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Sample records for h2 gas separations

  1. Evaluation of an electrochemical N2/H2 gas separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Wynveen, R. A.; Carlson, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    A program was successfully completed to evaluate an electrochemical nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) separator for use in a spacecraft nitrogen (N2) generator. Based on the technical data obtained a N2/H2 separator subsystem consisting of an organic polymer gas permeator first stage and an electrochemical second and third stage was estimated to have the lowest total spared equivalent weight, 257 kg (566 lb), for a 15 lb/day N2 generation rate. A pre-design analysis of the electrochemical N2/H2 separator revealed that its use as a first stage resulted in too high a power requirement to be competitive with the organic polymer membrane and the palladium-silver membrane separation methods. As a result, program emphasis was placed on evaluating the electrochemical. A parametric test program characterized cell performance and established second- and third-stage electrochemical N2/H2 separator operating conditions. A design verification test was completed on the second and third stages. The second stage was then successfully endurance tested for 200 hours.

  2. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  3. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  4. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  5. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  6. Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    SciTech Connect

    Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

    2009-01-07

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most

  7. Ni-H2 cell separator matrix engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was initiated to develop alternative separator materials to the previously used asbestos matrices which were removed from the market for health and environmental reasons. The objective of the research was to find a material or combination of materials that had the following characteristics: (1) resistant to the severe conditions encountered in Ni-H2 cells; (2) satisfactory electrical, electrolyte management, and thermal management properties to function properly; (3) environmentally benign; and (4) capable of being manufactured into a separator matrix. During the course of the research it was discovered that separators prepared from wettable polyethylene fibers along and in combination with potassium titanate pigment performed satisfactory in preliminary characterization tests. Further studies lead to the optimization of the separator composition and manufacturing process. Single ply separator sheets were manufactured with 100 percent polyethylene fibers and also with a combination of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment (PKT) in the ratio of 60 percent PKT and 40 percent fibers. A pilot paper machine was used to produce the experimental separator material by a continuous, wet laid process. Both types of matrices were produced at several different area densities (grams/sq m).

  8. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

    2007-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center

  9. CO2/H2 separation using a highly permeable polyurethane membrane: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Morteza; Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were conducted to investigate the diffusivity, solubility, and permeability of CO2, CO, H2, and H2O in a polyurethane membrane at three different temperatures. The characterization of the simulated structures was carried out using XRD, FFV, Tg and density calculation, and cavity size distribution. The obtained results were within the expectations reported data in the literature based on the experimental approach, indicating the authenticity of approached in this work. The results showed that the highest diffusivity and permeability coefficients were observed for H2; while the highest values of solubility coefficient were found for H2O and CO2 gases. The increase of operating temperature from 298 K to 318 K has a positive effect on the permeation of all gases and a corresponding negative effect on the selectivity of the gas pair CO2/H2. Also, the results vividly showed that CO2 and H2O gases have a profound affinity with hard phase of polyurethane, while H2 and CO were conversely adsorbed by soft one. Moreover, the enhancement of permeability and permselectivity of CO2/H2 pair confirmed using Robeson Upper-Bond graph showed its good capacity for CO2/H2 separation application.

  10. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  11. Removal of Boron in Silicon by H2-H2O Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Andersson, Stefan; Nordstrand, Erlend; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-08-01

    The removal of boron in pure silicon by gas mixtures has been examined in the laboratory. Water-vapor-saturated hydrogen was used to remove boron doped in electronic-grade silicon in a vacuum frequency furnace. Boron concentrations in silicon were reduced from 52 ppm initially to 0.7 ppm and 3.4 ppm at 1450°C and 1500°C, respectively, after blowing a H2-3.2%H2O gas mixture for 180 min. The experimental results indicate that the boron removal as a function of gas-blowing time follows the law of exponential decay. After 99% of the boron is removed, approximately 90% of the silicon can be recovered. In order to better understand the gaseous refining mechanism, the quantum chemical coupled cluster with single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations method was used to accurately predict the enthalpy and entropy of formation of the HBO molecule. A simple refining model was then used to describe the boron refining process. This model can be used to optimize the refining efficiency.

  12. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2- H2O- H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. Bhogeswara; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1983-02-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 × 10-13 Nm-2 and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 × 10-2 Nm-2 to 33 × 10-2 Nm-2. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials ( P S 2 ± 2.7 × 10-2 Nm-2) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfidation. At low sulfur potentials ( P S 2 ± 0.19 × 10-2 Nm-2) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases. Thermochemical diagrams for the Fe-Cr-S-O, Fe-Ni-S-O, Cr-Ni-S-O, and Si-Cr-S-O systems were constructed, and the experimental results are discussed in relation to these diagrams. Based on this comparison, reasonable corrosion mechanisms were developed. At high sulfur potentials, oxide and sulfide phases initially nucleate as separate islands. Overgrowth of the oxide by the sulfide occurs and an exchange reaction governs the corrosion process. Preoxidation at low oxygen potentials and 1150 K is beneficial in suppressing sulfidation at high sulfur potentials.

  13. NOVEL NANOCOMPOSITE MEMBRANE STRUCTURES FOR H2 SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Benny D. Freeman

    2005-03-31

    This report explores possible methods of improving CO{sub 2} selectivity in polymer based membranes. The first method investigated using basic nanoparticles to enhance the solubility of acid gases in nanocomposite membranes, thus enhancing the overall acid gas/light gas selectivity (e.g., CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, etc.). The influence of nanoparticle surface chemistry on nanocomposite morphology and transport properties will be determined experimentally in a series of poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne). Additional factors (e.g., chemical reaction of the particles with the polymers) have been considered, as necessary, during the course of the investigation. The second method investigated using polar polymers such as crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(ether-b-amide) to improve CO{sub 2} sorption and thereby increase CO{sub 2} permeability and CO{sub 2}/light gas selectivity. For both types of materials, CO{sub 2} and light gas permeabilities have been characterized. The overall objective was to improve the understanding of materials design strategies to improve acid gas transport properties of membranes.

  14. Fabrication of COF-MOF Composite Membranes and Their Highly Selective Separation of H2/CO2.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingru; Das, Saikat; Xing, Guolong; Ben, Teng; Valtchev, Valentin; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-06-22

    The search for new types of membrane materials has been of continuous interest in both academia and industry, given their importance in a plethora of applications, particularly for energy-efficient separation technology. In this contribution, we demonstrate for the first time that a metal-organic framework (MOF) can be grown on the covalent-organic framework (COF) membrane to fabricate COF-MOF composite membranes. The resultant COF-MOF composite membranes demonstrate higher separation selectivity of H2/CO2 gas mixtures than the individual COF and MOF membranes. A sound proof for the synergy between two porous materials is the fact that the COF-MOF composite membranes surpass the Robeson upper bound of polymer membranes for mixture separation of a H2/CO2 gas pair and are among the best gas separation MOF membranes reported thus far. PMID:27225027

  15. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  16. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  17. Investigation of H2S separation from H2S/CH4 mixtures using functionalized and non-functionalized vertically aligned carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, Neda; Towfighi, Jafar; Rashidi, Alimorad; Mohammadi, Toraj; Omidkhah, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghian, Ahmad

    2013-04-01

    Separation of H2S from binary mixtures of H2S/CH4 using vertically aligned carbon nanotube membranes fabricated in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template was studied experimentally. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown in five AAO templates with different pore diameters using chemical vapor deposition, and CNT/AAO membranes with tubular carbon nanotube structure and open caps were selected for separation of H2S. For this, two tubular CNT/AAO membranes were fabricated with the CNT inner diameters of 23 and 8 nm. It was found that permeability and selectivity of the membrane with inner diameter of 23 nm for CNT were independent of upstream feed pressure and H2S feed concentration unlike that of CNT having an inner diameter of 8 nm. Selectivity of these membranes for separation of H2S was obtained in the ranges of 1.36-1.58 and 2.11-2.86, for CNTs with internal diameters of 23 and 8 nm, respectively. In order to enhance the separation of H2S from H2S/CH4 mixtures, dodecylamine was used to functionalize the CNT/AAO membrane with higher selectivity. The results showed that for amido-functionalized membrane, both upstream feed pressure and H2S partial pressure in the feed significantly increased H2S permeability, and selectivity for H2S being in the range of 3.0-5.57 respectively.

  18. Gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  19. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  20. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

    1994-01-25

    A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

  1. Polymide gas separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  2. Liquid/Gas Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid/gas separator vents gas from tank of liquid that contains gas randomly distributed in bubbles. Centrifugal force separates liquid and gas, forcing liquid out of vortex tube through venturi tube. Gas vented through exhaust port. When liquid detected in vent tube, exhaust port closed, and liquid/gas mixture in vent tube drawn back into tank through venturi.

  3. Removal of H2S from gas stream using combined plasma photolysis technique at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xia, Lanyan; Ge, Xiaoxue; Jing, Hengye; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, H(2)S in gas stream was successfully decomposed at atmospheric pressure by dielectric barrier discharge plasma and VUV-UV radiation from a combined plasma photolysis reactor (CDBD). In comparison with DBD, CDBD enhanced H(2)S removal efficiency significantly at the same applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency was determined as a function of Kr pressure, applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration, and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency could reach as high as 93% at inlet H(2)S concentration of 27.1 mg m(-3), residence time of 0.4 s, and applied voltage of 7.5 kV. The main products were discerned as H(2)O and SO(4)(2-) based on FTIR and IC analysis. PMID:22436586

  4. Phase Separation Kinetics in Isopycnic Mixtures of H2O/CO2/Ethoxylated Alcohol Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesemann, Markus; Paulaitis, Michael E.; Kaler, Eric W.

    1999-01-01

    Ternary mixtures of H2O and CO2 with ethoxylated alcohol (C(sub i)E(sub j)) surfactants form three coexisting liquid phases at conditions where two of the phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). Isopycnic phase behavior has been observed for mixtures containing C8E5, C10E6, and C12E6 surfactants, but not for those mixtures containing either C4E1 or C8E3 surfactants. Pressure-temperature (PT) projections for this three-phase equilibrium were determined for H2O/CO2/C8E5 and H2O/CO2/C10E6 mixtures at temperatures from approximately 25 to 33 C and pressures between 90 and 350 bar. Measurements of the microstructure in H2O/CO2/C12E6 mixtures as a function of temperature (25-31 C), pressure (63.1-90.7 bar), and CO2 composition (0-3.9 wt%) have also been carried out to show that while micellar structure remains essentially un-changed, critical concentration fluctuations increase as the phase boundary and plait point are approached. In this report, we present our first measurements of the kinetics of isopycnic phase separation for ternary mixtures of H2O/CO2/C8E5.

  5. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wynn, Nicholas P; Fulton, Donald A.

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  6. Update on DOE Advanced IGCC/H2 Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Cooling Flow Reduction: a) Focus on improving turbine hot gas path part cooling efficiency. b) Applicable to current metallic turbine components and synergistic with advanced materials. c) Address challenges of IGCC/hydrogen fuel environment (for example, possible cooling hole plugging). Leakage Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing turbine parasitic leakages, i.e. between static-to-static, static-to-rotating turbine parts. b) Develop improved seal designs in a variety of important areas. Purge Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing required flows to keep rotor disk cavities within temperature limits. b) Develop improved sealing at the cavity rims and modified flow geometries to minimize hot gas ingestion and aerodynamic impact.

  7. Nanoporous chalcogenides for adsorption and gas separation.

    PubMed

    Ori, Guido; Massobrio, Carlo; Pradel, Annie; Ribes, Michel; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-21

    The adsorption and gas separation properties of amorphous porous chalcogenides such as GeS2 are investigated using statistical mechanics molecular simulation. Using a realistic molecular model of such amorphous adsorbents, we show that they can be used efficiently to separate different gases relevant to environmental and energy applications (H2, CO2, CH4, N2). In addition to shedding light on the microscopic adsorption mechanisms, we show that coadsorption in this novel class of porous materials can be described using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). Such a simple thermodynamic model, which allows avoiding complex coadsorption measurements, describes the adsorption of mixture from pure component adsorption isotherms. Our results, which are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data, paves the way for the design of gas separation membranes using the large family of porous chalcogenides. PMID:27126718

  8. Mid Infrared H2 lines- a new direct tracer for total molecular gas content in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, John-David T.

    2016-01-01

    Robust knowledge of the molecular hydrogen (H2) gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. Since H2 is not readily observable in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), the molecular gas content has traditionally been inferred using indirect tracers like carbon-monoxide (CO), dust emission, gamma ray interactions, and star formation efficiency. Physical processes resulting in enhancement and reduction of these indirect tracers can result in misleading estimates of molecular gas masses. My dissertation work is based on devising a new temperature power law distribution model for warm H2, a direct tracer, to calculate the total molecular gas mass in galaxies. The model parameters are estimated using mid infrared (MIR) H2 rotational line fluxes, obtained from IRS- Spitzer (InfraRed Spectrograph- Spitzer) instrument, and the model can be extrapolated to a suitable lower temperature to recover the total molecular gas mass. The power law model is able to recover the dark molecular gas, undetected by CO, in low metallicity galaxies. Using the power law model in the coming era of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with the high sensitivity MIR Instrument (MIRI) spectrograph we will be able to understand the properties of molecular gas at low and high redshifts.

  9. Effect of H2 and CO contents in syngas during combustion using Micro Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. F.; Boosroh, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic gas or syngas is produced from the gasification process. Its main compositions are hydrogen, H2; carbon monoxide, CO; methane, CH4; carbon dioxide, CO2 and nitrogen, N2. Syngas is a substitute for the depleting natural gas (80-90%.vol. CH4). Natural gas is combusted in gas turbine in gas-fired power plant to produce electricity. However, combustion of syngas using gas turbine is expected to show different behavior compared to natural gas combustion. This is because of H2 and CO contents in syngas have higher adiabatic flame temperature than CH4. In this study, different quality of syngas with different contents of H2 (0.6-0.8 %.vol.) and CO (1-3 %.vol.) were combusted using 30kW Micro Gas Turbine (MGT). Performances of different syngas quality were studied using NOx, CO, CO2 emissions and combustion efficiency parameters. NOx and CO are the main pollutants from the combustion process. NOx emissions were the highest for syngas with H2 contents of 0.8 %.vol. and CO contents of 3 %.vol. CO emissions were in the range of 220-310 ppm for all the tested syngas. While, CO2 emissions were in the range of 0.96-1.06 % for all the tested syngas. Combustion efficiencies were reduced for syngas with CO contents of 1 %.vol. and H2 contents of 0.6-0.8 %.vol. This is most probably due to the dilution effect of N2 in syngas.

  10. Photoluminescence based H2 and O2 gas sensing by ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Kavita; Gahlaut, Shashank K.; Mehta, B. R.; Singh, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Gas sensing properties of ZnO nanowires prepared via thermal chemical vapor deposition method were investigated by analyzing change in their photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized nanowires show two different PL peaks positioned at 380 nm and 520 nm. The 380 nm emission is ascribed to near band edge emission, and the green peak (520 nm) appears due to the oxygen vacancy defects. The intensity of the green PL signal enhances upon hydrogen gas exposure, whereas it gets quenched upon oxygen gas loading. The ZnO nanowires' sensing response values were observed as about 54% for H2 gas and 9% for O2 gas at room temperature for 50 sccm H2/O2 gas flow rate. The sensor response was also analyzed as a function of sample temperature ranging from 300 K to 400 K. A conclusion was derived from the observations that the H2/O2 gases affect the adsorbed oxygen species on the surface of ZnO nanowires. The adsorbed species result in the band bending and hence changes the depletion region which causes variation in PL signal. A photoluminescence based gas sensing technique has advantage over a conductometric technique due to its higher sensitivity and faster response time.

  11. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  12. U2 8 + -intensity record applying a H2 -gas stripper cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Heilmann, Manuel; Hollinger, Ralph; Jäger, Egon; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Krier, Joerg; Scharrer, Paul; Vormann, Hartmut; Yakushev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    To meet the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research science requirements higher beam intensity has to be achieved in the present GSI-accelerator complex. For this an advanced upgrade program for the UNILAC is ongoing. Stripping is a key technology for all heavy ion accelerators. For this an extensive research and development program was carried out to optimize for high brilliance heavy ion operation. After upgrade of the supersonic N2 -gas jet (2007), implementation of high current foil stripping (2011) and preliminary investigation of H2 -gas jet operation (2012), recently (2014) a new H2 -gas cell using a pulsed gas regime synchronized with arrival of the beam pulse has been developed. An obviously enhanced stripper gas density as well as a simultaneously reduced gas load for the pumping system result in an increased stripping efficiency, while the beam emittance remains the same. A new record intensity (7.8 emA) for 238U2 8 + beams at 1.4 MeV /u has been achieved applying the pulsed high density H2 stripper target to a high intensity 238U4 + beam from the VARIS ion source with a newly developed extraction system. The experimental results are presented in detail.

  13. Radiation-induced reactions of COH 2 gas mixtures over various solid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, S.; Arai, H.; Hatada, M.

    Studies have been carried out of radiation-induced reactions of COH 2 gas mixtures in the presence of various solid catalysts in order to find possibilities of synthesizing organic raw materials from COH 2 by radiation for the future. The solid catalysts studied include Fischer-Tropsch catalyst (FeCu supported by diatomaceous earth), titania(TiO 2), and silica gel. Analysis of the reaction products over Fischer-Tropsch catalyst or semiconductors such as TiO 2 and ZnOCr 2O 3 reveals that these solid catalysts do not sensitize the radiation chemical reaction of COH 2 but show the secondary effects on the reaction so as to induce the hydrogenation of olefins produced by the catalytic reaction and of aldehydes produced in gas phase by radiation. On the other hand, silica gel and other insulators such as alumina have been found to exhibit high catalytic activity in the formation of hydrocarbons from COH 2 under electron beam irradiation at 300°C. It has been shown experimentally that secondary reactions between H 2 and carbonaceous solid produced from CO make a substantial contribution to the formation of hydrocarbons from COH 2 over silica gel. In an attempt to find the role of silica gel in the reaction to produce hydrocarbons, radiation-induced reactions have been studied of H 2 with the carbonaceous solid that had been produced by irradiation of CO in the absence of solid catalyst, over TiO 2, or over silica gel. The results indicate that silica gel not only enhances the yields of CO 2 and carbonaceous solid from CO but also promotes hydrogenation reactions of the carbonaceous solid under electron beam irradiation.

  14. Interactions of Multiple Gas-Transducing Systems: Hallmarks and Uncertainties of CO, NO, and H2S Gas Biology

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ryo; Bateman, Ryon M.; Yamamoto, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The diverse physiological actions of the “biologic gases,” O2, CO, NO, and H2S, have attracted much interest. Initially viewed as toxic substances, CO, NO, and H2S play important roles as signaling molecules. The multiplicity of gas actions and gas targets and the difficulty in measuring local gas concentrations obscures detailed mechanisms whereby gases exert their actions, and many questions remain unanswered. It is now readily apparent, however, that heme-based proteins play central roles in gas-generation/reception mechanisms and provide a point where multiple gases can interact. In this review, we consider a number of key issues related to “gas biology,” including the effective tissue concentrations of these gases and the importance and significance of the physical proximity of gas-producing and gas-receptor/sensors. We also take an integrated approach to the interaction of gases by considering the physiological significance of CO, NO, and H2S on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, a key target and central mediator of mitochondrial respiration. Additionally, we consider the effects of biologic gases on mitochondrial biogenesis and “suspended animation.” By evaluating gas-mediated control functions from both in vitro and in vivo perspectives, we hope to elaborate on the complex multiple interactions of O2, NO, CO, and H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 157–192. PMID:19939208

  15. Drift and clustering of daughter negative ions of H2O in parent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Urquijo, J.; Bekstein, A.; Ruiz-Vargas, G.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    The mobility of daughter negative ions of H2O in parent gas has been measured with a pulsed Townsend technique over the density-reduced field strength, E/N, range 9-100 Td and a pressure range 2-16 Torr. It has been found that the mobility of the anions is dependent on the gas pressure. Using a transport theory considering the influence of the permanent dipole field of H2O, we have found that the pressure-dependent mobilities can be associated with a series of cluster ions of the type OH-(H2O)n (n = 1-3), with the mass of the cluster species increasing with the total gas pressure. Also, the mobility of H- and OH- could be estimated. Using a Townsend avalanche simulator we have been able to explain the measured ionic currents in terms of an ion-molecule reaction scheme with a single set of swarm and reaction coefficients for each value of the density-reduced field strength, E/N, at several pressures. Regarding the positive ions, the only drifting ion is H3O+, the mobility of which could be estimated. The rate constants relative to the formation of the OH-(H2O)n (n = 1-3) species were also derived from this study.

  16. Block copolymer ion gels for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yuanyan; Lodge, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    Carbon dioxide removal from light gases (eg. N2, CH4, and H2) is a very important technology for industrial applications such as natural gas sweetening, CO2 capture from coal-fire power plant exhausts and hydrogen production. Current CO2 separation method uses amine-absorption, which is energy-intensive and requires frequent maintenance. Membrane separation is a cost-effective solution to this problem, especially in small-scale applications. Ionic liquids have recently received increasing interest in this area because of their selective solubility for CO2 and non-volatility. However, ionic liquid itself lacks the persistent structure and mechanical integrity to withstand the high pressure for gas separation. Here, we report the development and gas separation performances of physically crosslinked ion gels based on self-assembly of ABA-triblock copolymers in ionic liquids. Three different types of polymers was used to achieve gelation in ionic liquids. Specifically, a triblock copolymer ion gel with a polymerized ionic liquid mid-block shows performances higher than the upper bound of well-known ``Robeson Plot'' for CO2/N2.

  17. Gas-Phase Condensation Reactions of SixOyHz- Oxyanions with H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Benson, Michael Timothy; Wright, J. B.

    2001-09-01

    Water was reacted with gas-phase oxyanions having the general composition SixOyHz- that were formed and isolated in an ion trap-secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). The radical SiO2- reacted slowly with H2O to abstract HO, forming SiO3H-, at a rate of 8 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, corresponding to an efficiency of about 0.03% compared with the theoretical collision rate constant (average dipole orientation). The product ion SiO3H- underwent a consecutive condensation reaction with H2O to form SiO4H3- at a rate that was approximately 0.4-0.7% efficient. SiO4H3- did not undergo further reaction with water. The multiple reaction pathways by which radical SiO3- reacted with H2O were kinetically modeled using a stochastic approach. SiO3- reacted with water by three parallel reaction pathways: (1) abstraction of a radical H to form SiO3H-, which then reacted with a second H2O to form SiO4H3-; (2) abstraction of a radical OH to form SiO4H-, which further reacted by consecutive H abstractions to form SiO4H2- and then SiO4H3-; and (3) condensation with H2O to form SiO4H2-, which subsequently abstracted a radical H from a second H2O to form SiO4H3-. In all of these reactions, the rate constants were determined to be very slow, as determined by both direct measurement and stochastic modeling. For comparison, the even electron ion Si2O5H- was also investigated: it underwent condensation with H2O to form Si2O6H3-, with a rate constant corresponding to 50% efficiency. The reactions were also modeled using ab initio calculations at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level. Addition of H2O to SiO3-, SiO3H-, and Si2O5H- was calculated to be approximately 42, 45, and 55 kcal mol-1 exothermic, respectively, and encountered low activation barriers. Modeling of SiO2- and SiO3- reactions with H2O failed to produce radical abstraction reaction pathways observed in the IT-SIMS, possibly indicating that alternative reaction mechanisms are operative.

