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Sample records for h2o-3h exchange reaction

  1. Multidimentional Normal Mode Calculations for the OH Vibrational Spectra of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Han; Tan, Jake Acedera; Takahashi, Kaito; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-06-01

    Recent experimental observations of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar clusters in the region 1400-3800 wn show that the OH stretching vibration has distinct characteristics. Multidimensional normal mode calculations were carried out for OH stretching vibrations in the 1200-4000 wn photon energy range. The potential energy and dipole surfaces were evaluated by using first-principles methods. By comparing the calculated frequencies and intensities of OH stretching vibration with experimental spectra, we found that the assignment of OH strecthing of H_3O^+ moiety and free OH strectching vibration have resonable agreement with experimental data. Jeffrey M. Headrick, Eric G. Diken, Richard S. Walters, Nathan I. Hammer, Richard A. Christie, Jun Cui, Evgeniy M. Myshakin, Michael A. Duncan, Mark A. Johnson, Kenneth D. Jordan, Science, 2005, 17, 1765. Kenta Mizuse, Jer-Lai Kuo and Asuka Fujii, Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 868 Kenta Mizuse and Asuka Fujii, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 929.

  2. Multinucleon exchange in quasifission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayik, S.; Yilmaz, B.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-12-01

    The nucleon exchange mechanism is investigated in the central collisions of 40Ca+238U and 48Ca+238U systems near the quasifission regime in the framework of the stochastic mean-field (SMF) approach. Sufficiently below the fusion barrier, a dinuclear structure in the collisions is maintained to a large extent. Consequently, it is possible to describe nucleon exchange as a diffusion process familiar from deep-inelastic collisions. Diffusion coefficients for proton and neutron exchange are determined from the microscopic basis of the SMF approach in the semiclassical framework. Calculations show that after a fast charge equilibration the system drifts toward symmetry over a very long interaction time. Large dispersions of proton and neutron distributions of the produced fragments indicate that the diffusion mechanism may help to populate heavy transuranium elements near the quasifission regime in these collisions.

  3. Nucleon exchange in damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1986-04-01

    Starting from the general context of one-body nuclear dynamics, the nucleon-exchange mechanism in damped nuclear reactions is discussed. Some of its characteristic effects on various dinuclear observables are highlighted and a few recent advances are described.

  4. PEP Carboxykinase Exchange Reaction in Photosynthetic Bacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, T. G.; Benedict, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    This paper describes some new characteristics of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in purified preparations of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzymatic activity has been purified 169-fold. Nucleotide diphosphates substitute for nucleotide triphosphates in the exchange reaction. Nucleotide diphosphates will not support the synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate from oxaloacetate. This reaction differs significantly from the CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in higher plants and animals. PMID:5661493

  5. Charge-exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W+W--fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, R.

    2015-04-01

    Charge-exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp → n + Δ++ taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge-exchange reaction induced by W±-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77

  7. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  8. Phospholipid exchange reactions within the liver cell

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, W. C.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isolated rat liver mitochondria do not synthesize labelled phosphatidylcholine from CDP-[14C]choline or any phospholipid other than phosphatidic acid from [32P]phosphate. The minimal labelling of phosphatidylcholine and other phosphoglycerides can be attributed to microsomal contamination. However, when mitochondria and microsomes are incubated together with [32P]phosphate, the phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine of the reisolated mitochondria become labelled, suggesting a transfer of phospholipids between the two fractions. 2. When liver microsomes or mitochondria containing labelled phosphatidylcholine are independently incubated with the opposite un-labelled fraction, there is a substantial and rapid exchange of the phospholipid between the two membranes. Exchange of phosphatidylinositol also occurs rapidly, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid exchange only slowly. There is no corresponding transfer of marker enzymes. The transfer of phosphatidylcholine does not occur at 0°, and there is no requirement for added substrate, ATP or Mg2+, but the omission of a heat-labile supernatant fraction markedly decreases the exchange. 3. After intravenous injection of [32P]phosphate, short-period labelling experiments of the individual phospholipids of rat liver microsomes and mitochondria in vivo give no evidence for a similar exchange process. However, the incubation of isolated microsomes and mitochondria with [32P]phosphate also fails on reisolation of the fractions to demonstrate a precursor–product relationship between the individual phospholipids of the two membranes. 4. The intraperitoneal injection of [32P]phosphate results in a far greater proportion of the dose entering the liver than does intravenous administration. After intraperitoneal administration of [32P]phosphate the specific radioactivities of the individual phospholipids are in the order microsomes > outer mitochondrial membrane > inner mitochondrial membrane. 5. The incorporation of 32P into cardiolipin is very slow both in vivo and in vitro. After labelling in vivo the radioactivity in the cardiolipin persists compared with that of the other phospholipids, whose specific radioactivities in the microsomes and mitochondrial fragments decay at a similar rate to that of the acid-soluble phosphate pool. 6. The possibility of phospholipid exchange processes occurring in the liver cell in vivo is discussed, and it is suggested that only a small but highly labelled part of the endoplasmic-reticulum lipoprotein pool is involved in the transfer. PMID:4304512

  9. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  10. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  11. Heat exchanger development at Reaction Engines Ltd.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varvill, Richard

    2010-05-01

    The SABRE engine for SKYLON has a sophisticated thermodynamic cycle with heat transfer between the fluid streams. The intake airflow is cooled in an efficient counterflow precooler, consisting of many thousand small bore thin wall tubes. Precooler manufacturing technology has been under investigation at REL for a number of years with the result that flightweight matrix modules can now be produced. A major difficulty with cooling the airflow to sub-zero temperatures at low altitude is the problem of frost formation. Frost control technology has been developed which enables steady state operation. The helium loop requires a top cycle heat exchanger (HX3) to deliver a constant inlet temperature to the main turbine. This is constructed in silicon carbide and the feasibility of manufacturing various matrix geometries has been investigated along with suitable joining techniques. A demonstration precooler will be made to run in front of a Viper jet engine at REL's B9 test facility in 2011. This precooler will incorporate full frost control and be built from full size SABRE engine modules. The facility will incorporate a high pressure helium loop that rejects the absorbed heat to a bath of liquid nitrogen.

  12. A General Copper-Catalyzed Vinylic Halogen Exchange Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nitelet, Antoine; Evano, Gwilherm

    2016-04-15

    An efficient and general system for the halogen exchange reaction in alkenyl halides has been developed. Upon reaction with catalytic amounts of copper iodide and trans-N,N'-dimethylcyclohexane-1,2-diamine in the presence of tetramethylammonium chloride or bromide, a wide range of easily accessible alkenyl iodides can be smoothly transformed to their far less available chlorinated and brominated derivatives in excellent yields and with full retention of the double bond geometry. This reaction also enables the chlorination of bromoalkenes and could be extended to the use of gem-dibromoalkenes. PMID:27031868

  13. Radioactive iodine exchange reaction of HIPDM: kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, B.; Chang, J.; Sun, J.S.; Billings, J.; Steves, A.; Ackerhalt, R.; Molnar, M.; Kung, H.F.

    1987-03-01

    In conjunction with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), iodine-123 (/sup 123/I)-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamine (HIPDM) has been used clinically as a regional cerebral perfusion imaging agent. The (/sup 123/I)HIPDM can be prepared by a simple aqueous exchange reaction in a kit form. We synthesized unlabeled HIPDM by condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobezaldehyde and N,N,N'-trimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, followed by a sodium borohydride reduction reaction. The kinetics of the radioactive iodine exchange reaction for the preparation of (/sup 123/I)HIDM is controlled by the pH, the temperature, and the presence of reductant (sodium bisulfite), and oxidant (sodium iodate). The reaction is a second order iodine-iodine exchange with an activation energy of 30.6 kcal/mole. The mechanism of this reaction probably involves the formation of an active 1+ or iodine free radical, which is sensitive to the presence of a reductant, such as sodium bisulfite.

  14. Radioactive iodine exchange reaction of HIPDM: kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lui, B; Chang, J; Sun, J S; Billings, J; Steves, A; Ackerhalt, R; Molnar, M; Kung, H F

    1987-03-01

    In conjunction with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), iodine-123 (123I)-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-[2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl]-1,3-propanediamine (HIPDM) has been used clinically as a regional cerebral perfusion imaging agent. The [123I]HIPDM can be prepared by a simple aqueous exchange reaction in a kit form. We synthesized unlabeled HIPDM by condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobezaldehyde and N,N,N'-trimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, followed by a sodium borohydride reduction reaction. The kinetics of the radioactive iodine exchange reaction for the preparation of [123I]HIDM is controlled by the pH, the temperature, and the presence of reductant (sodium bisulfite), and oxidant (sodium iodate). The reaction is a second order iodine-iodine exchange with an activation energy of 30.6 kcal/mole. The mechanism of this reaction probably involves the formation of an active 1+ or iodine free radical, which is sensitive to the presence of a reductant, such as sodium bisulfite. PMID:3819852

  15. Analysis of (3He,t) charge exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pardeep; Zegers, R. G. T.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Noji, Shumpei

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 140 MeV/u on 12C, 18O, 26Mg, 58,62,64Ni, 68Zn and 118-120Sn targets, within distorted wave impulse approximation. In contrast to most previous calculations, exchange contributions to the reaction are treated exactly. The present work focuses on Gamow-Teller and Fermi transitions, for which a proportionality between the differential cross section at zero momentum transfer and transitions strength is known to exist. The goal of the study is to investigate the quality of the new reaction calculations. If successful, it will allow for more detailed investigation of charge-exchange reactions data obtained with composite particles including for transitions with non-zero ΔL. This Work was supported by the India University Grants Commission under Indo-US 21st Century Knowledge Initiative and by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-1068571 and PHY-1102511.

  16. Cross-ligation and exchange reactions catalyzed by hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Y; Koizumi, M; Sekiguchi, A; Ohtsuka, E

    1993-01-01

    The negative strand of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus (sTobRV(-)) contains a hairpin catalytic domain that shows self-cleavage and self-ligation activities in the presence of magnesium ions. We describe here that the minimal catalytic domain can catalyze a cross-ligation reaction between two kinds of substrates in trans. The cross-ligated product increased when the reaction temperature was decreased during the reaction from 37 degrees C to 4 degrees C. A two-stranded hairpin ribozyme, divided into two fragments between G45 and U46 in a hairpin loop, showed higher ligation activity than the nondivided ribozyme. The two stranded ribozyme also catalyzed an exchange reaction of the 3'-portion of the cleavage site. Images PMID:8441626

  17. Charge exchange reactions and solar neutrino detection in 81Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. F.; Gabbard, F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of 81Br as the detector of the solar neutrino flux hinges upon the knowledge of the Gamow-Teller matrix element from the ground state of 81Br to the 52- state at 0.457 MeV in 81Kr. The possibility of obtaining this matrix element is discussed in terms of the (p, n) and (3He, t) charge exchange reactions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 81Br(p, n)81Kr and 81Br(3He, t)81Kr Gamow-Teller transitions; solar neutrino detection.

  18. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  19. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, F.P.; Herbst, R.S.

    1995-05-30

    The isotopes of boron, {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF{sub 3} and a liquid BF{sub 3} donor molecular addition complex formed between BF{sub 3} gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone. 1 Fig.

  20. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, Frank P.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    The isotopes of boron, .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF.sub.3 and a liquid BF.sub.3 . donor molecular addition complex formed between BF.sub.3 gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone.

  1. Selenocysteine in Thiol/Disulfide-Like Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Among trace elements used as cofactors in enzymes, selenium is unique in that it is incorporated into proteins co-translationally in the form of an amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec). Sec differs from cysteine (Cys) by only one atom (selenium versus sulfur), yet this switch dramatically influences important aspects of enzyme reactivity. Recent Advances: The main focus of this review is an updated and critical discussion on how Sec might be used to accelerate thiol/disulfide-like exchange reactions in natural selenoenzymes, compared with their Cys-containing homologs. Critical Issues: We discuss in detail three major aspects associated with thiol/disulfide exchange reactions: (i) nucleophilicity of the attacking thiolate (or selenolate); (ii) electrophilicity of the center sulfur (or selenium) atom; and (iii) stability of the leaving group (sulfur or selenium). In all these cases, we analyze the benefits that selenium might provide in these types of reactions. Future Directions: It is the biological thiol oxidoreductase-like function that benefits from the use of Sec, since Sec functions to chemically accelerate the rate of these reactions. We review various hypotheses that could help explain why Sec is used in enzymes, particularly with regard to competitive chemical advantages provided by the presence of the selenium atom in enzymes. Ultimately, these chemical advantages must be connected to biological functions of Sec. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1675–1689. PMID:23121622

  2. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  3. Thermoneutral isotope exchange reactions of cations in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ausloos, P.; Lias, S.G.

    1981-07-01

    Rate constants have been measured for reactions of the type AD/sub 2//sup +/ + MH ..-->.. MD + ADH/sup +/, where AD/sub 2//sup +/ is CD/sub 3/CND/sup +/, CD/sub 3/CDOD/sup +/, (CD/sub 3/COCD/sub 3/)D/sup +/, or (C/sub 2/D/sub 5/)/sub 2/OD/sup +/ and the MH molecules are alcohols, acids, mercaptans, H/sub 2/S, AsH/sub 3/, PH/sub 3/, or aromatic molecules. Rate constants are also presented for the reactions Ar/sub H/D/sup +/ + D/sub 2/O ..-->.. Ar/sub d/D/sup +/ + HDO, where Ar/sub H/D/sup +/ is a deuteronated aromatic molecule and Ar/sub D/D/sup +/ is the same species with a D atom incorporated on the ring. In all but two cases, the competing deuteron transfer is sufficiently endothermic that it cannot be observed under the conditions of the ICR experiments at 320 to 420 K. The efficiencies of the isotope exchange reactions are interpreted in terms of estimated potential surface cross sections for the reactions AD/sub 2//sup +/ + MH ..-->.. (AD/sub 2//sup +/MH) ..-->.. (ADMHD/sup +/) ..-->.. (ADH/sup +/MD) ..-->.. ADH/sup +/ + MD. When the formation of the (ADMHD/sup +/) complex is estimated to be thermoneutral or slightly endothermic, the isotope exchange process is inefficient (probability of a reactive collision < 0.1) or does not occur. The most efficient isotope exchange reactions are observed for those systems for which it is estimated that the transformation (AD/sub 2//sup +/MH) ..-->.. (ADMHD/sup +/) is exothermic. For most of the systems, trends in reaction efficiency appear to be related to factors such as dipole moments of reactant species (or for aromatic compounds, the electron-donating or -withdrawing properties of ring substituents) which influence the relative orientation of the two reactant species in the complex.

  4. Charge-exchange reactions with a radioactive triton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenecke, J.

    1998-12-21

    A high-resolution (t, {sup 3}He) test experiment has been performed recently by making use of a secondary triton beam produced by fragmentation of {alpha}-particles. The purpose of this charge-exchange experiment was to achieve good energy resolution in an (n,p)-type reaction at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out with the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the A1200 beam-analysis system and the S800 magnetic spectrometer. The beam-analysis system was used to transport the energy-dispersed radioactive triton beam from the production target to the target position, and the magnetic spectrometer was used to focus the dispersion-matched {sup 3}He particles from the (t, {sup 3}He) reaction at 0 degree sign onto the focal plane of the spectrometer. An energy resolution of 200-250 keV was achieved.

  5. Population of 13Be in a nucleon exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, B. R.; DeYoung, P. A.; Smith, J. K.; Baumann, T.; Brown, J.; Frank, N.; Hinnefeld, J.; Hoffman, M.; Jones, M. D.; Kohley, Z.; Kuchera, A. N.; Luther, B.; Spyrou, A.; Stephenson, S.; Sullivan, C.; Thoennessen, M.; Viscariello, N.; Williams, S. J.

    2015-11-01

    The neutron-unbound nucleus 13Be was populated with a nucleon exchange reaction from a 71 MeV/u secondary 13B beam. The decay-energy spectrum was reconstructed using invariant mass spectroscopy based on 12Be fragments in coincidence with neutrons. The data could be described with an s -wave resonance at Er=0.73 (9 ) MeV with a width of Γr=1.98 (34 ) MeV and a d -wave resonance at Er=2.56 (13 ) MeV with a width of Γr=2.29 (73 ) MeV . The observed spectral shape is consistent with previous one-proton removal reaction measurements from 14B .

  6. Coherent pion production in heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyard, J.-L.; Augustyniak, W.; Dahl, R.; Drews, M.; Ellegaard, C.; Farhi, L.; Gaarde, C.; Hennino, T.; Jensen, J. A.; Jourdain, J.-C.; Kagarlis, M.; Kunne, R.; Larsen, J. S.; Radvanyi, P.; Ramstein, B.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Zupranski, P.

    2005-06-01

    We report the first observation of coherent pion production induced by a heavy ion charge exchange reaction. The ( 12C, 12N) reaction [D. Bachelier et al., Phys. Lett. B 172 (1986) 23; M. Roy-Stephan et al., Nucl. Phys. A 488 (1988) 178] at 1.1 GeV/nucleon has been used to shine negative (off-shell) pions on nuclei and observe (on-shell) pions, leaving the target nucleus in its ground state. The experiment was performed at the Laboratoire National Saturne with the SPES4- π setup [Laurent Farhi PHD thesis IPNO-T97-12, Universite d'Orsay, 1997; Rasmus Dahl Ph.D., Niels Bohr Institutet, Copenhagen (1999)].

  7. Reactive Resonances in N+N2 Exchange Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Stallcop, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Rich reactive resonances are found in a 3D quantum dynamics study of the N + N2 exchange reaction using a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface. This surface is characterized by a feature in the interaction region called Lake Eyring , that is, two symmetric transition states with a shallow minimum between them. An L2 analysis of the quasibound states associated with the shallow minimum confirms that the quasibound states associated with oscillations in all three degrees of freedom in Lake Eyring are responsible for the reactive resonances in the state-to-state reaction probabilities. The quasibound states, mostly the bending motions, give rise to strong reasonance peaks, whereas other motions contribute to the bumps and shoulders in the resonance structure. The initial state reaction probability further proves that the bending motions are the dominating factors of the reaction probability and have longer life times than the stretching motions. This is the first observation of reactive resonances from a "Lake Eyring" feature in a potential energy surface.

  8. Mechanism of the Exchange Reaction in HRAS from Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-01-01

    HRAS regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Understanding the transition mechanism is central for the design of small molecules to inhibit the formation of RAS-driven tumors. Using a multiscale approach involving coarse-grained (CG) simulations, all-atom classical molecular dynamics (CMD; total of 3.02 µs), and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we identified the structural features that determine the nucleotide (GDP) exchange reaction. We show that weakening the coupling between the SwitchI (residues 25–40) and SwitchII (residues 59–75) accelerates the opening of SwitchI; however, an open conformation of SwitchI is unstable in the absence of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and rises up towards the bound nucleotide to close the nucleotide pocket. Both I21 and Y32, play a crucial role in SwitchI transition. We show that an open SwitchI conformation is not necessary for GDP destabilization but is required for GDP/Mg escape from the HRAS. Further, we present the first simulation study showing displacement of GDP/Mg away from the nucleotide pocket. Both SwitchI and SwitchII, delays the escape of displaced GDP/Mg in the absence of GEF. Based on these results, a model for the mechanism of GEF in accelerating the exchange process is hypothesized. PMID:25272152

  9. Epitactic ion-exchange reactions into vanadyl(IV) arsenate

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Lara, M.; Bruque, S.; Moreno, L.; Aranda, M.A.G. )

    1991-03-01

    The synthesis, structural characterization, thermal stability, and spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis-diffuse reflectance) properties of three vanadyl arsenates are described. Vanadyl(IV) bis(dihydrogenarsenate), (VO(H{sub 2}AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}) (1), lithium vanadyl arsenate, (Li{sub 4}VO(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O) (2), and nickel(II) and lithium vanadyl arsenate, ((Li{sub 2.4}Ni){sub 0.8}VO(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center dot}4H{sub 2}O) (3), have been prepared. (1) Tetragonal ({alpha} = 9.128 {angstrom}; c = 8.128 {angstrom}) is prepared by reduction with isobutanol or ethanol from vanadyl(V) arsenate. (2) Cubic (a = 9.024 {angstrom}) is obtained from (1) by lithium ion-exchange, and (3) tetragonal (a = 9.106 {angstrom}; c = 8.454 {angstrom}) is made from (2) by Ni{sup 2+} ion-exchange. These exchange reactions are epitactic and the overall result is a topotactic transformation.

  10. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  11. Charge-exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W{sup +}W{sup −}-fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2015-04-10

    Charge-exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp → n + Δ{sup ++} taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge-exchange reaction induced by W{sup ±}-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  12. Geometric Phase Appears in the Ultracold Hydrogen Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum reactive scattering calculations for the hydrogen exchange reaction H +H2 (v =4 ,j =0 )→H +H2 (v', j') and its isotopic analogues are reported for ultracold collision energies. Because of the unique properties associated with ultracold collisions, it is shown that the geometric phase effectively controls the reactivity. The rotationally resolved rate coefficients computed with and without the geometric phase are shown to differ by up to 4 orders of magnitude. The effect is also significant in the vibrationally resolved and total rate coefficients. The dynamical origin of the effect is discussed and the large geometric phase effect reported here might be exploited to control the reactivity through the application of external fields or by the selection of a particular nuclear spin state.

  13. Surface characterization of chromia for chlorine/fluorine exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Unveren, Ercan; Kemnitz, Erhard; Lippitz, Andreas; Unger, Wolfgang E S

    2005-02-10

    The dismutation of CCl(2)F(2) was used to probe the effect of halogenation of chromia by Cl/F exchange reactions to find out the difference between the halogenated inactive and active catalysts. The heterogeneous reactions were performed in a continuous flow Ni reactor and also under simulated reaction conditions in a reactor where after the reaction X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES) analyses are possible without air exposure of the catalyst, i.e., under so-called "in situ" conditions. The Cr(III) 2p XP spectra, which revealed multiplet splitting features and satellite emission, were used for chemical analysis by using a simple evaluation procedure which neglects this inherent complexity. Chemical analysis was also applied by using chemical state plots for Cr 3s in order to cross-check Cr 2p related results. Both ex and in situ XPS show that as soon as Cr(2)O(3) is exposed to CCl(2)F(2) at 390 degrees C fluorination as well as chlorination takes place at the catalyst surface. When the XPS surface composition reaches approximately 4 at. % fluorination and 6 at. % chlorination, maximum catalytic activity was obtained. Application of longer reaction times did not change significantly the obtained surface composition of the activated chromia. The fluorination and chlorination of chromia was further investigated by various HF and HCl treatments. The activated chromia samples and the Cr(2)O(3), Cr(OH)(3), CrF(2)OH, CrF(3) x H(2)O, alpha-CrF(3), beta-CrF(3), and CrCl(3) reference samples with well-known chemical structures were also characterized by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), pyridine-FTIR, wet chemical (F and Cl) analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and surface area (BET) analysis. The results suggest that the formation of chromium oxide chloride fluoride species, e.g., chromium oxide halides, at the surface is sufficient to provide catalytic activity. The presence of any CrF(3) and/or CrCl(3) phases on the activated chromia samples was not found. PMID:16851173

  14. Oxygen exchange reaction kinetics for cerium(IV) oxide at 1000 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Christofer E. Douglas, John M.; Cremeans, Bethany M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2014-10-15

    Bulk oxygen exchange rate kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C were observed to have a first order dependence on the fraction of reaction remaining and to be independent of oxygen partial pressure, total pressure, particle size, and specific surface area. This suggests that the exchange reaction is dominated by an internal chemical reaction that is occurring throughout the bulk of the material, and not at the material surface. Oxygen exchange rates were limited by this internal chemical reaction for all CeO{sub 2} powders studied (15 nm to −325 mesh), and had a rate constant of 1.19×10{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a time to completion of 617 s. These results are similar to the exchange rates observed previously on PuO{sub 2}, suggesting that oxygen exchange on PuO{sub 2} may also be dominated by an internal chemical reaction under similar conditions. This work will help guide future experiments on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reactions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen exchange kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C are independent of a wide range of experimental conditions and exhibit first-order chemical reaction kinetics. - Highlights: • Stable oxygen exchange rates obtained on a variety of CeO{sub 2} powders at 1000 °C. • Exchange rates are independent of atmospheric composition and specific surface area. • Exchange rates are limited by an internal chemical reaction, not a surface reaction. • CeO{sub 2} exchange rates appear similar to the rates observed on PuO{sub 2} at 1000 °C.

  15. New results on hypercharge exchange reactions from LASS

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Dunwoodie, W.; Johnson, W.B.; Kunz, P.; Kwon, Y.; Leigh, D.W.G.S.; Levinson, L.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Sinervo, P.K.; Tarnopolsky, G.; Toge, N.; Waite, A.; Williams, S. ); Awaji, N.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.; Kajikawa, R.; Matsui, T.; Miyamoto, A.; Ozaki, H.; Pak, C.O.; Shimomura, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuk

    1990-11-01

    New results from a number of final states ({eta}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +},{bar K}*K*,{phi}{phi}) produced by hypercharge exchange in LASS by an 11 GeV/cK{sup {minus}} beam are described, and compared with results from other hadroproduction modes and from G/{psi} decay.

  16. Dithioacetal Exchange: A New Reversible Reaction for Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2016-05-10

    Reversibility of dithioacetal bond formation is reported under acidic mild conditions. Its utility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry was explored by combining it with orthogonal disulfide exchange. In such a setup, thiols are positioned at the intersection of both chemistries, constituting a connecting node between temporally separated networks. PMID:26990904

  17. Kinetics of the high temperature oxygen exchange reaction on 238PuO2 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Christofer E.; Du, Miting; Felker, L. Kevin; Wham, Robert M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen exchange reactions performed on PuO2 suggest the reaction is influenced by at least three mechanisms: an internal chemical reaction, surface mobility of active species/defects, and surface exchange of gaseous oxygen with lattice oxygen. Activation energies for the surface mobility and internal chemical reaction are presented. Determining which mechanism is dominant appears to be a complex function including at least specific surface area and temperature. Thermal exposure may also impact the oxygen exchange reaction by causing reductions in the specific surface area of PuO2. Previous CeO2 surrogate studies exhibit similar behavior, confirming that CeO2 is a good qualitative surrogate for PuO2, in regards to the oxygen exchange reaction. Comparison of results presented here with previous work on the PuO2 oxygen exchange reaction allows complexities in the previous work to be explained. These explanations allowed new conclusions to be drawn, many of which confirm the conclusions presented here.

  18. Dynamic/Thermochemical Balance Drives Unusual Alkyl/F Exchange Reactions in Siloxides and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Correra, Thiago C; Fernandes, André S; Riveros, José M

    2016-03-17

    A recent report has shown that siloxides can undergo an unusual Me/F exchange reaction promoted by NF3 in the gas phase ( Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012 , 51 , 8632 - 8635 ). A more extensive study of this kind of exchange has been carried out using mass spectrometry techniques (FT-ICR), DFT calculations, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations (BOMD), using NF3, SO2F2, and CF4 as fluorine donors and evaluating the effect of replacing the Si center by Ge and C. This comprehensive approach shows that NF3 is crucial for the exchange reaction, as SO2F2 forms SO3F(-) via a pentacoordinated channel whereas no reaction is observed for CF4. The uniqueness of NF3 is caused by favorable thermochemical consideration and by dynamic effects that preclude the formation of the ubiquitous Si-F pentacoordinated species. Me3GeO(-) was shown to be as reactive as siloxides toward NF3, whereas C analogs showed no reactions under our experimental conditions. The exchange reaction was also shown to take place for triethylsiloxides. These exchange reactions are examples of reaction systems that avoid the lower energy pathway and are driven by dynamic effects that cannot be explained by the potential energy surface. PMID:26911457

  19. Quantum resonance effects in exchange, photodissociation, and recombination reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, R.; Kendrick, B.; Kress, J.; Walker, R.; Hayes, E.; Lagana, A.; Parker, G.; Butcher, E.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project studied quantum resonance effects on chemical reactions. The authors accurate reactive scattering calculations showed that quantum resonance phenomena dominate most chemical reactions and are essential to any real understanding of reactivity. It was found that, as long-lived metastable states of the colliding system, resonances can decay to reactants, products, or a mixture of both. Only the latter contribute to reaction. Conditions under which resonances can be neglected or treated statistically were studied. Important implications about the mechanism of recombination reactions were discovered, and some remarkable effects of geometric phases on the symmetries and energies of resonances were also discovered. Calculations were completed for the reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O, which is the rate limiting step in the combustion of all hydrocarbons and the single most important reaction in all of combustion chemistry.

  20. Electron and energy transfer as probes of interparticle ion-exchange reactions in zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, E.S.; Snowden, P.T.; Kim, Y.I.; Mallouk, T.E. )

    1993-08-19

    Photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer reactions of tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) with methylviologen (MV[sup 2+]) and tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)osmium(II) (Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) ion-exchanged onto/into separate zeolite Y particles were studied by emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of interparticle exchange were probed by observing the quenching of the MLCT excited state of-Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] by mobile MV[sup 2+] or OS(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions. The exchange reactions occur on time scales of seconds to hours, depending on the ionic strength of the surrounding medium. The time-dependent luminescence data were fitted to a dispersed kinetics model, from which average rate constants for the exchange reactions could be extracted. Time constants for interparticle exchange of MV[sup 2+] and Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions, in the range 10[sup 3]-10[sup 5] s at electrolyte concentrations of 0.1-3 mM, are significantly longer than the time scales (10[sup [minus]7]-10[sup 1] s) of most electrochemical and photochemical intrazeolitic reactions involving these and similar electroactive ions. These results argue for reaction mechanisms that invoke intrazeolite electron transfer, rather than exchange of electroactive ions followed by solution-phase electron transfer, in these systems. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Sequential Anion and Cation Exchange Reactions for Complete Material Transformations of Nanoparticles with Morphological Retention.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James M; Kletetschka, Karel; Fenton, Julie L; Read, Carlos G; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-07-20

    Ion exchange reactions of colloidal nanocrystals provide access to complex products that are synthetically challenging using traditional hot-injection methods. However, such reactions typically achieve only partial material transformations by employing either cation or anion exchange processes. It is now shown that anion and cation exchange reactions can be coupled together and applied sequentially in one integrated pathway that leads to complete material transformations of nanocrystal templates. Although the product nanocrystals do not contain any of the original constituent elements, the original morphology is retained, thereby fully decoupling morphology and composition control. The sequential anion/cation exchange process was applied to pseudo-spherical CdO nanocrystals and ZnO tetrapods, producing fully transformed and shape-controlled nanocrystals of copper and silver sulfides and selenides. Furthermore, hollow core-shell tetrapod ZnS@CdS heterostructures were readily accessible. PMID:26110653

  2. Sulfo cation-exchange resins as heterogeneous catalysts for the reaction of styrene with formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Kasymova, K.A.; Sharf, V.Z.; Litvin, E.F.; Grigor'eva, E.N.

    1987-07-20

    Macroporous and gel sulfo cation-exchange resins are active catalysts for the condensation of styrene with formaldehyde. The product, 4-phenyl-1,3-dioxane was obtained in up to 97% yield. The activity of macroporous sulfo cation-exchange resins increases with decreasing particle diameter but in the case of the gel samples, granule size has only a slight effect on the reaction rate. The enhanced activity of sulfo cation-exchange resins is presumably a result of the high value of the acidity function H/sub 0/ of the sulfonic acid groups of the cation-exchange resin.

  3. Double FLP-Alkyne Exchange Reactions: A Facile Route to Te/B Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Fu An; Cao, Levy; Grimme, Stefan; Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-10-21

    1-Bora-4-tellurocyclohexa-2,5-diene undergoes sequential [4 + 2] cycloadditions/alkyne-elimination reactions to incorporate 2 equiv of terminal alkyne with the loss of diarylalkyne, affording access to a series of 11 new tellurium-boron heterocycles. These alkyne exchange reactions proceed regioselectively and can tolerate a variety of functional groups, thus providing the potential for further derivatization. The mechanism of the exchange reaction is confirmed by a DFT study to involve the interaction of the Te and B with the alkyne in a frustrated Lewis pair fashion in the transition states. PMID:26447492

  4. Why Seemingly Trivial Events Sometimes Evoke Strong Emotional Reactions: The Role of Social Exchange Rule Violations

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Mark R.; Diebels, Kate J.; Jongman-Sereno, Katrina P.; Fernandez, Xuan Duong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT People sometimes display strong emotional reactions to events that appear disproportionate to the tangible magnitude of the event. Although previous work has addressed the role that perceived disrespect and unfairness have on such reactions, this study examined the role of perceived social exchange rule violations more broadly. Participants (N = 179) rated the effects of another person’s behavior on important personal outcomes, the degree to which the other person had violated fundamental rules of social exchange, and their reactions to the event. Results showed that perceptions of social exchange rule violations accounted for more variance in participants’ reactions than the tangible consequences of the event. The findings support the hypothesis that responses that appear disproportionate to the seriousness of the eliciting event are often fueled by perceived rule violations that may not be obvious to others. PMID:26331429

  5. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  6. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  7. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  8. Formation of pseudomorphic nanocages from Cu2O nanocrystals through anion exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Lun; Sato, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kimura, Masato; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2016-03-18

    The crystal structure of ionic nanocrystals (NCs) is usually controlled through reaction temperature, according to their phase diagram. We show that when ionic NCs with different shapes, but identical crystal structures, were subjected to anion exchange reactions under ambient conditions, pseudomorphic products with different crystal systems were obtained. The shape-dependent anionic framework (surface anion sublattice and stacking pattern) of Cu2O NCs determined the crystal system of anion-exchanged products of CuxS nanocages. This method enabled us to convert a body-centered cubic lattice into either a face-centered cubic or a hexagonally close-packed lattice to form crystallographically unusual, multiply twinned structures. Subsequent cation exchange reactions produced CdS nanocages while preserving the multiply-twinned structures. A high-temperature stable phase such as wurtzite ZnS was also obtained with this method at ambient conditions. PMID:26989249

  9. Arrhenius' law in turbulent media and an equivalent tunnel effect. [in binary exchange chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuge, S.; Sagara, K.

