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Sample records for h2 partial pressures

  1. Geometry of α-Cr2O3(0001) as a Function of H2O Partial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction has been employed to elucidate the surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) as a function of water partial pressure at room temperature. In ultra high vacuum, following exposure to ∼2000 Langmuir of H2O, the surface is found to be terminated by a partially occupied double layer of chromium atoms. No evidence of adsorbed OH/H2O is found, which is likely due to either adsorption at minority sites, or X-ray induced desorption. At a water partial pressure of ∼30 mbar, a single OH/H2O species is found to be bound atop each surface Cr atom. This adsorption geometry does not agree with that predicted by ab initio calculations, which may be a result of some differences between the experimental conditions and those modeled. PMID:26877825

  2. The electrochemical behaviour of 316L austenitic stainless steel in Cl- containing environment under different H2S partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jinhui; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Minxu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Zhibin; Hao, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    In oil-gas production environments, presence of H2S-Cl- can induce deterioration of the passive film, leading to pitting corrosion of stainless steels. In this paper, by using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance measurements (Mott-Schottky analysis), the electrochemical behaviour of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was investigated in Cl- solutions under different H2S partial pressures (from 0 to 1.0 bar). The results indicated that presence of H2S in Cl- solution can accelerate both the cathodic and anodic current density, leading to a metastable passive state in higher passive potential range, changing the semiconductor behaviour from p-type to n-type, increasing its susceptibility to corrosion. XPS analysis was employed to characterize the surface film after potentiostatic polarization, whose results provide good evidences for the electrochemical measurements.

  3. Maximizing the Hydrogen Photoproduction Yields in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Cultures: The Effect of the H2 Partial Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kosourov, S. N.; Batyrova, K. A.; Petushkova, E. P.; Tsygankov, A. A.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Seibert, M.

    2012-05-01

    Photoproduction of H{sub 2} gas has been examined in sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chalmydomonas reinhardtii cultures, placed in photobioreactors (PhBRs) with different gas phase to liquid phase ratios (V{sub g.p.}/V{sub l.p.}). The results demonstrate that an increase in the ratio stimulates H{sub 2} photoproduction activity in both algal suspension cultures and in algae entrapped in thin alginate films. In suspension cultures, a 4x increase (from {approx}0.5 to {approx}2) in V{sub g.p.}/V{sub l.p} results in a 2x increase (from 10.8 to 23.1 mmol l{sup -1} or 264-565 ml l{sup -1}) in the total yield of H{sub 2} gas. Remarkably, 565 ml of H{sub 2} gas per liter of the suspension culture is the highest yield ever reported for a wild-type strain in a time period of less than 190 h. In immobilized algae, where diffusion of H{sub 2} from the medium to the PhBR gas phase is not affected by mixing, the maximum rate and yield of H{sub 2} photoproduction occur in PhBRs with V{sub g.p.}/V{sub l.p} above 7 or in a PhBR with smaller headspace, if the H{sub 2} is effectively removed from the medium by continuous flushing of the headspace with argon. These experiments in combination with studies of the direct inhibitory effect of high H{sub 2} concentrations in the PhBR headspace on H{sub 2} photoproduction activity in algal cultures clearly show that H{sub 2} photoproduction in algae depends significantly on the partial pressure of H{sub 2} (not O{sub 2} as previously thought) in the PhBR gas phase.

  4. High Tc phase of (H2S)2H2 at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen was predicted to metalize at high pressures and believed to be a room-temperature superconductor. However, metallization of hydrogen is still under debates. As an alternative, hydrogen dominated materials were extensively explored because of their lower metallization pressure. Here I present the high-pressure studies on structures, metallization, and superconductivity of (H2S)2H2 from ab initio calculations. At lower pressures, two phases containing H2 units are stable with P1 (<37 GPa) and Cccm (37-111 GPa) symmetries, which are still insulators. Upon further compression, H2 units disappear and two intriguing metallic structures with R3m and Im-3 m symmetries are reconstructive above 111 GPa and 180 GPa, respectively. Remarkably, the estimated Tc of Im-3 m phase at 200 GPa achieves a very high value of 191 ~ 204 K. Moreover, Tc decreases with pressure at an approximate rate (dTc/dP) of -0.12 K/GPa. Our predicted high Tc and its pressure dependence in Im-3 m phase are subsequently verified by recent experiments. Our findings support the conjecture that hydrogen-rich materials are a way to achieve a metallic phase with high Tc at accessibly experimental pressures and represent a significant step toward the understanding of high-pressure behavior of metallic hydrogen.

  5. Pressure-induced metallization of dense (H2S)2H2 with high-Tc superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Defang; Liu, Yunxian; Tian, Fubo; Li, Da; Huang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhonglong; Yu, Hongyu; Liu, Bingbing; Tian, Wenjing; Cui, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The high pressure structures, metallization, and superconductivity of recently synthesized H2-containing compounds (H2S)2H2 are elucidated by ab initio calculations. The ordered crystal structure with P1 symmetry is determined, supported by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental X-ray diffraction data, equation of states, and Raman spectra. The Cccm structure is favorable with partial hydrogen bond symmetrization above 37 GPa. Upon further compression, H2 molecules disappear and two intriguing metallic structures with R3m and Im-3m symmetries are reconstructive above 111 and 180 GPa, respectively. The predicted metallization pressure is 111 GPa, which is approximately one-third of the currently suggested metallization pressure of bulk molecular hydrogen. Application of the Allen-Dynes-modified McMillan equation for the Im-3m structure yields high Tc values of 191 K to 204 K at 200 GPa, which is among the highest values reported for H2-rich van der Waals compounds and MH3 type hydride thus far. PMID:25382349

  6. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  7. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  8. Pressure-induced superconductivity in H2-containing hydride PbH4(H2)2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Tingting; Zhong, Guohua; Yang, Chunlei; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-01-01

    High pressure structure, stability, metallization, and superconductivity of PbH4(H2)2, a H2-containing compound combining one of the heaviest elements with the lightest element, are investigated by the first-principles calculations. The metallic character is found over the whole studied pressure range, although PbH4(H2)2 is metastable and easily decompose at low pressure. The decomposition pressure point of 133?GPa is predicted above which PbH4(H2)2 is stable both thermodynamically and dynamically with the C2/m symmetry. Interestedly, all hydrogen atoms pairwise couple into H2 quasi-molecules and remain this style up to 400?GPa in the C2/m structure. At high-pressure, PbH4(H2)2 tends to form the Pb-H2 alloy. The superconductivity of Tc firstly rising and then falling is observed in the C2/m PbH4(H2)2. The maximum of Tc is about 107?K at 230?GPa. The softening of intermediate-frequency phonon induced by more inserted H2 molecules is the main origin of the high Tc. The results obtained represent a significant step toward the understanding of the high pressure behavior of metallic hydrogen and hydrogen-rich materials, which is helpful for obtaining the higher Tc. PMID:26559369

  9. Pressure-induced superconductivity in H2-containing hydride PbH4(H2)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Tingting; Zhong, Guohua; Yang, Chunlei; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-01

    High pressure structure, stability, metallization, and superconductivity of PbH4(H2)2, a H2-containing compound combining one of the heaviest elements with the lightest element, are investigated by the first-principles calculations. The metallic character is found over the whole studied pressure range, although PbH4(H2)2 is metastable and easily decompose at low pressure. The decomposition pressure point of 133 GPa is predicted above which PbH4(H2)2 is stable both thermodynamically and dynamically with the C2/m symmetry. Interestedly, all hydrogen atoms pairwise couple into H2 quasi-molecules and remain this style up to 400 GPa in the C2/m structure. At high-pressure, PbH4(H2)2 tends to form the Pb-H2 alloy. The superconductivity of Tc firstly rising and then falling is observed in the C2/m PbH4(H2)2. The maximum of Tc is about 107 K at 230 GPa. The softening of intermediate-frequency phonon induced by more inserted H2 molecules is the main origin of the high Tc. The results obtained represent a significant step toward the understanding of the high pressure behavior of metallic hydrogen and hydrogen-rich materials, which is helpful for obtaining the higher Tc.

  10. Silicate-H2O Systems at High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailby, N.; Mavrogenes, J. A.; Hermann, J.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    Since the discovery of the second critical endpoint (CP2) in the albite-water system, numerous attempts have been made to determine the pressure and temperature of this CP2 and the mutual solubilities within more complex systems. The P-T position of the CP2 has been estimated for many systems: SiO2 (<10 kb/900 °C, Newton and Manning, 2008); NaAlSi3O8 (15 kb/800 °C, Burnham and Davis, 1974; Shen and Keppler, 1997); Pelite (50 kb/1,000 °C, Schmidt et al., 2004), basalt (50 kb/ 1000 °C, Kessel et al., 2004), Peridotite (38 kb/1000 °C, Mibe et al., 2007). A number of experimental techniques have been used to determine phase relations and H2O solubility in experiments. These include in-situ experimental techniques (e.g., HYDAC; Shen and Keppler, 1997), fluid trap techniques (e.g., diamond traps; Stalder et al., 2000), and single crystal weight-loss techniques (e.g., SiO2-H2O techniques employed by Newton and Manning, 2008). None of these techniques is without difficulties, as H2O rich experiments need to overcome huge retrograde fluid solubilities upon quench in order to determine mutual solubilities at experimental conditions. We have developed a new technique to determine "rock"-H2O relationships at high-P conditions, with particular focus on the shape and locus of solvi in pressure temperature space. In this series of experiments, an oxygen fugacity buffer (Re-ReO2) and a sliding H-fugacity sensor (NiO-Ni-Pd mixture) are combined to monitor H2O activity over the entire range of pressure and temperature. Unlike other techniques, the use of sensor capsules does not require textural interpretation of experiments. H2O activity is related to oxygen and hydrogen fugacity by the reaction: H2O = H2 + ½O2 NiO-Ni-Pd mixtures were placed within a ZrO2 jacket and sealed within a welded 2.3 mm Pt capsule. This 2.3 mm Pt sensor capsule was then encased within a larger, thick walled 6 mm diameter Ag capsule. Pelite-H2O mixtures and oxygen buffers were held within this larger Ag capsule and sealed by capsule swaging. Changes in H2O activity (measured by shifts in the Ni content of the alloy) that occur with changes in pelite- water ratios at isothermal and isobaric conditions, can be used to determine the shape and position of the melt-H2O solvus. Pelite-H2O experiments at 25 kbar show solvus behaviour at 900 °C (temperatures >200 °C) above the wet solidus), indicating that the wet solidus and critical curve do not intersect at these conditions. In contrast, experiments at 35 kbar and 800-900 °C, show a gradual change in H2O activity with increasing water:pelite ratios, indicating that the critical curve and wet solidus become closer with increasing pressure. Solvus topology in the pelite-H2O system, as determined by this series of experiments at 25 and 35 kbar, can also be used to estimate the shape and orientation of solubility isopleths (in terms of P-T). While the seminal work of Burnham and Davis (1974) demonstrated the importance of pressure on inducing H2O saturation in silicate melts, experiments presented here indicate that temperature may also play an important role. Burnham C. W. and Davis N. F. 1974, American Journal of Science. 274; 8, 902-940. Kessel, R., et al 2005, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 237, 873-892. Mibe, K et al. 2007, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 68, 24, 5189-5195. Newton, R. C., and Manning, C. E., 2008, Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Schmidt, M.W.et al, 2004, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 228, 65-84. Shen, A., and Keppler, H. 1997 Nature, 385, 710-712. Stadler, R., et al, 2000, American Mineralogist, 85, 68-77. class="ab'>

  11. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers. PMID:9092469

  12. The effect of H2O on partial melting of garnet peridotite at 3.5 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Travis J.; Hirschmann, Marc M.; Humayun, Munir

    2012-03-01

    We present experimental determinations of the influence of H2O on partial melting of garnet peridotite (+1.5, 2.5, and 5 wt. % added H2O) at 3.5 GPa and 1200-1450°C. Experiments produced complex polyphase regions of quenched melt and equilibrium partial melt compositions were reconstructed by combined EMP and LA-ICP-MS analyses. Mass balance-derived melt fractions (F) range from 0.18 to 0.33 and dissolved water contents range from 4.5 to 23.5 wt. %. One exceptional experiment quenched glass, allowing independent verification of H2O concentration by FTIR. The influence of H2O on melt production is quantified by the temperature difference required to achieve a given F under dry and wet conditions, ΔT, which is controlled by the H2O concentration in partial melts. Melts with 1.5, 5, 10, and 15 wt. % H2O yield ΔT values of 50, 150, 250, and 320°C, respectively, consistent with a cryoscopic parameterization that assumes 3 oxygens per mole of silicate melt. Based on this parameterization, we calculate that beneath oceanic ridges, peridotite H2O storage capacity increases from 0 to 240 ppm from 66 to 110 km depth. For H2O to be solely responsible for melting in the oceanic low velocity zone (LVZ) at least 5.7 wt. % H2O must be dissolved in the melt at 110 km, and considerably more (e.g., 15 wt.% at 220 km) is required for melting throughout the entire observed interval. The addition of H2O results in 3.5 GPa partial melts of garnet peridotite (normalized anhydrous) that are SiO2 and Al2O3 poor (43-50 and 9-11.5 wt. %, respectively), and MgO and CaO rich (18-27 and 7-12 wt. %, respectively) when compared to anhydrous analogues. These effects become highly pronounced deep in the upper mantle, and are opposite to the effect of H2O on melt compositions in the spinel stability field, potentially owing in part to OH-association with network modifying cations in high pressure, depolymerized melts and in part to low-temperature stabilization of garnet, which enhances CaO/Al2O3.

  13. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  14. Partial covering of the emission regions of Q 0528-250 by intervening H2 clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Balashev, S. A.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Ledoux, C.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the molecular hydrogen absorption system at zabs = 2.811 in the spectrum of the blazar Q 0528-250. We demonstrate that the molecular cloud does not cover the background source completely. The partial coverage reveals itself as a residual flux at the bottom of the saturated H2 absorption lines. This amounts to about (2.22 ± 0.54) per cent of the continuum and does not depend on the wavelength. This value is small and it explains why this effect has not been detected in previous studies of this quasar spectrum. However, it is robustly detected and is significantly higher than the zero-flux level at the bottom of the saturated lines of the Lyα forest, (-0.21 ± 0.22) per cent. The presence of the residual flux could be caused by unresolved quasar multicomponents, by light scattered by dust and/or by jet-cloud interaction. The H2 absorption system is very well described by a two-component model without the inclusion of additional components when we take partial coverage into account. The derived total column densities in the H2 absorption components A and B are log N(H2)(cm-2) = 18.10 ± 0.02 and 17.82 ± 0.02, respectively. HD molecules are present only in component B. Given the column density, log N(HD) = 13.33 ± 0.02, we find N(HD)/2N(H2) = (1.48 ± 0.10) × 10- 5, significantly lower than previous estimations. We argue that it is crucial to take into account the partial coverage effects in any analysis of H2 bearing absorption systems, in particular when studying the physical state of the high-redshift interstellar medium.

  15. Partial phase diagram for the system NH3-H2O - The water-rich region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Schwake, A.; Nicol, M.

    1984-01-01

    Phase boundaries of the H2O-NH3 system for (NH3)/x/(H2O)/1-x/ have been determined with diamond-anvil cells for mixtures in two composition ranges: (1) for x in the range from 0 to 0.3, at pressures up to 4 GPa at 21 C, and (2) for x in the range from 0.46 to 0.50, at pressures up to 5 GPa from 150 to 400 K. Phases were identified visually with a microscope and polarized optics. The NH3.2(H2O) phase is strongly anisotropic with a much smaller refractive index than that of ice VII and cracks in two nonperpendicular networks. NH3.H2O has a refractive index closer to that of Ice VII and does not appear to form cracks. Both phases are colorless. Phase boundaries were determined on both increasing and decreasing pressures, and compositions of the ammonia ices were determined by estimating relative amounts of water and ammonia ices at known overall compositions. For low-ammonia compositions (x equal to or less than 0.15), the following assemblages succedd one another as pressure increases: liquid; liquid and Ice VI (at 1.0 + GPa); liquid and Ice VII (at 2.1 GPa); Ice VII and NH3.H2O (at 3.5 GPa). For x in the range from 0.15 to 0.30, the water ice and liquid fields are replaced by the NH3.2(H2O) and liquid field at pressures down to 1.0 GPa and lower.

  16. Removal of H2S from gas stream using combined plasma photolysis technique at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xia, Lanyan; Ge, Xiaoxue; Jing, Hengye; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, H(2)S in gas stream was successfully decomposed at atmospheric pressure by dielectric barrier discharge plasma and VUV-UV radiation from a combined plasma photolysis reactor (CDBD). In comparison with DBD, CDBD enhanced H(2)S removal efficiency significantly at the same applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency was determined as a function of Kr pressure, applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration, and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency could reach as high as 93% at inlet H(2)S concentration of 27.1 mg m(-3), residence time of 0.4 s, and applied voltage of 7.5 kV. The main products were discerned as H(2)O and SO(4)(2-) based on FTIR and IC analysis. PMID:22436586

  17. Advanced High Pressure O2/H2 Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morea, S. F. (Editor); Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the development of advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen stage combustion rocket engines are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the Space Shuttle main engine. The areas of engine technology discussed include fracture and fatigue in engine components, manufacturing and producibility engineering, materials, bearing technology, structure dynamics, fluid dynamics, and instrumentation technology.

  18. Atmospheric Pressure-Induced Effects in the VUV Absorption Spectrum of C2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Wu, R.; Judge, D.

    2002-09-01

    It is well known that high pressure in an absorbing system can cause line broadening, line shifts, and pressure-induced transitions. Real planetary atmospheres consist of a mixture of various molecules. It is well known that the pressure effects vary in nature depending on the characteristics of the collision constituents. It is thus desirable to measure the cross sections of molecules under the planetary atmosphere conditions of interest. For example, in Jupiter's atmosphere typical absorber (e.g., C2H2) abundances vary from 0.2 cm-atms to 5 cm-atms in the presence of H2. The pressure of H2 is in fact about 10(7) times that of C2H2. We have investigated the absorption cross section of C2H2 in the presence of Ar and N2 up to the highest pressure possible using our existing apparatus, namely, a factor of about 1.6 x 10(5) times that of C2H2. We have initially carried out a study of pressure effects in the 150-153.5 nm, 124-126 nm, 119.5-123.0 nm, and 116.5-118.5 nm regions, which covers three different Rydberg transitions of C2H2. In the case of Ar only pressure broadening effects are observed whereas, in the case of N2, pronounced pressure-induced transitions are also observed in addition to the well known spectral broadening. In the future we will investigate the pressure effects on C2H2 in the presence of H2. The preliminary results obtained to date will be presented. This research is based on work supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NAG5-11042.

  19. FT-Raman and high-pressure FT-infrared spectroscopic investigation of monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, Ca(H 2PO 4) 2·H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingwei; Gilson, Denis F. R.; Butler, Ian S.

    1998-10-01

    The FT-infrared spectra of monocalcium monohydrate, Ca(H 2PO 4) 2·H 2O, have been measured as a function of pressure up to 50 kbar. A phase transition occurs at 18 kbar. The Lippincott-Schroeder model for the hydrogen bond has been used to explain the pressure dependence of the vibrational frequencies.

  20. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C-O-H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred. PMID:26813580

  1. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C-O-H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred.

  2. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C–O–H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred. PMID:26813580

  3. Significant Enhancement of H2 Formation in Disk Galaxies under Strong Ram Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    We show for the first time that H2 formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution of H i and H2 components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies can be influenced by the hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intracluster medium. We find that compression of H i caused by RP increases H2 formation in disk galaxies before RP rapidly strips H i, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in H2 density. We also find that the level of this H2 formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter halo, the initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and the disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the H i and H2 mass in disk galaxies under strong RP. We discuss how the correlation between H2 fractions and surface gas densities of disk galaxies evolves with time in the galaxies under RP. We also discuss whether galaxy-wide star formation rates (SFRs) in cluster disk galaxies can be enhanced by RP if the SFRs depend on H2 densities.

  4. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of H2O-CH3OH mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chien, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Complex intra-molecular interactions and the hydrogen-bonding network in H2O-volatile mixtures play critical roles in many dynamics processes in physical chemistry, biology, and Earth and planetary sciences. We used high pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the pressure evolution of vibrational frequencies and bonding behavior in H2O-CH3OH mixtures. We found that the presence of low CH3OH content in H2O increases the transition pressure where water crystallizes to ice VI, but does not significantly change the pressure where ice VI transforms to ice VII. Furthermore, the stiffening rates of C-H stretching frequencies dω/dP in CH3OH significantly decrease upon the crystallization of water, and the softening rates of the O-H stretching frequencies of ice VII are suppressed over a narrow pressure range, after which the frequencies of these modes shift with pressure in ways similar to pure CH3OH and ice VII, respectively. Such complex pressure evolution of Raman frequencies along with pronounced variations in Raman intensities of CH3OH within the sample, and the hysteresis of the water-ice VI phase transition suggest pressure-induced segregation of low content CH3OH from ice VII. These findings indicate the significant influence of volatiles on the crystallization of sub-surface ocean and thermal evolution within large icy planets and satellites. PMID:25704667

  5. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of H2O-CH3OH mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chien, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    Complex intra-molecular interactions and the hydrogen-bonding network in H2O-volatile mixtures play critical roles in many dynamics processes in physical chemistry, biology, and Earth and planetary sciences. We used high pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the pressure evolution of vibrational frequencies and bonding behavior in H2O-CH3OH mixtures. We found that the presence of low CH3OH content in H2O increases the transition pressure where water crystallizes to ice VI, but does not significantly change the pressure where ice VI transforms to ice VII. Furthermore, the stiffening rates of C-H stretching frequencies dω / dP in CH3OH significantly decrease upon the crystallization of water, and the softening rates of the O-H stretching frequencies of ice VII are suppressed over a narrow pressure range, after which the frequencies of these modes shift with pressure in ways similar to pure CH3OH and ice VII, respectively. Such complex pressure evolution of Raman frequencies along with pronounced variations in Raman intensities of CH3OH within the sample, and the hysteresis of the water-ice VI phase transition suggest pressure-induced segregation of low content CH3OH from ice VII.

  6. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of H2O-CH3OH mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chien, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-02-01

    Complex intra-molecular interactions and the hydrogen-bonding network in H2O-volatile mixtures play critical roles in many dynamics processes in physical chemistry, biology, and Earth and planetary sciences. We used high pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the pressure evolution of vibrational frequencies and bonding behavior in H2O-CH3OH mixtures. We found that the presence of low CH3OH content in H2O increases the transition pressure where water crystallizes to ice VI, but does not significantly change the pressure where ice VI transforms to ice VII. Furthermore, the stiffening rates of C-H stretching frequencies dω/dP in CH3OH significantly decrease upon the crystallization of water, and the softening rates of the O-H stretching frequencies of ice VII are suppressed over a narrow pressure range, after which the frequencies of these modes shift with pressure in ways similar to pure CH3OH and ice VII, respectively. Such complex pressure evolution of Raman frequencies along with pronounced variations in Raman intensities of CH3OH within the sample, and the hysteresis of the water-ice VI phase transition suggest pressure-induced segregation of low content CH3OH from ice VII. These findings indicate the significant influence of volatiles on the crystallization of sub-surface ocean and thermal evolution within large icy planets and satellites.

  7. Characterization of partially reduced graphene oxide as room temperature sensor for H2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Sheng; Wang, Wei D; Liang, Xian-Qing; Chu, Wang-Sheng; Song, Wei-Guo; Wang, Wei; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2011-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was synthesized under H(2)/Ar treatment from 100 °C to 900 °C. RGO-300 shows excellent sensitivity to H(2) and a dual sensing mode was observed. The balance between the chemical adsorption capacity and electronic conductivity, and the dominance of either electrons or holes are the key factors. PMID:21566828

  8. The effects of H2-He pressure broadening parameters on the retrieval of brown dwarf atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Ryan; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Barstow, Joanna K.

    2015-11-01

    Brown dwarf atmospheres are compositionally very similar to the gas giant planets, made up of approximately 85% H2 and 15% He, as well as other trace gases such as CH4 and H2O, depending on the spectral type. We have investigated the effects of using pressure broadening parameters related to H2-He broadening and compared them to using air-broadening parameters for each of the major trace gases involved in brown dwarf atmospheres. We have identified from limited data sets that H2-He broadening, relative to air broadening, can act to increase or decrease the Lorentzian broadening experienced by a given transition. This change in Lorentzian broadening is dependent on the gas considered and the transition's associated quantum numbers (such as rotational and vibrational quantum numbers). By altering the transitions lineshape, we also alter its opacity. Some gases are affected significantly at all pressure levels (NH3, CO2, CH4), some at deep (~1bar) pressure levels (CO, H2O), and others not at all (TiO, VO). We conclude, however, that these limited data sets do not provide the complex and comprehensive dependence of pressure broadening on the relevant quantum numbers that is available to air broadening, and we cannot say for certain how much this limits our results until more data is available. Our conclusions demonstrate the need for further study of H2 and He broadening parameters for the relevant gases from both experimental and computational means. We present preliminary results of the knock-on effects that these broadening parameters have for the retrieval of atmospheric composition and thermal structure.

  9. Gibbs free energy of reactions involving SiC, Si3N4, H2, and H2O as a function of temperature and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isham, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are considered for application as structural materials and coating in advanced propulsion systems including nuclear thermal. Three-dimensional Gibbs free energy were constructed for reactions involving these materials in H2 and H2/H2O. Free energy plots are functions of temperature and pressure. Calculations used the definition of Gibbs free energy where the spontaneity of reactions is calculated as a function of temperature and pressure. Silicon carbide decomposes to Si and CH4 in pure H2 and forms a SiO2 scale in a wet atmosphere. Silicon nitride remains stable under all conditions. There was no apparent difference in reaction thermodynamics between ideal and Van der Waals treatment of gaseous species.

  10. Appearance of high-pressure H2O ice on ice-covered terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, S.; Sasaki, T.

    2014-03-01

    A lot of terrestrial exoplanets and free-floating planets have been discovered. Whether terrestrial planets with liquid water exist is an important question to consider, especially in terms of their habitability. Even in a globally ice-covered state, liquid water could exist beneath the surface ice shell because sufficient geothermal heat flow from the planetary interior is likely to melt the interior ice, so that an internal ocean under the surface ice shell could appear (e.g., Hoffman & Schrag 2002). In this study, we argue the conditions that must be satisfied for ice-covered terrestrial planets to have an internal ocean on the timescale of planetary evolution (Ueta & Sasaki 2013). Geothermal heat flow calculated by a parameterized convection model (e.g., McGovern & Schubert 1989) is considered as the heat source at the origin of the internal ocean. By applying and improving the model of Tajika (2008), we also examine how the amount of radiogenic heat and H2O mass affect these conditions. Moreover, we investigate the structures of surface H2O layers of ice-covered planets by considering the effects of ice under high pressure (high-pressure ice). At 1 AU from the central star, as shown in Fig. 1, a 1M.+ planet with 0.6-25 times H2O mass of the Earth could have an internal ocean. When the planet has an H2O mass over 25 times that of the Earth, high-pressure ice layers may appear between the internal ocean and the rock-part of the planet. The results indicate that planetary size and surface H2O mass strongly ristrict the conditions under which an extrasolar terrestrial planet could have an internal ocean without high-pressure ice existing under the internal ocean. The habitability of a planet might be influenced by the existence of such high-pressure ice layers.

  11. Pressure-dependent mobility of negative ions in mixtures of H2O with Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Urquijo, J.; Ruiz-Vargas, G.

    2016-04-01

    The mobility of negative ions in H2O-Ar mixtures has been measured with a pulsed Townsend technique. It has been found that for a fixed value of the density-normalized electric field strength, E/N, the mobility of the H2O anions is strongly pressure dependent. We have also found that even for a single, total gas mixture pressure, even though at first sight the mobility of the anions seems to follow Blanc’s relation closely, a closer view indicates that the mobilities tend to shift to higher values as the water vapour concentration decreases. In spite of the lack of mass spectrometry to assess the mass and abundance of the drifting anions under specific conditions of E/N, water vapour concentration and gas pressure, the present measurements are strongly indicative of a complex ion transport and ion-molecule reaction scheme of daughter H2O anions in the H2O-Ar mixture.

  12. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Atmospheric Pressure He/2%H2O Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Graves, D. B.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure micro-discharges in contact with liquid surfaces are of increasing interest, especially in the bio-medical field. We conduct 1D3v particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a voltage-driven 1 mm width atmospheric pressure He/2% H2O plasma discharge in series with an 0.5 mm width liquid H2O layer and a 1mm width quartz dielectric layer. A previously developed two-temperature hybrid global model of atmospheric pressure He/H2O discharges was used to determine the most important species and collisional reactions to use in the PIC simulations. We found that H13O6+, H5O3-, and electrons were the most prominent charged species, while most of the metastable helium He* was quenched via Penning ionization. The ion-induced secondary emission coefficient γi was assumed to be 0.15 at all surfaces. A series of simulations were conducted at 27.12 MHz with Jrf ~ 800-2200 A/m2. The H2O rotational and vibrational excitation losses were so high that electrons reached the walls at thermal temperatures. We also simulated a much lower frequency case of 50 kHz with Vrf = 10 kV. In this case, the discharge ran in a pure time-varying γ-mode. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC0001939.

  13. The effects of small amounts of H2O on partial melting of model spinel lherzolite in the system CMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; St. C. Oneill, H.

    2003-04-01

    Water (H_2O) is so effective at lowering the solidus temperatures of silicate systems that even small amounts of H_2O are suspected to be important in the genesis of basaltic magmas. The realization that petrologically significant amounts of H_2O can be stored in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (olivine and pyroxenes) has fundamental implications for the understanding of partial melting in the mantle, for it implies that the role that H_2O plays in mantle melting may not be appropriately described by models in which the melting is controlled by hydrous phases such as amphibole. Although the effect of water in suppressing the liquidus during crystallization is quite well understood, such observations do not provide direct quantitative information on the solidus. This is because liquidus crystallization occurs at constant major-element composition of the system, but at unbuffered component activities (high thermodynamic variance). By contrast, for partial melting at the solidus the major-element component activities are buffered by the coexisting crystalline phases (low variance), but the major-element composition of the melt can change as a function of added H_2O. Accordingly we have determined both the solidus temperature and the melt composition in the system CMAS with small additions of H_2O, to 4 wt%, in equilibrium with the four-phase lherzolite assemblage of fo+opx+cpx+sp. Experiments were conducted at 1.1 GPa and temperatures from 1473 K to the dry solidus at 1593 K in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Starting materials were pre-synthesised assemblage of fo+opx+cpx+sp, plus an oxide/hydroxide mix of approximately the anticipated melt composition. H_2O was added as either Mg(OH)_2 or Al(OH)_3. The crystalline assemblage and melt starting mix were added as separate layers inside sealed Pt capsules, to ensure large volumes of crystal-free melt. After the run doubly polished sections were prepared in order to analyse the quenched melt by FTIR spectroscopy, to quantify the amounts of H_2O. This is necessary, as Pt capsules are to some extent open to H_2 diffusion. All melts were found to contain CO_2 (<0.7 wt%), which appears to come mainly from the hydroxide starting materials but also by C diffusion through the Pt capsule. Since CO_2 is experimentally correlated with H_2O, its presence significantly effects the interpretation of the results. Ignoring this complication, we find that 1 wt% H_2O decreases the solidus by ˜40 K; melt compositions do not change greatly, the main effect being a small decrease in MgO.

  14. A System for Incubations at High Gas Partial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed 1 MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well. We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations at hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa, temperatures up to 120°C, and at high gas partial pressure. The composition and partial pressure of gasses can be manipulated during the experiment. To keep costs low, the system is mainly made from off-the-shelf components with only very few custom-made parts. A flexible and inert PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow-through mode. The incubation system described here is usable for versatile purposes, not only the incubation of microorganisms and determination of growth rates, but also for chemical degradation or extraction experiments under high gas saturation, e.g., fluid–gas–rock-interactions in relation to carbon dioxide sequestration. As an application of the system we extracted organic compounds from sub-bituminous coal using H2O as well as a H2O–CO2 mixture at elevated temperature (90°C) and pressure (5 MPa). Subsamples were taken at different time points during the incubation and analyzed by ion chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could detect an increase in sulfate reduction rate upon the addition of methane to the sample. PMID:22347218

  15. High pressure experimental study of eclogite with varying H2O contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A.; Frost, D. J.; Petitgirard, S.; Yaxley, G. M.; Berry, A.; Woodland, A. B.; Pinter, Z.; Vasilyev, P.; Ionov, D. A.; Jacob, D. E.; Pearson, G. D.; Kovacs, I.; Padron-Navarta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Given the strong influence of volatiles on mantle melting processes, it is critical to understand the behaviour of volatiles (such as H2O) in subducted oceanic crustal material (eclogite) during subduction and subsequent recycling and mantle melting processes, and their impacts on volcanism. As natural samples from subduction zones from the deep Earth's interior are largely inaccessible, the only way to determine the H2O content of eclogite is to simulate high pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions equivalent to conditions of the Earth's interior using high-P experimental facilities. A particular interest is to determine the H2O content of eclogitic nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs; such as garnet, clinopyroxene) at the conditions where hydrous phases (such as phengite) are breaking down to release H2O that would then leave the slab. As a starting material, we use average oceanic basalt (GA1, representative of recycled oceanic crust [1]) with varying bulk %H2O (≤7 wt.%). We conducted experiments using GA1 at different P's (6-10 GPa), T's (850-1500°C) and bulk %H2O (up to 7 wt.%) using multi anvil apparatuses. The run products at each P, T, and bulk H2O contents show well-equilibrated eclogitic phase assemblages of garnet ± clinopyroxene ± coesite/stishovite ± rutile ± phengite ± melt ± vapour. Runs (>0.5 wt.% H2O) at 6 GPa and up to ~950°C, and at 8-9 GPa and up to ~1050°C are subsolidus, while towards higher T small melt fractions appear. Similar to previous studies [e.g. 2-6], the stability of phengite varies as a function of P, T, buffering mineral paragenesis and bulk H2O concentration. Phengite breaks down >9 GPa. Eclogitic NAMs and phengite also break down at subsolidus conditions in the presence of excess of hydrous fluids. For instance, K2O in phengite and clinopyroxene decrease with increasing bulk H2O content at subsolidus conditions at given P, T, suggesting a leaching role of K2O by a vapour-rich fluid. [1] Yaxley, G. M. & Green, D. H. Earth Planet Sci Lett 128, 313-325 (1994). [2] Hermann, J. Green, D. H. Earth Planet Sci Lett 188, 149-168 (2001). [3] Hermann J. & Spandler, C. J. J Petrol 49, 717-740 (2008). [4] Schmidt, M. W. Science 272, 1927-1930 (1996). [5] Schmidt, M. W. & Poli, S. Earth Planet Sci Lett 163, 361-379 (1998). [6] Schmidt, M. W. et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 228, 65-84 (2004).

  16. Characteristics of a VHF H2 plasma at high pressures for different discharge gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Chia-Fu; Yang, Ching-Lung; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Chiu, Kuo-Feng; Shi, Jen-Bin; Huang, Sy-Ruen; Wang, Jui-Hao; Tsai, Yu-Jer; Lien, Ting-Kuei

    2015-09-01

    A capacitively coupled VHF H2 plasma (60 MHz) was produced at high pressures, and plasma parameters were examined as a function of pressure and power at different discharge gaps (10, 15, and 20 mm). Here, a balanced power feeding method was adopted to avoid anomalous discharges. It was found that the electron density peaked at a certain pressure. As the discharge gap decreased, the peak pressure increased. The electron temperatures at the discharge gaps of 10 and 20 mm were approximately 8 and 3 eV at high pressures, respectively. In addition, we found that the sheath potential corresponding to the ion bombardment energy with the discharge gap of 10 mm was lower than the theoretical value calculated on the basis of the sheath theory, suggesting the existence of negative ions. Estimation of negative ion concentration was attempted on the basis of the sheath theory taking into consideration negative ions.

  17. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  18. In situ observations of a high-pressure phase of H2O ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Blank, J.G.; Goncharov, A.F.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A previously unknown solid phase of H2O has been identified by its peculiar growth patterns, distinct pressure-temperature melting relations, and vibrational Raman spectra. Morphologies of ice crystals and their pressure-temperature melting relations were directly observed in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell for H2O bulk densities between 1203 and 1257 kilograms per cubic meter at temperatures between -10??and 50??C. Under these conditions, four different ice forms were observed to melt: two stable phases, ice V and ice VI, and two metastable phases, ice IV and the new ice phase. The Raman spectra and crystal morphology are consistent with a disordered anisotropic structure with some similarities to ice VI.

  19. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    DOEpatents

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  20. Ultrahigh-pressure phases of H2O ice predicted using an adaptive genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Min; Umemoto, Koichiro; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2011-12-01

    We propose three phases of H2O under ultrahigh pressure. Our structural search was performed using an adaptive genetic algorithm which allows an extensive exploration of crystal structure at density functional theory accuracy. The sequence of pressure-induced transitions beyond ice X at 0 K should be ice X→Pbcm→Pbca→Pmc21→P21→P21/c phases. Across the Pmc21-P21 transition, the coordination number of oxygen increases from 4 to 5 with a significant increase of density. All stable crystalline phases have nonmetallic band structures up to 7 TPa.

  1. Estimation of partial pressure during graphite conditioning by matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, P.; Prakash, A.; Reddy, D. C.

    2008-05-01

    Plasma Facing Components (PFC) of SST-1 tokamak are designed to be compatible for UHV as it is kept in the main vacuum vessel. Graphite is the most widely used plasma facing material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. However, graphite is porous and absorbs gases, which may be released during plasma operation. Graphite tiles are baked at high temperature of about 1000 °C in high vacuum (10-5 Torr) for several hours before installing them in the tokamak to remove the impurities (mainly water vapour and metal impurities), which may have been deposited during machining of the tiles‥ The measurements of the released gas (such as H2, H2O, CO, CO2, Hydrocarbons, etc.) from graphite tiles during baking are accomplished with the help of a Quadrupole Mass Analyzer (QMA). Since, the output of this measurement is a mass spectrum and not the partial pressures of the residual gases, one needs to adopt some procedure to convert the spectrum to obtain the partial pressures. The conventional method of analysis is tedious and time consuming. We propose a new approach based on constructing a set of linear equations and solving them using matrix operations. This is a simple method compared to the conventional one and also eliminates the limitations of the conventional method. A Fortran program has been developed which identifies the likely gases present in the vacuum system and calculates their partial pressures from the data of the residual gas analyzers. Application of this method of calculating partial pressures from mass spectra data will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Melting phase relations in the system H2O - NH3 at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, E.; Hirose, K.; Komabayashi, T.; Ohishi, Y.; Hirao, N.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    The density models of Uranus and Neptune constrained by their gravitational moments from Voyager mission suggest that mantles of these planets may be predominantly comprised of water (H2O), methane (CH4), and ammonia (NH3). The impurities in pure water would greatly influence the phase relations in the water-rich system expected in the icy mantle, which must be known to construct a plausible planetary model. One of important effects of the impurity is on the liquidus temperature (Tliq), since it decides the actual presence of solid phase within the icy mantle. In order to determine Tliq in H2O-rich region of the H2O - CH4 - NH3 ternary system, the melting phase relations in the H2O - CH4 and H2O - NH3 systems must be accurately known. However, previous melting experiments on each binary system were limited to several gigapascals, thus need to be explored to higher P-T conditions for application in interiors of Uranus and Neptune. We have investigated high-pressure (P) and -temperature (T) melting phase relations in the H2O - NH3 system based on a combination of visual observation and angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at BL10XU, SPring-8. High-P-T conditions were generated in an externally-resistive heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). Starting material was 20wt% NH3 aqueous solution whose composition was checked via Tliq of the solution measured in a DAC at near atmospheric pressure. The aqueous solution was loaded into a gold-lined hole in a preindented rhenium gasket in order to insulate the sample from rhenium. Pressure was determined from the unit-cell volume of gold liner. Melting and freezing of the sample were detected by monitoring disappearance/appearance of diffraction peaks of solid and diffuse scattering of liquids, as well as observing melting/crystallization of crystal grains under microscope. Up to 20 GPa at room temperature, in addition to ice VII, diffraction peaks of bcc-like phase, which is most likely to be the reported phase VI of ammonia monohydrate (AMH VI), were observed, although the diffraction peaks were either too broad or too few to specify its structure. When temperature was raised until diffuse scattering appeared, the diffraction peaks of AMH VI disappeared, indicating ice VII is the liquidus phase. Newly obtained Tliq were higher than all the exiting melting curves of pure H2O determined in externally-heated DAC by 50 K at 15 GPa at minimum. This contradicts the previous reports that the H2O - NH3 system is eutectic, i.e. Tliq of our sample should be lower than the melting temperature of the H2O end member. We will discuss possible sources for this discrepancy. We also propose a new phase diagram of the system H2O - NH3 and possible implications for the structure of the icy planets.

  3. Quantification of the CO2 budget and H2O-CO2 systematics in subduction-zone magmas through the experimental hydration of melt inclusions in olivine at high H2O pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Nikita; Portnyagin, Maxim; Botcharnikov, Roman; Gurenko, Andrey; Hoernle, Kaj; Holtz, François

    2015-09-01

    Reliable evaluation of CO2 contents in parental arc magmas, which can be preserved in melt inclusions in phenocrysts, is required to verify the proposed efficiency of CO2 recycling at convergent margins. Quantification of bulk CO2 concentration in melt inclusions requires their complete homogenization. Using samples from lavas from the Bulochka vent of Klyuchevskoy Volcano (Kamchatka), we applied a novel experimental approach to homogenize and re-equilibrate naturally dehydrated (<1 wt.% H2O) melt inclusions from high-Fo (85-91 mol.%) olivine. The experiments were performed at temperatures of 1150-1400 °C, pressures of up to 500 MPa, under dry to H2O-saturated conditions and with oxygen fugacity ranging from CCO to QFM+3.3. No homogenization was achieved at dry conditions. Complete dissolution of fluid bubbles (homogenization) in the melt inclusions was achieved at H2O pressures of 500 MPa and temperature of 1150 °C, when water content in the melt inclusions reached 4-5 wt.% H2O. The CO2 content in the homogenized inclusions is 3800 ± 140 ppm and CO2/Nb = 3000 ± 420, which are the highest values reported so far for the typical middle-K primitive arc melts and fall within the range of values inferred from the magmatic flux and volcanic gas data for primary arc magma compositions. About 83% of the CO2 in Klyuchevskoy magmas is likely to be derived from the subducting slab and can be attributed to flux melting with a fluid having a CO2/H2O ratio of ∼0.06. The H2O and CO2 contents in the melt inclusions after hydrous experiments were found to correlate positively with each other and negatively with the volume of fluid bubble, reflecting increasing internal pressure in melt inclusions with increasing melt hydration. Therefore, similar trends observed in some natural sets of melt inclusions can be attributed to a partial dehydration of melts after entrapment, operating simultaneously with or following post-entrapment crystallization. Our study implies that the process of post-entrapment dehydration can be completely reversed under high pressure experimental conditions. If temperature, redox conditions and pressure of melt inclusion entrapment can be independently estimated, then our novel experimental approach (homogenization at high H2O pressure) can be used to reconstruct the initial CO2 content and also the entire composition of melt inclusions in olivine, including their initial H2O content, from any type of volcanic rock. With this approach volatiles in ancient lavas can also be determined, expanding our knowledge of volatile recycling further back in Earth history.

  4. Pressure optimization of high harmonic generation in a differentially pumped Ar or H2 gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayrac, M.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Anumula, S.; Boran, Y.; Hart, N. A.; Kaya, N.; Strohaber, J.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    We experimentally studied the dependence of high harmonic generation in argon and molecular hydrogen on pressure changes in a gas jet that cause variations of the phase matching conditions and absorption. The study was performed at a peak laser intensity of 1.5 1014 W/cm2. To enable measurements over a wide range of pressures, we employed differential pumping with an additional cell (20 cm3 volume) enclosing the gas jet. By increasing the pressure in the gas jet up to a maximum of 1.5 bars with argon or 0.5 bars with hydrogen, we observed an increase in the high harmonic (HH) yield until an optimum pressure of 0.2 bars was reached for Ar, beyond which the output began decreasing. For H2, we observed an increase of the HH output up to the maximum pressure of 0.5 bars. This pressure-dependence study allowed us to achieve a tenfold enhancement in the high harmonic yield at the optimum pressure.

  5. Hole superconductivity in H2S and other sulfides under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Marsiglio, F.

    2015-04-01

    Superconductivity at temperatures up to 190 K at high pressures has recently been observed in H2S and interpreted as conventional BCS-electron-phonon-driven superconductivity (Drozdov et al., 2014). Instead we propose that it is another example of the mechanism of hole superconductivity at work. Within this mechanism high temperature superconductivity arises when holes conduct through negatively charged anions in close proximity. We propose that electron transfer from H to S leads to conduction by holes in a nearly full band arising from direct overlap of S= p orbitals in a planar structure. The superconductivity is non-phononic and is driven by pairing of heavily dressed hole carriers to lower their kinetic energy. Possible explanations for the observed lower critical temperature of D2S are discussed. We predict that high temperature superconductivity will also be found in other sulfides under high pressure such as Li2S,Na2S and K2S .

  6. Hydrogen negative-ion surface production on diamond materials in low-pressure H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartry, Gilles; Achkasov, Kostiantyn; Pardanaud, Cédric; Layet, Jean-Marc; Simonin, Alain; Gicquel, Alix; PIIM Collaboration; IRFM Collaboration; LSPM Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    Negative-ion sources producing H-current density of ~200 A/m2 are required for the heating of the fusion plasma of the international project ITER. The only up-to-date solution to reach such a high H-negative-ion current is the use of cesium (Cs). Deposition of Cs on the negative-ion source walls lowers the material work function and allows for high electron-capture efficiency by incident particles and thus, high negative ion yields. However, severe drawbacks to the use of Cs have been identified and its elimination from the fusion negative-ion sources would be highly valuable. Volume production is not efficient enough at low-pressure to reach the high current required. Therefore, we are working on alternative solutions to produce high yield of H-negative-ions on surfaces in Cs-free H2 plasmas. In this communication, we will detail the methodology employed to study negative-ion surface production. In particular we will describe how the negative-ions are extracted from the plasma, and how we can obtain information on surface production mechanisms from the measurement of the H-energy distribution functions. We will present some results obtained on diamond surfaces and show that diamond is a promising candidate as a negative-ion enhancer material in low-pressure H2 plasmas. EFDA, FR-FCM, ANR, PACA are acknowledged for their support.

  7. Wall pressure fluctuations in rectangular partial enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, T.; Camussi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations generated within rectangular partial enclosures (RPEs) have been studied experimentally for a broad range of geometrical parameters. The geometry represents a simplified version of a new generation trapped vortex combustor and consisted of a rectangular cavity connected to a neck of smaller size. Wall pressure fluctuations have been measured through wall mounted microphones providing single and multi-variate pressure statistics both in the physical space and in the Fourier domain. In order to interpret the pressure signals, aerodynamic and acoustic investigations have been carried out as well for several cavity-neck ratios. The analysis of the acoustic response of the cavity has been conducted both numerically and experimentally and a simple theoretical model has been proposed to predict the frequency of the acoustic resonances. The aerodynamic study has been carried out through PIV measurements that provided characterization in terms of the geometrical parameters of both the large-scale vortex generated within the cavity and the recirculation zone formed upstream of the neck. The use of the POD decomposition permitted us to correlate the dynamics of the recirculation with the observed pressure statistics. The aerodynamic and acoustic investigations allowed us to interpret exhaustively the wall pressure cross-statistics and to separate contributions induced by hydrodynamic and purely acoustic pressure fluctuations.

  8. Partial pressure analysis in space testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilford, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    For vacuum-system or test-article analysis it is often desirable to know the species and partial pressures of the vacuum gases. Residual gas or Partial Pressure Analyzers (PPA's) are commonly used for this purpose. These are mass spectrometer-type instruments, most commonly employing quadrupole filters. These instruments can be extremely useful, but they should be used with caution. Depending on the instrument design, calibration procedures, and conditions of use, measurements made with these instruments can be accurate to within a few percent, or in error by two or more orders of magnitude. Significant sources of error can include relative gas sensitivities that differ from handbook values by an order of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with pressure by as much as two orders of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with time after exposure to chemically active gases, and the dependence of the sensitivity for one gas on the pressures of other gases. However, for most instruments, these errors can be greatly reduced with proper operating procedures and conditions of use. In this paper, data are presented illustrating performance characteristics for different instruments and gases, operating parameters are recommended to minimize some errors, and calibrations procedures are described that can detect and/or correct other errors.

  9. A new type of functional chemical sensitizer {MgH}2 for improving pressure desensitization resistance of emulsion explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Yan, S. L.; Ma, H. H.; Shen, Z. W.; Liu, R.

    2015-07-01

    In millisecond-delay blasting and deep water blasting projects, traditional emulsion explosives sensitized by the chemical sensitizer NaNO2 often encounter incomplete explosion or misfire problems because of the "pressure desensitization" phenomenon, which seriously affects blasting safety and construction progress. A MgH2 -sensitized emulsion explosive was invented to solve these problems. Experimental results show that MgH2 can effectively reduce the problem of pressure desensitization. In this paper, the factors which influence the pressure desensitization of two types of emulsion explosives are studied, and resistance to this phenomenon of MgH2 -sensitized emulsion explosives is discussed.

  10. A new type of functional chemical sensitizer MgH2 for improving pressure desensitization resistance of emulsion explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Yan, S. L.; Ma, H. H.; Shen, Z. W.; Liu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In millisecond-delay blasting and deep water blasting projects, traditional emulsion explosives sensitized by the chemical sensitizer NaNO2 often encounter incomplete explosion or misfire problems because of the "pressure desensitization" phenomenon, which seriously affects blasting safety and construction progress. A MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosive was invented to solve these problems. Experimental results show that MgH2 can effectively reduce the problem of pressure desensitization. In this paper, the factors which influence the pressure desensitization of two types of emulsion explosives are studied, and resistance to this phenomenon of MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosives is discussed.

  11. Pressure-induced H2 opacity in the 5-micron region. [of outer planet spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Tipping, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The H2 opacity arising from the pure-rotational hexadecapole-induced transitions occurring during H2-H2 and H2-He collisions, and from the hexadecapole-induced and the quadrupole-induced transitions in H2-He collisions, has been calculated. The hexadecapole-induced and quadrupole-induced contributions from H2-H2 collisions are important H2 opacities in the frequency range from 700-3000/cm for temperatures appropriate to the outer planets. It is concluded that this opacity is needed in addition to the opacity from the extrapolation of the 0-0 and 1-0 H2-H2 collisionally-induced bands to interpret the spectrum at 5 microns for the outer planets.

  12. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  13. Partial Melting of Garnet Lherzolite with H2o and CO2 at 3 GPa: Implications for Intraplate Magmatism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, A.; Medard, E.; Laporte, D.

    2014-12-01

    The origin and source rock of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth`s upper mantle have been under debate for a long time. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggest a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 3 GPa and 1345-1445 C in a piston-cylinder apparatus using mixtures of natural lherzolite with 0.4-0.7 wt% H2O and 0.4-0.7 wt% CO2 as starting materials. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. Mineral and melt phases were analysed with electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The degree of partial melting in the experiments ranges from ~20% to ~4% and decreases with decreasing temperature and decreasing volatile content in the starting material. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. Garnet is present in experiments performed below 1420 C. The amount of clinopyroxene decreases with increasing degree of partial melting and volatile concentration in the starting material. Depending on the capsule design the melts quenched to glasses or to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass. The composition of the partial melts ranges from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. The alkali concentration increases and the SiO2 concentration decreases with decreasing degree of partial melting and increasing volatile concentration in the starting material. The partial melts are similar in many aspects to alkali intraplate magmas (basanites to melilitites), although they are richer in MgO. Compositions closer to natural basanites could be obtained either at lower degree of melting (and lower volatile contents) or through olivine fractionation. Our results strongly suggests that. SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by mantle melting of garnet-lherzolite in the presence of H2O and CO2 in the Earth`s upper mantle at 3 GPa (~100 km depth).

  14. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting at UHP conditions could therefore have a dramatic rheological effect and actually limits continental rocks subduction and facilitates their exhumation.

  15. Thin film devices used as oxygen partial pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canady, K. S.; Wortman, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of zinc oxide films to be used in an oxygen partial pressure sensor is measured as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and other atmospheric constituents. Time response following partial pressure changes is studied as a function of temperature and environmental changes.

  16. Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H.; Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Naumenko, N.; Tugarinov, S.

    1998-07-01

    Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

  17. Measurement and Simulation of Spontaneous Raman Scattering Spectra in High-Pressure, Fuel-Rich H2-Air Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    Rotational vibrational spontaneous Raman spectra (SRS) of H2, N2, and H2O have been measured in H2-air flames at pressures up to 30 atm as a first stem towards establishing a comprehensive Raman spectral database for temperatures and species in high-pressure combustion. A newly developed high-pressure burner facility provides steady, reproducible flames with a high degree of flow precision. We have obtained an initial set of measurements that indicate the spectra are of sufficient quality in terms of spectral resolution, wavelength coverage, and signal-to-noise ratio for use in future reference standards. The fully resolved Stokes and anti-Stokes shifted SRS spectra were collected in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm) using pulse-stretched 532 nm excitation and a non-intensified CCD spectrograph with a high-speed shutter. Reasonable temperatures were determined via the intensity distribution of rotational H2 lines at stoichiometry and fuel-rich conditions. Theoretical Raman spectra of H2 were computed using a semi-classical harmonic-oscillator model with recent pressure broadening data and were compared with experimental results. The data and simulation indicated that high-J rotational lines of H2 might interfere with the N2 vibrational Q-branch lines, and this could lead to errors in N2-Raman thermometry based on the line-fitting method. From a comparison of N2 Q-branch spectra in lean H2 low-pressure (1.2 atm) and high-pressure (30 atm) flames, we found no significant line-narrowing or -broadening effects at the current spectrometer resolution of 0.04 nm.

  18. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 from enstatite to H2 fluid under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Hisako; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Okada, Taku; Nakano, Satoshi; Yagi, Takehiko

    2015-12-01

    Stability and phase relations of coexisting enstatite and H2 fluid were investigated in the pressure and temperature regions of 3.1-13.9 GPa and 1500-2000 K using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells. XRD measurements showed decomposition of enstatite upon heating to form forsterite, periclase, and coesite/stishovite. In the recovered samples, SiO2 grains were found at the margin of the heating hot spot, suggesting that the SiO2 component dissolved in the H2 fluid during heating, then precipitated when its solubility decreased with decreasing temperature. Raman and infrared spectra of the coexisting fluid phase revealed that SiH4 and H2O molecules formed through the reaction between dissolved SiO2 and H2. In contrast, forsterite and periclase crystals were found within the hot spot, which were assumed to have replaced the initial orthoenstatite crystals without dissolution. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 components of enstatite in H2 fluid, as well as that observed in the forsterite H2 system and the quartz H2 system, implies that H2-rich fluid enhances Mg/Si fractionation between the fluid and solid phases of mantle minerals.

  19. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 from enstatite to H2 fluid under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Hisako; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Okada, Taku; Nakano, Satoshi; Yagi, Takehiko

    2016-04-01

    Stability and phase relations of coexisting enstatite and H2 fluid were investigated in the pressure and temperature regions of 3.1-13.9 GPa and 1500-2000 K using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells. XRD measurements showed decomposition of enstatite upon heating to form forsterite, periclase, and coesite/stishovite. In the recovered samples, SiO2 grains were found at the margin of the heating hot spot, suggesting that the SiO2 component dissolved in the H2 fluid during heating, then precipitated when its solubility decreased with decreasing temperature. Raman and infrared spectra of the coexisting fluid phase revealed that SiH4 and H2O molecules formed through the reaction between dissolved SiO2 and H2. In contrast, forsterite and periclase crystals were found within the hot spot, which were assumed to have replaced the initial orthoenstatite crystals without dissolution. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 components of enstatite in H2 fluid, as well as that observed in the forsterite H2 system and the quartz H2 system, implies that H2-rich fluid enhances Mg/Si fractionation between the fluid and solid phases of mantle minerals.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Interference of Spontaneous Raman Scattering in High-Pressure Fuel-Rich H2-Air Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the spectral interferences in the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra of major combustion products in 30-atm fuel-rich hydrogen-air flames. An effective methodology is introduced to choose an appropriate line-shape model for simulating Raman spectra in high-pressure combustion environments. The Voigt profile with the additive approximation assumption was found to provide a reasonable model of the spectral line shape for the present analysis. The rotational/vibrational Raman spectra of H2, N2, and H2O were calculated using an anharmonic-oscillator model using the latest collisional broadening coefficients. The calculated spectra were validated with data obtained in a 10-atm fuel-rich H2-air flame and showed excellent agreement. Our quantitative spectral analysis for equivalence ratios ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 revealed substantial amounts of spectral cross-talk between the rotational H2 lines and the N2 O-/Q-branch; and between the vibrational H2O(0,3) line and the vibrational H2O spectrum. We also address the temperature dependence of the spectral cross-talk and extend our analysis to include a cross-talk compensation technique that removes the nterference arising from the H2 Raman spectra onto the N2, or H2O spectra.