  18. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N.; Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  19. Lighting the Dark Molecular Gas Using the Mid Infrared H2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, JD

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of molecular gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. The molecular gas content of galaxies must be inferred using indirect tracers since H2 which forms a major component of molecular gas in galaxies is not observable under typical conditions of interstellar medium. Physical processes causing enhancement and reduction of these tracers can cause misleading estimates of the molecular gas content in galaxies. We have devised a new method to measure molecular gas mass using quadrupole rotational lines of H2 found in the mid infrared spectra of various types of galaxies. We apply our model to derive the amount of molecular gas even in low metallicity galaxies where indirect tracers are unable to estimate the dark molecular gas mass. Bigiel, F., Leroy, A., Walter, F., et al. 2008, The Astronomical Journal, 136, 2846 (2008) Solomon, P. M., Rivolo, A. R., Barett, J., and Yahil, A. The Astrophysical Journal, 319, 730 (1987) Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D., and McKee, C. F. The Astrophysical Journal, 716, 1191 (2010)

  20. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N2-H2 gas mixture glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N2-H2) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H2 concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H2 concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H2 concentration.

  1. Phosphazene membranes for gas separations

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Frederick F.; Harrup, Mason K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2006-07-11

    A polyphosphazene having a glass transition temperature ("T.sub.g") of approximately -20.degree. C. or less. The polyphosphazene has at least one pendant group attached to a backbone of the polyphosphazene, wherein the pendant group has no halogen atoms. In addition, no aromatic groups are attached to an oxygen atom that is bound to a phosphorus atom of the backbone. The polyphosphazene may have a T.sub.g ranging from approximately -100.degree. C. to approximately -20.degree. C. The polyphosphazene may be selected from the group consisting of poly[bis-3-phenyl-1-propoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(2-phenyl-1-ethoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(dodecanoxypolyethoxy)-phosphazene], and poly[bis-(2-(2-(2-.omega.-undecylenyloxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)phosphazene]- . The polyphosphazene may be used in a separation membrane to selectively separate individual gases from a gas mixture, such as to separate polar gases from nonpolar gases in the gas mixture.

  2. Insights into the H2/CH4 Separation Through Two-Dimensional Graphene Channels: Influence of Edge Functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Sang, Pengpeng; Xing, Wei; Shi, Zemin; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue; Yan, Zifeng

    2015-12-01

    A molecular simulation technique is employed to investigate the transport of H2/CH4 mixture through the two-dimensional (2D) channel between adjacent graphene layers. Pristine graphene membrane (GM) with pore width of 0.515~0.6 nm is found to only allow H2 molecules to enter rather than CH4, forming a molecular sieve. At pore widths of 0.64~1.366 nm, both H2 and CH4 molecules could fill into the GM channel, where the permeability of methane is more preferential than that of hydrogen with the largest CH4/H2 selectivity (1.89) at 0.728 nm. The edge functionalization by -H, -F, -OH, -NH2, and -COOH groups could significantly alter gas permeability by modifying the active surface area of the pore and tuning attractive and/or repulsive interaction with molecules at the entrance of channel. At the pore width of 0.6 nm, the H2 permeability of molecular sieve is enhanced by -H, -F, and -OH groups but restrained by -NH2, especially -COOH with a passing rate of zero. At pore widths of 0.64 and 0.728 nm, both -H and -F edge-functionalized GMs show a preferential selectivity of methane over hydrogen, while the favorable transport for GM-OH is changed from H2 molecules at 0.64 nm to CH4 molecules at 0.728 nm. For GM-NH2, it exhibits an excellent hydrogen molecular sieve at 0.64 nm and then turns into a significant H2/CH4 selectivity at 0.728 nm. Meanwhile, small H2 molecules start to enter the channel of GM-COOH at the pore width up to 0.728 nm. For the largest pore width of 1.336 nm, the influence of edge functionalization becomes small, and a comparable CH4/H2 selectivity is observed for all the considered membranes.

  3. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors.

  4. Highly Excited H2 in Herbig–Haro 7: Formation Pumping in Shocked Molecular Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, R. E.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2016-05-01

    We have obtained K-band spectra at R ∼ 5000 and an angular resolution of 0.″3 of a section of the Herbig–Haro 7 (HH7) bow shock, using the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at Gemini North. Present in the portion of the data cube corresponding to the brightest part of the bow shock are emission lines of H2 with upper state energies ranging from ∼6000 K to the dissociation energy of H2, ∼50,000 K. Because of low signal-to-noise ratios, the highest excitation lines cannot be easily seen elsewhere in the observed region. However, excitation temperatures, measured throughout much of the observed region using lines from levels as high as 25,000 K, are a strong function of upper level energy, indicating that the very highest levels are populated throughout. The level populations in the brightest region are well fit by a two-temperature model, with 98.5% of the emitting gas at T = 1800 K and 1.5% at T = 5200 K. The bulk of the H2 line emission in HH7, from the 1800 K gas, has previously been well-modeled by a continuous shock, but the 5200 K cozmponent is inconsistent with standalone standard continuous shock models. We discuss various possible origins for the hot component and suggest that this component is H2 newly reformed on dust grains and then ejected from them, presumably following dissociation of some of the H2 by the shock.

  5. Gas-phase CO2, C2H2, and HCN toward Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lahuis, F.; Doty, S. D.; Wright, C. M.; Rosenthal, D.

    2003-03-01

    The infrared spectra toward Orion-IRc2, Peak 1 and Peak 2 in the 13.5-15.5 mu m wavelength range are presented, obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory. The spectra show absorption and emission features of the vibration-rotation bands of gas-phase CO2, HCN, and C2H2, respectively. Toward the deeply embedded massive young stellar object IRc2 all three bands appear in absorption, while toward the shocked region Peak 2 CO2, HCN, and C2H2 are seen in emission. Toward Peak 1 only CO2 has been detected in emission. Analysis of these bands shows that the absorption features toward IRc2 are characterized by excitation temperatures of ~ 175-275 K, which can be explained by an origin in the shocked plateau gas. HCN and C2H2 are only seen in absorption in the direction of IRc2, whereas the CO2 absorption is probably more widespread. The CO2 emission toward Peak 1 and 2 is best explained with excitation by infrared radiation from dust mixed with the gas in the warm component of the shock. The similarity of the CO2 emission and absorption line shapes toward IRc2, Peak 1 and Peak 2 suggests that the CO2 is located in the warm component of the shock (T ~ 200 K) toward all three positions. The CO2 abundances of ~ 10-8 for Peak 1 and 2, and of a few times 10-7 toward IRc2 can be explained by grain mantle evaporation and/or reformation in the gas-phase after destruction by the shock. The HCN and C2H2 emission detected toward Peak 2 is narrower (T ~ 50-150 K) and originates either in the warm component of the shock or in the extended ridge. In the case of an origin in the warm component of the shock, the low HCN and C2H2 abundances of ~ 10-9 suggest that they are destroyed by the shock or have only been in the warm gas for a short time (t <~ 104 yr). In the case of an origin in the extended ridge, the inferred abundances are much higher and do not agree with predictions from current chemical models at low temperatures. Based on

  6. Polyethylene/Potassium Titanate Separators For Ni/H2 Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, William E.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental separators fabricated on paper-making machine. Two-layer, paperlike composite of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment shows promise for replacing asbestos as separator material in nickel/hydrogen electrochemical cells.

  7. Separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas using activated carbon adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harihastuti, Nani; Purwanto, P.; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Research on the separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas has been conducted to improve the content of CH4 of biogas in order to increase calorific value. Biogas from tofu waste water contained many kinds of gases such as: CH4 of 53-64%, CO2 of 36-45%, H2S of 3,724-5,880 mg/Nm3, NH3 of 0.19-70.36 mg/Nm3, and H2O of 33,800-19,770,000 mg/Nm3. In fact, CO2, H2S, NH3, and moisture are impurities that have disturbance to human and environment, so that they are necessary to be separated from biogas. Particularly, H2S and NH3 have high toxicity to people, particularly the workers in the tofu industry. Therefore, separation of H2S and NH3 from biogas to increase calorific value is the focus of this research. The method used in this research is by adsorption of H2S and NH3 gases using activated carbon as adsorbent. It also used condensation as pretreatment to remove moisture content in biogas. Biogas was flowed to adsorption column (70 cm height and 9 cm diameter containing activated carbon as much as 500 g) so that the H2S and NH3 gases were adsorbed. This research was conducted by varying flow rate and flow time of biogas. From this experiment, it was found that the optimum adsorption conditions were flow rate of 3.5 l/min and 4 hours flow time. This condition could reach 99.95% adsorption efficiency of H2S from 5,879.50 mg/Nm3 to 0.67 mg/Nm3, and 74.96% adsorption efficiency of NH3 from 2.93 mg/Nm3 to 0.73 mg/Nm3. The concentration of CH4 increased from 63.88% to 76.24% in the biogas.

  8. Theoretical calculations of pressure broadening coefficients for H2O perturbed by hydrogen or helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Pollack, James B.

    1995-01-01

    Halfwidths were calculated for H2O with H2 as a broadening gas and were estimated for He as the broadening species. The calculations used the model of Robert and Bonamy with parabolic trajectories and all relevant terms in the interaction potential. The calculations investigated the dependence of the halfwidth on the order of the atom-atom expansion, the rotational states, and the temperature in the range 200 to 400K. Finally, calculations were performed for many transitions of interest in the 5 micrometer window region of the spectrum. The resulting data will be supplied to Dr. R. Freedman for extracting accurate water mixing ratios from the analysis of the thermal channels for the Net Flux experiment on the Galileo probe.

  9. Possible microwave absorption by H2S gas in Uranus' and Neptune's atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    De pater, Imke; Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K. Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Seabrook, MD Michigan, Univ., Ann Arbor )

    1991-06-01

    The disk-averaged brightness temperatures of the present 3.55 and 20.1 cm VLA observations are consistent with the planet's thermal spectra. It is estimated, on the basis of calculations which encompass microwave absorption by H2S, that the H2S mixing ratio on both Uranus and Neptune is probably enhanced by a factor of 10-30 above the elemental sulfur solar ratio. There is also more microwave opacity in the Neptune atmosphere than that of Uranus; this may be due to the presence of NH3 gas above the NH4SH cloud layer. Radio occultation data comparisons indicate the probability of NH3's supersaturation in the Neptune atmosphere. 42 refs.

  10. Direct Observation of a Gas Molecule (H2, Ar) Swallowed by C60

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, H.; Kakiuchi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Murata, Y.; Murata, M.; Komatsu, K.; Yakigaya, K.; Takagi, H.; Dragoe, N.

    2007-01-19

    Various types of endohedral fullerene complexes are known to date. The well known metallofullerenes are generally produced by arc-discharge method, but the use of such extremely drastic conditions is apparently not suitable for encapsulation of unstable molecules or gases. We recently succeeded in incorporation of a H2 molecule or an Ar atom in 100% into a C60. In order to observe the endohedral gas molecule directly, the X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation were carried out. We observed a gas molecule encapsulated in each fullerene cage using structure analysis and the maximum entropy method. These gas molecules are floating inside of the hollow cavities and are completely isolated from the outside.

  11. Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures for a cavitation erosion resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenstein, A. N.; Lepienski, C. M.; Buschinelli, A. J. A.; Brunatto, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures in CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel was studied in the present work. Nitriding was performed in H2 + N2 gas mixtures for 5, 10 and 20% N2, in volume, at 773 K (500 °C), during 2 h. Changes in the surface morphology and nitrided layer constitution were characterized by SEM, XRD, roughness analysis, and nanoindentation technique. Cavitation erosion behavior of the nitrided samples was also investigated by means of a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages (incubation, acceleration, and maximum erosion rate stage) of the cumulative erosion-time curve. Results indicate that the gas mixture nitrogen content strongly influences the phases' formation and its distribution on the nitrided layer. Better cavitation erosion resistance which was attributed to the finer and more homogeneous distribution of the nitrided layer phases was verified for samples treated at 5% N2. Otherwise, worse cavitation erosion behavior for samples nitrided at 20% N2 is supposed to be due to the formation of multiphase compound layer constituted by Fe4N + Fe2-3N + CrN, which can infer residual stress in treated surface.

  12. Pion transfer from hydrogen to deuterium in H2+D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Armstrong, D. S.; Measday, D. F.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Harston, M. R.; Aniol, K. A.; Horváth, D.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of negative pions from pionic hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in gas mixtures of H2 and D2 as a function of the D2 concentration (C). The concentration dependence of the transfer rate was fitted using a phenomenological model with two parameters. For C-->∞ (32+/-3)% of the pions undergo transfer. The fitted parameters reflect the ratio of pion capture to pion transfer in collisions of pionic hydrogen with protons or deuterons. No pressure dependence for pion transfer was found.

  13. State-to-state vibrational kinetics of H2 and H_2^+ in a post-shock cooling gas with primordial composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, C. M.; Mizzi, G.; Bruno, D.; Esposito, F.; Galli, D.; Palla, F.; Longo, S.

    2016-04-01

    The radiative cooling of shocked gas with primordial chemical composition is an important process relevant to the formation of the first stars and structures, as well as taking place also in high-velocity cloud collisions and supernovae explosions. Among the different processes that need to be considered, the formation kinetics and cooling of molecular hydrogen are of prime interest, since they provide the only way to lower the gas temperature to values well below ˜104 K. In previous works, the internal energy level structure of H2 and its cation has been treated in the approximation of ro-vibrational ground state at low densities, or trying to describe the dynamics using some arbitrary v > 0 H2 level that is considered representative of the excited vibrational manifold. In this study, we compute the vibrationally resolved kinetics for the time-dependent chemical and thermal evolution of the post-shock gas in a medium of primordial composition. The calculated non-equilibrium distributions are used to evaluate effects on the cooling function of the gas and on the cooling time. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the results to different initial values of the shock velocity and redshift.

  14. Online analysis of H2S and SO2 via advanced mid-infrared gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flavio da Silveira; Wilk, Andreas; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-10-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are among the most prevalent emitted pollutants in urban and rural atmospheres. Mainly because of the versatility of sulfur regarding its oxidation state (2- to 6+), VSCs are present in a wide variety of redox-environments, concentration levels, and molar ratios. Among the VSCs, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide are considered most relevant and have simultaneously been detected within naturally and anthropogenically caused emission events (e.g., volcano emissions, food production and industries, coal pyrolysis, and various biological activities). Next to their presence as pollutants, changes within their molar ratio may also indicate natural anomalies. Prior to analysis, H2S- and SO2-containing samples are usually preconcentrated via solid sorbents and are then detected by gas chromatographic techniques. However, such analytical strategies may be of limited selectivity, and the dimensions and operation modalities of the involved instruments prevent routine field usage. In this contribution, we therefore describe an innovative portable mid-infrared chemical sensor for simultaneously determining and quantifying gaseous H2S and SO2 via coupling a substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWG) serving as a highly miniaturized mid-infrared photon conduit and gas cell with a custom-made preconcentration tube and an in-line UV-converter device. Both species were collected onto a solid sorbent within the preconcentrator and then released by thermal desorption into the UV-device. Hydrogen sulfide is detected by UV-assisted quantitative conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into SO2, which provides a significantly more pronounced and distinctively detectable rovibrational signature. Modulation of the UV-device system (i.e., UV-lamp on/off) enables discriminating between SO2 generated from H2S conversion and abundant SO2 signals. After optimization of the operational parameters, calibrations in the range of 0.75-10 ppmv with a limit

  15. Insights into the H2/CH4 Separation Through Two-Dimensional Graphene Channels: Influence of Edge Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Sang, Pengpeng; Xing, Wei; Shi, Zemin; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue; Yan, Zifeng

    2015-12-01

    A molecular simulation technique is employed to investigate the transport of H2/CH4 mixture through the two-dimensional (2D) channel between adjacent graphene layers. Pristine graphene membrane (GM) with pore width of 0.515~0.6 nm is found to only allow H2 molecules to enter rather than CH4, forming a molecular sieve. At pore widths of 0.64~1.366 nm, both H2 and CH4 molecules could fill into the GM channel, where the permeability of methane is more preferential than that of hydrogen with the largest CH4/H2 selectivity (1.89) at 0.728 nm. The edge functionalization by -H, -F, -OH, -NH2, and -COOH groups could significantly alter gas permeability by modifying the active surface area of the pore and tuning attractive and/or repulsive interaction with molecules at the entrance of channel. At the pore width of 0.6 nm, the H2 permeability of molecular sieve is enhanced by -H, -F, and -OH groups but restrained by -NH2, especially -COOH with a passing rate of zero. At pore widths of 0.64 and 0.728 nm, both -H and -F edge-functionalized GMs show a preferential selectivity of methane over hydrogen, while the favorable transport for GM-OH is changed from H2 molecules at 0.64 nm to CH4 molecules at 0.728 nm. For GM-NH2, it exhibits an excellent hydrogen molecular sieve at 0.64 nm and then turns into a significant H2/CH4 selectivity at 0.728 nm. Meanwhile, small H2 molecules start to enter the channel of GM-COOH at the pore width up to 0.728 nm. For the largest pore width of 1.336 nm, the influence of edge functionalization becomes small, and a comparable CH4/H2 selectivity is observed for all the considered membranes. PMID:26698875

  16. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiaguo; Lu, Yonggi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  17. Absolute Infrared Cross Sections of Gas-Phase H2O2 Using Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.; Burton, Sarah D.

    2010-01-29

    We report quantitative spectra of pressure-broadened H2O2 vapor. An 83% solution was flowed into a disseminator and diluted with N2 gas; water lines were subtracted. The H2O2 spectrum spans the IR and compares well with HITRAN values for ν6 band.

  18. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  19. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1987-07-21

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

  20. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1987-01-01

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7.degree.-25.degree. C. and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10.degree.-30.degree. C.

  1. Study of DC Circuit Breaker of H2-N2 Mixture Gas for High Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Yuji; Morishita, Yukinaga; Kaneko, Shuhei; Okabe, Shigemitsu; Mizoguchi, Hitoshi; Yanabu, Satoru

    Global warming caused by CO2 etc. is a field where the concern is very high. Especially, automobile emissions are problem for it. Therefore, the hybrid car is widely development and used recently. Hybrid car used electric power and gasoline. So, the car reduces CO2. Hybrid car has engine and motor. To rotate the motor, hybrid car has battery. This battery is large capacity. Therefore, the relay should interrupt high DC current for the switch of the motor and the engine. So, hybrid car used hydrogen gas filling relay We studied interruption test for the research of a basic characteristic of hydrogen gas. DC current has not current zero point. So, it is necessary to make the current zero by high arc voltage and forcible current zero point. The loss coefficient and arc voltage of hydrogen is high. Therefore, we studied interruption test for used high arc voltage. We studied interruption test and dielectric breakdown test of air, pure Hydrogen, and Hydrogen- nitrogen mixture gas. As a result, we realized H2-N2(80%-20%) is the best gas.

  2. Hot Gas in SMC SNR 0057-7226 and the Giant H 2 Region N66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, C. W.; Hoopes, C. G.; Sankrit, R.; Chu, Y.-H.; Sembach, K. R.; Blair, W. P.

    2001-12-01

    The supernova remnant SNR 0057-7226 and the dense, young cluster NGC 346 lie within the giant H 2 region N66, the most active star formation site in the SMC. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary system HD 5980, which lies behind the SNR, show high velocity, O 6 and C 3 absorption associated with the far side of the remnant (Hoopes et al 2001, ApJ, 558, L35). Chandra ACIS-I and ROSAT HRI images of N66 show the diffuse X-ray emission associated with the SNR, but little or no diffuse emission around the core of the central cluster. We present high-dispersion, long-slit optical echelle observations of five positions within N66 including positions across the SNR 0057-7226 and NGC 346. These data show bright Hα emission at the SMC rest velocity (v ~155 km s-1). Where the spectrograph slits intersect the SNR, faint Hα emission at high (v ~300 km s-1) and low (v ~50 km s-1) velocities reveals clumps of material on the back and front sides of the SNR shell. Ten FUSE observations of sight lines toward stars in N66--including four toward NGC 346 cluster stars--provide sensitive absorption-line measurements of several ionic species including O 6 which traces hot (T ~3*E5 K), highly-ionized gas and Fe 2 which traces cooler (T ~104 K), ionized and neutral gas. We also present ground based optical narrowband images in Hα , [S 2], and [O 3] which show the morphology of the H 2 region. We use this data set to study the kinematics of the gas in this complex region and to model the properties of the SNR-ISM interaction. This work is supported by NASA Contract NAS5-32985 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  3. New Gas Carburizing Method for Minimizing CO2 Emission by Saving Resources and Selective Removal of H2 in Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukoshi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Yujiro; Hoshino, Hideaki; Ishigami, Itsuo; Usui, Tateo

    An attempt has been made to develop a new gas carburizing furnace with the system that discharges H2 gas selectively from the atmosphere in the furnace. Polyimide hollow-fiber membrane filter on the market was selected as a filter that was expected to have good H2 gas permeability and selectivity. The results of the various gas permeability measurements of this filter showed that it had superior H2 gas permeability and selectivity. Using this gas filter module, a new industrial gas carburizing furnace that had ‘H2 gas selective discharging system’ was produced as a trial. Use of this furnace made possible to stabilize the gas carburizing atmosphere in the furnace under the lower carrier gas flow rate condition (below 25% of standard condition). It was confirmed that the carbon concentration profile of the steel carburized with the new carburizing furnace under lower carrier gas flow rate condition was comparable to that of the specimen carburized under standard carrier gas flow rate condition.

  4. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOEpatents

    Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

    1994-08-02

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

  5. H2O maser emission in circumstellar envelopes around AGB stars: Physical conditions in gas-dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenok, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    The pumping of 22.2-GHz H2O masers in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch stars has been simulated numerically. The physical parameters adopted in the calculations correspond to those of the circumstellar envelope around IK Tau. The one-dimensional plane-parallel structure of the gas-dust cloud is considered. The statistical equilibrium equations for the H2O level populations and the thermal balance equations for the gas-dust cloud are solved self-consistently. The calculations take into account 410 rotational levels belonging to the five lowest vibrational levels of H2O. The stellar radiation field is shown to play an important role in the thermal balance of the gas-dust cloud due to the absorption of emission in rotational-vibrational H2O lines. The dependence of the gain in the 22.2-GHz maser line on the gas density and H2O number density in the gas-dust cloud is investigated. Gas densities close to the mean density of the stellar wind, 107-108 cm-3, and a high relative H2O abundance, more than 10-4, have been found to be the most likely physical conditions in maser sources.

  6. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOEpatents

    Choe, Hwang; Fallas, Thomas T.

    1994-01-01

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  7. Pressure optimization of high harmonic generation in a differentially pumped Ar or H2 gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayrac, M.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Anumula, S.; Boran, Y.; Hart, N. A.; Kaya, N.; Strohaber, J.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    We experimentally studied the dependence of high harmonic generation in argon and molecular hydrogen on pressure changes in a gas jet that cause variations of the phase matching conditions and absorption. The study was performed at a peak laser intensity of ˜1.5 × 1014 W/cm2. To enable measurements over a wide range of pressures, we employed differential pumping with an additional cell (˜20 cm3 volume) enclosing the gas jet. By increasing the pressure in the gas jet up to a maximum of 1.5 bars with argon or 0.5 bars with hydrogen, we observed an increase in the high harmonic (HH) yield until an optimum pressure of 0.2 bars was reached for Ar, beyond which the output began decreasing. For H2, we observed an increase of the HH output up to the maximum pressure of 0.5 bars. This pressure-dependence study allowed us to achieve a tenfold enhancement in the high harmonic yield at the optimum pressure.

  8. Hyperthin Organic Membranes for Gas Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghui

    selectivities, because a single PAA-glued LB bilayer made of a nonporous polymeric surfactant (ca. 7 nm) was found to exhibit a much higher H2/CO2 selectivity (200), which reached the "upper bound". The key factors that are likely to affect the quality of the glued LB bilayers were: (i) the degree of ionic crosslinking between surfactants and polyelectrolytes, (ii) charge repulsion and (iii) hydrogen bonding among the polyelectrolyte chains. In principle, employing a surfactant bearing a large number of ionic sites (e.g., a polymeric surfactant) that can increase the degree of ionic crosslinking and a weak polyelectrolyte (e.g., PAA) that can be optimized to minimize the charge repulsion and maximize the hydrogen bonding should afford glued LB films with high gas selectivities. The current finding also indicated that the PAA layer filled in between two surfactant monolayers served as the main gas barrier. In a related study, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) (ca. 14 nm in thickness), which were made from structurally matched (i.e., two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes having identical backbones) and unmatched polyelectrolytes pairs, both showed high CO2/N 2 selectivities (ca. 100-150). However, the permeabilities of PEMs derived from structurally matched polyelectrolytes were significantly higher than that from an unmatched pair. The larger solubility of CO 2 with respect to N2 in these PEMs should be the reason lead to the high CO2/N2 permeation selectivities.