    1978-01-01

    The indeterminacy inherent to the formal extension of Arrhenius' law to reactions in turbulent flows is shown to be surmountable in the case of a binary exchange reaction with a sufficiently high activation energy. A preliminary calculation predicts that the turbulent reaction rate is invariant in the Arrhenius form except for an equivalently lowered activation energy. This is a reflection of turbulence-augmented molecular vigor, and causes an appreciable increase in the reaction rate. A similarity to the tunnel effect in quantum mechanics is indicated. The anomaly associated with the mild ignition of oxy-hydrogen mixtures is discussed in this light.

  10. A molecular dynamics study of bond exchange reactions in covalent adaptable networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Yu, Kai; Mu, Xiaoming; Shi, Xinghua; Wei, Yujie; Guo, Yafang; Qi, H Jerry

    2015-08-21

    Covalent adaptable networks are polymers that can alter the arrangement of network connections by bond exchange reactions where an active unit attaches to an existing bond then kicks off its pre-existing peer to form a new bond. When the polymer is stretched, bond exchange reactions lead to stress relaxation and plastic deformation, or the so-called reforming. In addition, two pieces of polymers can be rejoined together without introducing additional monomers or chemicals on the interface, enabling welding and reprocessing. Although covalent adaptable networks have been researched extensively in the past, knowledge about the macromolecular level network alternations is limited. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the macromolecular details of bond exchange reactions in a recently reported epoxy system. An algorithm for bond exchange reactions is first developed and applied to study a crosslinking network formed by epoxy resin DGEBA with the crosslinking agent tricarballylic acid. The trace of the active units is tracked to show the migration of these units within the network. Network properties, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites, the chain angle, and the initial modulus, are examined after each iteration of the bond exchange reactions to provide detailed information about how material behaviors and macromolecular structure evolve. Stress relaxation simulations are also conducted. It is found that even though bond exchange reactions change the macroscopic shape of the network, microscopic network characteristic features, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites and the chain angle, relax back to the unstretched isotropic state. Comparison with a recent scaling theory also shows good agreement. PMID:26166382

  11. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  12. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  13. Halogen Exchange Reaction of Aliphatic Fluorine Compounds with Organic Halides as Halogen Source.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Yuki; Song, Zhiyi; Takahashi, Tamotsu

    2015-12-18

    The halogen exchange reaction of aliphatic fluorine compounds with organic halides as the halogen source was achieved. Treatment of alkyl fluorides (primary, secondary, or tertiary fluorides) with a catalytic amount of titanocene dihalides, trialkyl aluminum, and polyhalomethanes (chloro or bromo methanes) as the halogen source gave the corresponding alkyl halides in excellent yields under mild conditions. In the case of a fluorine/iodine exchange, no titanocene catalyst is needed. Only C-F bonds are selectively activated under these conditions, whereas alkyl chlorides, bromides, and iodides are tolerant to these reactions. PMID:26629792

  14. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products.

  15. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products. PMID:26296115

  16. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  17. (4B-3H) NADH-H2O exchange reaction of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Guillory, R.J.

    1985-06-14

    The purified mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase enzyme has been shown to catalyze a rapid (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange reaction. When the enzyme is subjected to a single freeze-thaw cycle there is a complete loss of NADH dehydrogenation without a measurable decrease in the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Complete loss of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange follows brief exposure to ultraviolet photoirradiation. The differential sensitivity of the water exchange reaction and the dehydrogenase activity suggests a direct involvement of the enzymes flavin cofactor in the catalysis of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Arylazido-beta-alanyl NAD+ (A3'-0-(3-(N-4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino) propionyl)NAD+) is shown to be a potent photodependent inhibitor of the (4B-3H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange activity following photoirradiation with visible light. This is consistent with the observed photodependent inhibition of the dehydrogenase activity by this photoprobe.

  18. Properties of ionic liquids on Au surfaces: non-conventional anion exchange reactions with carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Mathieu; Branca, Mathieu; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Zhao, Sandy Shuo; Chaurand, Pierre; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2011-10-14

    A simple anion metathesis in diluted aqueous carbonate at room temperature affords 1-(12-mercaptododecyl)-3-methyl-imidazolium carbonate (MDMI-HCO(3)) from MDMI salts self-assembled on gold films and nanoparticles. The properties of MDMI-SAM differ from MDMI in solution, for which the anion exchange reaction does not proceed. PMID:21879044

  19. Investigation of ligand exchange reactions in aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes using computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Doudou, Slimane; Arumugam, Krishnamoorthy; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2011-06-21

    Carbonate anion exchange reactions with water in the uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate aqueous systems have been investigated using computational methods. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the umbrella sampling technique were employed to determine potentials of mean force for the exchange reactions of water and carbonate. The presence of calcium counter-ions is predicted to increase the stability of the uranyl-carbonate species in accordance with previous experimental observations. However, the free energy barrier to carbonate exchange with water is found to be comparable both in the presence and absence of calcium cations. Possible implications of these results for uranyl adsorption on mineral surfaces are discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also used to confirm the trends observed in classical molecular dynamics simulations and to corroborate the validity of the potential parameters employed in the MD scheme. PMID:21566831

  20. A proton-magnetic-resonance study of hydrogen-exchange reactions of yeast tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C J; Malthouse, J P

    1991-02-01

    1H n.m.r. was used to observe tryptophan formation from indole and L-serine, proton exchange at C-2 of L-tryptophan, and proton exchange at C-2 of L-serine, catalysed by yeast tryptophan synthase in the presence of 2H2O. Tryptophan synthesis took place with compulsory replacement of C-2 hydrogen by solvent hydrogen. The exponential decay rate (kobs) of the serine exchange reaction was insensitive to serine concentration in the range 2-20mM and was used to calculate kcat./Km values. However, kobs. was very sensitive to pH* values in the range 6.5-8.5 and the data require that the free enzyme is active in the base form resulting from two inseparable ionizations of pKa 7.3, and inactive after a third ionization controlled by a pKa of 7.5. Initial rates measured by u.v. absorbance and colorimetric procedures were used to calculate kinetic parameters of the tryptophan synthesis reaction. From pH 6.5 to 7, kcat./Km values for L-serine in the tryptophan synthesis and hydrogen exchange reactions were indistinguishable and increased rapidly under the control of two acid-base groups of pKa 6.7 and 7.2. Above pH 7, this equivalence breaks down because the exchange reaction alone is responsive to the third pKa value of the free enzyme. The pH dependence of the catalytic constant for tryptophan synthesis was qualitatively similar to that of the kobs. for serine exchange. A mechanism to explain the results is contrasted with recent proposals for the Escherichia coli system. PMID:1899998

  1. Incorporation of monomethylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine by way of an exchange reaction followed by methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.S. Jr. )

    1989-04-01

    Recent evidence by Datko and Mudd indicates that phosphatidylcholine (PC) may be synthesized by methylation of phosphatidylmonomethyl-ethanolamine (PMME), but perhaps not by utilization of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) as a source of PMME. They provided evidence that a CDP derivative of monomethylethanolamine (MME) might be the source of the headgroup. Another possibility is incorporation of MME by an exchange reaction. We tested this by incubating MME with ER from castor bean endosperm and radiolabeled S- adenosylmethionine under conditions which would allow incorporation of the headgroup and methylation to PC. Under these conditions the reaction proceeded, with radiolabel appearing in both PC and phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine. Neither ethanolamine nor L-serine, both of which are known to undergo exchange reactions, yielded PC under the same conditions.

  2. Adenosine triphosphate-pyrophosphate isotopic exchange reaction: a tool for determination of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Trezeguet, V.; Labouesse, B.

    1986-05-01

    Quantitative determination of tryptophan at the picomole level is described, using the ATP-(/sup 32/P)PPi isotopic exchange reaction catalyzed by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. Sensitivity limits of 500 fmol were obtained. The presence of other amino acids at a 1000-fold excess over tryptophan did not interfere significantly with the quantitative determination of tryptophan. The specificity of the reaction was checked using five tryptophan analogs. These analogs did not prevent the determination of tryptophan when present in the same concentration range as tryptophan. When sensitive determination of a single amino acid is needed, the ATP-(/sup 32/P)PPi exchange reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is suggested as a general method and as an alternative to HPLC procedures.

  3. Competition between charge exchange and chemical reaction - The D2/+/ + H system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. K.; Cross, R. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the special features of molecular charge exchange and its competition with chemical reaction in the case of the D2(+) + H system. The trajectory surface hopping (TSH) model proposed by Tully and Preston (1971) is used to study this competition for a number of reactions involving the above system. The diatomics-in-molecules zero-overlap approximation is used to calculate the three adiabatic surfaces - one triplet and two singlet - which are needed to describe this system. One of the significant results of this study is that the chemical reaction and charge exchange are strongly coupled. It is also found that the number of trajectories passing into the chemical regions of the three surfaces depends very strongly on the surface crossings.-

  4. Analysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction by positional isotope exchange and secondary deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.C.; Singh, A.N.; Raushel, F.M.

    1988-11-15

    The mechanism of the galactosyltransferase-catalyzed reaction was probed using positional isotope exchange, alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effects, and inhibition studies with potential transition state analogs. Incubation of (beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O)UDP-galactose and alpha-lactalbumin with galactosyltransferase from bovine milk did not result in any positional isotope exchange. The addition of 4-deoxy-4-fluoroglucose as a dead-end inhibitor did not induce any detectable positional isotope exchange. alpha-Secondary deuterium isotope effects of 1.21 +/- 0.04 on Vmax and 1.05 +/- 0.04 on Vmax/KM were observed for (1-2H)-UDP-galactose. D-Glucono-1,5-lactone, D-galactono-1,4-lactone, D-galactono-1,5-lactone, nojirimycin, and deoxynojirimycin, did not inhibit the galactosyl transfer reaction at concentrations less than 1.0 mM. The magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect supports a mechanism in which the anomeric carbon of the galactosyl moiety has substantial sp2 character in the transition state. Therefore, the cleavage of the bond between the galactose and UDP moieties in the transition state has proceeded to a much greater extent than the formation of the bond between the galactose and the incoming glucose. The lack of a positional isotope exchange reaction indicates that the beta-phosphoryl group of the UDP is not free to rotate in the absence of an acceptor substrate.

  5. Hydraulic controls of in-stream gravel bar hyporheic exchange and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Oswald, Sascha E.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange transports solutes into the subsurface where they can undergo biogeochemical transformations, affecting fluvial water quality and ecology. A three-dimensional numerical model of a natural in-stream gravel bar (20 m × 6 m) is presented. Multiple steady state streamflow is simulated with a computational fluid dynamics code that is sequentially coupled to a reactive transport groundwater model via the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. Ambient groundwater flow is considered by scenarios of neutral, gaining, and losing conditions. The transformation of oxygen, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon by aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone are modeled, as is the denitrification of groundwater-borne nitrate when mixed with stream-sourced carbon. In contrast to fully submerged structures, hyporheic exchange flux decreases with increasing stream discharge, due to decreasing hydraulic head gradients across the partially submerged structure. Hyporheic residence time distributions are skewed in the log-space with medians of up to 8 h and shift to symmetric distributions with increasing level of submergence. Solute turnover is mainly controlled by residence times and the extent of the hyporheic exchange flow, which defines the potential reaction area. Although streamflow is the primary driver of hyporheic exchange, its impact on hyporheic exchange flux, residence times, and solute turnover is small, as these quantities exponentially decrease under losing and gaining conditions. Hence, highest reaction potential exists under neutral conditions, when the capacity for denitrification in the partially submerged structure can be orders of magnitude higher than in fully submerged structures.

  6. Preparation of radioactive acetyl-l-carnitine by an enzymatic exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Emaus, R.; Bieber, L.L.

    1982-01-15

    A rapid method for the preparation of (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine is described. The method involves exchange of (1-/sup 14/C)acetic acid into a pool of unlabeled acetyl-L-carnitine using the enzymes acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. After isotopic equilibrium is attained, radioactive acetylcarnitine is separated from the other reaction components by chromatography on Dowex 1 (C1/sup -/) anion exchange resin. One of the procedures used to verify the product (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine can be used to synthesize (3S)-(5-/sup 14/C)citric acid.

  7. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  8. Tuning the Optical Properties of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals by Anion Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that, via controlled anion exchange reactions using a range of different halide precursors, we can finely tune the chemical composition and the optical properties of presynthesized colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), from green emitting CsPbBr3 to bright emitters in any other region of the visible spectrum, and back, by displacement of Cl– or I– ions and reinsertion of Br– ions. This approach gives access to perovskite semiconductor NCs with both structural and optical qualities comparable to those of directly synthesized NCs. We also show that anion exchange is a dynamic process that takes place in solution between NCs. Therefore, by mixing solutions containing perovskite NCs emitting in different spectral ranges (due to different halide compositions) their mutual fast exchange dynamics leads to homogenization in their composition, resulting in NCs emitting in a narrow spectral region that is intermediate between those of the parent nanoparticles. PMID:26214734

  9. Density functional investigation of the water exchange reaction on the gibbsite surface.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Feng, Hui; Jin, Xiaoyan; Yang, Wenjing; Wang, Yingjie; Bi, Shuping

    2009-12-15

    The water exchange reactions on the gibbsite surface have been investigated by density functional calculations (B3LYP/6-31G(d) level) combining the supermolecular model and PCM model in this paper, and the water exchange rate constants on the gibbsite surface have also been predicted. In the proposed reaction pathways, the clusters Al6(OH)18(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are used as the models of gibbsite surface and protonated gibbsite surface respectively to examine the effect of protonation of gibbsite surface on the water exchange rate constants. The activation energy barriers DeltaE(s) not equal to (aq) for Al6(OH)18(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are 28.6 and 27.2 kJ*mol-1, respectively. The reaction energies DeltaE(s) (aq) for Al6(OH)18(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are 2.9 and 14.4 kJ mol-1, respectively, indicating that hexacoordinate aluminum in the gibbsite surface is more stable. The log k(TST) for Al6(OH)18(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are 6.5 and 7.5 respectively, and the log k(ex) calculated by the given transmission coefficient for Al6(OH)18-(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are 2.4 and 3.4 respectively, indicating that the protonation of gibbsite surface promotes the water exchange reaction of gibbsite surface and accelerates the dissolution rate of gibbsite. The relationship between the calculated free energy and experimental rate constants was explored, and according to this relationship, the log k(ex) for Al6(OH)18(H2O)6(0) and Al6(OH)12(H2O)12(6+) are 2.5 and 3.1 respectively, close to the corresponding values calculated by the given transmission coefficient. The water exchange rate constant of gibbsite surface is close to those of K-MAl(12)(M = Al, Ga, and Ge) polyoxocations, but deviates from that of Al(H2O)6(3+), implying that the same reactions with similar structure have similar water exchange rate constants. PMID:20000521

  10. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  11. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  12. Modeling dune-induced hyporheic exchange and nutrient reactions in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardini, L.; Boano, F.; Cardenas, M. B.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of water across the streambed plays an important role in the ecology of fluvial environments, since it assures the connections of surface and subsurface waters, which have very different peculiarities. Water-borne chemicals are also involved in the process: they enter the sediments with the water and they are transformed into oxidized or reduced substances by biogeochemical reactions, mediated by the hyporheic microbiota. In particular, organic substances can be used as electron donors in a series of redox reactions, with different electron acceptors, e.g., oxygen and nitrate. Nitrification and other secondary reactions also occur as soon as water enters the streambed. These pore-scale transformations concur to affect subsurface solute concentrations and, consequently, the chemistry of upwelling water and the quality of the stream environment. The exchange with the hyporheic zone occurs in response to variations in bed topography, with a very wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For instance, small-scale exchanges are mainly induced by river bed forms, like ripples and dunes, while large-scale exchanges depend on larger geomorphological features. In this work we focus on small-scale exchange induced by the presence of dunes on the streambed, investigating the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes and their effects on solute spatial distribution in the sediments. We numerically simulate the turbulent water flow and the pressure distribution on the streambed and then we evaluate the coupled flow field and biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone in steady-state conditions. Four representative reactive compounds are taken into account: dissolved organic carbon (DOC), oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Sensitivity analyses are also performed to analyze the influence of hydrological and chemical properties of the system on solute reaction rates. The results demonstrate that the stream water quality can strongly affect the reactive behavior of the sediments. For instance, the DOC availability has shown to be a discriminating factor for determining a net nitrate production or consumption at the bed surface. Stream velocity and sediment permeability have also displayed a direct influence on the chemical zonation, by affecting the transport efficiency and the reaction rates. This study represents an initial step for a better understanding of the complex interactions between hydrodynamical and biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone.

  13. Assessment of the Handy-Cohen optimized exchange density functional for organic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Jon; Pulay, Peter

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated the performance of the new optimized exchange functional (OPTX) developed by Handy and Cohen [Mol. Phys. 99, 403 (2001)] for predicting geometries, heats of reaction, and barrier heights for twelve organic reactions (six closed-shell and six radical). OPTX has been used in conjunction with, among others, the well-known Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlational functional to form two new functionals, OLYP and O3LYP. These are similar to the well-established BLYP and B3LYP functionals, respectively, with OPTX replacing the standard Becke exchange functional, B88. Our results strongly support claims made by their developers that OLYP is superior to BLYP, and essentially renders it obsolete. The computed OLYP heats of reaction, barrier heights, and even molecular geometries (with larger basis sets), are comparable with, if not better than, the corresponding B3LYP values. The O3LYP functional is overall better than B3LYP, albeit not by much. Both OLYP and O3LYP are among the best functionals currently available; the performance of OLYP in particular is noteworthy given that this functional includes no exact exchange.

  14. Hydrogen Isotope Exchange of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Aqueous Solution: Possibly a Termolecular Liquid Phase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gabričević, Mario; Lente, Gábor; Fábián, István

    2015-12-24

    This work reports an experimental study of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange in the basic aqueous solutions of trichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene using (1)H NMR as a monitoring method. 1,1-Dichlorethylene was also investigated but found not to exchange hydrogen isotopes with water. The kinetics of isotope exchange features two different pathways, the first is first order with respect to hydroxide ion, whereas the second is second order. The first pathway is interpreted as a straightforward bimolecular reaction between chloroethylene and hydroxide ion, which leads to the deprotonation of chloroethylene. The second pathway involves a transition state with the association of one molecule of the chloroethylene and two hydroxide ions. It is shown that the second pathway could involve the formation of a precursor complex composed of one chloroethylene molecule and one hydroxide ion, but a direct termolecular elementary reaction is also feasible, which is shown by deriving a theoretical highest limit for the rate constants of termolecular reactions in solution. PMID:26618984

  15. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  16. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a `perfect experiment`, measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H{sub 2} reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H{sub 2} molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H{sub 2} reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10{sup 3} molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H{sub 2} reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  17. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2] + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a 'perfect experiment', measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H[sub 2] reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H[sub 2] molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H[sub 2] reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10[sup 3] molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H[sub 2] reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  18. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  19. Double-regge exchange limit for the γp→ K⁺K⁻p reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, M.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We apply the generalized Veneziano model (B₅ model) in the double-Regge exchange limit to the γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. Four different cases defined by the possible combinations of the signature factors of leading Regge exchanges ((K*,a₂/f₂), (K*,ρ/ω), (K*₂,a₂/f₂), and (K*₂,ρ/ω)) have been simulated through the Monte Carlo method. Suitable event candidates for the double-Regge exchange high-energy limit were selected employing Van Hove plots as a better alternative to kinematical cuts in the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot. In this way we predict and analyze the double-Regge contribution to the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot, which constitutes one of the major backgrounds in the search for strangeonia, hybrids and exotics using γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. We expect that data currently under analysis, and that to come in the future, will allow verification of the double-Regge behavior and a better assessment of this component of the amplitude.

  20. Double-regge exchange limit for the γp→ K⁺K⁻p reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, M.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We apply the generalized Veneziano model (B₅ model) in the double-Regge exchange limit to the γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. Four different cases defined by the possible combinations of the signature factors of leading Regge exchanges ((K*,a₂/f₂), (K*,ρ/ω), (K*₂,a₂/f₂), and (K*₂,ρ/ω)) have been simulated through the Monte Carlo method. Suitable event candidates for the double-Regge exchange high-energy limit were selected employing Van Hove plots as a better alternative to kinematical cuts in the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot. In this way we predict and analyze the double-Regge contribution to the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot, which constitutes one of the major backgrounds in the search for strangeonia,more » hybrids and exotics using γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. We expect that data currently under analysis, and that to come in the future, will allow verification of the double-Regge behavior and a better assessment of this component of the amplitude.« less

  1. The analysis of reactions {pi}N {yields} two mesons + N within reggeon exchanges. Basic formulas for fit

    SciTech Connect

    Anisovich, V. V. Sarantsev, A. V.

    2009-11-15

    We present technical aspects of the fitting procedure given in the paper by V.V. Anisovich and A.V. Sarantsev 'The analysis of reactions {pi}N {yields} two mesons + N within reggeon exchanges. Fit and results.'

  2. Upper bounds to the impact parameter and cross section for atom-diatom exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnavich, Walter J.

    1982-09-01

    We establish upper bounds to the impact parameter and cross section for any A+BC exchange reaction in which the reagents are in a given initial state. The approach we take is to use the centrifugal forces generated in a collision to place a bound on the values of the total angular momentum for which reaction can occur. The bounds on the impact parameter and cross section then follow directly from the restrictions imposed by energy and angular momentum conservation. Our approach is related to theories based on the properties of periodic trajectories in that the system configuration which determines the angular momentum bound is also that of a quasibound ABC rigid rotor periodic trajectory. The equation which defines the configuration of this trajectory is similar in form to a generating function recently derived by Child and Pollak. Furthermore, an analysis of the symmetric stretch periodic trajectories in the H+H2 reaction suggests that the rigid rotor trajectory is the maximum angular momentum member of a family of periodic trajectories which exist at energies below and above the dissociation threshold. Our approach is also related to variational transition state theory. However, rather than vary the location of a diving surface, we keep the surface fixed in the reagents' region of the system phase space and vary instead its boundary. We compare the bounds we place on the impact parameter and cross section to the quasiclassical trajectory data of Karplus, Porter, and Sharma for the H+H2 exchange reaction and to that of Persky for the reactions of Cl with H2, D2, and HD. The cross section ratios show a near-linear dependence on the fraction of the total system energy which is partitioned initially into relative translational energy of the reagents, whereas the impact parameter ratios smoothly increase from ˜0.2 near threshold to a maximum of ˜0.9.

  3. Barrier Height for the Exchange Reaction F + HF → FH + F

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Stephen V.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Bender, Charles F.

    1974-01-01

    There exists a body of conflicting data as to the existence or nonexistence of FHF, ClHCl, BrHBr, and IHI as chemically bound molecular species. Ab initio quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations are presented which predict linear symmetric FHF to be unstable. The barrier height for the F + HF exchange reaction is suggested to be no less than 18 kcal/mol, much larger than expected either intuitively or on the basis of certain experiments on related systems. The expected reliability of the calculations is based upon comparable results for diatomic molecules and the F + H2 and H + F2 potential energy surfaces. PMID:16592128

  4. Neutron skin thickness of {sup 90}Zr determined by charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yako, K.; Sakai, H.; Sagawa, H.

    2006-11-15

    Charge exchange spin-dipole (SD) excitations of {sup 90}Zr are studied by the {sup 90}Zr(p,n) and {sup 90}Zr(n,p) reactions at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique is employed to obtain the SD strength distributions in the cross-section spectra. For the first time, a model-independent SD sum rule value is obtained: 148{+-}12 fm{sup 2}. The neutron skin thickness of {sup 90}Zr is determined to be 0.07{+-}0.04 fm from the SD sum rule value.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of ligand-exchange reactions of Cd(II) chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Nivorozhkin, L.E.; Kalabin, G.A.; Nivorozhkin, A.L.; Valeev, R.B.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-03-01

    Tetrahedral Cd(II) bis(5-thio(or seleno)pyrazole-4-carboxaldiminates) of types II and III have been synthesized for the first time. The kinetics of the degenerate ligand exchange and enantiomerization of the complexes obtained have been studied by dynamic /sup 111/Cd, /sup 77/Se, and /sup 1/H (s = 1/2) NMR. The rate of intramolecular enantiomerization (k = 1/tau) is more than an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding values for processes of degenerate ligand exchange (a second-order reaction) determined from the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd-/sup 77/Se and /sup 111/Cd-N=CH spin-spin coupling constants. The cleavage and formation processes of the Cd-Se and Cd-N bonds are isoenergetic (..delta.. G/sub 298//sup not equal to/ = 14.4 kcal/mole for chelate II with X = Se and R = CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/). The free energies of activation of degenerate ligand exchange determined form the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd N=CH spin-spin coupling constant increase from 12.7 to 17.9 kcal/mole along the following series for R: C/sub 2/H/sub 5/ < Ar < CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ < t-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/ < cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 11/. Replacement of the sulfur atom in the chelate ring by selenium results in increases in the rates of ligand exchange. A mechanism of degenerate ligand exchange has been proposed.

  6. Dynamics of the molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raff, L. M.; Thompson, D. L.; Sims, L. B.; Porter, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction are treated theoretically by means of extensive classical trajectories calculated on a reasonable potential energy surface on which the single adjustable parameter is the iodine-core effective charge. The analysis shows the molecular mechanism to be dynamically forbidden, but gives an over-all rate constant for the atomic mechanism that is in agreement with the experimental values. It is indicated that the formation of a weak H2I complex plays an important dynamical role if the atomic mechanism is limited to reactions with collision complexes involving no more than two hydrogen atoms and two iodine atoms. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained for the rate constant for the recombination I+I+H2 yields I2+H2 and its negative temperature coefficient.

  7. Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rashmi; Singh, Ashish; Kohli, D. K.; Singh, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels, Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ˜0.8 m3 (STP).s-1. m-3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining to the dynamics of supernova explosions and nuclear synthesis, and more recently to the measurements of (ββ) decay matrix elements and the determination of half-lives of (ββ) decaying nuclei.

  9. Time-Resolved Structural Analysis of Cation Exchange Reactions in Birnessite Using Synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Hanson, J. C.; Lee, Y.; Komarneni, S.

    2002-12-01

    Birnessite ((Na,Ca,Mn2+) Mn7O142.8H2O) is a layered Mn-oxide with a 7.2Å spacing between the Mn octahedral sheets. Since birnessite is an abundant phase in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules, it plays a significant role in soil and groundwater chemistry. Experiments by Golden et al. (1986,1987) have demonstrated that Na-buserite (hydrated birnessite) readily exchanges Na+ for a variety of other cations, including K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Ni2+, and Sr2+. In light of its high cation exchange capacity, birnessite is industrially important for ion and molecular sieves and cathodic materials. In addition, birnessite serves as a precursor in the synthesis of todorokite, which has a 3x3 tunnel structure and is used as an octahedral sieve. We monitored cation-exchange reactions in birnessite by time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction with a simple flow-through cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The flow-through cell was developed by Lee and Parise at SUNY-Stony Brook, and this work represents its first application to Mn oxides. A series of synthetic Na-birnessite samples were saturated with chloride solutions containing dissolved K+, Mg2+, and Ba2+, ranging from 0.1M to 0.001M. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every ~ 3 minutes. The synchrotron experiments revealed that complete cation exchange occurs within three hours, and significant modifications of the arrangements of interlayer cations and water molecules accompany the exchange. Specifically, the replacement of Na by Mg resulted in the continuous growth of a discrete buserite-like phase with a 10Å layer spacing, while replacement of Na by K and Ba retained the 7Å spacing. K replacement of Na resulted in gradually decreasing peak intensity and peak merging. The Ba exchange yielded an abrupt decrease in diffraction intensities followed by a more gradual lattice change over the last 2 hours. Rietveld analysis led to the first determination of the structure of Ba-birnessite in space group C-1. With a final chi-squared parameter of 1.540, the refined lattice parameters were a = 5.178(2)Å, b = 2.850(3)Å, c = 7.320(5)Å, α = 89.512(1)°, β = 102.989(6)°, and γ = 89.893(6)°. However, the lattice parameters of the fully exchanged Ba-birnessite indicate that Ba substitution causes the unit cell to be more monoclinic.

  10. Mineral carbonation of gaseous carbon dioxide using a clay-hosted cation exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Il-Mo; Roh, Ki-Min

    2013-01-01

    The mineral carbonation method is still a challenge in practical application owing to: (1) slow reaction kinetics, (2) high reaction temperature, and (3) continuous mineral consumption. These constraints stem from the mode of supplying alkaline earth metals through mineral acidification and dissolution. Here, we attempt to mineralize gaseous carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate, using a cation exchange reaction of vermiculite (a species of expandable clay minerals). The mineralization is operated by draining NaCI solution through vermiculite powders and continuously dropping into the pool of NaOH solution with CO2 gas injected. The mineralization temperature is regulated here at 293 and 333 K for 15 min. As a result of characterization, using an X-ray powder diffractometer and a scanning electron microscopy, two types of pure CaCO3 polymorphs (vaterite and calcite) are identified as main reaction products. Their abundance and morphology are heavily dependent on the mineralization temperature. Noticeably, spindle-shaped vaterite, which is quite different from a typical vaterite morphology (polycrystalline spherulite), forms predominantly at 333 K (approximately 98 wt%). PMID:24617079

  11. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  12. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  13. TraML--a standard format for exchange of selected reaction monitoring transition lists.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W; Chambers, Matthew; Neumann, Steffen; Levander, Fredrik; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Shofstahl, Jim; Campbell, David S; Mendoza, Luis; Ovelleiro, David; Helsens, Kenny; Martens, Lennart; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L; Brusniak, Mi-Youn

    2012-04-01

    Targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring is a powerful mass spectrometric technique affording higher dynamic range, increased specificity and lower limits of detection than other shotgun mass spectrometry methods when applied to proteome analyses. However, it involves selective measurement of predetermined analytes, which requires more preparation in the form of selecting appropriate signatures for the proteins and peptides that are to be targeted. There is a growing number of software programs and resources for selecting optimal transitions and the instrument settings used for the detection and quantification of the targeted peptides, but the exchange of this information is hindered by a lack of a standard format. We have developed a new standardized format, called TraML, for encoding transition lists and associated metadata. In addition to introducing the TraML format, we demonstrate several implementations across the community, and provide semantic validators, extensive documentation, and multiple example instances to demonstrate correctly written documents. Widespread use of TraML will facilitate the exchange of transitions, reduce time spent handling incompatible list formats, increase the reusability of previously optimized transitions, and thus accelerate the widespread adoption of targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring. PMID:22159873

  14. The neutron-proton charge-exchange amplitudes measured in the dp → ppn reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Barsov, S.; Carbonell, J.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Engels, R.; Gebel, R.; Glagolev, V.; Grigoryev, K.; Goslawski, P.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Komarov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Macharashvili, G.; Maier, R.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Seyfarth, H.; Stein, H. J.; Steffens, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Trusov, S.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.

    2013-04-01

    The unpolarised differential cross section and the two deuteron tensor analysing powers A xx and A yy of the ěc dp to \\{ pp\\} _s n charge-exchange reaction have been measured with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring. Using deuteron beams with energies 1.2, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27GeV, data were obtained for small momentum transfers to a { pp} s system with low excitation energy. The results at the three lower energies are consistent with impulse approximation predictions based upon the current knowledge of the neutron-proton amplitudes. However, at 2.27GeV, where these amplitudes are far more uncertain, agreement requires a reduction in the overall double-spin-flip contribution, with an especially significant effect in the longitudinal direction. These conclusions are supported by measurements of the deuteron-proton spin-correlation parameters C x,x and C y,y that were carried out in the ěc děc p to \\{ pp\\} _s n reaction at 1.2 and 2.27GeV. The values obtained for the proton analysing power A {/y p } also suggest the need for a radical re-evaluation of the neutron-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at the higher energy. It is therefore clear that such measurements can provide a valuable addition to the neutron-proton database in the charge-exchange region.