  1. Sensor for headspace pressure and H2O concentration measurements in closed vials by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingdong; Wang, Guishi; Cao, Zhensong; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    The concentration of H2O and the pressure in the headspace of vials are simultaneously measured by a tunable diode laser sensor based on absorption spectroscopy techniques. The 7168.437 cm-1 spectral line of H2O is chosen as the sensing transition for its strong absorption strength and being reasonably far away from its neighboring molecular transitions. In order to prevent interference absorption by ambient water vapor in the room air, a difference between the measured signal and the referenced signal is used to calculate the pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials, eliminating the need for inert gas purges and calibration with known gas. The validation of the sensor is conducted in a static vial, yielding an accuracy of 1.23% for pressure and 3.81% for H2O concentration. The sensitivity of the sensor is estimated to be about 2.5 Torr for pressure and 400 ppm for H2O concentration over a 3 cm absorption path length respectively. Accurate measurements for commercial freeze-dried products demonstrate the in-line applications of the sensor for the pharmaceutical industry.

  2. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  3. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in aNuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

    2007-01-02

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository forspent fuel and high-level waste, leads to hydrogen gas generation in thebackfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-termrepository safety. Previous modeling studies used a constant H2generation rate. However, iron corrosion and H2 generation rates varywith time, depending on factors such as water chemistry, wateravailability, and water contact area. To account for these factors andfeedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to ironcorrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena thatare driven by gas pressure buildup and water consumption. Resultsindicate that if H2 generation rates are dynamically calculated based ona chemistry model, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup are muchsmaller compared to a simulation in which the coupling between flow andreactive transport mechansism is neglected.

  4. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Masamitsu; Setoguchi, Kazuhide; Hara, Masahiro

    1998-12-31

    Global environmental issues, such as global warming and acid rain, have been recently the focus of much attention on the international scene. Along with various continuing efforts to reduce sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions, there has been an urgent need to develop technology to reduce emissions of CO{sub 2}, one of the principal materials responsible for global warming. The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), an environmental friendly power generation system of high thermal efficiency, is being developed via various approaches around the world. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. has conducted R and D on a Coal Partial Combustor (hereinafter referred to as CPC) as a gasifier since 1984, jointly with the Center for Coal Utilization, Japan. Since 1994, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Electric Power Development Co., Ltd have been cooperating. Through this activity, a structure of the CPC has been established, and the influences of operating parameters on performance have been clarified. The purpose of the present study is to apply these developed CPC techniques to a Pressurized CPC (hereinafter referred to as PCPC) as a gasifier for the IGCC system. For the present study, the authors conducted systematic experiments on the air-blown process with a two stage dry feed system, using a 7 t/d-coal element test facility and a 25 t/d-coal pilot scale plant, clarified the influence of coal feed ratio, of oxygen enrichment, and of coal types on coal gasification performance. This paper describes conceptual structure of the PCPC, the test results of a 7 t/d-coal PCPC element test facility, and also some information of a 25 t/d-coal PCPC pilot plant which is now under the start-up operation phase.

  5. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Y.; Suda, Y.; Setoguchi, K.; Hara, M.

    1999-07-01

    As an estimated amount of coal deposits is large and coal is widely distributed in the world, supply of coal is stable. It is considered that coal will be one of the most important fuels for power generation in the future. However, the global warming problem has recently become a subject of the world, and one of the principal substances responsible for global warming is CO{sub 2} which coal exhausts. To develop a technology for reducing emissions of CO{sub 2} is an urgent need. The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), an environment-friendly power generation system of high thermal efficiency, is being developed via various approaches around the world. Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. has conducted R and D on a Coal Partial Combustor (hereinafter referred to as CPC) as a gasifier since 1984, jointly with Center for Coal Utilization, Japan. Since 1994, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. have been cooperating. Through this activity, a structure of the CPC has been established, and influences of operating parameters on performance have been clarified. The purpose of the present study is to develop a Pressurized CPC (hereinafter referred to as PCPC) as a gasifier for the IGCC system by applying these techniques. For the present study, the authors had conducted systematic experiments using a 7 t/d bench scale test facility. After that they had constructed a 25 t/d pilot plant in the yard of Wakamatsu coal utilization research center, Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., in Japan in November 1997, and have conducted various tests, such as air-blown two-stage gasification, oxygen-enriched gasification, the expansion of coal varieties. This paper describes conceptual structure of the PCPC and the test results of a 25 t/d pilot plant.

  6. Hydrogen CARS thermometry in a high-pressure H2-air flame. Test of H2 temperature accuracy and influence of line width by comparison with N2 CARS as reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussong, J.; Lckerath, R.; Stricker, W.; Bruet, X.; Joubert, P.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.

    This work describes a further step towards the determination of the temperature accuracy of H2 Q-branch CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) at high pressure with regard to the influence of the H2 line widths. In laminar steady H2/air flames in the pressure range 1-15 bar and at fuel-rich conditions with stoichiometries between two and four, quasi-simultaneous temperature measurements were performed with H2 and N2 CARS. The temperature values deduced from H2 CARS are in good agreement with the reference temperature from N2 CARS. The influence of different line-width contributions on the accuracy of H2 Q-branch thermometry was investigated in detail.

  7. Raman spectroscopic quantitative study of NaCl-CaCl2-H2O system at high temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Mao, Shi-De; Zheng, Hai-Fei

    2014-07-01

    Raman spectra features of the ternary system NaCl-CaCl2-H2O under high temperatures and high pressures were systematically studied in the present work by using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and Raman shifts of quartz to determine pressures, and it has been obtained for the quantitative relationship between Raman shifts of the O-H stretching band of water, mass fractions of solutes and pressures was obtained. The mass fractions of salts, where salinity of NaCl equal to that of CaCl2, are 4.0 mass %, 8.0 mass %, and 12.0 mass %, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the standardized Raman frequency shift differences of the O-H stretching vibration (deltav(O0H)) rise with the increasing temperatures when the mass fractions of salts and pressures of the NaCl-CaCl2-H2O system remain constant. deltav(O-H) increases with the increase in mass fractions of salts in the system when the temperatures and pressures are constant. Linear relationship between deltav(O-H) and pressure with similar slopes can be found for the NaCl-CaCl2-H2O system with different salinities. The quantitative relationship between deltav(O-H), temperature (T), pressure (P), and mass fraction of solute (M) is P = -31.892 deltav(O-H) + 10.131T + 222.816M - 3 183.567, where the valid PTM range of the equation is 200 MPa < or = P < or = 1 700 MPa, 273 K < or = T < or = 539 K and M < or = 12 mass %. The equation can be used as a geobarometer in the studies of fluid inclusions of NaCl-CaCl2-H2O system with equal salinities. The method, as a direct geological detecting technique, has a potential application value. PMID:25269273

  8. A theoretical study of MgH2 ambient and high-pressure phases using NQCC parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Marjan A.

    2014-12-01

    Quadrupolar parameters of nuclei can be used as a tool to understand the electronic structure of the compounds. Magnesium hydride (MgH2) is a potential hydrogen storage material due to its outstanding hydrogen capacity, however, its high thermodynamic stability is unfavorable for dehydrogenation processes. Understanding the bonding nature of Mg and H is essential for improving its dehydrogenation performance. In this work the charge density distribution in MgH2 is studied. For this purpose, using calculated NQCCs of hydrogen atoms, the electronic structure of α-MgH2 with several high pressure forms of MgH2 were compared. The results show that in the high pressure phases (β, γ, and δ) some hydrogens have very small NQCC and therefore these hydrogens form weaker bond with Mg. In other words, easier condition for dehydrogenation in pressure-induced forms is expected. The electric field gradient (EFG) at the site of quadrupolar nuclei were calculated to obtain NQCC parameters using Gaussian 03 at B3LYP/6-31G level of theory. The selected level and basis set give the rather acceptable qualitative NQCCs of hydrogen atoms.

  9. First principles study of pressure induced structural phase transition in hydrogen storage material—MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaprabha, S.; Asvinimeenaatci, A. T.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Iyakutti, K.

    2012-01-01

    First principles calculation were performed using Vienna ab-initio simulation package within the frame work of density functional theory (DFT) to understand the electronic properties of magnesium hydride. At normal pressure, the most stable structure of MgH 2 is rutile type with a wide band gap of 3.52 eV, which agrees well with the available data. A pressure induced semi-conductor to metallic transition at a pressure of 92.54 GPa is predicted. Our results indicate a sequence of pressure induced structural phase transition in MgH 2. The obtained sequence of phase transition was α→γ→β→δ→ε at a pressure of 0.37 GPa, 3.89 GPa,7.23 GPa and 11.26 GPa, respectively. Thus our results indicate that MgH 2 is one of the best hydrogen storage material and the maximum storage capacity achieved was 7.7%.

  10. Thermal Conductivity Measurements of H2O-Methanol Mixtures at High Pressure Using Time Domain Thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that the presence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze compound, in the primordial oceans in icy moons may affect the internal thermal evolution and the crystallization of primordial oceans. We have measured the thermal conductivity of H2O alloyed with methanol at high pressure and room temperature using time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) combined with diamond anvil cell techniques. The TDTR utilizes ultrafast optical pulses to pump and probe the dynamics of thermal diffusion, enabling precise measurements of thermal conductivity under extreme conditions. We found that the addition of methanol into the H2O suppresses the effective thermal conductivity of H2O-methanol compound. We will discuss geophysical implications of these measurements to the thermal evolution within the icy moons.

  11. Theoretical calculations of pressure broadening coefficients for H2O perturbed by hydrogen or helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Pollack, James B.

    1995-01-01

    Halfwidths were calculated for H2O with H2 as a broadening gas and were estimated for He as the broadening species. The calculations used the model of Robert and Bonamy with parabolic trajectories and all relevant terms in the interaction potential. The calculations investigated the dependence of the halfwidth on the order of the atom-atom expansion, the rotational states, and the temperature in the range 200 to 400K. Finally, calculations were performed for many transitions of interest in the 5 micrometer window region of the spectrum. The resulting data will be supplied to Dr. R. Freedman for extracting accurate water mixing ratios from the analysis of the thermal channels for the Net Flux experiment on the Galileo probe.

  12. On the Stark effect in open shell complexes exhibiting partially quenched electronic angular momentum: Infrared laser Stark spectroscopy of OH-C2H2, OH-C2H4, and OH-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2015-08-01

    The Stark effect is considered for polyatomic open shell complexes that exhibit partially quenched electronic angular momentum. Matrix elements of the Stark Hamiltonian represented in a parity conserving Hund's case (a) basis are derived for the most general case, in which the permanent dipole moment has projections on all three inertial axes of the system. Transition intensities are derived, again for the most general case, in which the laser polarization has projections onto axes parallel and perpendicular to the Stark electric field, and the transition dipole moment vector is projected onto all three inertial axes in the molecular frame. Simulations derived from this model are compared to experimental rovibrational Stark spectra of OH-C2H2, OH-C2H4, and OH-H2O complexes formed in helium nanodroplets.

  13. Influence of under pressure dissolved oxygen on trichloroethylene degradation by the H2O2/TiO2 process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread use of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its frequent release into the environment has caused many environmental and health problems. In this study the degradation of TCE at different micromolar concentrations was investigated in a stainless steel reactor with various concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 at different oxygen pressures and three different pHs. Methods To examine the synergistic effect of under pressure oxygen on TCE degradation, the concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 as well as pH were first optimized, and then the experiments were performed under optimal conditions. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (FID) was used to measure TCE concentrations. Results Results showed that the percentage of TCE degradation without pressurized oxygen was low and it increased with increasing pressure of oxygen at all initial concentrations of TCE. The degradation percentages without oxygen pressure were 48.27%, 51.22%, 58.13% and 64.33% for TCE concentrations of 3000, 1500, 300 and 150 μg/L respectively. At an oxygen pressure of 2.5 atmospheres (atm) the percent degradation of TCE reached 84.85%, 89.14%, 93.13% and 94.99% respectively for the aforementioned TCE concentrations. Conclusions The results of this study show that the application of dissolved oxygen under pressure increases the efficiency of the H2O2/TiO2 process on the degradation of TCE and can be used along with other oxidants as an effective method for the removal of this compound from aqueous solutions. PMID:24359702

  14. First-principles study on the structural and electronic properties of metallic HfH2 under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunxian; Huang, Xiaoli; Duan, Defang; Tian, Fubo; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Da; Zhao, Zhonglong; Sha, Xiaojing; Yu, Hongyu; Zhang, Huadi; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures and properties of hafnium hydride under pressure are explored using the first-principles calculations based on density function theory. The material undergoes pressure-induced structural phase transition I4/mmm→Cmma→P21/m at 180 and 250 GPa, respectively, and all of these structures are metallic. The superconducting critical temperature Tc values of I4/mmm, Cmma, and P21/m are 47–193 mK, 5.99–8.16 K and 10.62–12.8 K at 1 atm, 180 and 260 GPa, respectively. Furthermore, the bonding nature of HfH2 is investigated with the help of the electron localization function, the difference charge density and Bader charge analyses, which show that HfH2 is classified as a ionic crystal with the charges transferring from Hf atom to H. PMID:26096298

  15. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  16. H2O storage capacity of olivine at 5-8 GPa and consequences for dehydration partial melting of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardia, P.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Tenner, T. J.

    2012-09-01

    The H2O storage capacities of peridotitic minerals place crucial constraints on the onset of hydrous partial melting in the mantle. The storage capacities of minerals in equilibrium with a peridotite mineral assemblage (“peridotite-saturated” minerals) are lower than when the minerals coexist only with fluid because hydrous partial melt is stabilized at a lower activity of H2O. Here, we determine peridotite-saturated olivine H2O storage capacities from 5 to 8 GPa and 1400-1500 °C in layered experiments designed to grow large (∼100-150 μm) olivine crystals in equilibrium with the full hydrous peridotite assemblage (melt+ol+opx+gar+cpx). The peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C rises from 57±26 ppm (by wt.) at 5 GPa to 254±60 ppm at 8 GPa. Combining these with results of a parallel study at 10-13 GPa (Tenner et al., 2011, CMP) yields a linear relation applicable from 5 to 13 GPa for peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C, CH2Oolivine(ppm)=57.6(±16)×P(GPa)-169(±18). Storage capacity diminishes with increasing temperature, but is unaffected by variable total H2O concentration between 0.47 and 1.0 wt%. Both of these are as predicted for the condition in which the water activity in the melt is governed principally by the cryoscopic requirement of melt stability for a given temperature below the dry solidus. Measured olivine storage capacities are in agreement or slightly greater than those predicted by a model that combines data from experimental freezing point depression and olivine/melt partition coefficients of H2O (Hirschmann et al., 2009). Considering the temperature along the mantle geotherm, as well as available constraints on garnet/olivine and pyroxene/olivine partitioning of H2O (DH2Ogar/ol,DH2Opx/ol), we estimate the peridotite H2O storage capacity in the low velocity zone. The CH2O required to initiate melting between 150 and 250 km depth is between 270 and 855 ppm. We conclude that hydrous partial melting does not occur at these depths for H2O concentrations (50-200 ppm) typical of the convecting upper mantle sampled by mid-ocean ridge basalts.

  17. Deactivation of lipopolysaccharide by Ar and H2 inductively coupled low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartis, E. A. J.; Barrett, C.; Chung, T.-Y.; Ning, N.; Chu, J.-W.; Graves, D. B.; Seog, J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma system, we study the effects of direct plasma, plasma-generated high-energy photons in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV), and radical treatments on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is a biomolecule found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and a potent stimulator of the immune system composed of polysaccharide and lipid A, which contains six aliphatic chains. LPS film thickness spun on silicon was monitored by ellipsometry while the surface chemistry was characterized before and after treatments by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, biological activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay under (a) a sensitive regime (sub-µM concentrations of LPS) and (b) a bulk regime (above µM concentrations of LPS) after plasma treatments. Direct plasma treatment causes rapid etching and deactivation of LPS in both Ar and H2 feed gases. To examine the effect of UV/VUV photons, a long-pass filter with a cut-off wavelength of 112 nm was placed over the sample. H2 UV/VUV treatment causes material removal and deactivation due to atomic and molecular UV/VUV emission while Ar UV/VUV treatment shows minimal effects as Ar plasma does not emit UV/VUV photons in the transmitted wavelength range explored. Interestingly, radical treatments remove negligible material but cause deactivation. Based on the amphiphilic structure of LPS, we expect a lipid A rich surface layer to form at the air-water interface during sample preparation with polysaccharide layers underneath. XPS shows that H2 plasma treatment under direct and UV/VUV conditions causes oxygen depletion through removal of C-O and O-C = O bonds in the films, which does not occur in Ar treatments. Damage to these groups can remove aliphatic chains that contribute to the pyrogenicity of LPS. Radical treatments from both Ar and H2 plasmas remove aliphatic carbon from the near-surface, demonstrating the important role of neutral species.

  18. Progress of serpentinization in olivine-H2O system at 250 °C and vapor-saturated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Ogasawara, Y.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids play a crucial role in global-scale mass transfer, metamorphism, volcanism, and seismic processes in subduction zones. Serpentine minerals, which are produced by interaction between ultramafic rocks and fluids, contain about 13% water and are the greatest carrier of H2O into the deep interior of Earth. Therefore, the volume and distribution of hydrated oceanic mantle are of special interest in evaluating the effects of fluids on subduction zone processes. We conducted hydrothermal experiments in olivine (Ol; Fo91)-H2O and orthopyroxenite (Opx; composed of 95% of orthopyroxene, En66)-H2O systems under conditions of 250 °C and vapor-saturated pressure (Psat) to examine the temporal evolution of the solution chemistry and products in runs of up to 1008 h in duration. The maximal degree of hydration (i.e., H2O content in the solid sample) in the Ol-H2O experiments (3.6 wt.%) was much higher than that in the Opx-H2O experiments (0.4 wt.%). In the Ol-H2O experiments, Mg and Si in solution showed an initial increase (stage 1) before decreasing (stage 2) and finally attaining a steady state after 504 h (stage 3). Following a drop in silica activity toward the level of brucite stability filed, the products also changed from serpentine + magnetite (stages 1 and 2) to serpentine + brucite + magnetite (stage 3). Serpentine minerals also changed from lizardite (stages 1 and 2) to lizardite + chrysotile (stage 3). The textures observed in this study were similar to those observed in partly serpentinized dunites. In the Opx-H2O experiments, chlorite formed after orthopyroxene grains, which differs from the formation of talc and serpentine after orthopyroxene (bastite), as observed in natural hydrated harzburgites. The Opx-H2O system maintained 10-103 times higher silica activity than Ol-H2O system, suggesting that brucite does not form after olivine during hydration of peridotites when the Ol-H2O system is linked to the Opx-H2O system. The progress of hydration reactions is affected by mechanical properties of host rocks. The hydration reactions observed in this study produced hierarchical fractures in the reactants, which became filled with reaction products, similar to mesh textures after olivine in natural peridotites. This reaction-induced fracturing produced new reaction surfaces and fluid pathways that enhanced the hydration reactions. The overall reaction producing serpentine+brucite in the Ol-H2O experiments showed the large volume expansion (V/V0 = 1.38 at stage 3), whereas that producing only serpentine proceeded with near constant volume (V/V0 = 1.09 at stage 1). The volume expansion is more difficult to occur in the oceanic lithosphere than in our experiments during serpentinization. Thus, in the case that volume expansion is prevented at reaction sites, one of the following outcomes occurs: (1) the hydration reaction stops until new fractures form, or (2) the reaction proceeds with low volume expansion (absence of brucite) by removing Mg from the system. These two outcomes would produce contrasting distributions or extent of hydration in oceanic lithosphere.

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet utilizing Ar and Ar/H2O mixtures and its applications to bacteria inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Shen, Jie; Xiao, De-Zhi; Xie, Hong-Bing; Lan, Yan; Fang, Shi-Dong; Meng, Yue-Dong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated with Ar with H2O vapor is characterized and applied to inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores. The emission spectra obtained from Ar/H2O plasma shows a higher intensity of OH radicals compared to pure argon at a specified H2O concentration. The gas temperature is estimated by comparing the simulated spectra of the OH band with experimental spectra. The excitation electron temperature is determined from the Boltzmann's plots and Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer H? line is applied to measure the electron density. The gas temperature, excitation electron temperature, and electron density of the plasma jet decrease with the increase of water vapor concentration at a fixed input voltage. The bacteria inactivation rate increases with the increase of OH generation reaching a maximum reduction at 2.6% (v/v) water vapor. Our results also show that the OH radicals generated by the Ar/H2O plasma jet only makes a limited contribution to spore inactivation and the shape change of the spores before and after plasma irradiation is discussed.

  20. In Situ High-Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of H2O Ice VII

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu,M.; Shu, J.; Zha, C.; Goncharov, A.; Tschauner, O.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    Ice VII was examined over the entire range of its pressure stability by a suite of x-ray diffraction techniques in order to understand a number of unexplained characteristics of its high-pressure behavior. Axial and radial polycrystalline (diamond anvil cell) x-ray diffraction measurements reveal a splitting of diffraction lines accompanied by changes in sample texture and elastic anisotropy. In situ laser heating of polycrystalline samples resulted in the sharpening of diffraction peaks due to release of nonhydrostatic stresses but did not remove the splitting. Radial diffraction measurements indicate changes in strength of the material at this pressure. Taken together, these observations provide evidence for a transition in ice VII near 14 GPa involving changes in the character of the proton order/disorder. The results are consistent with previous reports of changes in phase boundaries and equation of state at this pressure. The transition can be interpreted as ferroelastic with the appearance of spontaneous strain that vanishes at the hydrogen bond symmetrization transition near 60 GPa.

  1. Pressurized H_{2} rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; et al.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10−18 to 10−16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  2. Pressure-induced transformations in LiCl-H2O at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, G N; Bove, L E; Corti, H R; Loerting, T

    2014-09-14

    A systematic study of the properties of high-density amorphous ice (HDA) in the presence of increasing amounts of salt is missing, especially because it is challenging to avoid ice crystallization upon cooling the pressurized liquid. In order to be able to study HDA also in the presence of small amounts of salt, we have investigated the transformation behaviour of quenched aqueous LiCl solutions (mole fraction x < 0.25) upon pressurization in a piston-cylinder setup at 77 K. The sample properties were characterized by in situ dilatometry under high pressure conditions and after recovery by ex situ powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at ambient pressure. Two regimes can be identified, with a rather sharp switch at about x = 0.12. At x < 0.12 the samples show the phenomenology also known for pure water samples. They are composed mainly of hexagonal ice (Ih) and experience pressure-induced amorphization to HDA at P > 1 GPa. The observed densification is consistent with the idea that a freeze concentrated LiCl solution of x = 0.14 (R = 6) segregates, which transforms to the glassy state upon cooling, and that the densification is only due to the Ih → HDA transition. Also the XRD patterns and DSC scans are almost unaffected by the presence of the segregated glassy LiCl solution. Upon heating at ambient pressure HDA experiences the polyamorphic transition to low-density amorphous ice (LDA) at ∼120 K, even at x ∼ 0.10. Based on the latent heat evolved in the transition we suggest that almost all water in the sample transforms to an LDA-like state, even the water in the vicinity of the ions. The glassy LiCl solution acts as a spectator that does not shift the transformation temperature significantly and experiences a glass-to-liquid transition at ∼140 K prior to the crystallization to cubic ice. By contrast, at x > 0.12 the phenomenology completely changes and is now dominated by the salt. Hexagonal ice no longer forms upon quenching the LiCl solution, but instead LDA forms. A broad pressure-induced transformation at >0.6 GPa can be attributed to the densification of LDA, the glassy LiCl solution and/or glassy hydrates. PMID:25072395

  3. Laser-fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in low-pressure H2/O2/NO flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattolica, R. J.; Mataga, T. G.; Cavolowsky, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration profiles of NO in low-pressure (76 Torr) H2/O2/Ar flames to which nitric oxide is added are measured by pulsed laser-induced fluorescence. Temporally resolved fluorescence measurements are used to determine the collisional deexcitation rates needed to convert time-integrated fluorescence signal into oxide concentration. Five flames are studied with H2/O2 equivalence ratios of 0.88, 0.98, 1.22, 1.37, and 1.50. In these flames the collisional deexcitation rate decreases rapidly above the burner surface as the density decreases with increasing temperature. A 20 percent decrease is observed for the lean flames, and a 30 percent decrease for the rich flames. Within the precision of the measurement technique (+ or - 10 percent), no significant removal of nitric oxide is observed in these flames.

  4. Xe(H2)7 - A hydrogen-rich van der Waal compound stable to multimegabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Gramsch, Stephen; Hemley, Russell

    2010-03-01

    We have recently reported the occurrence and stability of a sequence of hydrogen-rich compounds of Xe and H2 [1]. The first solid phase that forms at 4 GPa changes stoichiometry at discrete pressures culminating in a solid whose stoichiometry is determined to be Xe(H2)7. The Raman and IR spectra of this solid display remarkable complexity that can be explained in terms of a tripled hydrogen lattice. We report the details of this spectroscopy that have been measured to a maximum pressure of 255 GPa. Single crystal diffraction data of very high quality was collected at the HPCAT beamline 16-BM-D at the APS. The low pressure data was used to identify not only the structural details but also evaluate the changes in the electron density of xenon indicative of interaction between the xenon dimers and the surrounding hydrogen molecules. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by DOE-BES (DE-FG02-06ER46280), NSF-DMR (DMR-0805056) and DOE-NNSA(CDAC). A.P.S. is supported by DOE-BES under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. [4pt] [1] Somayazulu et. al Nature Chemistry (in press)

  5. The vapor pressures of supercooled NHO3/H2O solutions. [in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure utilizing the Gibbs-Duhem relation is used to extrapolate vapor pressures of supercooled HNO3 mixtures to 190 K. Values of A and B from the equation logP = A - B/T are presented for solutions between 0.20 and 0.25 mole fraction HNO3. In the stratosphere, if sufficient HNO3 vapor is present because it has not come into equilibrium with the nitric acid trihydrate, supercooled nitric acid solutions could condense at temperatures up to 1.5 + or - 0.8 K above the ice point.

  6. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Ino, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Kimura, N.

    1995-12-31

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), an environment-friendly power generation system of high thermal efficiency, is being developed via various approaches around the world. The oxygen-blown entrained flow gasification process is a relatively simple method of producing medium calorie coal gas suitable for application to gas turbines. Various systems for this process have been developed to a demonstration level in Europe and America. Japan has actively been developing the air-blown process. However, taking stable molten slag discharge into consideration, coal must be supplied at two stages to raise the combustor temperature in ash molten part. Only two reports have been presented regarding two-stage coal supply. One is the report on an experiment with the Hycol gasifier, in which air feed ratio is varied, with coal feed fixed. The other is report on a simulation study with various gasifier coal feed ratios, conducted at Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry. It seems that the appropriate feed ratio has not yet been established. Through this activity, a unique furnace construction has been established, and these influences of stoichiometric air ratio, of oxygen enrichment, of char recycling and of coal types on performance have been clarified. The purpose of the present study is to apply this developed CPC techniques to a Pressurized CPC (PCPC), thereby improving the IGCC technology. For the present study, we conducted systematic experiments on the air-blown process with a two stage dry feed system, using a 7 t/d-coal bench scale PCPC test facility, operated at the pressure of 0.4 MPa, and clarified the influence of coal feed ratio on coal gasification performance. This report describes the above-mentioned bench scale test procedures and results, and also some informations about a plan of a 25 t/d-coal pilot test system.

  7. High Temperature and Pressure Steam-H2 Interaction with Candidate Advanced LWR Fuel Claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2012-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed to evaluate cladding materials that could serve as improvements to Zircaloy in terms of accident tolerance. This testing involved oxidation resistance to steam or H{sub 2}-50% steam environments at 800-1350 C at 1-20 bar for short times. A selection of conventional alloys, SiC-based ceramics and model alloys were used to explore a wide range of materials options and provide guidance for future materials development work. Typically, the SiC-based ceramic materials, alumina-forming alloys and Fe-Cr alloys with {ge}25% Cr showed the best potential for oxidation resistance at {ge}1200 C. At 1350 C, FeCrAl alloys and SiC remained oxidation resistant in steam. Conventional austenitic steels do not have sufficient oxidation resistance with only {approx}18Cr-10Ni. Higher alloyed type 310 stainless steel is protective but Ni is not a desirable alloy addition for this application and high Cr contents raise concern about {alpha}{prime} formation. Higher pressures (up to 20.7 bar) and H{sub 2} additions appeared to have a limited effect on the oxidation behavior of the most oxidation resistant alloys but higher pressures accelerated the maximum metal loss for less oxidation resistant steels and less metal loss was observed in a H{sub 2}-50%H{sub 2}O environment at 10.3 bar. As some of the results regarding low-alloyed FeCrAl and Fe-Cr alloys were unexpected, further work is needed to fundamentally understand the minimum Cr and Al alloy contents needed for protective behavior in these environments in order to assist in alloy selection and guide alloy development.

  8. A unified equation for calculating methane vapor pressures in the CH4-H2O system with measured Raman shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Song, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A unified equation has been derived by using all available data for calculating methane vapor pressures with measured Raman shifts of C-H symmetric stretching band (??1) in the vapor phase of sample fluids near room temperature. This equation eliminates discrepancies among the existing data sets and can be applied at any Raman laboratory. Raman shifts of C-H symmetric stretching band of methane in the vapor phase of CH4-H2O mixtures prepared in a high-pressure optical cell were also measured at temperatures between room temperature and 200 ??C, and pressures up to 37 MPa. The results show that the CH4 ??1 band position shifts to higher wavenumber as temperature increases. We also demonstrated that this Raman band shift is a simple function of methane vapor density, and, therefore, when combined with equation of state of methane, methane vapor pressures in the sample fluids at elevated temperatures can be calculated from measured Raman peak positions. This method can be applied to determine the pressure of CH4-bearing systems, such as methane-rich fluid inclusions from sedimentary basins or experimental fluids in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell or other types of optical cell. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microwave measurements of water vapor partial pressure at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Latorre, V.R.

    1991-02-01

    One of the desired parameters in the Yucca Mountain Project is the capillary pressure of the rock comprising the repository. This parameter is related to the partial pressure of water vapor in the air when in equilibrium with the rock mass. Although there are a number of devices that will measure the relative humidity (directly related to the water vapor partial pressure), they generally will fail at temperatures on the order of 150C. Since thee author has observed borehole temperatures considerably in excess of this value in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a different scheme is required to obtain the desired partial pressure data at higher temperatures. This chapter presents a microwave technique that has been developed to measure water vapor partial pressure in boreholes at temperatures up to 250C. The heart of the system is a microwave coaxial resonator whose resonant frequency is inversely proportional to the square root of the real part of the complex dielectric constant of the medium (air) filling the resonator. The real part of the dielectric constant of air is approximately equal to the square of the refractive index which, in turn, is proportional to the partial pressure of the water vapor in the air. Thus, a microwave resonant cavity can be used to measure changes in the relative humidity or partial pressure of water vapor in the air. Since this type of device is constructed of metal, it is able to withstand very high temperatures. The actual limitation is the temperature limit of the dielectric material in the cable connecting the resonator to its driving and monitoring equipment-an automatic network analyzer in our case. In the following sections, the theory of operation, design, construction, calibration and installation of the microwave diagnostics system is presented. The results and conclusions are also presented, along with suggestions for future work.

  10. Report on ISS Oxygen Production, Resupply, and Partial Pressure Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, Ryan; Ghariani, Ahmed; Leonard, Daniel; Lehman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The majority of oxygen used on International Space Station (ISS) is for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Oxygen is supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to oxygen production capability on both the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) and Russian Segment (RS). To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen partial pressure is controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable oxygen partial pressure along with the increased ISS cabin volume is utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes amount of oxygen supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing oxygen partial pressure along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  11. Laboratory measurement of H2O2 pressure broadening parameter for JEM/SMILES Observation from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Mizoguchi, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kanamori, H.

    2009-12-01

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor Insulator Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise remote sensing measurements of minor constituents in the earth and planetary atmosphere.Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).SMILES in Transfer Vehicle (HTV) plan to launch in September 11 2009 by Japanese H-IIB rocket. JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, BrO, HOCl, HO2, H2O2, HNO3 and CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, and water vapor with the precisions in a few to several tens percents [1] in the altitude region upper troposphere (about 8km in mid-latitude) and the mesosphere (about 90km in mid-latitude). In this paper, laboratory measurement of the pressure broadening parameter (γ) of Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at JKa,Kc = 201,19 - 192,17 rotational transition (625.044 GHz) will be presented. This is one of the target transitions of JEM/SMILES observation. γ of H2O2 in sub-millimeter-wave region was measured for the first time. The measurement was carried out using a sub-millimeter-wave absorption spectrometric system in Tokyo Institute of Technology.The radiation source from a backward wave oscillator (BWO) was phase-locked to the harmonics of a synthesized sweeper with two-step phase lock loop. The BWO source frequency was modulated with the modulation frequency of 51 kHz. H2O2 sample was prerpared by distillation of commercial available 30% solution. The pressures of sample and buffer gas (N2 and O2) were controlled by a mass flow meter and monitored by two Baratron monitors in the cell. From the observed profiles of the spectrum, the pressure broadening line widths were determined using a convolution method proposed by Pickett [2], [3]. γ was determined by fitting the measured line widths to a linear function with a least-square method. γ (N2) = 4.03 ± 0.06 [MHz/Torr] (1.4%), γ (O2) = 2.49 ± 0.04 [MHz/Torr] (1.7%). The errors are presumably caused by representational accuracy fluctuation of Baratron pressure monitor. Precision of JEM/SMILES sensitive observation requires the precise value of γ of H2O2 within the error of 3%. We confirmed that the precision of the measurement fulfills the SMILES observation requirement. Refferences [1] JEM/SMILES mission plan. Version 2.1, November 15, 2002. [2] M. M. Yamada, M. Kobayashi, M. Habara, T. Amano, and B. J. Drouin, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 82, 391-399 (2003). [3] H. M. Pickett, Appl. Opt. 19, 2745 (1980).

  12. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  13. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  14. H2 CARS thermometry in a fuel-rich, premixed, laminar CH4/air flame in the pressure range between 5 and 40 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, V.; Stricker, W.

    1995-07-01

    To establish H2 CARS thermometry at high pressure, accumulated H2 Q-branch CARS spectra were recorded in the exhaust of a fuel-rich CH4/air flame at pressures between 5 and 40 bar. Temperatures were deduced by fitting theoretical spectra to experimental data points. The Energy-Corrected Sudden (ECS) scaling law was employed to set up an empirical model for the calculation of H2 linewidths in high-pressure hydrocarbon flames with H2 as a minority species. Experimental H2 CARS spectra could be simulated very accurately with this model. The evaluated temperatures agreed well with reference temperatures obtained by spontaneous rotational Raman scattering of N2.

  15. New high-pressure van der Waals compound Kr(H2)4 discovered in the krypton-hydrogen binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleppe, Annette K.; Amboage, Mnica; Jephcoat, Andrew P.

    2014-05-01

    The application of pressure to materials can reveal unexpected chemistry. Under compression, noble gases form stoichiometric van der Waals (vdW) compounds with closed-shell molecules such as hydrogen, leading to a variety of unusual structures. We have synthesised Kr(H2)4 for the first time in a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell at pressures >=5.3 GPa and characterised its structural and vibrational properties to above 50 GPa. The structure of Kr(H2)4, as solved by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction, is face-centred cubic (fcc) with krypton atoms forming isolated octahedra at fcc sites. Rotationally disordered H2 molecules occupy four different, interstitial sites, consistent with the observation of four Raman active H2 vibrons. The discovery of Kr(H2)4 expands the range of pressure-stabilised, hydrogen-rich vdW solids, and, in comparison with the two known rare-gas-H2 compounds, Xe(H2)8 and Ar(H2)2, reveals an increasing change in hydrogen molecular packing with increasing rare gas atomic number.

  16. EQUILIBRIUM PARTIAL PRESSURE OF SULFUR DIOXIDE IN ALKALINE SCRUBBING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of IERL-RTP in-house studies in which equilibrium partial pressure of SO2 was measured as a function of pH, temperature, and concentration of sulfur (IV) on various scrubber liquors. These studies were done for potassium-, sodium-, and citrate-based scrub...

  17. Calibration Of Partial-Pressure-Of-Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yount, David W.; Heronimus, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Report and analysis of, and discussion of improvements in, procedure for calibrating partial-pressure-of-oxygen sensors to satisfy Spacelab calibration requirements released. Sensors exhibit fast drift, which results in short calibration period not suitable for Spacelab. By assessing complete process of determining total drift range available, calibration procedure modified to eliminate errors and still satisfy requirements without compromising integrity of system.

  18. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than

  19. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  20. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H2O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh; Inaba, Akira; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κT, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H2O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 °C. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκT/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κT data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d2κT/dp2, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dαp/dxGly and d2αp/dxGly2, at 0.1 MPa (αp is the thermal expansivity and xGly the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H2O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 - 80 °C for points X and 90 - 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero xGly extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 °C there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  1. Hydrothermal Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetic Characterization of a New Ferrimagnetic Open Framework Phosphate: MIL-21 or [Fe III5- xV IIIx(H 2PO 4) 4(HPO 4) 4F 4(H 2O) 2, 4(H 2+ yN-(CH 2) 2-NH 2+ y)] with a Partial Cationic Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou-Cavellec, Myriam; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Férey, Gérard

    1999-11-01

    MIL-21 or [FeIII5-xVIIIx(H2PO4)4(HPO4)4F4(H2O)2, 4(H2+yN-(CH2)2-NH2+y)] was prepared hydrothermally (453 K, autogenous pressure, 3 days) in the presence of ethylenediamine. Its structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. MIL-21 is tetragonal (space group P-421c, No. 114, with cell parameters a=17.2023(2) Å, c=13.3086(2) Å, V=3938.27(9) Å3, Z=4. Its three-dimensional network can be described from the connection via phosphate tetrahedra of infinite corner-sharing cis-trans octahedral chains of metallic atoms in a random distribution and isolated FeO4(H2O)2 octahedra. The (Fe3+, V3+) infinite chains belong to the KTP type. Mössbauer and structure refinements demonstrate this segregation. This structure exhibits small tunnels and cages in which the ethylenediamine molecules are located. Moreover, MIL-21 shows a ferrimagnetic behavior below 13 K.

  2. Calibration-free sensor for pressure and H2O concentration in headspace of sterile vial using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tingdong; Gao, Guangzhen; Liu, Ying

    2013-11-10

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials using a distributed-feedback (DFB) diode laser near 1.4 μm are reported. A H2O line located near 7161.41 cm(-1) is selected based on its strong absorption strength and isolation from interference of neighboring transitions. Direct absorption spectra of H2O are obtained for the measurement path as well as the reference path by scanning the laser wavelength. The pressure and H2O vapor concentration in the headspace of a vial are inferred from a differential absorption signal, which is the difference between the measured and the referenced absorbance spectra. This sensor is calibration-free and no purge gas is needed. The demonstrated capability would enable measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials within 2.21% and 2.86%, respectively. A precision of 1.02 Torr and 390 ppm is found for the pressure and H2O concentration, respectively. A set of measurements for commercial freeze-dried products are also performed to illustrate the usefulness of this sensor. PMID:24216725

  3. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber, bioregenerative life support

  4. Biological nitrogen fixation under primordial Martian partial pressures of dinitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingler, J. M.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most striking differences between the conditions on early Mars and earth was a low (18 mb) partial pressure of N2 (pN2) on early Mars, as opposed to 780 mb N2 on earth. To investigate the possibility of biological nitrogen fixation under conditions of early Mars, experiments were carried out on the growth of Azotobacter vinelandii and Azomonas agilis in nitrogen-free synthetic medium under various partial pressures of N2 (ranging from 780 to 0 mb). It was found that, although the biomass, cell number, and growth rate of these bacteria decreased with decreasing pN2 values below pN2 of 400 mb, both microorganisms were capable of growing at pN2 as low as 5 mb (but not at of below 1 mb), indicating that biological fixation of nitrogen could have occurred on primordial Mars.

  5. Extrapolation of IAPWS-IF97 data: The saturation pressure of H2O in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustyuzhanin, E. E.; Ochkov, V. F.; Shishakov, V. V.; Rykov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Some literature sources and web sites are analyzed in this report. These sources contain an information about thermophysical properties of H2O including the vapor pressure Ps. (Ps,T)-data have a form of the international standard tables named as “IAPWS-IF97 data”. Our analysis shows that traditional databases represent (Ps,T)-data at t > 0.002, here t = (Tc - T)/Tc is a reduced temperature. It is an interesting task to extrapolate IAPWS-IF97 data in to the critical region and to get (Ps,T)-data at t < 0.002. We have considered some equations Ps(t) and estimated that previous models do not follow to the degree laws of the scaling theory (ST). A combined model (CM) is chosen as a form, F(t,D,B), to express a function ln(Ps/Pc) in the critical region including t < 0.002, here D = (α, Pc,Tc,...) are critical characteristics, B are adjustable coefficients. CM has a combined structure with scaling and regular parts. The degree laws of ST are taken into account to elaborate F(t, D, B). Adjustable coefficients (B) are determined by fitting CM to input (Ps,T)-points those belong to IAPWS-IF97 data. Application results are got with a help of CM in the critical region including values of the first and the second derivatives for Ps(T). Some models Ps(T) are compared with CM.

  6. Oxygen-Partial-Pressure Sensor for Aircraft Oxygen Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark; Pettit, Donald

    2003-01-01

    A device that generates an alarm when the partial pressure of oxygen decreases to less than a preset level has been developed to help prevent hypoxia in a pilot or other crewmember of a military or other high-performance aircraft. Loss of oxygen partial pressure can be caused by poor fit of the mask or failure of a hose or other component of an oxygen distribution system. The deleterious physical and mental effects of hypoxia cause the loss of a military aircraft and crew every few years. The device is installed in the crewmember s oxygen mask and is powered via communication wiring already present in all such oxygen masks. The device (see figure) includes an electrochemical sensor, the output potential of which is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen. The output of the sensor is amplified and fed to the input of a comparator circuit. A reference potential that corresponds to the amplified sensor output at the alarm oxygen-partial-pressure level is fed to the second input of the comparator. When the sensed partial pressure of oxygen falls below the minimum acceptable level, the output of the comparator goes from the low state (a few millivolts) to the high state (near the supply potential, which is typically 6.8 V for microphone power). The switching of the comparator output to the high state triggers a tactile alarm in the form of a vibration in the mask, generated by a small 1.3-Vdc pager motor spinning an eccentric mass at a rate between 8,000 and 10,000 rpm. The sensation of the mask vibrating against the crewmember s nose is very effective at alerting the crewmember, who may already be groggy from hypoxia and is immersed in an environment that is saturated with visual cues and sounds. Indeed, the sensation is one of rudeness, but such rudeness could be what is needed to stimulate the crewmember to take corrective action in a life-threatening situation.

  7. Structure and Composition of the 200 K-Superconducting Phase of H2 S at Ultrahigh Pressure: The Perovskite (SH(-) )(H3 S(+) ).

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elijah E; Xu, Ke; Xiang, Hongjun; Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Kremer, Reinhard K; Simon, Arndt; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    At ultrahigh pressure (>110 GPa), H2 S is converted into a metallic phase that becomes superconducting with a record Tc of approximately 200 K. It has been proposed that the superconducting phase is body-centered cubic H3 S (Im3‾ m, a=3.089 Å) resulting from the decomposition reaction 3 H2 S→2 H3 S+S. The analogy between H2 S and H2 O led us to a very different conclusion. The well-known dissociation of water into H3 O(+) and OH(-) increases by orders of magnitude under pressure. H2 S is anticipated to behave similarly under pressure, with the dissociation process 2 H2 S→H3 S(+) +SH(-) leading to the perovskite structure (SH(-) )(H3 S(+) ). This phase consists of corner-sharing SH6 octahedra with SH(-) ions at each A site (the centers of the S8 cubes). DFT calculations show that the perovskite (SH(-) )(H3 S(+) ) is thermodynamically more stable than the Im3‾ m structure of H3 S, and suggest that the A site hydrogen atoms are most likely fluxional even at Tc  . PMID:26855072

  8. H2O activity in concentrated KCl and KCl-NaCl solutions at high temperatures and pressures measured by the brucite-periclase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovich, L. Y.; Newton, R. C.

    H2O activities in supercritical fluids in the system KCl-H2O-(MgO) were measured at pressures of 1, 2, 4, 7, 10 and 15 kbar by numerous reversals of vapor compositions in equilibrium with brucite and periclase. Measurements spanned the range 550-900°C. A change of state of solute KCl occurs as pressures increase above 2kbar, by which H2O activity becomes very low and, at pressures of 4kbar and above, nearly coincident with the square of the mole fraction (xH2O). The effect undoubtedly results primarily from ionic dissociation as H2O density (ρH2O) approaches 1gm/cm3, and is more pronounced than in the NaCl-H2O system at the same P-T-X conditions. Six values of solute KCl activity were yielded by terminal points of the isobaric brucite-periclase T-xH2O curves where sylvite saturation occurs. The H2O mole fraction of the isobaric invariant assemblage brucite-periclase-sylvite-fluid is near 0.52 at all pressures, and the corresponding temperatures span only 100°C between 1 and 15kbar. This remarkable convergence of the isobaric equilibrium curves reflects the great influence of pressure on lowering of both KCl and H2O activities. The H2O and KCl activities can be expressed by the formulas: aH2O=γH2O[xH2O+(1+(1+α)xKCl)], and aKCL=γKCl[(1+α)xKCl/(xH2O+(1+α)xKCl)](1+α), where α is a degree of dissociation parameter which increases from zero at the lowest pressures to near one at high pressures and the γ's are activity coefficients based on an empirical regular solution parameter W: ln γi=(1-xi)2W. Least squares fitting of our H2O and KCl activity data evaluates the parameters: α=exp(4.166 -2.709/ρH2O) - 212.1P/T, and W=(-589.6-23.10P) /T, with ρH2O in gm/cm3, P in kbar and T in K. The standard deviation from the measured activities is only +/-0.014. The equations define isobaric liquidus curves, which are in perfect agreement with previous DTA liquidus measurements at 0.5-2kbar, but which depart progressively from their extrapolation to higher pressures because of the pressure-induced dissociation effect. The great similarity of the NaCl-H2O and KCl-H2O systems suggests that H2O activities in the ternary NaCl-KCl-H2O system can be described with reasonable accuracy by assuming proportionality between the binary systems. This assumption was verified by a few reconnaissance measurements at 10kbar of the brucite-periclase equilibrium with a Na/(Na+K) ratio of 0.5 and of the saturation temperature for Na/(Na+K) of 0.35 and 0.50. At that pressure the brucite-periclase curves reach a lowest xH2O of 0.45 and a temperature of 587°C before salt saturation occurs, values considerably lower than in either binary. This double-salt eutectic effect may have a significant application to natural polyionic hypersaline solutions in the deep crust and upper mantle in that higher solute concentrations and very low H2O activities may be realized in complex solutions before salt saturation occurs. Concentrated salt solutions seem, from this standpoint, and also because of high mechanical mobility and alkali-exchanging potential, feasible as metasomatic fluids for a variety of deep-crust and upper mantle processes.

  9. High-Pressure Equation of State for Partially Ionic Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we showed that the cohesive energy of partially ionic solids may be characterized by a two-term energy relationship consisting of a Coulomb term arising from the valence-charge transfer delta Z between the atoms, and a scaled universal energy function E(sup *)(a(sup *)), which accounts for the partially covalent character of the bond and for the repulsion between the atomic cores for small R; a(sup *) is a scaled length. Normalized cohesive-energy curves of alkali halide crystals and of Ti and Ag halide crystals were obtained, and the cohesive-energy-curve parameters were used to generate theoretical equation-of-state (EOS) curves for the Li, Na, K, Cs, and Ag halides. Good agreement was obtained with the experimental isothermal compression curves over a wide pressure range (0-90 kbar). In this paper we verify that the cohesive-energy relationship is valid for divalent partially ionic solids; physically reasonable charge-transfer values (1.80 less than delta Z less than 2.0) are obtained for MgO, CaO, and CaS. Next, EOS curves for LiF, NaF, Nal, CsCl, Csl, MgO, CaO, and CaS are generated in terms of the cohesive-energy parameters. These EOS's yield excellent fits to experimental isothermal-compression data and to shock-wave data to very high pressures (P(sub max)= 250-1350 kbar).

  10. Interface chemistry of H2O on GaAs nanowires probed by near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Lamere, Edward; Liu, Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-06-01

    Interface chemistry of H2O on GaAs nanowires is investigated by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at elevated water vapor pressures (from UHV to 5 mbar) and temperatures (from room temperature to 400 °C). Surface-assisted water dissociation leads to oxidation and hydroxylation of surface Ga atoms. In comparison with the simple planar GaAs(1 0 0) crystal, the H2O dissociation process on GaAs nanowires is greatly enhanced at elevated pressures and temperatures.

  11. Water Exchange on [Ln(DO3A)(H2O)2] and [Ln(DTTA-Me)(H2O)2](-) Studied by Variable Temperature, Pressure, and Magnetic Field NMR.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shima; Helm, Lothar

    2016-05-01

    Water exchange kinetics of [Ln(L)(H2O)2](x) complexes (Ln = Pr, Nd, Dy, Tm, and Yb; L = DO3A and DTTA-Me) were studied by (17)O NMR spectroscopy as a function of temperature, pressure, and frequency and by (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion. Water exchange rate constants of both complexes show a maximum at dysprosium. Water exchange on negatively charged complexes of the acyclic DTTA-Me ligand is much faster than on the neutral complexes of the macrocyclic DO3A. Small activation volumes |ΔV(⧧)| < 1 cm(3) mol(-1) measured for water exchange on [Ln(DO3A)(H2O)2] indicate an interchange type of mechanism (I) for the lanthanide complexes studied. In the case of [Ln(DTTA-Me)(H2O)2](-), a change in mechanism is detected from a dissociative mechanism (D, ΔV(⧧) = 7 cm(3) mol(-1)) for complexes with larger ions (Pr to Gd) to an interchange mechanism (Id, I; ΔV(⧧) = +1.8 and +0.4 cm(3) mol(-1)) for complexes with smaller ions (Dy and Tm). PMID:27082861

  12. Determination of the partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure lamp arcs: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.; Aubes, M.

    1986-08-01

    The partial pressure of thallium in high-pressure Hg-TlI discharges with different mercury, thallium, and electron pressures has been measured by using the optically thin line Tl 655 nm and the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm. The partial pressure of the arc axis has been measured from the line Tl 655nm. The effective partial pressure has been measured from the self-reversed line Tl 535 nm on the basis of the multiparameter method, and it has been calculated from the known axis pressure of thallium and the calculation of its radial variation by taking into account the chemical reactions. The experimental results confirm the dispersion character of the blue wing of the line Tl 535 nm. The systematic difference obtained between the measured and calculated effective pressure, particularly at the moment of minimum electron density, may be interpreted by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) caused by overpopulation of the upper level of the line Tl 535 nm.

  13. The influence of hydrogen sulfide-to-hydrogen partial pressure ratio on the sulfidization of Pd and 70 mol% Pd–Cu membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Morreale, B.

    2007-11-15

    The influence of H2S-to-H2 partial pressure ratio on the sulfidization of Pd and 70 mol% Pd–Cu membrane alloys was studied using various H2Scontaining gas mixtures. The Pd membranes exposed to various H2S mixtures were in very good agreement with the thermodynamic calculations used in this study, resisting sulfidization when exposed to H2S-to-H2 ratios below the equilibrium value predicted for Pd4S formation, and experiencing sulfidization when exposed to ratios above the equilibrium values. The 70 mol% Pd–Cu membranes, however, exhibited deviations from the predicted values, resisting sulfidization at some conditions close to the equilibrium values at which sulfidization was expected, and experiencing sulfidization at some conditions at which resistance was expected. This phenomenon was attributed to deviations of the Pd–Cu alloy from ideality, probably due to Cu segregation at the membrane surface.

  14. The influence of hydrogen sulfide-to-hydrogen partial pressure ratio on the sulfidization of Pd and 70 mol% Pd-Cu membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Morreale, B.D.

    2007-11-15

    The influence of H2S-to-H2 partial pressure ratio on the sulfidization of Pd and 70 mol% Pd–Cu membrane alloys was studied using various H2S-containing gas mixtures. The Pd membranes exposed to various H2S mixtures were in very good agreement with the thermodynamic calculations used in this study, resisting sulfidization when exposed to H2S-to-H2 ratios below the equilibrium value predicted for Pd4S formation, and experiencing sulfidization when exposed to ratios above the equilibrium values. The 70 mol% Pd–Cu membranes, however, exhibited deviations from the predicted values, resisting sulfidization at some conditions close to the equilibrium values at which sulfidization was expected, and experiencing sulfidization at some conditions at which resistance was expected. This phenomenon was attributed to deviations of the Pd–Cu alloy from ideality, probably due to Cu segregation at the membrane surface.

  15. Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Robertson

    2002-09-30

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1-September 30, 2002 time period.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-01-30

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1--December 31, 2002 time period.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Archie Robertson

    2002-07-10

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2002 time period.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Archie Robertson

    2003-10-29

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the July 1--September 30, 2003 time period.

  19. Development of Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Partial Gasification Module (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Robertson

    2003-12-31

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 - December 31, 2003 time period.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Archie Robertson

    2003-07-23

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the April 1--June 30, 2003 time period.

  1. First-principles calculations of the high-pressure melt line of SiO2 and strength of H2O: planetary science implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; Hamel, Sebastien; Qi, Tingting

    2015-06-01

    We report the results from high-pressure high-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations of two materials of importance to planetary science. First, the high-pressure melt line of SiO2 using constrained free energy calculations under condition relevant to the Outer Planets. Second, we explore the stability of the H2O super-ionic phase by calculating the elastic constants at finite temperature and provides insight into the generation of magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune.

  2. Akbu-LAAO exhibits potent anti-tumor activity to HepG2 cells partially through produced H2O2 via TGF-? signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunmei; Liu, Shuqing; Dong, Panpan; Zhao, Dongting; Wang, Chengyi; Tao, Zhiwei; Sun, Ming-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we characterized the biological properties of Akbu-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase from Agkistrodon blomhoffii ussurensis snake venom (SV). Current work investigated its in vitro anti-tumor activity and underlying mechanism on HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO inhibited HepG2 growth time and dose-dependently with an IC50 of ~38.82??g/mL. It could induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO exhibited cytotoxicity by inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis of HepG2 as it showed no effect on its cell cycle. The inhibition of Akbu-LAAO to HepG2 growth partially relied on enzymatic-released H2O2 as catalase only partially antagonized this effect. cDNA microarray results indicated TGF-? signaling pathway was linked to the cytotoxicity of Akbu-LAAO on HepG2. TGF-? pathway related molecules CYR61, p53, GDF15, TOB1, BTG2, BMP2, BMP6, SMAD9, JUN, JUNB, LOX, CCND1, CDK6, GADD45A, CDKN1A were deregulated in HepG2 following Akbu-LAAO stimulation. The presence of catalase only slightly restored the mRNA changes induced by Akbu-LAAO for differentially expressed genes. Meanwhile, LDN-193189, a TGF-? pathway inhibitor reduced Akbu-LAAO cytotoxicity on HepG2. Collectively, we reported, for the first time, SV-LAAO showed anti-tumor cell activity via TGF-? pathway. It provides new insight of SV-LAAO exhibiting anti-tumor effect via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:26655928

  3. Akbu-LAAO exhibits potent anti-tumor activity to HepG2 cells partially through produced H2O2 via TGF-β signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunmei; Liu, Shuqing; Dong, Panpan; Zhao, Dongting; Wang, Chengyi; Tao, Zhiwei; Sun, Ming-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we characterized the biological properties of Akbu-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase from Agkistrodon blomhoffii ussurensis snake venom (SV). Current work investigated its in vitro anti-tumor activity and underlying mechanism on HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO inhibited HepG2 growth time and dose-dependently with an IC50 of ~38.82 μg/mL. It could induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO exhibited cytotoxicity by inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis of HepG2 as it showed no effect on its cell cycle. The inhibition of Akbu-LAAO to HepG2 growth partially relied on enzymatic-released H2O2 as catalase only partially antagonized this effect. cDNA microarray results indicated TGF-β signaling pathway was linked to the cytotoxicity of Akbu-LAAO on HepG2. TGF-β pathway related molecules CYR61, p53, GDF15, TOB1, BTG2, BMP2, BMP6, SMAD9, JUN, JUNB, LOX, CCND1, CDK6, GADD45A, CDKN1A were deregulated in HepG2 following Akbu-LAAO stimulation. The presence of catalase only slightly restored the mRNA changes induced by Akbu-LAAO for differentially expressed genes. Meanwhile, LDN-193189, a TGF-β pathway inhibitor reduced Akbu-LAAO cytotoxicity on HepG2. Collectively, we reported, for the first time, SV-LAAO showed anti-tumor cell activity via TGF-β pathway. It provides new insight of SV-LAAO exhibiting anti-tumor effect via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:26655928

  4. Broadening of vibrational-rotational lines of the H2S molecule by pressure of monatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, V. I.