  9. Ribonuclease H2 mutations induce a cGAS/STING-dependent innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Karen J; Carroll, Paula; Lettice, Laura; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Reddy, Kaalak; Dix, Flora; Revuelta, Ailsa; Abbondati, Erika; Rigby, Rachel E; Rabe, Björn; Kilanowski, Fiona; Grimes, Graeme; Fluteau, Adeline; Devenney, Paul S; Hill, Robert E; Reijns, Martin Am; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-04-15

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) provides a monogenic model of nucleic acid-mediated inflammation relevant to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmunity. Mutations that impair ribonuclease (RNase) H2 enzyme function are the most frequent cause of this autoinflammatory disorder of childhood and are also associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Reduced processing of eitherRNA:DNAhybrid or genome-embedded ribonucleotide substrates is thought to lead to activation of a yet undefined nucleic acid-sensing pathway. Here, we establishRnaseh2b(A174T/A174T)knock-in mice as a subclinical model of disease, identifying significant interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) transcript upregulation that recapitulates theISGsignature seen inAGSpatients. The inflammatory response is dependent on the nucleic acid sensor cyclicGMP-AMPsynthase (cGAS) and its adaptorSTINGand is associated with reduced cellular ribonucleotide excision repair activity and increasedDNAdamage. This suggests thatcGAS/STINGis a key nucleic acid-sensing pathway relevant toAGS, providing additional insight into disease pathogenesis relevant to the development of therapeutics for this childhood-onset interferonopathy and adult systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:26903602

  10. Recirculating gas separator for electric submersible

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a gas separator apparatus for a submersible well pump. It comprises: a rotary gas separator means; and recirculating means for recirculating a portion of the liquid discharged from the discharge outlet back to the separating chamber so that a gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator means is substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of well fluid entering the well fluid inlet wherein the recirculating means. This patent also describes a method of pumping liquid from a well producing well fluids having a relatively high gas-to-liquid ratio. It comprises: centrifugally separating the well fluid into a liquid and a gas with a separator located downhole in the well; directing the separated liquid toward an inlet of a submersible well pump; recycling a portion of the separated liquid to the separator; and providing an effective gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of the well fluid prior to separation.

  11. Liquid/Gas Separator Handles Varying Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, John

    1992-01-01

    Liquid/gas separator includes two independent motors, one for pumping mixture and other for drawing off extracted gas. Two materials moved at speeds best suited for them. Liquid expelled radially outward from separator rotor. Entrained gas released, flows axially through rotor, and leaves through fan at downstream end. Unit developed to separate air from urine in spacecraft wastewater-treatment system, also functions in normal gravity. Made largely of titanium to resist corrosion.

  12. Comparison of pulsed and continuous addition of H2 gas via membranes for stimulating PCE biodegradation in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Novak, Paige J; Semmens, Michael J; Clapp, Lee W; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2006-03-01

    Column experiments were performed to investigate a technology for remediating aquifers contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The technology involves installation of hollow-fiber membranes in the subsurface to supply hydrogen gas (H2) to groundwater to support biological reductive dechlorination in situ. Three laboratory-scale columns [control (N2 only), continuous H2, and pulsed H2] were packed with aquifer material from a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated wetland in Minnesota and supplied with perchloroethene (PCE)-contaminated synthetic groundwater. The main goals of the research were: (1) evaluate the long-term performance of the H2 supply system and (2) compare the effects of pulsed (4 h on, 20 h off) versus continuous H2 supply (lumen partial pressure approximately 1.2 atm) on PCE dechlorination and production of by-products (i.e. methane and acetate). The silicone-coated fiberglass membranes employed in these experiments were robust, delivering H2 steadily over the entire 349-day experiment. Methane production decreased when H2 was added in a pulsed manner. Nevertheless, the percentage of added H2 used to support methanogenesis was similar in both H2-fed columns (92-93%). For much of the experiment, PCE dechlorination (observed end product = dichloroethene) in the continuous and pulsed H2 columns was comparable, and enhanced in comparison to the natural attenuation observed in the control column. Dechlorination began to decline in the pulsed H2 column after 210 days, however, while dechlorination in the continuous H2 column was sustained. Acetate was detected only in the continuous H2 column, at concentrations of up to 36 microM. The results of this research suggest that in situ stimulation of PCE dechlorination by direct H2 addition requires the continuous application of H2 at high partial pressures, favoring the production of bioavailable organic matter such as acetate to provide a carbon source, electron donor, or both for dechlorinators. Unfortunately

  13. Theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of the gas-phase H2/CO2/Ni(3D) system.

    PubMed

    Qin, Song; Hu, Changwei; Yang, Huaqing; Su, Zhishan

    2005-07-28

    The ground-state potential energy surface (PES) in the gas-phase H2/CO2/Ni(3D) system is investigated at the CCSD(T)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels in order to explore the possible reaction mechanism of the reverse water gas shift reaction catalyzed by Ni(3D). The calculations predict that the C-O bond cleavage of CO2 assisted by co-interacted H2 is prior to the dissociation of the H2, and the most feasible reaction path for Ni(3D) + H2 + CO2 --> Ni(3D) + H2O + CO is endothermic by 12.5 kJ mol(-1) with an energy barrier of 103.9 kJ mol(-1). The rate-determining step for the overall reaction is predicted to be the hydrogen migration with water formation. The promotion effect of H2 on the cleavage of C-O bond in CO2 is also discussed and compared with the analogous reaction of Ni(3D) + CO2 --> NiO + CO, and the difference between triplet and singlet H2/CO2/Ni systems is also discussed. PMID:16833994

  14. A feasibility study on the bioconversion of CO2 and H2 to biomethane by gas sparging through polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, I; Pérez, C; Alfaro, N; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the potential of a pilot hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to CH4 was evaluated. The system transformed 95% of H2 and CO2 fed at a maximum loading rate of 40.2 [Formula: see text] and produced 0.22m(3) of CH4 per m(3) of H2 fed at thermophilic conditions. H2 mass transfer to the liquid phase was identified as the limiting step for the conversion, and kLa values of 430h(-1) were reached in the bioreactor by sparging gas through the membrane module. A simulation showed that the bioreactor could upgrade biogas at a rate of 25m(3)/mR(3)d, increasing the CH4 concentration from 60 to 95%v. This proof-of-concept study verified that gas sparging through a membrane module can efficiently transfer H2 from gas to liquid phase and that the conversion of H2 and CO2 to biomethane is feasible on a pilot scale at noteworthy load rates. PMID:25770473

  15. Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P; Li, Xin; Dudeck, Kevin W; Benicewicz, Brian C; Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2012-06-12

    There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.

  16. Sulfidation Kinetics of Natural Chromite Ore Using H2S Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sazzad; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Pownceby, Mark I.; Bruckard, Warren J.

    2015-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of natural chromite (FeCr2O4) sulfidation using 5 pct H2S (balance Ar) gas were studied in the temperature range 1173 K to 1473 K (900 °C to 1200 °C). Reaction products were examined using combined X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicated the formation of an outer sulfide-rich layer comprising mixed (Fe,Cr)1- x S and (Cr,Fe)1- x S phases, underlain by a cation-depleted diffusion zone. The kinetics investigation indicated that the reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and that the sulfidation of chromite followed a shrinking unreacted core model. It is proposed that Cr3+ cation diffusion through the reaction product was the rate controlling step with an apparent activation energy of 166 ± 4 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energy lies between the activation energy for Fe2+ and Cr3+ diffusion through pure chromite spinel and Fe-Cr alloy. Possible reasons for the discrepancy from pure chromite are expected to be the presence of minor Al and Mg in the natural chromite sample, and the partial pressure of oxygen under the reaction conditions used.

  17. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Hwang; Fallas, T.T.

    1993-11-29

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter uses the principle that surface tension in the filter pores prevents gas bubbles from passing through; the gas collects in the interior of the filter to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is suited for microgravity since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which forces liquid from the inner region through the pores and the device outlet while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen enclosed by the filter. The screen has pores larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated; this results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  18. Regenerative adsorption and removal of H2S from hot fuel gas streams by rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sakbodin, Mann; Wang, Zheng

    2006-06-01

    Sorbent materials that allow for high-temperature, regenerative desulfurization of fuel gas streams for the anode of a solid oxide fuel cell have been developed. Reversible adsorption of H2S on cerium and lanthanum oxide surfaces is demonstrated over many cycles at temperatures as high as 800 degrees C, on both fresh or presulfided sorbents, and at very high space velocities. The adsorption and desorption processes are very fast, and removal of H2S to sub-parts per million levels is achieved at very short (millisecond) contact times. Any type of sulfur-free gas, including water vapor, can be used to regenerate the sorbent surface. Preferably, the anode off-gas stream is used to sweep the desorbed H(2)S to a burner. PMID:16763145

  19. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Theyse, F.H.; Kelling, F.E.T.

    1980-01-08

    Ultra Centrifuge Nederland N.V.'s improved centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas comprises a hollow cylindrical rotor, designated as a separating drum, within a stationary housing. Natural gas liquids that condense under pressure in the separating drum pass through openings in the drum into the space between the drum and housing. In this space, a series of openings, or throttling restrictors, allows the liquids to expand and return to gas. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum remains separate for drawing off.

  20. A Microporous Metal-Organic Framework with Lewis Basic Nitrogen Sites for High C2H2 Storage and Significantly Enhanced C2H2/CO2 Separation at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hui-Min; Wang, Huizhen; Li, Bin; Cui, Yuanjing; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Guodong; Chen, Banglin

    2016-08-01

    A novel metal-organic framework (MOF), [Cu2L(H2O)2]·7DMF·4H2O [ZJU-40; H4L = 5,5'-(pyrazine-2,5-diyl)diisophthalic acid], with Lewis basic nitrogen sites has been constructed and structurally characterized. Owing to the combined features of high porosity, moderate pore sizes, and immobilized Lewis basic nitrogen sites, the activated ZJU-40a exhibits the second-highest gravimetric C2H2 uptake of 216 cm(3) g(-1) (at 298 K and 1 bar) among all of the reported MOFs so far. This value is not only much higher than that of the isoreticular NOTT-101a (184 cm(3) g(-1)), but also superior to those of two very promising MOFs, known as HKUST-1 (201 cm(3) g(-1)) and Co-MOF-74 (197 cm(3) g(-1)). Interestingly, the immobilized nitrogen sites in ZJU-40a have nearly no effect on the CO2 uptake, so ZJU-40a adsorbs a similar amount of CO2 (87 cm(3) g(-1)) compared with NOTT-101a (84 cm(3) g(-1)) at 298 K and 1 bar. As a result, ZJU-40a shows significantly enhanced adsorption selectivity for C2H2/CO2 separation (17-11.5) at ambient temperature compared to that of NOTT-101a (8-9), leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. PMID:27176900

  1. Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    The Mars atmospheric capture and gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure C02 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as welL To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from un-reacted carbon oxides (C02- CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents, zeolites, and new technologies. This paper and presentation will summarize the results of an extensive literature review and laboratory evaluations of candidate technologies for the capture and separation of C02 and other relevant gases.

  2. Enhanced H2S gas-sensing properties of Pt-functionalized In2Ge2O7 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changhyun; Park, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyunsu; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-02-01

    In2Ge2O7 one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures were synthesized using an evaporation technique. The morphology, crystal structure, and sensing properties of the In2Ge2O7 nanostructures functionalized with Pt to H2S gas at 100 ∘C were examined. The diameters and lengths of the 1D nanostructures were a few tens of nanometers and up to a few hundreds of micrometers, respectively. Pt nanoparticles with diameters of a few tens of nanometers were distributed over the In2Ge2O7 nanowires. Gas sensors fabricated from the multiple networked In2Ge2O7 nanowires functionalized with Pt exhibited enhanced electrical responses to H2S gas compared to the uncoated In2Ge2O7 nanowires. The responses of the nanowires were improved 240, 234, and 225 fold at H2S concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 ppm, respectively. The enhanced electrical response of the Pt-functionalized In2Ge2O7 nanowire sensor to H2S gas can be attributed to a combination of the spillover effect and the enhanced chemisorption, as well as the dissociation of the gas.

  3. Using Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry to Determine the Fractionation Factor for H2 Production by Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hui; Ghandi, H.; Shi, Liang; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2, and they are key enzymes in the biological cycling of H2. H isotopes should be a very useful tool in quantifying proton trafficking in biological H2 production processes, but there are several obstacles that have thus far limited the use of this tool. In this manuscript, we describe a new method that overcomes some of these barriers and is specifically designed to measure isotopic fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed H2 evolution. A key feature of this technique is that purified hydrogenases are employed, allowing precise control over the reaction conditions and therefore a high level of precision. A custom-designed high-throughput gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometer is employed to measure the isotope ratio of the H2. Using this method, we determined that the fractionation factor of H2 production by the [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfivibrio fructosovran is 0.27. This result indicates that, as expected, protons are highly favored over deuterons during H2 evolution. Potential applications of this new method are discussed.

  4. Monitoring of CO2/H2S gas mixture injection in basaltic rocks at Hellisheiði Geothermal Power Plant, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Deirdre E.; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Aradóttir, Edda S.; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Júlíusson, Bjarni M.; Matter, Juerg M.; Stute, Martin; Oelkers, Eric H.; Snæbjörnsdóttir, Sandra Ó.; Gíslason, Sigurður R.

    2016-04-01

    Hellisheiði geothermal power plant emits about 41,000 tonnes of CO2 and 10,000 tonnes of H2S per year as a by-product of geothermal energy production. Icelandic regulations, stricter than WHO guidelines, have been in effect in order to reduce H2S emissions of the geothermal industry, while carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one method recommended to minimise the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The overall cost of CCS is dominated by that of capture and gas separation. This capture cost could be lowered by injecting gas mixtures into rocks as is now being tested at Hellisheiði geothermal power plant in SW-Iceland. There, a gas mixture of 60% CO2 and 40% H2S is dissolved in water from the plant and injected into the basaltic rocks. The CarbFix and SulFix pilot projects demonstrated solubility storage of the pure separate gases in a few minutes [1,2] and that more than 80% of the injected CO2 into basaltic rocks was mineralised within a year from its injection at 20-50°C [3]. The first phase of the gas mixture injection began on 3 June 2014, while tracer tests started three weeks later. By the end of the year 2015, approximately 6280 tonnes of CO2 and 3520 tonnes of H2S had been injected. The gases are dissolved in condensation water, mixed with waste water and injected to 750 m depth into a high temperature reservoir of 200-270°C. Water and gas samples were collected from four monitoring wells. There is a minor increase in CO2 (total dissolved carbon) and H2S (total dissolved sulphite), while the majority of major and minor elements are relatively stable. The data from monitoring wells therefore suggests that some of the injected gas mixture is already stored as minerals in the basaltic reservoir. [1] Sigfusson et al. (2015) Int. J. of Greenh. Gas Control 37, 213-219. [2] Gunnarsson et al. (2013) GRC Transactions 37, 785-789. [3] Matter et al. (2014) Energy Procedia 63, 4180-4185.

  5. Fluid inclusion volatile analysis by gas chromatography with photoionization micro-thermal conductivity detectors: Applications to magmatic MoS 2 and other H 2O-CO 2 and H 2O-CH 4 fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C. J.; Spooner, E. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen fluid inclusion volatile peaks have been detected and identified from 1-2 g samples (quartz) by gas chromatography using heated (~105°C) on-line crushing, helium carrier gas, a single porous polymer column (HayeSep R; 10' × 1/8″: 100/120#; Ni alloy tubing), two temperature programme conditions for separate sample aliquots, micro-thermal conductivity (TCD) and photoionization detectors (PID; 11.7 eV lamp), and off-line digital peak processing. In order of retention time these volatile peaks are: N 2, Ar, CO, CH 4, CO 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6, C 2H 2, COS, C 3H 6, C 3H 8, C 3H 4 (propyne), H 2O (22.7 min at 80°C), SO 2, ± iso- C4H10 ± C4H8 (1-butene) ± CH3SH, C 4H 8 (iso-butylene), (?) C 4H 6 (1,3 butadiene) and ± n- C4H10 ± C4H8 (trans-2-butene) (80 and -70°C temperature programme conditions combined). H 2O is analysed directly. O 2 can be analysed cryogenically between N 2 and Ar, but has not been detected in natural samples to date in this study. H 2S, SO 2, NH 3, HCl, HCN, and H 2 ca nnot be analysed at present. Blanks determined by crushing heat-treated Brazilian quartz (800-900°C/4 h) are zero for 80°C temperature programme conditions, except for a large, unidentified peak at ~64 min, but contain H 2O, CO 2, and some low molecular weight hydrocarbons at -70°C temperature conditions due to cryogenic accumulation from the carrier gas and subsequent elution. TCD detection limits are ~30 ppm molar in inclusions; PID detection limits are ~ 1 ppm molar in inclusions and lower for unsaturated hydrocarbons (e.g., ~0.2 ppm for C 2H 4; ~ 1 ppb for C 2H 2; ~0.3 ppb for C 3H 6). Precisions (1σ) are ~ ±1-2% and ~ ± 13% for H 2O in terms of total moles detected; the latter value is equivalent to ±0.6 mol% at the 95 mol% H 2O level. Major fluid inclusion volatile species have been successfully analysed on a ~50 mg fluid inclusion section chip (~7 mm × ~10 mm × ~100 μm). Initial inclusion volatile analyses of fluids of interpreted magmatic origin from

  6. Global rate and distribution of H2 gas produced by serpentinization within oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, Stacey L.; Pratson, Lincoln F.; Karson, Jeffrey A.; Klein, Emily M.

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been estimated that serpentinization within continental lithosphere produces H2 at rates comparable to oceanic lithosphere (both are ~1011 mol H2/yr). Here we present a simple model that suggests that H2 production rates along the mid-oceanic ridge alone (i.e., excluding other marine settings) may exceed continental production by an order of magnitude (~1012 mol H2/yr). In our model, H2 production rates increase with spreading rate and the net thickness of serpentinizing peridotite (S-P) in a column of lithosphere. Lithosphere with a faster spreading rate therefore requires a relatively smaller net thickness of S-P to produce H2 at the same rate as lithosphere with a slower rate and greater thickness of S-P. We apply our model globally, incorporating an inverse relationship between spreading rate and net thickness of S-P to be consistent with observations that serpentinization is more common within lithosphere spreading at slower rates.

  7. Interfacial Design of Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improved Gas Separation Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenggong; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Shenxiang; Hu, Liang; Jin, Jian

    2016-05-01

    High-performance metal-organic framework (MOF)/polyimide (PI) mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) are fabricated by a facile strategy by designing the MOF/PI matrix interface via poly dopamine coating. The overall separation performance of the designed MMMs surpasses the state-of-the-art 2008 Robeson upper bound for the H2 /CH4 and H2 /N2 gas pairs and approaches the 2008 upper bound for the O2 /N2 gas pair. PMID:26936293

  8. Radioactive-gas separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, R.; King, K. J.; Nellis, D. O.; Nisson, R. S.; Robling, P.; Womack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cryogenic technique recovers gases inexpensively. Method uses differences in vapor pressures, melting points, and boiling points of components in gaseous mixture. Series of temperature and pressure variations converts gases independently to solid and liquid states, thereby simplifying separation. Apparatus uses readily available cryogen and does not require expensive refrigeration equipment.

  9. Mechanism of Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Si Film Deposition by Magnetron Sputtering Employing a Si Target and H2/Ar Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Kota; Tabata, Akimori; Sasaki, Koichi

    2009-03-01

    The mechanism of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) film deposition by magnetron sputtering employing a Si target and H2/Ar gas mixture has been investigated by measuring Si and H atom densities in the gas phase by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The crystalline volume fraction of the film correlated positively with H atom density. The variation in Si atom density indicated the increase in sputtering yield from the Si target in the H2/Ar discharge. The surface of the Si target immersed in the H2/Ar discharge was hydrogenated. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect the production of SiHx molecules (typically SiH4) from the hydrogenated Si target via reactive ion etching. Since SiHx molecules produced from the target may function as a deposition precursor, the mechanism of µc-Si:H film deposition is considered to be similar to that of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) employing a SiH4/H2 gas mixture. The advantage of magnetron sputtering deposition over PECVD is the production of SiHx molecules without using toxic, explosive SiH4.

  10. Ion-Molecule Reaction of Gas-Phase Chromium Oxyanions: CrxOyHz- + H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Benson, Michael Timothy; Harrington, Peter Boves; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olson, John Eric; Groenewold, Gary Steven

    2003-08-01

    Chromium oxyanions having the general formula CrxOyHz- play a key role in many industrial, environmental, and analytical processes, which motivated investigations of their intrinsic reactivity. Reactions with water are perhaps the most significant, and were studied by generating CrxOyHz- in the gas phase using a quadrupole ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer. Of the ions in the Cr1OyHz envelope (y = 2, 3, 4; z = 0, 1), only CrO2- was observed to react with H2O, producing the hydrated CrO3H2- at a slow rate (~0.07% of the ion-molecule collision constant at 310 K). CrO3-, CrO4-, and CrO4H- were unreactive. In contrast, Cr2O4-, Cr2O5-, and Cr2O5H2- displayed a considerable tendency to react with H2O. Cr2O4- underwent sequential reactions with H2O, initially producing Cr2O5H2- at a rate that was ~7% efficient. Cr2O5H2- then reacted with a second H2O by addition to form Cr2O6H4- (1.8% efficient) and by OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H3- (0.6% efficient). The reactions of Cr2O5- were similar to those of Cr2O5H2-: Cr2O5- underwent addition to form Cr2O6H2- (3% efficient) and OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H- (<1% efficient). By comparison, Cr2O6- was unreactive with H2O, and in fact, no further H2O addition could be observed for any of the Cr2O6Hz- anions. Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations showed that reactive CrxOyHz- species underwent nucleophilic attack by the incoming H2O molecules, which produced an initially formed adduct in which the water O was bound to a Cr center. The experimental and computational studies suggested that Cr2OyHz- species that have bi- or tricoordinated Cr centers are susceptible to attack by H2O; however, when the metal becomes tetracoordinate, reactivity stops. For the Cr2OyHz- anions the lowest energy structures all contained rhombic Cr2O2 rings with pendant O atoms and/or OH groups. The initially formed [Cr2Oy- + H2O] adducts underwent H rearrangement to a gem O atom to produce stable dihydroxy structures. The calculations indicated that

  11. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  12. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  13. Simulation of Ultrasonic-driven Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, David R.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Doctor, Steven R.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2007-06-01

    The separation of components in a gas mixture is important for a wide range of applications. One method for achieving this separation is by passing a traveling acoustic wave through the gas mixture, which creates a flux of the lighter components away from the transducer. A series of simulation were performed to assess the effectiveness of this method for separating a binary mixture of argon and helium using the lattice kinetics method. The energy transport equation was modified to account for adiabatic expansion and compression. The species transport equation was modified to include a barodiffusion term. Simulations were performed on two different scales; detailed acoustic wave simulations to determine the net component flux as a function of local concentration, pressure, etc., and device scale simulations to predict the gas composition as a function of time inside a gas separation cylinder. The method is first validated using data from literature and then applied to mixtures of argon and helium. Results are presented and discussed.

  14. Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Selective Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on translating a novel class of material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—selfassembled mesoporous carbon—into robust, efficient membrane systems for selective industrial gas separations.