  15. Fe-Zn exchange reaction between tetrahedrite and sphalerite in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Michael J.; Sack, Richard O.

    1987-12-01

    Microprobe and fluid inclusion analyses of hydrothermal ore deposits containing the subassemblage sphalerite+ tetrahedrite-tennantite ˜[(Cu, Ag)10(Fe, Zn)2(As,Sb)4S13] reveal that the Gibbs energies of the reciprocal reaction Cu10Zn2Sb4S13 + Cu10Fe2As4S13 = Cu10Fe2Sb4S13 + Cu10Zn2As4S13 and the Fe-Zn exchange reaction 1/2Cu10Fe2Sb4S13 + ZnS = 1/2Cu10Zn2Sb4S13 + FeS are within the uncertainties of the values established by Sack and Loucks (1985) and Raabe and Sack (1984), 2.59±0.14 and 2.07±0.07 kcal/gfw. However, this study suggests that the Fe-Zn exchange reaction between sphalerite and Sb and Ag-rich tetrahedrites does not obey the simple systematics suggested by Sack and Loucks (1985) wherein tetrahedrite is assumed to behave as an “ideal” reciprocal solution. Instead these studies show that the configurational Gibbs energy of this exchange reaction, RTln[( X Fe/ X Zn)TET( X ZnS/ X FeS)SPH], corrected for sphalerite nonideality exhibits both a local maximum and minimum as a function of Ag/(Cu+Ag) ratio at a given X {FeS/SPH}and temperature. The local maximum for X {FeS/SPH}˜0.10 corresponds to the position of the cell edge maximum established for natural tetrahedrites by Riley (1974), Ag/(Ag+Cu)˜0.4. These studies and the results of structural refinements of Ag-bearing tetrahedrites suggest that in low silver tetrahedrites Ag is preferentially incorporated in trigonal-planar sites but that in tetrahedrites with intermediate and greater Ag/(Ag+Cu) ratio, Ag is preferentially incorporated in tetrahedral sites. A nonconvergent site ordering model for tetrahedrite is developed to quantify and extrapolate these predictions.

  16. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  17. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  18. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  19. Ligand Exchange Reaction of Au(I) R-N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes with Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, H F; Vieira, M A; Sánchez Delgado, G Y; Paschoal, D

    2016-04-14

    The chemotherapy with gold complexes has been attempted since the 90s after the clinical success of auranofin, a gold(I) coordination complex. Currently, the organometallics compounds have shown promise in cancer therapy, mainly in those complexes containing N-heterocylic carbenes (NHC) as a ligand. The present study shows a kinetic analysis of the reaction of six alkyl-substituted NHC with cysteine (Cys), which is taken as an important bionucleophile representative. The first and second ligand exchange processes were analyzed with the complete description of the mechanism and energy profiles. For the first reaction step, which is the rate-limiting step of the whole substitution reaction, the activation enthalpy follows the order 1/Me2 < 2/Me,Et < 4/n-Bu2 < 3/i-Pr2 < 6/Cy2 < 5/t-Bu2, which is fully explained by steric and electronic features. From a steric point of view, the previous reactivity order is correlated with the r(Au-S) calculated for the transition state structures where S is the sulfur ligand from the Cys entering group. This means that longer r(Au-S) leads to higher activation enthalpy and is consistent with the effectiveness of gold shielding from nucleophile attack by bulkier alkyl-substituted NHC ligand. When electronic effect was addressed we found that higher activation barrier was predicted for strongly electron-donating NHC ligand, represented by the eigenvalue of σ-HOMO orbital of the free ligands. The molecular interpretation of the electronic effects is that strong donating NHC forms strong metal-ligand bond. For the second reaction step, similar structure-reactivity relationships were obtained, however the activation energies are less sensitive to the structure. PMID:27010796

  20. Charge-exchange reactions from the standpoint of the parton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using simple arguments, we show that charge-exchange reactions at high energies go through the hard scattering of fast quarks. On this basis we describe π-p→ M0n and K-p→ M0Λ, M0=π0,η,η', in a combined approach which defines hard contributions in the parton model and soft ones in Regge phenomenology. The disappearance of a dip according to recent GAMS- 4π data in the differential cross-section K-p→ηΛ at \\vert t\\vert≈ 0.4-0.5 (GeV/c)2 at transition to relatively high momenta, is explained as a manifestation of a mode change of summation of hard contributions from coherent to incoherent. Other manifestations of the mentioned mode change are discussed. Constraints on the η- η{^' mixing and gluonium admixture in η{^' are obtained.

  1. Bremsstrahlung in intermediate-energy nucleon reactions within an effective one-boson exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, V. V.; Kämpfer, B.; Reznik, B. L.; Titov, A. I.

    1998-01-01

    Within a covariant effective one-boson exchange model for the T matrix of NN interactions we present detailed calculations of bremsstrahlung cross sections for proton-proton and proton-neutron reactions at beam energies in the 1 GeV region. Besides pure bremsstrahlung processes we consider photons from Λ decays and contributions from the η → γγ process. At beam energies above 700 MeV the Λ decay channel dominates the spectra at large photon energies, where the interference between non-resonance processes and the Λ decay channel becomes also important. Low energy photons stem from pure bremsstrahlung processes. The available experimental data at 730 MeV beam energy is well described. We extrapolate the model down to 280 MeV, where more detailed experimental data exist, and find agreement with angular distributions.

  2. Pion nucleus single charge exchange reactions above the. delta. (1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    Forward-angle differential cross sections for the (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup 0/) reaction leading to the Isobaric Analog State in the residual nuclei at 300, 425, 500 and 550 MeV have been measured. Targets ranged in mass from /sup 7/Li to /sup 208/Pb. A description of the experimental setup and the analysis is presented. The 0/sup 0/ cross sections are found to rise markedly between 300 and 425 MeV, contrary to the extrapolation from the lower energy data and to the behavior of the free pion-nucleon single charge exchange process. The angular distributions are sharply forward peaked. Systematics of the data indicate increased volume penetration with increasing pion beam energy. The cross sections are compared with the results of Glauber model calculations indicating the significance of higher order processes even at these energies. 67 refs., 40 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. Charge-exchange reactions and electron-capture rates for presupernova stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, Remco

    2015-04-01

    Weak reaction rates such as electron captures and beta decays play major roles in a variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae and accreting neutron stars. Consequently, the use of accurate weak reaction rates in astrophysical simulations to understand these phenomena is important. Unfortunately, the number of relevant nuclei is typically very large, and, except for a few special cases, it is impossible to rely on experimental results only: theoretical models must be used to estimate the weak reaction rates. These models can then be benchmarked and improved on the basis of a limited number of experimental data. The most important nuclear structure input that is required for calculating weak reaction rates are Gamow-Teller transition strengths. Although these can be extracted from beta and electron-capture decay data, the energy window accessible by such experiments is limited, if accessible at all. However, at the high temperatures and densities that occur in massive stars prior to the cataclysmic demise, transitions to final states at high excitation energies are important. In addition, to properly test theory, full Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions are very valuable. Fortunately, nature is kind: charge-exchange experiments at intermediate energies can provide the relevant strength distributions over a wide energy window and a variety of charge-exchange probes, such as (p,n), (n,p), (d,2 He) and (t,3 He) have been used to extract strengths of relevance for astrophysics (and for other purposes). This presentation will focus on efforts to validate electron capture rates calculated based on nuclear structure models for nuclei with masses ranging from A ~ 40-65, and on studies aimed at testing astrophysical sensitivities to uncertainties/deviations in the theoretical rates. These efforts include experiments with unstable isotopes, and special gamma-ray coincidence techniques to localize very weak, but astrophysically important, low-lying Gamow-Teller transitions. Future efforts will focus on heavier nuclei (A>65) and nuclei further from stability. For the latter, opportunities provided at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be critically important. In particular, experiments enables by the construction of a High Rigidity Spectrometer will strongly enhance the impact of the data for the validation and improvements of novel theoretical approaches. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation (under Grants PHY-1102511 and PHY-0822648 [JINA]) and the US Department Of Energy under Grant DE- 334 AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL).

  4. Bidirectional exchange of biogenic volatiles with vegetation: emission sources, reactions, breakdown and deposition

    PubMed Central

    Niinemets, Ülo; Fares, Silvano; Harley, Peter; Jardine, Kolby J.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are widely modeled as inputs to atmospheric chemistry simulations. However, BVOC may interact with cellular structures and neighboring leaves in a complex manner during volatile diffusion from the sites of release to leaf boundary layer and during turbulent transport to the atmospheric boundary layer. Furthermore, recent observations demonstrate that the BVOC emissions are bidirectional, and uptake and deposition of BVOC and their oxidation products are the rule rather than the exception. This review summarizes current knowledge of within-leaf reactions of synthesized volatiles with reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake, deposition and storage of volatiles and their oxidation products as driven by adsorption on leaf surface and solubilization and enzymatic detoxification inside leaves. The available evidence indicates that due to reactions with ROS and enzymatic metabolism, the BVOC gross production rates are much larger than previously thought. The degree to which volatiles react within leaves and can be potentially taken up by vegetation depends on compound reactivity, physicochemical characteristics, as well as their participation in leaf metabolism. We argue that future models should be based on the concept of bidirectional BVOC exchange and consider modification of BVOC sink/source strengths by within-leaf metabolism and storage. PMID:24635661

  5. Influence of matrix diffusion and exchange reactions on radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Maloszewski, P. ); Zuber, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The parallel fissure model coupled with the equation of diffusion into the matrix and with exchange reaction equations has been used to derive a simple formula for estimating the influence of matrix porosity and reaction parameters on the determination of radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate rocks. Examples of evidently too great radiocarbon ages in carbonate formations, which are not explainable by models for the initial {sup 14}C corrections, can easily be explained by this formula. Parameters obtained for a chalk formation from a known multitracer experiment combined with a pumping test suggest a possibility of {sup 14}C ages more than three orders of magnitude greater than the ages which would be observed if the radiocarbon transport took place only in the mobile water in the fissures. It is shown that contrary to the solute movement on a small scale and with a variable input, the large-scale movement, characteristic for the {sup 14}C dating, does not necessarily require the knowledge of kinetic parameters, because they may be replaced by the distribution coefficient. Discordant tritium and {sup 14}C concentrations are commonly interpreted as a proof of mixing either in the aquifer or at the discharge site. For fissured carbonate formations, however, an alternative explanation is given by the derived model showing a considerable delay of {sup 14}C with respect to nonsorbable tracers.

  6. Reversible Dissociation and Ligand-Glutathione Exchange Reaction in Binuclear Cationic Tetranitrosyl Iron Complex with Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO45H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO42H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)??k1 = (4.6 0.1)10?3?s?1 and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k2 = (1.8 0.2)10?3?s?1 at 25C in 0.05?M phosphate buffer, ?pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS? during decomposition of 1.510?4?M (I) in the presence of 10?3?M GSH, with 76% yield in 24?h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity. PMID:24790592

  7. Neutrino and antineutrino charge-exchange reactions on {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Samana, A. R.; Krmpotic, F.; Paar, N.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2011-02-15

    We extend the formalism of weak interaction processes, obtaining new expressions for the transition rates, which greatly facilitate numerical calculations, for both neutrino-nucleus reactions and muon capture. Explicit violation of the conserved vector current hypothesis by the Coulomb field, as well as development of a sum-rule approach for inclusive cross sections, has been worked out. We have done a thorough study of exclusive (ground-state) properties of {sup 12}B and {sup 12}N within the projected quasiparticle random phase approximation (PQRPA). Good agreement with experimental data achieved in this way put into evidence the limitations of the standard RPA and QRPA models, which come from the inability of the RPA to open the p{sub 3/2} shell and from the nonconservation of the number of particles in the QRPA. The inclusive neutrino/antineutrino ({nu}/{nu}-tilde) reactions {sup 12}C({nu},e{sup -}){sup 12}N and {sup 12}C({nu}-tilde,e{sup +}){sup 12}B are calculated within both the PQRPA and the relativistic QRPA. It is found that (i) the magnitudes of the resulting cross sections are close to the sum-rule limit at low energy, but significantly smaller than this limit at high energies, for both {nu} and {nu}-tilde; (ii) they increase steadily when the size of the configuration space is augmented, particularly for {nu}/{nu}-tilde energies >200 MeV; and (iii) they converge for sufficiently large configuration space and final-state spin. The quasi-elastic {sup 12}C({nu},{mu}{sup -}){sup 12}N cross section recently measured in the MiniBooNE experiment is briefly discussed. We study the decomposition of the inclusive cross section based on the degree of forbiddenness of different multipoles. A few words are dedicated to the {nu}/{nu}-tilde-{sup 12}C charge-exchange reactions related to astrophysical applications.

  8. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  9. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of 90Sr 2+ from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; Zachara, J. M.; Smith, S. C.; Liu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr 2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr 2+, 90Sr 2+, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr 2+ to the water table.

  10. Control of directionality in the DNA strand-exchange reaction catalysed by the tyrosine recombinase TnpI

    PubMed Central

    Vanhooff, Virginie; Normand, Christophe; Galloy, Christine; Segall, Anca M.; Hallet, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    In DNA site-specific recombination catalysed by tyrosine recombinases, two pairs of DNA strands are sequentially exchanged between separate duplexes and the mechanisms that confer directionality to this theoretically reversible reaction remain unclear. The tyrosine recombinase TnpI acts at the internal resolution site (IRS) of the transposon Tn4430 to resolve intermolecular transposition products. Recombination is catalysed at the IRS core sites (IR1–IR2) and is regulated by adjacent TnpI-binding motifs (DR1 and DR2). These are dispensable accessory sequences that confer resolution selectivity to the reaction by stimulating synapsis between directly repeated IRSs. Here, we show that formation of the DR1–DR2-containing synapse imposes a specific order of activation of the TnpI catalytic subunits in the complex so that the IR1-bound subunits catalyse the first strand exchange and the IR2-bound subunits the second strand exchange. This ordered pathway was demonstrated for a complete recombination reaction using a TnpI catalytic mutant (TnpI-H234L) partially defective in DNA rejoining. The presence of the DR1- and DR2-bound TnpI subunits was also found to stabilize transient recombination intermediates, further displacing the reaction equilibrium towards product formation. Implication of TnpI/IRS accessory elements in the initial architecture of the synapse and subsequent conformational changes taking place during strand exchange is discussed. PMID:20044348

  11. Photochemical Synthesis and Ligand Exchange Reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (Eta[superscript 2]-Alkene) Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical synthesis and subsequent ligand exchange reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (eta[superscript2]-alkene) compounds has provided a novel experiment for upper-level inorganic chemistry laboratory courses. The experiment is designed to provide a system in which the changing electronic properties of the alkene ligands could be easily…

  12. Prospects for Thermal Atomic Layer Etching Using Sequential, Self-Limiting Fluorination and Ligand-Exchange Reactions.

    PubMed

    George, Steven M; Lee, Younghee

    2016-05-24

    Thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of Al2O3 and HfO2 using sequential, self-limiting fluorination and ligand-exchange reactions was recently demonstrated using HF and tin acetylacetonate (Sn(acac)2) as the reactants. This new thermal pathway for ALE represents the reverse of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and should lead to isotropic etching. Atomic layer deposition and ALE can together define the atomic layer growth and removal steps required for advanced semiconductor fabrication. The thermal ALE of many materials should be possible using fluorination and ligand-exchange reactions. The chemical details of ligand-exchange can lead to selective ALE between various materials. Thermal ALE could produce conformal etching in high-aspect-ratio structures. Thermal ALE could also yield ultrasmooth thin films based on deposit/etch-back methods. Enhancement of ALE rates and possible anisotropic ALE could be achieved using radicals or ions together with thermal ALE. PMID:27216115

  13. Exchange repulsive potential adaptable for electronic structure changes during chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, D.

    2015-04-28

    Hybrid methods combining quantum mechanical (QM) and classical calculations are becoming important tools in chemistry. The popular approach to calculate the interaction between QM and classical calculations employs interatomic potentials. In most cases, the interatomic potential is constructed of an electrostatic (ES) potential and a non-ES potential. Because QM treatment is employed in the calculation of the ES potential, the electronic change can be considered in this ES potential. However, QM treatment of the non-ES potential is difficult because of high computational cost. To overcome this difficulty of evaluating the non-ES potential, we proposed an exchange repulsive potential as the main part of the non-ES potential on the basis of a QM approach. This potential is independent of empirical parameters and adaptable for electronic structure. We combined this potential with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution and successfully applied it to the chemical reactions in aqueous phase.

  14. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Samuel M.; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory.

  15. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  16. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-02-28

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory. PMID:26931687

  17. HupUV proteins of Rhodobacter capsulatus can bind H2: evidence from the H-D exchange reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Vignais, P M; Dimon, B; Zorin, N A; Colbeau, A; Elsen, S

    1997-01-01

    The H-D exchange reaction has been measured with the D2-H2O system, for Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91, which lacks the hupSL-encoded hydrogenase, and R. capsulatus BSE16, which lacks the HupUV proteins. The hupUV gene products, expressed from plasmid pAC206, are shown to catalyze an H-D exchange reaction distinguishable from the H-D exchange due to the membrane-bound, hupSL-encoded hydrogenase. In the presence of O2, the uptake hydrogenase of BSE16 cells catalyzed a rapid uptake and oxidation of H2, D2, and HD present in the system, and its activity (H-D exchange, H2 evolution in presence of reduced methyl viologen [MV+]) depended on the external pH, while the H-D exchange due to HupUV remained insensitive to external pH and O2. These data suggest that the HupSL dimer is periplasmically oriented, while the HupUV proteins are in the cytoplasmic compartment. PMID:8982013

  18. Methyl exchange reaction of trimethylindium on GaAs(100) and the preferential etching of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, V. M.; McCaulley, J. A.

    1990-09-01

    We have observed a heterogeneous methyl exchange reaction between trimethylindium (TMIn) and Ga atoms on GaAs(100) which could be important in controlling stoichiometry in III-V compound semiconductor films containing In and Ga, prepared from group-III-alkyl sources. Adsorbed layers were prepared by dosing clean GaAs (either Ga- or As-stabilized) with TMIn near room temperature, to saturated coverage (1.7 × 10 14 In atoms/cm 2). Total carbon and indium coverages were monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Samples were heated to ~ 500° C at a rate of 1.6° /s and desorption products were detected by a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer. TMIn decomposes to form a Ga-alkyl product (either Ga(CH 3) 2, Ga(CH 3) 3, or a mixture) which desorbs between 70 and 350 ° C, and CH 3 which is detected between 220 and 450 ° C. The Ga-alkyl yield was higher for Ga-stabilized surfaces, while the yield of CH 3 was greater for As-rich surfaces. On both Ga- and As-rich surfaces, the yields of Ga(CH 3) x and CH 3 are, within experimental error, the same as those measured for trimethylgallium decomposition. The preferential "etching" of Ga by TMIn is a likely explanation for the observed reduction in the Ga incorporation probability in InGaAs films prepared from metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy. It could also explain the In-rich surfaces left after CH 4/H 2 plasma etching of InGaAsP.

  19. Going through the barrier: coupled disulfide exchange reactions promote efficient catalysis in quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Israel, Benjamin A; Kodali, Vamsi K; Thorpe, Colin

    2014-02-21

    The quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) family of enzymes generates disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Determination of the potentials of the redox centers in Trypanosoma brucei QSOX provides a context for understanding catalysis by this facile oxidant of protein thiols. The CXXC motif of the thioredoxin domain is comparatively oxidizing (E'0 of -144 mV), consistent with an ability to transfer disulfide bonds to a broad range of thiol substrates. In contrast, the proximal CXXC disulfide in the ERV (essential for respiration and vegetative growth) domain of TbQSOX is strongly reducing (E'0 of -273 mV), representing a major apparent thermodynamic barrier to overall catalysis. Reduction of the oxidizing FAD cofactor (E'0 of -153 mV) is followed by the strongly favorable reduction of molecular oxygen. The role of a mixed disulfide intermediate between thioredoxin and ERV domains was highlighted by rapid reaction studies in which the wild-type CGAC motif in the thioredoxin domain of TbQSOX was replaced by the more oxidizing CPHC or more reducing CGPC sequence. Mixed disulfide bond formation is accompanied by the generation of a charge transfer complex with the flavin cofactor. This provides thermodynamic coupling among the three redox centers of QSOX and avoids the strongly uphill mismatch between the formal potentials of the thioredoxin and ERV disulfides. This work identifies intriguing mechanistic parallels between the eukaryotic QSOX enzymes and the DsbA/B system catalyzing disulfide bond generation in the bacterial periplasm and suggests that the strategy of linked disulfide exchanges may be exploited in other catalysts of oxidative protein folding. PMID:24379406

  20. Unexpected Toxicity of Monolayer Protected Gold Clusters Eliminated by PEG-Thiol Place Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Carrie A.; Huffman, Brian J.; Gerdon, Aren E.; Cliffel, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) are small, metal nanoparticles capped with thiolate ligands that have been widely studied for their size-dependent properties and for their ability to be functionalized for biological applications. Common water-soluble MPCs, functionalized by 2-mercaptopropanoyl) amino acetic acid (tiopronin) or glutathione, have been used previously to interface with biological systems. These MPCs are ideal for biological applications not only due to their water-solubility but also their small size (< 5 nm). These characteristics are expected to enable easy biodistribution and clearance. In this report we show an unexpected toxicity is associated with the tiopronin monolayer protected cluster (TMPC), making it incompatible for potential in vivo applications. This toxicity is linked to significant histological damage to the renal tubules, causing mortality at concentrations above 20 μM. We further show how the incorporation of poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) by simple place-exchange reaction eliminates this toxicity. We analyzed gold content within blood and urine and found an increased lifetime of the particle within the bloodstream due to the creation of the mixed monolayer. Also shown was the elimination of kidney damage with the use of the mixed-monolayer particle via Multistix™ analysis, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and histological examination. Final immunological analysis showed no effect on white blood cell (WBC) count for the unmodified particle and a surprising increase in WBC count with injection of mixed monolayer particles at concentrations higher than 30 μM, suggesting that there may be an immune response to these mixed monolayer nanoparticles at high concentrations; therefore, special attention should be focused on selecting the best capping ligands for use in vivo. These findings make the mixed monolayer an excellent candidate for further biological applications using water-soluble nanoparticles. PMID:20715858

  1. Unexpected toxicity of monolayer protected gold clusters eliminated by PEG-thiol place exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Carrie A; Huffman, Brian J; Gerdon, Aren E; Cliffel, David E

    2010-10-18

    Monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) are small, metal nanoparticles capped with thiolate ligands that have been widely studied for their size-dependent properties and for their ability to be functionalized for biological applications. Common water-soluble MPCs, functionalized by N-(2-Mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (tiopronin) or glutathione, have been used previously to interface with biological systems. These MPCs are ideal for biological applications not only due to their water-solubility but also their small size (<5 nm). These characteristics are expected to enable easy biodistribution and clearance. In this article, we show an unexpected toxicity is associated with the tiopronin monolayer protected cluster (TMPC), making it incompatible for potential in vivo applications. This toxicity is linked to significant histological damage to the renal tubules, causing mortality at concentrations above 20 μM. We further show how the incorporation of poly ethylene glycol (PEG) by a simple place-exchange reaction eliminates this toxicity. We analyzed gold content within blood and urine and found an increased lifetime of the particle within the bloodstream due to the creation of the mixed monolayer. Also shown was the elimination of kidney damage with the use of the mixed-monolayer particle via Multistix analysis, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and histological examination. Final immunological analysis showed no effect on white blood cell (WBC) count for the unmodified particle and a surprising increase in WBC count with the injection of mixed monolayer particles at concentrations higher than 30 μM, suggesting that there may be an immune response to these mixed monolayer nanoparticles at high concentrations; therefore, special attention should be focused on selecting the best capping ligands for use in vivo. These findings make the mixed monolayer an excellent candidate for further biological applications using water-soluble nanoparticles. PMID:20715858

  2. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals. PMID:22961747

  3. Effect of grossular on garnet-biotite, Fe Mg exchange reactions: evidence from garnet with mixed growth and diffusion zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, J.

    1996-07-01

    Garnets that exhibit mixed growth and diffusion zoning are used to evaluate the effect of grossular content on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions. These garnets from the uppermost amphibolite-facies to granulite-facies gneiss of the Wissahickon Group, southeastern Pennsylvania, show variation in grossular content (0.035< X Ca<0.14) but nearly constant Mg? ( X Mg/( X Mg+ X Fe) and X Mn through the interior indicating re-equilibration of garnet and matrix minerals with respect to iron, magnesium, and manganese. Mg? is not correlated with calcium content, evidence that the effect of calcium on garnet Fe Mg exchange reactions is small or is offset by other interactions in almandine-rich garnets. In either case, the data presented here indicate that correction for calcium content of garnets in the application of garnet-biotite geothermometry to high-grade metapelites is unnecessary and may lead to an overestimate of peak temperature.

  4. Synthesis of free-standing metal sulfide nanoarrays via anion exchange reaction and their electrochemical energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinhui; Zhu, Changrong; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Ng, Chin Fan; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-02-26

    Metal sulfides are an emerging class of high-performance electrode materials for solar cells and electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, a facile and powerful method based on anion exchange reactions is reported to achieve metal sulfide nanoarrays through a topotactical transformation from their metal oxide and hydroxide preforms. Demonstrations are made to CoS and NiS nanowires, nanowalls, and core-branch nanotrees on carbon cloth and nickel foam substrates. The sulfide nanoarrays exhibit superior redox reactivity for electrochemical energy storage. The self-supported CoS nanowire arrays are tested as the pseudo-capacitor cathode, which demonstrate enhanced high-rate specific capacities and better cycle life as compared to the powder counterparts. The outstanding electrochemical properties of the sulfide nanoarrays are a consequence of the preservation of the nanoarray architecture and rigid connection with the current collector after the anion exchange reactions. PMID:24809111

  5. Synthesis of N=127 isotones through (p,n) charge-exchange reactions induced by relativistic {sup 208}Pb projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, A. I.; Benlliure, J.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Casarejos, E.; Dragosavac, D.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Verma, S.; Agramunt, J.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Alkhomashi, N.; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Pietri, S.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P. H.; Steer, S. J.; Boutachkov, P.; Caceres, L. S.

    2011-07-15

    The production cross sections of four N=127 isotones ({sup 207}Hg, {sup 206}Au, {sup 205}Pt, and {sup 204}Ir) have been measured using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions, induced in collisions of a {sup 208}Pb primary beam at 1 A GeV with a Be target. These data allow one to investigate the use of a reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of nuclides toward the important r-process nuclei in the region of the third peak of elemental abundance distribution.

  6. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of the Deuterium Exchange in Classical Keto-Enol Tautomeric Equilibrium Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Michael A.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the classic keto-enol tautomerization of beta-dicarbonyl compounds into a kinetic analysis of deuterium exchange is presented. It is shown that acetylacetone and ethyl acetoacetate undergo nearly complete deuterium exchange of the alpha-methylene carbon when dissolved in methanol-d[subscript 4]. The extent of deuteration may be…

  7. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of the Deuterium Exchange in Classical Keto-Enol Tautomeric Equilibrium Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Michael A.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the classic keto-enol tautomerization of beta-dicarbonyl compounds into a kinetic analysis of deuterium exchange is presented. It is shown that acetylacetone and ethyl acetoacetate undergo nearly complete deuterium exchange of the alpha-methylene carbon when dissolved in methanol-d[subscript 4]. The extent of deuteration may be

  8. The loss rates of O{sup +} in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.; Shen, C.

    2014-03-15

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O{sup +} (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O{sup +} to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O{sup +} are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  9. Reaction Engineering International and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Addressing computational fluid dynamics needs of the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communications and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective to industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms. Information in this report on the staff exchange of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff with Reaction Engineering International (REI) includes the significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefit of that work. The objectives of this project were as follows: Work with REI to develop an understanding of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) needs of the chemical process industry; assess the combined capabilities of the PNL and REI software analysis tools to address these needs; and establish a strategy for a future programmatically funded, joint effort to develop a new CFD tool for the chemical process industry.

  10. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  11. Functionalized Mesoporous Silica via an Aminosilane Surfactant Ion Exchange Reaction: Controlled Scaffold Design and Nitric Oxide Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide-releasing mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were prepared using an aminosilane-template surfactant ion exchange reaction. Initially, bare silica particles were synthesized under basic conditions in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). These particles were functionalized with nitric oxide (NO) donor precursors (i.e., secondary amines) via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol and a commensurate ion exchange reaction between the cationic aminosilanes and CTAB. N-Diazeniumdiolate NO donors were formed at the secondary amines to yield NO-releasing MSNs. Tuning of the ion exchange-based MSN modification approach allowed for the preparation of monodisperse particles ranging from 30 to 1100 nm. Regardless of size, the MSNs stored appreciable levels of NO (0.4–1.5 μmol mg–1) with tunable NO release durations (1–33 h) dependent on the aminosilane modification. Independent control of NO release properties and particle size was achieved, demonstrating the flexibility of this novel MSN synthesis over conventional co-condensation and surface grafting strategies. PMID:26717238

  12. Viologen (2+/1+) and viologen(1+/0) electron-self-exchange reactions in a redox polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, E.F.; Murray, R.W. )

    1991-08-08

    An analysis is given of the electron-self-exchange reactions responsible for the steady-state redox conductivity of thin films of the electropolymerized monomer N,N{prime}-bis(3-pyrrol-1-yl-propyl)-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium tetrafluoroborate, sandwiched between two electrodes. Concentration-gradient-driven electron self-exchange in the liquid-acetonitrile-bathed viologen(2+/1+) mixed-valent state of this polymer, k{sub ex} = 8 {times} 10{sup 3} M{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}, is much slower than that for the viologen (1+/0) mixed-valent state, k{sub ek} = 1.6 {times} 10{sup 5} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, which has a smaller activation barrier. Neither self-exchange reaction responds to use of alternative counteranions except that both rates decrease in polymer containing tosylate counterions. The rate constant found for the electrical-gradient-driven viologen (1+/0) electron self-exchange, k{sub ex} = 1.1 {times} 10{sup 5} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, observed in dry, N{sub 2}-bathed polymer where ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} counterion mobility is quenched, is nearly the same as the acetonitrile-bathed value. The rate constants appear to be dominated by characteristics of the polymer phase rather than the bathing environment of the polymer. Estimates are made of the counteranion diffusivity in acetonitrile-bathed films and of how it effects transient electron transport measurements.

  13. Cu3-xP Nanocrystals as a Material Platform for Near-Infrared Plasmonics and Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis approaches to colloidal Cu3P nanocrystals (NCs) have been recently developed, and their optical absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR) have been interpreted as arising from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Our pump–probe measurements on platelet-shaped Cu3-xP NCs corroborate the plasmonic character of this absorption. In accordance with studies on crystal structure analysis of Cu3P dating back to the 1970s, our density functional calculations indicate that this material is substoichiometric in copper, since the energy of formation of Cu vacancies in certain crystallographic sites is negative, that is, they are thermodynamically favored. Also, thermoelectric measurements point to a p-type behavior of the majority carriers from films of Cu3-xP NCs. It is likely that both the LSPR and the p-type character of our Cu3-xP NCs arise from the presence of a large number of Cu vacancies in such NCs. Motivated by the presence of Cu vacancies that facilitate the ion diffusion, we have additionally exploited Cu3-xP NCs as a starting material on which to probe cation exchange reactions. We demonstrate here that Cu3-xP NCs can be easily cation-exchanged to hexagonal wurtzite InP NCs, with preservation of the anion framework (the anion framework in Cu3-xP is very close to that of wurtzite InP). Intermediate steps in this reaction are represented by Cu3-xP/InP heterostructures, as a consequence of the fact that the exchange between Cu+ and In3+ ions starts from the peripheral corners of each NC and gradually evolves toward the center. The feasibility of this transformation makes Cu3-xP NCs an interesting material platform from which to access other metal phosphides by cation exchange. PMID:25960605

  14. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Branchina, V.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.

    2015-10-01

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  15. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  16. Charge exchange dp → (pp)n reaction study at 1.75 A GeV/c by the STRELA spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilev, S. N.; Bushuev, Yu. P.; Glagolev, V. V.; Dolgiy, S. A.; Kirillov, D. A.; Kostyaeva, N. V.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Livanov, A. N.; Manyakov, P. K.; Martinská, G.; Mušinský, J.; Piskunov, N. M.; Povtoreiko, A. A.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Sitnik, I. M.; Slepnev, V. M.; Slepnev, I. V.; Urbán, J.