    2013-07-01

    Optimal sets of parameters for a model intermolecular potential that provide the best reproduction of broadening coefficients γ for the absorption lines in the ν2 band of the H2S molecule are determined for systems H2S-A (A = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe). For H2S-He, the potential is obtained with the temperature dependence of coefficients γ taken into account for two rotational absorption lines 110 ← 101 and 211 ← 202. With the potentials obtained, the coefficients γ are calculated for the ν1 and ν3 bands and compared with the available experimental data. There are significant discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values of γ.

  5. High-pressure dielectric studies of a novel hydrogen-bonded ferroelectric (NH4)2H2P2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Frączek, M.; Frączek, Z. J.; Szklarz, P.; Jakubas, R.

    2012-07-01

    The hydrostatic pressure effect on the dielectric properties of (NH4)2H2P2O6 ferroelectric crystal was studied for pressures from 0.1 MPa to 360 MPa and for temperatures from 100 to 190 K. The pressure-temperature phase diagram obtained is linear with increasing pressure. The paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure with the pressure coefficient dTc/dp=-5.16×10-2 K MPa-1. Additionally, the pressure dependences of Curie-Weiss constants for the crystal in paraelectric (C+) and ferroelectric (C-) phases are evaluated and discussed. The possible mechanism of paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition is also discussed.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-03-29

    Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is working under DOE contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx}2500 to 2800 F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Effects of chemical composition and the addition of H2 in a N2 atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge on polymer surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Ayotte, Guylaine; Turgeon, Stéphane; Massines, Françoise; Laroche, Gaétan

    2009-08-18

    We examined the effect of hydrogen content in various polymers in a N2/H2 discharge for surface amine functionalization. Three polymers (polyethylene (PE), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)) containing various amounts of hydrogen and fluorine were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). While surface modification was observed on the PE and the PVDF in a pure N2 discharge, adding H2 in a N2 discharge was necessary to observe the fluorine etching on the surface of the PVDF and PTFE polymers. The presence of a slight amount of hydrogen in the gas mixture was also a prerequisite to the formation of amino groups on the surface of all three polymers (max NH2/C approximately 5%). Aging revealed that the modified polymer surfaces treated in a N2-H2 discharge were less prone to hydrophobic recovery than were surfaces treated in pure N2, due primarily to the presence of a higher density of polar groups on the surfaces. We demonstrated that H atoms in the discharge are necessary for the surface amine functionalization of polymers in a N2 atmospheric pressure DBD, regardless of polymer chemical composition. It is therefore possible to control the plasma functionalization process and to optimize the concentration and specificity of NH2 grafted onto polymer surfaces by varying the H2 concentration in a N2 atmospheric pressure DBD. PMID:19572502

  8. Wavelength-modulation spectroscopy near 1.4 µm for measurements of H2O and temperature in high-pressure and -temperature gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenstein, C. S.; Spearrin, R. M.; Schultz, I. A.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-05-01

    The development, validation and demonstration of a two-color tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption sensor for measurements of temperature and H2O in high-pressure and high-temperature gases are presented. This sensor uses first-harmonic-normalized wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f/1f) to account for non-absorbing transmission losses and emission encountered in harsh, high-pressure environments. Two telecommunications-grade TDLs were used to probe H2O absorption transitions near 1391.7 and 1469.3 nm. The lasers were frequency-multiplexed and modulated at 160 and 200 kHz to enable a measurement bandwidth up to 30 kHz along a single line-of-sight. In addition, accurate measurements are enabled at extreme conditions via an experimentally derived spectroscopic database. This sensor was validated under low-absorbance (<0.05) conditions in shock-heated H2O-N2 mixtures at temperatures and pressures from 700 to 2400 K and 2 to 25 atm. There, this sensor recovered the known temperature and H2O mole fraction with a nominal accuracy of 2.8% and 4.7% RMS, respectively. Lastly, this sensor resolved expected transients with high bandwidth and high precision in a reactive shock tube experiment and a pulse detonation combustor.

  9. MgSO4-H2O system at High pressure and its implication for the internal structure and evolution of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R. S.; Ohtani, E.; Terasaki, H.

    2008-12-01

    Cryovolcanism and active geological alterations have been discovered in many icy satellites. Not only the surface activities but also the possibility of the subsurface ocean in Galilean satellites have been discussed by Shoemaker et al. (1982) and Kargel (1991). In the previous studies (Prockter 2001, Fortes 2007) existence of subsurface ocean has been suggested based on the observed data such as surface structures of alteration and gravity observations which includes the momentum of inertia. We can adopt the three- layered model for Ganymede (Mueller et al. 1988) composed of Fe or FeS inner core, Silicate outer core, and volatile-rich icy mantle. We calculated the density profile for the three-layered model based on the mixture of C1 chondrite Orgueil meteorite and H2O. We constructed a new model which has a deeper icy mantle with the density larger than pure ice. The infrared data of the Galileo survey (McCord et al. 1999,2001) found a large amount of sulfates such as MgSO4•6 H2O, MgSO4•7 H2O. Thus we estimated that the volatile-rich icy mantle contains not only pure ice but also a heavy MgSO4 component with several weight percents. We investigated the phase relations of MgSO4- H2O system under high pressure in order to discuss the internal structure of Ganymede. The sample which consisted of 0 to 30 weight percent of MgSO4 was put in diamond anvil cell with external heating device. The experiments performed up to 5GPa and 600K. This condition is a bit higher than the bottom of icy mantle (around 350K and 2GPa) (Prentice 2000, Sohl 2001). Under our experimental conditions, we found various high pressure phases in MgSO4- H2O system such as Ice VI and VII, and sulfates hydrates such as MgSO4•1H2O, MgSO4•6H2O, and MgSO4•7H2O depending on pressure and temperature conditions. Viscosity and density of the eutectic liquid at high pressure were measured using the falling sphere method with diamond anvil cell.We will present our experimental results and discuss the evolution of the internal structure of Ganymede based on the experiments.

  10. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H2/CH4 microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rond, C.; Hamann, S.; Wartel, M.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2014-09-01

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H2/CH4 Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH3, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 1012-1017 molecules cm-3, while the methyl radical CH3 (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 1014 molecules cm-3. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH4, associated to an increase of the C2H2 density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  11. Repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharge treatment of rough polymer surfaces: II. Treatment of micro-beads in He/NH3/H2O and He/O2/H2O mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth N.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2008-08-01

    Plasmas are increasingly being used to functionalize the surface of polymers having complex shapes for biomedical applications such as tissue scaffolds and drug delivering micro-beads. The functionalization often requires affixation of amine (NH2) or O-containing groups. In this paper, results are discussed from a two-dimensional computational investigation of the atmospheric pressure plasma functionalization of non-planar and porous surfaces of polypropylene with NHx and O-containing groups. For the former, the discharge is sustained in He/NH3/H2O mixtures in a dielectric barrier-corona configuration. Significant microscopic non-uniformities arise due to competing pathways for reactive gas phase radicals such as OH and NH2, and on the surface by the availability of OH to initiate amine attachment. The treatment of inside surfaces of porous polymer micro-beads placed on an electrode is particularly sensitive to view angles to the discharge and pore size, and is ultimately controlled by the relative rates of radical transport and surface reactions deep into the pores. The functionalization of micro-beads suspended in He/O2/H2O discharges is rapid with comparable treatment of the outer and interior surfaces, but varies with the location of the micro-bead in the discharge volume.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Archie Robertson

    2004-07-01

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building bock that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. Under this contract a series of pilot plant tests are being conducted to ascertain PGM performance with a variety of fuels. The performance and economics of a PGM based plant designed for the co-production of hydrogen and electricity will also be determined. This report describes the work performed during the April-June 30, 2004 time period.

  13. H2O activity in concentrated NaCl solutions at high pressures and temperatures measured by the brucite-periclase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovich, L. Y.; Newton, R. C.

    1996-10-01

    H2O activities in concentrated NaCl solutions were measured in the ranges 600° 900° C and 2 15 kbar and at NaCl concentrations up to halite saturation by depression of the brucite (Mg(OH)2) periclase (MgO) dehydration equilibrium. Experiments were made in internally heated Ar pressure apparatus at 2 and 4.2 kbar and in 1.91-cm-diameter piston-cylinder apparatus with NaCl pressure medium at 4.2, 7, 10 and 15 kbar. Fluid compositions in equilibrium with brucite and periclase were reversed to closures of less than 2 mol% by measuring weight changes after drying of punctured Pt capsules. Brucite-periclase equilibrium in the binary system was redetermined using coarsely crystalline synthetic brucite and periclase to inhibit back-reaction in quenching. These data lead to a linear expression for the standard Gibbs free energy of the brucite dehydration reaction in the experimental temperature range: ΔG° (±120J)=73418 134.95 T(K). Using this function as a baseline, the experimental dehydration points in the system MgO-H2O-NaCl lead to a simple systematic relationship of high-temperature H2O activity in NaCl solution. At low pressure and low fluid densities near 2 kbar the H2O activity is closely approximated by its mole fraction. At pressures of 10 kbar and greater, with fluid densities approaching those of condensed H2O, the H2O activity becomes nearly equal to the square of its mole fraction. Isobaric halite saturation points terminating the univariant brucite-periclase curves were determined at each experimental pressure. The five temperature-composition points in the system NaCl-H2O are in close agreement with the halite saturation curves (liquidus curves) given by existing data from differential thermal analysis to 6 kbar. Solubility of MgO in the vapor phase near halite saturation is much less than one mole percent and could not have influenced our determinations. Activity concentration relations in the experimental P-T range may be retrieved for the binary system H2O-NaCl from our brucite-periclase data and from halite liquidus data with minor extrapolation. At two kbar, solutions closely approach an ideal gas mixture, whereas at 10 kbar and above the solutions closely approximate an ideal fused salt mixture, where the activities of H2O and NaCl correspond to an ideal activity formulation. This profound pressure-induced change of state may be characterized by the activity ( a) concentration ( X) expression: a H 2O= X H 2O/(1+α X NaCl), and a NaCl=(1+α)(1+α)[ X NaCl/(1+α X NaCl)](1+α). The parameter α is determined by regression of the brucite-periclase H2O activity data: α=exp[A B/ϱH 2O ]-C P/ T, where A=4.226, B=2.9605, C=164.984, and P is in kbar, T is in Kelvins, and ϱH 2O is the density of H2O at given P and T in g/cm3. These formulas reproduce both the H2O activity data and the NaCl activity data with a standard deviation of ±0.010. The thermodynamic behavior of concentrated NaCl solutions at high temperature and pressure is thus much simpler than portrayed by extended Debye-Hückel theory. The low H2O activity at high pressures in concentrated supercritical NaCl solutions (or hydrosaline melts) indicates that such solutions should be feasible as chemically active fluids capable of coexisting with solid rocks and silicate liquids (and a CO2-rich vapor) in many processes of deep crustal and upper mantle metamorphism and metasomatism.

  14. H2-,He-and CO2-line broadening coefficients and pressure shifts for the HITRAN database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzewski, Jonas; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2014-06-01

    To increase the potential of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line broadening coefficients and line shifts of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2,He,and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for studying planetary atmospheres. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models for complete data sets from the microwave to the UV part of the spectrum of the studied molecules. The presented work will help identify the need for further investigations of broadening and shifting of spectral lines.

  15. A theoretical study on the reactivity and spectra of H2CO and HCOH. A dimeric model for nonzero pressure formaldehyde photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, M. J. H.; Hoeks, C. H.; Buck, H. M.

    1981-05-01

    The reactivity and spectra of formaldehyde isomers and dimeric complexes between them are studied with ab initio methods. A large number of complexes between H2CO, trans-HCOH, cis-HCOH is calculated. Infrared and Raman spectra of (H2CO)2 are calculated with relatively simple methods using spectroscopic masses and scaled force constants. In this way, the structure of dimers in matrices can be deduced. Hydroxycarbene (HCOH) plays a key role in a model that explains a large number of experimental facts of the nonzero pressure photochemistry. Hydroxycarbene forms complexes with H2CO; the stabilization is due to classical hydrogen bonds. HCOH is a new example of an ambiphilic carbene. Addition products are formed from HCOHṡṡṡH2CO complexes. The calculations show that, in agreement with matrix experiments, glycoaldehyde and methanol are easily formed. The formation of trans-HCOH occurs through a dimeric interaction with the shifting hydrogen. This bimolecular process is 9.6 kcal/mol (6-31G*) in favor of the unimolecular conversion. cis-HCOH might be formed via a nonplanar transition state, where also stabilization at the carbenic center is possible. When higher concentrations of HCOH are available, a hydrogen exchange mechanism easily transfers hydroxycarbene back to H2CO. Several experiments are suggested in this paper; notably, molecular beam and isotopic-mixture experiments will give useful information. The involvement of HCOH in the light-induced formose reaction is suggested.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-07-10

    Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is working under DOE contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The unique aspect of the process is that it utilizes a pressurized circulating fluidized bed partial gasifier and does not attempt to consume the coal in a single step. To convert all the coal to syngas in a single step requires extremely high temperatures ({approx}2500 to 2800F) that melt and vaporize the coal and essentially drive all coal ash contaminants into the syngas. Since these contaminants can be corrosive to power generating equipment, the syngas must be cooled to near room temperature to enable a series of chemical processes to clean the syngas. Foster Wheeler's process operates at much lower temperatures that control/minimize the release of contaminants; this eliminates/minimizes the need for the expensive, complicated syngas heat exchangers and chemical cleanup systems typical of high temperature gasification. By performing the gasification in a circulating bed, a significant amount of syngas can still be produced despite the reduced temperature and the circulating bed allows easy scale up to large size plants. Rather than air, it can also operate with oxygen to facilitate sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. The PGM consists of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) reactor together with a recycle cyclone and a particulate removing barrier filter. Coal, air, steam, and possibly sand are fed to the bottom of the PCFB reactor and establish a relatively dense bed of coal/char in the bottom section. As these constituents react, a hot syngas is produced which conveys the solids residue vertically up through the reactor and into the recycle cyclone. Solids elutriated from the dense bed and contained in the syngas are collected in the cyclone and drain via a dipleg back to the dense bed at the bottom of the PCFB reactor. This recycle loop of hot solids acts as a thermal flywheel and promotes efficient solid-gas chemical reaction.

  17. [Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO[sub 2]. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO[sub 2] on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO[sub 2] in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

  18. The role of hydrogen partial pressure on the annealing of copper substrates for graphene CVD synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Welyson T. S.; Cunha, Thiago H. R.; Barcelos, Ingrid D.; Miquita, Douglas R.; Ferrari, Gustavo A.; de Oliveira, Sergio; Seara, Luciana M.; Silva Neto, Eliel G.; Ferlauto, Andre S.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of hydrogen utilized during the thermal treatment of copper substrates on the subsequent graphene growth is investigated. It is known that various parameters such as nature of the carbon precursor, temperature and pressure strongly affect the quality of the graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. Another important parameter is the hydrogen partial pressure adjusted during the growth stage and in the pre-growth annealing of the substrate. In attempts to elucidate the role of hydrogen assisted thermal annealing on the copper substrate morphology and on the subsequent graphene growth, we subjected Cu foils to thermal annealing under H2 atmosphere at different pressures. The copper surface was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy whereas graphene films and grains were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. Our findings suggest that hydrogen not only affect the Cu surface but also diffuses into the substrate, being stored in the bulk material during the thermal treatment of the substrate. The release of hydrogen species in the subsequent stages of growth can result in damage to the graphene layer or induce the nucleation of additional layers depending on the growth and pre-growth conditions. Therefore, the use of hydrogen during the annealing of ‘low purity Cu foils’ should be carefully planned in order to obtain high quality graphene via LPCVD.

  19. Thermal conductivity of H2O-CH3OH mixtures at high pressures: Implications for the dynamics of icy super-Earths outer shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Thermal conductivity of H2O-volatile mixtures at extreme pressure-temperature conditions is a key factor to determine the heat flux and profile of the interior temperature in icy bodies. We use time domain thermoreflectance and stimulated Brillouin scattering combined with diamond anvil cells to study the thermal conductivity and sound velocity of water (H2O)-methanol (CH3OH) mixtures to pressures as high as 12 GPa. Compared to pure H2O, the presence of 5-20 wt % CH3OH significantly reduces the thermal conductivity and sound velocity when the mixture becomes ice VI-CH3OH and ice VII-CH3OH phases at high pressures, indicating that the heat transfer is hindered within the icy body. We then apply these results to model the heat transfer through the icy mantles of super-Earths, assuming that these mantles are animated by thermal convection. Our calculations indicate that the decrease of thermal conductivity due to the presence of 10 wt % CH3OH induces a twofold decrease of the power transported by convection.

  20. Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.F.

    1998-10-15

    All of the technical goals of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) field program which were supported under the Department of Energy research grant ''Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' (DE-FG03-90ER60981) have been met. This has included the measurement of the partial pressures of carbon dioxide (C0{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in both the surface ocean and the atmosphere on 24 separate shipboard expedition legs of the WOCE Hydrographic Programme. These measurements were made in the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans over a six-and-a-half year period, and over a distance of nearly 200,000 kilometers of ship track. The total number of measurements, including ocean measurements, air measurements and standard gas measurements, is about 136,000 for each gas, or about 34,000 measurements of each gas in the ocean and in the air. This global survey effort is directed at obtaining a better understanding of the role of the oceans in the global atmospheric budgets of two important natural and anthropogenic modulators of climate through the ''greenhouse effect'', CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O, and an important natural and anthropogenic modulator of the Earth's protective ozone layer through catalytic processes in the stratosphere, N{sub 2}O. For both of these compounds, the oceans play a major role in their global budgets. In the case of CO{sub 2}, roughly half of the anthropogenic production through the combustion of fossil fuels has been absorbed by the world's oceans. In the case of N{sub 2}O, roughly a third of the natural flux to the atmosphere originates in the oceans. As the interpretation of the variability in the oceanic distributions of these compounds improves, measurements such as those supported by this research project are playing an increasingly important role in improving our understanding of natural and anthropogenic influences on climate and ozone. (B204)

  1. Low pressure UV/H2O2 treatment for the degradation of the pesticides metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - Kinetics and reaction product formation.

    PubMed

    Semitsoglou-Tsiapou, Sofia; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel J D; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Martijn, Bram J; Royce, Alan; Kruithof, Joop C

    2016-03-15

    The degradation kinetics of three pesticides - metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - by ultraviolet photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation by low pressure ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (LP-UV/H2O2) advanced oxidation was determined. Mecoprop was susceptible to both LP-UV photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation, and exhibited the fastest degradation kinetics, achieving 99.6% (2.4-log) degradation with a UV fluence of 800 mJ/cm(2) and 5 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Metaldehyde was poorly degraded by LP-UV photolysis while 97.7% (1.6-log) degradation was achieved with LP-UV/H2O2 treatment at the maximum tested UV fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 15 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Clopyralid was hardly susceptible to LP-UV photolysis and exhibited the lowest degradation by LP-UV/H2O2 among the three pesticides. The second-order reaction rate constants for the reactions between the pesticides and OH-radicals were calculated applying a kinetic model for LP-UV/H2O2 treatment to be 3.6 × 10(8), 2.0 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop, respectively. The main LP-UV photolysis reaction product from mecoprop was 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid, while photo-oxidation by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment formed several oxidation products. The photo-oxidation of clopyralid involved either hydroxylation or dechlorination of the ring, while metaldehyde underwent hydroxylation and produced acetic acid as a major end product. Based on the findings, degradation pathways for the three pesticides by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment were proposed. PMID:26803264

  2. Factors associated with blood oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure regulation during respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: data from a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Marcelo; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Barbosa, Edzangela Vasconcelos Santos; Hirota, Adriana Sayuri; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore the factors associated with blood oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure. Methods The factors associated with oxygen - and carbon dioxide regulation were investigated in an apneic pig model under veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. A predefined sequence of blood and sweep flows was tested. Results Oxygenation was mainly associated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow (beta coefficient = 0.036mmHg/mL/min), cardiac output (beta coefficient = -11.970mmHg/L/min) and pulmonary shunting (beta coefficient = -0.232mmHg/%). Furthermore, the initial oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure measurements were also associated with oxygenation, with beta coefficients of 0.160 and 0.442mmHg/mmHg, respectively. Carbon dioxide partial pressure was associated with cardiac output (beta coefficient = 3.578mmHg/L/min), sweep gas flow (beta coefficient = -2.635mmHg/L/min), temperature (beta coefficient = 4.514mmHg/ºC), initial pH (beta coefficient = -66.065mmHg/0.01 unit) and hemoglobin (beta coefficient = 6.635mmHg/g/dL). Conclusion In conclusion, elevations in blood and sweep gas flows in an apneic veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation model resulted in an increase in oxygen partial pressure and a reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure 2, respectively. Furthermore, without the possibility of causal inference, oxygen partial pressure was negatively associated with pulmonary shunting and cardiac output, and carbon dioxide partial pressure was positively associated with cardiac output, core temperature and initial hemoglobin. PMID:27096671

  3. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures. PMID:26455345

  4. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-10-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures.

  5. A "uniform" heterogeneous photocatalyst: integrated p-n type CuInS2/NaInS2 nanosheets by partial ion exchange reaction for efficient H2 evolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Ngaw, Chee Keong; Tay, Yee Yan; Cao, Shaowen; Barber, James; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Single-crystalline-like P-N type CuInS2/NaInS2 heterogeneous nanosheets were synthesized by partial cation exchange reaction and show highly improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity attributed to the increased efficiency of interfacial charge transfer. PMID:25959829

  6. Kinetics of CH2OO reactions with SO2, NO2, NO, H2O and CH3CHO as a function of pressure.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel; Blitz, Mark; Daubney, Laura; Howes, Neil U M; Seakins, Paul

    2014-01-21

    Kinetics of CH2OO Criegee intermediate reactions with SO2, NO2, NO, H2O and CH3CHO and CH2I radical reactions with NO2 are reported as a function of pressure at 295 K. Measurements were made under pseudo-first-order conditions using flash photolysis of CH2I2-O2-N2 gas mixtures in the presence of excess co-reagent combined with monitoring of HCHO reaction products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and, for the reaction with SO2, direct detection of CH2OO by photoionisation mass spectrometry (PIMS). Rate coefficients for CH2OO + SO2 and CH2OO + NO2 are independent of pressure in the ranges studied and are (3.42 ± 0.42) × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1) (measured between 1.5 and 450 Torr) and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1) (measured between 25 and 300 Torr), respectively. The rate coefficient for CH2OO + CH3CHO is pressure dependent, with the yield of HCHO decreasing with increasing pressure. Upper limits of 2 × 10(-13) cm(3) s(-1) and 9 × 10(-17) cm(3) s(-1) are placed on the rate coefficients for CH2OO + NO and CH2OO + H2O, respectively. The upper limit for the rate coefficient for CH2OO + H2O is significantly lower than has been reported previously, with consequences for modelling of atmospheric impacts of CH2OO chemistry. PMID:24287566

  7. A New Parameterization of H2SO4/H2O Aerosol Composition: Atmospheric Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Toon, Owen B.; Clegg, Simon L.; Hamill, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Recent results from a thermodynamic model of aqueous sulfuric acid are used to derive a new parameterization for the variation of sulfuric acid aerosol composition with temperature and relative humidity. This formulation is valid for relative humidities above 1 % in the temperature range of 185 to 260 K. An expression for calculating the vapor pressure of supercooled liquid water, consistent with the sulfuric acid model, is also presented. We show that the Steele and Hamill [1981] formulation underestimates the water partial pressure over aqueous H2SOI solutions by up to 12% at low temperatures. This difference results in a corresponding underestimate of the H2SO4 concentration in the aerosol by about 6 % of the weight percent at approximately 190 K. In addition, the relation commonly used for estimating the vapor pressure of H2O over supercooled liquid water differs by up to 10 % from our derived expression. The combined error can result in a 20 % underestimation of water activity over a H2SO4 solution droplet in the stratosphere, which has implications for the parameterization of heterogeneous reaction rates in stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols. The influence of aerosol composition on the rate of homogeneous ice nucleation from a H2SO4 solution droplet is also discussed. This parameterization can also be used for homogeneous gas phase nucleation calculations of H2SO4 solution droplets under various environmental conditions such as in aircraft exhaust or in volcanic plumes.

  8. Absorption line shift with temperature and pressure: impact on laser-diode-based H2O sensing at 1.393 microm.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Richard; Lynch, Michael; Donegan, John F; Weldon, Vincent

    2003-08-20

    High-resolution absorption measurements of the H2O line in the v1 + v3 band at 1.3928 microm were made in the temperature range of 296-1100 K by use of an InGaAsP distributed-feedback laser diode operating at 1.39 microm. Spectral line shift, line strength, and N2 broadening on the water-vapor line and their impact on the accuracy of optical-absorption-based gas sensing have been investigated. The results obtained were compared with values obtained from the HITRAN database and values reported in the literature, facilitating H2O sensing in a nonstandard temperature and pressure environment. PMID:12952345

  9. Pressure-composition relations for coexisting gases and liquids and the critical points in the system NaCl-H2O at 450, 475, and 500C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Bischoff, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature-composition (P,T,x) relations for the co-existing vapor and liquid phases in the system NaCl-H2O were determined experimentally at 450, 475, and 500C. Data for each isotherm includeP-xrelations near the critical point and extend to the three-phase assemblage vapor-liquid-halite on the vapor side. On the liquid side theP-xdata range from the critical point to the room-temperature halite saturation point (~25 wt.% NaCl). Critical pressures were calculated from measured pressures and compositions and classical theory. The results generally support the few data points ofUrusova(1974, 1975) and lander andLiander(1950) but differ markedly from the extensive data ofSourirajanandKennedy(1962).

  10. Subduction Factory 3: An Excel worksheet and macro for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and H2O contents of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Abers, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An Excel macro to calculate mineral and rock physical properties at elevated pressure and temperature is presented. The workbook includes an expandable database of physical parameters for 52 rock-forming minerals stable at high pressures and temperatures. For these minerals the elastic moduli, densities, seismic velocities, and H2O contents are calculated at any specified P and T conditions, using basic thermodynamic relationships and third-order finite strain theory. The mineral modes of suites of rocks are also specifiable, so that their predicted aggregate properties can be calculated using standard solid mixing theories. A suite of sample rock modes taken from the literature provides a useful starting point. The results of these calculations can be applied to a wide variety of geophysical questions including estimating the alteration of the oceanic crust and mantle; predicting the seismic velocities of lower-crustal xenoliths; estimating the effects of changes in mineralogy, pressure and temperature on buoyancy; and assessing the H2O content and mineralogy of subducted lithosphere from seismic observations.

  11. The rate constant of the reaction NCN + H2 and its role in NCN and NO modeling in low pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames.

    PubMed

    Faßheber, Nancy; Lamoureux, Nathalie; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-06-28

    Bimolecular reactions of the NCN radical play a key role in modeling prompt-NO formation in hydrocarbon flames. The rate constant of the so-far neglected reaction NCN + H2 has been experimentally determined behind shock waves under pseudo-first order conditions with H2 as the excess component. NCN3 thermal decomposition has been used as a quantitative high temperature source of NCN radicals, which have been sensitively detected by difference UV laser absorption spectroscopy at [small nu, Greek, tilde] = 30383.11 cm(-1). The experiments were performed at two different total densities of ρ≈ 4.1 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) and ρ≈ 7.4 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) (corresponding to pressures between p = 324 mbar and p = 1665 mbar) and revealed a pressure independent reaction. In the temperature range 1057 K < T < 2475 K, the overall rate constant can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 4.1 × 10(13) exp(-101 kJ mol(-1)/RT) (Δlog k = ±0.11). The pressure independent reaction as well as the measured activation energy is consistent with a dominating H abstracting reaction channel yielding the products HNCN + H. The reaction NCN + H2 has been implemented together with a set of reactions for subsequent HNCN and HNC chemistry into the detailed GDFkin3.0_NCN mechanism for NOx flame modeling. Two fuel-rich low-pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames served as examples to quantify the impact of the additional chemical pathways. Although the overall NCN consumption by H2 remains small, significant differences have been observed for NO yields with the updated mechanism. A detailed flux analysis revealed that HNC, mainly arising from HCN/HNC isomerization, plays a decisive role and enhances NO formation through a new HNC → HNCO → NH2→ NH → NO pathway. PMID:26017854

  12. Vibrational dynamics, intermolecular interactions, and compound formation in GeH4–H2 under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, Timothy A.; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Somayazulu, Maddury; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    Optical microscopy, spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction studies at high-pressure are used to investigate intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures of germane (GeH{sub 4} )+hydrogen (H{sub 2} ) . The measurements reveal the formation of a new molecular compound, with the approximate stoichiometry GeH{sub 4} (H{sub 2} ){sub 2} , when the constituents are compressed above 7.5 GPa. Raman and infrared spectroscopic measurements show multiple H{sub 2} vibrons substantially softened from bulk solid hydrogen. With increasing pressure, the frequencies of several Raman and infrared H{sub 2} vibrons decrease, indicating anomalous attractive interaction for closed-shell, nonpolar molecules. Synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction measurements show that the compound has a structure based on face-centered cubic (fcc) with GeH{sub 4} molecules occupying fcc sites and H{sub 2} molecules likely distributed between O{sub h} and T{sub d} sites. Above ca. 17 GPa, GeH{sub 4} molecules in the compound become unstable with respect to decomposition products (Ge+H{sub 2} ) , however, the compound can be preserved metastably to ca. 27 GPa for time-scales of the order of several hours.

  13. Characteristics of high-purity Cu thin films deposited on polyimide by radio-frequency Ar/H2 atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Zheng, W.; Meng, Y. D.; Nagatsu, M.

    2013-03-01

    With a view to fabricating future flexible electronic devices, an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet driven by 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power is developed for depositing Cu thin films on polyimide, where a Cu wire inserted inside the quartz tube was used as the evaporation source. A polyimide substrate is placed on a water-cooled copper heat sink to prevent it from being thermally damaged. With the aim of preventing oxidation of the deposited Cu film, we investigated the effect of adding H2 to Ar plasma on film characteristics. Theoretical fitting of the OH emission line in OES spectrum revealed that adding H2 gas significantly increased the rotational temperature roughly from 800 to 1500 K. The LMM Auger spectroscopy analysis revealed that higher-purity Cu films were synthesized on polyimide by adding hydrogen gas. A possible explanation for the enhancement in the Cu film deposition rate and improvement of purity of Cu films by H2 gas addition is that atomic hydrogen produced by the plasma plays important roles in heating the gas to promote the evaporation of Cu atoms from the Cu wire and removing oxygen from copper oxide components via reduction reaction.

  14. Comparative ecology of H2 cycling in sedimentary and phototrophic ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Albert, Daniel B.; Alperin, Marc J.; Bebout, Brad M.; Martens, Christopher S.; Des Marais, David J.

    2002-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is critical to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. The sensitivity of each of these processes to H2 can be described collectively, through the quantitative language of thermodynamics. A necessary prerequisite is to understand the factors that, in turn, control H2 partial pressures. These factors are assessed for two distinctly different ecosystems. In anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight (North Carolina, USA), H2 partial pressures are strictly maintained at low, steady-state levels by H2-consuming organisms, in a fashion that can be quantitatively predicted by simple thermodynamic calculations. In phototrophic microbial mats from Baja California (Mexico), H2 partial pressures are controlled by the activity of light-sensitive H2-producing organisms, and consequently fluctuate over orders of magnitude on a daily basis. The differences in H2 cycling can subsequently impact any of the H2-sensitive microbial processes in these systems. In one example, methanogenesis in Cape Lookout Bight sediments is completely suppressed through the efficient consumption of H2 by sulfate-reducing bacteria; in contrast, elevated levels of H2 prevail in the producer-controlled phototrophic system, and methanogenesis occurs readily in the presence of 40 mM sulfate.

  15. Critical Properties and Vapor Pressure Equation for Alkanes CnH2n + 2: Normal Alkanes With n<=36 and Isomers for n = 4 Through n = 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, Eric W.; Goodwin, A. R. H.

    2000-01-01

    A correlation for estimating the vapor pressure of normal alkanes from methane through n-hexatriacontane and isomers of butane to nonane is reported. This work extends the correlation for normal alkanes (CnH2n+2), with n⩽20, reported by Ambrose, to both normal alkanes with n⩽36 and their isomers with n⩽9. This vapor pressure equation was based on the Wagner equation and is similar to that used by Ambrose. Literature vapor pressure measurements have been reviewed. Tables are given that list the type of apparatus, measurement range and precision, and chemical purity. These criteria were initially used to select measurements for inclusion in the regression analyses to determine the coefficients of the correlation. Vapor pressures estimated from the correlation were compared with all vapor pressure (p1+g) measurements reviewed in this work. At pressures greater than 1 kPa, the vapor pressure equation presented here has the following accuracies: 0.0001ṡp1+g for methane, 0.001ṡp1+g for ethane, propane, and n-butane, 0.002ṡp1+g for n-pentane through n-octane, 2-methylpropane, and 2-methylbutane, 0.005ṡp1+g for 2,2-dimethylpropane, n-nonane, n-decane, and the isomers of hexane through nonane, 0.01ṡp1+g for n-undecane to n-hexadecane, 0.02ṡp1+g for n-heptadecane to n-eicosane, 0.05ṡp1+g for n-heneicosane to n-octacosane, and 0.10ṡp1+g for n-nonacosane to n-hexatriacontane. Equations for the critical temperatures and pressures of the normal alkanes as functions of the carbon number are also reported.

  16. Unconventional magnetic field and pressure dependences of the ground state of the low-dimensional organic superconductor (BEDO-TTF)2ReO4.H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, A.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Laukhin, V. N.; Brossard, L.; Jérome, D.; Kushch, N. D.

    1996-06-01

    Magnetotransport experiments have been carried out in the two-dimensional organic metal (BEDO-TTF)2ReO4·H2O at temperatures down to 0.4 K and under hydrostatic pressure up to 11 kbar. When measured in magnetic field of a few teslas, the magnetoresistance is large and a steep resistance rise is observed below 4 K, which, as is the case for quasi one-dimensional TMTSF-based compounds, is the signature of a spin density wave condensation. As already observed at ambient pressure, two series of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, linked to hole and electron orbits, are evidenced in the applied pressure range from 3.5 to 11 kbar. Both hole and electron orbit oscillation frequencies (respectively noted Fh and Fe) increase strongly as the pressure increases (dln (Fh,e)/dP = 0.07 kbar-1), while their ratio remains unchanged (Fh/Fe = 2). As the applied pressure increases, both cyclotron masses either slowly decrease or remain constant, keeping low values when compared to other 2D compounds.

  17. Oxygen Partial Pressure and Oxygen Concentration Flammability: Can They Be Correlated?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Susana A.; Juarez, Alfredo; Perez, Horacio, III; Hirsch, David B.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA possesses a large quantity of flammability data performed in ISS airlock (30% Oxygen 526mmHg) and ISS cabin (24.1% Oxygen 760 mmHg) conditions. As new programs develop, other oxygen and pressure conditions emerge. In an effort to apply existing data, the question arises: Do equivalent oxygen partial pressures perform similarly with respect to flammability? This paper evaluates how material flammability performance is impacted from both the Maximum Oxygen Concentration (MOC) and Maximum Total Pressures (MTP) perspectives. From these studies, oxygen partial pressures can be compared for both the MOC and MTP methods to determine the role of partial pressure in material flammability. This evaluation also assesses the influence of other variables on flammability performance. The findings presented in this paper suggest flammability is more dependent on oxygen concentration than equivalent partial pressure.

  18. Partial Fe-Ti alloy phase diagrams at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Toshimi; Hisayuki, Koji; Nakao, Riyuichiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi; Araki, Hideki; Hirao, Keiichi

    1999-11-01

    Recently, high pressure treatments such as hot isostatic pressing have become more familiar in industrial processes. The high pressure induces changes of both the phase equilibrium and the kinetics of the phase transformation in alloys. The iron-rich phase diagrams under high pressure have been previously reported in the Fe-Mo, Fe-W, Fe-Cr, Fe-V, and Fe-Si systems, which have the {gamma} loop in the iron-rich side at the ordinary pressure. These systems exhibit the astonishing changes in phase equilibrium under high pressure: the {gamma} loop expands under high pressure, and especially the {gamma} loop type phase diagrams of Fe-Mo and Fe-W systems transform to the {gamma} shrink type phase diagram at higher pressures. So, it is very interesting to investigate the effect of high pressure on phase equilibrium in the {gamma} loop phase diagram of the Fe-Ti system, which is practically important for hydrogen storage alloys, titanium clad steels, and so on. Therefore, the authors have established the iron-rich Fe-Ti phase diagrams at the high pressure up to 2.7 GPa.

  19. Equation of state and pressure-induced structural changes in mirabilite (Na2SO410H2O) determined from ab initio density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Helen E. A.; Fortes, A. Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Vo?adlo, Lidunka

    2009-09-01

    We have carried out ab initio calculations using density functional theory to determine the bulk elastic properties of mirabilite, Na2SO410H2O, and to obtain information on structural trends caused by the application of high pressure up to ~60 GPa. We have found that there are substantial isosymmetric discontinuous structural re-organisations at ~7.7 and ~20 GPa caused by changes in the manner in which the sodium cations are coordinated by water molecules. The low-pressure and intermediate-pressure phases both have sodium in sixfold coordination but in the high-pressure phase the coordination changes from sixfold to sevenfold. These coordination changes force a re-arrangement of the hydrogen-bond network in the crystal. The trend is towards a reduction in the number of hydrogen bonds donated to the sulphate group (from twelve down to six over the range 0-60 GPa) and an increase in hydrogen bonding amongst the Na-coordinated water molecules and the two interstitial water molecules. Ultimately, we observe proton transfers from the interstitial waters (forming OH- ions) to two of the Na-coordinated waters (forming a pair of H3O+ ions). The equation of state in the athermal limit of the low-pressure phase of mirabilite, parameterised by fitting an integrated form of the third-order Birch-Murnaghan expression to the calculated energy as a function of unit-cell volume, yields the zero-pressure unit-cell volume, V 0 = 1468.6(9) 3, the incompressibility, K 0 = 22.21(9) GPa, and the first pressure derivative K 0' = (?K/?P)0 = 5.6(1).

  20. Forces and pressures in adsorbing partially directed walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Prellberg, T.

    2016-05-01

    Polymers in confined spaces lose conformational entropy. This induces a net repulsive entropic force on the walls of the confining space. A model for this phenomenon is a lattice walk between confining walls, and in this paper a model of an adsorbing partially directed walk is used. The walk is placed in a half square lattice {{{L}}}+2 with boundary \\partial {{{L}}}+2, and confined between two vertical parallel walls, which are vertical lines in the lattice, a distance w apart. The free energy of the walk is determined, as a function of w, for walks with endpoints in the confining walls and adsorbing in \\partial {{{L}}}+2. This gives the entropic force on the confining walls as a function of w. It is shown that there are zero force points in this model and the locations of these points are determined, in some cases exactly, and in other cases asymptotically.

  1. H2 blockers

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H2 blockers; PUD - H2 blockers; Gastroesophageal reflux - H2 blockers ... provider about your symptoms. If you have a peptic ulcer, your provider may prescribe H2 blockers along with ...

  2. H2, He, and CO2 line-broadening coefficients, pressure shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for the HITRAN database. Part 1: SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Hill, Christian; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the potential for use of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line-broadening coefficients, line shifts and temperature-dependence exponents of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2, He, and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models so that every HITRAN line of the studied molecules has corresponding parameters. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for remote sensing studies of planetary atmospheres. In this paper we make the first step in assembling complete sets of these parameters, thereby creating datasets for SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2.

  3. Potential hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures in legacy plutonium oxide packages at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.

    2014-07-07

    An approach to estimate the maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures within sealed containers is described and applied to a set of packages containing high-purity plutonium dioxide. The approach uses experimentally determined maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures and scales the experimentally determined pressures to the relevant packaged material properties. The important material properties are the specific wattage and specific surface area (SSA). Important results from the experimental determination of maximum partial pressures are (1) the ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is stoichiometric, and (2) the maximum pressures increase with increasing initial rates of production. The material properties that influence the rates are the material specific wattage and the SSA. The unusual properties of these materials, high specific wattage and high SSA, result in higher predicted maximum pressures than typical plutonium dioxide in storage. The pressures are well within the deflagration range for mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  4. Impact of hydrogen partial pressure on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Hoover, D.S.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1984-06-01

    This program was conducted to determine the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the SRC-I direct coal liquefaction process and SRC-I Demonstration Plant design. A native solvent was produced in quantity and slurried with Kentucky number 9 Mulford coal in a series of coal liquefaction runs under varying hydrogen gas rates, temperatures, residence times, and hydrogen partial pressures. The results showed that hydrogen partial pressure significantly affected product distribution; the magnitude of the effect was comparable to changes in temperature and residence time. Also, the impact of hydrogen partial pressure was enhanced by increases in both temperature and residence time. Operating at low hydrogen partial pressure did not show any apparent advantage; it reduced coal conversion, reduced oil yield, and had a detrimental effect on the yield distribution of other products. An increase in hydrogen partial pressure had the following effects: increased coal conversion; increased conversion of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes to lighter products; significantly increased the oil yield; increased light gas yields; decreased sulfur content in the SRC; increased hydrogen content of the recycle solvent; and increased hydrogen consumption. This study strongly suggests that further studies should be conducted to optimize the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the process, both within and, preferably, beyond the constraints of the current basic SRC-I design, considering the major impact of this variable on the process. 10 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

  5. Hybrid model of neutral diffusion, sheaths, and the α to γ transition in an atmospheric pressure He/H2O bounded rf discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Water is a trace gas of interest for plasma-based medical applications. We use a two-temperature hybrid global model to simulate a chemically complex, bounded, He/H2O atmospheric pressure discharge, including 43 species with clusters up to {H_{19}O_9^+} . The discharge is embedded in a larger volume, in which the trace gas fraction is controlled, leading to depletion of water within the discharge and diffusive flows of reaction products to the walls. For a planar discharge with a 1 cm electrode radius and a 0.5 mm gap, driven at 13.56 MHz, we determine the depletion and diffusion effects and the α to γ transition, over a range of rf currents (100-1600 A m-2) and external H2O concentrations (500-10 000 ppm). The transition from the low power α-mode to the high power γ-mode is accompanied by a collapse of the bulk electron temperature, an increase in the density and a decrease in the sheath width. At the highest external H2O concentration studied, there are no low current (α-mode) solutions because the sheath widths fill the device. The α-mode is recovered at larger gaps (e.g., 1 mm) or higher frequencies (e.g., 27.12 MHz). The higher mass cluster densities decrease rapidly with increasing gas temperature. Each simulation takes about two minutes on a medium size laptop computer, allowing exploration of a large input parameter space.

  6. Method and apparatus for monitoring oxygen partial pressure in air masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark E. (Inventor); Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring an oxygen partial pressure in an air mask and providing a tactile warning to the user. The oxygen partial pressure in the air mask is detected using an electrochemical sensor, the output signal from which is provided to a comparator. The comparator compares the output signal with a preset reference value or range of values representing acceptable oxygen partial pressures. If the output signal is different than the reference value or outside the range of values, the air mask is vibrated by a vibrating motor to alert the user to a potentially hypoxic condition.

  7. Microwave Spectra and Structures of H_2S-CuCl and H_2O-CuCl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Wheatley, D. E.; Stephens, S. L.; Roberts, F. J.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Legon, A. C.

    2010-06-01

    A Balle-Flygare FT-MW spectrometer coupled to a laser ablation source has been used to measure the pure rotational spectra of H2S-CuCl and H2O-CuCl. Both molecules are generated via laser ablation (532 nm) of a metal rod in the presence of CCl4, argon, a low partial pressure of H2S or H2O and are stabilized by supersonic expansion. Rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants have been measured for eight isotopologues of H2S-CuCl with substitutions available at the copper, chlorine and hydrogen atoms. Transitions in the spectra of nine isotopologues of H2O-CuCl have been measured with isotopic substitutions achieved for every atom. The spectra of both H2S-CuCl and H2O-CuCl are consistent with a linear arrangement of sulphur or oxygen, metal and chlorine atoms. The structure of H2S-CuCl is pyramidal with CS symmetry. The structure of H2O-CuCl is either C2v planar at equilibrium or CS pyramidal but with a low potential-energy barrier to planarity such that the v=0 and 1 states associated with the motion that inverts the configuration at the O atom are well separated. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been measured for the chlorine and copper atoms in each molecule. Nuclear spin-rotation constants have been determined for the copper atom.

  8. Comparative Ecology of H2 Cycling in Organotrophic and Phototrophic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Bebout, Brad M.; Martens, Christopher S.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is critical to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. The sensitivity of these many processes to H2 can be described quantitatively, at a basic thermodynamic level. This shared dependence on H2 may provide a means for interpreting the ecology and system-level biogeochemistry of widely variant microbial ecosystems on a common (and quantitative) level. Understanding the factors that control H2 itself is a critical prerequisite. Here, we examine two ecosystems that vary widely with respect to H2 cycling. In anoxic, 'organotrophic' sediments from Cape Lookout Bight (North Carolina, USA), H2 partial pressures are strictly maintained at low, steady-state levels by H2-consuming organisms, in a fashion that can be quantitatively predicted by simple thermodynamic calculations. In phototrophic microbial mats from Baja, Mexico, H2 partial pressures are instead controlled by the activity of light-sensitive H2-producing organisms. In consequence, H2 partial pressures within the system fluctuate by orders of magnitude on hour-long time scales. The differences in H2 cycling subsequently impact H2-sensitive microbial processes, such as methanogenesis. For example, the presence of sulfate in the organotrophic system always yielded low levels of H2 that were inhibitory to methanogenesis; however, the elevated levels of H2 in the phototrophic system favored methane production at significant levels, even in the presence of high sulfate concentrations. The myriad of other H2-sensitive microbial processes are expected to exhibit similar behavior.

  9. Partial Pressures of Te2 and Thermodynamic Properties of Ga-Te System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The partial pressures of Te2 in equilibrium with Ga(1-x)Te(x) samples were measured by optical absorption technique from 450 to 1100 C for compositions, x, between 0.333 and 0.612. To establish the relationship between the partial pressure of Te, and the measured optical absorbance, the calibration runs of a pure Te sample were also conducted to determine the Beer's Law constants. The partial pressures of Te2 in equilibrium with the GaTe(s) and Ga2Te3(s)compounds, or the so-called three-phase curves, were established. These partial pressure data imply the existence of the Ga3Te4(s) compound. From the partial pressures of Te2 over the Ga-Te melts, partial molar enthalpy and entropy of mixing for Te were derived and they agree reasonable well with the published data. The activities of Te in the Ga-Te melts were also derived from the measured partial pressures of Te2. These data agree well with most of the previous results. The possible reason for the high activity of Te measured for x less than 0.60 is discussed.

  10. Experimental data on the effect of pressure on the volatiles partitioning (Cl, F, H2O) in fluid-magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevychelov, Vitaly

    2014-05-01

    Fluids, separating from the silicate melt with decreasing pressure during magma ascent, will contain all smaller amounts of chlorine and presumably of fluorine due to repartitioning of these halogens into the melt. Effect of pressure on the partitioning of F is expressed more weakly compared with Cl. Experimental studies on the solubility (1N NaCl +0.1N HCl) chloride acidoulous fluid in model melts of granodioritic, granitic and leucogranitic compositions were carried out at T =900-1000oC and P =500 and 100 MPa (Chevychelov, Chevychelova, 1997). The mass ratio of fluid / melt was (2-3): 1. The chlorine content after the experiments was defined only in granitoid melts (glasses). It is shown that, when the pressure is reduced from 500 to 100 MPa, the chlorine content in the silicate melt increases 3-2.5 times (from 0.3 wt.% to 0.9-0.8 wt.% in granodioritic melt, from 0.2% to 0.6-0.5% in granitic melt and from 0.2% to 0.5-0.4% in the leucogranitic melt). At these conditions the content of H2O in granitoid melts decreases approximately 2.5 times from 9-11 wt.% to 4 wt.% (Johannes, Holtz, 1996). Another series of experiments on the solubility of (HCl + HF) fluids of various concentration (from 1N to 16N) in phonolitic melt was held at T =1000°C and P =400, 200 and 50 MPa (Chevychelov, Mukhanova, 2008). The mass ratio of fluid / melt was 0.15:1. The chlorine and fluorine contents in the melt (glass) after the experiments were determined by microprobe analysis. With decreasing pressure the water content in the silicate melts decreased from 8-9 wt.% at 400 MPa to about 6 wt.% at 200 MPa and up to 2-3 wt.% at 50 MPa (Behrens et al., 2009). The Cl, F and H2O contents in the fluid coexisting with phonolitic melt were calculated using the mass balance method. It is shown that with decreasing pressure the chlorine content in phonolitic melt increases (from 0.1 wt.% to 0.35 wt.% at 1N HCl), and the chlorine content in the fluid decreases (from 8-9 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%). With increasing concentration of fluid the pressure effect on the partitioning of Cl decreases. The pressure has a weaker influence on the partitioning of F compared with Cl. At 3-7N HF fluid with decreasing pressure the fluorine content in the fluid coexisting with phonolitic melt decreases. At 1N HF fluid the pressure effect on the partitioning of F is not identified.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF PARTIAL VAPOR PRESSURE OF AMMONIA OVER ACID AMMONIUM SULFATE SOLUTIONS BY AN INTEGRAL METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a simple, integral, passive method for measuring partial vapor pressure. ntegral methods are useful tools when dealing with very low concentrations because collection over extended periods increases the analytical sensitivity. assive methods have the advantage of not i...

  12. Infrared rovibrational spectroscopy of OH-C2H2 in 4He nanodroplets: Parity splitting due to partially quenched electronic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douberly, Gary E.; Raston, Paul L.; Liang, Tao; Marshall, Mark D.

    2015-04-01

    The T-shaped OH-C2H2 complex is formed in helium droplets via the sequential pick-up and solvation of the monomer fragments. Rovibrational spectra of the a-type OH stretch and b-type antisymmetric CH stretch vibrations contain resolved parity splitting that reveals the extent to which electronic angular momentum of the OH moiety is quenched upon complex formation. The energy difference between the spin-orbit coupled 2B1 (A″) and 2B2 (A') electronic states is determined spectroscopically to be 216 cm-1 in helium droplets, which is 13 cm-1 larger than in the gas phase [Marshall et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 5845 (2004)]. The effect of the helium is rationalized as a difference in the solvation free energies of the two electronic states. This interpretation is motivated by the separation between the Q(3/2) and R(3/2) transitions in the infrared spectrum of the helium-solvated 2Π3/2 OH radical. Despite the expectation of a reduced rotational constant, the observed Q(3/2) to R(3/2) splitting is larger than in the gas phase by ≈0.3 cm-1. This observation can be accounted for quantitatively by assuming the energetic separation between 2Π3/2 and 2Π1/2 manifolds is increased by ≈40 cm-1 upon helium solvation.

  13. Pressure-induced magnetic crossover driven by hydrogen bonding in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Neal, Kenneth R.; Brinzari, Tatiana V.; Wright, Joshua B.; Ma, Chunli; Giri, Santanab; Schlueter, John A.; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru; Liu, Zhenxian; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2014-08-13

    Here, hydrogen bonding plays a foundational role in the life, earth, and chemical sciences, with its richness and strength depending on the situation. In molecular materials, these interactions determine assembly mechanisms, control superconductivity, and even permit magnetic exchange. In spite of its long-standing importance, exquisite control of hydrogen bonding in molecule-based magnets has only been realized in limited form and remains as one of the major challenges. Here, we report the discovery that pressure can tune the dimensionality of hydrogen bonding networks in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine) to induce magnetic switching. Specifically, we reveal how the development of exchange pathways under compression combinedmore » with an enhanced ab-plane hydrogen bonding network yields a three dimensional superexchange web between copper centers that triggers a reversible magnetic crossover. Similar pressure- and strain-driven crossover mechanisms involving coordinated motion of hydrogen bond networks may play out in other quantum magnets.« less

  14. Crystal structure, equation of state, and elasticity of phase H (MgSiO4H2) at Earth's lower mantle pressures.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Jun; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2015-01-01

    Dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases play a crucial role in transporting water in to the Earth's interior. A newly discovered DHMS, phase H (MgSiO4H2), is stable at Earth's lower mantle, i.e., at pressures greater than 30 GPa. Here we report the crystal structure and elasticity of phase H and its evolution upon compression. Using first principles simulations, we have explored the relative energetics of the candidate crystal structures with ordered and disordered configurations of magnesium and silicon atoms in the octahedral sites. At conditions relevant to Earth's lower mantle, it is likely that phase H is able to incorporate a significant amount of aluminum, which may enhance the thermodynamic stability of phase H. The sound wave velocities of phase H are ~2-4% smaller than those of isostructural ?-AlOOH. The shear wave impedance contrast due to the transformation of phase D to a mixture of phase H and stishovite at pressures relevant to the upper part of the lower mantle could partly explain the geophysical observations. The calculated elastic wave velocities and anisotropies indicate that phase H can be a source of significant seismic anisotropy in the lower mantle. PMID:26493639

  15. Crystal structure, equation of state, and elasticity of phase H (MgSiO4H2) at Earth’s lower mantle pressures

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Jun; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2015-01-01

    Dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases play a crucial role in transporting water in to the Earth’s interior. A newly discovered DHMS, phase H (MgSiO4H2), is stable at Earth’s lower mantle, i.e., at pressures greater than 30 GPa. Here we report the crystal structure and elasticity of phase H and its evolution upon compression. Using first principles simulations, we have explored the relative energetics of the candidate crystal structures with ordered and disordered configurations of magnesium and silicon atoms in the octahedral sites. At conditions relevant to Earth’s lower mantle, it is likely that phase H is able to incorporate a significant amount of aluminum, which may enhance the thermodynamic stability of phase H. The sound wave velocities of phase H are ~2–4% smaller than those of isostructural δ-AlOOH. The shear wave impedance contrast due to the transformation of phase D to a mixture of phase H and stishovite at pressures relevant to the upper part of the lower mantle could partly explain the geophysical observations. The calculated elastic wave velocities and anisotropies indicate that phase H can be a source of significant seismic anisotropy in the lower mantle. PMID:26493639

  16. Crystal structure, equation of state, and elasticity of phase H (MgSiO4H2) at Earth’s lower mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Jun; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2015-10-01

    Dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases play a crucial role in transporting water in to the Earth’s interior. A newly discovered DHMS, phase H (MgSiO4H2), is stable at Earth’s lower mantle, i.e., at pressures greater than 30 GPa. Here we report the crystal structure and elasticity of phase H and its evolution upon compression. Using first principles simulations, we have explored the relative energetics of the candidate crystal structures with ordered and disordered configurations of magnesium and silicon atoms in the octahedral sites. At conditions relevant to Earth’s lower mantle, it is likely that phase H is able to incorporate a significant amount of aluminum, which may enhance the thermodynamic stability of phase H. The sound wave velocities of phase H are ~2-4% smaller than those of isostructural δ-AlOOH. The shear wave impedance contrast due to the transformation of phase D to a mixture of phase H and stishovite at pressures relevant to the upper part of the lower mantle could partly explain the geophysical observations. The calculated elastic wave velocities and anisotropies indicate that phase H can be a source of significant seismic anisotropy in the lower mantle.

  17. A Priori Analysis of Subgrid Mass Flux Vectors from Massively Parallel Direct Numerical Simulations of High Pressure H2/O2 Reacting Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin; Miller, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are conducted for temporally developing reacting H2/O2 shear layers at an ambient pressure of 100atm. The compressible form of the governing equations are coupled with the Peng Robinson real gas equation of state and are solved using eighth order central finite differences and fourth order Runge Kutta time integration with resolutions up to ~3/4 billion grid points. The formulation includes a detailed pressure dependent kinetics mechanism having 8 species and 19 steps, detailed property models, and generalized forms of the multicomponent heat and mass diffusion vectors derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation theory. The DNS is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 4500 based on the free stream velocity difference and initial vorticity thickness. The results are then analyzed in an a priori manner to illustrate the role of the subgrid mass flux vector within the filtered form of the governing equations relevant to Large Eddy Simulations. The subgrid mass flux vector is found to be a significant term; particularly within localized regions of the flame. Research supported by NSF Grant CBET-0965624 and Clemson University's Palmetto Cluster.