  15. First accurate experimental study of Mu reactivity from a state-selected reactant in the gas phase: the Mu + H2{1} reaction rate at 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakule, Pavel; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Pratt, Francis; Fleming, Donald; Momose, Takamasa; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Torikai, Eiko

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports on the experimental background and methodology leading to recent results on the first accurate measurement of the reaction rate of the muonium (Mu) atom from a state-selected reactant in the gas phase: the Mu + H2\\{1\\}\\to MuH + H reaction at 300 K, and its comparison with rigorous quantum rate theory, Bakule et al (2012 J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3 2755). Stimulated Raman pumping, induced by 532 nm light from the 2nd harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, was used to produce H2 in its first vibrational (v = 1) state, H2\\{1\\}, in a single Raman/reaction cell. A pulsed muon beam (from ‘ISIS’, at 50 Hz) matched the 25 Hz repetition rate of the laser, allowing data taking in equal ‘Laser-On/Laser-Off’ modes of operation. The signal to noise was improved by over an order of magnitude in comparison with an earlier proof-of-principle experiment. The success of the present experiment also relied on optimizing the overlap of the laser profile with the extended stopping distribution of the muon beam at 50 bar H2 pressure, in which Monte Carlo simulations played a central role. The rate constant, found from the analysis of three separate measurements, which includes a correction for the loss of {{H}2}\\{1\\} concentration due to collisional relaxation with unpumped H2 during the time of each measurement, is {{k}Mu}\\{1\\} = 9.9[(-1.4)(+1.7)] × 10-13 cm3 s-1 at 300 K. This is in good to excellent agreement with rigorous quantum rate calculations on the complete configuration interaction/Born-Huang surface, as reported earlier by Bakule et al, and which are also briefly commented on herein.

  16. Optimization of operating parameters for gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of H2S by novel vermiculate packed tubular reactor.

    PubMed

    Preethi, V; Kanmani, S

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen production by gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) was investigated on four semiconductor photocatalysts including CuGa1.6Fe0.4O2, ZnFe2O3, (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 and Ce/TiO2. The CdS and ZnS coated core shell particles (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 shows the highest rate of hydrogen (H2) production under optimized conditions. Packed bed tubular reactor was used to study the performance of prepared photocatalysts. Selection of the best packing material is a key for maximum removal efficiency. Cheap, lightweight and easily adsorbing vermiculate materials were used as a novel packing material and were found to be effective in splitting H2S. Effect of various operating parameters like flow rate, sulphide concentration, catalyst dosage, light irradiation were tested and optimized for maximum H2 conversion of 92% from industrial waste H2S. PMID:27562700

  17. Understanding the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition in SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornstetter, Jean-Christophe; Bruneau, Bastien; Bulkin, Pavel; Johnson, Erik V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2014-06-01

    We report on the growth of microcrystalline silicon films from the dissociation of SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures. For this growth chemistry, the formation of HF molecules provides a clear signature of the amorphous to microcrystalline growth transition. Depositing films from silicon tetrafluoride requires the removal of F produced by SiF4 dissociation, and this removal is promoted by the addition of H2 which strongly reacts with F to form HF molecules. At low H2 flow rates, the films grow amorphous as all the available hydrogen is consumed to form HF. Above a critical flow rate, corresponding to the full removal of F, microcrystalline films are produced as there is an excess of atomic hydrogen in the plasma. A simple yet accurate phenomenological model is proposed to explain the SiF4/H2 plasma chemistry in accordance with experimental data. This model provides some rules of thumb to achieve high deposition rates for microcrystalline silicon, namely, that increased RF power must be balanced by an increased H2 flow rate.

  18. Isotope Separation in Concurrent Gas Centrifuges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.

    An analytical equation defining separative power of an optimized concurrent gas centrifuge is obtained for an arbitrary binary mixture of isotopes. In the case of the uranium isotopes the equation gives δU= 12.7(V/700 m/s)2(300 K/T)L, kg SWU/yr, where L and V are the length and linear velocity of the rotor of the gas centrifuge, T is the temperature. This formula well agrees with an empirical separative power of counter current gas centrifuges.

  19. Merging open metal sites and Lewis basic sites in a NbO-type metal-organic framework for improved C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separation.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengling; Hu, Jiayi; Ling, Yajing; Feng, Yunlong; Chen, De-Li; He, Yabing

    2015-09-01

    A new three-dimensional NbO-type porous metal-organic framework ZJNU-47 was synthesized via a solvothermal reaction of Cu(NO3)2·3H2O and a Lewis basic nitrogen donor site-rich tetracarboxylate, namely, 5,5'-(pyridazine-3,6-diyl)-diisophthalate, and the structure was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be isostructural with NOTT-101. With the synergistic effect of open metal sites, Lewis basic sites and a suitable pore space, the MOF material ZJNU-47a after activation can take up a large amount of C2H2 and CO2. The gravimetric C2H2 uptake of 214 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) at room temperature and 1 atm is the highest among all reported MOFs to date, and the gravimetric CO2 uptake of 108 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) is also among the highest reported for MOFs. Compared to the isostructural MOF NOTT-101a, ZJNU-47a exhibits a significant increase in C2H2 and CO2 uptake and thus improved C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separations. Significantly, comprehensive DFT studies of C2H2 and CO2 adsorption have revealed that the open nitrogen donor sites are comparable and even superior to open metal sites regarding the adsorption sites. This work demonstrated that the simultaneous introduction of Lewis basic nitrogen donor sites and Lewis acidic metal sites into the framework is a promising approach to improve the gas sorption toward CO2 and C2H2 and thus to produce materials possessing enhanced C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separation performance. PMID:26223674

  20. A thermodynamical model for the surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colucci, Simone; Battaglia, Maurizio; Trigila, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension plays an important role in the nucleation of H2O gas bubbles in magmatic melts and in the time-dependent rheology of bubble-bearing magmas. Despite several experimental studies, a physics based model of the surface tension of magmatic melts in contact with H2O is lacking. This paper employs gradient theory to develop a thermodynamical model of equilibrium surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas at low to moderate pressures. In the last decades, this approach has been successfully applied in studies of industrial mixtures but never to magmatic systems. We calibrate and verify the model against literature experimental data, obtained by the pendant drop method, and by inverting bubble nucleation experiments using the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). Our model reproduces the systematic decrease in surface tension with increased H2O pressure observed in the experiments. On the other hand, the effect of temperature is confirmed by the experiments only at high pressure. At atmospheric pressure, the model shows a decrease of surface tension with temperature. This is in contrast with a number of experimental observations and could be related to microstructural effects that cannot be reproduced by our model. Finally, our analysis indicates that the surface tension measured inverting the CNT may be lower than the value measured by the pendant drop method, most likely because of changes in surface tension controlled by the supersaturation.

  1. Molecular gas in low-metallicity starburst galaxies:. Scaling relations and the CO-to-H2 conversion factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorín, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Planesas, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Tracing the molecular gas-phase in low-mass star-forming galaxies becomes extremely challenging due to significant UV photo-dissociation of CO molecules in their low-dust, low-metallicity ISM environments. Aims: We aim to study the molecular content and the star-formation efficiency of a representative sample of 21 blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), previously characterized on the basis of their spectrophotometric properties. Methods: We present CO (1-0) and (2-1) observations conducted at the IRAM-30m telescope. These data are further supplemented with additional CO measurements and multiwavelength ancillary data from the literature. We explore correlations between the derived CO luminosities and several galaxy-averaged properties. Results: We detect CO emission in seven out of ten BCDs observed. For two galaxies these are the first CO detections reported so far. We find the molecular content traced by CO to be correlated with the stellar and Hi masses, star formation rate (SFR) tracers, the projected size of the starburst, and its gas-phase metallicity. BCDs appear to be systematically offset from the Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law, showing lower average gas surface densities for a given ΣSFR, and therefore showing extremely low (≲0.1 Gyr) H2 and H2 +Hi depletion timescales. The departure from the SK law is smaller when considering H2 +Hi rather than H2 only, and is larger for BCDs with lower metallicity and higher specific SFR. Thus, the molecular fraction (ΣH2/ ΣHI) and CO depletion timescale (ΣH2/ ΣSFR) of BCDs is found to be strongly correlated with metallicity. Using this, and assuming that the empirical correlation found between the specific SFR and galaxy-averaged H2 depletion timescale of more metal-rich galaxies extends to lower masses, we derive a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor αCO,Z ∝ (Z/Z⊙)- y, with y = 1.5(±0.3)in qualitative agreement with previous determinations, dust-based measurements, and recent model

  2. Remote processing, delivery and injection of H2[15O] produced from a N2/H2 gas target using a simple and compact apparatus.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, R A; Alexoff, D L; Schlyer, D J; Wolf, A P

    1994-12-01

    We report here a simple apparatus for remote trapping and processing of H2[15O] produced from the N2/H2 target. The system performs a three step operation for H2[15O] delivery at the PET imaging facility which includes the following: (i) collecting the radiotracer in sterile water; (ii) adjusting preparation pH through removal of radiolytically produced ammonia, while at the same time adjusting solution isotonicity; and (iii) delivery of the radiotracer preparation to the injection syringe in a sterile and pyrogen-free form suitable for human studies. The processing apparatus is simple, can be remotely operated and fits inside a Capintec Dose Monitoring Chamber for direct measurement of accumulated radioactivity. Using this system, 300 mCi of H2[15O] (15 microA of 8 MeV D+ on target) is transferred from target through 120 m x 3.18 mm o.d. Impolene tubing to yield 100 mCi of H2[15O] which is isotonic, neutral and suitable for human studies. A remote hydraulically driven system for i.v. injection of the H2[15O] is also described. The device allows for direct measurement of syringe dose while filling, and for easy, as well as safe transport of the injection syringe assembly to the patient's bedside via a shielded delivery cart. This cart houses a hydraulic piston that allows the physician to "manually" inject the radiotracer without directly handling the syringe. PMID:7894394

  3. SEPARATION OF GAS MIXTURES BY THERMOACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. SWIFT; D.A. GELLER; P.S. SPOOR

    2001-06-01

    Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

  4. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this

  5. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.A.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lyke, S.E.

    1986-08-01

    The goal of this program is to determine the feasibility of solvent-dissolved coordination complexes for the separation of gas mixtures under bench-scale conditions. In particular, mixtures such as low-Btu gas are examined for CO and H/sub 2/ separation. Two complexes, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Br/sub 2/ and Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, were examined in a bench-scale apparatus for the separation of binary (CO-N/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/-N/sub 2/) and quinary (H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, and N/sub 2/) mixtures. The separation of CO-N/sub 2/ was enhanced by the presence of the palladium complex in the 1,1,2-trichloroethane (TCE) solvent, especially at high gas and low liquid rates. The five-component gas mixture separation with the palladium complex in TCE provided quite unexpected results based on physical solubility and chemical coordination. The complex retained CO, while the solvent retained CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, and N/sub 2/ to varying degrees. This allowed the hydrogen content to be enhanced due to its low solubility in TCE and inertness to the complex. Thus, a one-step, hydrogen separation can be achieved from gas mixtures with compositions similar to that of oxygen-blown coal gas. A preliminary economic evaluation of hydrogen separation was made for a system based on the palladium complex. The palladium system has a separation cost of 50 to 60 cents/MSCF with an assumed capital investment of $1.60/MSCF of annual capacity charged at 30% per year. This assumes a 3 to 4 year life for the complex. Starting with a 90% hydrogen feed, PSA separation costs are in the range of 30 to 50 cents/MSCF. The ruthenium complex was not as successful for hydrogen or carbon monoxide separation due to unfavorable kinetics. The palladium complex was found to strip hydrogen gas from H/sub 2/S. The complex could be regenerated with mild oxidants which removed the sulfur as SO/sub 2/. 24 refs., 26 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Optimization of a gas sampling system for measuring eddy-covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Burba, G.; Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Li, J.; Luo, H.; Zulueta, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) will provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across eco-climatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analysers are widely employed for eddy-covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties, and requires correction. Here, we show that the gas sampling system substantially contributes to high-frequency attenuation, which can be minimized by careful design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyser cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this basis. The design consists of the stainless steel intake tube, a pleated mesh

  7. The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and sh...

  8. I(CO)/N(H2) conversions and molecular gas abundances in spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip; Black, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of emission in the J = 1-0 rotational transition of interstellar CO are used to obtain column densities and masses of hydrogen. By taking into account the effects of variations in molecular cloud parameters on conversion factors between integrated CO intensity and molecular hydrogen column density, it is shown that conversion factors are very sensitive to the kinetic temperature of the emitting gas. Results indicate that the gas temperatures in systems with high star formation rates can be quite high, and it is suggested that use of a standard conversion factor will lead to systematic overestimation of the amount of molecular gas.

  9. Crosslinked Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Young, Jennifer S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2005-09-20

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by layering a solution of polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a,a'dibromo-p-xylene onto a porous support and evaporating solvent. A supported membrane of cross-linked poly-2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole unexpectedly exhibits an enhanced gas permeability compared to the non-cross linked analog at temperatures over 265° C.

  10. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  11. First-principles calculations on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes for H2S gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muliyati, Dewi; Wella, Sasfan A.; Wungu, Triati D. K.; Suprijadi

    2015-09-01

    In this research, we performed first-principles calculations by means of density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the interaction of H2S gas on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In order to understand the effect of chirality to the electronic structure of SWNTs/H2S, the pristine SWNTs was varied to become SWNTs (5,0), (6,0), (7,0), (8,0), (9,0), and (10,0). From the calculation we found that after H2S adsorbed on surface of SWNTs, the electronic properties of system changes from semiconductor to metal but not vice versa. It was only SWNTs (5,0), (7,0), (8,0), and (10,0) occuring the changing on its electronic properties behavior, others were remain similar with its initial behavior. In the degassing process, metal return to semiconductor behavior, which is an indication that SWNTs is a good gas sensors, responsive and reversible.

  12. Growth conditions effects on the H2 and CO2 gas sensing properties of Indium Tin Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, S.; Coban, O.; Shafai, C.; Tuzemen, S.; Gur, E.

    2016-04-01

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films are transparent conducting wide bandgap oxide. In this study investigated optical, structural and morphological properties of sputtered ITO thin films using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX) and optical absorption techniques. These measurements revealed that the oxygen gas percentage present in the ITO film deposited by RF magnetron sputter deposition showed systematic variation of its band gap, crystal orientation, growth rate, figure of merit (FOM) and dominant XRD peaks. All the thin films deposited at room temperature (RT). Once characterization of the films carried out, H2 and CO2 resistive gas sensors fabricated by depositing the ITO film on top of aluminium interdigitated contacts/electrode (IDE), that fabricated following lithography and etching processes. These devices showed reasonable sensitivity for pure H2 and CO2 at elevated temperature. A correlation found between the thin film properties of the ITO and its sensing capability for H2 and CO2, which these gases are important in many fields such as automotive, energy, biological and health-related applications.

  13. Novel design of an enclosed CO2/H2O gas analyser for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; McDermitt, D. K.; Anderson, D. J.; Furtaw, M. D.; Eckles, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes design and field performance of a new enclosed CO2/H2O gas analyser, LI-7200. Unlike present closed-path analysers, this new instrument is designed for operation with short intake tubes, with the intention to maximize strengths and to minimize weaknesses of both traditional open-path and closed-path approaches. The study provides description of the instrument, shows the principles of its operation, and explains advantages of a new design. Field results are provided from three field experiments with the prototypes, and cover such parameters as high frequency air temperature and pressure fluctuations inside the sampling cell versus ambient conditions, instantaneous concentrations and cospectra for CO2 and H2O in comparison with open-path instrument, and eddy covariance hourly CO2 and H2O fluxes in comparison with both open-path and closed-path instruments. Field data loss inventory is also provided in comparison with open-path and closed-path gas analysers. The new enclosed design results in little data loss during precipitation and icing, similar to the closed-path design, but with a low power consumption and high field stability comparable to open-path instruments.

  14. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  15. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH4 and C2H2 interconversion in hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH4 and C2H2 molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H2 gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm-1 using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H2 plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r ,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH4 and C2H2 molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH4 and C2H2. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH4→C2H2 conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400H2→CH4 is favored in the more distant regions where Tgas<1400 K. Analysis of the multistep interconversion mechanism reveals substantial net consumption of H atoms accompanying the CH4→C2H2 conversion, whereas the reverse C2H2→CH4 process only requires H atoms to drive the reactions; H atoms are not consumed by the overall

  16. [Ci](1-0) observations in M33 A study of CO dark H2 gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glück, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Okada, Y.; Buchbender, C.; Röllig, M.; Stutzki, J.

    2016-05-01

    Based on [Ci] (1-0) observations and complementary Hi, 12/13CO (1-0), 12CO (2-1) and [Cii] data we estimated the column density and fraction of molecular hydrogen in GMCs along the major axis of the galaxy M33. We found that on average 75%± 14% of the hydrogen is in molecular form. Roughly 40-45% of the H2 is both traced by [Cii] and CO, while ˜ 15% by the [Ci] lines. The found CO-dark H2 gas fractions are within the predictions by Wolfire et al. (2010) for a half solar metallicity, Z = 0.5 Z⊙, as in M33.

  17. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  18. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

    1994-08-30

    A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

  19. Gas separation using ultrasound and light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-07-31

    An apparatus and method for separating a chosen gas from a mixture of gases having no moving parts and utilizing no chemical processing is described. The separation of particulates from fluid carriers thereof has been observed using ultrasound. In a similar manner, molecular species may be separated from carrier species. It is also known that light-induced drift may separate light-absorbing species from carrier species. Therefore, the combination of temporally pulsed absorption of light with ultrasonic concentration is expected to significantly increase the efficiency of separation by ultrasonic concentration alone. Additionally, breaking the spatial symmetry of a cylindrical acoustic concentrator decreases the spatial distribution of the concentrated particles, and increases the concentration efficiency.

  20. Synthesis of activated carbon from oil fly ash for removal of H2S from gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Zaheer; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Al-Baghli, Nadhir; Eic, Mladen

    2015-02-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is made from waste oil fly ash (OFA) which is produced in large quantities from power generation plants through combustion of heavy fuel oil. OFA contains ∼80% carbon that makes it suitable for producing AC by physicochemical treatments using a mixture of HNO3, H2SO4, and H3PO4 acids to remove non-carbonaceous impurities. The acid treated OFA is then activated by CO2 at 990 °C. The physico-chemical treatments of OFA have increased the surface area from 4 to 375 m2/g. Surface morphology and pore volume of AC are characterized by combined SEM and EDX techniques. Elemental analysis shows that sulfur content is reduced from 7.1 wt% in untreated OFA to 0.51 wt% for the treated OFA. The AC is further treated with HNO3 and NH4OH solutions in order to attach the carboxylic and amine groups on the surface, respectively. FTIR characterization is used to confirm the presence of the functional groups on the surface of AC at different stages of its development. The performance of functionalized AC samples is tested for the removal of H2S from a synthetic natural gas by carrying out breakthrough experiments. The results from these tests have shown maximum adsorption capacity of 0.3001 mg/g for NH4OH functionalized activated carbon with 86.43% regeneration efficiency. The ammonium hydroxide treated AC is found to be more effective for H2S removal than acid treated AC as confirmed by breakthrough experiments. The results indicate that the presence of more acidic functionalities on the surface reduces the H2S adsorption efficiency from the gas mixture.

  1. Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for H2SO4/Water and I2/HI/H2O Water Separation and Hydrogen Permeation for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick R. Stewart

    2006-10-01

    In this report are the findings into three membrane separation studies for potential application to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. The first is the removal of water from hydriodic acid/iodine mixtures. In the S-I cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and iodine mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, performance data for Nafion® and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes is shown.

  2. Metering Gas Strut for Separating Rocket Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A proposed gas strut system would separate a liquid-fueled second rocket stage from a solid-fueled first stage using an array of pre-charged struts. The strut would be a piston-and-cylinder mechanism containing a compressed gas. Adiabatic expansion of the gas would drive the extension of the strut. The strut is designed to produce a force-versus-time profile, chosen to prevent agitation of the liquid fuel, in which the force would increase from an initial low value to a peak value, then decay toward the end of the stroke. The strut would include a piston chamber and a storage chamber. The piston chamber would initially contain gas at a low pressure to provide the initial low separation force. The storage chamber would contain gas at a higher pressure. The piston would include a longitudinal metering rod containing an array of small holes, sized to restrict the flow gas between the chambers, that would initially not be exposed to the interior of the piston chamber. During subsequent expansion, the piston motion would open more of the metering holes between the storage and piston chambers, thereby increasing the flow of gas into the piston chamber to produce the desired buildup of force.

  3. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  4. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct

  5. A comparison of TiO2 nanoparticles and nanotubes for catalytic gas phase destruction of H2S gas at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Naeem; Hussain, Syed Tajammul; Siddiqua, Asima; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2012-06-01

    Reduction of H2S gas over Sulphur doped TiO2 nanoparticles and TiO2 nanotubes was studied in this work. Fixed bed catalytic system was used for the catalytic reduction of H2S gas at a high temperature of 450 degrees C under laboratory conditions. 99.97% reduction was achieved using S-doped TiO2. 2.89% Sulphur was adsorbed on S-doped TiO2 nanoparticles in the form of Ti(SO4)2, while 95.6% reduction was achieved in case of TiO2 nanotubes and the sulphur adsorption was 2.67%. The XRD, SEM, and EDX techniques were carried out to characterize the nanoparticles and nanotubes, while gas reduction analysis was carried out using GC-MS for gas samples. PMID:22905577

  6. [Regulation of Ovarian Function: Part of the Gas Transmitters NO, CO and H2S].

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Zenkina, V G

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the management of ovarian function and participation in the process of a new class of cellular regulators--Gasotransmitters (NO, CO and H2S). According to modern concepts in regulatory processes, in addition to hypothalamic-pituitary mechanisms involved a large and diverse group of ovary cells (interstitial, internal theca and atretic bodies, follicular epithelium, teka-luteal and granulosa-luteal cells of the corpus luteum), which not only mediate the gonadotropic stimulation, but satisfy the for the production of a wide range of biologically active substances. These materials are expected to participate in all these processes gaseous mediators. However, our knowledge of topochemistry, mechanisms and the role of these substances in the important organs of the reproductive system-ovary, fragmentary and do not allow to form a holistic understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which Gasotransmitters have a regulating effect on the individual structures of the ovary in normal functioning of the body and disease. Creation of an experimental model for studying the mechanisms of gaseous mediators in different cell types of ovarian, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels, in which the functional significance of these substances may be particularly significant, will provide fundamental knowledge for the development of new approaches to the treatment of diseases of the reproductive system. PMID:27183785

  7. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  8. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  9. Low temperature H2S removal with 3-D structural mesoporous molecular sieves supported ZnO from gas stream.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Sun, T H; Shu, C H; Zhang, H B

    2016-07-01

    A series of 3-dimensional (3-D) structural mesoporous silica materials, SBA-16, MCM-48 and KIT-6, was synthesized and supported with different ZnO loadings (10, 20, 30, and 40wt%) by the incipient wetness method to evaluate the performances on H2S removal at room temperature. These materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, XRD, and TEM to investigate their textural properties. All the ZnO-loaded adsorbents exhibited the H2S removal capacity of bellow 0.1 ppmv. With the best ZnO loading percentage of 30wt% on MCM-48 and KIT-6, 20wt% on SBA-16 according to the results of breakthrough test, further increasing ZnO loading caused the decrease of the adsorption capacity due to the agglomeration of ZnO. Besides, the H2S adsorption capacities of the supports materials varied in the order of KIT-6>MCM-48>SBA-16, which was influenced primarily by their pore volume and pore size. With the largest pores in these 3-D arrangement materials, KIT-6 showed the best performance of supported material for ZnO, due to its retained superior physical properties as well as large pore diameter to allow faster gas-solid interaction and huge pore volume to disperse ZnO on the surface of it. PMID:26970044

  10. Muonium Addition Reactions and Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase: k∞ Rate Constants for Mu + C2H2.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Garner, David M; Reid, Ivan D; Fleming, Donald G

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the addition reaction of muonium (Mu) to acetylene have been studied in the gas phase at N2 moderator pressures mainly from ∼800 to 1000 Torr and over the temperature range from 168 to 446 K, but also down to 200 Torr at 168 K and over a much higher range of pressures, from 10 to 44 bar at 295 K, demonstrating pressure-independent rate constants, kMu(T). Even at 200 Torr moderator pressure, the kinetics for Mu + C2H2 addition behave as if effectively in the high-pressure limit, giving k∞ = kMu due to depolarization of the muon spin in the MuC2H2 radical formed in the addition step. The rate constants kMu(T) exhibit modest Arrhenius curvature over the range of measured temperatures. Comparisons with data and with calculations for the corresponding H(D) + C2H2 addition reactions reveal a much faster rate for the Mu reaction at the lowest temperatures, by 2 orders of magnitude, in accord with the propensity of Mu to undergo quantum tunneling. Moreover, isotopic atom exchange, which contributes in a major way to the analogous D atom reaction, forming C2HD + H, is expected to be unimportant in the case of Mu addition, a consequence of the much higher zero-point energy and hence weaker C-Mu bond that would form, meaning that the present report of the Mu + C2H2 reaction is effectively the only experimental study of kinetic isotope effects in the high-pressure limit for H-atom addition to acetylene. PMID:25664674

  11. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  12. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction

  13. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kelling, F.E.; Theyse, F.H.