    2016-02-01

    The differential cross sections of the charge exchange reaction dp → (pp)n has been measured at 1.75 GeV/c momentum per nucleon for small transferred momenta using the one arm magnetic spectrometer STRELA at the Nuclotron accelerator. The ratio of the differential cross section of the charge exchange reaction dp → (pp)n to that of the np → pn elementary process is discussed in order to estimate the spin-dependent part of the np → pn charge exchange amplitude on the basis of dp → (pp)n data. The np → pn amplitude turned out to be predominantly spin-dependent.

  17. Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory: Application to Hydrogen Atom Abstraction and Exchange Reactions of Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2015-12-17

    Quantum mechanical methods for calculating rate constants are often intractable for reactions involving many atoms. Semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) offers computational advantages over these methods but nonetheless scales exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the system. Here we present a method with more favorable scaling, reduced-dimensionality SCTST (RD SCTST), that treats only a subset of DOFs of the system explicitly. We apply it to three H abstraction and exchange reactions for which two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) have previously been constructed and evaluated using RD quantum scattering calculations. We differentiated these PESs to calculate harmonic frequencies and anharmonic constants, which were then used to calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and rate constants by RD SCTST. This method yielded rate constants in good agreement with quantum scattering results. Notably, it performed well for a heavy-light-heavy reaction, even though it does not explicitly account for corner-cutting effects. Recent extensions to SCTST that improve its treatment of deep tunneling were also evaluated within the reduced-dimensionality framework. The success of RD SCTST in this study suggests its potential applicability to larger systems. PMID:26090556

  18. Chiral modification of copper exchanged zeolite-Y with cinchonidine and its application in the asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Deka, Jogesh; Satyanarayana, L; Karunakar, G V; Bhattacharyya, Pradip Kr; Bania, Kusum K

    2015-12-28

    Chirally modified Cu(2+) exchanged zeolite-Y was synthesized by direct adsorption of cinchonidine under ambient conditions. The chirally modified materials were characterized using various spectrochemical and physicochemical techniques viz. BET, FTIR, MAS ((1)H and (13)C NMR), XPS, SEM, cyclic voltammetry and PXRD. Characteristic peaks of cinchonidine observed in the supported materials confirmed the adsorption of cinchonidine and its coordination with the Cu(2+) active site on copper exchanged zeolite-Y. (13)C SSNMR and XPS analysis however confirmed for the half encapsulation process, only the quinoline ring of cinchonidine gets coordinated to the internal metal sites via the N atom while the quinuclidine moiety extends out of the host surface. Cinchonidine supported Cu(2+)-Y zeolites were found to exhibit good catalytic performance in the asymmetric Henry reaction. (1)H SSNMR studies also confirmed the protonation of the N atom of the quinuclidine ring during the course of the Henry reaction. Heterogeneous chiral catalysts were effective for up to two consecutive cycles. Leaching of cinchonidine after the second cycle was found to have a negative result in the catalytic performance. PMID:26579982

  19. Room Temperature Cation Exchange Reaction in Nanocrystals for Ultrasensitive Speciation Analysis of Silver Ions and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Tang, Jie; Yang, Lu; Zhou, Jingrong; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and Ag(+) and gain deep insight into the transformation of AgNPs in the environment or organisms, ultrasensitive analytical methods are needed for their speciation analysis. About 40-fold of Cd(2+) in CdTe ionic nanocrystals can be "bombarded-and-exploded" (exchanged) in less than 1 min simply by mixing the nanocrystals with Ag(+) solution at room temperature, while this cation exchange reaction did not occur when only silver nanoparticles were present. On the basis of this striking difference, an ultrasensitive method was developed for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in complex matrices. The released Cd(2+) was reduced to its volatile species by sodium tetrahydroborate, which was separated and swept to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) or an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) for the indirect but ultrasensitive detection of Ag(+). Owing to the remarkable signal amplification via the cation exchange reaction and the advantages of chemical vapor generation for sampling, the limit of detection was 0.0003 μg L(-1) for Ag(+) by ICPMS, which was improved by 100-fold compared to the conventional method. Relative standard deviations are better than 2.5% at a concentration of 0.5 μg L(-1) Ag(+) or AgNPs regardless of the detector. The proposed method retains several unique advantages, including ultrahigh sensitivity, speciation analysis, simplicity and being organic reagent-free, and has been successfully utilized for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in environmental water samples and paramecium cells. PMID:26017198

  20. Quantum dynamics of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Guillon, G.; Honvault, P.

    2015-05-07

    We present quantum dynamical investigations of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions using a time-independent quantum mechanical method and an accurate global potential energy surface of ozone [Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)]. Initial state-selected integral cross sections, rate constants, and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are obtained and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical results. The computed thermal rate constants for the oxygen exchange reactions exhibit a negative temperature dependence, as found experimentally. They are in better agreement with the experiments than the previous studies on the same reactions.

  1. Ab initio study of the H + HONO reaction: Direct abstraction versus indirect exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Lin, M.C.; Mebel, A.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1997-01-02

    The mechanism of the H + HONO reaction (for which no experimental data are available) has been elucidated by ab initio molecular orbital calculations using modified G2 and BAC-MP4 methods. These results indicate that the reaction occurs predominantly by two indirect metathetical processes. One produces OH + HNO and H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited hydroxyl nitroxide, HN(O)OH, formed by H atom addition to the N atom of HONO. The other produces H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited dihydroxylamino radical, N(OH){sub 2}, formed by H atom addition to the terminal O atom. These indirect displacement processes are much more efficient than the commonly assumed, direct H-abstraction reaction producing H{sub 2} + NO{sub 2}. A transition-state theory calculation for the direct abstraction reaction and RRKM calculations for the two indirect displacement processes give rise to the following rate constants, in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the 300-3500 K temperature range under atmospheric conditions: k{sub H(2)} = 3.33 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.55} exp(-3328.5/T), k{sub OH} = 9.36 x 10{sup -14}T{sup 0.86} exp(-2500.8/T), k{sub H(2)O} = 1.35 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.89} exp-(-1935.7/T), where the rate constant for H{sub 2}O production represents the sum from both indirect displacement reactions. 32 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Quasiclassical dynamics for the H + HS abstraction and exchange reactions on the 3A" and the 3A' states.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi Xin; Li, Wen Liang; Xu, Wen Wu; Lv, Shuang Jiang

    2013-09-01

    A detailed quasiclassical trajectory study of the H + HS reaction yielding an exchange (H + HS) and an abstraction (H2 + S) channel has been performed by employing the new triplet (3)A" and (3)A' surfaces developed by our group. The cross sections for both channels are presented and found to be in good agreement with previous quantum wave packet results. The thermal rate coefficients for abstraction channel at the temperature between 200 and 1000 K have been evaluated by averaging over a Boltzmann distribution of rotational states and compared with the available experimental values. It is found that the thermal rate coefficients exhibit a conventional Arrhenius-type dependence on temperature, which agrees well with the experimental data. Average fractions, vibration and rotation distributions of the products H2 and HS at different collision energies have been also fully investigated. Furthermore, influence of the collision energy on the total and product-state-resolved differential cross sections (DCSs) for both channels are calculated and discussed. Some observations on the mechanism of the title reaction have been made; in particular it was discovered that reactive collisions along the collinear pathway cause the H2 product to scatter backward, while the reactive collisions with large impact parameters b, which are favored deviating from the minimum energy path, produced mainly forward scattering. For the exchange channel, the discrepancies in the DCS are also distinguished through an analysis of individual trajectories and found a double microscopic mechanism, migration or non-migration. The state-to-state DCSs provide a global perspective of the reaction mechanisms and their contribution to the final product internal energy states. The theoretical findings are discussed and compared with a kinematic constraint model. PMID:24028117

  3. Quasiclassical dynamics for the H + HS abstraction and exchange reactions on the 3A″ and the 3A' states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhi Xin; Li, Wen Liang; Xu, Wen Wu; Lv, Shuang Jiang

    2013-09-01

    A detailed quasiclassical trajectory study of the H + HS reaction yielding an exchange (H + HS) and an abstraction (H2 + S) channel has been performed by employing the new triplet 3A″ and 3A' surfaces developed by our group. The cross sections for both channels are presented and found to be in good agreement with previous quantum wave packet results. The thermal rate coefficients for abstraction channel at the temperature between 200 and 1000 K have been evaluated by averaging over a Boltzmann distribution of rotational states and compared with the available experimental values. It is found that the thermal rate coefficients exhibit a conventional Arrhenius-type dependence on temperature, which agrees well with the experimental data. Average fractions, vibration and rotation distributions of the products H2 and HS at different collision energies have been also fully investigated. Furthermore, influence of the collision energy on the total and product-state-resolved differential cross sections (DCSs) for both channels are calculated and discussed. Some observations on the mechanism of the title reaction have been made; in particular it was discovered that reactive collisions along the collinear pathway cause the H2 product to scatter backward, while the reactive collisions with large impact parameters b, which are favored deviating from the minimum energy path, produced mainly forward scattering. For the exchange channel, the discrepancies in the DCS are also distinguished through an analysis of individual trajectories and found a double microscopic mechanism, migration or non-migration. The state-to-state DCSs provide a global perspective of the reaction mechanisms and their contribution to the final product internal energy states. The theoretical findings are discussed and compared with a kinematic constraint model.

  4. Viking gas exchange reaction - Simulation on UV-irradiated manganese dioxide substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, T. R.; Holland, H. D.; Ceasar, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    The exchange of O2 for H2O, analogous to that recorded on Mars by the Viking GEX experiment, has been observed on humidifying powdered beta-MnO2 (pyrolusite) which had been irradiated by UV in a humidified analog of the Martian atmosphere. Pyrolusite irradiated in a dry atmosphere did not release O2 on humidification. The XPS spectra of Mn and O of the reactive pyrolusite were shifted toward higher binding energies during UV irradiation. These shifts are consistent with the creation of a surface layer of a Mn(V) or Mn(VI) compound. The destruction of such a layer on humidification could account for the observed O2 release. Although manganese has not been identified in the Martian regolith, the upper limit of the Mn concentration is sufficiently high that O2 release from pyrolusite could have been responsible for the results of the Viking GEX experiment.

  5. Replica exchange reactive molecular dynamics simulations of initial reactions in zeolite synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhifeng; Xin, Liang; Sun, Huai

    2015-10-14

    Molecular simulation is a promising tool for the study of zeolite formation. However, sufficient sampling remains a grand challenge for the practical use of molecular simulation for this purpose. Here, we investigate the initial stage of zeolite synthesis under realistic conditions by using the replica-exchange method and the ReaxFF reactive force field. After a total simulation time of 480 ns, both energetic and structural properties approach convergence. Analyses of data collected at 600 K show that the inorganic structure directing agent NaOH promotes the aggregation of silicate, the formation of branched Si atoms and the formation of 5-membered rings. With the trajectories collected simultaneously at different temperatures, the effect of temperature is discussed. PMID:26365615

  6. The Exchange Reaction Between Methane Hydrate and Carbon Dioxide: An Oceanic Feasibility Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    The conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate offers, in principle, a way of sequestering CO2, with the additional recovery of CH4 gas as an energy source. We report results from the first in-situ oceanic experiment on this reaction, carried out in August 2006 at the massive thermogenic hydrate mounds in 850 m water depth, Barkley Canyon, offshore from Vancouver Island (48° 18.642' N, 126° 3.903' W), using MBARI's ROV Tiburon deployed from the R/V Western Flyer. Two small cores (10 cm length, 4 cm diameter) of white hydrate were collected from exposed outcrops using an ROV operated tool and hydraulically ejected into a glass walled, closed top, reaction chamber. Approximately 2 L of liquid CO2 were dispensed into the chamber, and the chamber transferred to an aluminium base plate to seal the system. Under ambient conditions (P = 870 dbar, T = 4.0 °C, S = 34.2), the densities of natural gas hydrate and liquid CO2 are closely matched and less than that of seawater, where the hydrate cores floated at the top of the chamber fully immersed within the buoyant liquid CO2. Over the following ~48 hours, the system was inspected periodically with the ROV HDTV camera prior to examination with the sea-going laser Raman spectrometer, DORISS II. For this, the chamber was transferred to a Precision Underwater Positioner (PUP) that enabled focusing of the laser beam with sub- mm precision. Our choice of where to focus the laser was based upon the need to explore all phases the cored natural gas hydrate, liquid CO2, any created CO2 hydrate, and any liberated CH4 gas. The natural gas hydrate was composed primarily of CH4, with minor amounts of C2H6 and C3H8, indicating the presence of Structure II hydrate. To date, laboratory experiments have focused on the reaction between pure Structure I CH4 hydrate and CO2 vapour, where the difference in free energy between the CH4 and CO2 hydrate states provides a thermodynamic argument in favour of conversion. However for a Structure II hydrate with a complex guest gas composition immersed in liquid CO2 there are multiple pathways for the reaction to proceed. If the hydrate cage occupancy is 100% then we suspect on thermodynamic grounds that the reaction may proceed slowly; nevertheless if cage occupancy is <100%, and/or a mixture of Structure I and II is present, then substitution could occur rapidly. In addition, dissolution of the natural gas hydrate in the unsaturated liquid CO2 will liberate water molecules that are then available to form CO2 hydrate. Obviously, grain size and porosity (surface area) will have profound effects on reaction rate and extent. We also note that the solubility of CH4 in CO2 is significant, and we may not expect liberation of a free CH4 gas phase until the saturation condition has been met. Given the complexity of this system, the only way to know what will occur is to do the experiment. Indeed, spectra were obtained of a commingled CO2 and CH4 hydrate. The CO2 fermi-diad peaks in the hydrate phase are distinguishable from the liquid, and are shifted to lower wavenumbers by ~~3 cm-1. We also observed the presence of dissolved CH4 within the liquid CO2, and free CH4 gas in a small but visually identifiable bubble layer at the top of the chamber. The initial success of this pilot study bodes well for future investigations both in the laboratory and in ROV based experiments.

  7. Solvent effects on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between chloride ion and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorchloridothioate

    SciTech Connect

    Mikolajczyk, M.; Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Reimschussel, W.

    1982-03-26

    The effect of solvent on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between /sup 36/Cl- ions and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridothioate has been investigated in nitromethane, acetonitrile, propylene carbonate, benzonitrile, nitrobenzene, and hexamethyl-phosphoric triamide. The rate constants decrease with increasing electrophilicity of the solvent. A good correlation between the logarithm of the rate constants and acceptor number (AN) of the solvent was obtained with identical slopes for reactions with phosphoryl and thiophosporyl compounds. The slopes for the dependence of ..delta..H or T..delta..S vs. AN for chlorine isotopic exchange in (PHO)/sub 2/ pace are opposite those for the exchange reaction in (PHO)/sub 2/ PSCl, so a constant ratio of k/sub p=O//k/sub p=s/ is observed, resulting from compensation of ..delta..H by ..delta..S. The effect of solvent on the initial state (from solubility measurements) and the transition state of the reaction between (PhO)/sub 2/PSCl and the Cl- ion was evaluated. Changes of solvation of (PHO)/sub 2/ PSCE have practically no effect on the kinetics of the reactions. Changes of solvation of the chloride ion and of the transition state primarily influence the rate constants and activation parameters of the investigated isotopic-exchange reaction.

  8. Exploring the limits of ultrafast polymerase chain reaction using liquid for thermal heat exchange: A proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Maltezos, George; Johnston, Matthew; Taganov, Konstantin; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Gorman, John; Baltimore, David; Chantratita, Wasun; Scherer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Thermal ramp rate is a major limiting factor in using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for routine diagnostics. We explored the limits of speed by using liquid for thermal exchange rather than metal as in traditional devices, and by testing different polymerases. In a clinical setting, our system equaled or surpassed state-of-the-art devices for accuracy in amplifying DNA∕RNA of avian influenza, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Using Thermococcus kodakaraensis polymerase and optimizing both electrical and chemical systems, we obtained an accurate, 35 cycle amplification of an 85-base pair fragment of E. coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin gene in as little as 94.1 s, a significant improvement over a typical 1 h PCR amplification. PMID:21267083

  9. Exploring the limits of ultrafast polymerase chain reaction using liquid for thermal heat exchange: A proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Johnston, Matthew; Taganov, Konstantin; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Gorman, John; Baltimore, David; Chantratita, Wasun; Scherer, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Thermal ramp rate is a major limiting factor in using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for routine diagnostics. We explored the limits of speed by using liquid for thermal exchange rather than metal as in traditional devices, and by testing different polymerases. In a clinical setting, our system equaled or surpassed state-of-the-art devices for accuracy in amplifying DNA/RNA of avian influenza, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Using Thermococcus kodakaraensis polymerase and optimizing both electrical and chemical systems, we obtained an accurate, 35 cycle amplification of an 85-base pair fragment of E. coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin gene in as little as 94.1 s, a significant improvement over a typical 1 h PCR amplification.

  10. The T{sub z} = -1{yields}T{sub z} =0 beta decays and comparison with Charge Exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Gelletly, W.; Collaboration: Santiago Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions can be studied in both {beta} decay and charge exchange (CE) reactions. If isospin is a good quantum number, then the Tz = -1{yields}0 and Tz = +1{yields}0GT mirror transitions, are identical. Therefore, a comparison of the results from studies of {beta} decay and CE should shed light on this assumption. Accordingly we have studied the {beta} decay of the Tz = -1 fp-shell nuclei, {sup 54}Ni, {sup 50}Fe, {sup 46}Cr, and {sup 42}Ti, produced in fragmentation and we have compared our results with the spectra from ({sup 3}He, t) measurements on the mirror Tz = +1 target nuclei studied in high resolution at RCNP, Osaka. The {beta} decay experiments were performed as part of the STOPPED beam RISING campaign at GSI.

  11. Isospin and spin-isospin modes in charge-exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Brandenburg, S.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Akimune, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.

    1999-11-16

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E({sup 3}He)=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  12. Isospin and Spin-Isospin Modes in Charge-Exchange Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harakeh, M.N.; Akimune, H.; van den Berg, A.M.; Brandenburg, S.; Fujiwara, M.; Laurent, H.; Willis, A.; Zegers, R.G.T.

    1999-12-31

    The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been investigated in the {sup 208}Pb({sup 3}He,tp){sup 207}Pb reaction at E{sup 3}He=450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. The partial and total branching ratios and the escape widths for GTR and SDR decay to the residual neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb were deduced. These are found to be in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The ({sup 3}He,tp) reaction on Pb at E({sup 3}He)=177 MeV was also studied in order to locate isovector monopole strength corresponding to 2{Dirac_h}{omega} transitions. Monopole strength at excitation energies above 25 MeV was discovered and compared to calculated strength due to the isovector giant monopole resonance and the spin-flip isovector monopole resonance. Calculations in a normal-mode framework show that all isovector monopole strength can be accounted for if the branching ratio for decay by proton emission is 20%.

  13. Sulfur(VI) fluoride exchange (SuFEx): another good reaction for click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiajia; Krasnova, Larissa; Finn, M G; Sharpless, K Barry

    2014-09-01

    Aryl sulfonyl chlorides (e.g. Ts-Cl) are beloved of organic chemists as the most commonly used S(VI) electrophiles, and the parent sulfuryl chloride, O2 S(VI) Cl2 , has also been relied on to create sulfates and sulfamides. However, the desired halide substitution event is often defeated by destruction of the sulfur electrophile because the S(VI) Cl bond is exceedingly sensitive to reductive collapse yielding S(IV) species and Cl(-) . Fortunately, the use of sulfur(VI) fluorides (e.g., R-SO2 -F and SO2 F2 ) leaves only the substitution pathway open. As with most of click chemistry, many essential features of sulfur(VI) fluoride reactivity were discovered long ago in Germany.6a Surprisingly, this extraordinary work faded from view rather abruptly in the mid-20th century. Here we seek to revive it, along with John Hyatt's unnoticed 1979 full paper exposition on CH2 CH-SO2 -F, the most perfect Michael acceptor ever found.98 To this history we add several new observations, including that the otherwise very stable gas SO2 F2 has excellent reactivity under the right circumstances. We also show that proton or silicon centers can activate the exchange of SF bonds for SO bonds to make functional products, and that the sulfate connector is surprisingly stable toward hydrolysis. Applications of this controllable ligation chemistry to small molecules, polymers, and biomolecules are discussed. PMID:25112519

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction characteristics of synthetic nickel-cobalt-oxide electrodes for alkaline anion-exchange membrane water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Tae Woo; Park, ChanSu; Kim, Yang Do; Lee, Dooyong; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Choi, Chul Young

    2015-11-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis system can produce high-purity hydrogen gases in a highly efficient manner. However, the level of hydrogen gas production is still small. In addition, noble-metal catalysts for the reaction in acidic environments, as well as an additional drying step to remove water contained in the hydrogen, are required. Therefore, water electrolysis system with high efficiency and lower cost, an alkaline anion-exchange membrane system that can produce high-purity hydrogen without a noble-metal catalyst, is needed. Nano-size NiCo2O4 powders were prepared by using a sol-gel method to achieve an efficient and economical water electrolysis system. When the powder was calcined at 450 °C, the crystallinity and the cyclic voltammogram measurement showed the best values. In addition, the 15-wt.% polytetrafluoroethylene mixed NiCo2O4 powders exhibited the largest cyclic voltammetry active area and the highest oxygen evolution reaction activity with the appropriate stability.

  15. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-02-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology.

  16. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2–based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology. PMID:26880381

  17. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C

    2016-01-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2-based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology. PMID:26880381

  18. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation. PMID:25562431

  19. Time dependent three-dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The first successful application of the three-dimensional quantum body frame wave packet approach to reactive scattering is reported for the H + H2 exchange reaction on the LSTH potential surface. The method used is based on a procedure for calculating total reaction probabilities from wave packets. It is found that converged, vibrationally resolved reactive probabilities can be calculated with a grid that is not much larger than required for the pure inelastic calculation. Tabular results are presented for several energies.

  20. The structure of the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Rlf in complex with the small G-protein Ral identifies conformational intermediates of the exchange reaction and the basis for the selectivity.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Schouten, Arie; Rensen-de Leeuw, Marije; Rehmann, Holger

    2016-02-01

    CDC25 homology domain (CDC25-HD) containing Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs) initiate signalling by small G-proteins of the Ras-family. Each GEF acts on a small subset of the G-proteins only, thus providing signalling selectivity. Rlf is a GEF with selectivity for the G-proteins RalA and RalB. Here the crystal structure of Rlf in complex with Ral is determined. The Rlf·Ral complex crystallised into two different crystal forms, which represent different steps of the exchange reaction. Thereby general insight in the CDC25-HD catalysed nucleotide exchange is obtained. In addition, the basis for the selectivity of the interaction is investigated. The exchange activity is monitored by the use of recombinant proteins. Selectivity determinants in the binding interface are identified and confirmed by a mutational study. PMID:26687416

  1. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of Sr-90(2+) from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-01-15

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr2+, 90Sr2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na+, Ca2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr2+ to the water table.

  2. H/D exchange in reactions of OH(-) with D2 and of OD(-) with H2 at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mulin, Dmytro; Roučka, Štěpán; Jusko, Pavol; Zymak, Illia; Plašil, Radek; Gerlich, Dieter; Wester, Roland; Glosík, Juraj

    2015-04-14

    Using a cryogenic linear 22-pole rf ion trap, rate coefficients for H/D exchange reactions of OH(-) with D2 (1) and OD(-) with H2 (2) have been measured at temperatures between 11 K and 300 K with normal hydrogen. Below 60 K, we obtained k1 = 5.5 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) for the exoergic . Upon increasing the temperature above 60 K, the data decrease with a power law, k1(T) ∼T(-2.7), reaching ≈1 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) at 200 K. This observation is tentatively explained with a decrease of the lifetime of the intermediate complex as well as with the assumption that scrambling of the three hydrogen atoms is restricted by the topology of the potential energy surface. The rate coefficient for the endoergic increases with temperature from 12 K up to 300 K, following the Arrhenius equation, k2 = 7.5 × 10(-11) exp(-92 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) over two orders of magnitude. The fitted activation energy, EA-Exp = 7.9 meV, is in perfect accordance with the endothermicity of 24.0 meV, if one accounts for the thermal population of the rotational states of both reactants. The low mean activation energy in comparison with the enthalpy change in the reaction is mainly due to the rotational energy of 14.7 meV contributed by ortho-H2 (J = 1). Nonetheless, one should not ignore the reactivity of pure para-H2 because, according to our model, it already reaches 43% of that of ortho-H2 at 100 K. PMID:25738934

  3. Nanosized IrxRu1-xO2 electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction in proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh Pham, Hong; Nguyen, Ngoc Phong; Linh Do, Chi; Thang Le, Ba

    2015-01-01

    Normally in proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE), the anode has the largest overpotential at typical operating current densities. By development of the electrocatalytic material used for the oxygen evolving electrode, great improvements in efficiency can be performed. In electrochemistry, rare metallic oxides RuO2 and IrO2 exhibit the best catalytic properties for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acid electrolytes compared to other noble metals. RuO2 is the most active catalyst and IrO2 is the most stable catalyst. An oxide containing both elements is therefore expected to be a good catalyst for the OER. In this study IrxRu1-xO2 nanosized powder electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction is synthesized by hydrolysis method. Cyclic voltammetry, anodic polarization and galvanostatic measurements were conducted in solution of 0.5 M H2SO4 to investigate electrocatalytic behavior and stability of the electrocatalyst. The mechanisms of the thermal decomposition process of RuCl3.nH2O and IrCl3.mH2O precursors to form oxide powders were studied by means of thermal gravity analysis (TGA). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used analysis for determination of the crystallographic structure, morphology and catalysts particle size. Based on the given results, the IrxRu1-xO2 (x = 0.5 0.7) compounds were found to be more active than pure IrO2 and more stable than pure RuO2.

  4. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-11-05

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D/sub 2/O, EtOD, or ND/sub 3/ as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND/sub 3/, D/sub 2/O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  5. Hyporheic exchange and fulvic acid redox reactions in an Alpine stream/wetland ecosystem, Colorado Front Range.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew P; McKnight, Diane M; Cory, Rose M; Williams, Mark W; Runkel, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    The influence of hyporheic zone interactions on the redox state of fulvic acids and other redox active species was investigated in an alpine stream and adjacent wetland, which is a more reducing environment. A tracer injection experiment using bromide (Br-) was conducted in the stream system. Simulations with a transport model showed that rates of exchange between the stream and hyporheic zone were rapid (alpha approximately 10(-3) s(-1)). Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence spectra was used to quantifythe redox state of dissolved fulvic acids. The rate coefficient for oxidation of reduced fulvic acids (lambda = 6.5 x 10(-3) s(-1)) in the stream indicates that electron-transfer reactions occur over short time scales. The rate coefficients for decay of ammonium (lambda = 1.2 x 10(-3) s(-1)) and production of nitrate (lambda = -1.0 x 10(-3) s(-1)) were opposite in sign but almost equal in magnitude. Our results suggest that fulvic acids are involved in rapid electron-transfer processes in and near the stream channel and may be important in determining ecological energy flow at the catchment scale. PMID:17051783

  6. tetra neutron system studied by exothermic double-charge exchange reaction 4He(8He, 8Be)4n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisamori, Keiichi; Sharaq06 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A possible existence of the tetra-neutron system as a resonance state is still an open and fascinating question, while theoretical papers using ab-initio calculation suggests that the bound tetra-neutron does not exist. We have performed a missing-mass spectroscopy of the 4n system via the exothermic double-charge exchange reaction 4He(8He,8Be)4n. The experiment was carried out at the RIBF at RIKEN using the SHARAQ spectrometer and the liquid He target system. Since the secondary beam, 8He at 190A MeV, has a large internal energy, it is possible to produce the 4n system in small momentum transfers of less than 20 MeV/c. In the present analysis, a new analytical framework to treat multi-particles under high beam rate condition (2 MHz) was developed for good statistics. At the SHARAQ spectrometer, 8Be can be identified by measuring the invariant mass of the coincident two-alpha particle with a good signal-to-noise ratio. About several tens of candidate events are obtained above the 4n threshold. We will show the preliminary result of missing-msss spectrum and discuss the shape of spectrum.

  7. Hyporheic exchange and fulvic acid redox reactions in an alpine stream/wetland ecosystem, Colorado front range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.P.; McKnight, Diane M.; Cory, R.M.; Williams, M.W.; Runkel, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of hyporheic zone interactions on the redox state of fulvic acids and other redox active species was investigated in an alpine stream and adjacent wetland, which is a more reducing environment. A tracer injection experiment using bromide (Br-) was conducted in the stream system. Simulations with a transport model showed that rates of exchange between the stream and hyporheic zone were rapid (?? ??? 10-3 s -1). Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence spectra was used to quantify the redox state of dissolved fulvic acids. The rate coefficient for oxidation of reduced fulvic acids (?? = 6.5 ?? 10-3 s -1) in the stream indicates that electron-transfer reactions occur over short time scales. The rate coefficients for decay of ammonium (?? = 1.2 ?? 10-3 s-1) and production of nitrate (?? = -1.0 ?? 10-3 s-1) were opposite in sign but almost equal in magnitude. Our results suggest that fulvic acids are involved in rapid electron-transfer processes in and near the stream channel and may be important in determining ecological energy flow at the catchment scale. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  8. Quasielastic charge-exchange reaction p/sup 3/ He. -->. n/sub F/ ppp at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, A.V.; Vanyushin, I.A.; Grechko, V.E.; Zombkovskii, S.M.; Kondratyuk, L.A.; Korolev, Y.V.; Selektor, Y.M.; Solov'ev, V.V.; Turov, V.F.; Chuvilo, I.V.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The principal characteristics of the quasielastic-charge-exchange reaction p/sup 3/He..-->..n/sub F/ppp are investigated by means of the liquid-hydrogen bubble chamber at our institute of diameter 80 cm, exposed in beams of /sup 3/He nuclei with momenta 2.5 and 5 GeV/c (the kinetic energy of the primary protons T/sub p/ in the rest system of the nucleus is respectively 0.318 and 0.978 GeV). The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the Glauber-Sitenko multiple-scattering theory and with the pole model taking into account the interaction of spectator nucleons in the final state. In the mass spectrum of the 3p system at 3.05 GeV a well expressed structure is observed which is not described in the framework of the pole model. A possible resonance occurrence of this structure is discussed.

  9. (16) O/(18) O Exchange of Aldehydes and Ketones caused by H2 (18) O in the Mechanistic Investigation of Organocatalyzed Michael, Mannich, and Aldol Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Mukaiyama, Takasuke; Benohoud, Meryem; Gupta, Nishant R; Ono, Tsuyoshi; Toda, Shunsuke

    2016-04-18

    Organocatalyzed Michael, Mannich, and aldol reactions of aldehydes or ketones, as nucleophiles, have triggered several discussions regarding their reaction mechanism. H2 (18) O has been utilized to determine if the reaction proceeds through an enamine or enol mechanism by monitoring the ratio of (18) O incorporated into the final product. In this communication, we describe the risk of H2 (18) O as an evaluation tool for this mechanistic investigation. We have demonstrated that exchange of (16) O/(18) O occurs in the aldehyde or ketone starting material, caused by the presence of H2 (18) O and amine catalysts, before the Michael, Mannich, and aldol reactions proceed. Because the newly generated (18) O starting aldehydes or ketones and (16) O water affect the incorporation ratio of (18) O in the final product, the use of H2 (18) O would not be appropriate to distinguish the mechanism of these organocatalyzed reactions. PMID:26841358

  10. Attenuated total reflection infrared studies of oleate and trioctylphosphine oxide ligand adsorption and exchange reactions on CdS quantum dot films.