  18. Effects of operating pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in a partially premixed swirl combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Gyung-Min; Kim, Duck-Jool

    2011-01-15

    The influence of varying combustor pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame were investigated. In order to investigate combustion characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame, the combustor pressure was controlled in the range of -30 to 30 kPa for each equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.8-1.2). The r.m.s. of the pressure fluctuations increased with decreasing combustor pressure for the lean condition. The combustor pressure had a sizeable influence on combustion oscillation, whose dominant frequency varied with the combustor pressure. Combustion instabilities could be controlled by increasing the turbulent intensity of the unburned mixture under the lean condition. An unstable flame was caused by incomplete combustion; hence, EICO greatly increased. Furthermore, EINO{sub x} simply reduced with decreasing combustor pressure at a rate of 0.035 g/10 kPa. The possibility of combustion control on the combusting mode and exhaust gas emission was demonstrated. (author)

  19. Efficient representation of the absorption line blackbody distribution function for H2O, CO2, and CO at variable temperature, mole fraction, and total pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John T.; Webb, Brent W.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.; Ma, Jiefu

    2014-05-01

    The absorption line blackbody distribution function (ALBDF) is the primary tool used in the SLW model for calculating the weights of gray gases. The ALBDF for H2O, CO2, and CO is calculated rigorously using the HITEMP 2010 spectroscopic database. The line-by-line data is the basis for an updated and improved hyperbolic tangent correlation of the ALBDF, valid for temperatures ranging from 400 K to 3000 K and total pressures ranging from 0.1 atm to 50 atm. The correlations are first established at atmospheric pressure, and variable total pressure is accounted for as a shift from the atmospheric pressure calculation. Further, the line-by-line ALBDF data have been tabulated to directly represent the ALBDF; the ALBDF has been tabulated for discrete temperatures ranging from 300 K to 3000 K, mole fractions (where appropriate) from 0 to 1, and total pressures ranging from 0.1 atm to 50 atm. The data have been made available on the website http://albdf.byu.edu. Improvements made compared to other representations of the ALBDF include more rigorous generation of the detailed spectral absorption cross-section, correlation and tabulation of the ALBDF for CO, expansion to variable total pressure, and a higher temperature ceiling. The accuracy of the hyperbolic tangent correlation is characterized and regimes of relative lower accuracy identified, and it is demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate for engineering applications. The tabulated ALBDF data, which can be used directly in place of the correlation, are shown to be considerably more accurate than the correlation. There is an initial computational cost to read the tabulated data after which interpolation is used to obtain the ALBDF at specified conditions. The updated and expanded ALBDF correlation and the tabulated ALBDF data are used to compute total emissivity and radiative transfer in both homogeneous, isothermal media and non-homogeneous, non-isothermal media and are compared to line-by-line benchmark calculations. The hyperbolic tangent correlation performs very well in these calculations and shows excellent accuracy, while the accuracy of calculations using the tabulated data is considerably better.

  20. Burn rates of TiH2/KClO4/Viton and output testing of NASA SKD26100098-301 pressure cartridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holy, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The burn rates of the pyrotechnic TiH2/KClO4/Viton with a mass ratio of 30/65/5 have been measured as a function of pressure in nitrogen up to 312 MPa(45 Kpsi). The burn rates were fit to R = a pn, with a = 2.055 cm/sec/MPan and n = 0.472 between 0.15 MPa (22 psi) and 21.6 MPa (3.13 Kpsi) and a = 4.38 cm/sec/MPan and n = 0.266 between 70 MPa (10.15 Kpsi) and 312 MPa (45.25 Kpsi). The decrease in slope at the higher pressures is attributed to a diffusion limited reaction. No acoustically driven flame instabilities or large conductive-to-convective burn transitions were observed. Solid reaction products were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction detected only TiO2 and KC1. SEM showed that the particle size of the reaction products increased as the nitrogen pressure increased. There were no anomalous characteristics of the burn of this pyrotechnic that could be interpreted as a cause of the o-ring blow-by problem in the forward shear bolt assembly. Three NASA SKD26100098-301 pressure cartridges were fired into a fixed volume vessel that was sealed with an O-ring. A maximum pressure of 181.7 MPa(26,350 psi) was reached in around 100 ,mu sec for two shots fired into a volume of 16.3 cm3(0.996 in3). A maximum pressure of 33,460 psi was reached for one shot fired into a volume of 9.55 cm3(0.583 in3). The O-ring burned through on one shot in the larger volume and leaked on the other two thereby simulating the effects of an O-ring leak. The results imply that the piston in the shear bolt assembly would receive a large impulse even if there was a leak in an O-ring seal.

  1. In-situ Raman spectroscopic study of aluminate speciation in H2O-KOH solutions at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Keppler, H.; Manning, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The solubility of corundum in H2O is low even at high pressure and temperatures. Therefore, it is commonly assumed that alumina remains essentially immobile during fluid-rock interaction. However, field and experimental evidence suggests that alumina solubility is strongly enhanced in the presence of silica as well as in alkaline solutions. In order to understand what controls the alumina solubility and how it is enhanced as a function of fluid composition, we conducted Raman-spectroscopic study of Al speciation in aqueous fluids at high pressure and temperature. Experiments were carried out in an externally heated hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell equipped with low-fluorescence diamonds and iridium gaskets. Raman spectra were collected with a Horiba Jobin-Yvon Labram HR spectrometer using the 514 nm line of an argon laser for excitation. In a first series of experiments, the speciation of alumina was studied in a 1 M KOH solution in equilibrium with corundum up to 700 oC and ~1 GPa. The Raman spectra show a prominent band at 618 cm-1 interpreted to arise from Al-O stretching vibrations associated with the tetrahedral [Al(OH)4]1- species. At higher pressure and temperature, an additional vibrational mode appears in the spectra at 374 cm-1 (full width at half maximum ~ 20 cm-1). This feature is tentatively attributed to [(OH)3Al-O-Al(OH)3]2- (Moolenaar et al. 1970, Jour. Phys. Chem., 74, 3629-3636). No evidence for KAl(OH)4 was observed, consistent with piston cylinder experiments at 700 oC and 1 GPa (Wohlers & Manning, 2009, Chem. Geol., 262, 310). Upon cooling from high-pressure and high temperature, slow kinetics of corundum regrowth lead to oversaturation in the solutions, as evidenced by sharp peaks at 930 and 1066 cm-1 observed upon cooling. These features are probably due to colloidal aluminum hydroxide. The results provide the first evidence for aluminate polymerization at high pressure and temperature, and offer insights into the causes for enhancement of corundum solubility in alkaline solutions.

  2. The stability and Raman spectra of ikaite, CaCO3·6H2O, at high pressure and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shahar, Anat; Bassett, William A.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Chou, I-Ming; Mao, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Raman analyses of single crystals of ikaite, CaCO3·6H2O, synthesized in a diamond-anvil cell at ambient temperature yield spectra from 0.14 to 4.08 GPa; the most intense peaks are at 228 and 1081 cm−1 corresponding to Eg(external) and A1g (internal) modes of vibrations in CO2− 3 ions, respectively. These are in good agreement with Raman spectra previously published for ikaite in powder form at ambient temperature and pressure. Visual observations of a sample consisting initially of a mixture of calcite + water in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell yielded a P-T phase diagram up to 2 GPa and 120 °C; the boundary for the reaction ikaite ↔ aragonite + water has a positive slope and is curved convexly toward the aragonite + water field similar to typical melt curves. This curvature can be explained in terms of the Clapeyron equation for a boundary between a solid phase and a more compressible liquid phase or largely liquid phase assemblage.

  3. Absolute OH density measurements in the effluent of a cold atmospheric-pressure Ar-H2O RF plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreycken, Tiny; Mensink, Rob; van der Horst, Ruud; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2013-10-01

    Absolute OH densities are obtained in a radio-frequency-driven Ar-H2O atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), calibrated by Rayleigh scattering and by UV broadband absorption. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and the effect of air entrainment into the Ar jet is measured by analyzing the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The OH densities are obtained for different water vapor concentrations admixed to the Ar and as a function of the axial distance from the nozzle. A sensitivity analysis to deduce the accuracy of the model-calculated OH density from the LIF measurement is reported. It is found that the UV absorption and the LIF results correspond within experimental accuracy close to the nozzle and deviate in the far effluent. The possible reasons are discussed. The OH densities found in the plasma jet are in the range (0.1-2.5) × 1021 m-3 depending on the water concentration and plasma conditions.

  4. Partial pressures of oxygen, phosphorus and fluorine in some lunar lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, W. P.; Hausel, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar sample 14310 is a feldspar-rich basalt which shows no evidence of shock deformation or recrystallization. Pyroxenes include Mg-rich orthopyroxene, pigeonite and augite; pyroxferroite occurs in the interstitial residuum. Plagioclase feldspars are zoned from An(96) to An(67), and variations in feldspar compositions do not necessarily indicate loss of Na during eruption of the lava. Opaque phases include ilmenite, ulvospinel, metallic iron, troilite, and schreibersite. Both whitlockite and apatite are present, and the interstitial residua contain baddeleyite, tranquillityite and barium-rich sanidine. Theoretical calculations provide estimates of partial pressures of oxygen, phosphorus, and fluorine in lunar magmas. In general, partial pressures of oxygen are restricted by the limiting assemblages of iron-wuestite and ilmenite-iron-rutile; phosphorus partial pressures are higher in lunar magmas than in terrestrial lavas. The occurrence of whitlockite indicates significantly lower fugacities of fluorine in lunar magmas than in terrestrial magmas.

  5. Preliminary modeling of high pressure partial melting - Implications for early lunar differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented for equilibrium crystallization of lunar magmas at high pressure, which, viewed in reverse, is equivalent to equilibrium partial melting. Data are extrapolated from simple systems, mare basalt systems, and from experiments on terrestrial compositions. Liquidus phase equilibria in a portion of the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system serve as a guide for predicting phase equilibria in the natural system. High pressure partial melting sequences are calculated for several proposed whole moon compositions at nominal pressure of 10 and 20 kb. Results show that compositions with chondritic Ca/Al have quite different melting paths from those with subchondritic Ca/Al, and as a result the types of magmas produced are quite different. If the moon possesses a chondritic Ca/Al ratio, models which rely on small degrees of partial melting to produce the early lunar magnetism are suspect.

  6. Phase relations in the system NaCl-KCl-H2O: IV. Differential thermal analysis of the sylvite liquidus in the KCl-H2O binary, the liquidus in the NaCl-KCl-H2O ternary, and the solidus in the NaCl-KCl binary to 2 kb pressure, and a summary of experimental data for thermodynamic-PTX analysis of solid-liquid equilibria at elevated P-T conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sterner, S.M.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1992-01-01

    The sylvite liquidus in the binary system KCl-H2O and the liquidus in the ternary system NaCl-KCl-H2O were determined by using isobaric differential thermal analysis (DTA) cooling scans at pressures up to 2 kbars. Sylvite solubilities along the three-phase curve in the binary system KCl-H2O were obtained by the intersection of sylvite-liquidus isopleths with the three-phase curve in a P-T plot. These solubility data can be represented by the equation Wt.% KCl (??0.2) = 12.19 + 0.1557T - 5.4071 ?? 10-5 T2, where 400 ??? T ??? 770??C. These data are consistent with previous experimental observations. The solidus in the binary system NaCl-KCl was determined by using isobaric DTA heating scans at pressures up to 2 kbars. Using these liquidus and solidus data and other published information, a thermodynamic-PTX analysis of solid-liquid equilibria at high pressures and temperatures for the ternary system has been performed and is presented in an accompanying paper (Part V of this series). However, all experimental liquidus, solidus, and solvus data used in this analysis are summarized in this report (Part IV) and they are compared with the calculated values based on the analysis. ?? 1992.

  7. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Surface Tension of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Gowda, Vijaya Kumar Malahalli Shankare; Rodriguez, Justin; Matson, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been recently upgraded with an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop, and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects of oxygen partial pressure on the surface tension of undercooled liquid nickel will be analyzed, and the results will be presented. The surface tension will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension will be measured using the oscillating drop method. While undercooled, each sample will be oscillated several times consecutively to investigate how the surface tension behaves with time while at a particular oxygen partial pressure.

  8. Thermo- and piezochromic properties of [Fe(hyptrz)]A2·H2O spin crossover 1D coordination polymer: Towards spin crossover based temperature and pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jureschi, Catalin-Maricel; Rusu, Ionela; Codjovi, Epiphane; Linares, Jorge; Garcia, Yann; Rotaru, Aurelian

    2014-09-01

    We have used reflectance measurements to investigate the effect of a hydrostatic pressure on the molecular 1D spin crossover coordination polymer [Fe(hyptrz)]A2·H2O (hyptrz=4-(3‧-hydroxypropyl)-1,2,4-triazole and A=4-chloro-benzenesulfonate) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80 (2009) 123901. Both thermal and pressure hysteresis have been recorded at different pressures and temperatures, respectively, in order to obtain valuable information about the optimal conditions of their use as wireless temperature and pressure sensors. The experimental analysis has been completed with a theoretical study and potential applications in terms of temperature and pressure wireless detection are discussed.

  9. Optimizing the physical ergonomics indices for the use of partial pressure suits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Li, Xianxue; Hedge, Alan; Hu, Huimin; Feathers, David; Qin, Zhifeng; Xiao, Huajun; Xue, Lihao; Zhou, Qianxiang

    2015-03-01

    This study developed an ergonomic evaluation system for the design of high-altitude partial pressure suits (PPSs). A total of twenty-one Chinese males participated in the experiment which tested three types of ergonomics indices (manipulative mission, operational reach and operational strength) were studied using a three-dimensional video-based motion capture system, a target-pointing board, a hand dynamometer, and a step-tread apparatus. In total, 36 ergonomics indices were evaluated and optimized using regression and fitting analysis. Some indices that were found to be linearly related and redundant were removed from the study. An optimal ergonomics index system was established that can be used to conveniently and quickly evaluate the performance of different pressurized/non-pressurized suit designs. The resulting ergonomics index system will provide a theoretical basis and practical guidance for mission planners, suit designers and engineers to design equipment for human use, and to aid in assessing partial pressure suits. PMID:25479976

  10. Effect of partial pressure and temperature on properties of vacuum deposited chromium gold thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, J.G.; Zawicki, L.R.; Thomas, N.C.

    1981-09-01

    Chromium-gold thin films were deposited on alumina substrates over a pressure range of 0.0267 to 13.3 mPa, with substrate temperatures ranging from 313 to 523/sup 0/K. A quadrapole residual gas analyzer was used to record the bell jar gas spectrum before and during each run. Correlation of properties with oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure was observed. Adhesion of the chromium-gold films as determined by a 90-degree pull test of thermocompression bonded lead frames was shown to have a bimodal distribution of very low or high strength dependent on oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. A system pressure of 6.67 mPa with a substrate temperature of 473/sup 0/K resulted in the highest pull strengths and acceptable failure modes.

  11. Effect of partial pressure and temperature on properties of vacuum deposited chromium gold thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, J.G.; Zawicki, L.R.; Thomas, N.C.

    1981-09-01

    Chromium-gold thin films were deposited on alumina substrates over a pressure range of 0.0267 to 13.3 mPa, with substrate temperatures ranging from 313 to 523K. A quadrapole residual gas analyzer was used to record the bell jar gas spectrum before and during each run. Correlation of properties with oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure was observed. Adhesion of the chromium-gold films as determined by a 90-degree pull test of thermocompression bonded lead frames was shown to have a bimodal distribution of very low or high strength dependent on oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. A system pressure of 6.67 mPa with a substrate temperature of 473K resulted in the highest pull strengths and acceptable failure modes.

  12. Effect of partial pressure and temperature on properties of vacuum deposited chromium-gold thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, J.G.; Zawicki, L.R.; Thomas, N.C.

    1981-11-01

    Chromium-gold thin films were deposited on alumina substrates over a pressure range of 0.0267 to 13.3 mPa, with substrate temperatures ranging from 313 to 523/sup 0/K. A quadrapole residual gas analyzer was used to record the bell jar gas spectrum before and during each run. Correlation of properties with oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure was observed. Adhesion of the chromium-gold films as determined by a 90-degree pull test of thermocompression bonded lead frames was shown to have a bimodal distribution of very low or high strength dependent on oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. A system pressure of 6.67 mPa with a substrate temperature of 473/sup 0/K resulted in the highest pull strengths and acceptable failure modes.

  13. On the sensitivity to partial pressure of oxygen of the mobility in cadmium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, M. A.; Grado-Caffaro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen during the deposition process of cadmium oxide is a crucial quantity whose influence on the electrical and optical properties of this material is really very significant (consider, for example, the experimental technique known as activated reactive evaporation). In fact, this paper is a theoretical formulation to evaluate the sensitivity changes of the aforementioned pressure of the electron drift-mobility and velocity in CdO. Indeed, as we will see later, given that the electron relaxation time depends upon the oxygen partial pressure, then the electron drift-mobility, mean free path and velocity also depend on this pressure. Relevant calculations involving the above physical quantities are carried out.

  14. Report on ISS O2 Production, Gas Supply and Partial Pressure Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, Ryan N.; Cook, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is used on International Space Station (ISS) for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Nitrogen is used to maintain total pressure and account for losses associated with leakage and operational losses. Oxygen and nitrogen have been supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to the on-orbit oxygen production capability. Starting in 2014, new high pressure oxygen/nitrogen tanks are available to launch on commercial cargo vehicles and will replace the high pressure gas source that Shuttle used to provide. To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen and nitrogen partial pressures are controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable partial pressures along with the increased ISS cabin volume are utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen and nitrogen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes the amount of gas supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing partial pressures along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  15. H2O nucleation around Au+.

    PubMed

    Reveles, J Ulises; Calaminici, Patrizia; Beltrn, Marcela R; Kster, Andres M; Khanna, Shiv N

    2007-12-19

    First principles electronic structure calculations have been carried out to investigate the ground state geometry, electronic structure, and the binding energy of [Au(H2O)n]+ clusters containing up to 10 H2O molecules. It is shown that the first coordination shell of Au+ contains two H2O molecules forming a H2O-Au+-H2O structure with C2 symmetry. Subsequent H2O molecules bind to the previous H2O molecules forming stable and fairly rigid rings, each composed of 4 H2O molecules, and leading to a dumbbell structure at [Au(H2O)8]+. The 9th and the 10th H2O molecules occupy locations above the Au+ cation mainly bonded to one H2O from each ring, leading to structures where the side rings are partially distorted and forming structures that resemble droplet formation around the Au+ cation. The investigations highlight quantum effects in nucleation at small sizes and provide a microscopic understanding of the observed incremental binding energy deduced from collision induced dissociation that indicates that [Au(H2O)n]+ clusters with 7-10 H2O molecules have comparable binding energy. The charge on the Au+ is shown to migrate to the outside H2O molecules, suggesting an interesting screening phenomenon. PMID:18034477

  16. Accelerated carbon sequestration in mine tailings using elevated CO2 partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A. L.; Power, I. M.; Dipple, G. M.; Mayer, K. U.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralization of atmospheric CO2 within hydrated Mg-carbonate minerals occurs passively in ultramafic mine tailings at low temperature via weathering of Mg-silicate minerals [1]. If this process were accelerated, large mines may have the capacity to sequester millions of tonnes of CO2 annually, providing the potential to offset the greenhouse gas emissions of mining. Recent laboratory evidence indicates the rate-limiting step for sequestration in mine tailings is the uptake of atmospheric CO2 into solution [2]. Supplying elevated partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2) into mine tailings may accelerate carbon sequestration by increasing dissolved inorganic carbon and enhancing mineral dissolution. Passive carbon mineralization has been documented at the Mount Keith Nickel Mine (MKM), Western Australia [3]. MKM produces ~11 Mt of tailings annually, consisting primarily of Mg-silicate serpentine minerals. Brucite [Mg(OH)2] is present at lower abundance (~1-2.5 wt.%) [3], yet is more rapidly carbonated. The effect of elevated pCO2 on the carbonation rate of brucite was investigated experimentally with solutions mimicking process water chemistry and temperature conditions in tailings at MKM. Gas streams ranging in composition from 10 to 100% CO2 (balance N2) were sparged into 3.0 L alkaline slurries containing 5% brucite. Brucite was completely replaced by nesquehonite [MgCO3?3H2O] ± dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2?5H2O] within 75, 12, and 7 hours with 10%, 50%, and 100% CO2 gas, respectively. This corresponds to a linear increase in carbon mineralization rate with pCO2. Approximately 30% of supplied CO2 was sequestered within these time periods. PHREEQC geochemical modelling using experimentally determined mineral dissolution rate laws suggests acceleration of the brucite carbonation rate with pCO2 is attributable to HCO3- promoted dissolution. Modelling of experimental conditions indicates that equilibrium between CO2 in the gas and aqueous phases is not attained during the carbonation reaction. This implies CO2 uptake into solution remains the rate-limiting step during brucite carbonation at elevated pCO2, providing further potential for acceleration. An increase in carbonation rate of serpentine with pCO2 is expected due to increased acidity, but the effect of HCO3- requires further investigation. Modelling reveals a non-linear relationship between both acidity and HCO3- promoted dissolution and carbonation rate of serpentine and brucite with pCO2. This implies use of lower pCO2 gas (e.g. 10%) may be sufficient to achieve similar carbonation rates as 100% CO2 gas if CO2 uptake were enhanced. The minimum experimental brucite carbonation rate is in excess of that required to completely carbonate the average mass of brucite produced annually at MKM. Achievement of this rate at the mine scale would sequester 80 - 210 kt CO2/year, offsetting annual mine emissions by ~22 - 56%. [1] Wilson et al. (2009), Econ. Geol. 104: 95-112. [2] Wilson et al. (2010), Environ. Sci. Technol. 44: 9522-9529. [3] Wilson (2009), PhD thesis, UBC, Vancouver, Canada.

  17. Study of pressure broadening effects of H2 on CO2 and CO in the near infrared region between 6317 and 6335 cm-1 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, A.; Tzanetakis, T.; Chanda, A.; Thomson, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this absorption spectroscopy study of CO2 and CO in the near-infrared (NIR) region between 6317 and 6335 cm-1, we focus on the broadening effect of H2 at room temperature (296 K). Absorption spectra were collected using a Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) operating in the NIR for various gas mixtures filled in a monel gas cell. The experimental parameters chosen in this study are highly relevant to combustion-related industrial applications where TDL sensors are employed to monitor CO2 and CO emissions. In many such applications H2 is always present and there is a need to understand the broadening effect of H2 on CO2 and CO to improve the detection quality of such sensors. Voigt profile analysis was performed to retrieve the experimental parameters. CO2-H2 broadening coefficients are presented for room temperature. From our study on the CO-H2 broadening effect at room temperature, we conclude that within the sensitivity of the measurements made, the presence of H2 has no significant effect in this region. The parameters calculated in this study are intended to be an addition to spectroscopic databases such as HITRAN.

  18. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. 868.1200 Section 868.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. 868.1150 Section 868.1150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. 868.1200 Section 868.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. 868.1200 Section 868.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. 868.1200 Section 868.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. 868.1150 Section 868.1150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. 868.1150 Section 868.1150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. 868.1150 Section 868.1150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. 868.1150 Section 868.1150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. 868.1200 Section 868.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices §...

  8. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O with montomorillonite has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  9. Measurement and Control of Oxygen Partial Pressure in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been upgraded to include an oxygen control system. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, at elevated temperatures, theoretically in the range from 10(exp -36) to 10(exp 0) bar. The role of active surface agents in liquid metals is fairly well known; however, published surface tension data typically has large scatter, which has been hypothesized to be caused by the presence of oxygen. The surface tension of metals is affected by even a small amount of adsorption of oxygen. It has even been shown that oxygen partial pressures may need to be as low as 10(exp -24) bar to avoid oxidation. While electrostatic levitation is done under high vacuum, oxide films or dissolved oxygen may have significant effects on materials properties, such as surface tension and viscosity. Therefore, the ability to measure and control the oxygen partial pressure within the chamber is highly desirable. The oxygen control system installed at MSFC contains a potentiometric sensor, which measures the oxygen partial pressure, and an oxygen ion pump. In the pump, a pulse-width modulated electric current is applied to yttrium-stabilized zirconia, resulting in oxygen transfer into or out of the system. Also part of the system is a control unit, which consists of temperature controllers for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop for the ion pump, and a control algorithm. This system can be used to study the effects of oxygen on the thermophysical properties of metals, ceramics, glasses, and alloys. It can also be used to provide more accurate measurements by processing the samples at very low oxygen partial pressures. The oxygen control system will be explained in more detail and an overview of its use and limitations in an electrostatic levitator will be described. Some preliminary measurements have been made, and the results to date will be provided.

  10. Investigation of the H2 Oxidation System in Rhizobium japonicum 122 DES Nodule Bacteroids 1

    PubMed Central

    Emerich, David W.; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomas; Russell, Sterling A.; Evans, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    The H2-oxidizing complex in Rhizobium japonicum 122 DES bacteroids failed to catalyze, at a measurable rate, 2H1H exchange from a mixture of 2H2 and 1H2 in presence of 2H2O and 1H2O, providing no evidence for reversibility of the hydrogenase reaction in vivo. In the H2 oxidation reaction, there was no significant discrimination between 2H2 and 1H2, indicating that the initial H2-activation step in the over-all H2 oxidation reaction is not rate-limiting. By use of improved methods, an apparent Km for H2 of 0.05 micromolar was determined. The H2 oxidation reaction in bacteroids was strongly inhibited by cyanide (88% at 0.05 millimolar), theonyltrifluoroacetone, and other metal-complexing agents. Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone at 0.005 millimolar and 2,4-dinitrophenol at 0.5 millimolar inhibited H2 oxidation and stimulated O2 uptake. This and other evidence suggest the involvement of cytochromes and nonheme iron proteins in the pathway of electron transport from H2 to O2. Partial pressures of H2 at 0.03 atmosphere and below had a pronounced inhibitory effect on endogenous respiration by bacteroid suspensions. The inhibition of CO2 evolution by low partial pressures of H2 suggests that H2 utilization may result in conservation of oxidizable substrates and benefits the symbiosis under physiological conditions. Succinate, acetate, and formate at concentrations of 50 millimolar inhibited rates of H2 uptake by 8, 29, and 25%, respectively. The inhibition by succinate was noncompetitive and that by acetate and formate was uncompetitive. A concentration of 11.6 millimolar CO2 (initial concentration) in solution inhibited H2 uptake by bacteroid suspensions by 18%. Further research is necessary to establish the significance of the inhibition of H2 uptake by succinate, acetate, formate, and CO2 in the metabolism of the H2-uptake-positive strains of Rhizobium. PMID:16661577

  11. Oxidation of C/SiC Composites at Reduced Oxygen Partial Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Serra, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    T-300 carbon fibers and T-300 carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites (C/SiC) were oxidized in flowing reduced oxygen partial pressure environments at a total pressure of one atmosphere (0.5 atm O2, 0.05 atm O2 and 0.005 atm O2, balance argon). Experiments were conducted at four temperatures (816deg, 1149deg, 1343deg, and 1538 C). The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. T-300 fibers were oxidized to completion for times between 0.6 and 90 h. Results indicated that fiber oxidation kinetics were gas phase diffusion controlled. Oxidation rates had an oxygen partial pressure dependence with a power law exponent close to one. In addition, oxidation rates were only weakly dependent on temperature. The C/SiC coupon oxidation kinetics showed some variability, attributed to differences in the number and width of cracks in the SiC seal coat. In general, weight losses were observed indicating oxidation of the carbon fibers dominated the oxidation behavior. Low temperatures and high oxygen pressures resulted in the most rapid consumption of the carbon fibers. At higher temperatures, the lower oxidation rates were primarily attributed to crack closure due to SiC thermal expansion, rather than oxidation of SiC since these reduced rates were observed even at the lowest oxygen partial pressures where SiC oxidation is minimal.

  12. Response of the Endophytic Diazotroph Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus on Solid Media to Changes in Atmospheric Partial O2 Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bo; Vessey, J. Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is an N2-fixing endophyte isolated from sugarcane. G. diazotrophicus was grown on solid medium at atmospheric partial O2 pressures (pO2) of 10, 20, and 30 kPa for 5 to 6 days. Using a flowthrough gas exchange system, nitrogenase activity and respiration rate were then measured at a range of atmospheric pO2 (5 to 60 kPa). Nitrogenase activity was measured by H2 evolution in N2-O2 and in Ar-O2, and respiration rate was measured by CO2 evolution in N2-O2. To validate the use of H2 production as an assay for nitrogenase activity, a non-N2-fixing (Nif−) mutant of G. diazotrophicus was tested and found to have a low rate of uptake hydrogenase (Hup+) activity (0.016 ±  0.009 μmol of H2 1010 cells−1 h−1) when incubated in an atmosphere enriched in H2. However, Hup+ activity was not detectable under the normal assay conditions used in our experiments. G. diazotrophicus fixed nitrogen at all atmospheric pO2 tested. However, when the assay atmospheric pO2 was below the level at which the colonies had been grown, nitrogenase activity was decreased. Optimal atmospheric pO2 for nitrogenase activity was 0 to 20 kPa above the pO2 at which the bacteria had been grown. As atmospheric pO2 was increased in 10-kPa steps to the highest levels (40 to 60 kPa), nitrogenase activity decreased in a stepwise manner. Despite the decrease in nitrogenase activity as atmospheric pO2 was increased, respiration rate increased marginally. A large single-step increase in atmospheric pO2 from 20 to 60 kPa caused a rapid 84% decrease in nitrogenase activity. However, upon returning to 20 kPa of O2, 80% of nitrogenase activity was recovered within 10 min, indicating a “switch-off/switch-on” O2 protection mechanism of nitrogenase activity. Our study demonstrates that colonies of G. diazotrophicus can fix N2 at a wide range of atmospheric pO2 and can adapt to maintain nitrogenase activity in response to both long-term and short-term changes in atmospheric pO2. PMID:11571174

  13. [Device to assess in-socket pressure distribution for partial foot amputation].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Camacho, Michelín; Urrusti, José Luis; Acero, María Del Carmen; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Mendoza-Cruz, Felipe

    2014-07-01

    A device for dynamic acquisition and distribution analysis of in-socket pressure for patients with partial foot amputation is presented in this work. By using the developed system, we measured and generated pressure distribution graphs, obtained maximal pressure, and calculated pressure-time integral (PTI) of three subjects with partial foot amputation and of a group of Healthy subjects (Hs) (n = 10). Average maximal pressure in the healthy group was 19.4 ± 4.11 PSI, while for the three amputated patients, this was 27.8 ± 1.38, 17.6 ± 1.15, 29.10 ± 3.9 PSI, respectively. Maximal pressure-time integral for healthy subjects was 11.56 ± 2.83 PSI*s, and for study subjects was 19.54 ± 1.9, 12.35 ± 1.48, and 13.17 ± 1.31 PSI*s, respectively. The results of the control group agree with those previously reported in the literature. The pressure distribution pattern showed clear differences between study subjects and those of the control group; these graphs allowed us to identify the pressure in regions-of-interest that could be critical, such as surgical scars. The system presented in this work will aid to assess the effectiveness with which prosthetic systems distribute load, given that the formation of ulcers is highly linked to the pressure exercised at the point of contact; in addition, these results will help to investigate the comfort perception of the prosthesis, a factor directly influenced by the stump's pressure distribution. PMID:25264793

  14. Vapor-phase atomic layer epitaxy of CuGaS2 at atmospheric pressure using metal chlorides and H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Nozomu; Isu, Takehiro; Kakuda, Noritoshi; Terasako, Tomoaki; Iida, Seishi

    1994-02-01

    In the alternate feeding of metal chlorides (CuCl, GaCl3) and H2S sources, the growth rate saturations of CuGaS2 on GaP was observed for substrate temperatures between 530 and 570 C, and also for some range of H2S flow rate. Together with the growth rate saturation behavior for metal chlorides reported in our previous paper, these results can be considered to indicate achievement of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) of CuGaS2. The growth orientation change leading to c-axis growth was observed for a large H2S flow rate. Some possibility of stoichiometry control by ALE was suggested from photoluminescence spectra.

  15. Flight test evaluation of an RAF high altitude partial pressure protective assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, G. R.; Putnam, T. W.; Dana, W. J.; Enevoldson, E. K.; Winter, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A partial pressure suit was evaluated during tests in an F-104 and F-15 as a protective garment for emergency descents. The garment is an pressure jerkin and modified anti-g suit combined with an oronasal mask. The garment can be donned and doffed at the aircraft to minimize thermal buildup. The oronasal mask was favored by the pilots due to its immobility on the face during high g-loading. The garment was chosen to provide optimum dexterity for the pilot, which is not available in a full pressure suit, while protecting the pilot at altitudes up to 18,288 meters, during a cabin decompression, and subsequent aircraft descent. During cabin decompressions in the F-104 and F-15, cabin pressure altitude was measured at various aircraft angles of attack, Mach numbers, and altitudes to determine the effect of the aerodynamic slipstream on the cabin altitude.

  16. Oxidation of C/SiC Composites at Reduced Oxygen Partial Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Serra, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced SiC (C/SiC) composites are proposed for leading edge applications of hypersonic vehicles due to the superior strength of carbon fibers at high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). However, the vulnerability of the carbon fibers in C/SiC to oxidation over a wide range of temperatures remains a problem. Previous oxidation studies of C/SiC have mainly been conducted in air or oxygen, so that the oxidation behavior of C/SiC at reduced oxygen partial pressures of the hypersonic flight regime are less well understood. In this study, both carbon fibers and C/SiC composites were oxidized over a wide range of temperatures and oxygen partial pressures to facilitate the understanding and modeling of C/SiC oxidation kinetics for hypersonic flight conditions.

  17. Measured pressure distributions inside nonaxisymmetric nozzles with partially deployed thrust reversers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert S.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at static conditions to measure the pressure distributions inside a nonaxisymmetric nozzle with simultaneous partial thrust reversing (50-percent deployment) and thrust vectoring of the primary (forward-thrust) nozzle flow. Geometric forward-thrust-vector angles of 0 and 15 deg. were tested. Test data were obtained at static conditions while nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to 4.0. Results indicate that, unlike the 0 deg. vector angle nozzle, a complicated, asymmetric exhaust flow pattern exists in the primary-flow exhaust duct of the 15 deg. vectored nozzle.

  18. Introduction to total- and partial-pressure measurements in vacuum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Kern, F. A.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction to the fundamentals of total and partial pressure measurement in the vacuum regime (760 x 10 to the -16th power Torr) is presented. The instrument most often used in scientific fields requiring vacuum measurement are discussed with special emphasis on ionization type gauges and quadrupole mass spectrometers. Some attention is also given to potential errors in measurement as well as calibration techniques.

  19. Effect of partial pressure of hydrogen on IGSCC of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. )

    1991-10-01

    The frequently reported effect of the partial pressures of hydrogen on the alloy 600 susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature water is explained in this paper. On the basis of thermodynamic calculations, it was demonstrated that the susceptibility of NiO in this environment. The lower the free energy of formation of NiO, the higher the susceptibility of alloy 600 to IGSCC.

  20. Development of an infrared absorption transducer to monitor partial pressure of carbon dioxide for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Glenn; Margiott, Victoria; Murray, Sean; Schaff, James

    1993-01-01

    An infrared (IR) carbon dioxide (CO2) transducers has been designed, developed, and produced for space applications. The transducer provides measurement of partial pressure of CO2 in life support applications, including the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Space Shuttle Orbiter and Spacehab. The electrochemical sensor presently used for these applications has a slow reponse time and has reliability concerns due to the electrolyte. The new microprocessor based unit has a fast response time and can be tailored to other space applications.

  1. Effect of H2O, and combined effects of H2O + F, H2O + CO2, and H2O + F + CO2 on the viscosity of a natural basalt from Fuego volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Knipping, J.; Scherbarth, S.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2012-12-01

    We measured the viscosity of 5 series of remelted natural basalt from Fuego volcano, Guatemala. These series include single and multiple volatile species: H2O, F, H2O-F, H2O-CO2, and H2O-CO2-F. The hydrous glasses were synthesized at 3 kbar and 1250C in Internally Heated Pressure Vessels. The multiple volatile series were synthesized at 5 kbar and 1250C. CO2 was added as Ag2C2O4, F as AlF3, and H2O as distilled water. The anhydrous, F-bearing series was synthesized at 1 atm by simply remelting the Fuego basalt and adding F as CaF2.The natural, dry, remelted Fuego basalt has an NBO/T of 0.64. The following comparisons are based on parallel-plate viscosity measurements in the range ~108 to 1012 Pa s. The temperature at which the viscosity is 1012 Pa s (T12) is taken to be the viscosimetric glass transition temperature (Tg). The addition of 2 wt.% H2O results in a decrease of T12 of ~150C for basalt. Fluorine on its own has a measurable, but much smaller effect, than the equivalent amount of water. Indeed, ~2 wt.% F results in a T12 depression of only ~30C. When H2O and F are both present, their effects are approximately additive. For example, the viscosity of a basalt with 1.44 wt.% H2O is very similar to the viscosity of a basalt with ~1 wt.% H2O and ~1.25 wt.% F, and the viscosities of a basalt with 2.29 wt.% H2O and a basalt with ~1.65 wt.% H2O and ~1.3 wt.% F are also very similar. The effect of CO2 is somewhat ambiguous. The viscosity of a basalt with ~1.7 wt.% H2O, ~1.3 wt.% F and ~0.2 wt.% CO2 is essentially the same as the viscosity of a basalt with 2.29 wt.% H2O, so CO2 seems to have a negligible or even viscosity-increasing effect when F and H2O are also present. However, a basalt with ~0.84 wt.% H2O and ~0.09 wt.% CO2 has about the same viscosity as a basalt with 1.34 wt.% H2O, which could suggest a strong (viscosity-decreasing) effect of very small amounts of CO2. These results suggest that the effects on viscosity of F in basaltic systems are small, and that the effects of combined F and H2O are approximately additive. CO2, when present in significant amounts (~1000s of ppm) seems to have a negligible or even a slight viscosity-increasing effect, which may partially counteract the effects of dissolved H2O or H2O + F. However, small amounts of CO2 (a few 100 ppm) may further decrease the viscosity of hydrous basalt. Because the viscosity-reducing effect of added H2O is strongest at low water contents, degassed basaltic lavas containing only small amounts of H2O, CO2 and F may still be substantially more fluid than truly volatile-free liquids.

  2. Novel cooperative interactions and structural ordering in H2S-H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and hydrogen (H2) crystallize into a 'guest-host' structure at 3.5 GPa and, at the initial formation pressure, the rotationally disordered component molecules exhibit weak van der Waals type interactions. With increasing pressure, hydrogen bonding develops and strengthens between neighboring H2S molecules, reflected in a pronounced drop in S-H vibrational stretching frequency and also observed in first-principles calculations. At 17 GPa, an ordering process occurs where H2S molecules orient themselves to maximize hydrogen bonding and H2 molecules simultaneously occupy a chemically distinct lattice site. Intermolecular forces in the H2S+H2 system may be tuned with pressure from the weak hydrogen-bonding limit to the ordered hydrogen-bonding regime, resulting in a novel clathrate structure stabilized by cooperative interactions.

  3. Novel Cooperative Interactions and Structural Ordering in H2S-H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Timothy A.; Ganesh, P.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Kent, P. R. C.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and hydrogen (H2) crystallize into a ‘guest-host’ structure at 3.5 GPa and, at the initial formation pressure, the rotationally disordered component molecules exhibit weak van der Waals-type interactions. With increasing pressure, hydrogen bonding develops and strengthens between neighboring H2S molecules, reflected in a pronounced drop in S-H vibrational stretching frequency and also observed in first-principles calculations. At 17 GPa, an ordering process occurs where H2S molecules orient themselves to maximize hydrogen bonding and H2 molecules simultaneously occupy a chemically distinct lattice site. Intermolecular forces in the H2S+H2 system may be tuned with pressure from the weak hydrogen-bonding limit to the ordered hydrogen-bonding regime, resulting in a novel clathrate structure stabilized by cooperative interactions.

  4. Preliminary Measurements Of N2O Partial Pressures In Rivers of Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. B.; Rasera, M. F.; Krusche, A. V.; Victoria, R. L.; Richey, J. E.; Cunha, H. B.; Gomes, B. M.

    2006-12-01

    The concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important component of the greenhouse effect and with a long residence time in the atmosphere, have significantly increased in this century. The reasons for this atmospheric increase in N2O are still partially unexplained. This uncertainty is worse in relation to aquatic environments. Here we report on preliminary measurements of N2O partial pressures in rivers of the Amazon basin. The study areas are in the state of Rondonia (rivers Ji Parana, Urupa, Comemoracao and Pimenta Bueno) and Amazonas (rivers Solimoes and Negro). The rivers were sampled from October 2005 to April 2006, using with immersion pumps, lowered in the middle of the channel to 60% of total depth. Water was pumped directly into a 1 l plastic bottle, which was overflown three times before closing. Using syringes, 60 ml of N2 were injected into the bottle, simultaenously to the withdrawn of 60 ml of sample. N2O was extracted into these 60 ml of N2 by shaking vigorously for 2 minutes. With the same syringes, the gas was taken from the bottles and injected into sealed evacuated 25 ml vials. Atmospheric samples were taken from one meter above the water column and stored the same way. N2O partial pressures were determined on a Shimadzu GC-14 Green House Gas Analyzer. All rivers showed little variations in N2O partial pressures. Average values in the rivers of Rondonia were around 0.41 ± 0.07 μ atm (n=46), whereas the Solimoes and Negro rivers, in the state of Amazonas, showed values around 0.43 ± 0.08 μ atm (n=131). Atmospheric averages were approximately 0.34 ± 0.04 μ atm (n=58) and 0.32 ± 0.03 μ atm (n=134) in the states of Rondonia and Amazonas, respectively. This means that, although these waters are supersatured in CO2, making evasive fluxes of this gas an important component of the C cycle in this basin, the same does not occur in the N cycle. Small differences in partial pressures of N2O between water and air will result in small fluxes of this gas to the atmosphere from the middle of the river channels. However, at the river margins and riparian zones, significantly different redox conditions may occur, which should be further investigated to fully understand the role of N2O fluxes in these riverine systems.

  5. Dehydration and partial melting of tremolitic amphibole coexisting with zoisite, quartz, anorthite, diopside, and water in the system H2O-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, Diane M.; Jenkins, David M.

    The greenschist to amphibolite transition as modeled by the reaction zoisite+tremolite + quartz= anorthite+diopside+water has been experimentally investigated in the chemical system H2O-CaO- MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 over the range of 0.4-0.8 GPa. This reaction is observed to lie within the stability fields of anorthite + water and of zoisite + quartz, in accord with phase equilibrium principles, and its position is in excellent agreement with the boundary calculated from current internally-consistent data bases. The small dP/dT slope of 0.00216 GPa/K (21.6 bars/K) observed for this reaction supports the pressure-dependency of this transition in this chemical system. Experimental reversals of the Al content in tremolitic amphibole coexisting with zoisite, diopside, quartz, and water were obtained at 600, 650, and 700°C and indicated Al total cations (atoms per formula unit, apfu) of only up to 0.5+/-0.08 at the highest temperature. Thermodynamic analysis of these and previous compositional reversal data for tremolitic amphibole indicated that, of the activity/composition relationships considered, a two-site-coupled cation substitution model yielded the best fit to the data and a S0 (1 bar, 298 K) of 575.4+/-1.6 J/K.mol for magnesio-hornblende. The calculated isopleths of constant Al content in the amphibole are relatively temperature sensitive with Al content increasing with increasing temperature and pressure. Finally, several experiments in the range of 1.0-1.3 GPa were conducted to define the onset of melting, and thus the upper-thermal limit, for this mineral assemblage, which must involve an invariant point located at approximately 1.05 GPa and 770°C.

  6. CARS diagnostics of the burning of H2 O2 and CH4 O2 mixtures at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagin, K. A.; Smirnov, Valery V.; Stel'makh, O. M.; Fabelinskii, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is used to determine the parameters of gaseous combustion products of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels with oxygen at high temperatures and pressures. The methodical aspects of CARS thermometry, which are related to the optimal choice of molecules (diagnostic references) and specific features of their spectra, dependent on temperature and pressure, are analysed. Burning is modelled under the conditions similar to those of real spacecraft propulsion systems using a specially designed laboratory combustion chamber, operating in the pulse-periodic regime at high temperatures (to 3500 K) and pressures (to 20 MPa) of combustion products.

  7. Proximate nutritional composition of CELSS crops grown at different CO2 partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Mackowiak, C L; Sager, J C; Knott, W M; Berry, W L

    1994-11-01

    Two CELSS candidate crops, soybean (Glycine max) and potato (Solanum tuberosum), were grown hydroponically in controlled environments maintained at carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressures ranging from 0.05 to 1.00 kPa (500 to 10,000 ppm at 101 kPa atmospheric pressure). Plants were harvested at maturity (90 days for soybean and 105 days for potato) and all tissues analyzed for proximate nutritional composition (i.e. protein, fat, carbohydrate, crude fiber, and ash content). Soybean seed ash and crude fiber were higher and carbohydrate was lower than values reported for field-grown seed. Potato tubers showed little difference from field-grown tubers. With the exception of increased crude fiber of soybean seed with increased CO2, no trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition of soybean seed and potato tubers. Crude fiber of soybean stems and leaves increased with increased CO2, as did soybean leaf protein (total nitrogen). Potato leaf and stem (combined) protein levels also increased with increased CO2, while leaf and stem carbohydrates decreased. Values for leaf and stem protein and ash were higher than values generally reported for field-grown plants for both species. Results suggest that CO2 partial pressure should have little influence on proximate composition of potato tubers or soybean seed, but that high ash and protein levels might be expected from leaves and stems of crops grown in controlled environments of a CELSS. PMID:11540178

  8. Proximate nutritional composition of celss crops grown at different CO2 partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.

    1994-11-01

    Two CELSS candidate crops, soybean (Glycine max) and potato (Solanum tuberosum), were grown hydroponically in controlled environments maintained at carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressures ranging from 0.05 to 1.00 kPa (500 to 10,000 ppm at 101 kPa atmospheric pressure). Plants were harvested at maturity (90 days for soybean and 105 days for potato) and all tissues analyzed for proximate nutritional composition (i.e. protein, fat, carbohydrate, crude fiber, and ash content). Soybean seed ash and crude fiber were higher and carbohydrate was lower than values reported for field-grown seed. Potato tubers showed little difference from field-grown tubers. With the exception of increased crude fiber of soybean seed with increased CO2, no trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition of soybean seed and potato tubers. Crude fiber of soybean stems and leaves increased with increased CO2, as did soybean leaf protein (total nitrogen). Potato leaf and stem (combined) protein levels also increased with increased CO2, while leaf and stem carbohydrates decreased. Values for leaf and stem protein and ash were higher than values generally reported for field-grown plants for both species. Results suggest that CO2 partial pressure should have little influence on proximate composition of potato tubers or soybean seed, but that high ash and protein levels might be expected from leaves and stems of crops grown in controlled environments of a CELSS.

  9. Proximate nutritional composition of CELSS crops grown at different CO2 partial pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.

    1994-01-01

    Two Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) candidate crops, soybean (Glycine max) and potato (Solanum tuberosum), were grown hydroponically in controlled environments maintained at carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressures ranging from 0.05 to 1.00 kPa (500 to 10,000 ppm at 101 kPa atmospheric pressure). Plants were harvested at maturity (90 days for soybean and 105 days for potato) and all tissues analyzed for proximate nutritional composition (i.e. protein, fat, carbohydrate, crude fiber, and ash content). Soybean seed ash and crude fiber were higher and carbohydrate was lower than values reported for field-grown seed. Potato tubers showed little difference from field-grown tubers. Crude fiber of soybean stems and leaves increased with increased CO2, as did soybean leaf protein (total nitrogen). Potato leaf and stem (combined) protein levels also increased with increased CO2, while leaf and stem carbohydrates decreased. Values for leaf and stem protein and ash were higher than values generally reported for field-grown plants for both species. Results suggest that CO2 partial pressure should have little influence on proximate composition of potato tubers or soybean seed, but that high ash and protein levels might be expected from leaves and stems of crops grown in controlled environments of a CELSS.

  10. Effect of plasma treatment on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the detection of H2S and SO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Yang, Bing; Wang, Xiaojing; Luo, Chenchen

    2012-01-01

    H(2)S and SO(2) are important characteristic gases of partial discharge (PD) generated by latent insulated defects in gas insulated switchgear (GIS). The detection of H(2)S and SO(2) is of great significance in the diagnosis and assessment of the operating status of GIS. In this paper, we perform experiments on the gas sensitivity of unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and those modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma at different times (30, 60 and 120 s) for H(2)S and SO(2), respectively. The results show that the sensitivity and response time of modified MWNTs to H(2)S are both improved, whereas the opposite effects are observed for SO(2). The modified MWNTs have almost zero sensitivity to SO(2). Thus, the MWNTs modified by atmospheric pressure DBD air plasma present good selectivity to H(2)S, and have great potential in H(2)S detection. PMID:23012548

  11. Effect of Plasma Treatment on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for the Detection of H2S and SO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Yang, Bing; Wang, Xiaojing; Luo, Chenchen

    2012-01-01

    H2S and SO2 are important characteristic gases of partial discharge (PD) generated by latent insulated defects in gas insulated switchgear (GIS). The detection of H2S and SO2 is of great significance in the diagnosis and assessment of the operating status of GIS. In this paper, we perform experiments on the gas sensitivity of unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and those modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma at different times (30, 60 and 120 s) for H2S and SO2, respectively. The results show that the sensitivity and response time of modified MWNTs to H2S are both improved, whereas the opposite effects are observed for SO2. The modified MWNTs have almost zero sensitivity to SO2. Thus, the MWNTs modified by atmospheric pressure DBD air plasma present good selectivity to H2S, and have great potential in H2S detection. PMID:23012548

  12. The influence of pressure on the activity coefficients of the solutes and on the solubility of minerals in the system Na-Ca-Cl-SO 4-H 2O to 200°C and 1 kbar and to high NaCl concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, Christophe

    1990-12-01

    A model is presented which is used to calculate the effect of pressure on activity coefficients of aqueous solutes in the system Na-Ca-Cl-SO 4-H 2O to 200°C. Literature data for the density and compressibility of aqueous binary solutions of Na 2SO 4 and CaCl 2 to 200°C are used to calculate the first and second pressure derivatives of Pitzer's ion interaction model parameters, as well as the standard molal compressibility and volume of these two salts. Empirical correlations between the apparent molal volume and compressibility of the aqueous electrolytes are used to guide the choice of the temperature dependent expressions used for the numerical representation of the derivatives of Pitzer's parameters with respect to pressure. For sodium sulfate solutions, such correlations are used to extrapolate compressibilities to 200°C. The change in the thermodynamic properties of the-CaSO 04 ion pair with pressure is taken into account by the variation of its dissociation constant. The volumetric properties (partial molal volumes and compressibilities) of multicomponent solutions in the Na-Ca-Cl-SO 4-H 2O system can be predicted from the information generated here and the volumetric equations of ROGERS and PITZER (1982) for NaCl. This model is then combined with the high temperature model of MOLLER (1988) of the same system in order to calculate activity coefficients at high pressures to 200°C. The resulting model is validated by comparing calculated and measured solubilities of anhydrite and gypsum in pure water and in NaCl solutions up to 6 M. The agreement between the calculated and measured solubilities of the calcium sulfates is typically better than 10% up to 200°C and 1 kbar. The relevance of temperature and pressure corrections to the activity coefficients of aqueous solutes is discussed in regard to the assumed accuracy with which geochemical models are able to calculate mineral solubilities.

  13. Relating oxygen partial pressure, saturation and content: the haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve

    PubMed Central

    Rudenski, Aram; Gibson, John; Howard, Luke; O’Driscoll, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Key Points In clinical practice, the level of arterial oxygenation can be measured either directly by blood gas sampling to measure partial pressure (PaO2) and percentage saturation (SaO2) or indirectly by pulse oximetry (SpO2). This review addresses the strengths and weaknesses of each of these tests and gives advice on their clinical use. The haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve describing the relationship between oxygen partial pressure and saturation can be modelled mathematically and routinely obtained clinical data support the accuracy of a historical equation used to describe this relationship. Educational Aims To understand how oxygen is delivered to the tissues. To understand the relationships between oxygen saturation, partial pressure, content and tissue delivery. The clinical relevance of the haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve will be reviewed and we will show how a mathematical model of the curve, derived in the 1960s from limited laboratory data, accurately describes the relationship between oxygen saturation and partial pressure in a large number of routinely obtained clinical samples. To understand the role of pulse oximetry in clinical practice. To understand the differences between arterial, capillary and venous blood gas samples and the role of their measurement in clinical practice. The delivery of oxygen by arterial blood to the tissues of the body has a number of critical determinants including blood oxygen concentration (content), saturation (SO2) and partial pressure, haemoglobin concentration and cardiac output, including its distribution. The haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve, a graphical representation of the relationship between oxygen satur­ation and oxygen partial pressure helps us to understand some of the principles underpinning this process. Historically this curve was derived from very limited data based on blood samples from small numbers of healthy subjects which were manipulated in vitro and ultimately determined by equations such as those described by Severinghaus in 1979. In a study of 3524 clinical specimens, we found that this equation estimated the SO2 in blood from patients with normal pH and SO2 >70% with remarkable accuracy and, to our knowledge, this is the first large-scale validation of this equation using clinical samples. Oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) is nowadays the standard clinical method for assessing arterial oxygen saturation, providing a convenient, pain-free means of continuously assessing oxygenation, provided the interpreting clinician is aware of important limitations. The use of pulse oximetry reduces the need for arterial blood gas analysis (SaO2) as many patients who are not at risk of hypercapnic respiratory failure or metabolic acidosis and have acceptable SpO2 do not necessarily require blood gas analysis. While arterial sampling remains the gold-standard method of assessing ventilation and oxygenation, in those patients in whom blood gas analysis is indicated, arterialised capillary samples also have a valuable role in patient care. The clinical role of venous blood gases however remains less well defined. PMID:26632351

  14. Real-time monitoring of basal H2O2 levels with peroxiredoxin-based probes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bruce; Van Laer, Koen; Owusu, Theresa N E; Ezeriņa, Daria; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Amponsah, Prince Saforo; Tursch, Anja; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-06-01

    Genetically encoded probes based on the H2O2-sensing proteins OxyR and Orp1 have greatly increased the ability to detect elevated H2O2 levels in stimulated or stressed cells. However, these proteins are not sensitive enough to monitor metabolic H2O2 baseline levels. Using yeast as a platform for probe development, we developed two peroxiredoxin-based H2O2 probes, roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCR and roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCPΔCR, that afford such sensitivity. These probes are ∼50% oxidized under 'normal' unstressed conditions and are equally responsive to increases and decreases in H2O2. Hence, they permit fully dynamic, real-time measurement of basal H2O2 levels, with subcellular resolution, in living cells. We demonstrate that expression of these probes does not alter endogenous H2O2 homeostasis. The roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCR probe revealed real-time interplay between basal H2O2 levels and partial oxygen pressure. Furthermore, it exposed asymmetry in H2O2 trafficking between the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix and a strong correlation between matrix H2O2 levels and cellular growth rate. PMID:27089028

  15. Pressure Distribution Over a Rectangular Airfoil with a Partial-Span Split Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Harris, Thomas A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of pressure-distribution tests of a Clark y wing model with a partial-span split flap made to determine the distribution of air loads over both the wing and the flap. The model was used in conjunction with a reflection plane in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The 20-percent-chord split flap extended over the inboard 60 percent of the semispan. The tests were made at various flap deflections up to 45 degrees and covered a range of angles of attack from zero lift to approximately maximum lift for each deflection.

  16. Oxygen partial pressure dependence of electrical conductivity in ??-Bi2MoO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, C. M. C.; Aragn, R.

    2008-05-01

    The electrical conductivity of ?'-Bi 2MoO 6 was surveyed between 450 and 750 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure, in the range 0.01-1 atm. A - {1}/{6} power law dependence, consistent with a Frenkel defect model of doubly ionized oxygen vacancies and interstitials, is evidence for an n-type semiconductive component, with an optical band gap of 2.9 eV. The absence of this dependence is used to map the onset of dominant ionic conduction.

  17. Toxicity of elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide to invasive New Zealand mudsnails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielson, R. Jordan; Moffitt, Christine M.; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the efficacy of elevated partial pressures of CO2 to kill invasive New Zealand mudsnails. The New Zealand mudsnails were exposed to 100 kPa at three water temperatures, and the survival was modeled versus dose as cumulative °C-h. We estimated an LD50 of 59.4°C-h for adult and juvenile New Zealand mudsnails. The results suggest that CO2 may be an effective and inexpensive lethal tool to treat substrates, tanks, or materials infested with New Zealand mudsnails.

  18. Toxicity of elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide to invasive New Zealand mudsnails.

    PubMed

    Nielson, R Jordan; Moffitt, Christine M; Watten, Barnaby J

    2012-08-01

    The authors tested the efficacy of elevated partial pressures of CO(2) to kill invasive New Zealand mudsnails. The New Zealand mudsnails were exposed to 100 kPa at three water temperatures, and the survival was modeled versus dose as cumulative °C-h. We estimated an LD50 of 59.4°C-h for adult and juvenile New Zealand mudsnails. The results suggest that CO(2) may be an effective and inexpensive lethal tool to treat substrates, tanks, or materials infested with New Zealand mudsnails. PMID:22573531

  19. Payload specialist Umberto Guidioni, wearing the partial pressure launch and entry garment, prepares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Payload specialist Umberto Guidioni, wearing the partial pressure launch and entry garment, prepares for the de-orbit phase of the 16-day flight. Guidioni represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The seven member crew was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 22, 1996, and landed on March 9, 1996. Crew members were Andrew M. Allen, mission commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and Maurizio Cheli, European Space Agency (ESA); Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, (ESA), all mission specialists; along with Guidioni.