    1980-01-08

    A centrifuge is claimed for the separation of gaseous mixtures with a rotor inside a housing, comprising a hollow, cylindrical or nearly cylindrical rotorpart also called a separating drum, in which drum a gaseous component may condense as a liquid. This liquid is admitted thereafter through openings in the drum to the space between drum and housing. In this space are formed a sequence of narrow openings, so called restrictors in which the liquid is brought to expansion, returning to gas form. These restrictors act also as bearings for the drum. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum is drawn off.

  14. Improved characterization of soil organic matter by thermal analysis using CO2/H2O evolved gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José M; Peltre, Clément; Craine, Joseph M; Plante, Alain F

    2012-08-21

    Simultaneous thermal analysis [i.e., thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)] is frequently used in materials science applications and is increasingly being used to study soil organic matter (SOM) stability. Yet, important questions remain, especially with respect to how the soil mineral matrix affects TG-DSC results, which could confound the interpretation of relationships between thermal and biogeochemical SOM stability. The objective of this study was to explore the viability of using infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) based CO(2)/H(2)O evolved gas analysis (EGA) as a supplement or alternative to TG-DSC to improve the characterization of SOM. Here, we subjected reference samples and a set of 28 diverse soil samples from across the U.S. to TG-DSC coupled with IRGA-based EGA. The results showed the technical validity of coupling TG-DSC and CO(2)-EGA, with more than 80% of the theoretically evolved CO(2)-C recovered during pure cellulose and CaCO(3) analysis. CO(2)-EGA and DSC thermal profiles were highly similar, with correlation coefficients generally >0.90. Additionally, CO(2)/H(2)O-EGA proved useful to improve the accuracy of baseline correction, detect the presence of CaCO(3) in soils, and identify SOM oxidative reactions normally hidden in DSC analysis by simultaneous endothermic reactions of soil minerals. Overall, this study demonstrated that IRGA-based CO(2)/H(2)O-EGA constitutes a valuable complement to conventional TG-DSC analysis for SOM characterization. PMID:22809165

  15. Multi-model Predictive System for Solubility of CH4 and H2S in Water at Shale Gas Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namhata, A.; Small, M.; Nakles, D. V.; Karamalidis, A.

    2013-12-01

    Technological advancements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing make extraction of natural gas from shale formations economically feasible. However, those activities may induce environmental risks associated with regional water quality due to migration of gases like CH4 and H2S through fractures and accidental spills. Thus, predicting the solubility of these gases in different aqueous conditions relevant to typical subsurface conditions is important. Nine models, including equations of state and empirical models, for predicting CH4 solubility in aqueous phases and six models for H2S are considered and evaluated. The goal of this study was to develop an integrated predictive system for each of these gases for a range of ionic strengths varying from freshwater, saline water and brine conditions over a temperature range of 298 - 483 K and a pressure range of 1 - 350 bars. The predictive accuracy of each model varies with different aqueous conditions. A variance - based weighted model is developed to predict the solubility of the two gases under different subsurface conditions (i.e., temperature, pressure and salt concentration (T-P-X)), and the performance of the weighted model is compared to the best fitting individual model in each case. Predicted and observed values are compared using a 5 - fold cross validation. Cases for which the weighted model outperforms the best predictive model for each of the two gases are identified and discussed. The modeling approach increases the predictive accuracy of CH4 and H2S solubility across the subsurface T-P-X conditions likely to be encountered at shale gas extraction sites.

  16. Sulfur Nanoparticles Synthesis and Characterization from H2S Gas, Using Novel Biodegradable Iron Chelates in W/O Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Aniruddha S.; Khomane, Ramdas B.; Vaidya, Bhalchandra K.; Joshi, Renuka M.; Harle, Arti S.; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D.

    2008-06-01

    Sulfur nanoparticles were synthesized from hazardous H2S gas using novel biodegradable iron chelates in w/o microemulsion system. Fe3+ malic acid chelate (0.05 M aqueous solution) was studied in w/o microemulsion containing cyclohexane, Triton X-100 and n-hexanol as oil phase, surfactant, co-surfactant, respectively, for catalytic oxidation of H2S gas at ambient conditions of temperature, pressure, and neutral pH. The structural features of sulfur nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), diffused reflectance infra-red Fourier transform technique, and BET surface area measurements. XRD analysis indicates the presence of α-sulfur. TEM analysis shows that the morphology of sulfur nanoparticles synthesized in w/o microemulsion system is nearly uniform in size (average particle size 10 nm) and narrow particle size distribution (in range of 5 15 nm) as compared to that in aqueous surfactant systems. The EDS analysis indicated high purity of sulfur (>99%). Moreover, sulfur nanoparticles synthesized in w/o microemulsion system exhibit higher antimicrobial activity (against bacteria, yeast, and fungi) than that of colloidal sulfur.

  17. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    DOEpatents

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  18. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with on-line cooling inlet for real-time monitoring H2S concentration in sewer gas.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-06-01

    Malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas often exists in the sewer system and associates with the problems of releasing the dangerous odor to the atmosphere and causing sewer pipe to be corroded. A simple method is in demand for real-time measuring H2S level in the sewer gas. In this paper, an innovated method based on dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DANP-IMS) with on-line semiconductor cooling inlet was put forward and successfully applied for the real-time measurement of H2S in sewer gas. The influence of moisture was effectively reduced via an on-line cooling method and a non-equilibrium dilution with drift gas. The limits of quantitation for the H2S in ≥60% relative humidity air could be obtained at ≤79.0ng L(-1) with linear ranges of 129-2064ng L(-1). The H2S concentration in a sewer manhole was successfully determined while its product ions were identified by an ion-mobility time-of-fight mass spectrometry. Finally, the correlation between sewer H2S concentration and the daily routines and habits of residents was investigated through hourly or real-time monitoring the variation of sewer H2S in manholes, indicating the power of this DANP-IMS method in assessing the H2S concentration in sewer system. PMID:27130121

  19. Integrated membrane systems for gas separation in biotechnology: potential and prospects.

    PubMed

    Teplyakov, V; Sostina, E; Beckman, I; Netrusov, A

    1996-09-01

    Integrated non-porous membrane systems were applied for microbial combustible gas separation processes. Methane/CO2 mixtures of various concentrations from methane fermentation processes (biogas) were separated using a membrane-separation complex of permabsorber type into individual components of technical grade (more than 95% purity). In experiments with three-component mixtures, using a selective membrane valve with various liquid carriers, all the gases of interest (H2, CH4 and CO2) were obtained at greater than 90% purity in one separation step. The perspectives for the further application of non-porous membrane separating devices for various gaseous mixtures from different microbial processes are discussed. PMID:24415378

  20. Four-port gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wynn, Nicholas P.; Fulton, Donald A.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    2010-07-20

    A gas-separation membrane assembly, and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly incorporates multiple gas-separation membranes in an array within a single vessel or housing, and is equipped with two permeate ports, enabling permeate gas to be withdrawn from both ends of the membrane module permeate pipes.

  1. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

    2013-05-28

    Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

  2. Reduction mechanism of high-chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite pellets by H2-CO-CO2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jue; Chu, Man-sheng; Li, Feng; Tang, Ya-ting; Liu, Zheng-gen; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of high-chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite as a typical titanomagnetite containing 0.95wt% V2O5 and 0.61wt% Cr2O3 by H2-CO-CO2 gas mixtures was investigated from 1223 to 1373 K. Both the reduction degree and reduction rate increase with increasing temperature and increasing hydrogen content. At a temperature of 1373 K, an H2/CO ratio of 5/2 by volume, and a reduction time of 40 min, the degree of reduction reaches 95%. The phase transformation during reduction is hypothesized to proceed as follows: Fe2O3 → Fe3O4 → FeO → Fe; Fe9TiO15 + Fe2Ti3O9 → Fe2.75Ti0.25O4 → FeTiO3 → TiO2; (Cr0.15V0.85)2O3 → Fe2VO4; and Cr1.3Fe0.7O3 → FeCr2O4. The reduction is controlled by the mixed internal diffusion and interfacial reaction at the initial stage; however, the interfacial reaction is dominant. As the reduction proceeds, the internal diffusion becomes the controlling step.

  3. Parameterization of a coupled CO2 and H2O gas exchange model at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G. F.; Li, X.; Su, Y. H.; Huang, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The following two models were combined to simultaneously predict CO2 and H2O gas exchange at the leaf scale of Populus euphratica: a Farquhar et al. type biochemical sub-model of photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and a Ball et al. type stomatal conductance sub-model (Ball et al., 1987). The photosynthesis parameters [including maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation rate (Vcmax), potential light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax), triose phosphate utilization (TPU) and day respiration (Rd)] were determined by using the genetic algorithm (GA) method based on A/Ci data. Values of Vcmax and Jmax standardized at 25 °C were 75.09±1.36 (mean ± standard error), 117.27±2.47, respectively. The stomatal conductance sub-model was calibrated independently. Prediction of net photosynthesis by the coupled model agreed well with the validation data, but the model tended to underestimate transpiration rates. Overall, the combined model generally captured the diurnal patterns of CO2 and H2O exchange resulting from variation in temperature and irradiation.

  4. Sensing Characteristics of Flame-Spray-Made Pt/ZnO Thick Films as H2 Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tamaekong, Nittaya; Liewhiran, Chaikarn; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Phanichphant, Sukon

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sensing of thick films of nanoparticles of pristine, 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 atomic percentage of Pt concentration doped ZnO were investigated. ZnO nanoparticles doped with 0.2–2.0 at.% Pt were successfully produced in a single step by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) technique using zinc naphthenate and platinum(II) acetylacetonate as precursors dissolved in xylene. The particle properties were analyzed by XRD, BET, SEM and TEM. Under the 5/5 (precursor/oxygen) flame condition, ZnO nanoparticles and nanorods were observed. The crystallite sizes of ZnO spheroidal and hexagonal particles were found to be ranging from 5 to 20 nm while ZnO nanorods were seen to be 5–20 nm wide and 20–40 nm long. ZnO nanoparticles paste composed of ethyl cellulose and terpineol as binder and solvent respectively was coated on Al2O3 substrate interdigitated with gold electrodes to form thin films by spin coating technique. The thin film morphology was analyzed by SEM technique. The gas sensing properties toward hydrogen (H2) was found that the 0.2 at.% Pt/ZnO sensing film showed an optimum H2 sensitivity of ∼164 at hydrogen concentration in air of 1 volume% at 300 °C and a low hydrogen detection limit of 50 ppm at 300 °C operating temperature. PMID:22399971

  5. Gas separation by adsorption in carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekhai, Anton; Gatica, Silvina

    Gas separation by adsorption can be accomplished by three basic physical mechanisms: equilibria, kinetics, and steric effects. Equilibrium mechanisms rely on the strength of attraction between gas molecules and their substrate. For example, CO2 possesses the strongest, attractive interactions with its substrate. As a result, the equilibrium mechanism presents the most plausible strategy to separate carbon dioxide from mixtures. The specification of a sound adsorbent is the key for separation by adsorption. In this paper we investigate carbon nanohrons for selectivity of carbon dioxide over methane. Carbon Nanohorns resemble short, wide, highly defected single-wall nanotubes that end in conical tips (``horns''). In contrast to regular nanotubes that assemble into parallel bundles, nanohorns form spherical aggregates with the nanohorns arranged along radial directions. Using the simulation technique Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) we obtained the adsorption isotherms of CH4 and CO2 in a 2D array of carbon nanohorns. We estimated the selectivity based on the IAST approximation. We also study the adsorption of argon and neon and compare with experimental results. We acknowledge support from the Partnership for Reduced Dimension Materials (PRDM), NSF Grant No. DMR1205608.

  6. Tunable composite membranes for gas separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1999-05-01

    The use of membrane technology for gas separations offers significant thermodynamic and economic advantages over distillation processes. Target separations of importance to the coal and energy fields include N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S/syngas and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}. Current strategies for improving these separations are largely directed towards processable polymers with thin (< 500 {angstrom}) skins. Unfortunately most polymeric materials that provide commercially viable permeation rates exhibit poor selectivities and vice versa and there are inherent limitations in gas permeability/permselectivity for pure polymers. The strategy relies on modification of composite membranes, preferably in situ, to enhance the permselectivity while maintaining acceptable permeabilities. The composites consist of electroactive polymers (which can be switched from rubbery to glassy), filled with selective absorbents (zeolites) which are impregnated with metals or catalysts to effect facilitated transport. The project is multifaceted and involves the efforts of a polymer synthesis group, a microporous materials group, a microscopy group and a permeability measurements group, all working in concert. This final report summarizes the results of the efforts on the project.

  7. Photoionization-induced water migration in the amide group of trans-acetanilide-(H2O)1 in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Kenji; Harada, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Yuiga; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-02-10

    IR-dip spectra of trans-acetanilide-water 1:1 cluster, AA-(H(2)O)(1), have been measured for the S(0) and D(0) state in the gas phase. Two structural isomers, where a water molecule binds to the NH group or the CO group of AA, AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) and AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1), are identified in the S(0) state. One-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization, (1 + 1) RE2PI, of AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) via the S(1)-S(0) origin generates [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+) in the D(0) state, however, photoionization of [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)] does not produce [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)](+), leading to [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+). This observation explicitly indicates that the water molecule in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+) migrates from the CO group to the NH group in the D(0) state. The reorganization of the charge distribution from the neutral to the D(0) state of AA induces the repulsive force between the water molecule and the CO group of AA(+), which is the trigger of the water migration in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+). PMID:21235222

  8. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2009-07-21

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  9. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  10. Centrifugal Liquid/Gas Separator With Phase Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Centrifugal liquid/gas separator that includes phase (liquid or gas) detectors helps ensure exclusiveness of each phase at its assigned outlet. Acoustic sensors in centrifugal liquid/gas separator measure speeds of sound in nominally pure liquid and nominally pure gas at liquid and gas outlets respectively. When speed of sound is that of pure liquid or gas, valve opens to let liquid or gas flow out.

  11. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  12. CO 2 and H 2O gas exchange of a triticale field: I. Leaf level porometry and upscaling to canopy level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, J.; Lösch, R.; Meixner, F. X.; Ammann, C.

    1996-05-01

    Within the frame of an extended field experiment the CO 2 and H 2O gas exchange between a triticale field and the atmosphere was measured during the period between heading and harvest in the summer of 1995. Diurnal courses of H 2O loss, CO 2 gain and leaf conductance were obtained together with microclimatic parameters for leaves of different insertion levels. Patterns of dependence of leaf gas exchange on microclimatic conditions were determined. Based on the results of porometric measurements and crop structural parameters (LAI) gas exchange was scaled up to canopy level.

  13. Production and characterization of thin a-C:(H) films for gas permeation barrier functionality against He, CO(2), N(2), O(2) and H(2)O.

    PubMed

    Laidani, N; Bartali, R; Gottardi, G; Anderle, M; Chuste, G; Bellachioma, C

    2006-07-01

    This work reports on (i) the gas barrier properties of a-C:H films rf-sputtered in Ar-H(2) plasmas from a graphite target on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and (ii) the influence of the film chemical structure and defect properties on the gas permeability. The intrinsic permeabilities of the films to He, CO(2), O(2), N(2) gases and H(2)O vapour were determined and found to be orders of magnitude lower than that of the bare PET. Indirect evidence was given to a solubility-diffusion process as the more probable permeation mechanism, over a gas flow through microdefects or gas transport through nanodefects by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The barrier capability of the films was found to scale as the gas molecular diameter within the He, CO(2), O(2) and N(2) series, and inversely with the gas critical temperature for the CO(2), O(2), N(2) and H(2)O series. A correlation between the film Urbach energy, E(u), and the gas permeability was established, except for H(2)O. Such findings further favour a bulk diffusion contributing mechanism to permeation over the gas state transport. Conversely, this E(u)-permeability relation shed more light on the origin of the valence band tailing of the amorphous carbon electron structure. PMID:21690810

  14. Production and characterization of thin a-C:(H) films for gas permeation barrier functionality against He, CO2, N2, O2 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Gottardi, G.; Anderle, M.; Chuste, G.; Bellachioma, C.

    2006-07-01

    This work reports on (i) the gas barrier properties of a-C:H films rf-sputtered in Ar-H2 plasmas from a graphite target on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and (ii) the influence of the film chemical structure and defect properties on the gas permeability. The intrinsic permeabilities of the films to He, CO2, O2, N2 gases and H2O vapour were determined and found to be orders of magnitude lower than that of the bare PET. Indirect evidence was given to a solubility-diffusion process as the more probable permeation mechanism, over a gas flow through microdefects or gas transport through nanodefects by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The barrier capability of the films was found to scale as the gas molecular diameter within the He, CO2, O2 and N2 series, and inversely with the gas critical temperature for the CO2, O2, N2 and H2O series. A correlation between the film Urbach energy, Eu, and the gas permeability was established, except for H2O. Such findings further favour a bulk diffusion contributing mechanism to permeation over the gas state transport. Conversely, this Eu-permeability relation shed more light on the origin of the valence band tailing of the amorphous carbon electron structure.

  15. Separative recovery with lime of phosphate and fluoride from an acidic effluent containing H3PO4, HF and/or H2SiF6.

    PubMed

    Gouider, Mbarka; Feki, Mongi; Sayadi, Sami

    2009-10-30

    Fluoride content and flow-rate of fertilizer plant wastewater from phosphoric acid and/or triple superphosphate (TSP) production lead to the discharge of several thousand tons of fluoride (F(-)) per year and even more for phosphate (PO4(3-)). Since sustainability is an important environmental concern, the removal methods should allow phosphorus and fluoride to be recycled as a sustainable products for use as raw materials either in agricultural or industrial applications. In the present work, separative recovery with lime of these two target species was investigated. A preliminary speciation study, carried out on the crude effluent, showed that two forms of fluoride: HF and H2SiF6 are present in a highly acidic medium (pH approximately 2). Evidence that fluoride is present under both free (HF) and combined (H2SiF6) forms, in the phosphate-containing effluent, was provided by comparing potentiometric titration curves of a crude wastewater sample and synthetic acid mixtures containing H3PO4, HF and H2SiF6. In a second step synthetic effluent containing mixtures of the following acids: HF, H2SiF6 and H3PO4, were treated with lime. The behaviour of these compounds under lime treatment was analysed. The data showed that fluoride has a beneficial effect on phosphate removal. Moreover, by acting on the precipitation pH, a "selective" recovery of fluoride and phosphate ions was possible either from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid or phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixtures. Indeed, the first stage of the separative recovery, led to a fluoride removal efficiency of 97-98% from phosphoric acid/hydrofluoric acid mixture. It was of 93-95% from phosphoric acid/hexafluorosilicic acid mixture. During the second stage, the phosphate precipitation reached 99.8% from both acidic mixtures whereas it did not exceed 82% from a solution containing H3PO4 alone. The XRD and IR analyses showed that during lime treatment, a H2SiF6 hydrolysis occurred, instead of CaSiF6 solid

  16. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1999-01-01

    Poly 2-(3-thienyl)ethylacetate (PAET) was synthesized and solution cast as thin films to form dense membranes. These membranes are mechanically robust and are redox active, holding out promise as gas separation materials. The permeability properties of PAET membranes were evaluated for N{sub 2} (0.048 {+-} 0.008 Barrers), O{sub 2} (0.24 {+-} 0.02 Barrers), CH{sub 4} (0.081 {+-} 0.005 Barrers), and CO{sub 2} (1.4 {+-} 0.1 Barrers). The corresponding selectivity values ({alpha}) were: O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 5.1, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 29, and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} = 18.

  17. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  18. Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources: H2S as a Probe of Dense Gas and Possibly Hidden Luminosity Toward the Orion KL Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H2S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H2 32S, H2 34S, and H2 33S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H2S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T rot = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H2S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E up >~ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N tot(H2 32S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 1017 cm-2, gas kinetic temperature, T kin = 120+/- ^{13}_{10} K, and constrain the H2 volume density, n_H_2 >~ 9 × 10 7 cm-3, for the H2S emitting gas. These results point to an H2S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H2S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H2S of <4.9 × 10 -3. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. Descriptions of the neutral gas outflow in Comets P/Halley and Wilson (1987 VII) from analyses of velocity-resolved H2O line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.; Hu, Hong-Yao; Hsieh, K. C.; Weaver, Harold A.; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution and expansion velocity of the Comets Wilson (1987 VII) and pre- and postperihelion P/Halley are derived on the bases of velocity-resolved H2O spectral line profiles, using a kinematic model which synthesizes line profiles for comparison with observed line shapes. The results thus obtained demonstrate that the spherically symmetric outflow at constant velocity is a poor characterization of cometary neutral-gas outflow. While the radial dependence of the H2O expansion velocity is noted to be consistent with theoretically envisioned trends, the high H2O outflow velocity observed in Comet Wilson resists reconciliation with any existing kinematic model.

  20. Gas separation with glass membranes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

    1992-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual ``molecular sieving`` behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000{degrees}F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H{sub 2}/CO,N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

  1. Gas-liquid separator and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Whitt, David Brandon

    2009-07-14

    A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

  2. Measurements of Flow Distortion within the IRGASON Integrated Sonic Anemometer and CO_2/H_2O Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    Wind-tunnel and field measurements are analyzed to investigate flow distortion within the IRGASON integrated sonic anemometer and CO_2/H_2O gas analyzer as a function of wind speed, wind direction and attack angle. The wind-tunnel measurements are complimentary to the field measurements, and the dependence of the wind-tunnel mean-wind-component flow-distortion errors on wind direction agrees well with that of the field measurements. The field measurements exhibit significant overestimation of the crosswind variance and underestimation of the momentum flux with respect to an adjacent CSAT3 sonic, as well as a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy from the streamwise wind component to the cross-stream wind components. In contrast, we find attenuation of only a few percent in the vertical velocity variance and the vertical flux of sonic temperature. The attenuation of the fluxes appears to be caused to a large extent by decorrelation between the horizontal and vertical-velocity components and between the vertical velocity and sonic temperature. Additional flow distortion due to transducer shadowing reduces to some extent the overestimation, but also increases the underestimation of the IRGASON turbulence statistics.

