

  20. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie; Xu, Yanbin; Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu; Zheng, Changqing

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, ?-glucose, ?-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.