  20. An experimental study on the ergonomics indices of partial pressure suits.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianxue; Ding, Li; Hedge, Alan; Hu, Huimin; Qin, Zhifeng; Zhou, Qianxiang

    2013-05-01

    Partial pressure suits (PPSs) are used under high altitude, low-pressure conditions to protect the pilots. However, the suit often limits pilot's mobility and work efficiency. The lack of ergonomic data on the effects of PPSs on mobility and performance creates difficulties for human factor engineers and cockpit layout specialists. This study investigated the effects of PPSs on different ergonomic mobility and performance indices in order to evaluate the suit's impact on pilot's body mobility and work efficiency. Three types of ergonomics indices were studied: the manipulative mission, operational reach and operational strength. Research results indicated that a PPS significantly affects the mobility and operational performance of the wearers. The results may provide mission planners and human factors engineers with better insight into the understanding of pilots' operational function, mobility and strength capabilities when wearing PPS. PMID:23102522

  1. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determine operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATIONG FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE(PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Archie Robertson

    2003-04-17

    Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. is working under US Department of Energy contract No. DE-FC26-00NT40972 to develop a partial gasification module (PGM) that represents a critical element of several potential coal-fired Vision 21 plants. When utilized for electrical power generation, these plants will operate with efficiencies greater than 60% and produce near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The new process partially gasifies coal at elevated pressure producing a coal-derived syngas and a char residue. The syngas can be used to fuel the most advanced power producing equipment such as solid oxide fuel cells or gas turbines, or processed to produce clean liquid fuels or chemicals for industrial users. The char residue is not wasted; it can also be used to generate electricity by fueling boilers that drive the most advanced ultra-supercritical pressure steam turbines. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user-friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. This report describes the work performed during the January 1--March 31, 2003 time period.

  3. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  4. Experimental multi-phase H2O-CO2 brine interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    The burning of fossil fuel and other anthropogenic activities have caused a continuous and dramatic 30% increase of atmospheric CO2 over the past 150 yr. CO2 sequestration is increasingly being viewed as a tool for managing these anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. CO2-saturated brine-rock experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration in mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were generally consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions were occurring on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  5. Phase relations in the system NaCl-KCl-H2O: V. Thermodynamic-PTX analysis of solid-liquid equilibria at high temperatures and pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sterner, S.M.; Chou, I.-Ming; Downs, R.T.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1992-01-01

    The Gibbs energies of mixing for NaCl-KCl binary solids and liquids and solid-saturated NaCl-KCl-H2O ternary liquids were modeled using asymmetric Margules treatments. The coefficients of the expressions were calibrated using an extensive array of binary solvus and solidus data, and both binary and ternary liquidus data. Over the PTX range considered, the system exhibits complete liquid miscibility among all three components and extensive solid solution along the anhydrous binary. Solid-liquid and solid-solid phase equilibria were calculated by using the resulting equations and invoking the equality of chemical potentials of NaCl and KCl between appropriate phases at equilibrium. The equations reproduce the ternary liquidus and predict activity coefficients for NaCl and KCl components in the aqueous liquid under solid-saturation conditions between 673 and 1200 K from vapor saturation up to 5 kbar. In the NaCl-KCl anhydrous binary system, the equations describe phase equilibria and predict activity coefficients of the salt components for all stable compositions of solid and liquid phases between room temperature and 1200 K and from 1 bar to 5 kbar. ?? 1992.

  6. Post-treatment of refinery wastewater effluent using a combination of AOPs (H2O2 photolysis and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation) for possible water reuse. Comparison of low and medium pressure lamp performance.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Levchuk, I; Salcedo, I; Acevedo-Merino, A; Manzano, M A

    2016-03-15

    The main aim of this work was to study the feasibility of multi-barrier treatment (MBT) consisting of filtration, hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) for post-treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Also the possibility of water reuse or safe discharge was considered. The performance of MBT using medium (MP) and low (LP) pressure lamps was compared as well as operation and maintenance (O&M) cost. Decomposition of organic compounds was followed by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis. After filtration step (25 μm) turbidity and concentration of suspended solids decreased by 92% and 80%, respectively. During H2O2/UVC process with LP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 8 and UVC dose received by water 5.28 WUVC s cm(-2)) removal of phenolic compounds, TOC and COD was 100%, 52.3% and 84.3%, respectively. Complete elimination of phenolic compounds, 47.6% of TOC and 91% of COD was achieved during H2O2/UVC process with MP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 5, UVC dose received by water 6.57 WUVC s cm(-2)). In order to compare performance of H2O2/UVC treatment with different experimental set up, the UVC dose required for removal of mg L(-1) of COD was suggested as a parameter and successfully applied. The hydrophilicity of H2O2/UVC effluent significantly increased which in turn enhanced the oxidation of organic compounds during CWPO step. After H2O2/UVC treatment with LP and MP lamps residual H2O2 concentration was 160 mg L(-1) and 96.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Remaining H2O2 was fully consumed during subsequent CWPO step (6 and 3.5 min of contact time for LP and MP, respectively). Total TOC and COD removal after MBT was 94.7% and 92.2% (using LP lamp) and 89.6% and 95%, (using MP lamp), respectively. The O&M cost for MBT with LP lamp was estimated to be 0.44 € m(-3) while with MP lamp it was nearly five times higher. Toxicity assessment was performed using two marine species (Vibrio fischeri and Paracentrotus lividus sea-urchin) after each treatment step. The highest toxicity was attributed to H2O2/UVC effluent for both tested species. After MBT a drastic decrease of toxicity was achieved. PMID:26773490

  7. Effect of H2O on the density of silicate melts at high pressures: Static experiments and the application of a modified hard-sphere model of equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhicheng; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2012-05-01

    Density of ultramafic silicate melts was determined using the sink/float technique at high pressures. Seven melt compositions were studied, among which three were dry compositions with different Mg#'s (molar MgO/(MgO + FeO) × 100) and the other four were hydrous compositions synthesized by adding 2-7 wt.% H2O to the anhydrous ones. Experimental conditions range from 9 to 15 GPa and from 2173 to 2473 K. The sinking and floatation of density markers were observed for all melt compositions. Melt density data were analyzed by applying the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a newly developed equation of state for silicate melts based on the model of hard sphere mixtures. The presence of water can significantly reduce the density of melts due to its small molecular mass. On the other hand, water makes hydrous silicate melts more compressible than anhydrous melts and therefore the effect of H2O on melt density is less significant at high pressures. The density of hydrous melts was then calculated as a function of H2O content at the conditions of the bottom of the upper mantle, and was compared with the density of the dominant upper mantle minerals. Results show that the conditions for a negatively buoyant melt that coexists with a pyrolite mantle atop the 410 km discontinuity are marginally satisfied if H2O is the only volatile component to facilitate melting, but such conditions will be satisfied by a broader range of conditions when other heavier volatile elements (C, K, etc.) are also present.

  8. Effect of the nonlinearity of the carbonate system on partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trela, Piotr; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Moore, Robert M.; Kelley, Dan E.

    1995-01-01

    Partial pressure of CO2 is a nonlinear function of several seawater properties. Due to the nonlinearity in this relationship, the partial pressure of a uniform ocean would be different from that of a nonuniform ocean with the same bulk seawater properties. Assuming uniformity of seawater properties at some temporal and spatial scales in carbon models leads to systematic errors in partial pressure of CO2. In this paper we evaluate the magnitude of these errors. We partition the Geochemical Ocean Sections Study and Transient Tracers in the Oceans data according to the horizontal structure of several box models from the literature. Our results suggest that assumption of uniformity at large scales leads to understanding of underestimation of global surface ocean partial pressure of CO2 by at least 3 - 12 microatm. Nonlinear effects also introduce systematic errors in the buffer factor estimated from bulk seawater properties. We find the standard deviation of partial pressure of CO2 to be an indicator of the magnitude of the nonlinear effects. We discuss the implications of these errors for some conclusions drawn from carbon models. Biogeochemical processes, such as mixing, gas exchange, or biological activity, influence the distribution of the seawater properties. A shift in spatial or temporal patterns of these processes can modify the nonuniformity of the seawater properties and thus alter the partial pressure of the surface waters, even if the mean intensities of the processes remain constant.

  9. Formation of plutonium hydride PuH2: description of the reaction rate surface as a function of pressure and temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    T he hydriding reaction of plutonium metal is used increasingly in the recovery and processing of plutonium. There is thus an increased need for an understanding not only of the thermodynamic parameters governing the reaction, but also of the kinetic behavior to be expected with variations in process parameters such as pressure and temperature . A mathematical description of the behavior of the hydriding process in the entire reaction space in P, T, and rate provides a predictive capability, and enables the reaction rate to be optimized. In addition, given a well-defined description of this rate surface as a function of pressure and temperature, process parameters may be selected to optimize other important parameters such as particle size . These parameters may in some cases be mapped as regions or separate functions onto the surface described here .

  10. Low-energy BO and BO 2 emission from H 2BO 3 sputtered in a low-pressure high-frequency SNMS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenett, Holger; Ai, Xingtao; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Iga, Ione; Mu Tao, Lee

    1999-07-01

    Background corrected secondary neutral energy spectra derived from Cu powder pellets with H 3BO 3, MgO, Al 2O 3, TiO 2, Y 2O 3 and ZrO 2, show energy distributions being more or less typical for collision cascades in the cases of the metal ions M +, of O + at energies >5 eV above the ion generation potential, and of the molecules Cu 2+, AlO +, TiO +, YO + and ZrO +, whereas the larger parts of the energy distributions of BO +and BO 2+exhibit a similar shape as the Ar +plasma gas ions. From this, and from the background of the low decomposition and melting temperatures of H 3BO 3 and B 2O 3, respectively, we conclude that the detected BO and BO 2 molecules have been emitted with thermal energies in processes implying lower energies than collision cascades. Evidence was found that the same holds for HBO 2 and H 2BO 2. In order to obtain relative correction factors for MO + molecular ion intensities, electron impact ionization cross sections have been calculated for the light MO molecules using the binary-encounter Bethe (BEB) formula, and for the respective metal M atoms by means of the semiempirical Lotz formula. For the heavy MO molecules YO and ZrO, cross sections have been estimated using the Thomson formula. The comparison of corrected relative MO/M and M/Cu intensities yields evidence that thermal (H)BO x emission amounts to the same order of magnitude as B emission from collision cascades, and that this situation is comparable to the high yield of MO molecules emitted in collision cascades from oxides with high M masses. Since the normal energy window of an HF-plasma secondary neutral mass spectrometer does not accept particles with originally thermal energies, it is concluded that these findings are relevant for quantification.

  11. H2 Reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, Mike

    2002-02-01

    The high power microwave program at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) includes high power source development in narrow band and wideband technologies. The H2 source is an existing wideband source that was developed at the AFRL. A recent AFRL requirement for a wideband impulse generator to use in materials tests has provided the need to update the H2 source for the current test requirements. The H2 source is composed of a dual resonant transformer that charges a short length of coaxial transmission line. The transmission line is then discharged into an output coaxial transmission line with a self-break hydrogen switch. The dual resonant transformer is driven by a low inductance primary capacitor bank operating through a self-break gas switch. The upgrade of the coaxial hydrogen output switch is the focus of this report. The hydrogen output switch was developed through extensive electrical and mechanical simulations. The switch insulator is made of Ultem 2300 and is designed to operate with a mechanical factor of safety equal to 4.0 at 1,000 psi. The design criteria, design data and operational data will be presented.

  12. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  13. Partial Melting in the Iron-Sulfur System at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Shen, G.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2005-12-01

    Melting in the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-S system was investigated to pressures of 80 GPa, using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction through a laser-heated diamond anvil cell at the GSECARS sector of APS. Intimately mixed Fe-FeS powders were compressed between insulating layers of NaCl in the diamond anvil cell. Double-sided laser heating was used to reduce axial temperature gradients, and temperatures were measured spectroradiometrically on both sides of the cell. Only the central, hottest part of the laser-heated region was probed with the 5x7 micron x-ray beam. At high pressures, Fe3S was formed by reaction between Fe and FeS upon laser heating, with excess Fe remaining. The Fe was used as an internal, high-temperature pressure standard based on existing equation of state data. Diffraction data were collected during laser heating and also from the quenched sample following each heating episode. The use of an image plate area detector greatly improved our ability to verify the presence of both metal and sulfide during heating. The eutectic temperature was bracketed by the absence of one phase above the melting point and the presence of both phases at lower temperature. The reappearance of the absent component (sulfide or metal) upon rapid quenching was taken as confirmation that partial melting had been achieved. Our results using this method are in broad agreement with earlier data that were based on textural criteria.

  14. Silicate Carbonation in Supercritical CO2 Containing Dissolved H2O: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Arey, Bruce W.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances have been significant in recent years for managing environmentally harmful emissions (mostly CO2) resulting from combustion of fossil fuels. Deep underground geologic formations are emerging as reasonable options for long term storage of CO2 but mechanisms controlling rock and mineral stability in contact with injected supercritical fluids containing water are relatively unknown. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring between supercritical CO2 containing water and the silicate minerals forsterite (Mg2SiO4), wollastonite (CaSiO3), and enstatite (MgSiO3). This study utilizes newly developed in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) and in situ infra red (IR) to examine mineral transformation reactions. Forsterite and enstatite were selected as they are important minerals present in igneous and mafic rocks and have been the subject of a large number of aqueous dissolution studies that can be compared with non-aqueous fluid tests in this study. Wollastonite, classified as a pyroxenoid (similar to a pyroxene), was chosen as a suitably fast reacting proxy for examining silicate carbonation processes associated with a wet scCO2 fluid as related to geologic carbon sequestration. The experiments were conducted under modest pressures (90 to 160 bar), temperatures between 35° to 70° C, and varying concentrations of dissolved water. Under these conditions scCO2 contains up to 3,500 ppm dissolved water.

  15. Behaviour at high pressure of Rb7NaGa8Si12O40·3H2O (a zeolite with EDI topology): a combined experimental-computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. D.; Tabacchi, G.; Fois, E.; Lee, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The high-pressure behaviour and the P-induced structural evolution of a synthetic zeolite Rb7NaGa8Si12O40·3H2O (with edingtonite-type structure) were investigated both by in situ synchrotron powder diffraction (with a diamond anvil cell and the methanol:ethanol:water = 16:3:1 mixture as pressure-transmitting fluid) up to 3.27 GPa and by ab initio first-principles computational modelling. No evidence of phase transition or penetration of P-fluid molecules was observed within the P-range investigated. The isothermal equation of state was determined; V 0 and K T0 refined with a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state are V 0 = 1311.3(2) Å3 and K T0 = 29.8(7) GPa. The main deformation mechanism (at the atomic scale) in response to the applied pressure is represented by the cooperative rotation of the secondary building units (SBU) about their chain axis (i.e. [001]). The direct consequence of SBU anti-rotation on the zeolitic channels parallel to [001] is the increase in pore ellipticity with pressure, in response to the extension of the major axis and to the contraction of the minor axis of the elliptical channel parallel to [001]. The effect of the applied pressure on the bonding configuration of the extra-framework content is only secondary. A comparison between the P-induced main deformation mechanisms observed in Rb7NaGa8Si12O40·3H2O and those previously found in natural fibrous zeolites is made.

  16. Qualitative determination of H2S crossover rates in nation membranes using ion-probe techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Rockward, Tommy; Uribe, Francisco A; Garzon, Fernando H

    2008-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are sensitive to impurities that may be present in either the oxidizer or fuel. H2S, even at the ppb level, will have a dramatic and adverse affect on fuel cell performance. The H2S permeability through dry and humidified Nafion PEMFC membranes was studied using ion probe techniques. A sulfide anti-oxidant buffer solution was used to trap and concentrate trace quantities of H2S that permeated through 50 cm2samples of Nafion 117 and 212 membranes using a partial pressure difference up to I030ppm at room temperature. Experiments were conducted for up to 24 hours in order to achieve sulfide ion concentrations high enough to be precisely determined by subsequent titration with Pb(N03)2. The rate of H2S crossover for dry 117 and 212 were identical at 1.2e-7 g/min. Humidification increased the crossover rate to 5.ge-7 glmin and 1.8e-6 glmin for 117 and 212 respectively. Although the data collected in this work show that the rate of H2S crossover increases with water content and reduced membrane thickness, an accurate determination of permeation constants from this work was not possible because the H2S partial pressure was not constant throughout the experiment.

  17. Squeeze Film Problems of Long Partial Journal Bearings for Non-Newtonian Couple Stress Fluids with Pressure-Dependent Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jaw-Ren; Chu, Li-Ming; Hung, Chi-Ren; Lu, Rong-Fang

    2011-09-01

    According to the experimental work of C. Barus in Am. J. Sci. 45, 87 (1893) [1], the dependency of liquid viscosity on pressure is exponential. Therefore, we extend the study of squeeze film problems of long partial journal bearings for Stokes non-Newtonian couple stress fluids by considering the pressure-dependent viscosity in the present paper. Through a small perturbation technique, we derive a first-order closed-form solution for the film pressure, the load capacity, and the response time of partial-bearing squeeze films. It is also found that the non-Newtonian couple-stress partial bearings with pressure-dependent viscosity provide better squeeze-film characteristics than those of the bearing with constant-viscosity situation.

  18. H2O Adsorption on Smectites: Application to the Diurnal Variation of H2O in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Observations of the Martian planetary boundary layer lead to interpretations that are baffling and contradictory. In this paper, we specifically address the question of whether or not water vapor finds a substantial diurnal reservoir in the Martian regolith. To address this issue, we have measured H2O adsorption kinetics on SWy-1, a Na-rich montmorillonite from Wyoming. The highest-temperature (273 K) data equilibrates rapidly. Data gathered at realistic H2O partial pressures and temperatures appropriate to early morning show two phenomena that preclude a significant role for smectites in diurnally exchanging a large column abundance. First, the equilibration timescale is longer than a sol. Second, the equilibrium abundances are a small fraction of that predicted by earlier adsorption isotherms. The explanation for this phenomenon is that smectite clay actually increases its surface area as a function of adsorptive coverage. At Mars-like conditions, we show that the interlayer sites of smectites are likely to be unavailable.

  19. Influence of hydrogen input partial pressure on the polarity of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hisashi; Eriguchi, Ken-ichi; Torii, Jun-ichi; Cho, Hyun-Chol; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2008-04-01

    Influences of hydrogen input partial pressure in the carrier gas ( F=PHo/(PHo+PNo)) on the crystalline quality and polarities of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A surfaces were investigated by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). It was found that the polarity of the InN was affected by the hydrogen gas in the system regardless of the polarity of GaAs starting substrate. The polarity of InN layer grown with the hydrogen partial pressure of Fo=0.004 was a mixture of In-polarity and N-polarity, while that grown with Fo=0 was In-polarity. Degradation of the crystalline quality of InN grown with Fo=0.004 occurred due to the polarity inversion during the growth. The reason why the polarity of InN was influenced by the hydrogen carrier gas could be explained by the preferential growth of N-polarity InN in the H 2 contained ambient and/or the limiting reaction of InN decomposition.

  20. Partial Pressures of In-Se from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3 and 61 atomic percent and 673 and 1418K has been measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gage measurements for compositions between 50 and 61 atomic percent but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Torsion-Knudsen cell measurements. The sequiselenide is found to sublime incongruently. Congruent vaporization occurs for the liquid above 1000 K between 50.08 and 56 at. percent Se. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000 and 1300K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 and -38 kJ per gram atomic weight for 50 and 56 percent Se at 1200 and 1300K.

  1. Diurnal Changes in the Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide in Coral Reef Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayanne, Hajime; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1995-07-01

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO_2) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the PCO_2 values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods.

  2. Diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in coral reef water.

    PubMed

    Kayanne, H; Suzuki, A; Saito, H

    1995-07-14

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco(co2)) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the Pco(co2) values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods. PMID:17789850

  3. Partial Pressures for Several In-Se Compositions from Optical Absorbance of the Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brebrick, R. F.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2001-01-01

    The optical absorbance of the vapor phase over various In-Se compositions between 33.3-60.99 at.% Se and 673-1418 K was measured and used to obtain the partial pressures of Se2(g) and In2Se(g). The results are in agreement with silica Bourdon gauge measurements for compositions between 50-61 at.%, but significantly higher than those from Knudsen cell and simultaneous Knudsen-torsion cell measurements. It is found that 60.99 at.% Se lies outside the sesquiselenide homogeneity range and 59.98 at.% Se lies inside and is the congruently melting composition. The Gibbs energy of formation of the liquid from its pure liquid elements between 1000-1300 K is essentially independent of temperature and falls between -36 to -38 kJ per g atomic weight for 50 and 56% Se at 1200 and 1300 K.

  4. Diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in coral reef waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kayanne, Hajime; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1995-07-14

    Coral reefs are considered to be a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of their high calcium carbonate production and low net primary production. This was tested by direct measurement of diurnal changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (P{sub CO2}) in reef waters during two 3-day periods, one in March 1993 and one in March 1994, on Shiraho reef of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Although the P{sub CO2} values in reef waters exhibited large diurnal changes ranging from 160 to 520 microatmospheres, they indicate that the reef flat area is a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This suggests that the net organic production rate of the reef community exceeded its calcium carbonate production rate during the observation periods. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    The aim of this work is to examine the effectiveness of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings as long term lubrication coatings in microsystems, to examine the failure regimes of SAM coated devices, to examine the role of mobility in adsorbed lubricating films, and to examine evolution of the coefficient of friction of devices surrounded by ultralow partial pressures of alcohols up to saturation. Finally the role of self assembled monlayers in vapor phase lubrication is examined. Self-assembled monolayers are ubiquitous in fabrication of free-standing microdevices because of their ability to prevent release related and dormancy related stiction. However their ability to lubricate under sliding and normal contact conditions is not well documented. It can be shown that the energy dissipated per unit area in one sliding cycle due to friction is significant under general loading conditions. Therefore from an energy dissipated standpoint the bond energies of the silane molecules should not be enough to withstand even a short number of cycles. An extension of this is the energy imparted to the surface through a normal loading cycle through a loss of kinetic energy. It can also be shown that this is enough to break the silicon oxygen bonds however this is over a longer time scale than in sliding. Also there is an open question on the role of mobile and non-mobile adsorbed species on friction. Is the mobility of a molecule/layer on a surface an indicator of the effectiveness of the lubrication potential of the layer? Do submonolayer coverages of alcohols "lock-up" to contacting surfaces by disrupting non-corrogated potentials? Is there a distinct lowering of frictional forces at the formation of a monolayer? Controlled adsorption of mobile and non-mobile species on rubbing contacts is necessary to elucidate this physical relationship. To accomplish this one must take into account that friction measurements are highly scale dependant. Therefore to ensure the accuracy of measurements relating to microsystem contact conditions experiments must be conducted on actual microdevices. In the work presented here I have used microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometers to measure the friction and adhesive forces of SAM coated surfaces over the coarse of many sliding cycles as well as normal contacting cycles. It is shown that robustly adhered monolayer coatings degrade extremely rapidly and there is a direct correlation between the respective energies dissipated both in sliding and normal contacting cycles and the time it takes for the layers to degrade. Also it is shown that devices fail in two main modes: one where wear of the devices in the form of dislocation of polysilicon grains leads to a low/adhesion high wear regime and another where high adhesive forces are developed and the devices fail with little to no wear. In the studies of ultra low partial pressure lubrication of devices a clear correlation between lubricant mobility to device lubrication is observed even in the presence of a vapor, which should in principle be able to replenish removed lubricant in between sliding cycles. We show that ultralow partial pressures nominally corresponding to submonolayer coverages of ethanol and pentanol show a distinct decrease in coefficient of friction and lubricate MEMS microcontacts however this is only loosely correlated to their effectiveness as lubricants. Pentanol was only shown to lubricate at the point at which it becomes mobile on the surface where as ethanol is mobile at all times and lubricates effectively at very low partial pressures. Trifluoroethanol is not mobile at any portion of its isotherm and does not effectively lubricate the contacts. We also show the ability of the surrounding SAM to act as a lubricant reservoir when vapors of ethanol are removed. The correlation of lubricant mobility to lubrication can be used to predict the effectiveness to new lubricants as well as allow for the tailoring of lubricants to specific applications.

  6. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Quinn, Richard C.; Howard, Jeanie; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O a with montomorillonite, a smectite clay has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures, equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding rapidly to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  7. Nitrogen Partial Pressure in the Archean Atmosphere From Analysis of Hydrothermal Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, B.; Zimmermann, L.; Burgess, R.; Pujol, M.; Philippot, P.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen constitutes the main pool of one of the major biogenic elements, it may provide a record of the terrestrial magnetic field, and it might have been instrumental to maintain clement temperatures despite a lower energy provided by the ancient Sun. We have investigated the partial pressure of di-nitrogen in the Archean atmosphere by analyzing the ratio between N2 and argon-36 (a primordial, chemically inert noble gas for which there is no reason to suspect abundance variation in the atmosphere through time) in fluid inclusions (FI) trapped in two hydrothermal quartz from the 3.5 Ga-old Dresser formation, North Pole, Pilbara (NE Australia). These samples have different histories of fluid trapping and deposition, and their ages are constrained within 3.0-3.5 Ga from U-Xe, and Ar-Ar dating. FI nitrogen is a mixture between hydrothermal and air-saturated water (ASW) end-members, that can be identified through geochemical correlations between Cl/36Ar, 40Ar/36Ar and N2/36Ar ratios. The ASW component has a N2/36Ar ratio within 30 % of the modern value, implying a N2 partial pressure during the Archean was within 0.6-1 bar. The nitrogen isotopic composition of the ASW end-member is also found similar to the present-day one within 3 permil. Combined with the recent proposal from ancient raindrop imprints that the total atmospheric pressure was 0.5-1.14 bar, this leaves less than 0.7 bar for the pressure of other atmospheric gases including CO2. Thus nitrogen did not play a significant role in the thermal budget of the ancient Earth, and the terrestrial magnetic field was already strong enough at that time to shield the upper atmosphere from interaction with the solar wind, and therefore to prevent atmospheric escape that would have been recorded otherwise in the nitrogen composition. These results also imply that exchanges of nitrogen between the Earth's mantle and the surface were limited, or proceeded at similar rates in both ways from the Archean to Present.

  8. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  9. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/PtRh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-1910-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  10. Modeling the exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure metapelites, North-East Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Helen M.; Gilotti, Jane A.

    2015-06-01

    Pseudosection modeling constrains the pressure-temperature (P-T) exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metapelites exposed in the North-East Greenland UHP terrane. A robust peak P and T estimate of 3.6 GPa and 970 °C based on mineral assemblages in nearby kyanite eclogites is the starting point for the P-T path. Although the peak assemblage for the metapelite is not preserved, the calculated modeled peak assemblage contained substantial clinopyroxene, garnet, phengite, K-feldspar and coesite with minor kyanite and rutile. Combining the pseudosection and observed textures, the decompression path crosses the coesite-quartz transition before reaching the dry phengite dehydration melting reaction where phengite is abruptly consumed. In the range of 2.5 to 2.2 GPa, clinopyroxene is completely consumed and garnet grows to its maximum volume and grossular content, matching the high grossular rims of relict megacrysts. Plagioclase joins the assemblage and the pseudosection predicts up to 12-13 vol.% melt in the supersolidus assemblage, which contained garnet, liquid, K-feldspar, plagioclase, kyanite, quartz and rutile. At this stage, the steep decompression path flattened out and became nearly isobaric. The melt crystallization assemblage that formed when the path crossed the solidus with decreasing temperature contains phengite, garnet, biotite, 2 feldspars, kyanite, quartz and rutile. Therefore, the path must have intersected the solidus at approximately 1.2 GPa, 825 °C. The pseudosection predicts that garnet is consumed on the cooling path, but little evidence of late garnet consumption or other retrograde effects is observed. This may be due to partial melt loss from the rock. Isochemical PT-n and PT-X sections calculated along the P-T path display changes in mineral assemblage and composition that are consistent with preserved assemblages.

  11. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  12. MELCOR-H2

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular, we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.

  13. MELCOR-H2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-10

    Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular,more » we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.« less

  14. Revealing sub-μm and μm-scale textures in H2O ice at megabar pressures by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Nikitin, Sergey M.; Chigarev, Nikolay; Tournat, Vincent; Bulou, Alain; Gasteau, Damien; Castagnede, Bernard; Zerr, Andreas; Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2015-01-01

    The time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, also known as picosecond ultrasonic interferometry, allows monitoring of the propagation of coherent acoustic pulses, having lengths ranging from nanometres to fractions of a micrometre, in samples with dimension of less than a micrometre to tens of micrometres. In this study, we applied this technique to depth-profiling of a polycrystalline aggregate of ice compressed in a diamond anvil cell to megabar pressures. The method allowed examination of the characteristic dimensions of ice texturing in the direction normal to the diamond anvil surfaces with sub-micrometre spatial resolution via time-resolved measurements of the propagation velocity of the acoustic pulses travelling in the compressed sample. The achieved imaging of ice in depth and in one of the lateral directions indicates the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging and quantitative characterisation of the acoustical, optical and acousto-optical properties of transparent polycrystalline aggregates in a diamond anvil cell with tens of nanometres in-depth resolution and a lateral spatial resolution controlled by pump laser pulses focusing, which could approach hundreds of nanometres. PMID:25790808

  15. Two-dimensional simulation of an atmospheric-pressure RF DBD in a H2 : O2 mixture: discharge structures and plasma chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenkov, I. A.; Mankelevich, Yu A.; Rakhimova, T. V.

    2013-02-01

    The results of two-dimensional modelling of a radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF DBD) in a hydrogen-oxygen stoichiometric mixture under atmospheric pressure are presented. The production of active species and the possibility of ignition of the mixture are studied. It is shown that the production of active species in the discharge is enough to reduce the ignition temperature significantly. A detailed description of the ion production and loss is presented. The processes of electron attachment are very fast, while the detachment processes depend on the type of ion. The electron detachment, charge recombination, and conversion of negative and positive ions are very important here. The current discharge consists of breakdowns that occur in each half-period, and it resembles the standard DBDs of kilohertz frequency. The surface charge is not uniform over the electrode area and the RF DBD consists of micro-discharges, which are not so pronounced as in the DBDs of kilohertz frequency. Two additional types of RF DBDs, the dual-frequency RF DBD and frequency-modulated RF DBD, are simulated for the purpose of controlling the ratio between the input power absorbed by electrons and ions in this discharge.

  16. Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2009-09-15

    HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Oxidation of SiC/BN/SiC Composites in Reduced Oxygen Partial Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Boyd, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced SiC composites with a BN interphase are proposed for use as leading edge structures of hypersonic vehicles. The durability of these materials under hypersonic flight conditions is therefore of interest. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to characterize the oxidation kinetics of both the constituent fibers and composite coupons at four temperatures: 816, 1149, 1343, and 1538 C (1500, 2100, 2450, and 2800 F) and in oxygen partial pressures between 5% and 0.1% (balance argon) at 1 atm total pressure. One edge of the coupons was ground off so the effects of oxygen ingress into the composite could be monitored by post-test SEM and EDS. Additional characterization of the oxidation products was conducted by XPS and TOF-SIMS. Under most conditions, the BN oxidized rapidly, leading to the formation of borosilicate glass. Rapid initial oxidation followed by volatilization of boria lead to protective oxide formation and further oxidation was slow. At 1538C in 5% oxygen, both the fibers and coupons exhibited borosilicate glass formation and bubbling. At 1538C in 0.1% oxygen, active oxidation of both the fibers and the composites was observed leading to rapid SiC degradation. BN oxidation at 1538C in 0.1% oxygen was not significant.

  18. A theoretical study of water equilibria: the cluster distribution versus temperature and pressure for (H2O)n, n = 1-60, and ice.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Annika; Ojamäe, Lars

    2009-10-01

    The size distribution of water clusters at equilibrium is studied using quantum-chemical calculations in combination with statistical thermodynamics. The necessary energetic data is obtained by quantum-chemical B3LYP computations and through extrapolations from the B3LYP results for the larger clusters. Clusters with up to 60 molecules are included in the equilibrium computations. Populations of different cluster sizes are calculated using both an ideal gas model with noninteracting clusters and a model where a correction for the interaction energy is included analogous to the van der Waals law. In standard vapor the majority of the water molecules are monomers. For the ideal gas model at 1 atm large clusters [56-mer (0-120 K) and 28-mer (100-260 K)] dominate at low temperatures and separate to smaller clusters [21-22-mer (170-280 K) and 4-6-mer (270-320 K) and to monomers (300-350 K)] when the temperature is increased. At lower pressure the transition from clusters to monomers lies at lower temperatures and fewer cluster sizes are formed. The computed size distribution exhibits enhanced peaks for the clusters consisting of 21 and 28 water molecules; these sizes are for protonated water clusters often referred to as magic numbers. If cluster-cluster interactions are included in the model the transition from clusters to monomers is sharper (i.e., occurs over a smaller temperature interval) than when the ideal-gas model is used. Clusters with 20-22 molecules dominate in the liquid region. When a large icelike cluster is included it will dominate for temperatures up to 325 K for the noninteracting clusters model. Thermodynamic properties (C(p), DeltaH) were calculated with in general good agreement with experimental values for the solid and gas phase. A formula for the number of H-bond topologies in a given cluster structure is derived. For the 20-mer it is shown that the number of topologies contributes to making the population of dodecahedron-shaped cluster larger than that of a lower-energy fused prism cluster at high temperatures. PMID:19814548

  19. Feasibility of measuring dissolved carbon dioxide based on head space partial pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Boyd, C.E.; Schwartz, M.F.; Summerfelt, S.T.; Brazil, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an instrument prototype that measures dissolved carbon dioxide (DC) without need for standard wetted probe membranes or titration. DC is calculated using Henry's Law, water temperature, and the steady-state partial pressure of carbon dioxide that develops within the instrument's vertical gas-liquid contacting chamber. Gas-phase partial pressures were determined with either an infrared detector (ID) or by measuring voltage developed by a pH electrode immersed in an isolated sodium carbonate solution (SC) sparged with recirculated head space gas. Calculated DC concentrations were compared with those obtained by titration over a range of DC (2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28mg/l), total alkalinity (35, 120, and 250mg/l as CaCO3), total dissolved gas pressure (-178 to 120 mmHg), and dissolved oxygen concentrations (7, 14, and 18 mg/l). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) correlations were established between head space (ID) and titrimetrically determined DC concentrations (R2 = 0.987-0.999, N = 96). Millivolt and titrimetric values from the SC solution tests were also correlated (P < 0.001, R 2 = 0.997, N = 16). The absolute and relative error associated with the use of the ID and SC solution averaged 0.9mg/l DC and 7.0% and 0.6 mg/l DC and 9.6%, respectively. The precision of DC estimates established in a second test series was good; coefficients of variation (100(SD/mean)) for the head space (ID) and titration analyses were 0.99% and 1.7%. Precision of the SC solution method was 1.3%. In a third test series, a single ID was coupled with four replicate head space units so as to permit sequential monitoring (15 min intervals) of a common water source. Here, appropriate gas samples were secured using a series of solenoid valves (1.6 mm bore) activated by a time-based controller. This system configuration reduced the capital cost per sample site from US$ 2695 to 876. Absolute error averaged 2.9, 3.1, 3.7, and 2.7 mg/ l for replicates 1-4 (N = 36) during a 21-day test period (DC range, 36-40 mg/l). The ID meter was then modified so as to provide for DO as well as DC measurements across components of an intensive fish production system. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Observation of different core water cluster ions Y-(H2O)n (Y = O2, HCN, HOx, NOx, COx) and magic number in atmospheric pressure negative corona discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, K.; Takayama, M.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric ion water clusters have been of long-standing interest in the field of atmospheric sciences, because of them playing a central role in the formation of tropospheric aerosols which affect the photochemistry, radiation budget of the atmosphere and climate. On the basis of a mechanism of aerosol formation in the troposphere proposed by Yu and Turco, termed “ion-mediated nucleation” (Geophys. Res. Lett. 2000, 27, 883), atmospheric ion water clusters are most likely to be produced via two processes; 1) direct attachment of polar solvent molecules H2O to atmospheric ions due to them having strong binding energy via ion-dipole interactions, and 2) growth of ion-induced hydrates into larger water clusters bound via hydrogen-bonding networks by condensation with H2O molecules. The stability and growth rates of water clusters are strongly dependent on the thermochemical properties of individual atmospheric core ions. A large number of thermochemical information of the positive atmospheric ion H3O+ and its hydrates H3O+(H2O)n have been reported so far, while there has been little information of the water clusters with the negative atmospheric core ions. Therefore, fundamental studies of the thermochemistry of various negative atmospheric ion water clusters will contribute towards furthering an understanding of their unique role in atmospheric sciences and climate change. We have recently established an atmospheric pressure DC corona discharge device containing a specific corona needle electrode that made it possible to reproducibly generate negative core ions Y- originating from ambient air (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2007, 261, 38; Eur. Phys. J. D 2008, 50, 297). The change in electric field strength on the needle tip resulted in the formation of negative atmospheric core ions Y- with various different lifetimes in air. The low field strength brought about the dominant formation of core ions with short lifetimes in air such as O2- and HOx-, while the longer-lived core ions HCN-, NOx- and COx- were mainly produced at higher field strength. Furthermore, the use of the discharge system coupled to mass spectrometers led to the stable formation of large water clusters Y-(H2O)n due to adiabatic expansion caused by the pressure difference between the ambient discharge area (760 torr) and vacuum region in the mass spectrometers (≈ 1 torr). Here we show the resulting mass spectra of large water clusters Y-(H2O)n (0 ≤ n ≥ 80) with the dominant negative core ion Y- such as O2-, HO-, HO2-, HCN-, NO2-, NO3-, NO3-(HNO3)2, CO3- and HCO4- which play a central role in tropospheric ion chemistry, as well as the detailed mechanism of formation of those negative ion water clusters by atmospheric pressure DC corona discharge mass spectrometry. Here we also provide new thermochemical information about magic numbers and first hydrated shells for individual negative core ions Y-, which have particular stability in the Y-(H2O)n cluster series, by using the reliable mass spectrometry data obtained and the relationship between the temperature condition in a reaction chamber and the resulting cluster distribution.

  1. An Experimental Study of Magnetite Solubility as a Function of Pressure Along the Dewpoint Curve in the NaCl-, KCl-, HCl-H2O-Melt System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.

    2001-12-01

    Magnetite (Mt) is a ubiquitous phase in magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits and, thus, any model which aims to predict the evolving physical chemistry of porphyry-ore deposit environments must incorporate data on the equilibria that control the precipitation of Mt in such systems. Extant experimental data indicate that Mt solubility is controlled via the equilibrium Fe3O4Mt + 6HClV + H2V = 3FeCl2V + 4H2OV (Chou and Eugster, 1977, AJS, p 1296); however their experiments were performed at T=500-650° C by equilibrating Mt with a HCl-bearing supercritical aqueous fluid (NaCl-, KCl-free). Conversely, data from some natural Fe-bearing fluid inclusions have evinced that initial temperatures of magmatic volatile phases (MVP) in magmatic-hydrothermal environments may exceed 800° C, possibly even approaching 900° C, in the presence of melt (Clark and Arancibia, 1995, Giant Ore Deposits-II Conference, p. 511). Thus, there currently are no data constraining Mt solubility in the high-temperature regime obtained in natural magmatic systems. Additionally, there are no data on Mt solubility as a function of changes in the chemistry of the MVP. In the system NaCl-H2O, the composition and, thus, the density of brine-saturated vapor change significantly as a function of pressure along a given isotherm and the components KCl and HCl act to shift the limbs of the solvii (Bodnar et al., 1985, GCA, p 1861; Anderko and Pitzer, 1993, GCA, p 1657; Shinohara and Fujimoto, 1994, GCA, p 4857). The absence of data constraining Mt solubility as a function of pressure along a given isotherm, the resultant change in composition and density, as well as deviations in the Na:K:H ratio of the MVP hinder the development of forward models of magmatic-hydrothermal systems. In order to provide these critical data constraining Mt solubility in geologically reasonable magmatic systems we have performed a set of experiments as a function of pressure in the vapor-only field near the 800° C isotherm in the NaCl-H2O system. Natural Mt (aFe3O4 ~1), a synthetic haplogranitic minimum melt (100 MPa) and an aqueous phase (molar K:Na:H=1) were reacted in Au capsules in rapid-quench Stellite-25 vessels, using water as the pressure medium, at 800° C, log fO2 controlled by the NNO buffer, pressures of 100 and 120 MPa, and aqueous salinities of 1.8 and 3.0 wt. % NaCl equivalent, respectively. In all experiments the mass ratio of Mt:melt:fluid was 1:1:4. Detailed petrographic examination of run products did not reveal the presence of brine inclusions; however, fluid inclusions do contain opaque phases. Using the newly determined mFeCl2 (0.0345 at 100 MPa and 0.0359 at 120 MPa) and mHCl (0.0769 at 100 MPa and 0.0947 at 120 MPa) in the quenched MVP and the known fugacities of H2O (γ =1) and H2 (γ =1) at P and T, apparent equilibrium constants were calculated as log K' = (CFeCl2)3 \\times (fH2O)4 \\div (CHCl)6 \\times fH2. The values of log K' are 1.605 at 100 MPa and 13.01 at 120 MPa. K is fixed for a given P and T except for the effect of activity coefficients for HCl and FeCl2. The values of log K obtained in this study will facilitate more detailed characterization of the chemistry of magmatic-hydrothermal MVPs; both fossil MVPs and those that obtain in modern geothermal reservoirs. Determination of P, T, fH2 and mFeCl2 in fluid inclusions will allow for the direct calculation of a model HCl concentration in the MVP.

  2. [Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE]. Summary of research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under ``Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE`` and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO{sub 2}. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO{sub 2} on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO{sub 2} in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

  3. Quantitative absorption spectroscopy of residual water vapor in high-purity gases: pressure broadening of the 1.39253-microm H2O transition by N2, HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2.

    PubMed

    Vorsa, Vasil; Dheandhanoo, Seksan; Ketkar, Suhas N; Hodges, Joseph T

    2005-02-01

    We determined the respective pressure-broadening coefficients of HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2 (expressed relative to that of the reference gas N2) for the (v1,v2,v3)J(Ka,Kc) = (0,0,0)3(0,3) --> (1,0,1)2(0,2) rovibrational transition of H2 16O that occurs at 1.39253 microm. The experiment used a continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzer to measure the peak absorption losses as a function of added moisture concentration. The measured pressure-broadening coefficients for HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2 are, respectively, 2.76, 2.48, 1.39, and 0.49 times that of the N2 pressure-broadening coefficient, and detection limits for water vapor range from 0.22 nmol mol(-1) for O2 matrix gas to 2.3 nmol mol(-1) for HBr matrix gas. The degradation of the detection limit (relative to the N2 matrix gas) is ascribed to a pressure-broadening-induced reduction in peak absorption cross section and to elevated background loss from the matrix gas. PMID:15726959

  4. Pressure dependence of the electro-optic response function in partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals in a new configuration, termed partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (PEPDFLC), respond to external pressures and demonstrate pressure-induced electro-optic switching response. When the PEPDFLC thin film is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a glass plate and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvenylidene fluoride, the switching characteristics of the thin film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and the bias voltage across the electrodes. Response time measurements reveal a linear dependence of the change in electric field with external pressure.

  5. Organic Tank Safety Project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water content of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-U-105

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P{sub H2O} is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site`s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. Webb et al. identified Tank U-105 as a Conditionally Safe saltcake tank. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that is currently safe based on waste classification criteria but could, if dried, be classified as {open_quotes}Unsafe.{close_quotes} To provide information on the behavior of organic-bearing wastes, the Westinghouse Hanford Company provided us with four waste samples taken from Tank 241-U-105 (U-105) to determine the effect of P{sub H2O} on their equilibrium water content.

  6. Stigmatically focusing partial pressure analyzer with dual chamber ion source. Ph.D. Thesis - Technical Univ. of Munich, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasskopf, Klaus F.

    1987-01-01

    The partial pressure analyzer developed has a high absolute sensitivity and high resolution. Interaction effects, as they occur in conventional partial pressure analyzers between the heating filament for the emission of electrons and the residual gas, are suppressed by removing the heating filament from the measurement area. The electron beam is generated in an auxiliary vacuum compartment, and passes subsequently through an aperture into the ionization compartment. The probability is small, therefore, that the presence of substances produced at the heating filament by chemical reactions and thermal decompositions will have disturbing effects. The high sensitivity and resolution of the instrument are obtained with the aid of an electron path configuration of unconventional characteristics.

  7. Thermal expansion measurement of (U,Pu)O2-x in oxygen partial pressure-controlled atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masato; Ikusawa, Yoshihisa; Sunaoshi, Takeo; Nelson, Andrew T.; McClellan, Kenneth J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermal expansion of U0.7Pu0.3O2-x (x = 0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03) and U0.52Pu0.48O2.00 was investigated by a unique dilatometry which measured in an oxygen partial pressure-controlled atmosphere. The oxygen partial pressure was controlled to hold a constant oxygen-to-metal ratio in the (U,Pu)O2-x during the measurement. Thermal expansion slightly increased with the decrease in oxygen-to-metal ratio. We proposed a relationship to describe thermal expansion as a function of temperature, O/M and Pu content.

  8. Changes in oxygen partial pressure of brain tissue in an animal model of obstructive apnea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is one of the main consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is usually attributed in part to the oxidative stress caused by intermittent hypoxia in cerebral tissues. The presence of oxygen-reactive species in the brain tissue should be produced by the deoxygenation-reoxygenation cycles which occur at tissue level during recurrent apneic events. However, how changes in arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) during repetitive apneas translate into oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in brain tissue has not been studied. The objective of this study was to assess whether brain tissue is partially protected from intermittently occurring interruption of O2 supply during recurrent swings in arterial SpO2 in an animal model of OSA. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were used. Sixteen rats were anesthetized and non-invasively subjected to recurrent obstructive apneas: 60 apneas/h, 15 s each, for 1 h. A control group of 8 rats was instrumented but not subjected to obstructive apneas. PtO2 in the cerebral cortex was measured using a fast-response oxygen microelectrode. SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. The time dependence of arterial SpO2 and brain tissue PtO2 was carried out by Friedman repeated measures ANOVA. Results Arterial SpO2 showed a stable periodic pattern (no significant changes in maximum [95.5 ± 0.5%; m ± SE] and minimum values [83.9 ± 1.3%]). By contrast, brain tissue PtO2 exhibited a different pattern from that of arterial SpO2. The minimum cerebral cortex PtO2 computed during the first apnea (29.6 ± 2.4 mmHg) was significantly lower than baseline PtO2 (39.7 ± 2.9 mmHg; p = 0.011). In contrast to SpO2, the minimum and maximum values of PtO2 gradually increased (p < 0.001) over the course of the 60 min studied. After 60 min, the maximum (51.9 ± 3.9 mmHg) and minimum (43.7 ± 3.8 mmHg) values of PtO2 were significantly greater relative to baseline and the first apnea dip, respectively. Conclusions These data suggest that the cerebral cortex is partially protected from intermittently occurring interruption of O2 supply induced by obstructive apneas mimicking OSA. PMID:20078851

  9. Partial Defect Verification of the Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

    2010-02-05

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the responsibility to carry out independent inspections of all nuclear material and facilities subject to safeguards agreements in order to verify compliance with non-proliferation commitments. New technologies have been continuously explored by the IAEA and Member States to improve the verification measures to account for declared inventory of nuclear material and detect clandestine diversion and production of nuclear materials. Even with these efforts, a technical safeguards challenge has remained for decades for the case of developing a method in identifying possible diversion of nuclear fuel pins from the Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel assemblies. We had embarked on this challenging task and successfully developed a novel methodology in detecting partial removal of fuel from pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies. The methodology uses multiple tiny neutron and gamma detectors in the form of a cluster and a high precision driving system to obtain underwater radiation measurements inside a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assembly without any movement of the fuel. The data obtained in such a manner can provide spatial distribution of neutron and gamma flux within a spent fuel assembly. The combined information of gamma and neutron signature is used to produce base signatures and they are principally dependent on the geometry of the detector locations, and exhibit little sensitivity to initial enrichment, burn-up or cooling time. A small variation in the fuel bundle such as a few missing pins changes the shape of the signature to enable detection. This resulted in a breakthrough method which can be used to detect pin diversion without relying on the nuclear power plant operator's declared operation data. Presented are the results of various Monte Carlo simulation studies and experiments from actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies.

  10. Pressure and partial wetting effects on superhydrophobic friction reduction in microchannel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Friction reduction in microchannel flows can help alleviate the inherently taxing pumping power requirements associated with the dimensions involved. One possible way of achieving friction reduction is through the introduction of surface microtexturing that can lead to a superhydrophobic Cassie-Baxter state. The Cassie-Baxter state is characterized by the presence of air pockets within the surface microtexturing believed to act as an effective "shear free" (or at least shear reduced) layer, decreasing the overall friction characteristics of the surface. Most work in this area has concentrated on optimizing the surface microtexturing geometry to maximize the friction reduction effects and overall stability of the Cassie-Baxter state. However, less attention has been paid to the effects of partially wetted conditions induced by pressure and the correlation between the liquid-gas interface location within the surface microtexturing and the microchannel flow characteristics. This is mainly attributed to the difficulty in tracking the interface shape and location within the microtexturing in the typical top-down view arrangements used in most studies. In this paper, a rectangular microchannel with regular microtexturing on the sidewalls is used to visualize and track the location of the air-water interface within the roughness elements. While visually tracking the wetting conditions in the microtextures, pressure drops versus flow rates for each microchannel are measured and analyzed in terms of the non-dimensional friction coefficient. The frictional behavior of the Poiseuille flow suggests that (1) the air-water interface more closely resembles a no-slip boundary rather than a shear-free one, (2) the friction is rather insensitive to the degree of microtexturing wetting, and (3) the fully wetted (Wenzel state) microtexturing provides lower friction than the non-wetted one (Cassie state), in corroboration with observations (1) and (2).

  11. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  12. Spectroscopic study of partially-ordered semiconductor heterojunction under high pressure and high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.Y.; Martinez, G.; Zeman, J.; Uchida, K.

    2000-12-31

    Photoluminescence upconversion (PLU) is a phenomenon in which a sample emits photons with energy higher than that of the excitation photon. This effect has been observed in many materials including rare earth ions doped in insulating hosts and semiconductor heterostructures without using high power lasers as the excitation source. Recently, this effect has been observed also in partially CuPt-ordered GaInP{sub 2} epilayers grown on GaAs substrates. As a spectroscopic technique photoluminescence upconversion is particularly well suited for studying band alignment at heterojunction interface. The value of band-offset has been determined with meV precision using magneto-photoluminescence. Using the fact that the pressure coefficient of electrons in GaAs is higher than those in GaInP{sub 2} they have been able to manipulate the band-offset at the GaInP/GaAs interface. By converting the band-offset from Type I to Type II they were able to demonstrate that the efficiency of the upconversion process is greatly enhanced by a Type II band-offset.

  13. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor -- Pilot scale (25t/d-coal) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Masamitsu; Harada, Eiichi; Setoguchi, Kazuhide; Hara, Masahiro

    1999-07-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), an environment-friendly power generation system of high thermal efficiency, is being developed via various approaches around the world. Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. has conducted R and D on a Coal Partial Combustor (hereinafter referred to as CPC) as a gasifier since 1984, jointly with the Center for Coal Utilization, Japan. Since 1994, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Electric Power Development Co, Ltd have been cooperating. Through this activity, a structure of the CPC has been established, and these influences of operating parameters on performance have been clarified. The purpose of the present study is to apply this developed CPC techniques to a Pressurized CPC (hereinafter referred to as PCPC) as a gasifier for the IGCC system. For the present study, the authors conducted systematic experiments on the air-blown process with a two stage dry feed system, using a 7 t/d-coal bench scale test facility and a 25 t/d-coal pilot scale plant, clarified the influence of coal feed ratio, of oxygen enrichment, and of coal types on coal gasification performance. This paper describes conceptual structure of the PCPC, the test results of a 7 t/d-coal bench scale test facility, and 25 t/d-coal pilot plant.

  14. Measurement of the oxygen partial pressure and thermodynamic modeling of the U-Nd-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Knight, Travis W.; McMurray, Jacob W.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2016-05-01

    Fission products greatly impact the properties of fuel necessitating a thorough understanding of the thermochemical properties of oxide fuels with fission products. However, thermochemical data for the U-Nd-O system is insufficient even though neodymium is a major fission product. As neodymium will likely be present as a solute in UO2, this research focuses on the study of (U1-yNdy)O2±x. Experimental measurements and analyses of the oxygen partial pressure (pO2)-temperature-oxygen to metal ratio (O/M ratio) relationships were performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and an oxygen analyzer. Thermodynamic computational modeling was performed using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) method with the FactSage software. The Gibbs energy of the (U1-yNdy)O2±x solid solution was described by the compound energy formalism (CEF), which is based on earlier thermodynamic modeling data of the binary U-O system from Guéneau et al.. The thermodynamic and phase diagram data of the U-Nd-O system produced in this work show good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Non-site-specific allosteric effect of oxygen on human hemoglobin under high oxygen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Protein allostery is essential for vital activities. Allosteric regulation of human hemoglobin (HbA) with two quaternary states T and R has been a paradigm of allosteric structural regulation of proteins. It is widely accepted that oxygen molecules (O2) act as a “site-specific” homotropic effector, or the successive O2 binding to the heme brings about the quaternary regulation. However, here we show that the site-specific allosteric effect is not necessarily only a unique mechanism of O2 allostery. Our simulation results revealed that the solution environment of high O2 partial pressure enhances the quaternary change from T to R without binding to the heme, suggesting an additional “non-site-specific” allosteric effect of O2. The latter effect should play a complementary role in the quaternary change by affecting the intersubunit contacts. This analysis must become a milestone in comprehensive understanding of the allosteric regulation of HbA from the molecular point of view. PMID:24710521

  16. Crystalline structure of ceria particles controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and STI CMP performances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Kyun; Kim, Namsoo; Park, Jea-Gun; Paik, Ungyu

    2008-09-01

    The effect of the crystalline structures of nano-sized ceria particles on shallow trench isolation (STI) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) performance was investigated. The ceria particles were synthesized via a solid-state displacement reaction method, and their crystalline structure was controlled by regulating the oxygen partial pressure at the reaction site on the precursor. The crystalline structures of ceria particles were analyzed by the high-resolution TEM nano-beam diffraction pattern. In a calcination process with a high oxygen concentration, the synthesized ceria particles had a cubic fluorite structure (CeO(2)), because of the decarbonation of the cerium precursor. However, a low oxygen concentration results in a hexagonal phase cerium oxide (Ce(2)O(3)) rather than the cubic phase due to the insufficient oxidation of Ce(3+) to Ce(4+). In the STI CMP evaluation, the ceria slurry prepared with the cubic CeO(2) shows enhanced performances of the oxide-to-nitride removal selectivity. PMID:18562111

  17. Effects of varying oxygen partial pressure on molten silicon-ceramic substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ownby, D. P.; Barsoum, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The silicon sessile drop contact angle was measured on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon nitride coated on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon carbon coated on graphite, and on Sialon to determine the degree to which silicon wets these substances. The post-sessile drop experiment samples were sectioned and photomicrographs were taken of the silicon-substrate interface to observe the degree of surface dissolution and degradation. Of these materials, silicon did not form a true sessile drop on the SiC on graphite due to infiltration of the silicon through the SiC coating, nor on the Sialon due to the formation of a more-or-less rigid coating on the liquid silicon. The most wetting was obtained on the coated Si3N4 with a value of 42 deg. The oxygen concentrations in a silicon ribbon furnace and in a sessile drop furnace were measured using the protable thoria-yttria solid solution electrolyte oxygen sensor. Oxygen partial pressures of 10 to the minus 7 power atm and 10 to the minus 8 power atm were obtained at the two facilities. These measurements are believed to represent nonequilibrium conditions.

  18. Using satellite data to estimate partial pressure of CO2 in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parard, Gaëlle; Charantonis, Anastase Alexandre; Rutgersson, Anna

    2016-03-01

    In this study we focused on estimating the pressure partial of CO2 (pCO2) in the entire Baltic Sea which can be considered a coastal area in its entirety. We used the self-organizing multiple linear output (SOMLO) method to estimate the ocean surface pCO2 in the Baltic Sea from the remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a, colored dissolved organic matter, net primary production, and mixed-layer depth. Uncertainties in the estimates include sparsity of in situ data used to train the algorithms, in particular, for some sectors and seasons. For this application we divided the Baltic Sea in four basins. When comparing the results obtained with this division to those obtained in previous studies, we notice a decrease in the root-mean-square error (<40 μatm) between the reconstruction of the pCO2 and their corresponding in situ measurements, as well as an increase of the correlation coefficient (> 0.96) between them. The outputs of this research have a horizontal resolution of 4 km and cover the 1998-2011 period. For the first time, a climatological mean distribution of surface water pCO2 over the Baltic Sea was calculated based on the SOMLO method with a mean pCO2 of 368.3 ± 100 μatm, and a range of 234-514 μatm. The seasonal variability is similar throughout the Baltic Sea, being high in winter and low in summer.

  19. [Diffusion flux of partial pressure of dissolved carbon dioxide in Wan'an reservoir in spring].