  3. Measurements of Flow Distortion within the IRGASON Integrated Sonic Anemometer and CO_2 /H_2 O Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    Wind-tunnel and field measurements are analyzed to investigate flow distortion within the IRGASON integrated sonic anemometer and CO_2 /H_2 O gas analyzer as a function of wind speed, wind direction and attack angle. The wind-tunnel measurements are complimentary to the field measurements, and the dependence of the wind-tunnel mean-wind-component flow-distortion errors on wind direction agrees well with that of the field measurements. The field measurements exhibit significant overestimation of the crosswind variance and underestimation of the momentum flux with respect to an adjacent CSAT3 sonic, as well as a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy from the streamwise wind component to the cross-stream wind components. In contrast, we find attenuation of only a few percent in the vertical velocity variance and the vertical flux of sonic temperature. The attenuation of the fluxes appears to be caused to a large extent by decorrelation between the horizontal and vertical-velocity components and between the vertical velocity and sonic temperature. Additional flow distortion due to transducer shadowing reduces to some extent the overestimation, but also increases the underestimation of the IRGASON turbulence statistics.

  4. Kinetics of thermal reaction HOCl ⇄ H(2 S) + OCl( X 2Π i ) in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begović, N.; Marković, Z.; Anić, S.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of gas reaction HOCl\\underset{{k_r }}{overset{{k_f }}{longleftrightarrow}}H(^2 S) + OCl(X^2 Pi _i ) was analyzed by the MP4 method. In the temperature range of 100-373 K the rate constants k f and k r and equilibrium constant K were changed from 1.10 × 10-220 to 1.17 × 10-52 s-1, from 2.89 × 10-16 to 1.68 × 10-5s-1 and from 3.80 × 10-205 to 6.96 × 10-48 respectively. In the above temperature range, the activation energy of the forward reaction ( E f) is 105.05 kcal/mol. In the same temperature interval there are two kinetic domains for the reverse reaction with activation energies ( E r1 = 5.53 kcal/mol when T is 100-273 K and E r2 = 14.50 kcal/mol when T is 273-373 K, respectively.

  5. Optimisation of the Fischer-Tropsch process using zeolites for tail gas separation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Carbajo, J; Gómez-Álvarez, P; Bueno-Perez, R; Merkling, P J; Calero, S

    2014-03-28

    This work is aimed at optimizing a Fischer-Tropsch Gas To Liquid (GTL) process by recycling compounds of the expelled gas mixture using zeolites for the separation. To that end, we have performed a computational study on four structures widely used in industry. A range of Si/Al ratios have been explored and the effects of their distribution assessed. The ability of the considered force fields and molecular models to reproduce experimental results has been widely proved in previously reported studies. Since this tail gas is formed by a five-component mixture, namely carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and hydrogen, molecular simulations present clear advantages over experiments. In addition, the viability of the Ideal Adsorption Solution Theory (IAST) has been evaluated to easily handle further separation steps. On the basis of the obtained results, we provide a separation scheme to perform sequentially the separation of CO2, CH4, CO, N2 and H2. PMID:24522290

  6. Ortho-to-para Ratio Studies of Shocked H2 Gas in the Two Supernova Remnants IC 443 and HB 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2012-11-01

    We present near-infrared (2.5-5.0 μm) spectral studies of shocked H2 gas in two supernova remnants, IC 443 and HB 21, which are well known for their interactions with nearby molecular clouds. The observations were performed with the Infrared Camera aboard the AKARI satellite. At the energy range 7000 K lsim E(\\upsilon,J) lsim 20,000 K, the shocked H2 gas in IC 443 shows an ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 2.4+0.3 - 0.2, which is significantly lower than the equilibrium value 3, suggesting the existence of non-equilibrium OPR. The shocked gas in HB 21 also indicates a potential non-equilibrium OPR in the range of 1.8-2.0. The level populations are well described by the power-law thermal admixture model with a single OPR, where the temperature integration range is 1000-4000 K. We conclude that the obtained non-equilibrium OPR probably originates from the reformed H2 gas of dissociative J-shocks, considering several factors such as the shock combination requirement, the line ratios, and the possibility that H2 gas can form on grains with a non-equilibrium OPR. We also investigate C-shocks and partially dissociative J-shocks as the origin of the non-equilibrium OPR. However, we find that they are incompatible with the observed ionic emission lines for which dissociative J-shocks are required to explain. The difference in the collision energy of H atoms on grain surfaces would give rise to the observed difference between the OPRs of IC 443 and HB 21, if dissociative J-shocks are responsible for the H2 emission. Our study suggests that dissociative J-shocks can produce shocked H2 gas with a non-equilibrium OPR.

  7. Indium-tin oxide thin films deposited at room temperature on glass and PET substrates: Optical and electrical properties variation with the H2-Ar sputtering gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Fraga, L.; Jiménez-Villacorta, F.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; de Andrés, A.; Prieto, C.

    2015-07-01

    The optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited at room temperature on glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates were investigated. A clear evolution of optical transparency and sheet resistance with the content of H2 in the gas mixture of H2 and Ar during magnetron sputtering deposition is observed. An optimized performance of the transparent conductive properties ITO films on PET was achieved for samples prepared using H2/(Ar + H2) ratio in the range of 0.3-0.6%. Moreover, flexible ITO-PET samples show a better transparent conductive figure of merit, ΦTC = T10/RS, than their glass counterparts. These results provide valuable insight into the room temperature fabrication and development of transparent conductive ITO-based flexible devices.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of WO3·H2O with different nanostructures from 0D to 3D and their gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yangchun; Zeng, Wen; Xu, Mengxue; Peng, Xianghe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, WO3·H2O with different nanostructures from 0D to 3D were successfully synthesized via a simple yet cost-effective hydrothermal method with the assistance of surfactants. The structures and morphologies of products were investigated by XRD and SEM. Besides, we systematically explained the evolution process and formation mechanisms of different WO3·H2O morphologies. It is noted that both the kinds and amounts of surfactants strongly affect the formation of WO3·H2O crystals, as reflected in the tailoring of WO3·H2O morphologies. Furthermore, the gas sensing performance of the as-prepared samples towards methanol was also investigated. 3D flower-like hierarchical architecture displayed outstanding response to target gas among the four samples. We hoped our results could be of great benefit to further investigations of synthesizing different dimensional WO3·H2O nanostructures and their gas sensing applications.

  9. Mathematical modeling of synthesis gas fueled electrochemistry and transport including H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-10-01

    Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). A comprehensive macroscopic framework is proposed for synthesis gas (syngas) fueled electrochemistry and transport in SOFC anode with two main novelties, i.e. analytical H2/CO electrochemical co-oxidation, and correction of gas species concentration at triple phase boundary considering competitive absorption and surface diffusion. Staring from analytical approximation of the decoupled charge and mass transfer, we present analytical solutions of two defined variables, i.e. hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor. Giving explicit answer (rather than case-by-case numerical calculation) on how many percent of the current output contributed by H2 or CO and on how great the water gas shift reaction plays role on, this approach establishes at the first time an adaptive superposition mechanism of H2-fuel and CO-fuel electrochemistry for syngas fuel. Based on the diffusion equivalent circuit model, assuming series-connected resistances of surface diffusion and bulk diffusion, the model predicts well at high fuel utilization by keeping fixed porosity/tortuosity ratio. The model has been validated by experimental polarization behaviors in a wide range of operation on a button cell for H2-H2O-CO-CO2-N2 fuel systems. The framework could be helpful to narrow the gap between macro-scale and meso-scale SOFC modeling.

  10. Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.A.; Lilga, M.A.

    1986-12-01

    A system was investigated that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the hydrogenation of ketones. Such a catalyst, if used in a membrane containing an alcohol solvent, might be of use in selective H/sub 2/ separation from gas mixtures. The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol and 2-octanol were studied using a RhCl/sub 3//SnCl/sub 2//LiCl catalyst system. These alcohols are dehydrogenated at rates that are initially rapid, but which gradually slow to a stop. The decrease in rate of H/sub 2/ evolution is a result of the establishment of an equilibrium between the alcohol and the liberated hydrogen and ketone. At 150/sup 0/C, cyclohexanol has the fastest rate of dehydrogenation. Several dehydrogenation/hydrogenation cycles have been carried out using this alcohol over a period of one week without serious catalyst deactivation or side reactions. Initial tests of the catalyst dissolved in cyclohexanol within two membranes were inconclusive. An anion exchange membrane was not suitably wetted by the catalyst solution and Celgard/sup TM/, which was wetted, could not be kept wet at 150/sup 0/C under flow conditions in the membrane cell. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of mixed matrix membranes for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfeng

    2007-12-01

    Mixed-matrix membranes were prepared from Matrimid RTM and mesoporous ZSM-5 nanoparticles containing crystalline ZSM-5. The mesoporous ZSM-5 has both micropores (0.54 nm) and mesopores (2.7 nm), which were confirmed by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, and TEM. The Young's moduli and glass transition temperatures of mixed-matrix membranes are higher than those of pure MatrimidRTM membranes, suggesting that the polymer chains may penetrate into the mesopores. The ideal selectivity for H2/N2 separation increased from 79.6 for pure Matrimid RTM to 143 at 10% loading, while the selectivity of O2/N 2 increased from 6.6 for pure MatrimidRTM to 10.4 at 20% loading. The ideal H2/CH4 separation factor increased from 83.3 to 169 at 20% loading. The results suggest that the mesopores of the ZSM-5 material can provide good interfacial contact between the nanoparticles and the polymer, since the polymer chains can penetrate into the mesopores. The micropores of ZSM-5 crystals can provide size and shape selectivity. A carbon aerogel was prepared by carbonizing a resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer gel at 800°C. Nitrogen adsorption shows the obtained carbon aerogel has both micropores (0.54 nm) and mesopores (2.14 nm). Zeolite A and zeolite Y nanocrystals were grown in the mesopores of the carbon aerogel, resulting in carbon aerogel-zeolite composites. TEM confirmed the existence of nanosize zeolite crystals in the carbon aerogel matrix. Higher selectivity for the CO2/CH4, O2/N2 and H2/N 2 separation were obtained for carbon aerogel-zeolite, carbon aerogel-zeolite-Matrimid RTM membranes. The small pore diameter of zeolite A and the affinity between the CO2 and zeolite crystals make it perfect for CO 2/CH4 separation. Short single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) functionalized with carboxylic acid groups were made and incorporated into MatrimidRTM to form mixed-matrix membranes. SEM images of mixed-matrix membranes cross-sections showed good dispersion and interfacial contact. Pure gas

  12. Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for HI/H2O/I2 Water Separation for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2005-09-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and I2 mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, Nafion® membranes have been studied for their use as de-watering membranes. Specifically, two thicknesses of Nafion membranes have been found to be effective in this application. The thicker membrane, Nafion-117®, produces moderate fluxes of water with very high separation factors. On the other hand, the thinner membrane, Nafion-112®, yielded very large fluxes of water, however with smaller separation factors. All membranes were found to be durable and did not degrade in contact with the feed stream over periods of time up to three months.

  13. Calculating CO2 and H2O eddy covariance fluxes from an enclosed gas analyzer using an instantaneous mixing ratio 2159

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eddy covariance flux research has relied on open- or closed-path gas analyzers for producing estimates of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O). The two instruments have had different challenges that have led to development of an enclosed design that is intended to max...

  14. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOEpatents

    Henning, Carl D.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  15. H2 Detection via Polarography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Barile, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H ions or protons; H ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic O2 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic O2 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  16. Tunable Composite Membranes for Gas Separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solution cast membranes of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (PDDT) were studied for the room temperature separation of N{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}, and C0{sub 2} procedure for fabricating reproducible, smooth, uniformly thick (-35-pm), defect-free membranes was established. Permeability values were measured for as-cast PDDT membranes (PO{sub 2} = 9.4, PN{sub 2} = 20.2, PCO{sub 2} = 88. 2 Barrers) and selectivity values were calculated (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.2, XC0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 9.4). Chemically induced doping (-23%) with SbCI5 resulte in a decrease in permeability (PN{sub 2} = 3.5, P0{sub 2} =10.5, PCO{sub 2} = 48.5 Barrers) and a corresponding increase in permselectivity (X 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 0, (xCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =14.0)). Membrane undoping with hydrazine partially reversed these trends (PN{sub 2} = 5.4, P0{sub 2} = 15.1, PCO{sub 2} = 62.9 Barrers), (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.8), (XCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =I 1. 6). The chemical composition cast, doped, and undoped PDDT membranes were determined using elemental analysis and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Membrane microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy, TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The composition and microscopy results were correlated with changes in gas-transport properties. Two papers were presented at the Meeting of the North American Membranes Society, (June 2-4,1997, Baltimore, MD).

  17. The CO-to-H2 Conversion Factor and Dust-to-gas Ratio on Kiloparsec Scales in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, K. M.; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.; Bolatto, A. D.; Croxall, K. V.; Draine, B. T.; Wilson, C. D.; Wolfire, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Aniano, G.; Donovan Meyer, J.; Usero, A.; Bigiel, F.; Brinks, E.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Crocker, A.; Dale, D.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Galametz, M.; Groves, B.; Hunt, L. K.; Koda, J.; Kreckel, K.; Linz, H.; Meidt, S.; Pellegrini, E.; Rix, H.-W.; Roussel, H.; Schinnerer, E.; Schruba, A.; Schuster, K.-F.; Skibba, R.; van der Laan, T.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Brandl, B.; Gordon, K.; Hinz, J.; Krause, O.; Montiel, E.; Sauvage, M.; Schmiedeke, A.; Smith, J. D. T.; Vigroux, L.

    2013-11-01

    We present ~kiloparsec spatial resolution maps of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor (αCO) and dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) in 26 nearby, star-forming galaxies. We have simultaneously solved for αCO and the DGR by assuming that the DGR is approximately constant on kiloparsec scales. With this assumption, we can combine maps of dust mass surface density, CO-integrated intensity, and H I column density to solve for both αCO and the DGR with no assumptions about their value or dependence on metallicity or other parameters. Such a study has just become possible with the availability of high-resolution far-IR maps from the Herschel key program KINGFISH, 12CO J = (2-1) maps from the IRAM 30 m large program HERACLES, and H I 21 cm line maps from THINGS. We use a fixed ratio between the (2-1) and (1-0) lines to present our αCO results on the more typically used 12CO J = (1-0) scale and show using literature measurements that variations in the line ratio do not affect our results. In total, we derive 782 individual solutions for αCO and the DGR. On average, αCO = 3.1 M ⊙ pc-2 (K km s-1)-1 for our sample with a standard deviation of 0.3 dex. Within galaxies, we observe a generally flat profile of αCO as a function of galactocentric radius. However, most galaxies exhibit a lower αCO value in the central kiloparsec—a factor of ~2 below the galaxy mean, on average. In some cases, the central αCO value can be factors of 5-10 below the standard Milky Way (MW) value of αCO, MW = 4.4 M ⊙ pc-2 (K km s-1)-1. While for αCO we find only weak correlations with metallicity, the DGR is well-correlated with metallicity, with an approximately linear slope. Finally, we present several recommendations for choosing an appropriate αCO for studies of nearby galaxies.

  18. An Experimental Study of Atmospheric Homogeneous Nucleation: Cluster Growth and Gas-Particle Reactions of H2SO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    1996-01-01

    The work proposed on this project included both field and laboratory studies. The laboratory studies were to consist of measurements of H2SO4 uptake and evaporation from aerosols of varying chemical composition, while the field component would include measurements of H2SO4 and other compounds which would be conducted as part of a large field campaign. By chance, the opportunity to conduct such an H2SO4/aerosol/ultrafine particle study in conjunction with an OH intercomparison/photochemistry study became available very early in this project (September 1993). This study was conducted at Caribou, Colorado in conjunction with several other groups from NCAR, NOAA and a number of universities. Our group measured OH, H2SO4, SO2, and H20, while Dr. McMurfy's group measured ultrafine particles, and total particle number and size distribution. In addition measurements of HO2/RO2, O3, NO, NO2, NO(y) CO, hydrocarbons, CH2O, and other chemical compounds and meteorological parameters were performed by the other participants and a new laser oblation/mass spectrometry technique was also employed by the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory to study aerosol composition. The study of aerosol production and growth in conjunction with photochemical measurements is highly advantageous because particle growth precursors such as H2SO4.or MSA are formed by OH initiated sulfur oxidation. The large number of hydrocarbon measurements included in this study were also important in understanding particle growth.

  19. Effect of Ionization on Infrared and Electronic Absorption Spectra of Methyl and Ethyl Formate in the Gas Phase and in Astrophysical H2O Ice: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganathappa, Mahadevappa; Chaudhari, Ajay

    2011-04-01

    This work reports infrared and electronic absorption spectra of trans and gauche conformers of neutral ethyl formate, trans and cis conformers of neutral methyl formate, their ions in the gas phase, and neutral ethyl and methyl formate in astrophysical H2O ice. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) method with TZVP basis set has been used to obtain ground-state geometries. An influence of ice on vibrational frequencies of neutral ethyl and methyl formate was obtained using integral equation formalism polarizable continnum model (IEFPCM). Significant shift in vibrational frequencies for neutral methyl and ethyl formate when studied in H2O ice and upon ionization is observed. Rotational and distortion constants for neutral ethyl and methyl formate from this work are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. Electronic absorption spectra of conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions are obtained using time-dependent density functional method (TDDFT). The nature of electronic transitions is also identified. We suggested lines especially good to detect these molecules in interstellar medium. Using these lines, we can identify the conformers of ethyl and methyl formate in gas phase and H2O ice in interstellar medium. This comparative study should provide useful guidelines to detect conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions in gas phase and neutral molecules in H2O ice in different astronomical environment.

  20. CO/H2, C/CO, OH/CO, and OH/O2 in dense interstellar gas: from high ionization to low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-07-01

    We present numerical computations and analytic scaling relations for interstellar ion-molecule gas-phase chemistry down to very low metallicities (10-3 × solar), and/or up to high driving ionization rates. Relevant environments include the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, early enriched clouds at the reionization and Pop-II star formation era, and in dense cold gas exposed to intense X-ray or cosmic ray sources. We focus on the behaviour for H2, CO, CH, OH, H2O and O2, at gas temperatures ˜100 K, characteristic of a cooled ISM at low metallicities. We consider shielded or partially shielded one-zone gas parcels, and solve the gas-phase chemical rate equations for the steady-state `metal-molecule abundances for a wide range of ionization parameters, ζ/n, and metallicties, Z '. We find that the OH abundances are always maximal near the H-to-H2 conversion points, and that large OH abundances persist at very low metallicities even when the hydrogen is predominantly atomic. We study the OH/O2, C/CO and OH/CO abundance ratios, from large to small, as functions of ζ/n and Z '. Much of the cold dense ISM for the Pop-II generation may have been OH-dominated and atomic rather than CO-dominated and molecular.

  1. Effects of different petal thickness on gas sensing properties of flower-like WO3·H2O hierarchical architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wen; Zhang, He; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-08-01

    Hierarchical architectures consisting of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures are of great interest for potential use in recent year. Here, we report the successful synthesis of four hierarchical tungsten oxide flower-like architectures via a simple yet facile hydrothermal method. The as-prepared WO3·H2O hierarchical architectures are in fact assembled with numerous nanosheets or nanoplates. Through a comprehensive characterization of microstructures and morphologies of the as-prepared products, we find that petal thickness is a key factor for affecting gas-sensing performances. We further propose a possible growth mechanism for the four flower-like architectures. Moreover, gas-sensing measurements showed that the well-defined sheet-flower WO3·H2O hierarchical architectures exhibited the excellent gas-sensing properties to ethanol owing to their largest amount of thin petal structures and pores.

  2. Two-dimensional simulations of a VHF H2 plasma for different discharge gaps and gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Ogiwara, Kohei; Chiu, Kuo-Feng; Su, Li-Wen; Uchino, Kiichiro; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional simulation on a VHF H2 plasma (60 MHz) was performed using the plasma hybrid code, and plasma parameters were examined as a function of pressure for different discharge gaps. It was found that as the pressure increased, the H3 + and H+ densities as well as the electron density had a maximum at a certain pressure, and the maximum shifted to high pressures as the discharge gap decreased. On the other hand, the H2 + density decreased with the increase in pressure, independent of the discharge gap. The axial profiles of the H+, H2 +, and H3 + densities showed that dominant ions were H3 + in our pressure range.

  3. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  4. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  5. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.

    1991-12-31

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  6. Why do the HIghMass Galaxies Have so Much Gas?: Studying Massive, Gas-Rich Galaxies at z~0 with Resolved HI and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; HIghMass Team

    2016-01-01

    In the standard ΛCDM cosmology, galaxies form via mergers of many smaller dark matter halos. Because mergers drive star formation, the most massive galaxies should also be the ones which have been the most efficient at converting their gas reservoirs into stars. This trend is seen observationally: in general, as stellar mass increases, gas fraction (GF = MHI/M*) decreases. Galaxies which have large reservoirs of atomic hydrogen (HI) are thus expected to be extremely rare, which was seemingly supported by earlier blind HI surveys.In seeming contradiction, ALFALFA, the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey has observed a sample of 34 galaxies which are both massive (MHI>1010 M⊙) and have unusually high gas fractions (all ≥ 0.3; half are > 1). We call this sample HighMass. Unlike other extremely HI-massive samples, such galaxies are neither low surface brightness galaxies nor are they simply "scaled up" spirals. Could this gas be recently acquired, either from accreting small companions or directly from the cosmic web? Or is it primordial, and has been kept from forming stars, possibly because of an unusually high dark matter halo spin parameter?We present resolved HI, H2, and star formation properties of three of these HIghMass galaxies, and compare them with two HIghMass galaxies previously discussed in Hallenbeck et al. (2014). One of these galaxies, UGC 6168, appears in the process of transitioning from a quiescent to star-forming phase, as indicated by its bar and potential non-circular flows. A second, UGC 7899, has a clear warp, which could be evidence of recently accreted gas—but the presence of a warp is far from conclusive evidence. Both have moderately high dark matter halo spin parameters (λ' = 0.09), similar to the previously studied UGC 9037. The third, NGC 5230, looks undisturbed both optically and in its radio emission, but is in a group full of extragalactic gas. A neighboring galaxy has been significantly disrupted, and NGC 5230 may be in the

  7. Separation of gas mixtures by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Love, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) centrifuge utilizing electric currents and magnetic fields produces a magnetic force which develops supersonic rotational velocities in gas mixtures. Device is superior to ordinary centrifuges because rotation of gas mixture is produced by MHD force rather than mechanical means.

  8. Self-Assembled Multimetallic/Peptide Complexes: Structures and Unimolecular Reactions of [Mn (GlyGly-H)2n-1 ](+) and Mn+1 (GlyGly-H2n ](2+) Clusters in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maryam B; Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Fridgen, Travis D

    2015-10-26

    The unimolecular chemistry and structures of self-assembled complexes containing multiple alkaline-earth-metal dications and deprotonated GlyGly ligands are investigated. Singly and doubly charged ions [Mn (GlyGly-H)n-1 ](+) (n=2-4), [Mn+1 (GlyGly-H)2n ](2+) (n=2,4,6), and [M(GlyGly-H)GlyGly](+) were observed. The losses of 132 Da (GlyGly) and 57 Da (determined to be aminoketene) were the major dissociation pathways for singly charged ions. Doubly charged Mg(2+) clusters mainly lost GlyGly, whereas those containing Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) also underwent charge separation. Except for charge separation, no loss of metal cations was observed. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were the most consistent with the computed IR spectra for the lowest energy structures, in which deprotonation occurs at the carboxyl acid groups and all amide and carboxylate oxygen atoms are complexed to the metal cations. The N-H stretch band, observed at 3350 cm(-1) , is indicative of hydrogen bonding between the amine nitrogen atoms and the amide hydrogen atom. This study represents the first into large self-assembled multimetallic complexes bound by peptide ligands. PMID:26279054

  9. Influence of CuO catalyst in the nanoscale range on SnO2 surface for H2S gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vinay; Mozumdar, S.; Chowdhuri, Arijit; Sreenivas, K.