    PubMed

    Young, Aidan G; Al-Salim, Najeh; Green, David P; McQuillan, A James

    2008-04-15

    Ligand exchange reactions at the surface of oleate- and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO)-capped CdS quantum dots have been studied with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, using thin films deposited from organic solvent suspensions. The oleate and trioctylphosphine capping ligands were found to form highly ordered and densely packed monolayers on the CdS surface. Adsorbed oleate is coordinated to CdS in a chelating bidentate manner through the carboxylate functional group, while adsorbed trioctylphosphine oxide is coordinated though the P=O functional group and appears to have numerous adsorption environments on the CdS surface. Exposure of such films to aqueous solution was found to cause partial delamination of the films from the ATR prism interface which was reversible upon redrying. Ligand exchange reactions on the oleate- and trioctylphosphine-capped CdS films were studied in situ at room temperature by allowing the films to be exposed to dilute aqueous solutions of thiol-containing ligands. Oleate and trioctylphosphine oxide are both strongly adsorbed to the CdS surface, and ligand exchange with monothiol-containing ligands has been found to be highly dependent upon experimental conditions, in particular pH, where exchange is only observed at solution pH where the exchanging ligand is uncharged. This is attributed to the inability of a charged ligand to penetrate the hydrophobic polymethylene layer on the CdS surface. PMID:18312011

  11. Simple (17) O NMR method for studying electron self-exchange reaction between UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Bányai, István; Farkas, Ildikó; Tóth, Imre

    2016-06-01

    (17) O NMR spectroscopy is proven to be suitable and convenient method for studying the electron exchange by following the decrease of (17) O-enrichment in U(17) OO(2+) ion in the presence of U(4+) ion in aqueous solution. The reactions have been performed at room temperature using I = 5 M ClO4 (-) ionic medium in acidic solutions in order to determine the kinetics of electron exchange between the U(4+) and UO2 (2+) aqua ions. The rate equation is given as R = a[H(+) ](-2)  + R', where R' is an acid independent parallel path. R' depends on the concentration of the uranium species according to the following empirical rate equation: R' = k1 [UO(2 +) ](1/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2)  + k2 [UO(2 +) ](3/2) [U(4 +) ](1/2) . The mechanism of the inverse H(+) concentration-dependent path is interpreted as equilibrium formation of reactive UO2 (+) species from UO2 (2+) and U(4+) aqua ions and its electron exchange with UO2 (2+) . The determined rate constant of this reaction path is in agreement with the rate constant of UO2 (2+) -UO2 (+) , one electron exchange step calculated by Marcus theory, match the range given experimentally of it in an early study. Our value lies in the same order of magnitude as the recently calculated ones by quantum chemical methods. The acid independent part is attributed to the formation of less hydrolyzed U(V) species, i.e. UO(3+) , which loses enrichment mainly by electron exchange with UO2 (2+) ions. One can also conclude that (17) O NMR spectroscopy, or in general NMR spectroscopy with careful kinetic analysis, is a powerful tool for studying isotope exchange reactions without the use of sophisticated separation processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854521

  12. The interaction of quinone and detergent with reaction centers of purple bacteria. I. Slow quinone exchange between reaction center micelles and pure detergent micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Shinkarev, V P; Wraight, C A

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of light-induced electron transfer in reaction centers (RCs) from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied in the presence of the detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). After the light-induced electron transfer from the primary donor (P) to the acceptor quinone complex, the dark re-reduction of P+ reflects recombination from the reduced acceptor quinones, QA- or QB-. The secondary quinone, QB, which is loosely bound to the RC, determines the rate of this process. Electron transfer to QB slows down the return of the electron to P+, giving rise to a slow phase of the recovery kinetics with time tau P approximately 1 s, whereas charge recombination in RCs lacking QB generates a fast phase with time tau AP approximately 0.1 s. The amount of quinone bound to RC micelles can be reduced by increasing the detergent concentration. The characteristic time of the slow component of P+ dark relaxation, observed at low quinone content per RC micelle (at high detergent concentration), is about 1.2-1.5 s, in sharp contrast to expectations from previous models, according to which the time of the slow component should approach the time of the fast component (about 0.1 s) when the quinone concentration approaches zero. To account for this large discrepancy, a new quantitative approach has been developed to analyze the kinetics of electron transfer in isolated RCs with the following key features: 1) The exchange of quinone between different micelles (RC and detergent micelles) occurs more slowly than electron transfer from QB- to P+; 2) The exchange of quinone between the detergent "phase" and the QB binding site within the same RC micelle is much faster than electron transfer between QA- and P+; 3) The time of the slow component of P+ dark relaxation is determined by (n) > or = 1, the average number of quinones in RC micelles, calculated only for those RC micelles that have at least one quinone per RC (in excess of QA). An analytical function is derived that relates the time of the slow component of P+ relaxation, tau P, and the relative amplitude of the slow phase. This provides a useful means of determining the true equilibrium constant of electron transfer between QA and QB (LAB), and the association equilibrium constant of quinone binding at the QB site (KQ+). We found that LAB = 22 +/- 3 and KQ = 0.6 +/- 0.2 at pH 7.5. The analysis shows that saturation of the QB binding site in detergent-solubilized RCs is difficult to achieve with hydrophobic quinones. This has important implications for the interpretation of apparent dependencies of QB function on environmental parameters (e.g. pH) and on mutational alterations. The model accounts for the effects of detergent and quinone concentration on electron transfer in the acceptor quinone complex, and the conclusions are of general significance for the study of quinone-binding membrane proteins in detergent solutions. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9129834

  13. A facile route to synthesize CdZnSe core–shell-like alloyed quantum dots via cation exchange reaction in aqueous system

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Yingzhuo; Wei, Jumeng; Liu, Bitao; Peng, Lingling

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Water-soluble CdZnSe alloyed QDs synthesized by cation exchange reaction. • The as-prepared CdZnSe QDs have fairly good luminescence properties. • The surface defects of obtained QDs were removed due to the alloyed structure. - Abstract: Water-soluble CdZnSe alloyed nanocrystals have been successfully prepared via “green” cation exchange reaction in aqueous system. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that the as-prepared nanocrystals had high crystallinity and small particle size of 4–5 nm. The absorption spectra of CdZnSe show red shift of 100 nm from 375 to 475 nm. Moreover, the band-gap photoluminescent (PL) emission has a red shift of 50 nm from 430 to 480 nm with the increase of the reaction time. On the basis of the PL properties and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, one kind of core–shell-like structure model was proposed, which resulted from the different cation exchange reaction rates. This structure could greatly improve the luminescence properties by the removal of surface defect of quantum dots. This work would support potential applications in optoelectronic devices, and biomedical tags fields.

  14. The non-statistical dynamics of the 18O + 32O2 isotope exchange reaction at two energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wyngarden, Annalise L.; Mar, Kathleen A.; Quach, Jim; Nguyen, Anh P. Q.; Wiegel, Aaron A.; Lin, Shi-Ying; Lendvay, Gyorgy; Guo, Hua; Lin, Jim J.; Lee, Yuan T.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of the 18O(3P) + 32O2 isotope exchange reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams at collision energies (Ecoll) of 5.7 and 7.3 kcal/mol, and experimental results were compared with quantum statistical (QS) and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on the O3(X1A') potential energy surface (PES) of Babikov et al. [D. Babikov, B. K. Kendrick, R. B. Walker, R. T. Pack, P. Fleurat-Lesard, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 6298 (2003)]. In both QS and QCT calculations, agreement with experiment was markedly improved by performing calculations with the experimental distribution of collision energies instead of fixed at the average collision energy. At both collision energies, the scattering displayed a forward bias, with a smaller bias at the lower Ecoll. Comparisons with the QS calculations suggest that 34O2 is produced with a non-statistical rovibrational distribution that is hotter than predicted, and the discrepancy is larger at the lower Ecoll. If this underprediction of rovibrational excitation by the QS method is not due to PES errors and/or to non-adiabatic effects not included in the calculations, then this collision energy dependence is opposite to what might be expected based on collision complex lifetime arguments and opposite to that measured for the forward bias. While the QCT calculations captured the experimental product vibrational energy distribution better than the QS method, the QCT results underpredicted rotationally excited products, overpredicted forward-bias and predicted a trend in the strength of forward-bias with collision energy opposite to that measured, indicating that it does not completely capture the dynamic behavior measured in the experiment. Thus, these results further underscore the need for improvement in theoretical treatments of dynamics on the O3(X1A') PES and perhaps of the PES itself in order to better understand and predict non-statistical effects in this reaction and in the formation of ozone (in which the intermediate O3* complex is collisionally stabilized by a third body). The scattering data presented here at two different collision energies provide important benchmarks to guide these improvements.

  15. Conformal Cu2S-coated Cu2O nanostructures grown by ion exchange reaction and their photoelectrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguez-Bacho, Ignacio; Courté, Marc; Fan, Hong Jin; Fichou, Denis

    2015-05-01

    Cuprous oxide Cu2O is a promising p-type semiconductor for photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar hydrogen generation because it has a suitable bandgap (Eg = 2.0-2.2 eV) and a band alignment adapted to water reduction. In addition, metallic Cu is earth-abundant thus making Cu2O a low-cost material. However, the reduction potential of Cu2O into metallic Cu (0.47 V versus RHE) is lower than that of water which induces a severe instability under irradiation in a PEC cell. Therefore, our recent efforts focused on the growth of a protective overlayer on top of Cu2O in order to stabilize Cu2O when used as a photocathode in an aqueous electrolyte. Among potential protective materials cuprous sulphide Cu2S is another p-type semiconductor with a 1.2 eV bandgap and an appropriate energy level alignment with Cu2O that would allow electrons flowing to the interface. We present here an original and simple method aimed at protecting a compact layer (CL) or nanowires (NWs) of Cu2O with a Cu2S coating. Our method is based on the ions exchange reaction (IER) of O2- into S2- at the surface of Cu2O itself in a solution-containing Na2S as the sulphur source. The local surface IER implies the formation of a conformal and uniform coating independently on the starting Cu2O morphology, CLs or NWs. As expected, coating Cu2O photocathodes by a conformal Cu2S layer improves their stability and PEC performances.

  16. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  17. Single-Crystal to Single-Crystal Linker Substitution, Linker Place Exchange, and Transmetalation Reactions in Interpenetrated Pillared-Bilayer Zinc(II) Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    De, Dinesh; Neogi, Subhadip; Saudo, E Carolina; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2015-11-23

    A twofold interpenetrated pillared-bilayer framework, {[Zn3 (L)2 (L2 )(DMF)]?(18DMF)(6H2 O)}n (1), has been synthesized from the ligands tris(4'-carboxybiphenyl)amine (H3 L) and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (L2 ). The structure contains [Zn3 (COO)6 ] secondary building units (SBUs), in which three Zn(II) ions are almost linear with carboxylate bridging. This framework undergoes reversible pillar linker substitution reactions at the terminal Zn(II) centers with three different dipyridyl linkers of different lengths to afford three daughter frameworks, 2-4. Frameworks 2-4 are interconvertible through reversible linker substitution reactions. Also, competitive linker-exchange experiments show preferential incorporation of linker L3 in the parent framework 1. The larger linker L5 does not undergo such substitution reactions and framework 5, which contains this linker, can be synthesized solvothermally as a twofold interpenetrated structure. Interestingly, when framework 5 is dipped in a solution of L3 in DMF, linker substitution takes place as before, but linker L5 now moves and diagonally binds two Zn(II) centers to afford 6 as a nonpenetrated single framework. This linker place exchange reaction is unprecedented. All of these reactions take place in a single-crystal to single-crystal (SC-SC) manner, and have been observed directly through X-ray crystallography. In addition, each 3D framework undergoes complete copper(II) transmetalation. PMID:26462612

  18. Absence of isotope exchange in the reaction of N2O + O(1D) and the global Δ17O budget of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan; Röckmann, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Yung et al. (2004) suggested that N2O exchanges isotopes with O(1D), analogous to CO2, which would represent an additional contribution to the 17O isotope anomaly of atmospheric N2O. Here we demonstrate by isotope measurements of N2O remaining after partial conversion with O(1D) that this isotope exchange most likely proceeds at <1% of the total N2O + O(1D) reaction rate. It can therefore be neglected as a source of the 17O anomaly of atmospheric N2O, corroborating arguments based on previous indirect experimental evidence of the absence of such isotope exchange (Röckmann and Kaiser, 2005). In addition, we present a balanced budget of the 17O anomaly of atmospheric N2O, based on N2O sources at Earth's surface and in the atmosphere: the reactions of N2 + O(1D) + M, NH2 + NO2, and N + NO2, industrial processes, biomass burning, and the ``numerical'' source from microbial nitrogen conversion reactions (Kaiser et al., 2004b).

  19. Photochemical C-H activation and ligand exchange reactions of CpRe(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. Phosphine dissociation is not involved

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.; Rosini, G.P.; Maguire, J.A.

    1999-04-26

    The dihydride CpRe(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}H{sub 2} (1) catalyzes H/D exchange between C{sub 6}D{sub 6} and other arenes or alkanes. Compound 1 also undergoes photochemical phosphine substitution with PMe{sub 3} to give CpRe(PPh{sub 3})(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} and then CpRe(PMe{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. Mechanistic studies of these reactions are inconsistent with [CpRe(PPh{sub 3})H{sub 2}] as an intermediate. An alternative mechanism is presented proposing that the active species for H/D exchange is the 14-electron cyclic allyl intermediate [({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 5}H{sub 7})Re(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}] (E), in which both hydrides have migrated from the rhenium to the cyclopentadienyl ligand. This intermediate accounts for the fact that (1) deuterium does not exchange into the hydride ligands of complex 1 during the H/D exchange catalysis and (2) phosphine substitution occurs by an associative pathway. The precursor to intermediate E, [({eta}{sup 4}-C{sub 5}H{sub 6})Re(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}H] (D), can undergo reversible orthometalation, allowing H/D exchange between the hydride ligands and the ortho phosphine positions. Evidence is presented to support this new mechanism as well as to rule out other feasible mechanisms.

  20. Ionic atmosphere effects on the energetics of thermal and optical electron-exchange reactions: Application to ferrocenium-ferrocene self exchange. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Phelps, D.K.; Weaver, M.J.

    1990-05-01

    A treatment of ionic-atmosphere effects upon symmetrical electron-transfer reactions resulting from added electrolyte is outlined. Relationships are derived on the basis of the extended Debye-Huckel model for the increase in the activation free energy, associated with reorganization of the ionic atmosphere for homogeneous-phase reactions involving a pair of spherical reactants with varying internuclear distance R. Similar relationships apply to the energetics of symmetrical optical electron transfer, since the increase in the optical transition energy, should equal the corresponding ionic atmosphere reorganization energy, under the anticipated linear response conditions.

  1. Theoretical Study on the Noble Gas Exchange Reactions of Ng + HNBNg'(+) → Ng' + HNBNg(+) (Ng, Ng' = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Po-Chun; Hu, Wei-Ping

    2016-03-01

    High-level correlated electronic structure calculation and dual-level variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling calculation for rate constants have been performed on four noble gas exchange reactions [(1) He + HNBHe'(+) → He' + HNBHe(+), (2) He + HNBNe(+) → Ne + HNBHe(+), (3) Ne + HNBNe'(+) → Ne' + HNBNe(+), and (4) Ar + HNBAr'(+) → Ar' + HNBAr(+)] and on three (3)He isotopic analogues (He + HNB(3)He(+), (3)He + HNBHe(+), and (3)He + HNB(3)He(+)) of the first reaction. The classical barrier heights were predicted to be 8.9, 6.8, 5.7, and 5.5 kcal/mol for the four reactions, respectively. The tunneling effects were found to be important below 250 K for the He reactions and below 150 K for the Ne and Ar reactions. Kinetic helium isotope effects as large as 7.8 at 100 K were predicted for the (3)He + HNB(3)He(+) reaction. Additionally, the structures and energies of the Kr + HNBKr'(+) and Xe + HNBXe'(+) systems have also been studied. PMID:26651834

  2. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    The dissertation research is focused on (1) uncovering the mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation; (2) extending the cation exchange reaction protocol to zinc sulfide gel networks, with the goal of accessing new aerogel chemistries and understanding the factors that drive the process; and (3) conducting a quantitative analysis of the ability of ZnS aerogels to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to probe the chemical changes that occur during the gelation process. These techniques suggest that the bonding between the particles in the CdSe nanoparticle gels is due to the oxidation of surface selenide species, forming covalent Se--Se bonds. Treating the gel networks with a suitable reducing agent, such as a thiol, breaks the covalent bond and disperses the gel network. The addition of sodium borohydride, a "pure" reducing agent, also breaks down the gel network, strengthening the hypothesis that the reducing character of the thiols, not their ligation ability, is responsible for the gel network breakdown. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Powder X-ray Diffraction were used to analyze the particles after successive gelation-dispersion cycles. The primary particle size decreases after repeated oxidation-reduction cycles, due to nanoparticle surface etching. This trend is observed for CdSe and CdS gel networks, allowing for the proposition that the oxidative-reductive mechanism responsible for the formation-dispersion of the gels is general, applying to other metal chalcogenide nanocrystals as well. The cation exchange reaction previously demonstrated for CdSe gels was extended to ZnS gel networks. The exchange occurs under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, methanol solvent) with exchanging ions of different size, charge and mobility (Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+ , Cu2+). The overall reaction is kinetically controlled, since systems with similar solubility, and thus similar thermodynamic driving force (e.g. PbS and CdS) exchange at very different rates. A correlation exists between the speed of the reaction and the difference between the reduction potential of the incoming cation and that of Zn2+; the larger the difference, the faster the exchange. At the same time, the porosity of the aerogels and the surfactant-free surfaces hold great importance for the exchange reactions, allowing for exchange between cations of similar size and charge (i.e. Pb2+ for Zn2+), a phenomenon that was previously reported as impossible in ligand-capped metal chalcogenide nanoparticles. These observations allowed for a better understanding of the factors governing the cation exchange reaction in nanoscale metal chalcogenides. Quaternary ZnS-CuInS2 gels were obtained by cation exchange with Cu+ and In3+, but the pure CuInS2 phase was not obtained under the mild reaction conditions used, probably due to the very different mobility of the two exchanging cations. The kinetically fast cation exchange process and the propensity of the soft chalcogenide gel networks to bind heavy metal ions selectively, suggest that these materials could also be suitable for the removal of heavy metal ions from the environment. The dissertation research studied the capacity of ZnS aerogels to sequester heavy metal ions such as Pb2+ and Hg2+ from water. The materials are efficient in removing the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions with a wide range of initial concentrations. For initial concentrations that mimic an environmental spill (i.e. 100 ppb Pb2+), the treatment with the aerogel affords a final concentration lower than the 15 ppm action level recommended by the EPA. Under thermodynamically forcing conditions, the water remediation capacity of the ZnS nanoparticle aerogels was determined to be 14.2 mmol Pb2+ / g ZnS aerogel, which is the highest value reported to date.

  3. Protonolysis and amide exchange reactions of a three-coordinate cobalt amide complex supported by an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher B; Jordan, Richard F; Hillhouse, Gregory L

    2015-05-18

    A three-coordinate cobalt species, IPrCoCl{N(SiMe3)2} [1; IPr = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-ylidene], was synthesized by the reaction of {IPrCoCl2}2 with NaN(SiMe3)2. Compound 1 is a useful starting material for low-coordinate (IPr)Co species. 1 reacts with 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT-H) via aminolysis of the Co-N bond to generate a three-coordinate phenoxide complex, IPrCoCl(O-2,6-(t)Bu2-4-MeC6H2) (2). The reaction of 1 with 2,6-diisopropylaniline (NH2DIPP) generates IPrCoCl(NHDIPP) (4), which undergoes disproportionation to form a mixture of 4, {IPrCoCl2}2, and IPrCo(NHDIPP)2 (3). The same product mixture is formed by the reaction of 1 with Li[NH(DIPP)], which unexpectedly proceeds by amide exchange. Compound 3 was synthesized independently by the reaction of {IPrCoCl2}2 with 4 equiv of Li[NH(DIPP)]. The reaction of 1 with the bulkier lithium 2,6-dimesitylanilide (LiNHDMP) also proceeds by amide exchange to generate IPrCoCl(NHDMP) (5), which is stable toward disproportionation. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit trigonal-planar geometries at cobalt in the solid state. The solid-state structure of 3 also contains a trigonal-planar cobalt center and exhibits close Co---H contacts involving the methine hydrogen atoms of the NH(DIPP) groups in the axial positions. The solid-state structure of 5 features an interaction between cobalt and a flanking aryl group of the anilide ligand, resulting in pyramidalization of the cobalt center. PMID:25938547

  4. Multivalency in the gas phase: H/D exchange reactions unravel the dynamic "rock 'n' roll" motion in dendrimer-dendrimer complexes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhenhui; Schlaich, Christoph; Schalley, Christoph A

    2013-10-25

    Noncovalent dendrimer-dendrimer complexes were successfully ionized by electrospray ionization of partly protonated amino-terminated polypropylene amine (POPAM) and POPAM dendrimers fully functionalized with benzo[21]crown-7 on all branches. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments conducted on dendrimer-dendrimer complexes in the high vacuum of a mass spectrometer give rise to a complete exchange of all labile NH hydrogen atoms. As crown ethers represent noncovalent protective groups against HDX reactions on the ammonium group to which they are coordinated, this result provides evidence for a very dynamic binding situation: each crown is mobile enough to move from one ammonium binding site to another. Schematically, one might compare this motion with two rock 'n' roll dancers that swirl around each other without completely losing all contact at any time. Although the multivalent attachment certainly increases the overall affinity, the "microdynamics" of individual site binding and dissociation remains fast. PMID:24105808

  5. Modeling and experiment reveal an unexpected stereoelectronic effect on conformation and scalar couplings of alpha-aminoorganostannanes, with possible relevance to the tin-lithium exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Marcelina; Low, Eddy; Chambournier, Gilles; Gawley, Robert E

    2003-10-31

    The solution conformation of N-methyl-2-(tributylstannyl)piperidines has been determined through the use of vicinal 119Sn-13C coupling constants, revealing a conformational distortion caused by an unexpected stereoelectronic effect in some cases. Specifically, the "equatorial" conformer is distorted into a half-chair, in which the nitrogen lone pair eclipses the C-Sn bond. This distortion, which "costs" approximately 1 kcal/mol, correlates with a conformational dependence of geminal 119Sn-15N couplings and a possible correlation with reactivity in the tin-lithium exchange reaction. PMID:14575474

  6. Impact of transient stream flow on water exchange and reactions in the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater-surface water exchange is an important process that can facilitate the degradation of critical substances like nitrogen-species and contaminants, supporting a healthy status of the aquatic ecosystem. In our study, we simulate water exchange, solute transport and reactions within a natural in-stream gravel bar using a coupled surface and subsurface numerical model. Stream water flow is simulated by computational fluid dynamics software that provides hydraulic head distributions at the streambed, which are used as an upper boundary condition for a groundwater model. In the groundwater model water exchange, solute transport, aerobic respiration and denitrification in the subsurface are simulated. Ambient groundwater flow is introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries that generate neutral, losing or gaining stream conditions. Stream water transports dissolved oxygen, organic carbon (as the dominant electron donor) and nitrate into the subsurface, whereas an additional nitrate source exists in the ambient groundwater. Scenarios of stream flow events varying in duration and stream stage are simulated and compared with steady state scenarios with respect to water fluxes, residence times and the solute turn-over rates. Results show, that water exchange and solute turn-over rates highly depend on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater levels. For scenarios, where the stream flow event shifts the hydraulic system to a net-neutral hydraulic gradient between the average stream stage and the ambient groundwater level (minimal exchange between ground- and surface water), solute consumption is higher, compared to the steady losing or gaining case. In contrast, events that induce strong losing conditions lead to a lower potential of solute consumption.

  7. MAX phase - Alumina composites via exchange reaction in the Mn+1AlCn systems (M=Ti, V, Cr, Nb, or Ta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuskelly, Dylan T.; Kisi, Erich H.; Sugo, Heber O.

    2016-01-01

    MAX phases have been produced for the first time via an exchange reaction between the M-element oxide and Al leading to an M-Al-C-Al2O3 composite in the V-Al-C, Cr-Al-C, Nb-Al-C and Ta-Al-C systems in addition to the previously known Ti-Al-C system. The reduction reaction was first investigated by forming the binary M-X carbide and then proven to be generic across all M-Al-C systems with the production of the M2AlC phase in each case. The work was extended to the other M3AlC2 and M4AlC3 phases in the respective systems, and was successful in 4 of the 5 cases with moderate yield.

  8. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. )

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  9. New reactions and theory in organic photochemistry: The 1,3-vinyl migration and its relevance to exchange integral control*

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Howard E.; Penn, John H.; Johnson, Mark R.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemistry of 1,1,4-triphenyl-1,4-pentadiene was investigated. Sensitized irradiation of this compound labeled at carbon 3 with 2H led to a degenerate rearrangement wherein the diphenylvinyl moiety migrated 1,3, thus affording diene with 2H substitution at carbon 5. In contrast, direct irradiation of the triphenyl pentadiene led to 1,3,3-triphenylbicyclo[2.1.0]pentane by a [2 + 2] cycloaddition. This multiplicity dependence of the photochemistry is understood on the basis of triplet reactants preferring a linearly conjugated diradical mechanism with a large exchange integral (K) and singlet reactants preferring an electrocyclic mechanism with a small exchange integral. PMID:16593003

  10. A reactant-coordinate-based wave packet method for full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of tetra-atomic reactions: Application to both the abstraction and exchange channels in the H + H2O reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2016-02-14

    An efficient and accurate wave packet method is proposed for the calculation of the state-to-state S-matrix elements in bimolecular reactions involving four atoms. This approach propagates an initial state specific wave packet in reactant Jacobi coordinates. The projection in product channels is carried out on projection planes, which have one less degree of freedom, by transforming both the time-dependent wave packet and final product states into a set of intermediate coordinates. This reactant-coordinate-based method is more efficient than product-coordinate-based methods because it typically requires a smaller number of basis functions or grid points and allows the determination of S-matrix elements for multiple product channels from a single propagation. This method is demonstrated in calculating the (Jtot = 0) state-to-state S-matrix elements for both the abstraction and exchange channels of the H + H2O reaction. PMID:26874479

  11. Two-dimensional free-energy surface on the exchange reaction of alkyl chloride/chloride using the QM/MM-MC method

    SciTech Connect

    Ohisa, M.; Yamataka, H.; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-12-05

    Two-dimensional free-energy surfaces are calculated for alkyl chloride/chloride exchange/inversion reactions: Cl- + RCl (R = Me and t-Bu) surrounded by one hundred H2O molecules as a model of solvent. The methodology of free-energy calculation by perturbation theory based on a mixed-Hamiltonian model (QM/MM) combined with Monte Carlo sampling of the solvent configurations was used to obtain the changes in solvation free energy. We devised a special procedure to analyze the two-dimensional free-energy surfaces to gain unique insight into the differences in the reaction mechanisms between the two systems. The inversion reaction path for R = t-Bu on the free-energy surface is found to proceed in an asynchronous way within a concerted framework via the ion-pair region. This is in contrast to the R = Me system that proceeds as a typical SN2 reaction. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  12. Cumulative reaction probabilities and transition state properties: A study of the H++H2 and H++D2 proton exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Aoiz, F. J.; Eyles, C. J.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez Rábanos, V.

    2009-05-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) have been calculated by accurate (converged, close coupling) quantum mechanical (QM), quasiclassical trajectory (QCT), and statistical QCT (SQCT) methods for the H++H2 and H++D2 reactions at collision energies up to 1.2eV and total angular momentum J =0-4. A marked resonance structure is found in the QM CRP, most especially for the H3+ system and J =0. When the CRPs are resolved in their ortho and para contributions, a clear steplike structure is found associated with the opening of internal states of reactants and products. The comparison of the QCT results with those of the other methods evinces the occurrence of two transition states, one at the entrance and one at the exit. At low J values, except for the quantal resonance structure and the lack of quantization in the product channel, the agreement between QM and QCT is very good. The SQCT model, that reflects the steplike structure associated with the opening of initial and final states accurately, clearly tends to overestimate the value of the CRP as the collision energy increases. This effect seems more marked for the H++D2 isotopic variant. For sufficiently high J values, the growth of the centrifugal barrier leads to an increase in the threshold of the CRP. At these high J values the discrepancy between SQCT and QCT becomes larger and is magnified with growing collision energy. The total CRPs calculated with the QCT and SQCT methods allowed the determination of the rate constant for the H++D2 reaction. It was found that the rate, in agreement with experiment, decreases with temperature as expected for an endothermic reaction. In the range of temperatures between 200 and 500K the differences between SQCT and QCT rate results are relatively minor. Although exact QM calculations are formidable for an exact determination of the k(T ), it can be reliably expected that their value will lie between those given by the dynamical and statistical trajectory methods.

  13. Uniformly microsized luminescent materials obtained through a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} with Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yige; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yuhuan; Yu, Xiaoyan

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: We have reported the modification of Ln3+/ZL microcrystals by the tungstate-oxygen species via a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. Highlights: ► Luminescent materials were obtained from zeolite L crystals. ► The materials show characteristic luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. ► The framework of zeolite L crystals has been kept during the annealing process. ► Energy transfer from tungstate-oxygen species to lanthanide was confirmed. - Abstract: In this work, we report the uniformly microsized luminescent materials prepared by a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. The obtained materials were investigated by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of tungstate-oxygen species on the morphology and luminescence of the materials were discussed in detail. Energy transfer from the tungstate-oxygen species to Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions have been demonstrated by the photoluminescence spectra, implying the loading of tungstate-oxygen species into the nanochannels of the crystals and the close proximity of which to Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  14. Absolute level-to-level rate constants for inelastic collisions and exchange reactions in lithium + gaseous lithium(v,j) going to gaseous lithium(v',j') + lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppage, Steven Danforth

    We report 644 absolute level-to-level inelastic and reactive constants for the L7i*2 A1S+u (nui, ji) + 7Li → L7i*2 A1S+u (nu', j') + 7Li system with initial molecular quantum numbers nui = 2 and ji = 3, 11, and 19. We collected 87 rate constants for rotationally inelastic and vibrationally elastic collisions, 281 rate constants for vibrationally inelastic collisions, and 276 constants for exchange reactions with final vibrational levels from nu f = 0 to nuf = 3. Inelastic collisions are characterized by even changes in rotational quantum number, j , and exchange reactions are identified by odd Deltaj. Level-to-level rate constants for even Deltaj inelastic collisions show distributions similar to those in rare gas collisions with the excited Li2 molecule. The ECS (energy corrected sudden) scaling law of DePristo, et al., fit the vibrationally elastic data well. Reactive rate constant results are characterized by a statistical distribution for Deltanu of 0, -1, and -2 at a substantially reduced effective temperature consistent with a kinematic model proposed by Picconatto et al. Fitting quasiclassical trajectory studies to the data using a modified LEPS potential surface provide first insights into the parameters of the excited-state Li3* three-body potential.

  15. Two-pion-exchange and other higher-order contributions to the pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Sato, T.; Myhrer, F.; Kubodera, K.

    2009-07-15

    Much effort has been invested on effective-field-theoretical studies of the near-threshold NN{yields}NN{pi} reactions and, in order to deal with the somewhat large three-momentum transfers involved, the momentum counting scheme (MCS) was proposed as an alternative to the usual Weinberg counting scheme. Given the fact that a quantitative explanation of the existing high-precision NN{yields}NN{pi} data requires a careful examination of higher chiral order contributions to the transition operator, we make a detailed numerical investigation of the convergence property of MCS for a pilot case of the pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction. Our study indicates that MCS is superior to the Weinberg scheme in identifying dominant higher order contributions to the NN{yields}NN{pi} reactions.

  16. Fully converged integral cross sections of collision induced dissociation, four-center, and single exchange reactions, and accuracy of the centrifugal sudden approximation in H2 + D2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongwei; Lu, Yunpeng; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2012-03-01

    The initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method was employed to calculate the integral cross sections for the H2 + D2 reaction with and without the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation by including all important K (the projection of the total angular momentum on the body-fixed axis) blocks. With a full-dimensional model, the first fully converged coupled-channel (CC) cross sections for different competitive processes from the ground rotational state were obtained: collision induced dissociation (CID), four-center (4C) reaction and single exchange (SE) reaction. The effect of the total angular momentum J on the reaction dynamics of H2 + D2 and the accuracy of the CS approximation have also been studied. It was found that the CID and SE processes occur in a wide range of J values while the 4C process can only take place in a narrow window of J values. For this reason, the CC cross section for the 4C channel is merely comparable to the SE channel. A comparison of the integral cross sections from CC and CS calculations showed that the CS approximation works well for the CID process but not for the 4C and SE processes, and the discrepancy between the CC and CS cross sections grows larger as the translational energy and/or the vibrational energy increase(s).

  17. The N2+O+ charge-exchange reaction and the dayglow N2+ emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Stone, T.

    1999-08-01

    Dayglow spectra were recorded by the Arizona Airglow Experiment from the payload bay of the shuttle, STS-74. These spectra are used to reexamine the role of the prominent N2+ first negative emission from the dayglow thermosphere. Many reports of the N2+ emissions identify problems in validating the intensity of the emission. Also, an extended vibrational and rotational structure of the bands remains unexplained in the historical analysis. These anomalies appear to be due to the charge-exchange reaction, N2+O+(2D,2P)->N2++O, which is the dominant source of N2+ ions in the sunlit atmosphere at high altitudes. In the present work the N2+ emission was considered to originate from two separate ion sources. First are those emissions originating from ions produced by photoionization and electron bombardment; these emissions can be modeled. Second are the emissions originating from ions produced by the charge-exchange reaction; these emissions cannot be modeled. Synthetic emission profiles due to the first ion source were modeled and subtracted from the observed spectrum, leaving emission profiles resulting from the charge-exchange ion source. These residual vibrational and rotational profiles were analyzed to retrieve resonance scattering rates for these ions. These scattering rates can be used to estimate the N2+ first negative emission rate expected from the thermosphere with a model of the atmosphere. It is suggested that measurements of the N2+ emission rate can be used to determine the daytime concentration of the oxygen ion, O+(2D,2P). Although the present work appears to resolve the question of the extended vibrational and rotational band structure, it does not help the excess intensity problem significantly. It does point out that O+ must play an important role in intensity problems.