    PubMed

    Mei, Hang-Yuan; Wang, Fu-Shun; Yao, Chen-Chen; Wang, Bao-Li

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the emission of greenhouse gases (CO2) from the river-type reservoir, this study investigated the partial pressure of CO2 [p(CO2)], in the surface water, inflow waters, outflow waters of the Wan'an reservoir in China in the May 2009. p(CO2) in the inflow water, outflow water were calculated from titration method, and the surface water p(CO2) was measured underway using a continuous measurement system (equilibrator-NDIR system). Results showed that the inflow water from the Zhangshui, Meijiang, Taojiang have higher p(CO2) than atmosphere level, with the values of 211.5, 91.7, 259.7 Pa respectively. p(CO2) in the surface water of the incoming section of Wan'an reservoir was between 180-210 Pa, and in the middle section and central section near the dam, p(CO2) in the surface water were about 140-180 Pa and 70-110 Pa. In the outflow waters, p(CO2) reached to 176.2 Pa, higher than that in central section. As a result, it can be concluded that the surface water, inflow waters, outflow waters in the Wan'an reservoir are all the source to CO2. However there is clear evidence showing that the reservoir indeed has a role in mitigating the CO2 emission in this case. PMID:21404665

  20. Utilizing a one-dimensional multispecies model to simulate the nutrient reduction and biomass structure in two types of H2-based membrane-aeration biofilm reactors (H2-MBfR): model development and parametric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Xia, Siqing; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Chenhui

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional multispecies model (ODMSM) was utilized to simulate NO3 (-)-N and ClO4 (-) reduction performances in two kinds of H2-based membrane-aeration biofilm reactors (H2-MBfR) within different operating conditions (e.g., NO3 (-)-N/ClO4 (-) loading rates, H2 partial pressure, etc.). Before the simulation process, we conducted the sensitivity analysis of some key parameters which would fluctuate in different environmental conditions, then we used the experimental data to calibrate the more sensitive parameters μ1 and μ2 (maximum specific growth rates of denitrification bacteria and perchlorate reduction bacteria) in two H2-MBfRs, and the diversity of the two key parameters' values in two types of reactors may be resulted from the different carbon source fed in the reactors. From the simulation results of six different operating conditions (four in H2-MBfR 1 and two in H2-MBfR 2), the applicability of the model was approved, and the variation of the removal tendency in different operating conditions could be well simulated. Besides, the rationality of operating parameters (H2 partial pressure, etc.) could be judged especially in condition of high nutrients' loading rates. To a certain degree, the model could provide theoretical guidance to determine the operating parameters on some specific conditions in practical application. PMID:26490919

  1. Hydrogen production reaction with a metal oxide catalyst in high pressure high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Takahashi, M.; Inomata, H.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen production from biomass was attempted in high pressure high temperature water at 573 K by adopting partial oxidation to increase the yield of H2 via CO production in the presence of ZnO. The results revealed that an addition of H2O2 as an oxidant to the reaction of glucose and sugarcane bagasse brought about the trend of increasing the yields of H2, CO, and CO2. However, the sensitivity of H2 yield on H2O2 amount was different from those of CO and CO2, namely the excess amount of H2O2 tends to decrease the H2 yield with giving a maximum at a certain H2O2 amount. These indicated that the controllability of partial oxidation would be a key factor for maximizing the H2 yield through biomass conversion by partial oxidative gasification in high pressure high temperature water

  2. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on the microstructural and magnetic properties of Er-doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Bin; Liu, Xue-Chao; Li, Fei; Chen, Hong-Ming; Zhou, Ren-Wei; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-06-01

    Er-doped ZnO thin films have been prepared by using inductively coupled plasma enhanced physical vapor deposition at different O2:Ar gas flow ratio (R = 0:30, 1:30, 1:15, 1:10 and 1:6). The influence of oxygen partial pressure on the structural, optical and magnetic properties was studied. It is found that an appropriate oxygen partial pressure (R=1:10) can produce the best crystalline quality with a maximum grain size. The internal strain, estimated by fitting the X-ray diffraction peaks, varied with oxygen partial pressure during growth. PL measurements show that plenty of defects, especially zinc vacancy, exist in Er-doped ZnO films. All the samples show room-temperature ferromagnetism. Importantly, the saturation magnetization exhibits similar dependency on oxygen partial pressure with the internal strain, which indicates that internal strain has an important effect on the magnetic properties of Er-doped ZnO thin films.

  3. Oxygen partial pressure influenced structural and optical properties of DC magnetron sputtered ZrO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Kondaiah, P.; Madhavi, V.; Uthanna, S.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) were deposited on (100) p-silicon and quartz substrates by sputtering of metallic zirconium target under different oxygen partial pressures in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}Pa. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on the structural and optical properties of the deposited films was systematically investigated. The deposition rate of the films decreased from 3.3 to 1.83 nm/min with the increase of oxygen partial pressure from 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}Pa respectively. The X-ray diffraction profiles revealed that the films exhibit (111) refection of zirconium oxide in monoclinic phase. The optical band gap of the films increased from 5.62 to 5.80 eV and refractive index increased from 2.01 to 2.08 with the increase of oxygen partial pressure from 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}Pa respectively.

  4. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on microstructural and optical properties of titanium oxide thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, G.; Bandi, Vengala Rao; Rajeswari, S.M.; Balamurugan, N.; Babu, R. Venkatesh; Song, J.I.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Microstructural and optical properties are studied systematically. • The optical properties are studied by UV–visible and photoluminescence. • The PL spectra shows two peaks correspond to bandgap of anatase and rutile. • The maximum refractive index of 2.73 is obtained for rutile phase of titania. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on silicon (1 0 0) and quartz substrates at various oxygen partial pressures (1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar) with a substrate temperature of 973 K by pulsed laser deposition. The microstructural and optical properties were characterized using Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence. The X-ray diffraction studies indicated the formation of mixed phases (anatase and rutile) at higher oxygen partial pressures (3.5 × 10{sup −2} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar) and strong rutile phase at lower oxygen partial pressures (1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −3} mbar). The atomic force microscopy studies showed the dense and uniform distribution of nanocrystallites. The root mean square surface roughness of the films increased with increasing oxygen partial pressures. The UV–visible studies showed that the bandgap of the films increased from 3.20 eV to 3.60 eV with the increase of oxygen partial pressures. The refractive index was found to decrease from 2.73 to 2.06 (at 550 nm) as the oxygen partial pressure increased from 1.5 × 10{sup −4} mbar to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar. The photoluminescence peaks were fitted to Gaussian function and the bandgap was found to be in the range ∼3.28–3.40 eV for anatase and 2.98–3.13 eV for rutile phases with increasing oxygen partial pressure from 1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar.

  5. Experimental investigation on thermochemical sulfate reduction by H2S initiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, T.; Amrani, A.; Ellis, G.S.; Ma, Q.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to catalyze thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by hydrocarbons (HC), but the reaction mechanism remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of this catalytic reaction, a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted at 330 ??C for 24 h under a constant confining pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used were saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO4 in the presence of variable H2S partial pressures at three different pH conditions. The experimental results showed that the in-situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in-situ pH refers to the calculated pH of aqueous solution under the experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the TSR reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was recorded with a decrease in the in-situ pH value of the aqueous solution involved. A positive correlation between the rate of TSR and the initial partial pressure of H2S occurred under acidic conditions (at pH ???3-3.5). However, sulfate reduction at pH ???5.0 was undetectable even at high initial H2S concentrations. To investigate whether the reaction of H2S(aq) and HSO4- occurs at pH ???3, an additional series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted with CaSO4 and variable H2S partial pressures in the absence of HC at the same experimental temperature and pressure conditions. CaSO4 reduction was not measurable in the absence of paraffin even with high H2S pressure and acidic conditions. These experimental observations indicate that the formation of organosulfur intermediates from H2S reacting with hydrocarbons may play a significant role in sulfate reduction under our experimental conditions rather than the formation of elemental sulfur from H2S reacting with sulfate as has been suggested previously (Toland W. G. (1960) Oxidation of organic compounds with aqueous sulphate. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 82, 1911-1916). Quantification of labile organosulfur compounds (LSC), such as thiols and sulfides, was performed on the products of the reaction of H2S and HC from a series of gold-tube non-isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments conducted at about pH 3 from 300 to 370 ??C and a 0.1-??C/h heating rate. Incorporation of sulfur into HC resulted in an appreciable amount of thiol and sulfide formation. The rate of LSC formation positively correlated with the initial H2S pressure. Thus, we propose that the LSC produced from H2S reaction with HC are most likely the reactive intermediates for H2S initiation of sulfate reduction. We further propose a three-step reaction scheme of sulfate reduction by HC under reservoir conditions, and discuss the geological implications of our experimental findings with regard to the effect of formation water and oil chemistry, in particular LSC content. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental investigation on thermochemical sulfate reduction by H 2S initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Amrani, Alon; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) is known to catalyze thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by hydrocarbons (HC), but the reaction mechanism remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of this catalytic reaction, a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted at 330 °C for 24 h under a constant confining pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used were saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO 4 in the presence of variable H 2S partial pressures at three different pH conditions. The experimental results showed that the in- situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in- situ pH refers to the calculated pH of aqueous solution under the experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the TSR reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was recorded with a decrease in the in- situ pH value of the aqueous solution involved. A positive correlation between the rate of TSR and the initial partial pressure of H 2S occurred under acidic conditions (at pH ˜3-3.5). However, sulfate reduction at pH ˜5.0 was undetectable even at high initial H 2S concentrations. To investigate whether the reaction of H 2S (aq) and HSO4- occurs at pH ˜3, an additional series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted with CaSO 4 and variable H 2S partial pressures in the absence of HC at the same experimental temperature and pressure conditions. CaSO 4 reduction was not measurable in the absence of paraffin even with high H 2S pressure and acidic conditions. These experimental observations indicate that the formation of organosulfur intermediates from H 2S reacting with hydrocarbons may play a significant role in sulfate reduction under our experimental conditions rather than the formation of elemental sulfur from H 2S reacting with sulfate as has been suggested previously (Toland W. G. (1960) Oxidation of organic compounds with aqueous sulphate. J. Am. Chem. Soc.82, 1911-1916). Quantification of labile organosulfur compounds (LSC), such as thiols and sulfides, was performed on the products of the reaction of H 2S and HC from a series of gold-tube non-isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments conducted at about pH 3 from 300 to 370 °C and a 0.1-°C/h heating rate. Incorporation of sulfur into HC resulted in an appreciable amount of thiol and sulfide formation. The rate of LSC formation positively correlated with the initial H 2S pressure. Thus, we propose that the LSC produced from H 2S reaction with HC are most likely the reactive intermediates for H 2S initiation of sulfate reduction. We further propose a three-step reaction scheme of sulfate reduction by HC under reservoir conditions, and discuss the geological implications of our experimental findings with regard to the effect of formation water and oil chemistry, in particular LSC content.

  7. Flow-independent dynamics in aneurysm (FIDA): pressure measurements following partial and complete flow impairment in experimental aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masaki; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2014-01-01

    Background: There have been growing concerns regarding delayed aneurysm rupture subsequent to the flow-diverting stent deployment. Therefore, more investigations are needed regarding hemodynamic changes secondary to flow-diverting stent deployment. Objective: To study intra-aneurysmal and perianeurysmal pressures after partial and complete flow impairment into the aneurysm. Methods A silicone model of an 8-mm-sized aneurysm (neck diameter: 5 mm, vessel size: 4 mm) was used. The aneurysm wall was encapsulated and sealed within a 5 ml syringe filled with saline and a pressure sensor guide wire (ComboWire, Volcano Corp.) to detect pressure changes in the perivascular compartment (outer aneurysm wall). A second pressure sensor guide wire was advanced inside the aneurysm sac. Both pressure sensors were continuously measuring pressure inside and outside the aneurysm under pulsatile flow under the following conditions: 1) baseline (reference); 2) a 16 mm by 3.75 mm flow-diverting stent (ev3/Covidien Vascular, Mansfield, MA) deployed in front of the aneurysm; 3) two flow-diverting stents (16 mm by 3.5 mm) were deployed; and 4) a covered stent (4 mm by 16 mm VeriFlex coronary artery stent covered with rubber sheet) was deployed. Results: Mean (±SD) baseline pressures inside and outside the aneurysm were 53.9 (±2.4) mmHg (range 120–40 mmHg) and 15.4 (±0.7) mmHg (range 40–8mmHg), respectively. There was no change in pressure inside and outside the aneurysm after deploying the first and second flow-diverting stents (partial flow impairment) and it remained at 53.9 (±2.7) mmHg and 14.9 (±1) mmHg for the pressure inside and outside the aneurysm, respectively. The pressure recording from outside the aneurysm dropped from 15.4 (±0.7) mmHg to 0.3 (±0.7) mmHg after deploying the covered stent (complete flow impairment). There was no change in pressure inside the aneurysm after deploying the covered stent. Mean (±SD) pressure within the aneurysm was 55.1 (±1.7) mmHg and it remained 54.7 (±1.7) mmHg after covered stent deployment. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a major discordance between the pressures within the aneurysm and partial or complete flow impairment (flow independent). The outer wall pressure is reduced after covered stent placement. These finding may assist clinicians in better understanding of aneurysm hemodynamics and rupture after flow-diverting stent deployment. PMID:25298859

  8. Microvascular oxygen partial pressure during hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Kohei; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-12-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is a major therapeutic treatment for ischemic ulcerations that perforate skin and underlying muscle in diabetic patients. These lesions do not heal effectively, in part, because of the hypoxic microvascular O2 partial pressures (PmvO2 ) resulting from diabetes-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, which alters the dynamic balance between O2 delivery (Q̇o2) and utilization (V̇o2) rates. We tested the hypothesis that HBO in diabetic muscle would exacerbate the hyperoxic PmvO2 dynamics due, in part, to a reduction or slowing of the cardiovascular, sympathetic nervous, and respiratory system responses to acute HBO exposure. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into diabetic (DIA: streptozotocin ip) and healthy (control) groups. A small animal hyperbaric chamber was pressurized with oxygen (100% O2) to 3.0 atmospheres absolute (ATA) at 0.2 ATA/min. Phosphorescence quenching techniques were used to measure PmvO2 in tibialis anterior muscle of anesthetized rats during HBO. Lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were measured electrophysiologically. During the normobaric hyperoxia and HBO, DIA tibialis anterior PmvO2 increased faster (mean response time, CONT 78 ± 8, DIA 55 ± 8 s, P < 0.05) than CONT. Subsequently, PmvO2 remained elevated at similar levels in CONT and DIA muscles until normobaric normoxic recovery where the DIA PmvO2 retained its hyperoxic level longer than CONT. Sympathetic nervous system and cardiac and respiratory responses to HBO were slower in DIA vs. CONT. Specifically the mean response times for RR (CONT: 6 ± 1 s, DIA: 29 ± 4 s, P < 0.05), HR (CONT: 16 ± 1 s, DIA: 45 ± 5 s, P < 0.05), and LSNA (CONT: 140 ± 16 s, DIA: 247 ± 34 s, P < 0.05) were greater following HBO onset in DIA than CONT. HBO treatment increases tibialis anterior muscle PmvO2 more rapidly and for a longer duration in DIA than CONT, but not to a greater level. Whereas respiratory, cardiovascular, and LSNA responses to HBO are profoundly slowed in DIA, only the cardiovascular arm (via HR) may contribute to the muscle vascular incompetence and these faster PmvO2 kinetics. PMID:26468263

  9. H2 morphology of young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, James R.; Herbst, T. M.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Serabyn, E.; Beckwith, S.

    1993-05-01

    The distributions of H2 1-0 S(1) emission in the young planetary nebulae BD + 30 deg 3639 and NGC 7027 show striking similarities: both have limb-brightened arcs of H2 emission with radii that are about twice those of their H II regions. The extended H2 emission in both nebulae is attributed to a photodissociation region, implying that the neutral envelopes of these young planetaries extend well beyond the edge of the H II region in contrast to older nebulae, where the ionized and molecular gas are more nearly coextensive. The contrast between young and old planetaries can only be explained if the molecular envelope is inhomogeneous. We endorse a scenario for the evolution of a planetary nebula in which a photodissociation front propagates through the clumpy molecular envelope, leaving the ionized core embedded in an envelope of partially ionized atomic gas and dense molecular knots.

  10. Partial pharmacologic blockade shows sympathetic connection between blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Max J; Wang, Ruihao; Marthol, Harald; Liu, Mao; Tillmann, Alexandra; Riss, Stephan; Hauck, Paulina; Hösl, Katharina M; Wasmeier, Gerald; Stemper, Brigitte; Köhrmann, Martin

    2016-06-15

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) dampens transfer of blood pressure (BP)-fluctuations onto cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV). Thus, CBFV-oscillations precede BP-oscillations. The phase angle (PA) between sympathetically mediated low-frequency (LF: 0.03-0.15Hz) BP- and CBFV-oscillations is a measure of CA quality. To evaluate whether PA depends on sympathetic modulation, we assessed PA-changes upon sympathetic stimulation with and without pharmacologic sympathetic blockade. In 10 healthy, young men, we monitored mean BP and CBFV before and during 120-second cold pressor stimulation (CPS) of one foot (0°C ice-water). We calculated mean values, standard deviations and sympathetic LF-powers of all signals, and PAs between LF-BP- and LF-CBFV-oscillations. We repeated measurements after ingestion of the adrenoceptor-blocker carvedilol (25mg). We compared parameters before and during CPS, without and after carvedilol (analysis of variance, post-hoc t-tests, significance: p<0.05). Without carvedilol, CPS increased BP, CBFV, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers, and shortened PA. Carvedilol decreased resting BP, CBFV, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers, while PAs remained unchanged. During CPS, BPs, CBFVs, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers were lower, while PAs were longer with than without carvedilol. With carvedilol, CPS no longer shortened resting PA. Sympathetic activation shortens PA. Partial adrenoceptor blockade abolishes this PA-shortening. Thus, PA-measurements provide a subtle marker of sympathetic influences on CA and might refine CA evaluation. PMID:27206903

  11. Global Autocorrelation Scales of the Partial Pressure of Oceanic CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.

    2004-01-01

    A global database of approximately 1.7 million observations of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters (pCO2) collected between 1970 and 2003 is used to estimate its spatial autocorrelation structure. The patterns of the lag distance where the autocorrelation exceeds 0.8 is similar to patterns in the spatial distribution of the first baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation indicating that ocean circulation processes play a significant role in determining the spatial variability of pCO2. For example, the global maximum of the distance at which autocorrelations exceed 0.8 averages about 140 km in the equatorial Pacific. Also, the lag distance at which the autocorrelation exceed 0.8 is greater in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream than it is near the Kuroshio, approximately 50 km near the Gulf Stream as opposed to 20 km near the Kuroshio. Separate calculations for times when the sun is north and south of the equator revealed no obvious seasonal dependence of the spatial autocorrelation scales. The pCO2 measurements at Ocean Weather Station (OWS) 'P', in the eastern subarctic Pacific (50 N, 145 W) is the only fixed location where an uninterrupted time series of sufficient length exists to calculate a meaningful temporal autocorrelation function for lags greater than a few days. The estimated temporal autocorrelation function at OWS 'P', is highly variable. A spectral analysis of the longest four pCO2 time series indicates a high level of variability occurring over periods from the atmospheric synoptic to the maximum length of the time series, in this case 42 days. It is likely that a relative peak in variability with a period of 3-6 days is related to atmospheric synoptic period variability and ocean mixing events due to wind stirring. However, the short length of available time series makes identifying temporal relationships between pCO2 and atmospheric or ocean processes problematic.

  12. The H2O Content of Granite Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, O.; Cesare, B.; Remusat, L.; Acosta-Vigil, A.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 C and ~5 kbar. Small (? 5 m) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.51.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can be applied to MI hosted in higher-temperature, granulite-facies rocks that represent the parents of many upper-crustal granites. This will result in a better understanding of formation and evolution of granitic magmas.

  13. The H2O content of granite embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Omar; Cesare, Bernardo; Remusat, Laurent; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Poli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites [1, 2, 3]. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 °C and ~5 kbar. Small (≤ 5 µm) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.5±1.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region [3]. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can be applied to MI hosted in higher-temperature, granulite-facies rocks that represent the parents of many upper-crustal granites. This will result in a better understanding of formation and evolution of granitic magmas. [1] Cesare et al. (2009) Geology, 37, 627-630. [2] Bartoli et al. (2013) Geology, 41, 115-118. [3] Bartoli et al. (2014) EPSL, 395, 281-290.

  14. Oxygen partial pressure influence on the character of InGaZnO thin films grown by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Wang, Li

    2012-11-01

    The amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOSs) are promising for emerging large-area optoelectronic applications because of capability of large-area, uniform deposition at low temperatures such as room temperature (RT). Indium-gallium-zinc oxide (InGaZnO) thin film is a promising amorphous semiconductors material in thin film transistors (TFT) for its excellent electrical properties. In our work, the InGaZnO thin films are fabricated on the SiO2 glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the oxygen partial pressure altered from 1 to 10 Pa at RT. The targets were prepared by mixing Ga2O3, In2O3, and ZnO powder at a mol ratio of 1: 7: 2 before the solid-state reactions in a tube furnace at the atmospheric pressure. The targets were irradiated by an Nd:YAG laser(355nm). Finally, we have three films of 270nm, 230nm, 190nm thick for 1Pa, 5Pa, 10Pa oxygen partial pressure. The product thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Hall-effect investigation. The comparative study demonstrated the character changes of the structure and electronic transport properties, which is probably occurred as a fact of the different oxygen partial pressure used in the PLD.

  15. Impact of Xe partial pressure on the production of excimer vacuum ultraviolet emission for plasma display panels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Di; Zhang Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    In this work, the effect of the Xe partial pressure on the excimer vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission intensity of the plasma display panels is investigated, both by measuring the spectral emission directly and by two-dimensional simulations. Experimentally, we find that at the high Xe partial pressure levels, there is an supra-linear increase of excimer VUV radiation and that determines the strong increase of luminance at the high pressures and high voltage. Due to the increase of the luminance and the almost unchanged discharge current, the luminous efficacy strongly increases with the Xe partial pressure. In addition, we also investigated the dynamics of the VUV generation, by measuring the decay time of the excimer VUV light as a function of the gas pressure. It is found that the decay time decreases with the increase of gas pressure. The spatial characteristics of the excimer VUV emission are also discussed. Different from the Ne and near-infrared emission, the excimer VUV emission is generated near the surface of the electrodes and increases uniformly on both sides of the anode and cathode (i.e., the bulk plasma region). Most importantly, it is found that the VUV production occurs during the afterglow period, while it is almost zero at the moment of the discharge itself. From the simulations, it can be seen that the Xe{sub 2}*({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) excimer species, which are generated from Xe*(1s{sub 5}), play a dominant role in the excimer VUV emission output at the high Xe partial pressure. The two-dimensional simulations also show that the strong increase of Xe excimer excitation states in the case of high pressure is mainly the result of the high conversion efficiency of the Xe excimer states, especially in the afterglow period. Due to the high conversion efficiency of Xe excitation species to Xe excimer species by the high collision rate in the case of high pressure, there is a strong increase of excimer VUV production, especially from the cathode.

  16. H2 Detection via Polarography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus; Barile, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H ions or protons; H ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic O2 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic O2 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  17. Organic tank safety project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water contents of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-BY-108

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P{sub H2O} is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site`s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, Webb et al. determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that satisfies the waste classification criteria based on water content alone or a combination of water content and either total organic carbon (TOC) content or waste energetics. To provide information on the behavior of saltcake wastes, two waste samples taken from Tank 241-BY-108 (BY-108) were selected for study, even though BY-108 is not on the Organic Tanks Watch List because of their ready availability and their similarity to some of the organic-bearing saltcakes.

  18. H2S concentrations in the arterial blood during H2S administration in relation to its toxicity and effects on breathing

    PubMed Central

    Klingerman, Candice M.; Trushin, Neil; Prokopczyk, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to establish in spontaneously breathing urethane-anesthetized rats, the relationship between the concentrations of H2S transported in the blood and the corresponding clinical manifestations, i.e., breathing stimulation and inhibition, during and following infusion of NaHS at increasing rates. The gaseous concentration of H2S (CgH2S, one-third of the total soluble form) was computed from the continuous determination of H2S partial pressure in the alveolar gas, while H2S, both dissolved and combined to hemoglobin, was measured at specific time points by sulfide complexation with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S). We found that using a potent reducing agent in vitro, H2S added to the whole blood had little interaction with the plasma proteins, as sulfide appeared to be primarily combined and then oxidized by hemoglobin. In vivo, H2S was undetectable in the blood in its soluble form in baseline conditions, while CMBBH2S averaged 0.7 ± 0.5 μM. During NaHS infusion, H2S was primarily present in nonsoluble form in the arterial blood: CMBBH2S was about 50 times higher than CgH2S at the lowest levels of exposure and 5 or 6 times at the levels wherein fatal apnea occurred. CgH2S averaged only 1.1 ± 0.7 μM when breathing increased, corresponding to a CMBBH2S of 11.1 ± 5.4 μM. Apnea occurred at CgH2S above 5.1 μM and CMBBH2S above 25.4 μM. At the cessation of exposure, CMBBH2S remained elevated, at about 3 times above baseline for at least 15 min. These data provide a frame of reference for studying the putative effects of endogenous H2S and for testing antidotes against its deadly effects. PMID:23904109

  19. Measurements of Pressure Distributions and Force Coefficients in a Squeeze Film Damper. Part 2: Partially Sealed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, S. Y.; Sanandres, Luis A.; Vance, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results from a partially sealed squeeze film damper (SFD) test rig, executing a circular centered orbit are presented and discussed. A serrated piston ring is installed at the damper exit. This device involves a new sealing concept which produces high damping values while allowing for oil flow to cool the damper. In the partially sealed damper, large cavitation regions are observed in the pressure fields at orbit radii epsilon equals 0.5 and epsilon equals 0.8. The cavitated pressure distributions and the corresponding force coefficients are compared with a cavitated bearing solution. The experimental results show the significance of fluid inertia and vapor cavitation in the operation of squeeze film dampers. Squeeze film Reynolds numbers tested reach up to Re equals 50, spanning the range of contemporary applications.

  20. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  1. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  2. Method for sensing and measuring a concentration or partial pressure of a reactant used in a redox reaction

    DOEpatents

    Findl, E.

    1984-12-21

    A method for sensing or measuring the partial pressure or concentration of an electroactive species used in conjunction with an electrolyte, the method being characterized by providing a constant current between an anode and a cathode of an electrolyte-containing cell, while measuring changes in voltage that occur between either the anode and cathode or between a reference electrode and one of the main electrodes of the cell, thereby to determine the concentration or partial pressure of the electro-active species as a function of said measured voltage changes. The method of the invention can be practiced using either a cell having only an anode and a cathode, or using a cell having an anode and a cathode in combination with a reference electrode. Accurate measurements of small concentrations or partial pressures of electro-active species are obtainable with the method of the invention, by using constant currents of only a few microamperes between the anode and cathode of the cell, while the concentration-determining voltage is measured.

  3. Development of a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for measuring partial pressures of volatile organic compounds in natural water.

    PubMed

    Ooki, Atsushi; Yokouchi, Yoko

    2008-08-01

    Methods for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water and air are required so that the VOCs' fluxes in water environments can be estimated. We developed a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for collecting gas-phase samples containing VOCs at equilibrium with natural water. The equilibrator consists of six silicone tubes housed in a polyvinyl chloride pipe. Equilibrated air samples collected from the equilibrator were analyzed with an automated preconcentration gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for hourly measurements of VOC partial pressures. The partial pressures of all the target VOCs reached equilibrium within 1 h in the equilibrator. The system was used to determine VOC partial pressures in Lake Kasumigaura, a shallow eutrophic lake with a high concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Compressed air was used daily to remove SPM deposited on the inner wall of the equilibrator and to maintain the equilibrium conditions for more than a week without the need to shut the system down. CH2Br2, CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CH2BrCl, C2H5I, C2Cl4, CH3I, and CH3Br in the lake were supersaturated with respect to the air, whereas CH3CI was undersaturated. CHCl3 had the highest flux (6.2 nmol m(-2) hr(-1)) during the observation period. PMID:18754497

  4. "Molecular basket" sorbents for separation of CO(2) and H(2)S from various gas streams.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2009-04-29

    A new generation of "molecular basket" sorbents (MBS) has been developed by the optimum combination of the nanoporous material and CO(2)/H(2)S-philic polymer sorbent to increase the accessible sorption sites for CO(2) capture from flue gas (Postdecarbonization), and for CO(2) and H(2)S separation from the reduced gases, such as synthesis gas, reformate (Predecarbonization), natural gas, coal/biomass gasification gas, and biogas. The sorption capacity of 140 mg of CO(2)/g of sorb was achieved at 15 kPa CO(2) partial pressure, which shows superior performance in comparison with other known sorbents. In addition, an exceptional dependence of MBS sorption performance on temperature for CO(2) and H(2)S was found and discussed at a molecular level via the computational chemistry approach. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of MBS sorption characteristics, an innovative sorption process was proposed and demonstrated at the laboratory scale for removing and recovering CO(2) and H(2)S, respectively, from a model gas. The present study provides a new approach for development of the novel CO(2)/H(2)S sorbents and may have a major impact on the advance of science and technology for CO(2)/H(2)S capture and separation from various gases. PMID:19348482

  5. Particulate filtration for sorbent-based H2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hassel, Bart A.; Karra, Jagadeswara R.

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed for sizing the particulate filter that can be used inside a sorption-based onboard hydrogen storage system for light-duty vehicles. The method is based on a trade-off between the pressure drop across the particulate filter (during the fill of the H2 storage tank or during its discharge while driving) and the effect of this pressure drop on the usable amount of H2 gas from the H2 storage system. The permeability and filtration efficiency of the particulate filters (in the absence and presence of MOF-5 particulates) was quantified in this study, with an emphasis on meeting DOE's H2 purity requirements.

  6. Solubilization of 1-hexanol in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate at pressures up to 140 MPa: partial molar volumes, compressibilities, and partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Høiland, Harald; Alagic, Edin; Førland, Geir Martin

    2014-07-15

    Partial molar volumes and partial molar compressibilities of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 1-hexanol at pressure up to 140 MPa have been determined. For aqueous SDS solutions the partial molar compressibility increases with pressure below the cmc and decreases with pressure above the cmc. The partial molar compressibility of aqueous 1-hexanol increases with pressure. The increased partial molar compressibility reflects that the structure of water is gradually broken down by increased pressure. Thus, the negative effect of electrostriction around the charged parts of SDS decreases as do the effects of hydrophobic hydration around the CH2 groups. In the micellar state the compressibility of the aggregate is the main factor, becoming less compressible as pressure increases. The cmc of SDS, as determined by speed of sound measurements, increases with pressure and goes through a shallow maximum at about 110 MPa. When 1-hexanol is added to SDS solutions, it will be partitioned between the aqueous and micellar (pseudo) phases. The partition coefficient has been determined from partial molar compressibilites, and it appears to decrease with pressure, reach a minimum around 80 MPa, and then increase, though the change with pressure is small. PMID:24941422

  7. CO2 Solubility in Natural Rhyolitic Melts at High Pressures - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zones by Sediment Partial Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2011-12-01

    Partial melts of subducting sediments is thought to be a critical agent in carrying trace elements and water to arc basalt source regions. For subduction zones that contain significant amount of carbonates in ocean-floor sediments, sediment melts likely also act as a carrier of CO2. However, the CO2 carrying capacity of natural rhyolitic melts at sub-arc depths remains unconstrained. We conducted experiments on a synthetic composition, similar to average, low-degree experimental partial melt of pelitic sediments. The composition was constructed with reagent grade oxides and carbonates, the source of excess CO2. Experiments were conducted between 1 and 3 GPa at 1200 °C in Au80Pd20 capsules using a piston cylinder apparatus with a half-inch BaCO3 assembly at Rice University. Quench products showed glasses with bubbles, the latter suggesting saturation of the melt with a CO2-rich vapor phase. Oxygen fugacity during the experiments was not strictly controlled but the presence of CO2 bubbles and absence of graphite indicates fO2 above the CCO buffer. Major element concentrations of glasses were measured using EPMA. The CO2 and H2O contents of experimental doubly polished (50-110 μm), bubble-free portions of the glass chips were determined using a Thermo Nicolet Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Spectra were recorded with a resolution of 4 cm-1, 512 scans, from 650 to 4000 cm-1, under a nitrogen purge to eliminate atmospheric gases. Dissolved volatile concentrations were quantified using the Beer-Lambert law and linear molar absorption coefficients from previous studies [1, 2]. Total dissolved carbon dioxide of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch bands of CO32- at 1430 cm-1 and CO2mol at 2348 cm-1. Dissolved water content of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of O-H stretching at 3520 cm-1. Estimated total CO2 concentrations at 3 GPa are in the range of 1-2 wt%, for melts with H2O contents between 1.5 and 2.5 wt%. Compared to previous work on CO2 solubility in complex rhyolitic melts at lower pressures [3-5], there is a general trend of increasing CO2 solubility with pressure. Dissolved CO2 is present both as molecular CO2 and as CO32-, consistent with previous, simple system studies at high pressures [e.g. 2, 6]. The CO2mol/CO2Tot values are within the range of previous high pressure studies [e.g. 7] and range from 0.35 to 0.55. Experiments at variable P, T, and melt water content are underway. [1] Fine and Stolper (1985), CMP, 91, 105-121; [2] Stolper et al. (1987), AM, 72, 1071-1085; [3] Blank et al. (1993), EPSL, 119, 27-36; [4] Fogel and Rutherford (1990), AM, 75, 1331-1326; [5] Tamic et al. (2001), CG, 174, 333-347; [6] Mysen and Virgo (1980), AM, 65, 855-899; [7] Mysen (1976), AJS, 276, 969-996.

  8. Biogeochemistry of dihydrogen (H2).

    PubMed

    Hoehler, Tori M

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has had an important and evolving role in Earth's geo- and biogeochemistry, from prebiotic to modern times. On the earliest Earth, abiotic sources of H2 were likely stronger than in the present. Volcanic out-gassing and hydrothermal circulation probably occurred at several times the modern rate, due to presumably higher heat flux. The H2 component of volcanic emissions was likely buffered close to the modern value by an approximately constant mantle oxidation state since 3.9 billion years ago, and may have been higher before that, if the early mantle was more reducing. The predominantly ultramafic character of the early, undifferentiated crust could have led to increased serpentinization and release of H2 by hydrothermal circulation, as in modern ultramafic-hosted vents. At the same time, the reactive atmospheric sink for H2 was likely weaker. Collectively, these factors suggest that steady state levels of H2 in the prebiotic atmosphere were 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than at present, and possibly higher still during transient periods following the delivery of Fe and Ni by large impact events. These elevated levels had direct or indirect impacts on the redox state of the atmosphere, the radiation budget, the production of aerosol hazes, and the genesis of biochemical precursor compounds. The early abiotic cycling of H2 helped to establish the environmental and chemical context for the origins of life on Earth. The potential for H2 to serve as a source of energy and reducing power, and to afford a means of energy storage by the establishment of proton gradients, could have afforded it a highly utilitarian role in the earliest metabolic chemistry. Some origin of life theories suggest the involvement of H2 in the first energy-generating metabolism, and the widespread and deeply-branching nature of H2-utilization in the modern tree of life suggests that it was at least a very early biochemical innovation. The abiotic production of H2 via several mechanisms of water-rock interaction could have supported an early chemosynthetic biosphere. Such processes offer the continued potential for a deep, rock-hosted biosphere on Earth or other bodies in the solar system. The continued evolution of metabolic and community-level versatility among microbes led to an expanded ability to completely exploit the energy available in complex organic matter. Under the anoxic conditions that prevailed on the early Earth, this was accomplished through the linked and sequential action of several metabolic classes of organisms. By transporting electrons between cells, H2 provides a means of linking the activities of these organisms into a highly functional and interactive network. At the same time, H2 concentrations exert a powerful thermodynamic control on many aspects of metabolism and biogeochemical function in these systems. Anaerobic communities based on the consumption of organic matter continue to play an important role in global biogeochemistry even into the present day. As the principal arbiters of chemistry in most aquatic sediments and animal digestive systems, these microbes affect the redox and trace-gas chemistry of our oceans and atmosphere, and constitute the ultimate biological filter on material passing into the rock record. It is in such communities that the significance of H2 in mediating biogeochemical function is most strongly expressed. The advent of phototrophic metabolism added another layer of complexity to microbial communities, and to the role of H2 therein. Anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophs retained and expanded on the utilization of H2 in metabolic processes. Both groups produce and consume H2 through a variety of mechanisms. In the natural world, phototrophic organisms are often closely juxtaposed with a variety of other metabolic types, through the formation of biofilms and microbial mats. In the few examples studied, phototrophs contribute an often swamping term to the H2 economy of these communities, with important implications for their overall function-including regulation of the redox state of gaseous products, and direct release of large quantities of H2 to the environment. As one of the dominant sources of biological productivity for as much as 2 billion years of Earth's history, these communities have been among the most important agents of long-term global biogeochemical change. On the modern Earth, H2 is present at only trace levels in the atmosphere and oceans. Nonetheless, its function as an arbiter of microbial interactions and chemistry ensures an important role in biogeochemical cycling. The significance of H2 in a global sense may soon increase, as the search for alternative fuels casts attention on the clean-energy potential of hydrogen fuel cells. Already, H2 utilization plays an important role in all three phylogenetic domains of life. Humans may soon add an important new term to this economy. Considerable research is focused on the H2-producing capacities of phototrophic and other microorganisms as potential contributors in this regard. Regardless of source, the large scale utilization of H2 as an energy source could carry important consequences for biogeochemistry. PMID:16370113

  9. Seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone submitted to a range of confining pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using the forced oscillation method, we measure the extensional-mode attenuation and Young's modulus of a Berea sandstone sample at seismic frequencies (0.5-50 Hz) for varying levels of water saturation (~0-100%) and confining pressures (2-25 MPa). Attenuation is negligible for dry conditions and saturation levels <80%. For saturation levels between ~91% and ~100%, attenuation is significant and frequency dependent in the form of distinct bell-shaped curves having their maxima between 1 and 20 Hz. Increasing saturation causes an increase of the overall attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to lower frequencies. On the other hand, increasing the confining pressure causes a reduction in the attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to higher frequencies. For saturation levels above ~98%, the fluid pressure increases with increasing confining pressure. When the fluid pressure is high enough to ensure full water saturation of the sample, attenuation becomes negligible. A second series of comparable experiments reproduces these results satisfactorily. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, the frequency-dependent attenuation meets the theoretical predictions of mesoscopic wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) in response to a heterogeneous water distribution in the pore space, so-called patchy saturation. These results show that mesoscopic WIFF can be an important source of seismic attenuation at reservoir conditions.

  10. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions

    PubMed Central

    Groot, S. P. C.; Surki, A. A.; de Vos, R. C. H.; Kodde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. Methods Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. Key Results The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Conclusions Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice. PMID:22967856

  11. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, Achim; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Obst, Andrew W; Payton, J R; Stone, J B; Tabaka, L J; Grover, M; Macrum, G; Stevens, G D; Swift, D C; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  12. Investigation of NH3 input partial pressure for N-polarity InGaN growth on GaN substrates by tri-halide vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasaki, Takahide; Hasegawa, Tomoyasu; Meguro, Misaki; Thieu, Quang Tu; Murakami, Hisashi; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Monemar, Bo; Koukitu, Akinori

    2016-05-01

    The influence of NH3 input partial pressure on N-polarity InGaN grown by tri-halide vapor phase epitaxy was investigated. It was found that surface morphology, solid composition and optical properties were affected by NH3 input partial pressure. As shown in thermodynamic analyses, the indium content increased due to an increase in the driving force for InN deposition caused by increased NH3 input partial pressure. In addition, the deep level emission around 2.1 eV in photoluminescence measurements drastically decreased at higher NH3 input partial pressures. Ab initio calculations and subsequent secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements suggested the reduction of metal-vacancies and/or carbon impurity incorporation in the InGaN layers.

  13. Hematocrit and oxygenation dependence of blood (1)H(2)O T(1) at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Grgac, Ksenija; van Zijl, Peter C M; Qin, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of blood (1)H2O T1 is critical for perfusion-based quantification experiments such as arterial spin labeling and cerebral blood volume-weighted MRI using vascular space occupancy. The dependence of blood (1)H2O T1 on hematocrit fraction (Hct) and oxygen saturation fraction (Y) was determined at 7 T using in vitro bovine blood in a circulating system under physiological conditions. Blood (1)H2O R1 values for different conditions could be readily fitted using a two-compartment (erythrocyte and plasma) model, which are described by a monoexponential longitudinal relaxation rate constant dependence. It was found that T1 = 2171 ± 39 ms for Y = 1 (arterial blood) and 2010 ± 41 ms for Y = 0.6 (venous blood), for a typical Hct of 0.42. The blood (1)H2O T1 values in the normal physiological range (Hct from 0.35 to 0.45, and Y from 0.6 to 1.0) were determined to range from 1900 to 2300 ms. The influence of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and the effect of plasma osmolality for different anticoagulants were also investigated. It is discussed why blood (1)H2O T1 values measured in vivo for human blood may be about 10-20% larger than found in vitro for bovine blood at the same field strength. PMID:23169066

  14. Effect of hydrogen sulfide partial pressure, pH, and chloride content on the SSC resistance of martensitic stainless steels and martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, D.D.

    1999-11-01

    Centrifugal compressor applications require the use of martensitic stainless and martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels at high hydrogen sulfide partial pressures. These materials do not perform well when tested with standard TM0177 test solutions. This paper describes the effect of hydrogen sulfide partial pressure, pH, and chloride content on their SSC resistance and explains their successful field operational experience. Environmental limits are determined for several materials and heat treat conditions.

  15. On the Installation of Jet Engine Nacelles on a Wing Fourth Partial Report: Pressure-Distribution Measurements on a Sweptback Wing with Jet Engine Nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschner, R.

    1949-01-01

    The present report, which deals with pressure-distribution measurements made on a sweptback wing with a jet engine nacelle, is similar to a report on pressure-distribution measurements on a rectangular wing with a jet engine nacelle (second partial report). Here, in investigations preliminary to high-speed measurements, as in the second partial report, useful arrangements and fillet designs have been discovered.

  16. Effects of oxygen partial pressure on the characteristics of magnetron-sputtered ZnMgBeO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuong, Hoang Ba; Lee, Byung-Teak

    2015-11-01

    Effects of oxygen partial pressure within the Ar process plasma on the optical, structural, and electrical properties of magnetron-sputtered ZnMgBeO films were investigated in detail. It was observed that the optical energy bandgap (Eg) values of the ZnMgBeO films substantially decrease with the oxygen addition, from 5.3 to 4.3 eV as the oxygen partial pressure increases from zero to one. The full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) values of the (0 0 0 2) XRD peaks drastically decrease with the addition of a small amount of oxygen but then increase with further oxygen addition. All the films had very high sheet resistance, 1.3-1.4 GΩ/□. It was also observed that the concentration of Zn within the films significantly increased with the oxygen addition, which was proposed to be mainly responsible for the observed decrease in Eg. It was also proposed that the FWHM change due to the oxygen addition may be attributable to three factors, film composition, grain size, and point defect density, as confirmed by results of TEM and XPS investigations.

  17. Electronic and chemical structure of the H2O/GaN(0001) interface under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    We employed ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the electronic and chemical properties of the H2O/GaN(0001) interface under elevated pressures and/or temperatures. A pristine GaN(0001) surface exhibited upward band bending, which was partially flattened when exposed to H2O at room temperature. However, the GaN surface work function was slightly reduced due to the adsorption of molecular H2O and its dissociation products. At elevated temperatures, a negative charge generated on the surface by a vigorous H2O/GaN interfacial chemistry induced an increase in both the surface work function and upward band bending. We tracked the dissociative adsorption of H2O onto the GaN(0001) surface by recording the core-level photoemission spectra and obtained the electronic and chemical properties at the H2O/GaN interface under operando conditions. Our results suggest a strong correlation between the electronic and chemical properties of the material surface, and we expect that their evolutions lead to significantly different properties at the electrolyte/electrode interface in a photoelectrochemical solar cell. PMID:27108711

  18. Electronic and chemical structure of the H2O/GaN(0001) interface under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    We employed ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the electronic and chemical properties of the H2O/GaN(0001) interface under elevated pressures and/or temperatures. A pristine GaN(0001) surface exhibited upward band bending, which was partially flattened when exposed to H2O at room temperature. However, the GaN surface work function was slightly reduced due to the adsorption of molecular H2O and its dissociation products. At elevated temperatures, a negative charge generated on the surface by a vigorous H2O/GaN interfacial chemistry induced an increase in both the surface work function and upward band bending. We tracked the dissociative adsorption of H2O onto the GaN(0001) surface by recording the core-level photoemission spectra and obtained the electronic and chemical properties at the H2O/GaN interface under operando conditions. Our results suggest a strong correlation between the electronic and chemical properties of the material surface, and we expect that their evolutions lead to significantly different properties at the electrolyte/electrode interface in a photoelectrochemical solar cell. PMID:27108711

  19. The metastable HCl · 6H2O phase - IR spectroscopy, phase transitions and kinetic/thermodynamic properties in the range 170-205 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Rossi, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    In this laboratory study, 1 to 2 μm thick polycrystalline ice films have been grown under stirred flow reactor (SFR) conditions and subsequently doped with metered amounts of HCl under static conditions. A multidiagnostic approach including FTIR absorption spectroscopy in transmission, residual gas mass spectrometry (MS) and total pressure measurement was employed. Depending on the growth protocol controlling both temperature and partial pressure of HCl (PHCl), either amorphous HCl/H2O or crystalline HCl hexahydrate (HCl · 6H2O) have been obtained. After controlled doping with HCl and evaporation of excess H2O from the ice film, transmission FTIR of pure HCl · 6H2O films and use of calibrated residual gas MS enabled the measurement of differential (peak) IR cross sections at several mid-IR frequencies (σ = (6.5 ± 1.9) × 10-19 cm2 molec-1 at 1635 cm-1 as an example). Two types of kinetic experiments on pure HCl · 6H2O have been performed under SFR conditions: (a) evaporation of HCl · 6H2O under H2O-poor conditions over a narrow T range, and (b) observation of the phase transition from crystalline HCl · 6H2O to amorphous HCl/H2O under H2O-rich conditions at increasing T. The temperature dependence of the zero-order evaporation flux of HCl in pure HCl · 6H2O monitored at 3426 cm-1 led to log(Jev) molec cm-2s-1= (36.34 ± 3.20) - (80 810 ± 5800)/2.303RT with R=8.312 JK-1 mol-1. HCl · 6H2O has a significant intrinsic kinetic barrier to HCl evaporation of 15.1 kJ mol-1 in excess of the HCl sublimation enthalpy of 65.8 kJ mol-1 at 200 K but is kinetically unstable (metastable) at typical UT/LS conditions of HCl partial pressure (P(HCl)) and temperature. Water-rich HCl · 6H2O undergoes a facile phase transition from crystalline to the amorphous/ supercooled/disordered state easily observable at T≥ 195 K under both static and SFR conditions. This corresponds to low P(HCl) in the neighborhood of 10-7 Torr that also prevails at the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS). The atmospheric importance of HCl · 6H2O is questioned in view of its nucleation barrier and its dependence on temperature and P(HCl) compared to the amorphous HCl/H2O phase.

  20. Highly oriented NdFeCoB nanocrystalline magnets from partially disproportionated compacts by reactive deformation under low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Jun; Liu, Ying Yu, Yunping; Lian, Lixian

    2014-05-07

    In the present investigation, we take advantage of the ultrafine grain size of NdFeCoB partially hydrogen-disproportionated phases, and prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with full density and homogenous microstructure and texture by reactive deformation under low pressure. Our results suggest that the pressure could properly promote an occurrence of desorption-recombination reaction due to a shorter-range rearrangement of the atoms, and the newly recombined Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains with fine grain size could undergo deformation immediately after the phase transformation, and then an obvious anisotropy and uniform alignment would be obtained. The maximum magnetic properties, (BH){sub max} = 25.8 MGOe, Br = 11.8 kG, H{sub cj} = 5.5 kOe, were obtained after being treated for 5 min at 820 °C in vacuum. The present study highlights the feasibility to prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with homogeneous microstructure and a strong (00l) texture of uniform grain size under low pressure.

  1. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  2. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Hong, Bo Young; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Juwon; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  3. Structural, mechanical, electrical and wetting properties of ZrNx films deposited by Ar/N2 vacuum arc discharge: Effect of nitrogen partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, B.; Naddaf, M.; A-Kharroub, M.

    2013-03-01

    Non-stiochiometric zirconium nitride (ZrNx) thin films have been deposited on silicon substrates by vacuum arc discharge of (N2 + Ar) gas mixtures at different N2 partial pressure ratio. The microstructure, mechanical, electrical and wetting properties of these films are studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford back scattering (RBS) technique, conventional micro-hardness testing, electrical resistivity, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. RBS results and analysis show that the (N/Zr) ratio in the film increases with increasing the N2 partial pressure. A ZrNx film with (Zr/N) ratio in the vicinity of stoichiometric ZrN is obtained at N2 partial pressure of 10%. XRD and Raman results indicate that all deposited films have strained cubic crystal phase of ZrN, regardless of the N2 partial pressure. On increasing the N2 partial pressure, the relative intensity of (1 1 1) orientation with respect to (2 0 0) orientation is seen to decrease. The effect of N2 partial pressure on micro-hardness and the resistivity of the deposited film is revealed and correlated to the alteration of grain size, crystallographic texture, stoichiometry and residual stress developed in the film. In particular, it is found that residual stress and nitrogen incorporation in the film play crucial role in the alteration of micro-hardness and resistivity respectively. In addition, CA and AFM results demonstrate that as N2 partial pressure increases, both the surface hydrophobicity and roughness of the deposited film increase, leading to a significant decrease in the film surface free energy (SFE).

  4. Variations in Alveolar Partial Pressure for Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Have Additive Not Synergistic Acute Effects on Human Pulmonary Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Quentin P. P.; Formenti, Federico; Talbot, Nick P.; Lunn, Daniel; Robbins, Peter A.; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    The human pulmonary vasculature constricts in response to hypercapnia and hypoxia, with important consequences for homeostasis and adaptation. One function of these responses is to direct blood flow away from poorly-ventilated regions of the lung. In humans it is not known whether the stimuli of hypercapnia and hypoxia constrict the pulmonary blood vessels independently of each other or whether they act synergistically, such that the combination of hypercapnia and hypoxia is more effective than the sum of the responses to each stimulus on its own. We independently controlled the alveolar partial pressures of carbon dioxide (Paco2) and oxygen (Pao2) to examine their possible interaction on human pulmonary vasoconstriction. Nine volunteers each experienced sixteen possible combinations of four levels of Paco2 (+6, +1, ?4 and ?9 mmHg, relative to baseline) with four levels of Pao2 (175, 100, 75 and 50 mmHg). During each of these sixteen protocols Doppler echocardiography was used to evaluate cardiac output and systolic tricuspid pressure gradient, an index of pulmonary vasoconstriction. The degree of constriction varied linearly with both Paco2 and the calculated haemoglobin oxygen desaturation (1-So2). Mixed effects modelling delivered coefficients defining the interdependence of cardiac output, systolic tricuspid pressure gradient, ventilation, Paco2 and So2. No interaction was observed in the effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction of carbon dioxide and oxygen (p>0.64). Direct effects of the alveolar gases on systolic tricuspid pressure gradient greatly exceeded indirect effects arising from concurrent changes in cardiac output. PMID:23935847

  5. Correlation Between Partial Pressure of Arterial Carbon Dioxide and End Tidal Carbon Dioxide in Patients with Severe Alcohol Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Brinton, Taylor; Kramer, Jason; Khan, Basharath; Ziffra, Jeffrey; Villines, Dana; Shah, Poorvi; Hanif, Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression is a common adverse effect of benzodiazepine administration to patients with severe alcoholic withdrawal. This study was conducted to assess the value of end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels compared to partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels in monitoring respiratory depression secondary to benzodiazepine treatment in patients with severe alcohol withdrawal. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 36 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for severe alcohol withdrawal who had been administered sedative agents. Results We observed a statistically significant correlation between PaCO2 and ETCO2 at time 1 (r=0.74, P<0.01) and time 3 (r=0.52, P=0.02) but not at time 2 (r=0.22, P=0.31). Conclusion Our study confirms a positive correlation between PaCO2 and ETCO2 levels in patients experiencing severe alcohol withdrawal. PMID:26730226

  6. Aldehydes in hydrothermal solution - Standard partial molal thermodynamic properties and relative stabilities at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell D.; Shock, Everett L.

    1993-01-01

    Aldehydes are common in a variety of geologic environments and are derived from a number of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. Experimental data for aqueous aldehydes were taken from the literature and used, along with parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state, to estimate standard partial molal thermodynamic data for aqueous straight-chain alkyl aldehydes at high temperatures and pressures. Examples of calculations involving aldehydes in geological environments are given, and the stability of aldehydes relative to carboxylic acids is evaluated. These calculations indicate that aldehydes may be intermediates in the formation of carboxylic acids from hydrocarbons in sedimentary basin brines and hydrothermal systems like they are in the atmosphere. The data and parameters summarized here allow evaluation of the role of aldehydes in the formation of prebiotic precursors, such as amino acids and hydroxy acids on the early Earth and in carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies.

  7. Modeling of axial vibrational control technique for CdTe VGF crystal growth under controlled cadmium partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetissov, I.; Kostikov, V.; Meshkov, V.; Sukhanova, E.; Grishechkin, M.; Belov, S.; Sadovskiy, A.

    2014-01-01

    A VGF growth setup assisted by axial vibrations of baffle submerged into CdTe melt with controlled Cd partial pressure was designed. An influence of baffle shape on flow velocity map, temperature distribution in CdTe melt and interface shape of growing crystal was analyzed by numerical simulation and physical modeling. To produce the desirable shape of crystal melt interface we slant under different angles vertical generatrix in a cylindrical disk and made chasing on faceplates of a disk. It was ascertained that a disk with conical generatrix formed more intensive convective flows from a faceplate with larger diameter. It was shown that at CdTe VGF crystal growth rate about 10 mm/h application of AVC technique made it possible to produce convex interface for 2 in. crystal diameter.

  8. Aldehydes in hydrothermal solution: standard partial molal thermodynamic properties and relative stabilities at high temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Schulte, M D; Shock, E L

    1993-01-01

    Aldehydes are common in a variety of geologic environments and are derived from a number of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. Experimental data for aqueous aldehydes were taken from the literature and used, along with parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state, to estimate standard partial molal thermodynamic data for aqueous straight-chain alkyl aldehydes at high temperatures and pressures. Examples of calculations involving aldehydes in geological environments are given, and the stability of aldehydes relative to carboxylic acids is evaluated. These calculations indicate that aldehydes may be intermediates in the formation of carboxylic acids from hydrocarbons in sedimentary basin brines and hydrothermal systems like they are in the atmosphere. The data and parameters summarized here allow evaluation of the role of aldehydes in the formation of prebiotic precursors, such as amino acids and hydroxy acids on the early Earth and in carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies. PMID:11539453

  9. Growth of GaAs from a free surface melt under controlled arsenic pressure in a partially confined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.; Wu, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A partially confined configuration for the growth of GaAs from melt in space was developed, consisting of a triangular prism containing the seed crystal and source material in the form of a rod. It is suggested that the configuration overcomes two obstacles in the growth of GaAs in space: total confinement in a quartz crucible and lack of arsenic pressure control. Ground tests of the configuration show that it is capable of crystal growth in space and is useful for studying the growth of GaAs from a free-surface melt on earth. The resulting chemical composition, electrical property variations, and phenomenological models to account for the results are presented.

  10. Improvement of crystallinity of GaN layers grown using Ga2O vapor synthesized from liquid Ga and H2O vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yohei; Taniyama, Yuuki; Takatsu, Hiroaki; Kitamoto, Akira; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Isemura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Growth methods using Ga2O vapor allow long-term growth of bulk GaN crystals. Ga2O vapor is generated by the reduction of Ga2O3 powder with H2 gas (Ga2O3–H2 process) or by the oxidation of liquid Ga with H2O vapor (Ga–H2O process). We investigated the dependence of the properties of grown GaN layers on the synthesis of Ga2O. In the Ga–H2O process, the polycrystal density and full width at half maximum (FWHM) GaN(0002) X-ray rocking curves (XRC) at a high growth rate were lower than those in the Ga2O3–H2 process, and a GaN layer with FWHM of 99 arcsec and growth rate of 216 µm/h was obtained. A low H2O partial pressure in the growth zone improved crystallinity in the Ga–H2O process, realized by the high efficiency of conversion from liquid Ga to Ga2O vapor. We concluded that using Ga2O vapor in the Ga–H2O process has the potential for obtaining higher crystallinity with high growth rate.