    2005-10-01

    The dispersal of CuO catalyst on the surface of the semiconducting SnO_{2} film is found to be of vital importance for improving the sensitivity and the response speed of a SnO_{2} gas sensor for H_{2}S gas detection. Ultra-thin CuO islands (8 nm thin and 0.6 mm diameter) prepared by evaporating Cu through a mesh and subsequent oxidation yield a fast response speed and recovery. Ultimately nanoparticles of Cu (average size = 15 nm) prepared by a chemical technique using a reverse micelle method involving the reduction of Cu(NO_{3})_{2} by NaBH_{4} exhibited significant improvement in the gas sensing characteristics of SnO_{2} films. A fast response speed of sim 14 s and a recovery time of sim60 s for trace level sim20 ppm H_{2}S gas detection have been recorded. The sensor operating temperature (130^{circ}C) is low and the sensitivity (S=2.06 times 10^{3}) is high. It is found that the spreading over of CuO catalyst in the nanoscale range on the surface of SnO_{2} allows effective removal of excess adsorbed oxygen from the uncovered SnO_{2} surface due to spill over of hydrogen dissociated from the H_{2}S-CuO interaction.

  10. The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, George J.; Freeman, Craig M.

    2014-04-01

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  11. The RealGas and RealGasH2O Options of the TOUGH+ Code for the Simulation of Coupled Fluid and Heat Flow in Tight/Shale Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George; Freeman, Craig

    2013-09-30

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas . The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include: coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  12. Molecular dynamics investigation of separation of hydrogen sulfide from acidic gas mixtures inside metal-doped graphite micropores.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2015-09-21

    The separation of poisonous compounds from various process fluids has long been highly intractable, motivating the present study on the dynamic separation of H2S in acidic-gas-mixture-filled micropores. The molecular dynamics approach, coupled with the isothermal-isochoric ensemble, was used to model the molecular interactions and adsorption of H2S/CO2/CO/H2O mixtures inside metal-doped graphite slits. Due to the difference in the adsorption characteristics between the two distinct adsorbent materials, the metal dopant in the graphitic micropores leads to competitive adsorption, i.e. the Au and graphite walls compete to capture free adsorbates. The effects of competitive adsorption, coupled with changes in the gas temperature, concentration, constituent ratio and slit width on the constituent separation of mixtures were systematically studied. The molecule-wall binding energies calculated in this work (those of H2S, H2O and CO on Au walls and those of H2O, CO and CO2 on graphite walls) show good agreement with those obtained using density functional theory (DFT) and experimental results. The z-directional self-diffusivities (Dz) for adsorbates inside the slit ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) m(2) s(-1) as the temperature was increased from 10 to 500 K. The values are comparable with those for a typical microporous fluid (10(-8)-10(-9) m(2) s(-1) in a condensed phase and 10(-6)-10(-7) m(2) s(-1) in the gaseous state). The formation of H-bonding networks and hydrates of H2S is disadvantageous for the separation of mixtures. The results indicate that H2S can be efficiently separated from acidic gas mixtures onto the Au(111) surface by (i) reducing the mole fraction of H2S and H2O in the mixtures, (ii) raising the gas temperature to the high temperature limit (≥400 K), and (iii) lowering the slit width to below the threshold dimension (≤23.26 Å). PMID:26256825

  13. Fe isotope fractionation during phase separation in the NaCl-H2O system: An experimental study with implications for seafloor hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverson, Drew D.; Pester, Nicholas J.; Craddock, Paul R.; Seyfried, William E.

    2014-11-01

    Phase separation has been proposed as a possible mechanism contributing to the Fe isotope composition of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges. The uncertainty results largely from the emphasis on field data that can involve competing processes that obscure cause and effect of any one process. To better understand the potential significance of phase separation in the NaCl-Fe-H2O system on Fe isotope fractionation, temperature and pressure of a Fe-bearing NaCl fluid in a titanium flow reactor were carefully adjusted to produce vapor ± liquid ± halite, while the Fe isotope composition between coexisting phases was monitored. Two different P-T regions were emphasized: (1) 424-420 °C, 35.2-31.5 MPa; and (2) 464-466 °C, 29.8-24.7 MPa. Both regions were chosen to simulate the range of physical conditions that are experienced by hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). Decompression induced phase separation in both P-T regions results in the vapor phase becoming enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe, as the Fe/Cl ratio decreases. The coexisting NaCl-rich liquid phase remains essentially constant with respect to Fe/Cl ratio and Fe isotope composition. Coinciding with the lowest vapor chlorinity in the vapor-liquid stability field, the Fe/Cl ratio of the vapor abruptly increases, while the Fe isotope fractionation between the vapor and liquid (103ln ⁡αV/L56/54) reached a maximum value of +0.145±0.048‰ . Subsequently, Fe isotope fractionation decreased upon transition into the vapor-halite stability field (P-T region 2). We infer that the observed Fe isotope fractionation between vapor ± liquid ± halite is caused by differences in Fe speciation among coexisting chloride-bearing phases. The experimental study confirms for the first time that measurable Fe isotope variability can result from phase separation in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The species-dependent Fe isotope fractionation reported here is small relative to predicted mineral

  14. First spectrally-resolved H2 observations towards HH 54 . Low H2O abundance in shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangelo, G.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; Bjerkeli, P.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzani, A.; Lundin, L. K.; Cabrit, S.; Calzoletti, L.; Liseau, R.; Neufeld, D.; Tafalla, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Herschel observations suggest that the H2O distribution in outflows from low-mass stars resembles the H2 emission. It is still unclear which of the different excitation components that characterise the mid- and near-IR H2 distribution is associated with H2O. Aims: The aim is to spectrally resolve the different excitation components observed in the H2 emission. This will allow us to identify the H2 counterpart associated with H2O and finally derive directly an H2O abundance estimate with respect to H2. Methods: We present new high spectral resolution observations of H2 0-0 S(4), 0-0 S(9), and 1-0 S(1) towards HH 54, a bright nearby shock region in the southern sky. In addition, new Herschel/HIFI H2O (212 - 101) observations at 1670 GHz are presented. Results: Our observations show for the first time a clear separation in velocity of the different H2 lines: the 0-0 S(4) line at the lowest excitation peaks at -7 km s-1, while the more excited 0-0 S(9) and 1-0 S(1) lines peak at -15 km s-1. H2O and high-J CO appear to be associated with the H2 0-0 S(4) emission, which traces a gas component with a temperature of 700-1000 K. The H2O abundance with respect to H2 0-0 S(4) is estimated to be X(H2O) < 1.4 × 10-5 in the shocked gas over an area of 13''. Conclusions: We resolve two distinct gas components associated with the HH 54 shock region at different velocities and excitations. This allows us to constrain the temperature of the H2O emitting gas (≤1000 K) and to derive correct estimates of H2O abundance in the shocked gas, which is lower than what is expected from shock model predictions. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs: 089.C-0772, 292.C-5025.

  15. Fiber-Amplifier-Enhanced QEPAS Sensor for Simultaneous Trace Gas Detection of NH3 and H2S

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    A selective and sensitive quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating at 1582 nm was demonstrated for simultaneous detection of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Two interference-free absorption lines located at 6322.45 cm−1 and 6328.88 cm−1 for NH3 and H2S detection, respectively, were identified. The sensor was optimized in terms of current modulation depth for both of the two target gases. An electrical modulation cancellation unit was equipped to suppress the background noise caused by the stray light. An Allan-Werle variance analysis was performed to investigate the long-term performance of the fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor. Benefitting from the high power boosted by the EDFA, a detection sensitivity (1σ) of 52 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and 17 ppbv for NH3 and H2S, respectively, were achieved with a 132 s data acquisition time at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. PMID:26506351

  16. Gas separation applications to METC-supported technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Poku, J.A.; Plunkett, J.E.

    1989-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to catalog both hot and cold gas separation technologies, to identify the status and the developers of each, and to identify how these separation processes might be applied to METC-supported technologies for removal of trace contaminants, or purification of gases used in or generated by coal processing. Discussions on gas separation process names, typical feeds, process developers, and operating conditions are provided in the following sections of this report, as well as descriptions of how these gas cleanup techniques would be used in developmental coal conversion technologies. 82 refs., 22 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. CuO-Decorated ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures as Efficient and Established Sensing Materials for H2S Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Nguyen Minh; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors were developed from CuO-decorated ZnO semiconducting hierarchical nanostructures. The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure was fabricated by an electrospinning method following hydrothermal and heat treatment. CuO decoration of ZnO hierarchical structures was carried out by a wet method. The H2S gas-sensing properties were examined at different working temperatures using various quantities of CuO as the variable. CuO decoration of the ZnO hierarchical structure was observed to promote sensitivity for H2S gas higher than 30 times at low working temperature (200 °C) compared with that in the nondecorated hierarchical structure. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid sensor structure is also discussed. The morphology and characteristics of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and electrical measurements. PMID:27231026

  18. CuO-Decorated ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures as Efficient and Established Sensing Materials for H2S Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Nguyen Minh; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors were developed from CuO-decorated ZnO semiconducting hierarchical nanostructures. The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure was fabricated by an electrospinning method following hydrothermal and heat treatment. CuO decoration of ZnO hierarchical structures was carried out by a wet method. The H2S gas-sensing properties were examined at different working temperatures using various quantities of CuO as the variable. CuO decoration of the ZnO hierarchical structure was observed to promote sensitivity for H2S gas higher than 30 times at low working temperature (200 °C) compared with that in the nondecorated hierarchical structure. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid sensor structure is also discussed. The morphology and characteristics of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and electrical measurements. PMID:27231026

  19. CuO-Decorated ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures as Efficient and Established Sensing Materials for H2S Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Nguyen Minh; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-05-01

    Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors were developed from CuO-decorated ZnO semiconducting hierarchical nanostructures. The ZnO hierarchical nanostructure was fabricated by an electrospinning method following hydrothermal and heat treatment. CuO decoration of ZnO hierarchical structures was carried out by a wet method. The H2S gas-sensing properties were examined at different working temperatures using various quantities of CuO as the variable. CuO decoration of the ZnO hierarchical structure was observed to promote sensitivity for H2S gas higher than 30 times at low working temperature (200 °C) compared with that in the nondecorated hierarchical structure. The sensing mechanism of the hybrid sensor structure is also discussed. The morphology and characteristics of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and electrical measurements.

  20. Improving Hydrocarbon Separation In Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F.; Kojiro, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Modified solica spheres enhance chromatographic separation. Commercially available silica spheres are modified by reacting them with molecules containing isocyante and isothiocyanate groups. Applications of surface derivatized spheres that result from reaction include analysis of samples prouced by atmospheric or soil probes.

  1. H2 blockers

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H2 blockers; PUD - H2 blockers; Gastroesophageal reflux - H2 blockers ... H2 blockers are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  2. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Shimazu, Shogo; Bando, Kyoko K.

    2007-02-02

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  3. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Bando, Kyoko K.; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  4. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  5. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  6. Dynamics of effusive and diffusive gas separation on pillared graphene.

    PubMed

    Wesołowski, Radosław P; Terzyk, Artur P

    2016-06-22

    Pillared graphene structures, from a practical viewpoint, are very interesting novel carbon materials. Combining the properties of graphene and nanotubes, such as durability, chemical purity and a controlled structure, they were proven to be effective membranes for noble gas separation processes. Here, we examine their possible use for other, more commercially useful gas mixture separation, i.e. air and coal gas. The mechanism of air gas transport through the pillar channels is studied, and the prospective application of 2-D pillared membranes in effusion-like processes provided. The separative abilities of hybrid systems consisting of membranes with different channel diameters in relation to coal gas are proven to be promising. PMID:27297664

  7. A novel flexible C2H2 gas sensor based on Ag-ZnO nanorods on PI/PTFE substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, A. S. M. Iftekhar; Chung, Gwiy-Sang

    2016-02-01

    In this work a novel flexible acetylene (C2H2) gas sensor based on Ag nanoparticles decorated vertical ZnO nanorods (Ag-ZnO NRs) on PI/PTFE substrate has been investigated. The grown structure was synthesized through a simple, rapid, and low-temperature hydrothermal-RF magnetron sputtering method. The successful immobilization of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) onto the surface of ZnO nanorods contributed large effective surface area and facilitated the charge transfer process. The as-fabricated sensor exhibited enhanced C2H2 sensing performances at low temperature (200°C) including a broad detection range (3 - 1000 ppm), and short recovery time (39 sec). Mechanical robustness and device flexibility were investigated at different curvature angle (0 - 90°) and several times bending-relaxing process (0 - 5 × 105 times). The sensor exhibited stable response magnitude with a negligible drift of ~ 2.1% for a maximum bending angle of 90o and a response drop of 8% after 5 × 104 bending/relaxing processes. The superior sensing features along with outstanding flexibility to extreme bending stress indicate the sensor a promising candidate for the development of practical flexible C2H2 gas sensors.

  8. Modeling mass transfer in solid oxide fuel cell anode: II. H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in synthesis-gas operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    Following the previous work on comparing performance of Fickian, Stefan-Maxwell and dusty-gas model for mass transfer in single fuel system, this article is focused on the electrochemistry and transport in the anode of solid oxide fuel cell using H2sbnd H2Osbnd COsbnd CO2sbnd N2 hybrid fuel. Under the standard framework of the dusty-gas model combined with the Butler-Volmer equation, it carries out a macroscopic area-specific modeling work. More specifically, two variables of hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor are well defined and solved for the electrochemical co-oxidation of H2 and CO, and the diffusion equivalent circuit model is introduced to describe more comprehensively the resistance of mass transfer including molecular/Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion. The model has been validated well in full region of Vsbnd I performance of an experimental anode-supported button cell. An approximate analytical solution of the hydrogen current fraction is also presented for explicit computation. Comparison between the results by different approaches for the effective diffusivity shows the importance of right mass-transfer modeling.

  9. Functionalized inorganic membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ruud, James Anthony; Molaison, Jennifer Lynn; Schick, Louis Andrew ,; Ramaswamy, Vidya

    2008-07-08

    A porous membrane for separation of carbon dioxide from a fluid stream at a temperature higher than about 200.degree. C. with selectivity higher than Knudsen diffusion selectivity. The porous membrane comprises a porous support layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia; a porous separation layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia, and a functional layer comprising a ceramic oxide contactable with the fluid stream to preferentially transport carbon dioxide. In particular, the functional layer may be MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, La.sub.2O.sub.3, CeO.sub.2, ATiO.sub.3, AZrO.sub.3, AAl.sub.2O.sub.4, A.sup.1FeO.sub.3, A.sup.1MnO.sub.3, A.sup.1CoO.sub.3, A.sup.1NiO.sub.3, A.sup.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.3CeO.sub.3, Li.sub.2ZrO.sub.3, Li.sub.2SiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2TiO.sub.3 or a mixture thereof; wherein A is Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.1 is La, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.2 is Ca, Sr or Ba; and A.sup.3 is Sr or Ba.

  10. The removal of selenate to low ppb levels from flue gas desulfurization brine using the H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Yang, Ziming; Kim, Bi-o; Sholin, Mark; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-05-01

    The H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was shown to consistently remove nitrate, nitrite, and selenate at high efficiencies from flue-gas desulfurization brine. Selenate was removed to <50 ppb which is the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) criteria for the brine to be released into the environment. When selenate was removed to <50 ppb, nitrate and nitrite were still present in the mg/L range which suggests that selenate is able to be secondarily reduced to low levels when nitrate and nitrite serve as the main electron acceptors for bacterial growth. SO(4)(2-) was not removed and therefore did not compete with nitrate and selenate reduction for the available H(2). PMID:21454073

  11. Effect of pH on nitrate and selenate reduction in flue gas desulfurization brine using the H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Yang, Ziming; Kim, Bi-o; Sholin, Mark; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Increased tightening of air regulations is leading more electric utilities to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These systems produce brine containing high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and selenate which must be removed before discharge. The H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was shown to consistently remove nitrate, nitrite, and selenate at high efficiencies. The maximum selenate removal flux reached 362 mgSe m(-2)d(-1) and was higher than that observed in earlier research, which shows continual improvement of the biofilm for selenate reduction. A low pH of 6.8 inhibited precipitation when treating actual FGD brine, yet did not inhibit removal. SO4(2-) was not removed and therefore did not compete with nitrate, nitrite, and selenate reduction for the available H2. PMID:22049720

  12. Evaluation of Mars CO2 Capture and Gas Separation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    Recent national policy statements have established that the ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to ,enable such missions and it is appropriate to review progress in this area and continue to advance the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. The Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as well. To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (C02-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3)/carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include' freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents

  13. Ceria-based Catalysts for the Production of H2 Through the Water-gas-shift Reaction: Time-Resolved XRD and XAFS Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Marinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen is a potential alternate energy source for satisfying many of our energy needs. In this work, we studied H2 production from the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction over Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts, prepared with a novel microemulsion method, using two synchrotron-based techniques: time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results are compared with those reported for conventional CuO x /CeO2 and AuO x /CeO2 catalysts obtained through impregnation of ceria. For the fresh Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts, the results of XAFS measurements at the Cu K-edge indicate that Cu is in an oxidation state higher than in CuO. Nevertheless, under WGS reaction conditions the Ce1-x Cu x O2 catalysts undergo reduction and the active phase contains very small particles of metallic Cu and CeO2-x . Time-resolved XRD and XAFS results also indicate that Cud+ and Aud+ species present in fresh CuO x /CeO2 and AuO x /CeO2 catalysts do not survive above 200 C under the WGS conditions. In all these systems, the ceria lattice displayed a significant increase after exposure to CO and a decrease in H2O, indicating that CO reduced ceria while H2O oxidized it. Our data suggest that H2O dissociation occurred on the Ovacancy sites or the Cu-Ovacancy and Au-Ovacancy interfaces. The rate of H2 generation by a Ce0.95Cu0.05O2 catalyst was comparable to that of a 5 wt% CuO x /CeO2 catalyst and much bigger than those of pure ceria or CuO.

  14. GC/MS Gas Separator Operates At Lower Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gutnikov, George

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show palladium/silver tube used to separate hydrogen carrier gas from gases being analyzed in gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) system functions satisfactorily at temperatures as low as 70 to 100 degrees C. Less power consumed, and catalytic hydrogenation of compounds being analyzed diminished. Because separation efficiency high even at lower temperatures, gas load on vacuum pump of mass spectrometer kept low, permitting use of smaller pump. These features facilitate development of relatively small, lightweight, portable GC/MS system for such uses as measuring concentrations of pollutants in field.

  15. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  16. On the interplay of gas dynamics and the electromagnetic field in an atmospheric Ar/H2 microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synek, Petr; Obrusník, Adam; Hübner, Simon; Nijdam, Sander; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    A complementary simulation and experimental study of an atmospheric pressure microwave torch operating in pure argon or argon/hydrogen mixtures is presented. The modelling part describes a numerical model coupling the gas dynamics and mixing to the electromagnetic field simulations. Since the numerical model is not fully self-consistent and requires the electron density as an input, quite extensive spatially resolved Stark broadening measurements were performed for various gas compositions and input powers. In addition, the experimental part includes Rayleigh scattering measurements, which are used for the validation of the model. The paper comments on the changes in the gas temperature and hydrogen dissociation with the gas composition and input power, showing in particular that the dependence on the gas composition is relatively strong and non-monotonic. In addition, the work provides interesting insight into the plasma sustainment mechanism by showing that the power absorption profile in the plasma has two distinct maxima: one at the nozzle tip and one further upstream.

  17. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Boronylallene (H2CCCH(BO)) under Single Collision Conditions: A Crossed Molecular Beams and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Maity, Surajit; Parker, Dorian S N; Kaiser, Ralf I; Ganoe, Brad; Fau, Stefan; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2014-05-15

    The gas phase reaction between the boron monoxide radical ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) and allene (H2CCCH2; X(1)A1) was investigated experimentally under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique and theoretically exploiting ab initio electronic structure and statistical (RRKM) calculations. The reaction was found to follow indirect (complex forming) scattering dynamics and proceeded via the formation of a van der Waals complex ((11)BOC3H4). This complex isomerized via addition of the boron monoxide radical ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) with the radical center located at the boron atom to the terminal carbon atom of the allene molecule forming a H2CCCH2(11)BO intermediate on the doublet surface. The chemically activated H2CCCH2(11)BO intermediate underwent unimolecular decomposition via atomic hydrogen elimination from the terminal carbon atom holding the boronyl group through a tight exit transition state to synthesize the boronylallene product (H2CCCH(11)BO) in a slightly exoergic reaction (55 ± 11 kJ mol(-1)). Statistical (RRKM) calculations suggest that minor reaction channels lead to the products 3-propynyloxoborane (CH2((11)BO)CCH) and 1-propynyloxoborane (CH3CC(11)BO) with fractions of 1.5% and 0.2%, respectively. The title reaction was also compared with the cyano (CN; X(2)Σ(+))-allene and boronyl-methylacetylene reactions to probe similarities, but also differences of these isoelectronic systems. Our investigation presents a novel gas phase synthesis and characterization of a hitherto elusive organyloxoborane (RBO) monomer-boronylallene-which is inherently tricky to isolate in the condensed phase except in matrix studies; our work further demonstrates that the crossed molecular beams approach presents a useful tool in investigating the chemistry and synthesis of highly reactive organyloxoboranes. PMID:24806514

  18. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  19. H2 Reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, Mike

    2002-02-01

    The high power microwave program at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) includes high power source development in narrow band and wideband technologies. The H2 source is an existing wideband source that was developed at the AFRL. A recent AFRL requirement for a wideband impulse generator to use in materials tests has provided the need to update the H2 source for the current test requirements. The H2 source is composed of a dual resonant transformer that charges a short length of coaxial transmission line. The transmission line is then discharged into an output coaxial transmission line with a self-break hydrogen switch. The dual resonant transformer is driven by a low inductance primary capacitor bank operating through a self-break gas switch. The upgrade of the coaxial hydrogen output switch is the focus of this report. The hydrogen output switch was developed through extensive electrical and mechanical simulations. The switch insulator is made of Ultem 2300 and is designed to operate with a mechanical factor of safety equal to 4.0 at 1,000 psi. The design criteria, design data and operational data will be presented.

  20. BIODESULF(TM), A Novel Biological Technology for the Removal of H2S From Sour Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, K.C.; Stashick, J.J.; Johnson, P.E.; Kaushik, N.K.

    1997-10-01

    The state-of-the-art technologies for the removal of sulfur compounds from Sour Natural Gas (SNG) are not cost-effective when scaled down to approximately 2-5 MMSCFD. At the same time, the SNG Production is increasing at 3-6 TCF/Yr and -78 TCF potential reserves are also sour. Assuming only 3% treatment of this potential SNG market is for small volume processing, the potential U.S. Market is worth $0.14 to $0.28 billion. Therefore, the Gas Processing Industry is seeking novel, cost-effective, environmentally compatible and operator friendly technologies applicable to the small volume producers in the range of less than 1 MMSCFD to - 5 MMSCFD. A novel biological process, BIODESTJLFTM (patent pending), developed at ARCTECH removes H{sub 2}S and other sulfur contaminants that make the Natural Gas Sour. The removal is accomplished by utilizing an adapted mixed microbial culture (consortium). A variety of anaerobic microbial consortia from ARCTECH`s Microbial Culture Collection were grown and tested for removal of H{sub 2}S. One of these consortia, termed SS-11 was found to be particularly effective. Utilizing the SS-11 consortium, a process has been developed on a laboratory-scale to remove sulfur species from Sour Natural Gas at well head production pressures and temperatures. The process has been independently evaluated and found to be promising in effectively removing H{sub 2}S and other sulfur species cost effectively.

  1. Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

    2008-03-05

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

  2. Intracavity CO laser photoacoustic trace gas detection: cyclic CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 emission by cockroaches and scarab beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnen, F. G. C.; Harren, F. J. M.; Hackstein, J. H. P.; Reuss, J.