  18. A study of the interfacial resistive switching mechanism by proton exchange reactions on the SiOx layer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Chang, Yao-Feng; Chen, Ying-Chen; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Ye; Fowler, Burt; Lee, Jack C

    2015-12-23

    In this work, we investigated SiOx-based interfacial resistive switching in planar metal-insulator-metal structures using physical/chemical/electrical analyses. This work helps clarify the interfacial reaction process and mechanism in SiOx, and also shows the potential for high temperature operation in future nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:26659556

  19. /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: characterization of phosphate exchange reactions by iodoacetate and antimycin A inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; Jones, K.A.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-11-17

    /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) saturation-transfer (ST) techniques have been used to measure steady-state flows through phosphate-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) exchange reactions in glucose-grown derepressed yeast. The results have revealed that the reactions catalyzed by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase (GAPDH/PGK) and by the mitochondrial ATPase contribute to the observed ST. Contributions from these reactions were evaluated by performing ST studies under various metabolic conditions in the presence and absence of either iodoacetate, a specific inhibitor of GAPDH, or the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. Intracellular phosphate (P/sub i/) longitudinal relaxation times were determined by performing inversion recovery experiments during steady-state ATP/sub lambda/ saturation and were used in combination with ST data to determine P/sub i/ consumption rates. /sup 13/C NMR and O/sub 2/ electrode measurements were also conducted to monitor changes in rates of glucose consumption and O/sub 2/ consumption, respectively, under the various metabolic conditions examined. The results suggest that GAPDH/PGK-catalyzed P/sub i/-ATP exchange is responsible for antimycin-resistant saturation transfer observed in anaerobic and aerobic glucose-fed yeast. Kinetics through GAPDH/PGK were found to depend on metabolic conditions. The coupled system appears to operate in a unidirectional manner during anaerobic glucose metabolism and bidirectionally when the cells are respiring on exogenously supplied ethanol. Additionally, mitochondrial ATPase activity appears to be responsible for the transfer observed in iodoacetate-treated aerobic cells supplied with either glucose or ethanol, with synthesis of ATP occurring unidirectionally.

  20. Weak-interaction strength from charge-exchange reactions versus {beta} decay in the A=40 isoquintet

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Goodman, C. D.; Garcia, A.

    2009-11-15

    We report a measurement of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distribution for {sup 40}Ar{yields}{sup 40}K using the 0 deg. (p,n) reaction. The measurement extends observed GT strength distribution in the A=40 system up to an excitation energy of {approx}8 MeV. In comparing our results with those from the {beta} decay of the isospin mirror nucleus {sup 40}Ti, we find that, within the excitation energy region probed by the {beta}-decay experiment, we observe a total GT strength that is in fair agreement with the {beta}-decay measurement. However, we find that the relative strength of the two strongest transitions differs by a factor of {approx}1.8 in comparing our results from (p,n) reactions with the {beta} decay of {sup 40}Ti. Using our results we present the neutrino-capture cross section for {sup 40}Ar.

  1. Theoretical studies of the alteration of spodumene, petalite, eucryptite and pollucite in granitic pegmatites: exchange reactions with alkali feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Scott A.; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    1993-06-01

    The ratios Na/Li, K/Li, Na/Cs and K/Cs have been calculated for exchange equilibria among the Li and Cs silicates spodumene, petalite, eucryptite, and pollucite, and the alkali feldspars albite and K-feldspar plus quartz, in pure water and in chloride solutions at temperatures from 100° to 700°C and pressures from 0.5 to 4 kbar, using available thermodynamic data for minerals and the modified HKF equation of state for aqueous species. For exchange equilibria between Li-bearing aluminosilicates and the alkali feldspars, the activities of the alkali metals in solution under most of the conditions investigated follow the order Li>Na>K, and Na/Li and K/Li decrease with decreasing temperature. For exchange equilibria between pollucite and the alkali feldspars the order is Na>K>Cs in solution; Na/Cs and K/Cs increase strongly with decreasing temperature. The absolute values of these alkali metal ratios are in good agreement with the few available experimental data. The effect of chloride ion pairing on the calculated ratios is slight and does not consistently improve agreement between theory and experiment. These results suggest that the alteration of eucryptite, petalite or spodumene to albite and/or K-feldspar should be a normal consequence of the closed system evolution of rare element pegmatites upon cooling, in agreement with the ubiquity of such phenomena world-wide. On the other hand, alteration of pollucite to albite or K-feldspar upon cooling is only likely to occur if external fluids, with very high Na/Cs and/or K/Cs ratios, gain access to the pegmatite. Owing to the heterogeneity of rare element pegmatites, the fluid need not be external to the entire pegmatite, but could be simply external to the particular zone containing pollucite. Fluids in equilibrium with typical subsolidus rare metal pegmatite assemblages will invariably have high Li contents, thus explaining the common occurrence of Li-metasomatic halos about pegmatites. These same fluids are predicted to have relatively low Cs contents, in apparent agreement with the lesser role of Cs relative to Li in metasomatic halos. However, preferential formation of complexes of the alkali metals with fluoride, borate or aluminosilicate components potentially could alter the calculated alkali metal behaviors.

  2. Influence of varying hydraulic conditions on hyporheic exchange and reactions in an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    In the hyporheic zone (HZ) important biogeochemical transformations occur with crucial impact on nutrient cycling in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between stream flow and HZ exchange of a natural in-stream gravel bar (ISGB), by using three-dimensional steady state simulations of a coupled surface and subsurface numerical model. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM. It is sequentially coupled by the hydraulic head distribution to the top boundary of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. The modelling approach is validated to the stream rating curve and the subsurface travel times in the ISGB based on field measurements. Hydraulic conditions are varied by stream discharge, ranging from low discharge, sufficient to allow stream water flow through both stream channels surrounding the ISGB (0.1 m³/s), to conditions where the ISGB is completely submerged (5.0 m³/s). Ambient groundwater flow is assigned by constant head boundaries upstream and downstream of the ISGB. By varying stream discharge or ambient groundwater heads the general flow field of the ISGB can be adjusted from losing via neutral to gaining conditions. Reactive transport scenarios consider stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic carbon. Furthermore, two nitrate sources originated from the stream water and ambient groundwater are included in the model. Results show that highest hyporheic exchange and longest residence times occur under neutral conditions, where the extent of the hyporheic flow cell is at a maximum. Hence, the stronger the system is gaining and losing, the smaller is the hyporheic exchange flux and the shorter are the residence times in the HZ of the ISGB. AR and DN efficiencies of the ISGB are lowest under gaining conditions because infiltrating solutes are restriced to the hyporheic flow cells and hence to small reactive areas. In contrast, under losing conditions stream solutes infiltrate deep into the HZ and overreach the extent of the hyporheic flow cells, resulting in large reactive areas with highest AR and DN efficiencies.

  3. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-isotope-exchange reactions. 5. Determination of K and. delta. S/sup 0/ for the reaction OD/sup -/(daq) + HS/sup -/(aq) reversible OH/sup -/(aq) + DS/sup -/(daq)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.K.; Rock, P.A.

    1988-06-16

    This paper reports the authors results for the experimental determination of the equilibrium constant and its temperature dependence for the solution-phase hydrogen-isotope-exchange reaction OD/sup -/(daq) + HS/sup -/(aq) reversible OH/sup -/(aq) + DS/sup -/(daq). The results were obtained from measurements on electrochemical double cells of the type Pt(s) absolute value D/sub 2/(g) Na/sub 2/S(daq) HgS(s) Hg(l) absolute value HgS(s) Na/sub 2/S(aq) H/sub 2/(g) Pt(s) and analogous cells involving silver sulfide-silver electrodes in place of the mercuric sulfide-mercury electrodes. The experimental value of the equilibrium constant at 25.0 /sup 0/C for the reaction is K = 0.534 +/- 0.011; the experimental value of the standard entropy change at 25.0 /sup 0/C for the reaction is ..delta..S/sup 0/ = 7.0 +/- 1.8 J x K/sup -1/.

  4. MAX phase - Alumina composites via elemental and exchange reactions in the Tin+1ACn systems (A=Al, Si, Ga, Ge, In and Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuskelly, Dylan; Richards, Erin; Kisi, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Extension of the aluminothermal exchange reaction synthesis of Mn+1AXn phases to systems where the element 'A' is not the reducing agent was investigated in systems TiO2-A-Al-C for A=Al, Si, Ga, Ge, In and Sn as well as Cr2O3-Ga-Al-C. MAX phase-Al2O3 composites were made in all systems except those with A=Ga or In. The effectiveness of conversion to MAX phases was generally in the range 63-96% without optimisation of starting ratios. Optimisation in the Ti-Si-C system gave a MAX phase component with >98% Ti3SiC2.

  5. Precision evaluation of the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino capture rate from the (3He,t ) charge-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, D.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Alanssari, M.; Brown, B. A.; Cleveland, B. T.; Ejiri, H.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Gavrin, V. N.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hatanaka, K.; Holl, M.; Iwamoto, C.; Lennarz, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, H.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.

    2015-03-01

    A precision measurement of the 71Ga(3He,t ) 71Ge charge-exchange reaction was performed. By using a rather complete set of theoretical form factors to describe the cross-section angular distributions over a large angular range, the Gamow-Teller strength distribution up to the effective neutron-separation energy in 71Ge was extracted. The data and the analysis constrain the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino rate in a neutrino nonoscillation scenario. For nonoscillating neutrinos we report a solar neutrino capture rate of 122.4 ±3.4 (stat ) ±1.1 (sys ) SNU, which is lower than the presently accepted value of 132 ±18 SNU, though not in disagreement given the quoted errors.

  6. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  7. Hydrogen bonding induced proton exchange reactions in dense D{sub 2}-NH{sub 3} and D{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Borstad, Gustav M.; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated high-pressure behaviors of simple binary mixtures of NH{sub 3} and D{sub 2} to 50 GPa and CH{sub 4} and D{sub 2} to 30 GPa using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral data indicate strong proton exchange reactions occur in dense D{sub 2}-NH{sub 3} mixture, producing different isotopes of ammonia such as NH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}D, NHD{sub 2}, and ND{sub 3}. In contrast, the proton exchange process in dense D{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture is highly limited, and no vibration feature is apparent for deuterated methane. The vibrational modes of H{sub 2} isotopes in D{sub 2}-NH{sub 3} are blue shifted from those of pure H{sub 2} isotopes, whereas the modes of D{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} show overall agreement with those in pure D{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. In turn, this result advocates the presence of strong repulsion and thereby internal pressure in D{sub 2}-NH{sub 3} mixture, which are absent in D{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}. In fact, the bond length of hydrogen molecules in D{sub 2}-NH{sub 3}, calculated from the present spectral data, is shorter than that observed in pure hydrogen – supporting the enhanced intermolecular interaction in the mixture. Comparing the present spectral results with those previously observed in D{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O mixtures further suggests that the strength of repulsive interaction or the magnitude of internal pressure in the mixtures is proportional to the strength of hydrogen bonding in H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4} in decreasing order. Hence, we suggest that the proton exchange is assisted by hydrogen bonding in these molecules.

  8. Preparation of Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 hetero-composites by cation exchange reaction and its enhancing photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaning; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xitao

    2016-03-15

    Recently, Ag3PO4 has been shown to be a promising photocatalyst for the degradation of organic pollutants in wastewater. The hetero-composites between Ag3PO4 and other phosphate can help to enhance the dispersion of Ag3PO4 particles, improve the separation of photo-generated charges, and decrease the cost of photocatalyst. In this study, Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 hetero-composites were prepared by a cation exchange reaction for the first time using cheap Ni3(PO4)2 as starting materials, characterized with higher-magnification transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and photo-luminescence (PL) technique, and tested in photocatalytic degradation of phenol in water under visible light. The results show that the Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 composites prepared by cation exchange reaction consist of well dispersive Ag3PO4 particles on the surface of Ni3(PO4)2, and the size of Ag3PO4 particles is 3-5nm, which is far smaller than that of pure Ag3PO4 and Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 composites prepared by coprecipitation method. The content of Ag3PO4 has significant influence on the photo absorption, photocurrent response and photocatalytic performance, and Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 composites with Ag3PO4 loading of 60wt.% display the highest photocatalytic activity for the degradation of phenol under visible light among these samples. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ag3PO4/Ni3(PO4)2 is related to the small particle size of Ag3PO4 and efficient separation of electron-hole pairs. PMID:26722799

  9. Indoor transient SOA formation from ozone + α-pinene reactions: Impacts of air exchange and initial product concentrations, and comparison to limonene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S.

    2015-07-01

    The ozonolysis of reactive organic gases (ROG), e.g. terpenes, generates secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. The SOA formation strength of such reactions is parameterized by the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, which is the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. AMFs vary in magnitude both among and for individual ROGs. Here, we quantified dynamic SOA formation from the ozonolysis of α-pinene with 'transient AMFs,' which describe SOA formation due to pulse emission of a ROG in an indoor space with air exchange, as is common when consumer products are intermittently used in ventilated buildings. We performed 19 experiments at low, moderate, and high (0.30, 0.52, and 0.94 h-1, respectively) air exchange rates (AER) at varying concentrations of initial reactants. Transient AMFs as a function of peak SOA concentrations ranged from 0.071 to 0.25, and they tended to increase as the AER and product of the initial reactant concentrations increased. Compared to our similar research on limonene ozonolysis (Youssefi and Waring, 2014), for which formation strength was driven by secondary ozone reactions, the AER impact for α-pinene was opposite in direction and weaker, while the initial reactant product impact was in the same direction but stronger for α-pinene than for limonene. Linear fits of AMFs for α-pinene ozonolysis as a function of the AER and initial reactant concentrations are provided so that future indoor models can predict SOA formation strength.

  10. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of 18O(3P) + NO2 isotope exchange and reaction to O2 + NO on D0 and D1 potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bina; Zhang, Dong H.; Bowman, Joel M.

    2013-07-01

    We report quasiclassical trajectory calculations for the bimolecular reaction 18O(3P) + NO2 on the recent potential energy surfaces of the ground (D0) and first excited (D1) states of NO3 [B. Fu, J. M. Bowman, H. Xiao, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, J. Chem. Theory. Comput. 9, 893 (2013)], 10.1021/ct3009792. The branching ratio of isotope exchange versus O2 + NO formation, as well as the product angular distributions and energy and rovibrational state distributions are presented. The calculations are done at the collision energy of relevance to recent crossed beam experiments [K. A. Mar, A. L. Van Wyngarden, C.-W. Liang, Y. T. Lee, J. J. Lin, and K. A. Boering, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044302 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736567. Very good agreement is achieved between the current calculations and these experiments for the branching ratio and final translational energy and angular distributions of isotope exchange products 16O(3P) + NO2 and O2 + NO formation products. The reactant 18O atom results in 18O16O but not N18O for the O2 + NO formation product channel, consistent with the experiment. In addition, the detailed vibrational and rotational state information of diatomic molecules calculated currently for the 34O2 + NO formation channel on D0 and D1 states are in qualitative agreement with the previous experimental and theoretical results of the photodissociation of NO3 and are consistent with older thermal bimolecular kinetics measurements.

  11. The orbital-based view on reaction dynamics: ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fhlisch, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Time resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy has proven recently, that it can beat the complexity of dynamics in materials and chemical processes by its high selectivity towards elemental, chemical, and magnetic properties. Changes in chemical bonding, in particular bond breaking and bond creation seem conceptually simple, but as a result of coherent wave packet motion it is difficult to catch the dynamic pathways in a multidimensional potential energy landscape. In this contribution we exploit the unique approach of femtosecond time resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at LCLS to derive how ultrafast spin-crossover and ligation determines the pathways of ligand exchange of Ironpentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) in solution. As an outlook, it will be discussed, how non-linear X-ray processes can push time resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy in a new phase. In particular, stimulated Raman scattering and amplified spontaneous emission can overcome the weak scattering cross-sections of spontaneous processes, help to suppress sample damage and increase spectral resolution and excited state selectivity through the exploitation of Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering.

  12. Functional Exchangeability of Oxidase and Dehydrogenase Reactions in the Biosynthesis of Hydroxyphenylglycine, a Nonribosomal Peptide Building Block.

    PubMed

    Diez, Veronica; Loznik, Mark; Taylor, Sandra; Winn, Michael; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Podmore, Helen; Micklefield, Jason; Goodacre, Royston; Medema, Marnix H; Müller, Ulrike; Bovenberg, Roel; Janssen, Dick B; Takano, Eriko

    2015-07-17

    A key problem in the engineering of pathways for the production of pharmaceutical compounds is the limited diversity of biosynthetic enzymes, which restricts the attainability of suitable traits such as less harmful byproducts, enhanced expression features, or different cofactor requirements. A promising synthetic biology approach is to redesign the biosynthetic pathway by replacing the native enzymes by heterologous proteins from unrelated pathways. In this study, we applied this method to effectively re-engineer the biosynthesis of hydroxyphenylglycine (HPG), a building block for the calcium-dependent antibiotic of Streptomyces coelicolor, a nonribosomal peptide. A key step in HPG biosynthesis is the conversion of 4-hydroxymandelate to 4-hydroxyphenylglyoxylate, catalyzed by hydroxymandelate oxidase (HmO), with concomitant generation of H2O2. The same reaction can also be catalyzed by O2-independent mandelate dehydrogenase (MdlB), which is a catabolic enzyme involved in bacterial mandelate utilization. In this work, we engineered alternative HPG biosynthetic pathways by replacing the native HmO in S. coelicolor by both heterologous oxidases and MdlB dehydrogenases from various sources and confirmed the restoration of calcium-dependent antibiotic biosynthesis by biological and UHPLC-MS analysis. The alternative enzymes were isolated and kinetically characterized, confirming their divergent substrate specificities and catalytic mechanisms. These results demonstrate that heterologous enzymes with different physiological contexts can be used in a Streptomyces host to provide an expanded library of enzymatic reactions for a synthetic biology approach. This study thus broadens the options for the engineering of antibiotic production by using enzymes with different catalytic and structural features. PMID:25713978

  13. 3-D agricultural air quality modeling: Impacts of NH3/H2S gas-phase reactions and bi-directional exchange of NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Accurately simulating the transport and fate of reduced nitrogen (NHx = ammonia (NH3) + ammonium (NH4+))- and sulfur-containing compounds emitted from agricultural activities represents a major challenge in agricultural air quality modeling. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is further developed and improved by implementing 22 ammonia (NH3)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) related gas-phase reactions and adjusting a few key parameters (e.g., emission potential) for bi-directional exchange of NH3 fluxes. Several simulations are conducted over the eastern U.S. domain at a 12-km horizontal resolution for January and July 2002 to examine the impacts of those improved treatments on air quality. The 5th generation mesoscale model (MM5) and CMAQ predict an overall satisfactory and consistent performance with previous modeling studies, especially for 2-m temperature, 2-m relative humidity, ozone (O3), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). High model biases exist for precipitation in July and also dry/wet depositions. The updated model treatments contribute to O3, NHx, and PM2.5 by up to 0.4 ppb, 1.0 μg m-3, and 1.0 μg m-3 in January, respectively, and reduce O3 by up to 0.8 ppb and contribute to NHx and PM2.5 by up to 1.2 and 1.1 μg m-3 in July, respectively. The spatial distributions of O3 in both months and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in January are mainly affected by inline dry deposition velocity calculation. The spatial distributions of SO2 and sulfate (SO42-) in July are affected by both inline dry deposition velocity and NH3/H2S reactions. The variation trends of NH3, NHx, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), PM2.5 and total nitrogen (TN) are predominated by bi-directional exchange of NH3 fluxes. Uncertainties of NH3 emission potentials and empirical constants used in the bi-directional exchange scheme may significantly affect the concentrations of NHx and PM2.5, indicating that a more accurate and explicit treatment for those parameters should be considered in the future work.

  14. Development of a High-Speed Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction System Using a Circulating Water-Based Rapid Heat-Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hideyuki Terazono,; Hiroyuki Takei,; Akihiro Hattori,; Kenji Yasuda,

    2010-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful technique to detect microorganisms, viruses, or cells by amplifying a single copy or a few copies of a fragment of a particular DNA sequence. To reduce acquisition time, it is necessary to decrease the temperature transition time between denaturation and extension. We have developed a simple rapid real-time microlitter-sample droplet PCR system accomplished by the rapid liquid-based heat-exchange of sample droplets by quick switching of two circulating hot waters of denaturation and extension, a microlitter-sized droplet and a thin-film aluminum chip. Using this system, rapid PCR amplification of a set of droplets lined up on an aluminum chip was conducted successfully as shown by the increase in fluorescence intensity, and was accomplished within 3.5 min in 40 cycles of 1 s denaturation and 3 s extension reaction, which is one magnitude faster than conventional fast PCR systems. This method allows the rapid detection of DNA fragments and has a possibility for measuring multiple samples simultaneously in a miniaturized microfluidic chip.

  15. Rapid direct conversion of Cu(2-x)Se to CuAgSe nanoplatelets via ion exchange reactions at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moroz, N A; Olvera, A; Willis, G M; Poudeu, P F P

    2015-06-01

    The use of template nanostructures for the creation of photovoltaic and thermoelectric semiconductors is becoming a quickly expanding synthesis strategy. In this work we report a simple two-step process enabling the formation of ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets with a great degree of control over the composition and shape. Starting with hexagonal nanoplatelets of cubic Cu2-xSe, ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets were generated through a rapid ion exchange reaction at 300 K using AgNO3 solution. The Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template and the final CuAgSe nanoplatelets were analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that both the low temperature pseudotetragonal and the high temperature cubic forms of CuAgSe phase were created while maintaining the morphology of the Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template. Thermal and electronic transport measurements of hot-pressed pellets of the synthesized CuAgSe nanoplatelets showed a drastic reduction in the thermal conductivity and a sharp transition from n-type (S = -45 μV K(-1)) to p-type (S = +200 μV K(-1)) semiconducting behavior upon heating above the structural transition from the low temperature orthorhombic to the high temperature super-ionic cubic phase. This simple reaction process utilizing a template nanostructure matrix represents an energy efficient, cost-efficient, and versatile strategy to create interesting materials with lower defect density and superior thermoelectric performance. PMID:25965176

  16. Submolecular regulation of cell transformation by deuterium depleting water exchange reactions in the tricarboxylic acid substrate cycle.

    PubMed

    Boros, László G; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Katz, Howard E; Roth, Justine P; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Somlyai, Gábor

    2016-02-01

    The naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen ((1)H), deuterium ((2)H), could have an important biological role. Deuterium depleted water delays tumor progression in mice, dogs, cats and humans. Hydratase enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle control cell growth and deplete deuterium from redox cofactors, fatty acids and DNA, which undergo hydride ion and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A model is proposed that emphasizes the terminal complex of mitochondrial electron transport chain reducing molecular oxygen to deuterium depleted water (DDW); this affects gluconeogenesis as well as fatty acid oxidation. In the former, the DDW is thought to diminish the deuteration of sugar-phosphates in the DNA backbone, helping to preserve stability of hydrogen bond networks, possibly protecting against aneuploidy and resisting strand breaks, occurring upon exposure to radiation and certain anticancer chemotherapeutics. DDW is proposed here to link cancer prevention and treatment using natural ketogenic diets, low deuterium drinking water, as well as DDW production as the mitochondrial downstream mechanism of targeted anti-cancer drugs such as Avastin and Glivec. The role of (2)H in biology is a potential missing link to the elusive cancer puzzle seemingly correlated with cancer epidemiology in western populations as a result of excessive (2)H loading from processed carbohydrate intake in place of natural fat consumption. PMID:26826644

  17. Evidence for Sequence Scrambling and Divergent H/D Exchange Reactions of Doubly-Charged Isobaric b-Type Fragment Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekavat, Behrooz; Miladi, Mahsan; Al-Fdeilat, Abdullah H.; Somogyi, Arpad; Solouki, Touradj

    2013-12-01

    To date, only a limited number of reports are available on structural variants of multiply-charged b-fragment ions. We report on observed bimodal gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reaction kinetics and patterns for substance P b10 2+ that point to presence of isomeric structures. We also compare HDX reactions, post-ion mobility/collision-induced dissociation (post-IM/CID), and sustained off-resonance irradiation-collision induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of substance P b10 2+ and a cyclic peptide with an identical amino acid (AA) sequence order to substance P b10. The observed HDX patterns and reaction kinetics and SORI-CID pattern for the doubly charged head-to-tail cyclized peptide were different from either of the presumed isomers of substance P b10 2+, suggesting that b10 2+ may not exist exclusively as a head-to-tail cyclized structure. Ultra-high mass measurement accuracy was used to assign identities of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions of substance P b10 2+; over 30 % of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions from substance P b10 2+ had rearranged (scrambled) AA sequences. Moreover, post-IM/CID experiments revealed the presence of two conformer types for substance P b10 2+, whereas only one conformer type was observed for the head-to-tail cyclized peptide. We also show that AA sequence scrambling from CID of doubly-charged b-fragment ions is not unique to substance P b10 2+.

  18. Weathering reactions and hyporheic exchange controls on stream water chemistry in a glacial meltwater stream in the McMurdo Dry Valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, M.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Lyons, W.B.; Blum, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, dilute glacial meltwater flows down well-established streambeds to closed basin lakes during the austral summer. During the 6-12 week flow season, a hyporheic zone develops in the saturated sediment adjacent to the streams. Longer Dry Valley streams have higher concentrations of major ions than shorter streams. The longitudinal increases in Si and K suggest that primary weathering contributes to the downstream solute increase. The hypothesis that weathering reactions in the hyporheic zone control stream chemistry was tested by modeling the downstream increase in solute concentration in von Guerard Stream in Taylor Valley. The average rates of solute supplied from these sources over the 5.2 km length of the stream were 6.1 ?? 10-9 mol Si L-1 m-1 and 3.7 ?? 10-9 mol K L-1 m-1, yielding annual dissolved Si loads of 0.02-1.30 tool Si m-2 of watershed land surface. Silicate minerals in streambed sediment were analyzed to determine the representative surface area of minerals in the hyporheic zone subject to primary weathering. Two strategies were evaluated to compute sediment surface area normalized weathering rates. The first applies a best linear fit to synoptic data in order to calculate a constant downstream solute concentration gradient, dC/dx (constant weathering rate contribution, CRC method); the second uses a transient storage model to simulate dC/dx, representing both hyporheic exchange and chemical weathering (hydrologic exchange, HE method). Geometric surface area normalized dissolution rates of the silicate minerals in the stream ranged from 0.6 ?? 10-12 mol Si m-2 s-1 to 4.5 ?? 10-12 mol Si m-2 s-1 and 0.4 ?? 10-12 mol K m-2 s-1 to 1.9 ?? 10-12 mol K m-2 s-1. These values are an order of magnitude lower than geometric surface area normalized weathering rates determined in laboratory studies and are an order of magnitude greater than geometric surface area normalized weathering rates determined in a warmer, wetter setting in temperate basins, despite the cold temperatures, lack of precipitation and lack of organic material. These results suggest that the continuous saturation and rapid flushing of the sediment due to hyporheic exchange facilitates weathering in Dry Valley streams.

  19. A "uniform" heterogeneous photocatalyst: integrated p-n type CuInS2/NaInS2 nanosheets by partial ion exchange reaction for efficient H2 evolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Ngaw, Chee Keong; Tay, Yee Yan; Cao, Shaowen; Barber, James; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Single-crystalline-like P-N type CuInS2/NaInS2 heterogeneous nanosheets were synthesized by partial cation exchange reaction and show highly improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity attributed to the increased efficiency of interfacial charge transfer. PMID:25959829

  20. Rapid direct conversion of Cu2-xSe to CuAgSe nanoplatelets via ion exchange reactions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, N. A.; Olvera, A.; Willis, G. M.; Poudeu, P. F. P.

    2015-05-01

    The use of template nanostructures for the creation of photovoltaic and thermoelectric semiconductors is becoming a quickly expanding synthesis strategy. In this work we report a simple two-step process enabling the formation of ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets with a great degree of control over the composition and shape. Starting with hexagonal nanoplatelets of cubic Cu2-xSe, ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets were generated through a rapid ion exchange reaction at 300 K using AgNO3 solution. The Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template and the final CuAgSe nanoplatelets were analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that both the low temperature pseudotetragonal and the high temperature cubic forms of CuAgSe phase were created while maintaining the morphology of the Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template. Thermal and electronic transport measurements of hot-pressed pellets of the synthesized CuAgSe nanoplatelets showed a drastic reduction in the thermal conductivity and a sharp transition from n-type (S = -45 μV K-1) to p-type (S = +200 μV K-1) semiconducting behavior upon heating above the structural transition from the low temperature orthorhombic to the high temperature super-ionic cubic phase. This simple reaction process utilizing a template nanostructure matrix represents an energy efficient, cost-efficient, and versatile strategy to create interesting materials with lower defect density and superior thermoelectric performance.The use of template nanostructures for the creation of photovoltaic and thermoelectric semiconductors is becoming a quickly expanding synthesis strategy. In this work we report a simple two-step process enabling the formation of ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets with a great degree of control over the composition and shape. Starting with hexagonal nanoplatelets of cubic Cu2-xSe, ternary CuAgSe nanoplatelets were generated through a rapid ion exchange reaction at 300 K using AgNO3 solution. The Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template and the final CuAgSe nanoplatelets were analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that both the low temperature pseudotetragonal and the high temperature cubic forms of CuAgSe phase were created while maintaining the morphology of the Cu2-xSe nanoplatelet template. Thermal and electronic transport measurements of hot-pressed pellets of the synthesized CuAgSe nanoplatelets showed a drastic reduction in the thermal conductivity and a sharp transition from n-type (S = -45 μV K-1) to p-type (S = +200 μV K-1) semiconducting behavior upon heating above the structural transition from the low temperature orthorhombic to the high temperature super-ionic cubic phase. This simple reaction process utilizing a template nanostructure matrix represents an energy efficient, cost-efficient, and versatile strategy to create interesting materials with lower defect density and superior thermoelectric performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01451d

  1. Real-time monitoring of in situ gas-phase H/D exchange reactions of cations by atmospheric pressure helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS).

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Athula B; Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius

    2014-01-01

    An enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI-MS) source avoids, or minimizes, undesired back-exchange reactions usually encountered during deuterium incorporation experiments under ambient-pressure open-source conditions. A simple adaptation of an ESI source provides an economical way of conducting gas phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions (HDX) in real time without the need for complicated hardware modifications. For example, the spectrum of [(2)H8]toluene recorded under exposed ambient conditions showed the base peak at m/z 96 due to fast leaching of ring hydrogens because of interactions with H2O vapor present in the open source. Such D/H exchanges are rapidly reversed if the deuterium-depleted [(2)H8]toluene is exposed to D2O vapor. In addition to the enumeration of labile protons, our procedure enables the identification of protonation sites in molecules unambiguously, by the number of H/D exchanges observed in real time. For example, molecules such as tetrahydrofuran and pyridine protonate at the heteroatom and consequently undergo only one H/D exchange, whereas ethylbenzene, which protonates at a ring position of the aromatic ring, undergoes six H/D exchanges. In addition, carbocations generated in situ by in-source fragmentation of precursor protonated species, such as benzyl alcohol, do not undergo any rapid H/D exchanges. Because radical cations, second-generation cations (ions formed by losing a small molecule from a precursor ion), or those formed by hydride abstraction do not undergo rapid H/D exchanges, our technique provides a way to distinguish these ions from protonated molecules. PMID:24325360

  2. Competing Noncovalent Host-guest Interactions and H/D Exchange: Reactions of Benzyloxycarbonyl-Proline Glycine Dipeptide Variants with ND3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladi, Mahsan; Olaitan, Abayomi D.; Zekavat, Behrooz; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-11-01

    A combination of density functional theory calculations, hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reactions, ion mobility-mass spectrometry, and isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry was used to study gas-phase "host-guest" type interactions of a benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-capped proline (P) glycine (G) model dipeptide (i.e., Z-PG) and its various structural analogues with ND3. It is shown that in a solvent-free environment, structural differences between protonated and alkali metal ion (Na+, K+, or Cs+)-complexed species of Z-PG affect ND3 adduct formation. Specifically, [Z-PG + H]+ and [Z-PG-OCH3 + H]+ formed gas-phase ND3 adducts ([Z-PG (or Z-PG-OCH3) + H + ND3]+) but no ND3 adducts were observed for [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ or [Z-PG + H - CO2]+. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated collision cross sections (CCSs) of protonated and alkali metal ion-complexed Z-PG species showed similar trends that agreed with the observed structural differences from molecular modeling results. Moreover, results from theoretical ND3 affinity calculations were consistent with experimental HDX observations, indicating a more stable ND3 adduct for [Z-PG + H]+ compared to [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ species. Molecular modeling and experimental MS results for [Z-PG + H]+ and [Z-PG + alkali metal]+ suggest that optimized cation-π and hydrogen bonding interactions of carbonyl groups in final products are important for ND3 adduct formation.