  11. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  12. Microwave Spectra and Structures of H_2O\\cdotsAgF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, S. L.; Walker, N. R.; Tew, D. P.; Legon, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    A Balle-Flygare FT-MW spectrometer coupled to a laser ablation source has been used to measure the pure rotational spectra of H2O\\cdotsAgF. Generation is via laser ablation (532 nm) of a silver rod in the presence of SF6, argon, a low partial pressure of H2O and the molecules are stabilized by supersonic expansion. The spectra of eight isotopologues have been measured. Rotational constants, B0 and C0, and the centrifugal distortion constant, Δ _J have been determined. Isotopic substitutions are available at the silver, oxygen and hydrogen atoms. The spectra are consistent with a linear arrangement of oxygen, silver and fluorine atoms and the structure is either C2v planar at equilibrium or CS pyramidal but with a low potential-energy barrier to planarity such that the v = 0 and 1 states associated with the motion that inverts the configuration at the O atom are well separated.

  13. Experimental determination of the H2O-undersaturated peridotite solidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafian, E. K.; Gaetani, G. A.; Hauri, E. H.; Sarafian, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the H2O-undersaturated lherzolite solidus places important constraints on the process of melt generation and mantle potential temperatures beneath oceanic spreading centers. The small concentration of H2O (~50-200 μg/g) dissolved in the oceanic mantle is thought to exert a strong influence on the peridotite solidus, but this effect has not been directly determined. The utility of existing experimental data is limited by a lack of information on the concentration of H2O dissolved in the peridotite and uncertainties involved with identifying small amounts of partial melt. We have developed an experimental approach for determining the peridotite solidus as a function of H2O content that overcomes these difficulties. Our initial results demonstrate that the solidus temperature for spinel lherzolite containing 150 μg/g H2O is higher than existing estimates for the anhydrous solidus. Our approach to determining the H2O-undersaturated lherzolite solidus is as follows. First, a small proportion (~5 %) of San Carlos olivine spheres, ~300 μm in diameter, are added to a peridotite synthesized from high-purity oxides and carbonates. Melting experiments are then conducted in pre-conditioned Au80Pd20 capsules over a range of temperatures at a single pressure using a piston-cylinder device. Water diffuses rapidly in olivine resulting in thorough equilibration between the olivine spheres and the surrounding fine-grained peridotite, and allowing the spheres to be used as hygrometers. After the experiment, the concentration of H2O dissolved in the olivine spheres is determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Melting experiments, spaced 20°C apart, were performed from 1250 to 1430°C at 1.5 GPa. The starting material has the composition of the depleted MORB mantle of Workman and Hart (2005) containing 0.13 wt% Na2O and 150 µg/g H2O. The concentration of H2O in the olivine spheres remains constant up to 1350°C, and then decreases systematically with increasing temperature. This indicates a solidus temperature of ~1360°C, which is ~25-50°C above the existing estimates for anhydrous solidus corrected for our starting composition. The H2O-undersaturated solidus indicated by our experimental results suggests that potential temperatures for the oceanic mantle are higher than current estimates.

  14. Partial Molar Volume of CO2 in Peridotitic Melt at High Pressure and Applications to Melt Mobility in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Agee, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    The partial molar volume of CO2 (VCO2) is a quantity that may be used for elucidating the role of volatiles in silicate melt at high pressure, such as magma mobility during mantle differentiation when CO2 is present. Because CO2 tends to decrease silicate melt density, its presence should cause crystal-liquid density crossovers to occur at higher pressures than for non-carbonated silicate melts with the same major element composition. Experimental data presented here are crucial to understanding the driving force of carbonated magma eruption, such as kimberlite and nephelinite, especially in the pressure range of 0-3 GPa where extreme changes are observed in the compressibility and solubility of CO2 in peridotite partial melt.High pressure, sink/float experiments were conducted on a synthetic peridotite composition with ~5 wt.% CO2 added as CaCO3 (DG-5), and no CO2 added (DG-N). The mixtures were placed in Mo capsules with two synthetic forsterite spheres or two San Carlos spheres near the top and bottom of the capsule. Experiments were run in a Walker style multi-anvil using 8 mm TEL.Using the known compressibility of the spheres, the density (ρ) of each melt was determined at neutral buoyancy pressures and temperatures using the third order Birch-Murnaghan EOS. The forsterite crossover occurred at 4.6 GPa for DG-5 (ρ=3.14 g/cm3), and 4.0 GPa for DG-N (ρ=3.12 g/cm3). The San Carlos crossover occurred at 6.1 GPa for DG-5 (ρ=3.29 g/cm3), and ~5.0 GPa for DG-N (ρ=3.26 g/cm3).The VCO2 was determined using a modified version of the Bottinga and Weill (1970) equation: ρ=Σ XiMi / XiVi, the calculated ρ, the analyzed compositions, and the assumption that CO2 remained in the melt during sink/float. Preliminary values for VCO2 are 25.35 cm3/mol at 4.3 GPa and 22.92 cm3/mol at 5.6 GPa, both corrected to 1850°C. Based on the VCO2 at 1 bar (Liu & Lange, 2003) and at 19.5 GPa (Ghosh et al., 2007), the compressibility curve for CO2 may now be better constrained. The calculated curve shows a rapid decrease in VCO2 at low pressures indicating a high compressibility in the upper mantle.Currently, we are exploring electron microprobe and FTIR transmission and reflectance methods to better quantify the CO2 in our experimental run products which contain quench crystals and small pockets of glass. We believe the assumption that CO2 remains in the melt during sink/float experiment is valid because crossover positions differ between the DG-5 and DG-N samples. However, we are investigating this assumption because CO32-, CO2 and CO are not observed in the run products with FTIR transmission and reflectance, and the microprobe results for C are ambiguous. There are several possibilities that we are testing at this time.

  15. Photochemistry of CO and H2O - Analysis of laboratory experiments and applications to the prebiotic earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Jun-Shan; Pinto, Joseph P.; Yung, Yuk L.

    1989-01-01

    The role photochemical reactions in the early earth's atmosphere played in the prebiotic synthesis of simple organic molecules was examined, extending an earlier calculation of formaldehyde production rates to more reduced carbon species, such as methanol, methane, and acetaldehyde. The experimental results of Bar-Nun and Chang (1983) are simulated as an aid in the construction of the photochemical scheme and as a way of validating the model. The results indicate that some fraction of CO2 and H2 present in the primitive atmosphere could have been converted to simple organic molecules. The exact amount is dependent on the partial pressure of CO2 and H2 in the atmosphere and on what assumptions are made concerning the shape of the absorption spectra of CO2 and H2O.

  16. Effect of organic complexing and carbon dioxide partial pressure on metal transport in low-temperature hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hennet, R.J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The study has widespread geological applications in the genesis of metal-sulfide ore deposits or the transport and deposition of base metal in active hydrothermal environments. This study also presents the chemical analysis of natural sedimentary brines with emphasis on their trace metal and trace organic content. The first chapter summarizes the experimental data collected to quantify metal-organic complexation reactions at temperature up to 90/sup 0/C, and discusses equilibrium constants extrapolation to temperature up to 200/sup 0/C. The second chapter describes some experimental observations of the effects of increased CO/sub 2/ partial pressure on the solubility of ZnS in water, and the concentrations of base metals in sedimentary brines and oils. Also discussed is the possibility of a new, potentially important, transport mechanism for base metals in reduced-sulfur bearing solutions; it consists of base metal complexation with pressure-sensitive, thiocarbonate-like molecules. Chapter 3 presents the chemical analyses of three sedimentary brines from the Central Mississippi Salt Dome Basin. Several organic molecules were identified, including acetic and formic acids. Chapter 4 presents the theory and experimental results for the measurement of lead-organic complex stability constants by two independent polarographic techniques up to 90/sup 0/C, Anodic Stripping Voltametry and Differential Pulse Polarography. Chapter 5 describes the application of /sup 207/Pb Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for measuring equilibrium constants of lead-organic complexes at high temperatures. Results are presented for equilibrium of the lead-acetate system up to 80/sup 0/C. A proposal is made for further development of NMR for direct study of chemical equilibria at high pressures and temperatures.

  17. Prediction of the critical reduced electric field strength for carbon dioxide and its mixtures with 50% O2 and 50% H2 from Boltzmann analysis for gas temperatures up to 3500 K at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides theoretical calculations that predict the dielectric breakdown properties of carbon dioxide (CO2) and its mixtures with 50% O2 and 50% H2 for a gas temperature range of 300-3500 K at 0.1 MPa. CO2 is one of the most likely candidates for an environment-friendly arc-quenching medium to replace SF6 in high-voltage circuit breakers. Initially, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is derived by solving the Boltzmann equation under the zero-dimensional two-term spherical harmonic approximation. Then the reduced ionization and attachment coefficients are obtained, based on the calculated EEDF. Finally, the critical reduced electric field strength (E/N)cr, which is defined as the value for which total ionization reactions are equal to total attachment reactions, is obtained and analysed. The results demonstrate the superior breakdown properties of a 50% CO2-50% O2 mixture to those of both pure CO2 and 50% CO2-50% H2. Nearly no deviation in (E/N)cr is found in a 50% CO2-50% O2 mixture for gas temperatures up to 2500 K, and although there is clear reduction as the gas temperature is increased further to 3500 K, the value remains higher than that of pure CO2.

  18. H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ailin; Wang, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Jianchun; Huang, Di; Xu, Tonghui; Guo, Jianqiang; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    H2S is produced mainly by two enzymes:cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), using L-cysteine (L-Cys) as the substrate. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in gastric accommodation using CBS+/− mice, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, methylene blue assay, intragastric pressure (IGP) recording and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Mouse gastric fundus expressed H2S-generating enzymes (CBS and CSE) and generated detectable amounts of H2S. The H2S donor, NaHS or L-Cys, caused a relaxation in either gastric fundus or body. The gastric compliance was significantly increased in the presence of L-Cys (1 mM). On the contrary, AOAA, an inhibitor for CBS, largely inhibited gastric compliance. Consistently, CBS+/− mice shows a lower gastric compliance. However, PAG, a CSE inhibitor, had no effect on gastric compliances. L-Cys enhances the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of fundus strips, but AOAA reduces the magnitude of relaxations to EFS. Notably, the expression level of CBS but not CSE protein was elevated after feeding. Consistently, the production of H2S was also increased after feeding in mice gastric fundus. In addition, AOAA largely reduced food intake and body weight in mice. Furthermore, a metabolic aberration of H2S was found in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). In conclusion, endogenous H2S, a novel gasotransmitter, involves in gastric accommodation. PMID:26531221

  19. Simutaneous adsorption of CO2 and H2O under Mars-like conditions and application to the evolution of the Martian climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Quinn, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    The Martian regolith is the most substantial volatile reservoir on the planet; estimates of its adsorbed inventory have been based on simple measurements of the adsorption of either water or CO2 in isolation. Under some conditions, H2O can poison adsorbate surfaces, such that CO2 uptake is greatly reduced. We have made the first measurements of the simultaneous adsorption of CO2 and H2O under conditions appropriate to the Martian regolith and have found that at H2O monolayer coverage above about 0.5, CO2 begins to be displaced into the gas phase. We have developed an empirical expression that describes our co-adsorption data and have applied it to standard models of the Martian regolith. We find that currently, H2O does not substantially displace CO2, implying that the adsorbate inventories previously derived may be accurate, not more than 3-4 kPa (30-40 mbar). No substantial increase in atmospheric pressure is predicted at higher obliquities because high-latitude ground ice buffers the partial pressure of H2O in the pores, preventing high monolayer coverages of H2O from displacing CO2. The peak atmospheric pressure at high obliquity does increase as the total inventory of exchangeable CO2 increases.

  20. Simultaneous adsorption of CO2 and H2O under Mars-like conditions and application to the evolution of the Martian climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron, P.; Quinn, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    The Martian regolith is the most substantial volatile reservoir on the planet; estimates of its adsorbed inventory have been based on simple measurements of the adsorption of either water or CO2 in isolation. Under some conditions, H2O can poison adsorbate surfaces, such that CO2 uptake is greatly reduced. We have made the first measurements of the simultaneous adsorption of CO2 and H2O under conditions appropriate to the Martian regolith and have found that at H2O monolayer coverage above about 0.5, CO2 begins to be displaced into the gas phase. We have developed an empirical expression that describes our co-adsorption data and have applied it to standard models of the Martian regolith. We find that currently, H2O does not substantially displace CO, implying that the adsorbate inventories previously derived may be accurate, not more than 3-4 kPa (30-40 mbar). No substantial increase in atmospheric pressure is predicted at higher obliquities because high-latitude ground ice buffers the partial pressure of H2O in the pores, preventing high monolayer coverages of H2O from displacing CO2. The peak atmospheric pressure at high obliquity does increase as the total inventory of exchangeable CO2 increases.

  1. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkova, Natalia N.; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50–70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200–2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  2. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 ?M, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  3. End-tidal arterial CO2 partial pressure gradient in patients with severe hypercapnia undergoing noninvasive ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Defilippis, Vito; D’Antini, Davide; Cinnella, Gilda; Dambrosio, Michele; Schiraldi, Fernando; Procacci, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with severe hypercapnia represent a particularly serious condition in an emergency department (ED), requiring immediate attention. Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an integral part of the treatment for acute respiratory failure. The present study aimed to validate the measurement of end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) as a noninvasive technique to evaluate the effectiveness of NIV in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Methods Twenty consecutive patients admitted to the ED with severe dyspnea were enrolled in the study. NIV by means of bilevel positive airway pressure, was applied to the patients simultaneously with standard medical therapy and continued for 12 hours; the arterial blood gases and side-stream nasal/oral EtCO2 were measured at subsequent times: T0 (admission to the ED), T1h (after 1 hour), T6h (after 6 hours), and T12h (after 12 hours) during NIV treatment. Results The arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2)–EtCO2 gradient decreased progressively, reaching at T6h and T12h values lower than baseline (P < 0.001), while arterial pH increased during the observation period (P < 0.001). A positive correlation was found between EtCO2 and PaCO2 values (r = 0.89, P < 0.001) at the end of the observation period. Conclusion In our hypercapnic patients, the effectiveness of the NIV was evidenced by the progressive reduction of the PaCO2–EtCO2 gradient. The measurement of the CO2 gradient could be a reliable method in monitoring the effectiveness of NIV in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the ED.

  4. New fundamental equations of thermodynamics for systems in chemical equilibrium at a specified partial pressure of a reactant and the standard transformed formation properties of reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Alberty, R.A.; Oppenheim, I. )

    1993-06-01

    When temperature, pressure, and the partial pressure of a reactant are fixed, the criterion of chemical equilibrium can be expressed in terms of the transformed Gibbs energy [ital G][prime] that is obtained by using a Legendre transform involving the chemical potential of the reactant that is fixed. For reactions of ideal gases, the most natural variables to use in the fundamental equation are [ital T], [ital P][prime], and [ital P][sub [ital B

  5. Nitriding of titanium and its alloys by N2, NH3 or mixtures of N2 + H2 in a dc arc plasma at low pressures ( or = to torr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, R.

    1984-01-01

    The dc glow discharges in different gas mixtures of Ar + N2, Ar + NH3 or Ar + N2 + H2 result in the surface nitriding of Ti metal and its alloy (Ti6Al4V). Various gas mixtures were used in order to establish the main active species governing the nitriding process, i.e., N, N2, NH, or NH2 as excited or ionized particles. The dc discharge was sampled and analyzed by quadruple mass spectrometry (QPMS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and the nitrided samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an EDAX attachment, microhardness, and Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectrometry (FTIR). It was found that the excited and ionized nitrogen and hydrogen atoms are the main species responsible for the nitriding process in a dc glow discharge.

  6. Investigations on tailoring the deposition conditions in HIPIMS by varying the pulse durations and the argon partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, M.; Fenker, M.

    2012-09-01

    In most cases HIPIMS is used to get the highest possible ionisation of the deposition particles, which is realised by pulse durations with short on- and very long off-times. These conditions are combined with a more or less pronounced decrease in deposition rate. In this work the pulse configuration has been varied. A three dimensional matrix of parameters was spanned, made of 3 on- and 3 off-times at 4 argon partial pressures. The average power was kept constant and the data achieved were additionally compared to DC-magnetron sputtering. The experiments were carried out using 50 mm diameter targets made of Ti, powered by a MELEC SPIK1000A pulser unit. The deposition rate was measured by quartz microbalance mounted in front of the target. Peak current density and target voltage were recorded and time averaged optical emission spectroscopy (t.a.OES) measurements provided information about the ionisation conditions in the plasma. The results of the data analysis provide a coherent overview of the impact of the HIPIMS parameters as well as of their complex interrelations.

  7. Climate-independent paleoaltimetry using stomatal density in fossil leaves as a proxy for CO2 partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2004-12-01

    Existing methods for determining paleoelevation are primarily limited by (1) large errors (±450 m), (2) a reliance on incorrect assumptions that lapse rates in terrestrial temperature decrease with altitude in a globally predictable manner, and/or (3) are inherently climate dependent. Here I present a novel paleoelevation tool, based on a predictable, globally conserved decrease in CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) with altitude, as indicated by increased stomatal frequency of plant leaves. The approach was validated using historical populations of black oak (Quercus kelloggii). These analyses demonstrate highly significant inverse relationships between stomatal frequency and pCO2 (r2 > 0.73), independent of ecological or local climatic variability. As such, this is the first paleobotanical method to be globally applicable and independent of long-term Cenozoic climate change. Further, tests on modern leaves of known elevations indicate that species-specific application to the fossil record of Q. kelloggii (= Q. pseudolyrata) will yield paleoelevation estimates within average errors of ˜±300 m, representing a significant improvement in accuracy over the majority of existing methods.

  8. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue.

    PubMed

    Sakadzić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Mandeville, Emiri T; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Boas, David A

    2010-09-01

    Measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO(2) measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here we report to our knowledge the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO(2) measurements in small rodents' cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 microm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. The properties of the probe allowed for direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO(2), opening many possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  9. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure oxygen partial pressure (pO2) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO2 measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here, we report the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO2 measurements in small rodents’ cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 µm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. Most importantly, the properties of the probe allowed for the first direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO2, opening numerous possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  10. CO partial pressure dependence of the kinetics of melting of HbS aggregates studied in high concentration phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    2002-10-01

    Deoxygenated sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) monomers enter the polymer phase either by incorporation into a critical nucleus, through heterogeneous nucleation and or through linear growth of the polymers when the concentration of monomers exceeds the solubility. CO-bound, R-state HbS monomers do not polymerize. Thus, polymer melting is enhanced by binding of carbon monoxide (CO) to HbS polymerized monomers. In our study, the melting of HbS aggregates mediated by dilution and CO binding to polymerized monomers is observed with time-resolved extinction spectroscopy. The CO partial pressure (pCO) dependence of the kinetics of melting is studied for pCO = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 atm with difference progress curves. A phenomenological description with slow and fast relaxation modes reveals a variable relaxation time near the pCO=0.5 due to competition of kinetic mechanisms. The slow component increases with increasing pCO. It has a positive intercept due to the combined action of dilution of the sample and CO-ligation. The pCO dependence is near linear due to non-cooperative CO binding. Significant slowing down of aged samples, most likely due to gelation, is observed. As possible mechanism for variable relaxation time near pCO=0.5atm the fractional percolation threshold is discussed. This work was supported by NIH grant HL58091 (awarded to Daniel. B. Kim-Shapiro).

  11. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I: Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A.; Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active, epipelagic squid known to undertake diel vertical migrations across a large temperature and oxygen gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Hypoxia is known to cause metabolic suppression in D. gigas. However, the precise oxygen level at which metabolic suppression sets in is unknown. Here we describe a novel ship-board swim tunnel respirometer that was used to measure metabolic rates and critical oxygen partial pressures (Pcrit) for adult squids (2-7kg). Metabolic rate measurements were validated by comparison to the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mantle muscle tissue (2-17kg). We recorded a mean routine metabolic rate of 5.91μmolg-1h-1 at 10°C and 12.62μmolg-1h-1 at 20°C. A temperature coefficient, Q10, of 2.1 was calculated. D. gigas had Pcrits of 1.6 and 3.8kPa at 10 and 20°C, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate (MO2) varied with body mass (M) according to MO2=11.57M-0.12±0.03 at 10°C. Citrate synthase activity varied with body mass according to Y=9.32M-0.19±0.02.

  12. H2 distribution during the formation of multiphase molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gérin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Context. H2 is the simplest and the most abundant molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM), and its formation precedes the formation of other molecules. Aims: Understanding the dynamical influence of the environment and the interplay between the thermal processes related to the formation and destruction of H2 and the structure of the cloud is mandatory to understand correctly the observations of H2. Methods: We performed high-resolution magnetohydrodynamical colliding-flow simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES in which the physics of H2 has been included. We compared the simulation results with various observations of the H2 molecule, including the column densities of excited rotational levels. Results: As a result of a combination of thermal pressure, ram pressure, and gravity, the clouds produced at the converging point of HI streams are highly inhomogeneous. H2 molecules quickly form in relatively dense clumps and spread into the diffuse interclump gas. This in particular leads to the existence of significant abundances of H2 in the diffuse and warm gas that lies in between clumps. Simulations and observations show similar trends, especially for the HI-to-H2 transition (H2 fraction vs. total hydrogen column density). Moreover, the abundances of excited rotational levels, calculated at equilibrium in the simulations, turn out to be very similar to the observed abundances inferred from FUSE results. This is a direct consequence of the presence of the H2 enriched diffuse and warm gas. Conclusions: Our simulations, which self-consistently form molecular clouds out of the diffuse atomic gas, show that H2 rapidly forms in the dense clumps and, due to the complex structure of molecular clouds, quickly spreads at lower densities. Consequently, a significant fraction of warm H2 exists in the low-density gas. This warm H2 leads to column densities of excited rotational levels close to the observed ones and probably reveals the complex intermix between the warm and cold gas in molecular clouds. This suggests that the two-phase structure of molecular clouds is an essential ingredient for fully understanding molecular hydrogen in these objects.

  13. Effects of Temperature, Oxygen Partial Pressure, and Materials Selection on Slag Infiltration into Porous Refractories for Entrained-Flow Gasifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tetsuya Kenneth

    The penetration rate of molten mineral contents (slag) from spent carbonaceous feedstock into porous ceramic-oxide refractory linings is a critical parameter in determining the lifecycle of integrated gasification combined cycle energy production plants. Refractory linings that withstand longer operation without interruption are desirable because they can mitigate consumable and maintenance costs. Although refractory degradation has been extensively studied for many other high-temperature industrial processes, this work focuses on the mechanisms that are unique to entrained-flow gasification systems. The use of unique feedstock mixtures, temperatures from 1450 °C to 1600 °C, and oxygen partial pressures from 10-7 atm to 10-9 atm pose engineering challenges in designing an optimal refractory material. Experimentation, characterization, and modeling show that gasifier slag infiltration into porous refractory is determined by interactions between the slag and the refractory that either form a physical barrier that impedes fluid flow or induce an increased fluid viscosity that decelerates the velocity of the fluid body. The viscosity of the slag is modified by the thermal profile of the refractory along the penetration direction as well as reactions between the slag and refractory that alter the chemistry, and thereby the thermo-physical properties of the fluid. Infiltration experiments reveal that the temperature gradient inherently present along the refractory lining limits penetration. A refractory in near-isothermal conditions demonstrates deeper slag penetration as compared to one that experiences a steeper thermal profile. The decrease in the local temperatures of the slag as it travels deeper into the refractory increases the viscosity of the fluid, which in turn slows the infiltration velocity of fluid body into the pores of the refractory microstructure. With feedstock mixtures that exhibit high iron-oxide concentrations, a transition-metal-oxide, the oxygen partial pressure of the operating atmosphere regulates the penetration of slag into refractory. The viscosity of the slag, which dictates its penetration rate, is influenced by the oxidation state of the Fe cation. Slag penetrations are shallower in oxidizing conditions than they are in reducing conditions because the iron-oxide from the slag solutions into the corundum-structured refractory and the slag is depleted of iron-oxide, increasing the viscosity of slags. Equally, the chemistries of both the refractory and slag materials dictate the course of penetration. Cr2O3-Al2O3 refractory limits mixed feedstock slag penetration through formation of a chromium spinel layer that functions as a physical obstacle against fluid flow. Al2O 3-SiO2 refractory limits eastern coal feedstock slag penetration as a result of refractory dissolution of SiO2, which increases the viscosity of slags. A physical model, which considers unidirectional fluid flow of slag through each pore of the porous microstructure of the refractory, sufficiently approximates the penetration depth of the slag into the refractory. Agreement between experiments and the physical model demonstrates that the slag is driven into the refractory by capillary pressure. Since the viscosity of the slag continuously changes as the slag travels through the inherent temperature gradient of the refractory lining, the model incorporates dynamic viscosities that are dependent on both temperature and composition to project depths that are unique to the experimental parameters. The significantly different length scales of the radial and penetration directions of the pores allows for the application of a lubrication approximation onto the momentum equation. This process produces an analytical solution that effectively envelopes the variable viscosity into a single term.

  14. Effects of ambient and acute partial pressures of ozone on leaf net CO sub 2 assimilation of field-grown Vitis vinifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, T.R.; Williams, L.E. Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier, CA )

    1989-12-01

    Mature, field-grown Vitis vinifera L. grapevines grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered air or ambient ozone partial pressures throughout the growing season. Individual leaves also were exposed to ozone partial pressures of 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 micropascals per pascal for 5 hours. No visual ozone damage was found on leaves exposed to any of the treatments. Chronic exposure to ambient O{sub 3} partial pressures reduced net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate (A) between 5 and 13% at various times throughout the season when compared to the filtered treatment. Exposure of leaves to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} for 5 hours had no significant effect on A; however, A was reduced 84% for leaves exposed to 0.6 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls after 5 hours. Intercellular CO{sub 2} partial pressure (c{sub i}) was lower for leaves exposed to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls, while c{sub i} of the leaves treated with 0.6 micropascals per pascal of O{sub 3} increased during the fumigation. The long-term effects of ambient O{sub 3} and short-term exposure to acute levels of O{sub 3} reduced grape leaf photosynthesis due to a reduction in both stomatal and mesophyll conductances.

  15. Observed increase in springtime surface partial pressure of CO2 in the east equatorial Indian Ocean during 1962-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L.; Yu, W.; Wang, H.; Feng, L.; Wei, Q.; Ning, C.

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly rising atmospheric CO2 and global warming may have been impacting the ocean, and, in contrast, the response of surface CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the equatorial Indian Ocean is poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the variation of springtime sea surface pCO2 in the east equatorial Indian Ocean (5° N to 5° S along 90° E and 95° E, EIO), which is relatively better occupied, using data collected in May 2012, together with the historical data since 1962 (LDEO_Database_V2012). Results showed that sea surface pCO2 in the investigation area increased from ~308 μatm in April 1963, through ~373 μatm in May 1999, to ~387μatm in May 2012, with a mean increase rate of ~1.7μatm yr-1. Given that the EIO during the study period was almost always a CO2 source to the atmosphere, it was obvious that the observed increase of sea surface pCO2 with time in this region was not due to the local uptake of CO2 via air-sea exchange, although quickly increasing atmospheric CO2 had the potential to increase seawater pCO2. Further, we checked the effects of variations in sea surface temperature, salinity, mixed layer depth and chlorophyll a (as a proxy of biological production) on surface pCO2. We found surface ocean warming partially contributed to sea surface pCO2 increase, whereas the effects of salinity, mixed layer depth, and biological activity were not significant. The pCO2 increase in the equatorial waters (CO2 source to the atmosphere) was probably due to the transport of carbon accumulated in the CO2 sink region (to the atmosphere) towards the CO2 source region on a basin scale via ocean circulation. Additionally, our study showed that more and more release of CO2 from the ocean to the atmosphere and big pH reduction (0.07 pH units) in the past 50 yr (from 1963 to 2012) may have occurred in the EIO. It also demonstrated that ocean acidification may have taken place in the global ocean, not just limited to the CO2 sink region.

  16. Effects of occlusal rest design on pressure distribution beneath the denture base of a distal extension removable partial denture-an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hanako; Kubo, Kei; Hosokawa, Ryoichi; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pressure distribution beneath the denture bases of removable partial dentures (RPDs) with different occlusal rest designs (ORDs) by in vivo measurement. Four types of detachable occlusal rests (mesial and distal, distal, mesial, and nonrest) were placed on the direct abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs in four patients with free-end edentulous mandibles. Pressure measurements were obtained by using thin and flexible tactile sensors. The results showed significant variances with different ORDs in all four patients (P < .05), leading to the conclusion that the pressure distribution on the residual ridge beneath the RPD base was dependent on the ORD. PMID:25191891

  17. Long-Term Stroke Risk Due to Partial White-Coat or Masked Hypertension Based on Home and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurements: The Ohasama Study.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Michihiro; Asayama, Kei; Kikuya, Masahiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Metoki, Hirohito; Hosaka, Miki; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Obara, Taku; Ishiguro, Aya; Murakami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ayako; Yasui, Daisaku; Murakami, Takahisa; Mano, Nariyasu; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic significance of white-coat hypertension (WCHT) is controversial, and different findings on self-measured home measurements and 24-h ambulatory monitoring make identifying WCHT difficult. We examined whether individuals with partially or completely defined WCHT, as well as masked hypertension, as determined by different out-of-office blood pressure measurements, have a distinct long-term stroke risk. We followed 1464 participants (31.8% men; mean age, 60.6±10.8 years) in the general population of Ohasama, Japan, for a median of 17.1 years. A first stroke occurred in 212 subjects. Using sustained normal blood pressure (events/n=61/776) as a reference, adjusted hazard ratios for stroke (95% confidence intervals; events/n) were 1.38 (0.82-2.32; 19/137) for complete WCHT (isolated office hypertension), 2.16 (1.36-3.43; 29/117) for partial WCHT (either home or ambulatory normotension with office hypertension), 2.05 (1.24-3.41; 23/100) for complete masked hypertension (both home and ambulatory hypertension with office normotension), 2.08 (1.37-3.16; 38/180) for partial masked hypertension (either home or ambulatory hypertension with office normotension), and 2.46 (1.61-3.77; 42/154) for sustained hypertension. When partial WCHT and partial masked hypertension groups were further divided into participants only with home hypertension and those only with ambulatory hypertension, all subgroups had a significantly higher stroke risk (adjusted hazard ratio ≥1.84, P≤0.04). In conclusion, impacts of partial WCHT as well as partial masked hypertension for long-term stroke risk were comparable to those of complete masked hypertension or sustained hypertension. We need both home and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements to evaluate stroke risk accurately. PMID:26527046

  18. Structural polymorphism in the L1 loop regions of human H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Sato, Koichi; Shimada, Keisuke; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Iwasaki, Wakana; Kagawa, Wataru; Harata, Masahiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The histone H2A.Z variant is widely conserved among eukaryotes. Two isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified in vertebrates and may have distinct functions in cell growth and gene expression. However, no structural differences between H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 have been reported. In the present study, the crystal structures of nucleosomes containing human H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 were determined. The structures of the L1 loop regions were found to clearly differ between H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, although their amino-acid sequences in this region are identical. This structural polymorphism may have been induced by a substitution that evolutionally occurred at the position of amino acid 38 and by the flexible nature of the L1 loops of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2. It was also found that in living cells nucleosomal H2A.Z.1 exchanges more rapidly than H2A.Z.2. A mutational analysis revealed that the amino-acid difference at position 38 is at least partially responsible for the distinctive dynamics of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2. These findings provide important new information for understanding the differences in the regulation and functions of H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 in cells. PMID:24311584

  19. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and 13C content of north temperate and boreal lakes at spring ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Kortelainen, P.; Chanton, J.P.; Wickland, K.P.; Bugna, G.C.; Rantakari, M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulates under lake ice in winter and degasses to the atmosphere after ice melt. This large springtime CO2 pulse is not typically considered in surface-atmosphere flux estimates, because most field studies have not sampled through ice during late winter. Measured CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of lake surface water ranged from 8.6 to 4,290 Pa (85-4,230 ??atm) in 234 north temperate and boreal lakes prior to ice melt during 1998 and 1999. Only four lakes had surface pCO2 less than or equal to atmospheric pCO2, whereas 75% had pCO2 >5 times atmospheric. The ??13CDIC (DIC = ??CO2) of 142 of the lakes ranged from -26.28??? to +0.95.???. Lakes with the greatest pCO2 also had the lightest ??13CDIC, which indicates respiration as their primary CO2 source. Finnish lakes that received large amounts of dissolved organic carbon from surrounding peatlands had the greatest pCO2. Lakes set in noncarbonate till and bedrock in Minnesota and Wisconsin had the smallest pCO2 and the heaviest ??13CDIC, which indicates atmospheric and/or mineral sources of C for those lakes. Potential emissions for the period after ice melt were 2.36 ?? 1.44 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with average pCO2 values and were as large as 13.7 ?? 8.4 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with high pCO2 values.

  20. Microstructure, mechanical and optical properties of TiAlON coatings sputter-deposited with varying oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalk, Nina; Thierry Simonet Fotso, J. F.; Holec, David; Fian, Alexander; Jakopic, Georg; Terziyska, Velislava L.; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Due to their excellent mechanical and optical properties as well as chemical stability, the synthesis of transition metal oxynitride thin films has attracted growing interest in the last years. Within this work, the evolution of the structure and properties of TiAlON coatings over a wide compositional range, from the nitride to the oxide side, was investigated. The coatings were grown on Si substrates in a laboratory-scale unbalanced magnetron dc sputtering system from powder metallurgical TiAl targets with an Al/Ti atomic ratio of 60/40, using a constant level of nitrogen with rising oxygen partial pressure. Coating composition and microstructure were investigated by energy- and wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the mechanical and optical properties were evaluated using nanoindentation and spectroscopic ellipsometry, respectively. Oxygen concentrations of up to 49 at.% within the films could be obtained, at the expense of the nitrogen content. The oxygen-free coating exhibited a single-phase fcc-Ti1-x Al x N structure. With increasing oxygen content the structure remained fcc-Ti1-x Al x N based, but additional fractions of amorphous oxides were formed. The structural evolution was corroborated by ab initio calculations. Decreasing coating hardness could be observed with increasing oxygen concentration. The refraction index and extinction coefficient were lower for coatings with higher oxygen content, but the behavior of the optical properties remained Ti1-x Al x N-like over the investigated spectral range.

  1. Residual oxygen time model for oxygen partial pressure near 130 kPa (1.3 atm).

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    A two-part residual oxygen time model predicts the probability of detectible pulmonary oxygen toxicity P(P[O2tox]) after dives with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) approximately 130 kPa, and provides a tool to plan dive series with selected risk of P[O2tox]. Data suggest that pulmonary oxygen injury at this PO2 is additive between dives. Recovery begins after a delay and continues during any following dive. A logistic relation expresses P(P[O2tox]) as a function of dive duration (T(dur)) [hours]: P(P[O2tox]) = 100/[1+exp (3.586-0.49 x T(dur))] This expression maps T(dur) to P(P[O2tox]) or, in the linear mid-portion of the curve, P(P[O2tox]) usefully to T(dur). For multiple dives or during recovery, it maps to an equivalent dive duration, T(eq). T(eq) was found after second dives of duration T(dur 2). Residual time from the first dive t(r) = T(eq) - T(dur2). With known t(r), t and T(dur) a recovery model was fitted. t(r) = T(dur) x exp [-k x((t-5)/T(dur)2], where t = t - 5 hours, k = 0.149 for resting, and 0.047 for exercising divers, and t represents time after surfacing. The fits were assessed for 1,352 man-dives. Standard deviations of the residuals were 8.5% and 18.3% probability for resting or exercise dives, respectively. PMID:26742255

  2. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on protein synthesis and collagen hydroxylation by mature periodontal tissues maintained in organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Edwin H. K.; Sodek, Jaro; Melcher, Antony H.

    1979-01-01

    Mature periodontal tissues from adult-mouse first mandibular molars were cultured in a continuous-flow organ-culture system which allowed the regulation of both ascorbic acid concentration and pO2 (oxygen partial pressure). Protein synthesis was measured by analysing the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenous and non-collagenous proteins during the last 24h of a 2-day culture. At low pO2 [16.0kPa (approx. 120mmHg)] approx. 60% of protein-incorporated [3H]proline was found in collagenous proteins. However, it was evident that this collagen was considerably underhydroxylated. At high pO2 [56.0kPa (approx. 420mmHg)], both the amount of collagen deposited in the tissues and the degree of hydroxylation were increased considerably. In contrast, no significant effect on non-collagenous protein was observed. Tissues cultured at low pO2 for the first 48h were unable to respond to a subsequent increase in pO2 during the last 24h. Analysis of pepsin-solubilized collagen α-chains labelled with [14C]glycine demonstrated the synthesis of both type-I and type-III collagens by explants cultured for 48h at high pO2. Type-III collagen comprised 20–30% of the radioactivity in α-chains in both the periodontal ligament and the tissues of the alveolar process. The pattern of protein synthesis in the alveolar tissues at high pO2 was similar to that observed in these tissues in vivo. However, in the cultured periodontal ligament the proportions of non-collagenous proteins and type-III collagens were increased in comparison with the tissue in vivo. PMID:454369

  3. Value of measuring end tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide as an adjunct to treadmill exercise testing

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John B; Kiff, Peter J; Gardner, William N; Jackson, Graham; Bass, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    The end tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2) was measured during treadmill exercise in 30 normal controls and 113 patients referred for assessment of chest pain. Among the 92 patients without significant ST depression hypocapnia occurred more often in those reporting typical than atypical chest pain (17 of 22 patients compared with 29 of 70; p<001). Hypocapnia was uncommon in patients with significant ST depression whether reporting typical or atypical chest pain (one of 10 patients and two of 11, respectively). Hypocapnia at rest (Pco2 <4 kPa) occurred in 16 (14%) patients but in only one control. Hypocapnia occurred during or after exercise in only one control and three of the 21 patients with significant ST depression on exercise (group 1). The remaining 92 patients were divided into those with a history suggestive of hyperventilation (group 2; n=30) and those without (group 3; n=62). Hypocapnia developed significantly more often in both these groups (21 and 25 patients respectively) than in controls or patients with significant ST depression. An abnormal response of the Pco2 to exercise provided objective data to support a clinical suspicion of chest pain induced by hyperventilation in 24 cases, suggested a cause for equivocal ST depression other than coronary stenosis in five patients, and led to the diagnosis of previously unsuspected respiratory disease in 14 patients. Measurement of end tidal Pco2 gives additional valuable diagnostic information during the conventional treadmill exercise test in patients with both typical and atypical chest pain. PMID:3133051

  4. Two-stage high-rate biogas (H2 and CH4) production from food waste using anaerobic mixed microflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Lee, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Ebie, Y.; Li, Y.; Inamori, Y.

    2010-12-01

    To achieve the high-rate H2 and CH4 production from food waste using fermentative anaerobic microflora, the effects of carbonate-alkalinity in the recirculated digestion sludge on continuous two-stage fermentation were investigated. Higher H2 production rate of 2.9 L-H2/L/day was achieved at the recycle ratio of 1.0 in an alkalinity range of 9000 to 10000 mg-CaCO3/L. The maximum CH4 production rate was stably maintained at the range of 1.85 to 1.88 L-CH4/L/day without alkalinity change. Carbonate alkalinity in digestion sludge could reduce the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the fermentation reactors, and improve a biogas production capacity in the two-stage fermentation process. The average volatile solids degradation rate in the overall process increased as the digestion sludge recycle increased from 0.5 to 1.0. These results show that the alkalinity in recycle of the digestion sludge is crucial factor in determining biogas (H2 and CH4) production capacity and reducing the total solids.

  5. 42 CFR 52h.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 52h.2 Section 52h.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW OF RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATIONS AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT PROJECTS § 52h.2 Definitions. As used in this part: (a) Act means the Public Health...

  6. Thermodynamics of Silicon-Hydroxide Formation in H2O Containing Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of volatile silicon-hydroxide species from SiO2 in water containing atmospheres has been identified as a potentially important mode of degradation of Si-based ceramics. Availability of thermodynamic data for these species is a major problem. This study is part of an ongoing effort to obtain reliable, experimentally determined thermodynamic data for these species. The transpiration method was used to measure the pressure of Si-containing vapor in equilibrium with SiO2 (cristobalite) and Ar + H2O(g) with various mole fractions of water vapor, X(sub H2O), at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1780 K. Enthalpies and entropies for the reaction, SiO2(s) + 2H2O(g) = Si(OH)4(g), were obtained, at X(sub H2O) = 0.15 and 0.37, from the variation of lnK with 1/T according to the 'second law method'. The following data were obtained: delta(H)deg = 52.9 +/- 3.7 kJ/mole and delta(S)deg = -68.6 +/- 2.5 J/mole K at an average temperature of 1550 K, and delta(H)deg = 52.5+/-2.0 kJ/mole and delta(S)deg= -69.7 +/- 1.5 J/moleK at an average temperature of 1384 K, for X(sub H2O)= 0.15 and 0.37, respectively. These data agree with results from the literature obtained at an average temperature of 1600 K, and strongly suggest Si(OH)4(g) is the dominant vapor species. Contradictory results were obtained with the determination of the dependence of Si-containing vapor pressure on the partial pressure of water vapor at 1187 and 1722 K. These results suggested the Si-containing vapor could be a mixture of Si(OH)4 + SiO(OH)2. Further pressure dependent studies are in progress to resolve these issues.

  7. Multiple emissive triarylborane-A2H2 and triarylborane-Zn-A2H2 porphyrin conjugates.

    PubMed

    P, Chinna Ayya Swamy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-03-21

    Triarylborane-A2H2 (1) and triarylborane-Zn-A2H2 porphyrins (2) have been synthesized by acid catalyzed condensation of 4-dimesitylboryl-benzaldehyde and dipyrromethane under ambient conditions. Compounds 1 and 2 showed multiple emission bands upon excitation at the triarylborane dominated absorption region (350 nm). Detailed experimental and computational studies show that the multiple emission features of 1 and 2 arise as a result of a partial energy transfer from the donor (triarylborane) to the acceptor (porphyrin) moieties. Compounds 1 and 2 showed very high selectivities towards fluoride ions compared to other competing anions. PMID:26859387

  8. Experimental determination of the solubility of natural wollastonite in pure water up to pressures of 5 GPa and at temperatures of 400-800 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fockenberg, Thomas; Burchard, Michael; Maresch, Walter V.

    2006-04-01

    The solubility of natural, near-end-member wollastonite-I (>99.5% CaSiO 3) has been determined at temperatures from 400 to 800 C and pressures between 0.8 and 5 GPa in piston-cylinder apparatus with the weight-loss method. Chemical analysis of quench products and optical monitoring in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell demonstrates that no additional phases form during dissolution. Wollastonite-I, therefore, dissolves congruently in the pressure-temperature range investigated. The solubility of CaSiO 3 varies between 0.175 and 13.485 wt% and increases systematically with both temperature and pressure up to 3.0 GPa. Above 3.0 GPa wollastonite-I reacts rapidly to the high-pressure modification wollastonite-II. No obvious trends are evident in the solubility of wollastonite-II, with values between 1.93 and 10.61 wt%. The systematics of wollastonite-I solubility can be described well by a composite polynomial expression that leads to isothermal linear correlation with the density of water. The molality of dissolved wollastonite-I in pure water is then log(mwoll)=2.2288-3418.23T-1+671386.84T-2+log?(5.4578+2359.11T-1). By combining the present experimental data with literature data on the solubility of quartz (Manning, C.E., Boettcher, S.L., 1994. Rapid-quench hydrothermal experiments at mantle pressures and temperatures. Am. Mineral. 79, 1153-1158.) and wollastonite-I + quartz (Xie, Z., Walther, J.V., 1993b. Wollastonite + quartz solubility in supercritical NaCl aqueous solutions. Am. J. Sci. 293, 235-255.) in pure water, an analogous expression can be derived for the solubility of wollastonite in quartz-saturated aqueous solution as follows: log(mwoll)=2.5930-3660.98T-1+671402.32T-2+log?(-1.3609+6775.13T-1).(all temperatures are inC) This expression adequately describes wollastonite-I solubility between 0.2-3 GPa and 300-800 C.

  9. Permeance of H2 through porous graphene from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2013-12-01

    A recent experiment (Koenig et al., 2012 [15]) demonstrated the capability of porous graphene as one-atom-thin membrane to separate gases by molecular sieving. A quantitative connection between the measured leak rate and the simulated gas permeance has yet to be established. Using H2 as a model gas, here we determine its permeance through porous graphene from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Trajectories are used to directly obtain H2 flux, pressure drop across the graphene membrane, and subsequently, H2 permeance. The permeance is determined to be on the order of 105 GPU (gas permeance unit) for pressure driving forces ranging from 2 to 163 atm. By relating to the experimental leak rate, we then use the permeation data to estimate the pore density in the experimentally created porous graphene.

  10. Measurements of seismic attenuation and transient fluid pressure in partially saturated Berea sandstone: evidence of fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz

    2013-10-01

    A novel laboratory technique is proposed to investigate wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale as a mechanism for seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks. This technique combines measurements of seismic attenuation in the frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz with measurements of transient fluid pressure as a response of a step stress applied on top of the sample. We used a Berea sandstone sample partially saturated with water. The laboratory results suggest that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale is dominant in partially saturated samples. A 3-D numerical model representing the sample was used to verify the experimental results. Biot's equations of consolidation were solved with the finite-element method. Wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale was the only attenuation mechanism accounted for in the numerical solution. The numerically calculated transient fluid pressure reproduced the laboratory data. Moreover, the numerically calculated attenuation, superposed to the frequency-independent matrix anelasticity, reproduced the attenuation measured in the laboratory in the partially saturated sample. This experimental-numerical fit demonstrates that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale and matrix anelasticity are the dominant mechanisms for seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone.

  11. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  12. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1-β1-α2-β2-α3-αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {(1)H}-(15)N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27-34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  13. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  14. [Partial pressure of CO2 and CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou and Xiaolangdi Station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-ling; Yang, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    According to periodic sampling analysis per month in Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station from November 2011 to October 2012, combined with continuous sampling analysis of Xiaolangdi Reservoir during runoff and sediment control period in 2012, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface water were calculated based on Henry's Law, pCO2 features and air-water CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou station and Xiaolangdi station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir were studied. The results were listed as follows, when Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, pCO2 in surface water of Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station varied from 82 to 195 Pa and from 99 to 228 Pa, moreover, pCO2 in surface water from July to September were distinctly higher than those in other months; meanwhile, pCO, in surface water from Huayuankou station were higher than that from Xiaolangdi station. During runoff and sediment control period of Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations commonly indicated that pCO2 in surface water during water draining were obviously lower than those during sediment releasing. Whether in the period of normal operation or runoff and sediment control, pCO2 in surface water had positive relations to DIC content in two hydrological stations. Since the EpCO,/AOU value was higher than the theoretical value of 0. 62, the biological aerobic respiration effect had distinct contribution to pCO2. Throughout the whole year, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes from Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station were 0.486 p.mol (m2 s) -l and 0.588 pmol (m2 x s)(-1) respectively; When Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, air-water CO, degassing fluxes in Huayuankou station were higher than that in Xiaolangdi station; during runoff and sediment control from Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations had one observation result in common, namely, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes in the period of water draining were obviously lower than that in the period of sediment releasing. PMID:25898645

  15. Long-term spatial and temporal variation of CO2 partial pressure in the Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Lu, X. X.; Richey, J. E.; Sun, H.; Han, J.; Yu, R.; Liao, S.; Yi, Q.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon transport in river systems is an important component of the global carbon cycle. Most rivers of the world act as atmospheric CO2 sources due to high riverine CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). By determining the pCO2 from alkalinity and pH, we investigated its spatial and temporal variation in the Yellow River watershed using historical water chemistry records (1950s-1984) and recent sampling along the mainstem (2011-2012). Except the headwater region where the pCO2 was lower than the atmospheric equilibrium (i.e. 380 μatm), river waters in the remaining watershed were supersaturated with CO2. The average pCO2 for the watershed was estimated at 2810 ± 1985 μatm, which is 7-fold the atmospheric equilibrium. As a result of severe soil erosion and dry climate, waters from the Loess Plateau in the middle reaches had higher pCO2 than that from the upper and lower reaches. From a seasonal perspective, the pCO2 varied from about 200 μatm to > 30 000 μatm with higher pCO2 usually occurring in the dry season and lower pCO2 in the wet season (at 73% of the sampling sites), suggesting the dilution effect of water. While the pCO2 responded exponentially to total suspended solids (TSS) export when the TSS concentration was less than 100 kg m-3, it decreased slightly and remained stable if the TSS concentration exceeded 100 kg m-3. This stable pCO2 is largely due to gully erosion that mobilizes subsoils characterized by low organic carbon for decomposition. In addition, human activities have changed the pCO2 dynamics. Particularly, flow regulation by dams can diversely affect the temporal changes of pCO2, depending on the physiochemical properties of the regulated waters and adopted operation scheme. Given the high pCO2 in the Yellow River waters, large potential for CO2 evasion is expected and warrants further investigation.

  16. Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?

    PubMed

    Noren, S R; Williams, T M; Ramirez, K; Boehm, J; Glenn, M; Cornell, L

    2012-02-01

    Odontocetes have an exceptional range in body mass spanning 10(3) kg across species. Because, size influences oxygen utilization and carbon dioxide production rates in mammals, this lineage likely displays an extraordinary variation in oxygen store management compared to other marine mammal groups. To examine this, we measured changes in the partial pressures of respiratory gases ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), pH, and lactate in the blood during voluntary, quiescent, submerged breath holds in Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens), bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), and a killer whale (Orcinus orca) representing a mass range of 96-3,850 kg. These measurements provided an empirical determination of the effect of body size on the variability in blood biochemistry during breath hold and experimentally determined aerobic dive limits (ADL) within one taxonomic group (odontocetes). For the species in this study, maximum voluntary breath-hold duration was positively correlated with body mass, ranging from 3.5 min in white-sided dolphins to 13.3 min for the killer whale. Variation in breath-hold duration was associated with differences in the rate of change for [Formula: see text] throughout breath hold; [Formula: see text] decreased twice as fast for the two smaller species (-0.6 mmHg O(2) min(-1)) compared to the largest species (-0.3 mmHg O(2) min(-1)). In contrast, the rate of increase in [Formula: see text] during breath hold was similar across species. These results demonstrate that large body size in odontocetes facilitates increased aerobic breath-hold capacity as mediated by decreased mass-specific metabolic rates (rates of change in [Formula: see text] served as a proxy for oxygen utilization). Indeed the experimentally determined 5 min ADL for bottlenose dolphins was surpassed by the 13.3 min maximum breath hold of the killer whale, which did not end in a rise in lactate. Rather, breath hold ended voluntarily as respiratory gases and pH fell within a narrow range for both large and small species, likely providing cues for ventilation. PMID:21935721

  17. Enhanced Shrinkage of Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (La0.90Sr0.10MnO3+?) Resulting from Thermal and Oxygen Partial Pressure Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Ben; Pederson, Larry R.; Anderson, Harlan U.; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Singh, Prabhakar; Coffey, Greg W.; Thomsen, Ed C.

    2007-10-01

    Exposure of La0.9Sr0.1MnO3+? to repeated oxygen partial pressure cycles (air/10 ppm O2) resulted in enhanced densification rates, similar to behavior shown previously due to thermal cycling. Shrinkage rates in the temperature range 700 to 1000oC were orders of magnitude higher than Makipirtti-Meng model estimations based on stepwise isothermal dilatometry results at high temperature. A maximum in enhanced shrinkage due to oxygen partial pressure cycling occurred at 900oC. Shrinkage was greatest when LSM-10 bars that were first equilibrated in air were exposed to gas flows of lower oxygen fugacity than in the reverse direction. The former creates transient cation and oxygen vacancies well above the equilibrium concentration, resulting in enhanced mobility. These vacancies annihilate as Schottky equilibria is re-established, whereas the latter condition does not lead to excess vacancy concentrations.

  18. [Generation of Superoxide Radicals by Complex III in Heart Mitochondria and Antioxidant Effect of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes at Different Partial Pressure of Oxygen].

    PubMed

    Dudylina, A L; Ivanova, M V; Shumaev, K B; Ruuge, E K

    2016-01-01

    The EPR spin-trapping technique and EPR-oximetry were used to study generation of superoxide radicals in heart mitochondria isolated from Wistar rats under conditions of variable oxygen concentration. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-15N-D16 were chosen to determine oxygen content in a gas-permeable capillary tube containing mitochondria. TIRON was used as a spin trap. We investigated the influence of different oxygen concentrations in incubation mixture and demonstrated that heart mitochondria can generate superoxide in complex III at different partial pressure of oxygen as well as under the conditions of deep hypoxia (< 5% O2). Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (the pharmaceutical drug "Oxacom") exerted an antioxidant effect, regardless of the value of the partial pressure of oxygen, but the magnitude and kinetic characteristics of the effect depended on the concentration of the drug. PMID:27192832

  19. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  20. Laboratory Measurements and Astronomical Observations of {H_{2}NCO^{+}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Harshal; Gottlieb, Carl A.; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2013-06-01

    We will discuss the evidence for protonated HNCO (H_2NCO^+) in the centimeter- and millimeter-wave spectra of galactic molecular sources rich in polyatomic molecules, and the prospects for extending the astronomical observations to other sources. The astronomical observations were guided by laboratory measurements of the lowest rotational transitions in the centimeter-wave band by Fourier transform microwave (FTM) spectroscopy of a supersonic molecular beam, and over 15 transitions between 222 and 367 GHz in a low pressure dc discharge through H_2 and HNCO. Lattanzi et al., {J. Phys. Chem. Lett.} {3}, 3420 (2012)

  1. Reliability study of the NiH2 strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Glenn C.; Rash, Donald E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes a joint study by Gates Aerospace Batteries (GAB) and the Reliability Analysis Center (RAC). This study characterizes the reliability and robustness of the temperature compensated strain gages currently specified for sensing of internal pressure of NiH2 cells. These strain gages are characterized as fully encapsulated, metallic foil grids with known resistance that varies with deformation. The measurable deformation, when typically installed on the hemispherical portion of a NiH2 cell, is proportional to the material stresses as generated by internal cell pressures. The internal pressure sensed in this manner is calibrated to indicate the state-of-charge for the cell. This study analyzes and assesses both robustness and reliability for the basic design of the strain gage, the installation of the strain gage, and the circuitry involved.

  2. Ultra smooth NiO thin films on flexible plastic (PET) substrate at room temperature by RF magnetron sputtering and effect of oxygen partial pressure on their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, S.; Goswami, S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2010-03-01

    Transparent p-type nickel oxide thin films were grown on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering technique in argon + oxygen atmosphere with different oxygen partial pressures at room temperature. The morphology of the NiO thin films grown on PET and glass substrates was studied by atomic force microscope. The rms surface roughnesses of the films were in the range 0.63-0.65 nm. These ultra smooth nanocrystalline NiO thin films are useful for many applications. High resolution transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that the grains of NiO films on the highly flexible PET substrate were purely crystalline and spherical in shape with diameters 8-10 nm. XRD analysis also supported these results. NiO films grown on the PET substrates were found to have better crystalline quality with fewer defects than those on the glass substrates. The sheet resistances of the NiO films deposited on PET and glass substrates were not much different; having values 5.1 and 5.3 kΩ/□ and decreased to 3.05, 3.1 kΩ/□ respectively with increasing oxygen partial pressure. The thicknesses of the films on both substrates were ˜700 nm. It was also noted that further increase in oxygen partial pressure caused increase in resistivity due to formation of defects in NiO.

  3. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di; Song, Le; Zhang, Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

  4. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Song, Le; Zhang, Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-02-14

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

  5. Composition-Temperature-Partial Pressures Data for Cd(sub 0.8)Zn(sub 0.2)Te by Optical Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Known weights of Cd, Zn and Te were reacted in silica optical cells of known volume and the partial pressure of Te2 and Zn between 485 and 1160 C were determined by measuring the optical density of the vapor in the ultra-violet to visible range. The composition of the condensed phase or phases was calculated from the original weights and the amount of material in the vapor phase. The corresponding composition - temperature - partial pressures, x(sub Te)-T-P(sub Te2), data, including five Te-rich solidus points, were established. The solubility range for the Te-rich Cd(sub 0.8)Zn(sub 0.2)Te(s) is similar to that of CdTe(s) with x(sub Te) = 0.50005 at 809 C and an estimated maximum solubility of x(sub Te) = 0.50012 at about 1000 C. The partial pressure of Cd and Te(sub 2) measured over the Cd(sub 0.8)Zn(sub 0.2)Te melt at 1140 C were about 1.55 and 0.02 atm, respectively, and the corresponding P(Sub Zn) was estimated to be 0.05 atm. It was recommended that a Cd reservoir maintaining at 800 to 820 C should be used during directional solidification of Cd(sub o.8)Zn(sub 0.2)Te to prevent the preferential loss of Cd to the vapor phase.

  6. Effects of various oxygen partial pressures on Ti-doped ZnO thin film transistors fabricated on flexible plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Guodong; Han, Dedong; Yu, Wen; Shi, Pan; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Lingling; Cong, Yingying; Zhou, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiaomi; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    By applying a novel active layer of titanium zinc oxide (TiZO), we have successfully fabricated fully transparent thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a bottom gate structure fabricated on a flexible plastic substrate at low temperatures. The effects of various oxygen partial pressures during channel deposition were studied to improve the device performance. We found that the oxygen partial pressure during channel deposition has a significant impact on the performance of TiZO TFTs, and that the TFT developed under 10% oxygen partial pressure exhibits superior performance with a low threshold voltage (V th) of 2.37 V, a high saturation mobility (μsat) of 125.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, a steep subthreshold swing (SS) of 195 mV/decade and a high I on/I off ratio of 3.05 × 108. These results suggest that TiZO thin films are promising for high-performance fully transparent flexible TFTs and displays.