    1996-09-01

    A liquid-nitrogen-cooled CO laser and an intracavity resonant photoacoustic cell are employed to monitor trace gases. The setup was designed to monitor trace gas emissions of biological samples on line. The arrangement offers the possibility to measure gases at the 10 9 by volume (ppbv) level (e.g., CH 4 , H 2 O) and to detect rapid changes in trace gas emission. A detection limit of 1 ppbv for CH 4 in N 2 equivalent to a minimal detectable absorption of 3 10 9 cm 1 can be achieved. Because of the kinetic cooling effect we lowered the detection limit for CH 4 in air is decreased to 10 ppbv. We used the instrument in a first application to measure the CH 4 and H 2 O emission of individual cockroaches and scarab beetles. These emissions could be correlated with CO 2 emissions that were recorded simultaneously with an infrared gas analyzer. Characteristic breathing patterns of the insects could be observed; unexpectedly methane was also found to be released.

  3. A highly sensitive room temperature H2S gas sensor based on SnO2 multi-tube arrays bio-templated from insect bristles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junlong; Pan, Feng; Xue, Ruiyang; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-05-01

    A tin oxide multi-tube array (SMTA) with a parallel effect was fabricated through a simple and promising method combining chemosynthesis and biomimetic techniques; a biomimetic template was derived from the bristles on the wings of the Alpine Black Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio maackii). SnO2 tubes are hollow and porous structures with micro-pores regularly distributed on the wall. The morphology, the delicate microstructure and the crystal structure of this SMTA were characterized by super resolution digital microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The SMTA exhibits a high sensitivity to H2S gas at room temperature. It also exhibits a short response/recovery time, with an average value of 14/30 s at 5 ppm. In particular, heating is not required for the SMTA in the gas sensitivity measurement process. On the basis of these results, SMTA is proposed as a suitable new material for the design and fabrication of room-temperature H2S gas sensors. PMID:25823527

  4. Nanostructured PdO Thin Film from Langmuir-Blodgett Precursor for Room-Temperature H2 Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sipra; Betty, C A; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Saxena, Vibha; Bhattacharya, Debarati

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticulate thin films of PdO were prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique by thermal decomposition of a multilayer film of octadecylamine (ODA)-chloropalladate complex. The stable complex formation of ODA with chloropalladate ions (present in subphase) at the air-water interface was confirmed by the surface pressure-area isotherm and Brewster angle microscopy. The formation of nanocrystalline PdO thin film after thermal decomposition of as-deposited LB film was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Nanocrystalline PdO thin films were further characterized by using UV-vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements. The XPS study revealed the presence of prominent Pd(2+) with a small quantity (18%) of reduced PdO (Pd(0)) in nanocrystalline PdO thin film. From the absorption spectroscopic measurement, the band gap energy of PdO was estimated to be 2 eV, which was very close to that obtained from specular reflectance measurements. Surface morphology studies of these films using atomic force microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy indicated formation of nanoparticles of size 20-30 nm. These PdO film when employed as a chemiresistive sensor showed H2 sensitivity in the range of 30-4000 ppm at room temperature. In addition, PdO films showed photosensitivity with increase in current upon shining of visible light. PMID:27299704

  5. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1998-07-01

    Smooth, dense, uniformly thick membranes were solution cast from poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) and their permeability properties were investigated for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} (P{sub N{sub 2}} = 5.8 {+-} 0.4, P{sub O{sub 2}} = 15.6 {+-} 0.8, P{sub CH{sub 4}} = 17.8 {+-} 1.4, P{sub CO{sub 2}} = 63.6 {+-} 2.2 Barrers), and selectivity properties were calculated ({alpha}{sub O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 2.7 {+-} 0.2, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 11.2 {+-} 0.8, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}} = 3.6 {+-} 0.2). NaY/POT composite membranes (20, 30, and 40% w/w zeolite) were prepared by stirring the polymer into a zeolitic suspension. Facilitated transport of gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2}) was observed for each of the zeolite loadings, the magnitude of which depended on the chemical nature of the gas and polymer/zeolite-penetrant interaction. Maximum facilitation was observed for 40% NaY/POT composite membranes (Facilitation ratio of N{sub 2} = 0.38 {+-} 0.03, O{sub 2} = 0.56 {+-} 0.02, CH{sub 4} = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, CO{sub 2} = 0.71 {+-} 0.02). An increase in the selectivity of gases was also observed for all zeolite loadings.

  6. Laboratory Carburization of Direct-Reduced Iron in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures, and Comparison with Industrial Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yining; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2016-06-01

    Iron ore pellets, reduced with hydrogen, were isothermally carburized in CH4-H2-N2 at 823 K, 923 K, and 1023 K (550 °C, 650 °C, and 750 °C). Temperature strongly affected the total carbon concentration after carburization; significant unbound carbon deposited at the highest temperature. For the range of sizes tested (10 to 12 mm), pellet size did not affect carburization. The variability between pellets was much smaller than for industrial pellets; inhomogeneous gas distribution likely affects carburization under large-scale industrial conditions.

  7. Subwatt threshold cw Raman fiber-gas laser based on H2-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Couny, F; Benabid, F; Light, P S

    2007-10-01

    We report on what is, to our knowledge, the first cw pumped Raman fiber-gas laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with hydrogen. The high efficiency of the gas-laser interaction inside the fiber allows operation in a single-pass configuration. The transmitted spectrum exhibits 99.99% of the output light at the Stokes wavelength and a pump power threshold as low as 2.25 W. The study of the Stokes emission evolution with pressure shows that highly efficient Raman amplification is still possible even at atmospheric pressure. The addition of fiber Bragg gratings to the system, creating a cavity at the Stokes wavelength, reduces the Raman threshold power below 600 mW. PMID:17930673

  8. The properties of clusters in the gas phase. IV - Complexes of H2O and HNOx clustering on NOx/-/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Keesee, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities for the gas-phase clustering equilibria of NO2(-) and NO3(-) were determined with high-pressure mass spectrometry. A comparison of values of the free energy of hydration derived from the data shows good agreement with formerly reported values at 296 K. New data for larger NO2(-) and NO3(-) hydrates as well as NO2(-)(HNO2)n were obtained in this study. To aid in understanding the bonding and stability of the hydrates of nitrite and nitrate ions, CNDO/2 calculations were performed, and the results are discussed. A correlation between the aqueous-phase total hydration enthalpy of a single ion and its gas-phase hydration enthalpy was obtained. Atmospheric implications of the data are also briefly discussed.

  9. Flame made ceria supported noble metal catalysts for efficient H2 production via the water gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Lichtenberg, H.; Gaur, A.; Goldbach, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Rh/ceria catalysts were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis for high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reactions. These catalysts show a high specific surface area due to a high degree of nanocrystallinity. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) unraveled the formation of small Rh particles under WGS reaction conditions. The catalytic activity was examined at atmospheric pressure by measuring CO conversion as a function of temperature. Some methane formation was observed above 310°C.

  10. Ferric Iron-Bearing Sediments as a Mineral Trap for Geologic CO2 Sequestration: Iron Reduction Using SO2 or H2S Waste Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palandri, J. L.; Kharaka, Y. K.

    2002-12-01

    Disposal of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep aquifers is a potential means of reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. In geologic sequestration, CO2 may be stored in: 1) structural traps such as depleted petroleum or gas reservoirs, primarily as supercritical fluid (hydrodynamic trapping); 2) formation water as a dissolved constituent (solution trapping); or 3) carbonate minerals (mineral trapping). Most studies of in situ mineral trapping discuss the use of glauconitic or plagioclase-bearing sediments, to trap CO2 in siderite or calcite. Glauconitic beds, which contain the desired ferrous iron, are generally of limited thickness and geographical occurrence. However, ferric iron-bearing sediments, including redbeds, have the advantages of widespread geographic distribution, and generally greater thickness, and higher porosity and permeability. Iron must be in its ferrous oxidation state in order for it to precipitate in carbonate minerals. Ferric iron in sediments requires a reductant to be reduced to ferrous, and the reductant may be organic matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), or hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Equilibrium and kinetically controlled geochemical simulations at 105°C, with SO2 or H2S, which may be a component of the injected, CO2-dominated waste gas, show that iron in minerals can be made to reside almost entirely in siderite, and simultaneously, that sulfur can be made to exist predominantly as dissolved sulfate. For quartz arenite containing 1.0 wt. % Fe2O3, approximately 5.0 g. of CO2 is sequestered per kg. of rock. The appropriate CO2-dominated gas compositions contain approximately 20.0 wt. % SO2, or 5.0 wt. % H2S. If there is an insufficient amount of sulfur-bearing gas relative to CO2, then some of the iron is not reduced, and some of the CO2 is not sequestered. If there is a slight excess of sulfur-bearing gas, then complete iron reduction is ensured, and a small amount of the iron precipitates as pyrite or other

  11. RNase H2 catalytic core Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related mutant invokes cGAS-STING innate immune-sensing pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Pokatayev, Vladislav; Hasin, Naushaba; Chon, Hyongi; Cerritelli, Susana M; Sakhuja, Kiran; Ward, Jerrold M; Morris, H Douglas; Yan, Nan; Crouch, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) develops from mutations in genes encoding several nucleotide-processing proteins, including RNase H2. Defective RNase H2 may induce accumulation of self-nucleic acid species that trigger chronic type I interferon and inflammatory responses, leading to AGS pathology. We created a knock-in mouse model with an RNase H2 AGS mutation in a highly conserved residue of the catalytic subunit, Rnaseh2a(G37S/G37S) (G37S), to understand disease pathology. G37S homozygotes are perinatal lethal, in contrast to the early embryonic lethality previously reported for Rnaseh2b- or Rnaseh2c-null mice. Importantly, we found that the G37S mutation led to increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes dependent on the cGAS-STING signaling pathway. Ablation of STING in the G37S mice results in partial rescue of the perinatal lethality, with viable mice exhibiting white spotting on their ventral surface. We believe that the G37S knock-in mouse provides an excellent animal model for studying RNASEH2-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26880576

  12. Process for separating hydrocarbon gas constituents utilizing a fractionator

    SciTech Connect

    Aghili, H.K.

    1987-10-06

    A process is described for separating the constituents of a gas stream comprising: (a) lowering the temperature of the gas stream; (b) supplying the lower temperature gas stream to a high pressure separator; (c) lowering the pressure of the predominantly vapor stream; (d) supplying the lower pressure vapor stream to an upper region of a demethanizer column; (e) lowering the pressure of the predominantly fluid stream; (f) supplying the lower pressure fluid stream to the demethanizer column at an elevation below the vapor stream; (g) removing cold vapor residue gas from an upper region of the demethanizer column; (h) passing the vapor residue gas through at least one heat exchanger to raise the temperature of the vapor residue gas; (i) compressing the vapor residue gas for delivery elsewhere; (j) removing a cold demethanized product from a lower region of the demethanizer column; (k) supplying at least a portion of the demethanized product to a fractionator wherein the fractionator operates as a distillation column; (l) separating the demethanized product into an ethane overhead product and a deethanized bottom product; (m) removing a generally liquid deethanized product from a lower region of the fractionator; (n) drawing off a portion of the deethanized product; (o) lowering the temperature of the drawn off product; and, (p) supplying the lower temperature deethanized product to the top of the demethanizer column.

  13. Advanced Sorbents as a Versatile Platform for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Stephenson

    2003-09-30

    The program objective was to develop materials and processes for industrial gas separations to reduce energy use and enable waste reduction. The approach chosen combined novel oxygen selective adsorbents and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes. Preliminary materials development and process simulation results indicated that oxygen selective adsorbents could provide a versatile platform for industrial gas separations. If fully successful, this new technology offered the potential for reducing the cost of producing nitrogen/oxygen co-products, high purity nitrogen, argon, and possibly oxygen. The potential energy savings for the gas separations are appreciable, but the end users are the main beneficiaries. Lowering the cost of industrial gases expands their use in applications that can employ them for reducing energy consumption and emissions.

  14. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-31

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation variesmore » with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor–capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was

  15. Time of Flight measurement of stopping cross sections for low energy light ions in H2, He, N2, and Ne gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrejcic, David; Greife, Uwe

    2015-10-01

    The majority of available data for the stopping cross section of light ions in light gases is concentrated in the medium and high energy regimes, with little or no data available at energies below 25 keV/u. This energy regime applies to the temperature range of many stellar cores, where fusion reactions between light nuclei are common. Knowledge of the stopping cross section for light ions which interact in this environment is crucial to the accurate modeling of stellar nucleosynthesis. The current work uses time-of-flight techniques to directly measure the stopping cross section of H2, He, N2 and Ne gas for H and He ions with energies between 15-22 keV. The gas target is isolated using differential pumping, bypassing the need for entrance and exit foils. Funded through DOE Office of Science.

  16. Separation of anthracene from crude anthracene using gas antisolvent recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchung Liou; Chiehming Chang )

    1992-08-01

    Pure anthracene is mostly used for conversion to anthraquinone, an intermediate for the synthesis of very powerful vat dyestuffs. A coal tar distillate, crude anthracene, which contains 30% anthracene, 25% phenanthrene, 15% carbazole, and other impurities, was used as the model mixture. In this study, 90% by weight purity anthracene was obtained using gas antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization. The GAS process induces the separation of solids by introducing an antisolvent, carbon dioxide (or the supercritical fluid), into acetone which was used as the liquid solvent. The dissolution of the compressed gas into the solute-laden solution selectively lowers the solubilities of solid solutes and salts them out. The results showed that high purity anthracene was obtained at a high feed concentration and high pressure conditions. The separation factor of anthracene versus phenanthrene is close to 30.07.

  17. Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2011-05-01

    Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

  18. Porous liquids: A promising class of media for gas separation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jinshui; Chai, Song -Hai; Qiao, Zhen -An; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Chen, Jihua; Fang, Youxing; Wan, Shun; Nelson, Kimberly; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-17

    In porous liquids with empty cavities we successfully has been successfully fabricated by surface engineering of hollow structures with suitable corona and canopy species. By taking advantage of the liquid-like polymeric matrices as a separation medium and the empty cavities as gas transport pathway, this unique porous liquid can function as a promising candidate for gas separation. A facile synthetic strategy can be further extended to other types of nanostructure-based porous liquid fabrication, opening up new opportunities for preparation of porous liquids with attractive properties for specific tasks.

  19. Utilization of CO2 and biomass char derived from pyrolysis of Dunaliella salina: the effects of steam and catalyst on CO and H2 gas production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Jia, Lishan; Su, Shuai; Tian, Zhongbiao; Song, Qianqian; Fang, Weiping; Chen, Changping; Liu, Guangfa

    2012-04-01

    Biomass char, by-product of Dunaliella salina pyrolysis at a final pyrolysis temperature of 500°C, was used as feedstock material in this study. The reactions of biomass char with CO(2) were performed in a fixed-bed reactor to evaluate the effect of temperature and steam on the CO(2) conversion, CO yield and gas composition. The CO(2) conversion and CO yield without steam and catalyst reached about 61.84% and 0.99mol/(mol CO(2)) at 800°C, respectively. Steam and high temperature led to high CO(2) conversion. A new approach for improving H(2) was carried out by using biomass char and Au/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, which combined steam gasification of biomass char and water gas shift reaction, and the H(2) concentration was 1.8 times higher than without catalyst. The process not only mitigated CO(2) emission and made use of residual biomass char, but also created renewable source. PMID:22336747

  20. Binderless Composite Electrode Monolith from Carbon Nanotube and Biomass Carbon Activated by H2 SO4 and CO2 Gas for Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraman, M.; Ishak, M. M.; Farma, R.; Awitdrus, Taer, E.; Talib, I. A.; Omar, R.

    2011-12-01

    Binderless composite electrodes in the monolithic form prepared from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunch were studied as an electrode in a supercapacitor. The green monoliths (GMs) were prepared from three different types of precursors, SACG, SACG treated with 0.4 Molar H2 SO4 and mixture of SACG and 5% CNTs (by weight) treated with 0.4 Molar H2 SO4 , respectively. These GMs were carbonized at 600 ° C in N2 gas environment and activated by CO2 gas at 800 ° C for 1 hour to produce activated carbon monoliths (ACMs). The properties of the ACMs (density, porosity, microstructure, structure and electrical conductivity) were found affected by CNTs addition and acid treatment. The acid treatment did not improve the electrochemical behavior of the ACMs used as electrodes (specific capacitance, specific energy and specific power of the supercapacitor) in the supercapacitor cells but CNTs addition improves the equivalent series resistance of the cell.

  1. Sulfur-doped graphene via thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in H2S, SO2, or CS2 gas.

    PubMed

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Šimek, Petr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-25

    Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:23656223

  2. Sulfolane-Cross-Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOEpatents

    Young, Jennifer S.; Long, Gregory S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2006-02-14

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by reacting polybenzimidazole (PBI) with the sulfone-containing crosslinking agent 3,4-dichloro-tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1-dioxide. The cross-linked reaction product exhibits enhanced gas permeability to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and methane as compared to the unmodified analog, without significant loss of selectivity, at temperatures from about 20 degrees Celsius to about 400 degrees Celsius.

  3. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Using Ion Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W L; Johnson, M R

    2006-04-21

    We are developing a new way of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas based on ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, which can be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a nearly pure gas. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas. The slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. The simple, robust nature of the process lends itself to small separation plants. Although the energy cost of the ion pump is significant, we anticipate that it will be compete favorably with the current 35% energy penalty of chemical stripping systems in use at power plants. There is the distinct possibility that this simple method could be significantly more efficient than existing processes.

  4. Abundance profiles of CH3OH and H2CO toward massive young stars as tests of gas-grain chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Caselli, P.

    2000-09-01

    The chemistry of CH3OH and H2CO in thirteen regions of massive star formation is studied through single-dish and interferometer line observations at submillimeter wavelengths. Single-dish spectra at 241 and 338 GHz indicate that Trot = 30-200 K for CH3OH, but only 60-90 K for H2CO. The tight correlation between Trot(CH3OH) and Tex(C2H2) from infrared absorption suggests a common origin of these species, presumably outgassing of icy grain mantles. The CH3OH line widths are 3-5 km s-1, consistent with those found earlier for C17O and C34S, except in GL 7009S and IRAS 20126, whose line shapes reveal CH3OH in the outflows. This difference suggests that for low-luminosity objects, desorption of CH3OH-rich ice mantles is dominated by shocks, while radiation is more important around massive stars. The wealth of CH3OH and H2CO lines covering a large range of excitation conditions allows us to calculate radial abundance profiles , using the physical structures of the sources derived earlier from submillimeter continuum and CS line data. The data indicate three types of abundance profiles: flat profiles at CH3OH/H2 ~ 10-9 for the coldest sources, profiles with a jump in its abundance from ~ 10-9 to ~ 10-7 for the warmer sources, and flat profiles at CH3OH/H2 ~ few 10-8 for the hot cores. The models are consistent with the ~ 3'' size of the CH3OH 107 GHz emission measured interferometrically. The location of the jump at T~ 100 K suggests that it is due to evaporation of grain mantles, followed by destruction in gas-phase reactions in the hot core stage. In contrast, the H2CO data can be well fit with a constant abundance of a few x 10-9 throughout the envelope, providing limits on its grain surface formation. These results indicate that Trot (CH3OH) can be used as evolutionary indicator during the embedded phase of massive star formation, independent of source optical depth or orientation. Model calculations of gas-grain chemistry show that CO is primarily reduced (into CH3OH

  5. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  6. First detection of gas-phase ammonia in a planet-forming disk. NH3, N2H+, and H2O in the disk around TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Vachail N.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Brinch, Christian; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary J.; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C.; Kristensen, Lars; Yıldız, Umut A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Nitrogen chemistry in protoplanetary disks and the freeze-out on dust particles is key for understanding the formation of nitrogen-bearing species in early solar system analogs. In dense cores, 10% to 20% of the nitrogen reservoir is locked up in ices such as NH3, NH4+ and OCN-. So far, ammonia has not been detected beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. Aims: We aim to find gas-phase ammonia in a protoplanetary disk and characterize its abundance with respect to water vapor. Methods: Using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, we detected for the first time the ground-state rotational emission of ortho-NH3 in a protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. We used detailed models of the disk's physical structure and the chemistry of ammonia and water to infer the amounts of gas-phase molecules of these species. We explored two radial distributions (extended across the disk and confined to <60 au like the millimeter-sized grains) and two vertical distributions (near the midplane and at intermediate heights above the midplane, where water is expected to photodesorb off icy grains) to describe the (unknown) location of the molecules. These distributions capture the effects of radial drift and vertical settling of ice-covered grains. Results: The NH310-00 line is detected simultaneously with H2O 110-101 at an antenna temperature of 15.3 mK in the Herschel beam; the same spectrum also contains the N2H+ 6-5 line with a strength of 18.1 mK. We use physical-chemical models to reproduce the fluxes and assume that water and ammonia are cospatial. We infer ammonia gas-phase masses of 0.7-11.0 × 1021 g, depending on the adopted spatial distribution, in line with previous literature estimates. For water, we infer gas-phase masses of 0.2-16.0 × 1022 g, improving upon earlier literature estimates This corresponds to NH3/H2O abundance ratios of 7%-84%, assuming that water and ammonia are co-located. The inferred N2H+ gas mass of 4.9 × 1021 g agrees well with earlier

  7. Quantum chemical analysis of the energy of proton transfer from phenol and chlorophenols to H2O in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüürmann, Gerrit

    1998-12-01

    Proton transfer energies of phenol and 14 chlorophenols with H2O as a base are analyzed in the gas phase and in solution using quantum chemical methods at the semiempirical and ab initio level of computation. The effect of aqueous solution was accounted for by applying the density functional theory (DFT) implementation of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) as well as semiempirical continuum-solvation models. The results reveal substantial and systematic overestimations of the free energies of proton transfer as derived from experimental solution-phase pKa data. This can be traced back to both deficiencies in the current model parameterization as well as to limitations of the underlying gas-phase quantum chemical models, which is further illustrated by additional complete-basis-set (CBS) calculations for the proton transfer reaction with phenol. In contrast, the relative pKa trend is reflected well by COSMO-DFT calculations with correlation coefficients (adjusted for degrees of freedom) of 0.96. Decomposition of the dissociation energy in aqueous solution into a gas-phase term and a term summarizing the solvation contributions provides new insights into the effect of solvation on proton transfer energies, and yields mechanistic explanations for the observed differences in the gas-phase and solution-phase acidity orders of various subgroups of the compounds.

  8. Oxygen-for-Sulfur Switching in the Gas Phase: Reactions of Al and Si Oxyanions with H2S

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Hodges, Brittany DM; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Wright, J. B.

    2001-03-01

    Gas-phase Si and Al oxyanions were formed by particle bombardment, isolated by mass, and then reacted with H{sub 2}S in an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). The reactions proceeded by different reaction pathways depending on whether the oxyanions were even- or odd-electron species. The radical anion SiO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup -} reacted with H{sub 2}S by abstracting a {sm_bullet}SH radical to form the even-electron SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -}. Once formed, the even electron SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} reacted with a second H{sub 2}S molecule by O-for-S exchange to form SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}. The radical anion SiO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}{sup -} abstracted an {sm_bullet}H radical from H{sub 2}S to form even-electron SiO{sub 3}H{sup -}, which then underwent two consecutive O-for-S exchange reactions with H{sub 2}S to form SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} and SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}. For the reactions of the even-electron anion AlO{sub 2}{sup -}, the products of two consecutive O-for-S exchange reactions with H{sub 2}S were AlOS{sup -} and AlS{sub 2}{sup -}. The radical abstraction reactions and the O-for-S exchange reactions of SiO3H{sup -}, AlO{sub 2}{sup -}, and AlOS{sup -} were efficient in the 30-50% range. The efficiency of the O-for-S exchange reaction of SiO{sub 2}SH{sup -} (producing SiOS{sub 2}H{sup -}) was substantially less efficient at 8%.

  9. MELCOR-H2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular,more » we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.« less

  10. MELCOR-H2

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular, we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.