  3. X-ray Lithography on Perovskite Nanocrystals Films: From Patterning with Anion-Exchange Reactions to Enhanced Stability in Air and Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Films of colloidal CsPbX3 (X = I, Br or Cl) nanocrystals, prepared by solution drop-casting or spin-coating on a silicon substrate, were exposed to a low flux of X-rays from an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer source, causing intermolecular C=C bonding of the organic ligands that coat the surface of the nanocrystals. This transformation of the ligand shell resulted in a greater stability of the film, which translated into the following features: (i) Insolubility of the exposed regions in organic solvents which caused instead complete dissolution of the unexposed regions. This enabled the fabrication of stable and strongly fluorescent patterns over millimeter scale areas. (ii) Inhibition of the irradiated regions toward halide anion exchange reactions, when the films were exposed either to halide anions in solution or to hydrohalic vapors. This feature was exploited to create patterned regions of different CsPbIxBryClz compositions, starting from a film with homogeneous CsPbX3 composition. (iii) Resistance of the films to degradation caused by exposure to air and moisture, which represents one of the major drawbacks for the integration of these materials in devices. (iv) Stability of the film in water and biological buffer, which can open interesting perspectives for applications of halide perovskite nanocrystals in aqueous environments. PMID:26617344

  4. Non-innocent electrolyte effects on bimolecular pseudo-self-exchange reactions of ruthenium ammine complexes: Evidence for electron-transfer catalysis in H-bonded ternary assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jeff Christian; Inagaki, Mayuko; Chun, Sam J.; Eskandari, Vahid; Luo, Xining; Pan, Zheng N.; Sankararaman, Uma; Pengra, Gina E.; Zhou, Jiahua; Hailey, Philip; Laurent, Jeanny; Utalan, Daniel

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics of bimolecular pseudo-self-exchange reactions such as that between pentaammine(pyridine)ruthenium(II) and pentaammine(3-fluoropyridine)ruthenium(III) shown below, (NH3)5RuII(py)+(NH3)5RuIII(3-Fpy)⇄kex(NH3)5RuIII(py)+(NH3)5RuII(3-Fpy) reveal a novel form of non-covalently mediated electron transfer over distance when salts of non-innocent electrolytes such as the conjugated dicarboxylic acid anions trans, trans-muconate 2- or terephthalate 2- are added to the solution. The kinetic accelerations are distinct from those seen with simple electrolytes such as KCl or CaCl 2, and are thus outside the realm of classical electrolyte effects described by the Debye-Huckel theory of ion atmospheres. Kinetic simulations are presented, and the rate acceleration is interpreted in the context of possible superexchange-type interactions taking place in hydrogen-bonded ternary (or higher) association complexes which create new kinetic pathways for electron transfer over distance in aqueous solution.

  5. Missing-Mass Spectroscopy of the 4-Neutron System by Exothermic Double-Charge Exchange Reaction 4He(8He,8Be)4n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisamori, Keiichi; Shimoura, Susumu; Miya, Hiroyuki; Assie, Marlene; Baba, Hidetada; Baba, Tatsuo; Beaumel, Didier; Dozono, Masanori; Fujii, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Naoki; Go, Shintaro; Hammache, Fariouz; Ideguchi, Eiji; Inabe, Naohiro; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kameda, Daisuke; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kawabata, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Motoki; Kondo, Yosuke; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Kubota, Yuki; Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Lee, CheongSoo; Maeda, Yukie; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Michimasa, Shin'ichiro; Miki, Kenjiro; Nishi, Takahiro; Noji, Shumpei; Ota, Shinsuke; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sasamoto, Yoshiko; Sasano, Masaki; Sato, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yohei; Stolz, Andreas; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takaki, Motonobu; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tamii, Atsushi; Tang, Leung; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Miho; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Yako, Kentaro; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Rin

    A possible existence of the tetra-neutron system as a resonance state is still an open and fascinating question, while theoretical papers using ab-initio calculation suggests that the bound tetra-neutron does not exist. We have performed a missing-mass spectroscopy of the 4n system via the exothermic double-charge exchange reaction 4He(8He,8Be)4n. The experiment was carried out at the RIBF at RIKEN using the SHARAQ spectrometer. Since the secondary beam, 8He at 190 A MeV, has a large internal energy, it is possible to produce the 4n system with small momentum transfers of less than 20 MeV/c. In the present analysis, a new analytical framework to treat multi-particles under high beam rate condition (2 MHz) was developed for good statistics. At the SHARAQ spectrometer, 8Be can be identified by measuring the invariant mass of the coincident two alpha particles with a good signal-to-noise ratio. About several tens of candidate events are obtained above the 4n threshold.

  6. A review of the stability and durability of non-precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banham, Dustin; Ye, Siyu; Pei, Katie; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Kishimoto, Takeaki; Imashiro, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    A major hurdle to the widespread commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the high loading of noble metal (Pt/Pt-alloy) catalyst at the cathode, which is necessary to facilitate the inherently sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To eliminate the use of Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts at the cathode of PEMFCs and thus significantly reduce the cost, extensive research on non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has been carried out over the past decade. Major advances in improving the ORR activity of NPMCs, particularly Fe- and Co-based NPMCs, have elevated these materials to a level at which they can start to be considered as potential alternatives to Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts. Unfortunately, the stability (performance loss following galvanostatic experiments) of these materials is currently unacceptably low and the durability (performance loss following voltage cycling) remains uncertain. The three primary mechanisms of instability are: (a) Leaching of the metal site, (b) Oxidative attack by H2O2, and (c) Protonation followed by possible anion adsorption of the active site. While (a) has largely been solved, further work is required to understand and prevent losses from (b) and/or (c). Thus, this review is focused on historical progress in (and possible future strategies for) improving the stability/durability of NPMCs.

  7. Kinetics of the exchange reactions between Gd(DTPA)2-, Gd(BOPTA)2-, and Gd(DTPA-BMA) complexes, used as MRI contrast agents, and the triethylenetetraamine-hexaacetate ligand.

    PubMed

    Pálinkás, Zoltán; Baranyai, Zsolt; Brücher, Erno; Rózsa, Béla

    2011-04-18

    The kinetics of ligand exchange reactions occurring between the Gd(DTPA), Gd(BOPTA), and Gd(DTPA-BMA) complexes, used as contrast agents in MRI, and the ligand TTHA, have been studied in the pH range 6.5-11.0 by measuring the water proton relaxation rates at 25 °C in 0.15 M NaCl. The rates of the reactions are directly proportional to the concentration of TTHA, indicating that the reactions take place with the direct attack of the H(i)TTHA((6-i)-) (i = 0, 1, 2 and 3) species on the Gd(3+) complexes, through the formation of ternary intermediates. The rates of the exchange reactions of the neutral Gd(DTPA-BMA) increase when the pH is increased from 6.5 to 9, because the less protonated H(i)TTHA((6-i)-) species can more efficiently attack the Gd(3+) complex. The rates of the exchange reactions of [Gd(DTPA)](2-) and [Gd(BOPTA)](2-) also increase from pH 8.5 to 11, but from 6.5 to 8.5 an unexpected decrease was observed in the reaction rates. The decrease has been interpreted by assuming the validity of general acid catalysis. The protons from the H(i)TTHA((6-i)-) species (i = 2 and 3) can be transferred to the coordinated DTPA or BOPTA in the ternary intermediates when the dissociation of the Gd(3+) complexes occurs faster. The kinetic inertness of Gd(DTPA), Gd(BOPTA), and Gd(DTPA-BMA) differs very considerably; the rates of the ligand exchange reactions of Gd(DTPA-BMA), thus the rates of its dissociation, are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of Gd(DTPA) and Gd(BOPTA). The rates of the ligand exchange reactions increase with increasing concentration of the endogenous citrate, phosphate, or carbonate ions at a pH of 7.4, but the effect of citrate and phosphate is negligible at their physiological concentrations. The increase in the reaction rates at the physiological concentration of the carbonate ion is significant (20-60%), and the effect is the largest for the Gd(DTPA-BMA) complex. PMID:21405037

  8. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  9. Fe2⇄Mg2 and TiAl2⇄MgSi2 exchange reactions between clinopyroxenes and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, R. O.; Carmichael, I. S. E.

    1984-02-01

    The interdependence of the Fe(Mg)-1 (e.g., FeO-MgO in silicate melt; CaFeSi2O6-CaMgSi2O6 in pyroxene) and TiAl2(MgSi2)-1 exchange reactions between silicate melts and coexisting Ca-pyroxene has been examined. High-calcium clinopyroxenes were grown in 1 atmosphere melting and crystallization experiments on rock powders spanning the composition range tholeiite to melilitite (1,092exchange and (X_{{text{Ti}}^{{text{4 + }}} }^{M1} )^{{text{CPX}}} suggest that at given values of μ _{{text{Fe(Mg)}}_{ - {text{1}}} } extent of Fe(Mg)-1 substitution is strongly coupled with the TiAl2(MgSi2)-1 substitution in pyroxenes near the five-component space CaMg(Si2O6-CaFe(Si)2O6-CaTi(Al)2O6-CaFe‴(Al,Si)2O6-CaAl(Al,Si)2O6. The inferred stabilization of Ti in iron-rich relative to magnesium pyroxene is consistent with the operation of Fe2+⇄Ti4+ intervalence charge transfer interactions (e.g., Rossman 1980) and observations on zoning in natural titanaugites (e.g., Tracy and Robinson 1977). Although the rims of some pyroxenes grown in some melting experiments exhibit prominent zoning in TiAl2(MgSi2)-1, the average values of (X_{{text{Ti}}^{{text{4 + }}} }^{M1} /X_{{text{Mg}}^{{text{2 + }}} }^{M1} ) inferred from the compositions of these pyroxenes, together with those of the relatively homogeneous pyroxenes produced in crystallization experiments, exhibit a 1∶1 correlation with values of μ _{{text{TiAl}}_{text{2}} ({text{MgSi}}_{text{2}} )_{ - 1} } derived from the solution model of Ghiorso et al. (1983) with a standard error of 750 calories. The Ti contents of Ca-rich pyroxenes crystallizing from a wide range of natural silicate liquids can therefore be predicted.

  10. Calculating geochemical reaction pathways--exploration of the inner-sphere water exchange mechanism in Al(H2O)6(3+)(aq) + nH2O with ab Initio calculations and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Evans, R James; Rustad, James R; Casey, William H

    2008-05-01

    We have simulated exchange of inner-sphere and bulk water molecules for different sizes of Al3+(aq) clusters, Al(H2O)63+ + nH2O for n = 0, 1, 6, or 12, with ab initio and molecular dynamics simulations, in order to understand how robust the ab initio method is for identifying hydrolytic reaction pathways of particular importance to geochemistry. In contrast to many interfacial reactions, this particular elementary reaction is particularly simple and well-constrained by experiment. Nevertheless, we find that a rich array of parallel reaction pathways depend sensitively on the details of the solvation sphere and structure and that larger clusters are not necessarily better. Inner-sphere water exchange in Al3+(aq) may occur through two Langford-Gray dissociative pathways, one in which the incoming and outgoing waters are cis, the other in which they are trans to one another. A large majority of exchanges in the molecular dynamics simulations occurred via the trans mechanism, in contrast to the predictions of the ab initio method. In Al(H2O)63+ + H2O, the cis mechanism has a transition state of 84.3 kJ/mol, which is in good agreement with previous experimental and ab initio results, while the trans mechanism has only a saddle point with two negative frequencies, not a transition state, at 89.7 kJ/mol. In addition to the exchange mechanisms, dissociation pathways could be identified that were considerably lower in energy than experiment and varied considerably between 60 and 100 kJ/mol, depending on the particular geometry and cluster size, with no clear relation between the two. Ab initio calculations using large clusters with full second coordination spheres (n = 12) were unable to find dissociation or exchange transition states because the network of hydrogen bonds in the second coordination sphere was too rigid to accommodate the outgoing inner-sphere water. Our results indicate that caution should surround ab initio simulation of complicated dynamic processes such as hydrolysis, ion exchange, and interfacial reactions that involve several steps. Dynamic methods of simulation need to accompany static methods such as ab initio calculation, and it is best to consider simulated pathways as hypotheses to be tested experimentally rather than definitive properties of the reaction. PMID:18366199

  11. The non-statistical dynamics of the ¹⁸O + ³²O₂ isotope exchange reaction at two energies.

    PubMed

    Van Wyngarden, Annalise L; Mar, Kathleen A; Quach, Jim; Nguyen, Anh P Q; Wiegel, Aaron A; Lin, Shi-Ying; Lendvay, Gyorgy; Guo, Hua; Lin, Jim J; Lee, Yuan T; Boering, Kristie A

    2014-08-14

    The dynamics of the (18)O((3)P) + (32)O2 isotope exchange reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams at collision energies (E(coll)) of 5.7 and 7.3 kcal/mol, and experimental results were compared with quantum statistical (QS) and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on the O3(X(1)A') potential energy surface (PES) of Babikov et al. [D. Babikov, B. K. Kendrick, R. B. Walker, R. T. Pack, P. Fleurat-Lesard, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 6298 (2003)]. In both QS and QCT calculations, agreement with experiment was markedly improved by performing calculations with the experimental distribution of collision energies instead of fixed at the average collision energy. At both collision energies, the scattering displayed a forward bias, with a smaller bias at the lower E(coll). Comparisons with the QS calculations suggest that (34)O2 is produced with a non-statistical rovibrational distribution that is hotter than predicted, and the discrepancy is larger at the lower E(coll). If this underprediction of rovibrational excitation by the QS method is not due to PES errors and/or to non-adiabatic effects not included in the calculations, then this collision energy dependence is opposite to what might be expected based on collision complex lifetime arguments and opposite to that measured for the forward bias. While the QCT calculations captured the experimental product vibrational energy distribution better than the QS method, the QCT results underpredicted rotationally excited products, overpredicted forward-bias and predicted a trend in the strength of forward-bias with collision energy opposite to that measured, indicating that it does not completely capture the dynamic behavior measured in the experiment. Thus, these results further underscore the need for improvement in theoretical treatments of dynamics on the O3(X(1)A') PES and perhaps of the PES itself in order to better understand and predict non-statistical effects in this reaction and in the formation of ozone (in which the intermediate O3* complex is collisionally stabilized by a third body). The scattering data presented here at two different collision energies provide important benchmarks to guide these improvements. PMID:25134575

  12. The non-statistical dynamics of the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reaction at two energies

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wyngarden, Annalise L.; Mar, Kathleen A.; Wiegel, Aaron A.; Quach, Jim; Nguyen, Anh P. Q.; Lin, Shi-Ying; Lendvay, Gyorgy; Guo, Hua; Lin, Jim J.; Lee, Yuan T.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2014-08-14

    The dynamics of the {sup 18}O({sup 3}P) + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams at collision energies (E{sub coll}) of 5.7 and 7.3 kcal/mol, and experimental results were compared with quantum statistical (QS) and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on the O{sub 3}(X{sup 1}A’) potential energy surface (PES) of Babikov et al. [D. Babikov, B. K. Kendrick, R. B. Walker, R. T. Pack, P. Fleurat-Lesard, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 6298 (2003)]. In both QS and QCT calculations, agreement with experiment was markedly improved by performing calculations with the experimental distribution of collision energies instead of fixed at the average collision energy. At both collision energies, the scattering displayed a forward bias, with a smaller bias at the lower E{sub coll}. Comparisons with the QS calculations suggest that {sup 34}O{sub 2} is produced with a non-statistical rovibrational distribution that is hotter than predicted, and the discrepancy is larger at the lower E{sub coll}. If this underprediction of rovibrational excitation by the QS method is not due to PES errors and/or to non-adiabatic effects not included in the calculations, then this collision energy dependence is opposite to what might be expected based on collision complex lifetime arguments and opposite to that measured for the forward bias. While the QCT calculations captured the experimental product vibrational energy distribution better than the QS method, the QCT results underpredicted rotationally excited products, overpredicted forward-bias and predicted a trend in the strength of forward-bias with collision energy opposite to that measured, indicating that it does not completely capture the dynamic behavior measured in the experiment. Thus, these results further underscore the need for improvement in theoretical treatments of dynamics on the O{sub 3}(X{sup 1}A’) PES and perhaps of the PES itself in order to better understand and predict non-statistical effects in this reaction and in the formation of ozone (in which the intermediate O{sub 3}{sup *} complex is collisionally stabilized by a third body). The scattering data presented here at two different collision energies provide important benchmarks to guide these improvements.

  13. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  14. The aspartate aminotransferase-catalysed exchange of the alpha-protons of aspartate and glutamate: the effects of the R386A and R292V mutations on this exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Mahon, M M; Graber, R; Christen, P; Malthouse, J P

    1999-09-14

    1H-NMR was used to follow the aspartate aminotransferase-catalysed exchange of the alpha-protons of aspartate and glutamate. The effect of the concentrations of both the amino acids and the cognate keto acids on exchange rates was determined for wild-type and the R386A and R292V mutant forms of aspartate aminotransferase. The wild-type enzyme is found to be highly stereospecific for the exchange of the alpha-protons of L-aspartate and L-glutamate. The R386A mutation which removes the interaction of Arg-386 with the alpha-carboxylate group of aspartate causes an approximately 10,000-fold decrease in the first order exchange rate of the alpha-proton of L-aspartate. The R292V mutation which removes the interaction of Arg-292 with the beta-carboxylate group of L-aspartate and the gamma-carboxylate group of L-glutamate causes even larger decreases of 25,000- and 100,000-fold in the first order exchange rate of the alpha-proton of L-aspartate and L-glutamate respectively. Apparently both Arg-386 and Arg-292 must be present for optimal catalysis of the exchange of the alpha-protons of L-aspartate and L-glutamate, perhaps because the interaction of both these residues with the substrate is essential for inducing the closed conformation of the active site. PMID:10556573

  15. Kinetic isotope effect of the (16)O + (36)O2 and (18)O + (32)O2 isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The O + O2 isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the (18)O + (32)O2 and (16)O + (36)O2 reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the "reef" structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients. PMID:25956105

  16. Kinetic isotope effect of the 16O + 36O2 and 18O + 32O2 isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The O + O2 isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the 18O + 32O2 and 16O + 36O2 reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the "reef" structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  17. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency.

  19. Nucleophilic reactions at a vinylic center. XVI. Investigation of the nucleophilic exchange of fluorine in. beta. -fluoroacrylonitriles by the MINDO/3 method

    SciTech Connect

    Shainyan, B.A.

    1986-01-10

    The potential energy surfaces of the reactions of F/sup -/ with cis- and trans-..beta..-fluoroacrylonitriles were calculated by the MINDO/3 method. It was shown that three reaction paths can be realized in the system, i.e., attack by the nucleophile at the ..beta..-carbon atom, the elimination of a proton from the ..cap alpha.. position, and the elimination of a proton from the ..beta.. position. All three reaction paths are exothermic in the gas phase, and the elimination of the proton from the ..cap alpha.. position is 70 kJ/mole more favorable than from the ..beta.. position. Allowance for the effect of the medium in terms of an unconcerted solvation model modes not lead to the appearance of an activation barrier, in contrast to the reactions of anions with ethylene.

  20. Oxidation of CO by N/sub 2/O between 1076 and 1228 K: determination of the rate constant of the exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loirat, H.; Caralp, F.; Destriau, M.; Lesclaux, R.

    1987-12-17

    New measurements of the rate constant of the direct reaction of CO with N/sub 2/O are reported with the principal purpose of removing some of the remaining discrepancies on its value. Experiments were performed at lower temperatures (1076-1228 K) and lower pressure (approx. 15 Torr) than those prevailing in most of previous works, by using a static reactor. It is shown that, under these experimental conditions, the reaction proceeds essentially according to the direct reaction CO + N/sub 2/O ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ + N/sub 2/ (1). The previously proposed wet mechanism is not significant under our experimental conditions. It has to be taken into account, however, to describe the observed production and consumption of molecular oxygen. The Arrhenius expression derived from these experiments is k/sub 1/ = 10/sup 14.4 +/- 0.3 exp(-(46 +- 2) kcal mol/sup -1/RT) cm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. A detailed analysis of the results shows that the uncertainties in side reactions do not greatly influence the value of k/sub 1/. A critical discussion of the data reported in the literature is presented. In spite of remaining uncertainties in the reaction mechanism, the present results, obtained in a low-temperature range, show that the low activation energy values of reaction 1, reported in several works performed at higher temperatures, are highly unlikely

  1. Characterization of photoinduced self-exchange reactions at molecule-semiconductor interfaces by transient polarization spectroscopy: lateral intermolecular energy and hole transfer across sensitized TiO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Shane; Meyer, Gerald J

    2011-10-01

    Transient anisotropy measurements are reported as a new spectroscopic tool for mechanistic characterization of photoinduced charge-transfer and energy-transfer self-exchange reactions at molecule-semiconductor interfaces. An anisotropic molecular subpopulation was generated by photoselection of randomly oriented Ru(II)-polypyridyl compounds, anchored to mesoscopic nanocrystalline TiO(2) or ZrO(2) thin films, with linearly polarized light. Subsequent characterization of the photoinduced dichromism change by visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies on the nano- to millisecond time scale enabled the direct comparison of competitive processes: excited-state decay vs self-exchange energy transfer, or interfacial charge recombination vs self-exchange hole transfer. Self-exchange energy transfer was found to be many orders-of-magnitude faster than hole transfer at the sensitized TiO(2) interfaces; for [Ru(dtb)(2)(dcb)](PF(6))(2), where dtb is 4,4'-(C(CH(3))(3))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine and dcb is 4,4'-(COOH)(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, anchored to TiO(2), the energy-transfer correlation time was θ(ent) = 3.3 μs while the average hole-transfer correlation time was <θ(h+)> = 110 ms, under identical experimental conditions. Monte Carlo simulations successfully modeled the anisotropy decays associated with lateral energy transfer. These mesoscopic, nanocrystalline TiO(2) thin films developed for regenerative solar cells thus function as active "antennae", harvesting sunlight and transferring energy across their surface. For the dicationic sensitizer, [Ru(dtb)(2)(dcb)](PF(6))(2), anisotropy changes indicative of self-exchange hole transfer were observed only when ions were present in the acetonitrile solution. In contrast, evidence for lateral hole transfer was observed in neat acetonitrile for a neutral sensitizer, cis-Ru(dnb)(dcb)(NCS)(2), where dnb is 4,4'-(CH(3)(CH(2))(8))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, anchored to TiO(2). The results indicate that mechanistic models of interfacial charge recombination between electrons in TiO(2) and oxidized sensitizers must take into account diffusion of the injected electron and the oxidized sensitizer. The phenomena presented herein represent two means of concentrating potential energy derived from visible light that could be used to funnel energy to molecular catalysts for multiple-charge-transfer reactions, such as the generation of solar fuels. PMID:21861499

  2. Coordination chemical studies on metalloenzymes. Kinetics and mechanism of the Zn(II) exchange reaction between chelating agent and apo-bovine carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Kidani, Y; Hirose, J; Koike, H

    1976-01-01

    The mechanism of removal of the zinc ion from bovine carbonic anhydrase [EC 4.2.1.1] (BCA) by a chelating agent was studied. It was shown that the removal of the zinc ion from BCA took place through the formation of a ternary complex involving the enzyme, chelating agent, and metal ions. The formation constant of the ternary complex (KEML) was 10(2) M-1. This value was lower than the formation constant assumed by Wilkins. The reaction of zinc-2, 6-pyridinedicarboxylate complex with the apoenzyme also took place through the formation of the ternary complex and the species which reacted with apo-BCA was a 1:1 complex of zinc and 2, 6-pyridine-dicarboxylate. The theoretical equilibrium equation derived from the reaction mechanism showed a good fit with observed equilibrium dialysis data. PMID:820693

  3. The mechanism of proton exchange: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions, H(H2O)n+ (n=1-4)+D2O and D(D2O)n+ (n=1-4)+H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Kenji; Armentrout, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Reactions of protonated water clusters, H(H2O)n+ (n=1-4) with D2O and their "mirror" reactions, D(D2O)n+ (n=1-4) with H2O, are studied using guided-ion beam mass spectrometry. Absolute reaction cross sections are determined as a function of collision energy from thermal energy to over 10 eV. At low collision energies, we observe reactions in which H2O and D2O molecules are interchanged and reactions where H-D exchange has occurred. As the collision energy is increased, the H-D exchange products decrease and the water exchange products become dominant. At high collision energies, processes in which one or more water molecules are lost from the reactant ions become important, with simple collision-induced dissociation processes, i.e., those without H-D exchange, being dominant. Threshold energies of endothermic channels are measured and used to determine binding energies of the proton bound complexes, which are consistent with those determined by thermal equilibrium measurements and previous collision-induced dissociation studies. A kinetic scheme that relies only on the ratio of isomerization and dissociation rate constants successfully accounts for the kinetic energy dependence observed in the branching ratios for H-D and water exchange products in all systems. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and ab initio calculations confirm the feasibility and establish the details of this kinetic model.

  4. Stringent test of the statistical quasiclassical trajectory model for the H+3 exchange reaction: a comparison with rigorous statistical quantum mechanical results.

    PubMed

    Aoiz, F J; González-Lezana, T; Sáez Rábanos, V

    2007-11-01

    A complete formulation of a statistical quasiclassical trajectory (SQCT) model is presented in this work along with a detailed comparison with results obtained with the statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) model for the H+ +D2 and H+ +H2 reactions. The basic difference between the SQCT and the SQM models lies in the fact that trajectories instead of wave functions are propagated in the entrance and exit channels. Other than this the two formulations are entirely similar and both comply with the principle of detailed balance and conservation of parity. Reaction probabilities, and integral and differential cross sections (DCS's) for these reactions at different levels of product's state resolution and from various initial states are shown and discussed. The agreement is in most cases excellent and indicates that the effect of tunneling through the centrifugal barrier is negligible. Some differences are found, however, between state resolved observables calculated by the SQCT and the SQM methods which makes use of the centrifugal sudden (coupled states) approximation (SQM-CS). When this approximation is removed and the full close coupling treatment is used in the SQM model (SQM-CC), an almost perfect agreement is achieved. This shows that the SQCT is sensitive enough to show the relatively small inaccuracies resulting from the decoupling inherent to the CS approximation. In addition, the effect of ignoring the parity conservation is thoroughly examined. This effect is in general minor except in particular cases such as the DCS from initial rotational state j=0. It is shown, however, that in order to reproduce the sharp forward and backward peaks the conservation of parity has to be taken into account. PMID:17994809

  5. Impact of liquid water on oxygen reaction in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell: A simple and physically sound model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    When cells work at high current density, liquid water accumulates in their catalyst layer (CL) and the gaseous oxygen could dissolve into the water and the ionomer film simultaneously; their associated dissolved concentrations in equilibrium with the gaseous oxygen are also different. Based on a CL acquired using tomography, we present new methods in this paper to derive agglomerate models for partly saturated CL by viewing the movement and reaction of the dissolved oxygen in the two liquids (water and ionomer) and the agglomerate as two independent random processes. Oxygen dissolved in the water moves differently from oxygen dissolved in the ionomer, and to make the analysis tractable, we use an average distribution function to describe the average movement of all dissolved oxygen. A formula is proposed to describe this average distribution function, which, in combination with the exponential distribution assumed in the literature for oxygen reaction, leads to a simple yet physically sound agglomerate model. The model has three parameters which can be directly calculated from CL structure rather than by calibration. We explain how to calculate these parameters under different water contents for a given CL structure, and analyse the impact of liquid water on cell performance.

  6. Two-nucleon processes in pion-induced double charge exchange in {sup 4}He: A coincidence measurement of the {sup 4}He({pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup {minus}} {ital p})3{ital p} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, S.F.; Fong, W.; Harvey, M.T.; Matthews, J.L.; Park, H.T.; Vidos, L.L.; Zelevinsky, V.V.; Saunders, A.; Holcomb, M.D.; Kinney, E.R.; Kriss, B.J.; Gram, P.A.M.; Roberts, D.A.

    1995-05-10

    Inclusive measurements of pion double-charge-exchange in {sup 3}He[1] and {sup 4}He[2] in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region suggest the dominance of a two-step sequential single-charge-exchange mechanism involving quasi-free nucleons. To investigate this reaction mechanism, we have observed protons in coincidence with the outgoing pion in {pi}{sup +}+{sup 4}He{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}+4{ital p} at {ital T}{sub {pi}{sup +}}=240 MeV. Pions were detected in a magnetic spectrometer at {theta}{sub {pi}{sup {minus}}}=32{degree}, while protons were detected in a close-packed array of plastic scintillator telescopes covering {theta}{sub {ital p}}=67.5{degree}--157.5{degree} on the same side of the beam as the spectrometer, and {theta}{sub {ital p}}=22.5{degree}--157.5{degree} on the opposite side. We will present preliminary results for the distributions in energy and angle of the coincident protons. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Cumulative reaction probabilities and transition state properties: A study of the H{sup +}+H{sub 2} and H{sup +}+D{sub 2} proton exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jambrina, P. G.; Aoiz, F. J.; Eyles, C. J.; Herrero, V. J.; Saez Rabanos, V.

    2009-05-14

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) have been calculated by accurate (converged, close coupling) quantum mechanical (QM), quasiclassical trajectory (QCT), and statistical QCT (SQCT) methods for the H{sup +}+H{sub 2} and H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reactions at collision energies up to 1.2 eV and total angular momentum J=0-4. A marked resonance structure is found in the QM CRP, most especially for the H{sub 3}{sup +} system and J=0. When the CRPs are resolved in their ortho and para contributions, a clear steplike structure is found associated with the opening of internal states of reactants and products. The comparison of the QCT results with those of the other methods evinces the occurrence of two transition states, one at the entrance and one at the exit. At low J values, except for the quantal resonance structure and the lack of quantization in the product channel, the agreement between QM and QCT is very good. The SQCT model, that reflects the steplike structure associated with the opening of initial and final states accurately, clearly tends to overestimate the value of the CRP as the collision energy increases. This effect seems more marked for the H{sup +}+D{sub 2} isotopic variant. For sufficiently high J values, the growth of the centrifugal barrier leads to an increase in the threshold of the CRP. At these high J values the discrepancy between SQCT and QCT becomes larger and is magnified with growing collision energy. The total CRPs calculated with the QCT and SQCT methods allowed the determination of the rate constant for the H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reaction. It was found that the rate, in agreement with experiment, decreases with temperature as expected for an endothermic reaction. In the range of temperatures between 200 and 500 K the differences between SQCT and QCT rate results are relatively minor. Although exact QM calculations are formidable for an exact determination of the k(T), it can be reliably expected that their value will lie between those given by the dynamical and statistical trajectory methods.

  8. High performance fluorine doped (Sn,Ru)O2 oxygen evolution reaction electro-catalysts for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Karan; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Jampani, Prashanth; Park, Sung Kyoo; Chung, Sung Jae; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of electro-catalysts containing non-noble metal or significantly reduced amounts of expensive noble metals (e.g. RuO2) is highly desirable. Development of such a catalyst with comparable electrochemical performance to the standard noble metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a pioneering breakthrough in hydrogen generation by water electrolysis. In line with these goals, by exploiting a two-pronged theoretical first principles and experimental approach herein we demonstrate that a nano-structured solid solution of SnO2:10 wt% F containing only 20 at.% RuO2 [e.g. (Sn0.80Ru0.20)O2:10F] displays a remarkably similar electrochemical activity and moreover, comparable or even much improved electrochemical stability and durability compared to pure the noble metal counterpart, RuO2. Density functional theory calculations have demonstrated direct dependence of the catalytic activity on the electronic structure peculiarities of the F-doped (Ru,Sn)O2 which corresponds well with the experimental results.

  9. Insight into the photoinduced ligand exchange reaction pathway of cis-[Rh2(μ-O2CCH3)2(CH3CN)6]2+ with a DNA model chelate.