  7. Photolysis of H2O-H2O2 Mixtures: The Destruction of H2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present laboratory results on the loss of H2O2 in solid H2O + H2O2 mixtures at temperatures between 21 and 145 K initiated by UV photolysis (193 nm). Using infrared spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measured the decrease of the 3.5 micrometer infrared absorption band during UV irradiation and obtained a photodestruction cross section that varies with temperature, being lowest at 70 K. We use our results, along with our previously measured H2O2 production rates via ionizing radiation and ion energy fluxes from the spacecraft to compare H2O2 creation and destruction at icy satellites by ions from their planetary magnetosphere and from solar UV photons. We conclude that, in many cases, H2O2 is not observed on icy satellite surfaces because the H2O2 photodestruction rate is much higher than the production rate via energetic particles, effectively keeping the H2O2 infrared signature at or below the noise level.

  8. Energy Conservation Associated with Ethanol Formation from H2 and CO2 in Clostridium autoethanogenum Involving Electron Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Johanna; Zheng, Yanning; Mueller, Alexander P.; Ly, San; Tran, Loan; Segovia, Simon; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Köpke, Michael; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most acetogens can reduce CO2 with H2 to acetic acid via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, in which the ATP required for formate activation is regenerated in the acetate kinase reaction. However, a few acetogens, such as Clostridium autoethanogenum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, and Clostridium ragsdalei, also form large amounts of ethanol from CO2 and H2. How these anaerobes with a growth pH optimum near 5 conserve energy has remained elusive. We investigated this question by determining the specific activities and cofactor specificities of all relevant oxidoreductases in cell extracts of H2/CO2-grown C. autoethanogenum. The activity studies were backed up by transcriptional and mutational analyses. Most notably, despite the presence of six hydrogenase systems of various types encoded in the genome, the cells appear to contain only one active hydrogenase. The active [FeFe]-hydrogenase is electron bifurcating, with ferredoxin and NADP as the two electron acceptors. Consistently, most of the other active oxidoreductases rely on either reduced ferredoxin and/or NADPH as the electron donor. An exception is ethanol dehydrogenase, which was found to be NAD specific. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity could only be demonstrated with artificial electron donors. Key to the understanding of this energy metabolism is the presence of membrane-associated reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf), of electron-bifurcating and ferredoxin-dependent transhydrogenase (Nfn), and of acetaldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, which is present with very high specific activities in H2/CO2-grown cells. Based on these findings and on thermodynamic considerations, we propose metabolic schemes that allow, depending on the H2 partial pressure, the chemiosmotic synthesis of 0.14 to 1.5 mol ATP per mol ethanol synthesized from CO2 and H2. IMPORTANCE Ethanol formation from syngas (H2, CO, and CO2) and from H2 and CO2 that is catalyzed by bacteria is presently a much-discussed process for sustainable production of biofuels. Although the process is already in use, its biochemistry is only incompletely understood. The most pertinent question is how the bacteria conserve energy for growth during ethanol formation from H2 and CO2, considering that acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), is an intermediate. Can reduction of the activated acetic acid to ethanol with H2 be coupled with the phosphorylation of ADP? Evidence is presented that this is indeed possible, via both substrate-level phosphorylation and electron transport phosphorylation. In the case of substrate-level phosphorylation, acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol proceeds via free acetic acid involving acetaldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (carboxylate reductase). PMID:26148714

  9. Advanced H2/O2 space engine parametrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Engine cycle analyses conducted on a 3000-lbf component testing model of an H2/O2-fueled advanced orbit-transfer vehicle engine employing a dual-expander cycle have yielded pressure and temperature trend predictions. On the basis of the results obtained, the dual-expander cycle is projected to be scalable to thrust levels of as much as 50,000 lbf, with chamber pressures of 2000 psi. The high chamber pressure, in conjunction with the use of a gas-gas injector element, facilitates 10:1-range continuously variable throttling. The preferred thrust level for supporting mission studies would be of the order of 20,000 lbf.

  10. Global Ocean Surface Water Partial Pressure of CO2 Database: Measurements Performed During 1968-2007 (Version 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyr, Alex

    2008-09-30

    More than 4.1 million measurements of surface water partial pressure of CO2 obtained over the global oceans during 1968-2007 are listed in the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) database, which includes open ocean and coastal water measurements. The data assembled include only those measured by equilibrator-CO2 analyzer systems and have been quality-controlled based on the stability of the system performance, the reliability of calibrations for CO2 analysis, and the internal consistency of data. To allow re-examination of the data in the future, a number of measured parameters relevant to pCO2 measurements are listed. The overall uncertainty for the pCO2 values listed is estimated to be ± 2.5 µatm on the average. For simplicity and for ease of reference, this version is referred to as 2007, meaning that data collected through 31 December 2007 has been included. It is our intention to update this database annually. There are 37 new cruise/ship files in this update. In addition, some editing has been performed on existing files so this should be considered a V2007 file. Also we have added a column reporting the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater in units of Pascals. The data presented in this database include the analyses of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), pressure of the equilibration, and barometric pressure in the outside air from the ship’s observation system. The global pCO2 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  11. Freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures: Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Naihui

    1994-01-01

    The freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures were systematically documented. Nitric acid was found to affect freezing significantly. Measurements show that nitric acid can cause substantial supercooling over a broad composition range. However, some ternary compositions, like to those in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), have high freezing temperatures. The freezing of PSC particles could be controlled by the temperature and vapor pressure of both nitric acid and water in a non-linear way. Formation of polar stratospheric clouds may be forecasted on the basic of conditions of temperature and vapor contents of water and nitric acid.

  12. Degassing of volatiles (H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) during ascent, crystallization, and eruption at mafic monogenetic volcanoes in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Emily R.; Wallace, Paul J.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Delgado Granados, Hugo

    2010-11-01

    Mafic monogenetic volcanoes (cinder cones, maars) have eruption styles that include highly explosive, mildly explosive, and effusive regimes. Here we investigate the degassing and vapor-melt partitioning of volatiles (H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in monogenetic volcanoes from the subduction-related Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF) in central Mexico. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from these volcanoes contain variably degassed melts that were trapped over a wide range of pressures from < 50 MPa to ˜ 300 MPa. Variations in melt compositions and volatile contents provide evidence that crystallization and differentiation were driven by degassing of H 2O. Melt CO 2 and H 2O concentrations are highly variable, and much of the variation does not conform to equilibrium open- or closed-system degassing paths. Instead, we suggest that gas-fluxing - partial re-equilibration of magmas with CO 2-rich gases rising from depth - can explain the variable CO 2 and H 2O concentrations in the melts. Such fluxing may be common in basaltic systems, and it increases the extent of crystallization during magma ascent by removing dissolved H 2O from vapor-saturated (but H 2O-undersaturated) melts. Strong degassing of S and Cl during magma ascent and crystallization begins at pressures of approximately 50 MPa. Using the relationship between degassing and crystallization, we calculate apparent vapor-melt partition coefficients for S and Cl. Our results show that, overall, S partitions more strongly into the vapor phase than Cl, consistent with published experimental data and thermodynamic models, and that vapor-melt partitioning of S increases more strongly with decreasing pressure than Cl. The S and Cl partitioning behavior inferred from the melt inclusion data are consistent with the gas fluxing model suggested by the H 2O and CO 2 data.

  13. H2 fuel prototype hydride bed performance tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    H2Fuel is a project to design, build, and demonstrate a hydrogen-electric hybrid city bus for Augusta, GA. The H2Fuel bus uses metal hydride technology for on-board hydrogen fuel storage. This document reports on tests by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to measure the performance of the H2Fuel prototype hydride bed. Bed diameter measurements were made before and after hydrogen testing. Seven hydrogen absorption-desorption cycles were completed. Significant results include: - maximum hydrogen capacity of approximately 3500 STP liters (0.315 kg) - practical hydrogen capacity of approximately 3000 STP liters (0.270 kg) - absorption tests at four hydrogen supply pressures (75, 100, 140, and 300 psia) - desorption tests at three hydrogen rates (20, 30, and 50 slpm) - no measurable swelling of the hydride bed

  14. 42 CFR 52h.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 52h.2 Section 52h.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW OF RESEARCH... part: (a) Act means the Public Health Service Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 201 et seq.). (b)...

  15. Phase Transitions and Phase Decomposition of La{1-x}Sr{x}CoO{3-delta} in Low Oxygen Partial Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ovenstone,J.; White, J.; Misture, S.

    2008-01-01

    High-temperature X-ray diffraction has been used to investigate the phase stability of lanthanum strontium cobalt oxide (LSC) for a range of materials with the formula La1-xSrxCoO3-{delta} (x = 0.7, 0.4, and 0.2). The stability of LSC increases with La content in low oxygen partial pressures at high temperature. Oxygen vacancy ordering has been observed for all three compositions in either low oxygen pressure or under reducing gas, as evidenced by the formation of the brownmillerite phase. The crystal structure of the vacancy-ordered phase was determined using Rietveld analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. The decomposition products under low oxygen pressure and in reducing conditions have been identified and characterized, including the phase transition and thermal expansion of the primary decomposition products, LaSrCoO4 and LaSrCoO3.5.

  16. Mass spectrometric determination of partial pressures of ions in the saturated vapor over the NaF-Na3AlF6 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, S. V.; Chilingarov, N. S.; Borshchevsky, A. Ya; Sidorov, L. N.

    2004-01-01

    Mass spectrometric determination of absolute partial pressures of basic charged species Na2F+ and AlF4- in the saturated vapor over the NaF-Na3AlF6 system (1:1 molar ratio) was carried out in the 974-1090 K temperature range. The ion pressures were 5-8 orders of magnitude lower than the pressures of basic molecular components NaAlF4 and NaF. Particular attention was given to the equality of device sensitivity constants for positive and negative ions. Absolute device calibration was carried out using the measured ion currents Na2F+ and AlF4- and the equilibrium constant of heterolytic dissociation available in the literature.

  17. Role of partial miscibility on pressure buildup due to constant rate injection of CO2 into closed and open brine aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Gluyas, Jon G.; GonzáLez MartíNez de Miguel, Gerardo J.; Hosseini, Seyyed A.

    2011-12-01

    This work extends an existing analytical solution for pressure buildup because of CO2 injection in brine aquifers by incorporating effects associated with partial miscibility. These include evaporation of water into the CO2 rich phase and dissolution of CO2 into brine and salt precipitation. The resulting equations are closed-form, including the locations of the associated leading and trailing shock fronts. Derivation of the analytical solution involves making a number of simplifying assumptions including: vertical pressure equilibrium, negligible capillary pressure, and constant fluid properties. The analytical solution is compared to results from TOUGH2 and found to accurately approximate the extent of the dry-out zone around the well, the resulting permeability enhancement due to residual brine evaporation, the volumetric saturation of precipitated salt, and the vertically averaged pressure distribution in both space and time for the four scenarios studied. While brine evaporation is found to have a considerable effect on pressure, the effect of CO2 dissolution is found to be small. The resulting equations remain simple to evaluate in spreadsheet software and represent a significant improvement on current methods for estimating pressure-limited CO2 storage capacity.

  18. Adsorption and dissociation of H2O on the (001) surface of uranium mononitride: energetics and mechanism from first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tao; Lan, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Juan; Zhao, Yao-Lin; He, Chao-Hui; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-05-21

    The interfacial interaction of uranium mononitride (UN) with water from the environment unavoidably leads to corrosion of nuclear fuels, which affects a lot of processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. In this work, the microscopic adsorption behaviors of water on the UN(001) surface as well as water dissociation and accompanying H2 formation mechanisms have been investigated on the basis of DFT+U calculations and ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. For adsorption of one H2O monomer, the predicted adsorption energies are -0.88, -2.07, and -2.07 eV for the most stable molecular, partially dissociative, and completely dissociative adsorption, respectively. According to our calculations, a water molecule dissociates into OH and H species via three pathways with small energy barriers of 0.78, 0.72, and 0.85 eV, respectively. With the aid of the neighboring H atom, H2 formation through the reaction of H* + OH* can easily occur via two pathways with energy barriers of 0.61 and 0.36 eV, respectively. The molecular adsorption of water shows a slight coverage dependence on the surface while this dependence becomes obvious for partially dissociative adsorption as the water coverage increases from 1/4 to 1 ML. In addition, based on the "ab initio atomistic thermodynamic" simulations, increasing H2O partial pressure will enhance the stability of the adsorbed system and water coverage, while increasing temperature will decrease the H2O coverage. We found that the UN(001) surface reacts easily with H2O at room temperature, leading to dissolution and corrosion of the UN fuel materials. PMID:27118421

  19. On the significant enhancement of the continuum-collision induced absorption in H2O+CO2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Yu. I.

    2016-05-01

    The IR spectra of water vapor-carbon dioxide mixtures as well as the spectra of pure gas samples have been recorded using a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer at a resolution of 0.1 cm-1 in order to explore the effect of colliding CO2 and H2O molecules on their continuum absorptions. The sample temperatures were 294, 311, 325 and 339 K. Measurements have been conducted at several different water vapor partial pressures depending on the cell temperature. Carbon dioxide pressures were kept close to the three values of 103, 207 and 311 kPa (1.02, 2.04 and 3.07 atm). The path length used in the study was 100 m. It was established that, in the region around 1100 cm-1, the continuum absorption coefficient C H2 O + CO2 is about 20 times stronger than the water-nitrogen continuum absorption coefficient CH2O+N2. On the other hand, in the far wing region (2500 cm-1) of the ν3 CO2 fundamental band, the binary absorption coefficient CCO2+H2O appears to be about one order of magnitude stronger than the absorption coefficient CCO2+CO2 in pure carbon dioxide. The continuum interpretation and the main problem of molecular band shape formation are discussed in light of these experimental facts.

  20. Efficient H2 production via Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Esquível, Maria G; Amaro, Helena M; Pinto, Teresa S; Fevereiro, Pedro S; Malcata, F Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) obtained from biological sources provides an alternative to bulk chemical processes that is moving towards large-scale, economical generation of clean fuel for automotive engines. This opinion article examines recent improvements in H(2) production by wild and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - the green microalga currently considered the best eukaryotic H(2) producer. Here, we review various aspects of genetic and metabolic engineering of C. reinhardtii, as well as of process engineering. Additionally, we lay out possible scenarios that would lead to more efficient research approaches in the near future, as part of a consistent strategy for sustainable biohydrogen supply. PMID:21794941

  1. Astronomical detection of H2CCC

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Gottlieb, C.A.; Killian, T.C.; Guelin, M.; Paubert, G. Yebes Centro Astronomico Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, Saint-Martin-d'Heres )

    1991-02-01

    H2CCC, an isomer of the widely distributed interstellar ring C3H2, has been detected in TMC-1 and possibly IRC + 10216 with the IRAM 30 m telescope, following a recent laboratory determination of the rotational spectrum of this new type of highly polar carbon chain. The rotational temperature of H2CCC in TMC-1, like that of other highly polar molecules in this source, is very low: 4-6 K; the column density is also fairly low: (2.5 + or - 0.5) x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, slightly more than 1 percent that of the cyclic isomer. 16 refs.

  2. The influence of oxygen partial pressure on material properties of Eu3+-doped Y2O2S thin film deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. G.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Eu3+-doping has been of interest to improve the luminescent characteristics of thin-film phosphors. Y2O2S:Eu3+ films have been grown on Si (100) substrates by using a Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The thin films grown under different oxygen deposition pressure conditions have been characterized using structural and luminescent measurements. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed mixed phases of cubic and hexagonal crystal structures. As the oxygen partial pressure increased, the crystallinity of the films improved. Further increase of the O2 pressure to 140 mtorr reduced the crystallinity of the film. Similarly, both scanning electron microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy confirmed that an increase in O2 pressure affected the morphology of the films. The average band gap of the films calculated from diffuse reflectance spectra using the Kubelka-Munk function was about 4.75 eV. The photoluminescence measurements indicated red emission of Y2O2S:Eu3+ thin films with the most intense peak appearing at 619 nm, which is assigned to the 5D0-7F2 transition of Eu3+. This most intense peak was totally quenched at higher O2 pressures. This phosphor may be a promising material for applications in the flat panel displays.

  3. Maps of [HDO]/[H2O] near Mars’ Aphelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Robert E.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report maps of HDO and H2O taken at three seasonal points before and near Mars’ aphelion (Ls = 71°). These observations were taken at Ls = 357° (15 January 2006), Ls = 50° (26 March 2008) and Ls = 72° (2/3 April 2010) using CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. For these three seasonal dates, the entrance slit of the spectrometer was positioned N-S on Mars centered at the sub-Earth point; on 3 April 2010, the slit was positioned E-W. Data were extracted at 0.6 arc-second intervals from the spectral-spatial images. Individual spectral lines were measured near 3.67 μm (HDO) and 3.29 μm (H2O). The column densities were obtained by comparing the observed lines to those of a multi-layered, radiative transfer model. The model includes solar Fraunhofer lines, two-way transmission through Mars’ atmosphere, thermal emission from Mars’ surface and atmosphere, and a one-way transmission through the Earth’s atmosphere. Latitudinal maps of HDO, H2O, and their ratios were then constructed. The [HDO]/[H2O] ratios have been found to be larger than those on Earth and they vary with both latitude and season. For the Ls = 357° and 50° observations, the ratio peaks near the sub-solar latitude ([HDO]/[H2O] ~ 6.9 VSMOW) and decreases towards both the North and South polar-regions. At Ls = 72°, column densities of both HDO and H2O and their ratios increase from the Southern hemisphere to the North polar-region. Observations from 3 April 2013 show diurnal variations of both the column densities and their ratio. Specific points on Mars’ surface were tracked for four hours. It is believed that this variation is caused by the vaporization of ground frost and water ice clouds that are formed during the night and disappear during daytime. Our results for H2O column densities will be compared to TES results. The results for HDO and the [HDO]/[H2O] ratios will be compared to model results.This work was partially funded by grants from NASA's Planetary Astronomy (344-32-51-96) and Astrobiology Programs (344-53-51), and the NSF-RUI Program (AST-805540). We thank the administration and staff of the NASA IRTF for awarding observing times and coordinating our observations.

  4. The composition of Saturn's atmosphere at northern temperate latitudes from Voyager IRIS spectra - NH3, PH3, C2H2, C2H6, CH3D, CH4, and the Saturnian D/H isotopic ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Marten, A.; Bezard, B.; Hanel, R.

    1984-01-01

    The vertical distributions and mixing ratios of minor constituents in the northern hemisphere of Saturn are investigated. Results are obtained for NH3, PH3, C2H2, C2H6, CH3D, and CH4; the D/H ratio is obtained from the CH4 and CH3D abundances. The NH3 mixing ratio in the upper atmosphere is found to be compatible with the saturated partial pressure. The inferred PH3/H2 ratio of 1.4 + or - 0.8 x 10 to the -6th is higher than the value derived from the solar P/H ratio. The stratospheric C2H2/H2 and C2H6/H2 ratios are, respectively, 2.1 + or - 1.4 x 10 to the -7th and 3.0 + or - 1.1 x 10 to the -6th; the latter decreases sharply below the 20-50 mbar level. The results for CH3D/H2 and CH4/H2 imply an enrichment of Saturn's upper atmosphere in carbon by a factor of at least three over the solar abundance. The interpretation of two NH3 lines in the five-micron window suggests a NH3/H2 ratio at the two bar level below the solar value.

  5. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-06

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  6. 20 CFR 655.132 - H-2A labor contractor (H-2ALC) filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process for Temporary Agricultural Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) Application for Temporary Employment... agricultural business to which the H-2ALC expects to provide H-2A workers, the expected beginning and...

  7. In-Situ Partial Pressure Measurements and Visual Observation during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Seeded Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    An in-situ monitoring furnace was constructed with side windows to perform partial pressure measurements by optical absorption and visual observation of the growing crystal. A fused silica -rowth ampoule with a 4.5 cm long square tube between the source and the seed was prepared for the optical absorption measurements. A ZnSe crystal was grown by the seeded physical vapor transport (PVT) technique in the horizontal configuration. The growth temperature was 1120 C and the furnace translation rate was 3nmVday. Partial pressures of Se2, P(sub Se2), at three locations along the length of the growth ampoule were measured at 90 min intervals during the growth process. The measured P (sub Se2) were in the range of 2.0 to 6.5 x 10(exp -3) atm. The P(sub Se2) results indicated that the partial pressure profile was inconsistent with the results of the one-dimensional diffusion mass transport model and that the source composition shifted toward Se-rich during the run, i.e. the grown crystal was more Zn-rich than the source. The visual observation showed that the seed crystal first etched back, with greater thermal etching occurring along the edges of the seed crystal. Once the growth started, the crystal crew in a predominately contactless mode and facets were evident during growth. The crystal did not grow symmetrically which is believed to be due to the unintentional asymmetry of the radial thermal profile in the furnace.

  8. Piperidine hydrogenolysis on a commercial hydrocracking catalyst. II. The effects of initial piperidine concentration, temperature, catalyst presulfidation, and hydrogen partial pressure on catalyst activity, deactivation, and coke formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjiloizou, G.C.; Butt, J.B.; Dranoff, J.S. )

    1992-05-01

    The formation of coke in the piperidine hydrogenolysis reaction over a fresh sulfided hydrocracking catalyst was examined at temperatures ranging from 281 to 321 C, hydrogen partial pressures of 11.2 to 15.9 atm (1.1 to 1.6 MPa), and initial concentrations of piperidine of 3.94 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to 11.84 [times] 10[sup [minus]3]g mol/liter using elemental analysis, [sup 13]C NMR spectroscopy, and ESCA. The results indicated that most of the coke present on the catalyst after 17 h on stream was deposited in the initial 90 min of the reaction. Coke formation and hence catalyst deactivation were found to increase with both reaction temperature and initial concentration of piperidine. Reducing the catalyst instead of sulfiding it had no effect on the final coke content. Nitrogen was found to be present on the catalyst surface after reaction indicating that nitrogen-containing compound were participating in the formation of coke. The H/C ratio of the coke decreased very slowly with reaction time and was invariant to changes in temperature, initial concentration of piperidine, or catlayst pretreatment method. Comparing the activity of reduced versus sulfided fresh catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of piperidine, it was found that under the present conditions, catalyst presulfidation increased the activity of the metallic catalyst function and decreased the rate of catalyst deactivation. Furthermore, decreasing the partial pressure of hydrogen resulted in an activity decrease of the metallic catalyst function and had a negative effect on the overall catalyst activity maintenance. The intrinsic activity of the acidic catalyst function was not affected by the change in hydrogen partial pressure.

  9. Long-lasting effect of prolonged hypoxemia after birth on the immediate ventilatory response to changes in arterial partial pressure of oxygen in young lambs.

    PubMed

    Sladek, M; Parker, R A; Gr?gaard, J B; Sundell, H W

    1993-12-01

    The effect of prolonged hypoxemia (H) after birth on the evolution of the ventilatory response to changes in arterial partial pressure of O2 was determined in unanesthetized, awake lambs. H was induced for 12 d after birth in seven lambs through exposure to 0.10 fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2). Five control (C) lambs were kept in 0.21 FiO2. The ventilatory response (percent increase from baseline) to acute hypoxia was tested with 0.14 FiO2 and 0.10 FiO2. The tonic activity of the peripheral chemoreceptors was assessed by the transient pure oxygen inhalation test (Dejours' test). The occlusion technique was used to measure the baseline neuromuscular drive of breathing. A markedly decreased early ventilatory response to acute hypoxia persisted in the H lambs for at least 5 wk after termination of H compared with the C group. The second phase of the response was significantly lower only at 12 d (the end of H) and was thereafter comparable to that in the C lambs. The ventilatory response to hyperoxia was significantly lower in the H lambs only at the end of hypoxemia at 12 d and rapidly normalized after return to normoxia. H did not significantly affect resting neuromuscular drive. These results show that postnatal maturation of the ventilatory response to changes in arterial partial pressure of O2 can be delayed by prolonged postnatal hypoxemia. The effect on the response to hyperoxia is transient, whereas the response to acute hypoxia is affected for an extended time. This study illustrates the importance of an adequate postnatal arterial partial pressure of O2 for the development of the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia. PMID:8108201

  10. Interstellar clouds containing optically thin H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of Black and Delgarno that the relative populations of the excited rotational levels of H2 can be understood in terms of cascading following absorption in the Lyman and Werner bands is employed to infer the gas densities and radiation fields within diffuse interstellar clouds containing H2 that is optically thin in those bands. The procedure is described for computing the populations of the different rotation levels, the relative distribution among the different rotation levels of newly formed H2 is determined on the basis of five simplified models, and the rate of H2 formation is estimated. The results are applied to delta Ori, two components of iota Ori, the second components of rho Leo and zeta Ori, tau Sco, gamma Vel, and zeta Pup. The inferred parameters are summarized for each cloud.

  11. Plant and environment interactions: Growth and yield response of commercial bearing-age {open_quote}Casselman{close_quote} plum trees to various ozone partial pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Retzlaff, W.A.; Williams, L.E.; DeJong, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    Nursery stock of plum (Prunus salicina Lindel., cv. Casselman) was planted 1 Apr. 1988 in an experimental orchard at the Univ. of California Kearney Agricultural Center near Fresno, CA. Trees in this study were enclosed in open-top fumigation chambers on 1 May 1989, and exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressures (charcoal filtered air, ambient air, and ambient air + ozone) during the 1989 through 1992 growing seasons (typically 1 Apr. - 1 Nov.). A nonchamber treatment plot was used to assess chamber effects on tree performance. This study details the results of the exposures during the initial commercial bearing period (1991 through 1993) in this orchard. The mean 12-h (0800-2000 h Pacific Daylight Time [PDT]) ozone partial pressures during the experimental periods in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments averaged 0.031, 0.048, 0.091, and 0.056 {mu}Pa Pa{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992, respectively. Fruit number per tree decreased as atmospheric ozone partial pressure increased from the charcoal filtered to ambient + ozone treatment, significantly affecting yield. Yield of plum trees averaged 23.6, 19.8, 13.7, and 17.9 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992 in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments, respectively. Only one out of the five original treatment plots was exposed to ozone treatments during the 1993 growing season. Yield of plum trees in this single replicate in 1993 was reduced by increased atmospheric ozone partial pressure. Yield of plum trees in the four remaining unexposed treatment plots in 1993 was 16.7, 17.9, and 16.0 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in the previous charcoal filtered, ambient, and ambient + ozone treatments respectively. The similarity in yield of the post-chamber treatments indicates that a change in air quality in the current growing season can affect yield of Casselman plum trees. 26 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Formation of C3H2, C5H2, C7H2, and C9H2 from reactions of CH, C3H, C5H, and C7H radicals with C2H2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Lun; Huang, Wen-Jian; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2016-01-21

    The Cm+2H2 family can be classified into two categories - C2n+1H2 and C2n+2H2. Cm+2H2 are important intermediates in the syntheses of large carbonaceous molecules. An understanding of the formation mechanisms of both odd and even carbon-numbered Cm+2H2 is beneficial to atmospheric, astronomical, and combustion chemistry. HC2n+2H (polyynes) are believed to be producible from C2nH + C2H2 and C2H + C2nH2 reactions but C2n+1H2 (n≥ 2) attract less attention to their formation mechanisms. In the present study, we make up for the lack of knowledge on C2n+1H2 formation mechanisms by investigating the reactions C2n-1H + C2H2→ C2n+1H2 + H with n = 1-4. The dynamics of reactions of C2n-1H radicals with C2H2 are explored in crossed molecular beams using products C2n+1H2. The translational-energies and angular distributions of the hydrogen-loss channels of products are unraveled by measuring time-of-flight spectra and photoionization-efficiency spectra of C2n+1H2 with tunable synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. The C2n+1H2 product includes two isomers, c-(1)HC2n-1(C)CH and (3)HC2n+1H, which are identified by the maximal translational-energy release and the photoionization threshold. Furthermore, quantum-chemical calculations indicate that the title reactions incur a small or negligible entrance barrier and are nearly isoergic except for the barrierless exothermic reaction CH + C2H2→ C3H2 + H. We demonstrate for the first time that C5H2, C7H2, and C9H2 are producible from the title reactions. In conjunction with studies on the C2nH + C2H2 reactions, a brief picture for the CmH (m = 1-8) + C2H2→ Cm+2H2 + H reactions can be outlined. PMID:26691183

  13. Thermodynamics of the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the binary (H2SO4-H2O) and ternary (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, A.; Münch, S.; Rondo, L.; Bianchi, F.; Duplissy, J.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Franchin, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2015-09-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important gas influencing atmospheric new particle formation (NPF). Both the binary (H2SO4-H2O) system and the ternary system involving ammonia (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) may be important in the free troposphere. An essential step in the nucleation of aerosol particles from gas-phase precursors is the formation of a dimer, so an understanding of the thermodynamics of dimer formation over a wide range of atmospheric conditions is essential to describe NPF. We have used the CLOUD chamber to conduct nucleation experiments for these systems at temperatures from 208 to 248 K. Neutral monomer and dimer concentrations of sulfuric acid were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). From these measurements, dimer evaporation rates in the binary system were derived for temperatures of 208 and 223 K. We compare these results to literature data from a previous study that was conducted at higher temperatures but is in good agreement with the present study. For the ternary system the formation of H2SO4·NH3 is very likely an essential step in the formation of sulfuric acid dimers, which were measured at 210, 223, and 248 K. We estimate the thermodynamic properties (dH and dS) of the H2SO4·NH3 cluster using a simple heuristic model and the measured data. Furthermore, we report the first measurements of large neutral sulfuric acid clusters containing as many as 10 sulfuric acid molecules for the binary system using chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry.

  14. Structure and stability of solid Xe(H2)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Smith, Jesse; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-03-01

    Mixtures of xenon and molecular hydrogen form a series of hexagonal, van der Waals compounds at high pressures and at 300 K. Synchrotron, x-ray, single crystal diffraction studies reveal that below 7.5 GPa, Xe(H2)8 crystallizes in a P 3 ¯ m 1 structure that displays pressure-induced occupancy changes of two pairs of xenon atoms located on the 2c and 2d sites (while the third pair on yet another 2c site remains fully occupied). The occupancy becomes 1 at the P 3 ¯ m 1 to R3 transition and all the xenon atoms occupy the 3d sites in the high-pressure structure. These pressure-induced changes in occupancy coincide with volume changes that maintain the average Xe:H2 stoichiometry fixed at 1:8. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman measurements show that this unique hydrogen-bearing compound that can be synthesized at 4.2 GPa and 300 K, quenched at low temperatures to atmospheric pressure, and retained up to 90 K on subsequent warming.

  15. Test summary for advanced H2 cycle NI-CD cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee

    1987-01-01

    To improve operational tolerances and mass, the H2 gas recombination design provisions of the Ni-H2 system were incorporated into the sealed Ni-Cd system. Produced is a cell design capable of operating on the H2 cycle versus the normal O2 cycle. Three test cells have now completed approximately 4,330 LEO (90 minute) cycles at 20 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Performance remains stable although one cell exhibited a temporary pressure anomaly.

  16. Predicting possible effects of H2S impurity on CO2 transportation and geological storage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    For CO(2) geological storage, permitting impurities, such as H(2)S, in CO(2) streams can lead to a great potential for capital and energy savings for CO(2) capture and separation, but it also increases costs and risk management for transportation and storage. To evaluate the cost-benefits, using a recently developed model (Ji, X.; Zhu, C. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 2012, 91, 40-59), this study predicts phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the system H(2)S-CO(2)-H(2)O-NaCl under transportation and storage conditions and discusses potential effects of H(2)S on transportation and storage. The prediction shows that inclusion of H(2)S in CO(2) streams may lead to two-phase flow. For H(2)S-CO(2) mixtures, at a given temperature, the bubble and dew pressures decrease with increasing H(2)S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. For the CO(2)-H(2)S-H(2)O system, the total gas solubility increases while the mass density of the aqueous solution with dissolved gas decreases. For the CO(2)-H(2)S-H(2)O-NaCl system, at a given temperature, pressure and NaCl concentration, the solubility of the gas mixture in aqueous phase increases with increasing H(2)S content and then decreases, while the mass density of aqueous solution decreases and may be lower than the mass density of the solution without gas dissolution. PMID:22823266

  17. H2 production from simulated coal syngas containing H2S in multi-tubular Pd and 80 wt% Pd-20 wt% Cu membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Howard, B.H.; Ciocco, M.V.; Morreale, B.

    2007-12-01

    99.7% conversion of CO in a simulated syngas feed containing 53% CO, 35% H2 and 12% CO2 was achieved via the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction in a counter-current Pd multi-tube membrane reactor (MR) at 1173 K and 2 s residence time. This conversion is significantly greater than the 32% equilibrium conversion associated with a conventional (non-membrane) reactor primarily due to the high rate of H2 extraction from the reaction zone through the Pd membranes at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, nearly complete H2 recovery was attained in the permeate, resulting in the simultaneous production of a high-pressure CO2 (>99%) retentate stream after condensation of the steam. When Pd80 wt%Cu tubes were used in the reactor, a significantly lower CO conversion of 68% was attained at comparable residence times, probably due to the lower H2 permeance of the alloy. When H2S was added to the syngas feed and the H2S-to-H2 ratio was maintained below the threshold required for thermodynamically stable sulfides to form, the Pd and Pd80 wt%Cu MRs retained their mechanical integrity and H2 selectivity, but a precipitous drop in CO conversion was observed due to deactivation of the catalytic surface. The Pd and Pd80 wt%Cu MRs were observed to fail within minutes after increasing the H2S-to-H2 ratio to levels above that expected for thermodynamically stable sulfides to form, as evidenced by rupturing of the membrane tubes. SEM–EDS analyses of the membranes suggested that at high H2S-to-H2 ratios, the H2S compromised the mechanical integrity of the MRs by preferentially attacking the grain boundary region.

  18. Geochemical signatures of metasedimentary rocks of high-pressure granulite facies and their relation with partial melting: Carvalhos Klippe, Southern Brasília Belt, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioffi, Caue Rodrigues; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa; da Rocha, Brenda Chung; Moraes, Renato; Henrique-Pinto, Renato

    2012-12-01

    High-grade metasedimentary rocks can preserve geochemical signatures of their sedimentary protolith if significant melt extraction did not occur. Retrograde reaction textures provide the main evidence for trapped melt in the rock fabrics. Carvalhos Klippe rocks in Southern Brasília Orogen, Brazil, present a typical high-pressure granulite assemblage with evidence of mica breakdown partial melting (Ky + Grt + Kfs ± Bt ± Rt). The metamorphic peak temperatures obtained by Zr-in-Rt and ternary feldspar geothermometers are between 850 °C and 900 °C. The GASP baric peak pressure obtained using grossular rich garnet core is 16 kbar. Retrograde reaction textures in which the garnet crystals are partially to totally replaced by Bt + Qtz ± Fsp intergrowths are very common in the Carvalhos Klippe rocks. These reactions are interpreted as a result of interactions between residual phases and trapped melt during the retrograde path. In the present study the geochemical signatures of three groups of Carvalhos Klippe metasedimentary rocks are analysed. Despite the high metamorphic grade these three groups show well-defined geochemical features and their REE patterns are similar to average compositions of post-Archean sedimentary rocks (PAAS, NASC). The high-pressure granulite facies Grt-Bt-Pl gneisses with immature arenite (wacke, arkose or lithic-arenite) geochemical signatures present in the Carvalhos Klippe are compared to similar rocks in amphibolite facies from the same tectonic framework (Andrelândia Nappe System). The similar geochemical signatures between Grt-Bt-Pl gneisses metamorphosed in high-pressure granulite facies and Grt-Bt-Pl-Qtz schists from the Andrelândia and Liberdade Nappes, with minimal to absent melting conditions, are suggestive of low rates of melt extraction in these high-grade rocks. The rocks with pelitic compositions most likely had higher melt extraction and even under such circumstances nevertheless tend to show REE patterns similar to average compositions of post-Archean sedimentary rocks (PAAS, NASC).

  19. Ion kinetics in Ar/H2 cold plasmas: the relevance of ArH+

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Cueto, Maite; Doménech, José Luis; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has awakened the interest in the chemistry of this ion. In this work, the ion-molecule kinetics of cold plasmas of Ar/H2 is investigated in glow discharges spanning the whole range of [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) proportions for two pressures, 1.5 and 8 Pa. Ion concentrations are determined by mass spectrometry, and electron temperatures and densities, with Langmuir probes. A kinetic model is used for the interpretation of the results. The selection of experimental conditions evinces relevant changes with plasma pressure in the ion distributions dependence with the H2 fraction, particularly for the major ions: Ar+, ArH+ and H3+. At 1.5 Pa, ArH+ prevails for a wide interval of H2 fractions: 0.3<[H2]/([H2]+[Ar])<0.7. Nevertheless, a pronounced displacement of the ArH+ maximum towards the lowest H2 fractions is observed at 8 Pa, in detriment of Ar+, which becomes restricted to very small [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) ratios, whereas H3+ becomes dominant for all [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) > 0.1. The analysis of the data with the kinetic model allows the identification of the sources and sinks of the major ions over the whole range of experimental conditions sampled. Two key factors turn out to be responsible for the different ion distributions observed: the electron temperature, which determines the rate of Ar+ formation and thus of ArH+, and the equilibrium ArH+ + H2 ⇄ H3+ + Ar, which can be strongly dependent of the degree of vibrational excitation of H3+. The results are discussed and compared with previously published data on other Ar/H2 plasmas. PMID:26702354

  20. Nonenzymatic biotinylation of histone H2A

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Shannon; Heightman, Tom D; Hohmann, Laura; Schriemer, David; Gravel, Roy A

    2009-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS, eukaryotic enzyme) and BirA (prokaryotic) are biotin protein ligases that catalyze the ATP-dependent attachment of biotin to apocarboxylases via the reactive intermediate, bio-5′-AMP. In this study, we examined the in vitro mechanism of biotin attachment to histone H2A in the presence of HCS and BirA. The experiment derives from our observations that HCS is found in the nucleus of cells in addition to the cytoplasm, and it has the ability to attach biotin to histones in vitro (Narang et al., Hum Mol Genet 2004; 13:15–23). Using recombinant HCS or BirA, the rate of biotin attachment was considerably slower with histone H2A than with the biotin binding domain of an apocarboxylase. However, on incubation of recombinant H2A with chemically synthesized bio-5′-AMP, H2A was observed to be rapidly labeled with biotin in the absence of enzyme. Nonenzymatic biotinylation of a truncated apocarboxylase (BCCP87) has been previously reported (Streaker and Beckett, Protein Sci 2006; 15:1928–1935), though at a much slower rate than we observe for H2A. The specific attachment sites of nonenzymatically biotinylated recombinant H2A at different time points were identified using mass spectrometry, and were found to consist of a similar pattern of biotin attachment as seen in the presence of HCS, with preference for lysines in the highly basic N-terminal region of the histone. None of the lysine sites within H2A resembles the biotin attachment consensus sequence seen in carboxylases, suggesting a novel mechanism for histone biotinylation. PMID:19160459

  1. H2CO in the Horsehead nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Viviana

    2011-07-01

    Photodissociation region (PDR) models are used to understand the evolution of the far-UV illuminated matter both in our Galaxy and in external galaxies. The spectacular instrumental improvements, which happens in radioastronomy with the advent of Herschel, ALMA and NOEMA, call for matching progresses in PDR modeling. While it is now confirmed that some interstellar species are mostly formed in the gas phase (CO for instance) and others on grains (CH3OH, Garrod et al. 2007), the chemical routes for other species, like H2CO, are still debated because it is likely that solid and gas phase processes are both needed. The availability of well defined observations is essential here to discriminate between chemical assumptions about the important grain surface processes: adsorption, desorption and reactivity. Due to its closeness (~400 pc) and simple geometry, the Horsehead PDR is particularly well suited to investigate the grain surface chemistry. We present observations of 7 transitions of formaldehyde (H2CO) toward two positions: the edge of the nebula exposed to the UV-field (PDR), and a colder region (cold core) shielded from the UV radiation. A non-LTE Montecarlo radiative transfer code is used to determine the H2CO abundance from the observed intensities and line profiles. We find that the H2CO abundance is very similar in the warm PDR and in the cold dense core. The inferred abundances are compared with PDR models, including both gas-phase and grain surface reactions, in order to study the dominant formation routes of H2CO. Pure gas-phase chemistry models fail to reproduce the observed H2CO abundance by a factor ~10 in the PDR, while surface grain chemistry increases the H2CO abundance up to 3 orders of magnitude in the PDR.

  2. A SAFT equation of state for the quaternary H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the quaternary H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system were studied using a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) at temperatures from 0 to 200 °C (373.15-473.15 K), pressures up to 600 bar (60 MPa) and concentrations of NaCl up to 6 mol/kgH2O. The understanding of the physical-chemical properties of this system is critical for predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and H2S into geological formations (geological carbon sequestration) as an option for mitigating the global warming trend. Equation of state parameters were generated from regression of available and reliable experimental data and incorporation of existing parameters for some subsystems. Densities were predicted and compared with available experimental results. Using the EOS developed in this study, we predicted equilibrium compositions in both liquid and vapor phases, fugacity coefficients of components, the equilibrium pressures at a given composition of the H2O-rich phase in electrolyte solutions with NaCl varying from 0 to 4 mol/kgH2O, and the aqueous solution densities. These predicted values are tabulated and available as supplementary data in the electronic version online. These predictions provide information and guidance for future experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties and phase behaviors in the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system.

  3. Partial discharges and breakdown in SF6 in the pressure range 25-150 kPa in non-uniform background fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, M.; Clemen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The partial discharge (PD) and electric breakdown mechanisms in SF6 at a plug contact in the pressure range 25-150 kPa were investigated at ambient temperature in a plug-plate arrangement. This parameter range has similar particle number densities as in the previous investigation of the dielectric recovery in a high-voltage circuit breaker (Seeger et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 395204), where optical access was limited and the relevant parameters of pressure and temperature could only be determined indirectly by computational fluid dynamic simulations. The present investigation did not have these limitations, since the pressure and temperature were well defined. Optical observation by an image intensified high speed camera in combination with a photo multiplier tube allowed an understanding of the various mechanisms for the PDs and breakdown to be gained. The breakdown fields and PD parameters could be well described by a simple leader model in the pressure range 75-150 kPa for negative polarity and above 25 kPa for positive polarity. Discrepancies with the model are observed below 75 kPa for negative polarity and at 25 kPa for positive polarity. This could be explained by a slow, repetitive heating mechanism which has not been reported so far.

  4. Analysis of the Pressure Rise in a Partially Filled Liquid Tank in Microgravity with Low Wall Heat Flux and Simultaneous Boiling and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments performed with Freon 113 in the space shuttle have shown that in a pro- cess of very slow heating, high liquid superheats can be sustained for a long period in microgravity. In a closed system explosive vaporization of superheated liquid resulted in pressure spikes of varying magnitudes. In this paper, we analyze the pressure rise in a partially lled closed tank in which a large vapor bubble (i.e., ullage) is initially present, and the liquid is subjected to a low wall heat ux. The liquid layer adjacent to the wall becomes superheated until the temperature for nucleation of the bubbles (or the incipience of boiling) is achieved. In the absence of the gravity-induced convection large quantities of superheated liquid can accumulate over time near the heated surface. Once the incipience temperature is attained, explosive boiling occurs and the vapor bubbles that are produced on the heater surface tend to quickly raise the tank pressure. The liquid-vapor saturation temperature increases as well. These two e ects tend to induce condensation of the large ullage bubble that is initially present, and tends to mitigate the tank pressure rise. As a result, the tank pressure is predicted to rise sharply, attain a maximum, and subsequently decay slowly. The predicted pressure rise is compared with experimental results obtained in the microgravity environments of the space shuttle for Freon 113. The analysis is appli- cable, in general to heating of liquid in closed containers in microgravity and to cryogenic fuel tanks, in particular where small heat leaks into the tank are unavoidable.

  5. Forming Free Bipolar ReRAM of Ag/a-IGZO/Pt with Improved Resistive Switching Uniformity Through Controlling Oxygen Partial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yanli; Mai, Biaoren; Zhang, Xiaoke; Hu, Ruiqin; Li, Ya; Chen, Zimin; Fan, Bingfeng; Liang, Jun; Wang, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Bipolar resistive switching properties of Ag/a-IGZO/Pt structure resistive random-access memories (ReRAMs) were investigated. The amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) films were prepared by a radio frequency magnetron sputtering system at room temperature in mixed gas ambient of argon (Ar) and oxygen (O2). The oxygen partial pressures during sputtering deposition were varied from 0% to 17% to engineer defects in an a-IGZO layer. When the oxygen partial pressure increased to 17%, forming-free bipolar resistive switching properties were observed with nearly 100% device yield. In addition, the forming-free ReRAM device presents an enhanced resistive switching uniformity and an enhanced endurance. The forming-free resistive switching is attributed to the concentration of oxygen-related defects in an a-IGZO thin film via analyses of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and current-voltage ( I- V) curves, with which it is possible to reduce the forming energy of silver (Ag) conductive filaments.

  6. Interstellar H2 toward HD 147888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaciński, P.

    2013-01-01

    The ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet spectra of HD 147888 allows the H2 vibrational level ν = 0 to be accessed along with higher vibrational levels of the ground H2 electronic level. The large number of H2 absorption lines in the HST spectra allows column densities to be determined even from a noisy spectra. We have determined column densities of the H2 molecule on vibrational levels ν = 0-5 and rotational levels J = 0-6 using the profile fitting method. No variations in the column densities of H2 on vibrationally excited levels were observed from 2000 through 2009. The ortho to para H2 ratio (O/P)* for the excited vibrational states ν = 1-4 equals to 1.13. For the lowest vibrational state ν = 0 and rotational level J = 1 the ortho to para H2 ratio is only 0.15. The temperature of ortho-para thermodynamical equilibrium is TOP = 42 ± 3 K. The measurements of H2 column densities on excited vibrational levels (from the HST spectra) leads to constraints on the radiation field in photon-dominated region (PDR) models of the interstellar cloud towards HD 147888. The Meudon PDR model locates the cloud 0.62 pc from the star. The modeled hydrogen cloud density (89-336 cm-3) agrees with independent density estimations based on the C2 molecule and the chemical model. The observed (O/P)J = 1 and (O/P)* H2 ratios cannot be explained by a simple model. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and with NASA/Johns Hopkins University Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Support for FUSE data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NAG5-7584 and by other grants and contracts.

  7. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  8. Theoretical studies of photoexcitation and ionization in H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diercksen, G. H. F.; Kraemer, W. P.; Rescigno, T. N.; Bender, C. F.; Mckoy, B. V.; Langhoff, S. R.; Langhoff, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies using Franck-Condon and static-exchange approximations are reported for the complete dipole excitation and ionization spectrum in H2O, where (1) large Cartesian Gaussian basis sets are used to represent the required discrete and continuum electronic eigenfunctions at the ground state equilibrium geometry, and (2) previously devised moment-theory techniques are employed in constructing the continuum oscillator-strength densities from the calculated spectra. Comparisons are made of the calculated excitation and ionization profiles with recent experimental photoabsorption studies and corresponding spectral assignments, electron impact-excitation cross sections, and dipole and synchrotron-radiation studies of partial-channel photoionization cross sections. The calculated partial-channel cross sections are found to be atomic-like, and dominated by 2p-kd components. It is suggested that the latter transition couples with the underlying 1b(1)-kb(1) channel, accounting for a prominent feature in recent synchrotron-radiation measurements.

  9. The Dimerization of H2NO.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-01

    H2NO is the prototype of aminoxyls, kinetically persistent free radicals. The potential dimerization and reaction modes of H2NO are examined. The dimer potential energy surface features a barely metastable O-O bound species and several locally bound dimeric structures. One of these, a rectangular or rhomboid O-N-O-N ring, is a characteristic structural feature of more stable aminoxyls in the solid state. Its electronic structure is related to other four-center six-electron systems. A general picture of the weak dimer binding is constructed for these and other H2NO dimers from a balance of four-electron repulsions between NO π electrons, and two-electron attractive interaction between the singly occupied π* orbitals of the diradical. The most stable diradical structure is a surprisingly strongly hydrogen bonded dimer diradical. The barriers separating the other isomers from this global minimum are calculated to be small. PMID:26845239

  10. [Proton pump inhibitor H2 receptor antagonist].

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Kamada, Tomoari; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken

    2011-06-01

    Recently, Japanese guidelines for the treatment and prevention of peptic ulcers were established by the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology. Herein, we focus on proton pump inhibitor(PPI) and H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA) for prophylaxis and treatment of peptic ulcer associated with NSAIDs including low dose of aspirin. Double dose of H2RAs are effective at preventing chronic NSAID related ulcers, however, the effect is not superior to PPI. Full-dose misoprostol and PPI are clinically equivalent, although the potential adverse effects of misoprostol are a major cause of poor compliance. Overall, PPIs have the best profile of efficacy and side-effects for the healing and prevention of NSAID-associated ulcers, especially in the patients with high risk, such as history of peptic ulcer. PMID:21688623

  11. Pressure-distribution measurements on a tapered wing with a partial-span split flap in curved flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, TH; Rokus, F

    1939-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were made on the 32-foot whirling arm of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute of a tapered wing to determine the rolling and the yawing moments due to an angular velocity in yaw. The model was tested at 0 degree and 5 degree pitch; 0 degree, 5 degree, and 10 degree yaw; and with split flaps covering 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent of the wing span and deflected 60 degrees. The results are given in the form of load distributions and as calculated moment coefficients. The experimental values of rolling- and yawing- moment coefficients were in fairly close agreement with theory.

  12. Pressure-distribution measurements on a rectangular wing with a partial-span split flap in curved flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokus, Frank G

    1939-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were made on the 32-foot whirling arm of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute of a rectangular wing of NACA 23012 section to determine the rolling and the yawing moment due to angular velocity in yaw. The model was tested at 0 and 5 degree pitch; 0, +/- 5, and +/- 10 degrees yaw; and with no flap and with split flaps 25, 50 and 75 percent of the wing span and deflected 60 degrees. The results are given in the form of span load distributions and as calculated moment coefficients. The experimental values of rolling- and yawing-moment coefficients were in fairly close agreement with theory.

  13. H_2CO in the Horsehead nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, V.; Pety, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.

    2011-05-01

    Photodissociation region (PDR) models are used to understand the evolution of the far-UV illuminated matter both in our Galaxy and in external galaxies. The spectacular instrumental improvements, which happens in radioastronomy with the advent of Herschel, ALMA and NOEMA, call for matching progresses in PDR modeling. While it is now confirmed that some interstellar species are mostly formed in the gas phase (CO for instance) and others on grains (CH_3OH), the chemical routes for other species, like H_2CO, are still debated because it is likely that solid and gas phase processes are both needed. The availability of well defined observations is essential here to discriminate between chemical assumptions about the important grain surface processes: adsorption, desorption and reactivity. Due to its closeness (~400 pc) and simple geometry, the Horsehead PDR is particularly well suited to investigate the grain surface chemistry. We present observations of 7 transitions of formaldehyde (H_2CO) toward two positions: the edge of the nebula exposed to the UV-field (PDR), and a colder region (cold core) shielded from the UV radiation. A non-LTE Montecarlo radiative transfer code is used to determine the H2CO abundance from the observed intensities and line profiles. We find that the H_2CO abundance is very similar in the warm PDR and in the cold dense core. The inferred abundances are compared with PDR models, including both gas-phase and grain surface reactions, in order to study the dominant formation routes of H_2CO. Pure gas-phase chemistry models fail to reproduce the observed H2CO abundance by a factor ~10 in the PDR, while surface grain chemistry successfully reproduces the observed abundance.

  14. Synthesis of mixed-valent {alpha}- and {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} polymorphs under controlled partial oxygen pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Shaun R.; Blakely, Colin K.; Poltavets, Viktor V.

    2012-08-15

    Synthesis of mixed valent compounds, especially when multiple polymorphs exist, requires careful control of the preparation conditions. {alpha}- and {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} polymorphs were synthesized under controlled partial oxygen pressure (pO{sub 2}). pO{sub 2} regions of stability at 850 Degree-Sign C were determined for both phases for the first time. A modified oxygen buffer method was developed for the facile preparation of mixed valent oxides under controlled pO{sub 2}. {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the only known n=2 member of the AM{sub n}O{sub n+1} (A=alkali metal, M=3d metal) rock-salt related homolog series with layered cation ordering. The possibility of new members of the homolog series with other 3d metals is considered. - Graphical abstract: Schematic section of phase composition vs. partial O{sub 2} pressure diagram at 850 Degree-Sign C for Na/Fe=1/2 and structure models of {alpha}- and {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}- and {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} polymorphs were synthesized under controlled oxygen pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-NaFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has rock-salt related structure with layered cation ordering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Existence of the rock-salt related homolog series AM{sub n}O{sub n+1} is discussed.

  15. Plasticity in breathing and arterial blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia in infant rat pups with a partial loss of 5-HT neurons.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Jennifer; Cummings, Kevin J

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in cardiovascular responses to acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) has not been studied in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that a partial loss of 5-HT neurons would reduce arterial blood pressure (BP) at rest, increase the fall in BP during hypoxia, and reduce the long-term facilitation of breathing (vLTF) and BP following AIH. We exposed 2-wk-old, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-treated and controls to AIH (10% O2; n = 13 control, 14 treated), acute intermittent hypercapnia (5% CO2; n = 12 and 11), or acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (AIHH; 10% O2, 5% CO2; n = 15 and 17). We gave five 5-min challenges of AIH and acute intermittent hypercapnia, and twenty ∼20-s challenges of AIHH to mimic sleep apnea. Systolic BP (sBP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, heart rate (HR), ventilation (V̇e), and metabolic rate (V̇o2) were continuously monitored. 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine induced an ∼35% loss of 5-HT neurons from the medullary raphe. Compared with controls, pups deficient in 5-HT neurons had reduced resting sBP (∼6 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (∼5 mmHg), and HR (56 beats/min), and experienced a reduced drop in BP during hypoxia. AIHH induced vLTF in both groups, reflected in increased V̇e and V̇e/V̇o2, and decreased arterial Pco2. The sBP of pups deficient in 5-HT neurons, but not controls, was increased 1 h following AIHH. Our data suggest that a relatively small loss of 5-HT neurons compromises resting BP and HR, but has no influence on ventilatory plasticity induced by AIHH. AIHH may be useful for reversing cardiorespiratory defects related to partial 5-HT system dysfunction. PMID:26354844

  16. Symmetric electron transfer reactions of state-selected ions: H 2+ + H 2H 2 + H 2+(ν= 0-10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. Keith; Baer, Tomas; Guyon, Paul M.; Govers, Thomas R.

    1984-08-01

    Total symmetric electron transfer cross sections for state-selected H 2+ ions were measured for vibrational levels of the ion from ν = 0 to 10 at a relative translational energy of 16 eV. The internal energy of the H 2+ ions was selected by threshold photoelectron—photoion coincidence using pulsed synchrotron radiation from the ACO storage ring at Orsay. The relative cross sections agree very well with the recent calculations of Lee and DePristo using a semiclassical energy conserving trajectory approach with an accurate diabatic interaction potential between the ion and neutral diatoms.

  17. H2 MAGIE: H2 as a Major Agent to Galaxy Interaction and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Spitzer space telescope spectroscopy reveal a new class of H2-luminous galaxies with enhanced H2 line emission, but where star formation is strongly suppressed. This is in sharp contrast with what is observed in standard star forming galaxies. These sources are all in active phases of galaxy evolution (galaxy interactions, AGN feedback, gas accretion in galaxy clusters, etc.). Why is H2 present in violent phases of galaxy evolution? How is the H2 emission powered? Why is the H2 gas inefficient at forming stars? What can we learn from these "H2 galaxies" about galaxy formation? This thesis addresses these questions, and discuss the theoretical and observational perspectives of this work (in particular Herschel and JWST).

  18. Experimental investigation of the electrical behavior of olivine during partial melting under pressure and application to the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Leinenweber, K.; Tasaka, M.

    2015-09-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed during melting experiments of olivine compacts (dry and hydrous Fo77 and Fo90) at 4 and 6 GPa in order to investigate melt transport properties and quantify the effect of partial melting on electrical properties. Experiments were performed in the multi-anvil apparatus and electrical measurements were conducted using the impedance spectroscopy technique with the two-electrode method. Changes in impedance spectra were used to identify the transition from an electrical response controlled by the solid matrix to an electrical response controlled by the melt phase. This transition occurs slightly above the solidus temperature and lasts until Tsolidus + 75 °C (±25). At higher temperature, a significant increase in conductivity (corresponding to an increase in conductivity values by a factor ranging from ∼30 to 100) is observed, consistent with the transition from a tube-dominated network to a structure in which melt films and pools become prominent features. This increase in conductivity corresponds to an abrupt jump for all dry samples and to a smoother increase for the hydrous sample. It is followed by a plateau at higher temperature, suggesting that the electrical response of the investigated samples l