    PubMed

    Chifotides, Helen T; Lutterman, Daniel A; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2011-12-01

    We previously showed that [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)(6)](2+) binds to dsDNA only upon irradiation with visible light and that photolysis results in a 34-fold enhancement of its cytotoxicity toward Hs-27 human skin fibroblasts, making it potentially useful for photodynamic therapy (PDT). With the goal of gaining further insight on the photoinduced binding of DNA to the complex, we investigated by NMR spectroscopy the mechanism by which 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), a model for biologically relevant bidentate nitrogen donor ligands, binds to [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)(6)](2+) upon irradiation in D(2)O. The photochemical results are compared to the reactivity in the dark in D(2)O and CD(3)CN. The photolysis of [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)(6)](2+) with equimolar bpy solutions in D(2)O with visible light affords [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(eq/eq-bpy)(CH(3)CN)(2)(D(2)O(ax))(2)](2+) (eq/eq) with the reaction reaching completion in ~8 h. Only vestiges of eq/eq are observed at the same time in the dark, however, and the reaction is ~20 times slower. Conversely, the dark reaction of [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)(6)](2+) with an equimolar amount of bpy in CD(3)CN affords [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(η(1)-bpy(ax))(CH(3)CN)(5)](2+) (η(1)-bpy(ax)), which remains present even after 5 days of reaction. The photolysis results in D(2)O are consistent with the exchange of one equiv CH(3)CNeq for solvent, and the resulting species quickly reacting with bpy to generate eq/eq; the initial eq ligand dissociation is assisted by absorption of a photon, thus greatly enhancing the reaction rate. The photolytic reaction of [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)(6)](2+):bpy in a 1:2 ratio in D(2)O affords the eq/eq and (eq/eq)(2) adducts. The observed differences in the reactivity in D(2)O vs CD(3)CN are explained by the relative ease of substitution of eq D(2)O vs CD(3)CN by the incoming bpy molecule. These results clearly highlight the importance of dissociation of an eq CH(3)CN molecule from the dirhodium core to attain high reactivity and underscore the importance of light for the reactivity of these compounds, which is essential for PDT agents. PMID:22050331

  10. Selective metal-ion extraction for multiple metal-ion liquid-liquid exchange reactions. Progress report, February 1, 1982-January 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.

    1983-02-01

    Thermodynamic chemical equilibria models and chemical kinetics for the system copper-iron-acid sulfate solutions extracted by ..beta..-alkenyl-8-hydroxy quinoline in xylene are studied. Equilibrium extraction data were obtained for the iron-acid-sulfate ..beta..-alkenyl-8-hydroxy quinoline-xylene system. A preliminary model which includes the aqueous phase equilibria is being tested to model the data. Kinetic experiments have been completed on the above system for the forward reaction with the liquid jet recycle reactor. It has been determined that the iron-chelation complex is FeR/sub 3/ by the method of continuous variation. Kinetic models based on various mechanisms are being tested to describe the data. A one-liter two phase flow reactor system has been developed for the study of extraction efficiencies.

  11. Borate Exchanges of Lemna minor L. as Studied with the Help of the Enriched Stable Isotopes and of a (n,α) Nuclear Reaction 1

    PubMed Central

    Thellier, Michel; Duval, Yves; Demarty, Maurice

    1979-01-01

    Despite the lack of a convenient radioisotope of boron, it is possible to measure unidirectional fluxes of borate between cellular systems and their external medium. It was accomplished by using the two purified stable isotopes (10B and 11B), with 10B specifically detected by a (n,α) nuclear reaction. The method was applied to compartmental analysis of borate with intact plants of Lemna minor L. Four compartments were suggested. Three of them apparently correspond to the three classical ones: free space (including easily dissociable borate monoesters), cytoplasm, and vacuole. The fourth one was interpreted as corresponding to very stable borate diesters in the cell walls. The method allows the determination of the borate capacities of the various compartments and of the borate unidirectional fluxes between the different compartments, at borate flux equilibrium. Other physicochemical data (mono and diester mass action constants, turn over numbers) were evaluated. The results are consistent with what is known of pure substances. PMID:16660714

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  13. Nano PtCu binary and PtCuAg ternary alloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanmei; Zhang, Dongming

    2015-03-01

    In order to decrease the cost and enhance the performance of the cathode catalyst for PEMFC, carbon supported PtCu and PtCuAg alloys with differential Ag content are synthesized by a borohydride chemical reduction. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity are tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV)and linear sweep voltammograms (LSV) in 0.5 M H2SO4. By comparison with the ORR activities of PtCu/C and a series of PtCuAg/C catalysts with differential metal atomic ratios of Pt:Cu:Ag, the PtCuAg/C catalyst with the atomic ratio on 3:10:1 (marked as PtCuAg/C(3:10:1)) shows the best catalytic activity. For the 200th cycles, the limited current reaches to 3.85 mA cm-2 for PtCuAg/C(3:10:1) with Pt-loading of 9.29 μgPt cm-2. The CV curves of the PtCuAg/C catalysts show one more pair of redox peaks of Ag compared with PtCu/C catalyst, which is much different from Pt-M alloy catalysts reported in other literature. The TEM and XRD as well as XPS results indicate that the enhanced ORR activity is the result of the smaller particle size, the crystal distortion and the more exposure of Pt atoms with the introduction of Ag for PtCuAg/C(3:10:1) catalyst.

  14. Thermostability of endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei studied by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance MS, hydrogen/deuterium-exchange reactions and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Jänis, J; Rouvinen, J; Leisola, M; Turunen, O; Vainiotalo, P

    2001-01-01

    Endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II (XYNII) from Trichoderma reesei is a 21 kDa enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of xylan, the major plant hemicellulose. It has various applications in the paper, food and feed industries. Previous thermostability studies have revealed a significant decrease in enzymic activity of the protein at elevated temperatures in citrate buffer [Tenkanen, Puls and Poutanen (1992) Enzyme Microb. Technol. 14, 566-574]. Here, thermostability of XYNII was investigated using both conventional and nanoelectrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance MS and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange reactions. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used as a comparative method to observe possible changes in both tertiary and quaternary structures of the protein. We observed a significant irreversible conformational change and dimerization when the protein was exposed to heat. H/D exchange revealed two distinct monomeric protein populations in a narrow transition temperature region. The conformational change in both the water and buffered solutions occurred in the same temperature region where enzymic-activity loss had previously been observed. Approx. 10-30% of the protein was specifically dimerized when exposed to the heat treatment. However, adding methanol to the solution markedly lowered the transition temperature of conformational change as well as increased the dimerization up to 90%. DLS studies in water confirmed the change in conformation observed by electrospray ionization MS. We propose that the conformational change is responsible for the loss of enzymic activity at temperatures over 50 degrees C and that the functioning of the active site in the enzyme is unfeasible in a new, more labile solution conformation. PMID:11368772

  15. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  16. Structure and Properties of Precursor/Successor Complex and Transition State of the FeCl(2+)/Fe(2+) Electron Self-Exchange Reaction via the Inner-Sphere Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rotzinger, François P

    2015-11-01

    The electron self-exchange reaction FeCl(OH2)5(2+) + Fe(OH2)6(2+) → Fe(OH2)6(2+) + FeCl(OH2)5(2+), proceeding via the inner-sphere pathway, was investigated with quantum chemical methods. Geometry and vibrational frequencies of the precursor/successor complex, (H2O)5Fe(III)ClFe(II)(OH2)5(4+)/(H2O)5Fe(II)ClFe(III)(OH2)5(4+) (P/S), and the transition state, (H2O)5FeClFe(OH2)5(4+⧧) (TS), were computed with the LC-BOP functional and CPCM hydration. Bent and linear structures were computed for the TS and P/S. The electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) and the electronic energies were calculated with multistate extended general multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory (XGMC-QDPT2) and spin-orbit configuration interaction (SO-CI). Since the Fe···Fe distance changes considerably along the electron transfer step, the transformation P → TS → S, equations based on the hypothesis of a fixed donor-acceptor distance cannot be applied. Hence, the rate constant for the electron transfer step (ket) was calculated as described previously (Rotzinger, F. P. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 9923). ket is very fast, ∼9.4 × 10(8)-6.6 × 10(9) s(-1) at 0 °C. The experimental rate constant of the title reaction (k) is much slower and controlled by the formation of the precursor complex. The substitution of a water ligand by FeCl(OH2)5(2+) at Fe(OH2)6(2+) is rate-determining. PMID:26479082

  17. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... into a left and right bronchus within the lungs and further divides into smaller and smaller branches ... exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon ...

  18. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  19. Effect of nucleon exchange on projectile multifragmentation in the reactions of {sup 28}Si+{sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn at 30 and 50 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veselsky, M.; Ibbotson, R. W.; Laforest, R.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D. J.; Ruangma, A.; Winchester, E. M.; Martin, E.; Yennello, S. J.

    2000-12-01

    The multifragmentation of quasiprojectiles was studied in the reactions of a {sup 28}Si beam with {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn targets at projectile energies of 30 and 50 MeV/nucleon. The quasiprojectile observables were reconstructed using isotopically identified charged particles with Z{sub f}{<=}5 detected at forward angles. The nucleon exchange between projectile and target was investigated using the isospin and the excitation energy of the reconstructed quasiprojectile. For events with total reconstructed charge equal to the charge of the beam (Z{sub tot}=14), the influence of the beam energy and target isospin on the neutron transfer was studied in detail. Simulations were carried out employing a model of deep inelastic transfer, a statistical model of multifragmentation, and a software replica of the FAUST detector array. The concept of deep inelastic transfer provides a good description of the production of highly excited quasiprojectiles. The isospin and excitation energy of the quasiprojectile were described with good overall agreement. The fragment multiplicity, charge and isospin were reproduced satisfactorily. The range of contributing impact parameters was determined using a backtracing procedure.

  20. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  1. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  5. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  6. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  7. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  8. Media Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedstein, Harriet G., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews filmstrip/cassette recording materials titled "Reaction Rates: Molecules in Motion." Also reviews six college-level textbooks, addressing major strengths/weaknesses of texts under consideration with regard to their specific usefulness to high school chemistry teachers. (JN)

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and H/D exchange of μ-hydride-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenase subsite models formed by protonation reactions of (μ-TDT)Fe2(CO)4(PMe3)2 (TDT = SCH2SCH2S) with protic acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Cheng; Zhu, An-Guo; Guo, Yuan-Qiang

    2016-03-15

    As [FeFe]-hydrogenase models, the first thiodithiolate (TDT) ligand-containing μ-hydride complexes [(μ-TDT)Fe2(CO)4(PMe3)2(μ-H)](+)Y(-) (, Y = Cl, ClO4, PF6, BF4, CF3CO2, CF3SO3) have been prepared by protonation reactions of (μ-TDT)Fe2(CO)4(PMe3)2 () with the corresponding HY acids. While the protonation reactions are monitored by in situ(1)H and (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy to show the isomer type and stability of , the structures of the isolated are characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy and for some of them by X-ray crystallography. Although the H/D exchange of μ-hydride complex (Y = CF3SO3) with D2 or D2O has been proved not to occur under the studied conditions, the H/D exchange of with DCl gives the μ-deuterium complex [(μ-TDT)Fe2(CO)4(PMe3)2(μ-D)](+)[CF3SO3](-) () in a nearly quantitative yield. To our knowledge, is the first crystallographically characterized μ-deuterium-containing butterfly [2Fe2S] complex produced by H/D exchange reaction. PMID:26777138

  10. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  11. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhigang Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  12. Allelic Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lehman, McKenzie K; Bose, Jeffrey L; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    Methods used to understand the function of a gene/protein are one of the hallmarks of modern molecular genetics. The ability to genetically manipulate bacteria has become a fundamental tool in studying these organisms and while basic cloning has become a routine task in molecular biology laboratories, generating directed mutations can be a daunting task. This chapter describes the method of allelic exchange in Staphylococcus aureus using temperature-sensitive plasmids that have successfully produced a variety of chromosomal mutations, including in-frame deletions, insertion of antibiotic-resistance cassettes, and even single-nucleotide point mutations. PMID:25646609

  13. Segmented heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  14. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  15. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  16. Nonadiabatic ionic--covalent transitions. Exponential-linear model for the charge exchange and neutralization reactions Na+H arrow-right-left Na/sup +/+H/sup -/

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Mo, O.; Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    A previous study of charge exchange processes taking place through ionic--covalent transitions is extended to the case of Na+H and Na/sup +/+H/sup -/ collisions. A five-state molecular expansion, with the inclusion of two-electron translation factors, is employed to calculate the charge exchange and neutralization cross sections. Transitions at the first two pseudocrossings between the energy curves, practically determine the cross sections in the energy range 0.16--5 keV amu/sup -1/. We also show that the widely used multichannel Landau--Zener theory is totally inadequate, to treat these transitions.

  17. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  18. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  19. Handbook on heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhan, Pavel I.; Kanevets, Georgii E.; Seliverstov, Vladimir M.

    Essential data on heat exchange equipment used in ship, locomotive, automotive, and aircraft powerplants are presented in a systematic manner. The data cover the principal types and technical and performance characteristics of heat exchangers, fundamentals of the theory of heat exchange, calculation of heat transfer coefficients for different types of heat exchange apparatus, optimization of heat exchangers, computer-aided design of heat exchange equipment, testing techniques, and test result processing.

  20. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  1. Reaction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Typel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reactions with atomic nuclei play a pivotal role in the experimental study of nuclei. They are a tool in order to obtain crucial information on nuclear structure of nuclei, in particular for unstable nuclei far off the valley of stability. Besides the investigation of nuclear properties, nuclear reactions can be used as indirect methods to extract cross sections of astrophysical interest that cannot be measured directly in the laboratory. After an overview over the variety of nuclear reactions and their major characteristics, the basic formalism of reaction theory is introduced and essential concepts are presented in order to describe direct reactions. The main challenges in the future development of reaction theory are addressed.

  2. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  3. Developing an exchange strategy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Andrew S; Kim, Charles; O'Riordan, Jason; Pizzo, James J

    2014-01-01

    Developing a health insurance exchange strategy begins with: Understanding how both the public and private exchanges work. Conducting a thorough analysis to quantify how exchanges will affect the organization's current and future patient populations and revenue base. Determining when to participate in the exchanges, keeping in mind current market position as well as competitors' actions. PMID:24511779

  4. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  5. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  6. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  7. Efficiency of exchange schemes in replica exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenheil, Martin; Denschlag, Robert; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2009-08-01

    In replica exchange simulations a fast diffusion of the replicas through the temperature space maximizes the efficiency of the statistical sampling. Here, we compare the diffusion speed as measured by the round trip rates for four exchange algorithms. We find different efficiency profiles with optimal average acceptance probabilities ranging from 8% to 41%. The best performance is determined by benchmark simulations for the most widely used algorithm, which alternately tries to exchange all even and all odd replica pairs. By analytical mathematics we show that the excellent performance of this exchange scheme is due to the high diffusivity of the underlying random walk.

  8. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen-atom exchange between three HF molecules was investigated with particular attention given to the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using large segmented Gaussian basis sets to locate the (HF)3 stationary points at the SCF level, the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(3h) symmetry, were located, together with the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(3h) symmetry. Then, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons, the energetics of the exchange reaction were evaluated at the correlated level.

  9. Sizing plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Since their commercial debut in the 1930s, plate heat exchangers have found widespread use in the chemical process industries (CPI). Today, more than two dozen firms market this space-saving and highly efficient type of heat exchanger. One reason for the popularity of plate heat exchangers is that their overall heat-transfer coefficient (U) is superior to that of shell-and-tube heat exchangers [1,2,3,4]. In clean water-to-water service, for example, a shell-and-tube heat exchanger has a U value of 350 Btu/ft[sup 2]-h-F, much lower than the 1,000 of a plate design at the same pressure drop. However, the plate heat exchanger's much higher U values also mean that fouling factors have a much greater effect on calculations of exchanger surface area. The right fouling factor is the key to specifying plate heat exchanger areas correctly.

  10. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  11. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  12. Transfusion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Savage, William J

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion reactions are common occurrences, and clinicians who order or transfuse blood components need to be able to recognize adverse sequelae of transfusion. The differential diagnosis of any untoward clinical event should always consider adverse sequelae of transfusion, even when transfusion occurred weeks earlier. There is no pathognomonic sign or symptom that differentiates a transfusion reaction from other potential medical problems, so vigilance is required during and after transfusion when a patient presents with a change in clinical status. This review covers the presentation, mechanisms, and management of transfusion reactions that are commonly encountered, and those that can be life-threatening. PMID:27113000

  13. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  14. Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

  15. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  16. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... rhinitis or asthma is present. Severe Allergic Reactions Anaphylaxis (an-a-fi-LAK-sis) is a serious, ... are to foods, insect stings, medications and latex. Anaphylaxis typically affects more than one part of the ...

  17. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  18. Heat exchanger optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ik-Sang

    A computer code was developed which would analyze a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, and it was used in conjunction with a computer code for numerical optimization program. The problem is to find the smallest shell-and-tube heat exchanger with the minimum number of exchangers in series and parallel which will satisfy the heat duty and pressure drop requirements within the constraints imposed. The MINOS (Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System) programming code was used in the optimization of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger. MINOS purpose is to optimize a user written objective function. For heat exchanger design, it is necessary to develop two FORTRAN subroutines in order to analyze a heat exchanger. To get the generalized optimal heat exchanger design, the calculation method and data in Process Heat Transfer by Kern, was used. All the data, including material specifications were given as typical. Three types of case studies were studied and are discussed.

  19. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example. PMID:20055003

  20. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  1. Preparation of Pt-Co nanoparticles by galvanostatic pulse electrochemical codeposition on in situ electrochemical reduced graphene nanoplates based carbon paper electrode for oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaldagard, Maryam; Seghatoleslami, Naser; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposite films of Pt-Co nanoparticles deposited on graphene nanoplate based gas diffusion layer electrode are fabricated via an electrochemical route involving a series of electrochemical process. Pt-Co nanoparticles of 11.37 nm in average size are prepared by galvanostatic codeposition in 0.5 M NaCl at PH of 2.5 at 300 mA cm-2 on the surface of in situ reduced graphene nanoplates on carbon paper. The topographical features, structure, morphology and composition of the prepared film samples are characterized by Atomic Force microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, FTIR analysis, X-ray Diffraction, FESEM and EDS. At the same time, the catalytic activities of prepared electrodes for the oxygen reduction reaction are evaluated through cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirmed the graphitic structure of the produced graphene nanoplates. The nanoparticles in the film were observed to be uniform spherical objects and well distributed. Catalytic properties of Pt-Co/GNP/GDL electrode were compared with Pt/C/GDL using half cell polarization measurements based on both mass activity and specific activity. The as prepared Pt-Co/GNP/GDL electrode exhibits high catalytic activity for the ORR, which may be attributed to structural changes caused by alloying and the high specific surface area of graphene nanoplates catalyst support. The mass activity peak current is found to be as high as 728.25 mA mgPt-1.

  2. Catalytic mechanism of human UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase: in situ proton NMR studies reveal that the C-5 hydrogen of UDP-glucose is not exchanged with bulk water during the enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Eixelsberger, Thomas; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-07-15

    Human UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (hUGDH) catalyzes the biosynthetic oxidation of UDP-glucose into UDP-glucuronic acid. The catalytic reaction proceeds in two NAD(+)-dependent steps via covalent thiohemiacetal and thioester enzyme intermediates. Formation of the thiohemiacetal adduct occurs through attack of Cys(276) on C-6 of the UDP-gluco-hexodialdose produced in the first oxidation step. Because previous studies of the related enzyme from bovine liver had suggested loss of the C-5 hydrogen from UDP-gluco-hexodialdose due to keto-enol tautomerism, we examined incorporation of solvent deuterium into product(s) of UDP-glucose oxidation by hUGDH. We used wild-type enzyme and a slow-reacting Glu(161)?Gln mutant that accumulates the thioester adduct at steady state. In situ proton NMR measurements showed that UDP-glucuronic acid was the sole detectable product of both enzymatic transformations. The product contained no deuterium at C-5 within the detection limit (?2%). The results are consistent with the proposed mechanistic idea for hUGDH that incipient UDP-gluco-hexodialdose is immediately trapped by thiohemiacetal adduct formation. PMID:22525098

  3. Feasibility of Production of Moly-99 via 1-neutron Exchange Reaction 98 Mo +100 Mo -->299Mo in Strong-Focusing Auto Collider (``EXYDER'') of natural Molybdenum nuclei based on T and He-3 production data from d +d weak focusing Auto-Collider MIGMA IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Copious T and 3He production from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV colliding beams was observed in weak-focusing Self-Collider1-4 radius 15 cm, in B = 3.12 T, stabilized5 non-linearly by electron cloud oscillations with confinement time ~ 23 s. BARC's simulations7 predict that by switching to Strong Focusing Self Collider proposed by Blewett6, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, will generate 1 3He + 1T +1p + 1n at a total input energy cost of 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom respectively. While energy balance is negative, we project economic gain 205 MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 20 i.e. 3He production/sale will fund cost of T. Assuming the luminosity achieved in MIGMA IV, we replace D beam injection with a high energy beam of 14 times ionized natural Mo ions and look for the 1-neutron reactions of the type 98Mo+100Mo -->299Mo, where 99Mo14+ will be EM channeled into a mass spectrometer and collected at one loci/ radius, while all other masses/radii rejected. Physics and engineering parameters required to produce at least 1 g of 99Mo per day, at an electricity cost of 100K, will be presented. 2- and 3-neutron exchange reactions will be considered, too.

  4. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  5. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  6. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  7. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  8. Emittance exchange results

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  9. Emittance Exchange Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  10. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-07-08

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchanger. DSI completed a heat exchanger stress analysis of the ten-module heat exchanger bank; and, performed a shell-side flow inhomogeneity analysis of the three-module heat exchanger bank. The company produced 50 tubestrips using an in-house CNC milling machine and began pressing them onto tube arrays. DSI revised some of the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips into the array to improve some of the prototype tooling. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Electrical and magnetic properties of ion-exchangeable layered ruthenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Wataru . E-mail: wsugi@shinshu-u.ac.jp; Omoto, Masashi; Yokoshima, Katsunori; Murakami, Yasushi; Takasu, Yoshio

    2004-12-01

    An ion-exchangeable ruthenate with a layered structure, K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1}, was prepared by solid-state reactions. The interlayer cation was exchanged with H{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NH{sub 3}{sup +}, and ((C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N{sup +}) through proton-exchange, ion-exchange, and guest-exchange reactions. The electrical and magnetic properties of the products were characterized by DC resistivity and susceptibility measurements. Layered K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1} exhibited metallic conduction between 300 and 13K. The products exhibited similar magnetic behavior despite the differences in the type of interlayer cation, suggesting that the ruthenate sheet in the protonated form and the intercalation compounds possesses metallic nature.

  12. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  13. Development of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Aikawa, M.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ohnishi, A.; Kato, K.

    2008-05-21

    Experimental nuclear reaction data compilation activity in Japan for the NRDF database and international collaboration of experimental nuclear reaction data exchange by the EXFOR format are presented. Recent development of an experimental nuclear reaction data file (NRDF/A) for astrophysics, which is based on the EXFOR compilation, is also introduced. All services are available at http://www.jcprg.org/.

  14. ZEOLITE PERFORMANCE AS AN ANION EXCHANGER FOR ARSENIC SEQUESTRATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their use in ion exchange and acid catalysis reactions. The use of zeolites in anion or ligand exchange reactions is less studied. The NH4+ form of zeolite Y (NY6, Faujasite) has been tested in this work to evaluate its performance for arsenic removal...

  15. Double charge exchange on Te isotopes in the generalized seniority scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.C.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Dieperink, A.E.; Scholten, O.

    1996-09-01

    The pion double-charge-exchange reactions on the Te isotopes are discussed in the generalized seniority scheme. The elementary process of charge exchange is described in a double scattering process within the plane wave limit. The transition rates are calculated for double-isobaric-analog state as well as for ground-state reactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  17. Neopentane and solid acids: direct hydron exchange before cracking.

    PubMed

    Walspurger, Stéphane; Sun, Yinyong; Souna Sido, Abdelkarim Sani; Sommer, Jean

    2006-09-21

    The hydrogen/deuterium exchange reaction of 2,2-dimethylpropane (neopentane) over D(2)O-exchanged zeolites (MOR, FAU, BEA, MFI) using a batch recirculation reactor was studied by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer. In the temperature range 473-573 K, H/D exchange proceeds without side reaction such as cracking at short contact times. Indeed the C-H bond has appeared favorably involved in the activation of neopentane compared to the less accessible C-C bond. The transition state allowing hydron exchange is most likely a carbonium species (pentacoordinated carbon) as in the case of the H/D exchange between methane and solid acid. The activation energies of the H/D exchange between neopentane and zeolites are the same for all zeolites indicating a common carbonium ion type transition state. On the basis of previous results in the case of the exchange between methane and liquid superacids, the deuterium exchange rates in neopentane were tentatively related to the acidity of the solids. However the order of activity MOR > MFI > BEA > FAU seems to be related to the size of the pores, which may suggest the involvement of a confinement effect in the zeolites cavities. Moreover we found that H/D exchange takes also place between neopentane and deuterated sulfated zirconia (SZ) emphasizing its strong acidity. PMID:16970460

  18. Reaction of silicon ion (/sup 2/P) with silane (SiH/sub 4/, SiD/sub 4/). Heats of formation of SiH/sub n/, SiH/sub n//sup +/ (n = 1, 2, 3), and SiH/sub n//sup +/ (n = 0, 1, 2, 3). Remarkable isotope exchange reaction involving four hydrogen shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, B.H.; Armentrout, P.B.

    1987-06-10

    The reaction of ground-state silicon ion with silane is investigated by using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Reaction cross sections of all possible fragments, Si/sub m/H/sub n//sup +/ (m = 1, 2; n = 0, 1, 2, 3), as a function of relative kinetic energy are determined. All thermal energies, the major product is Si/sub 2/H/sub 2//sup +/. One remarkable reaction, the interchange of the projectile silicon ion with the target silicon atom, is observed at near zero kinetic energy. Labeling experiments employing /sup 30/Si/sup +/ for the beam or SiD/sub 4/ for the reactant indicate the intermediacy of the disilicon hydrides for the formation of the observed products. From the endothermicities of several reactions, the 298 K heats of formation for several ionic and neutral silicon hydrides are derived: ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH) = 90.0 +/- 1.7, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 2/) = 69.0 +/- 2, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 3/) = 48.5 +/- 1.6, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 2//sup +/) = 276.1 +/- 1.7, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 3//sup +/) = 237.1 +/- 2, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(Si/sub 2//sup +/) less than or equal to 328.0 +/- 2, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(Si/sub 2/H/sup +/) less than or equal to 304.4 +/- 1.6, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(Si/sub 2/H/sub 2/) less than or equal to 268.0 +/- 2.6, ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(Si/sub 2/H/sub 3//sup +/) = 266 +/- 2, all in kcal/mol. From an evaluation of these and other experiments, values of ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 2//sup +/) and ..delta..H/sub f//sup 0/(SiH/sub 2/) of 278.0 +/- 1.4 and 68.5 +/- 1.5 kcal/mol, respectively, are recommended.

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  20. Higher Education Exchange, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The "Higher Education Exchange" is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  1. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  2. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  3. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  4. International Exchange Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, Alan

    This paper focuses on the establishment of three standard international formats for the exchange of bibliographic data--UNIMARC, CCF, and the UNISIST Reference Manual--and outlines their common and differing features. The development of the UNIMARC manual as the standard international MARC network exchange format is traced, and its salient…

  5. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  6. Money and Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This teaching guide begins with an explanation of the role of money in the economy, focusing on its circulation or exchange. The use of money as a unit of account, a store of value, and a medium of exchange are explained. Three brief teaching units are included. The grade K-2 unit, "Money Counts," provides games and activities which develop the…

  7. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  8. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  9. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  10. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup / = 0 states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Ammonia/potassium exchange in methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sprott, G D; Shaw, K M; Jarrell, K F

    1984-10-25

    Methanospirillum hungatei exposed to ammonia in a K+-free buffer lost up to 98% of the cytoplasmic K+ through an ammonia/K+ exchange reaction. The exchange was immediate, and occurred in cells poisoned by air or by other metabolic inhibitors. Additions of NH4OH or various NH+4 salts (or methylamine) were most effective in causing K+ depletion in media of alkaline pH, suggesting that NH3 was the chemical species crossing the membrane. In alkaline media, the exchange reaction resulted in a dissipation of the transmembrane pH gradient (inside acidic), but had only small effects on the membrane potential until concentrations of ammonia were used above those required to abolish the K+ gradient. Through the use of NH4Cl to vary the cytoplasmic pH at a constant acidic external pH, and NH4OH to abolish the transmembrane pH gradient at various alkaline external pH values, we conclude that methanogenesis is sensitive to both the pH of the cytoplasm and the medium. Methanogenesis in Msp. hungatei and Methanosarcina barkeri was inhibited dramatically at external pH values more acidic than 6.5 or more alkaline than 7.5. Dramatic K+ depletion in response to ammonia additions at pH 8.0 occurred with Ms. barkeri, another strain of Msp. hungatei, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus polymyxa. In several other methanogens, ammonia/potassium exchange was hardly detected. PMID:6490632

  12. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  13. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  14. Cryptographic Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    While transparency in financial markets should enhance liquidity, its exploitation by unethical and parasitic traders discourages others from fully embracing disclosure of their own information. Traders exploit both the private information in upstairs markets used to trade large orders outside traditional exchanges and the public information present in exchanges' quoted limit order books. Using homomorphic cryptographic protocols, market designers can create "partially transparent" markets in which every matched trade is provably correct and only beneficial information is revealed. In a cryptographic securities exchange, market operators can hide information to prevent its exploitation, and still prove facts about the hidden information such as bid/ask spread or market depth.

  15. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  16. Heat and mass exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  17. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  18. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  19. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with conventional'' microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  20. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  1. Nucleophilic substitution at the halogen atom (halogenophilic reactions)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Petr K.; Artamkina, Galina A.; Beletskaya, Irina P.

    2012-04-01

    The key features of halogenophilic reactions defining their role in organic chemistry are considered. The results of studies of mechanisms involving a nucleophilic attack at the halogen atom (SN2Hal) are summarized. The main mechanistic evidence comes from the studies of halogen-metal exchange reactions. Primary attention is paid to the role of halogenophilic reaction as a competing process or a concealed mechanism in ordinary nucleophilic substitution reaction at carbon atoms. The bibliography includes 249 references.

  2. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, characterization, and other additional details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06460k

  3. Exam Question Exchange: A Popular Approach to Reaction Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael P. S.; Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate physical chemistry question and its acceptable solution. This question, presented to share exam questions with other teachers, shows the analogy between molecular kinetics and population dynamics. (HM)

  4. Proton channels and exchangers in cancer.

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Sonveaux, Pierre; Stock, Christian; Perez-Sayans, Mario; De Milito, Angelo; Avnet, Sofia; Garcìa, Abel Garcìa; Harguindey, Salvador; Fais, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Although cancer is characterized by an intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, a totally deranged pH control is a common feature of most cancer histotypes. Major determinants of aberrant pH gradient in cancer are proton exchangers and transporters, including V-ATPase, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Thanks to the activity of these proton transporters and exchangers, cancer becomes isolated and/or protected not only from the body reaction against the growing tumor, but also from the vast majority of drugs that when protonated into the acidic tumor microenvironment do not enter into cancer cells. Proton transporters and exchangers represent a key feature tumor cells use to survive in the very hostile microenvironmental conditions that they create and maintain. Detoxifying mechanisms may thus represent both a key survival option and a selection outcome for cells that behave as unicellular microorganisms rather than belonging to an organ, compartment or body. It is, in fact, typical of malignant tumors that, after a clinically measurable yet transient initial response to a therapy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, thus bursting a more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. This review critically presents the background of a novel and efficient approach that aims to fight cancer through blocking or inhibiting well characterized proton exchangers and transporters active in human cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25449995

  5. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  6. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  7. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  8. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin

    2016-05-10

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation is not dependent on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating and semiconducting systems, as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, such as that observed in planewave-based methods, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code. The ACE formulation can also be advantageous for other types of basis sets, especially when the storage cost of the exchange operator is expensive. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous, even for small systems with tens of atoms. In particular, the cost of each self-consistent field iteration for the electron density in the ACE formulation is only marginally larger than that of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) calculation, and thus offers orders-of-magnitude acceleration for Hartree-Fock-like calculations. PMID:27045571

  9. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution.

  10. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L; Santangelo, Philip J; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  11. Downhole heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The downhole heat exchanger (DHE) eliminates the problem of disposal of geothermal fluid, since only heat is taken from the well. The exchanger consists of a system of pipes or tubes suspended in the well through which clean secondary water is pumped or allowed to circulate by natural convection. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single-well system is adequate (typically less than 0.8 MWt, with well depths up to about 500 ft) and may be economical under certain conditions at well depths to 1500 ft. Several designs have proven successful; but, the most popular are a simple hairpin loop or multiple loops of iron pipe (similar to the tubes in a U-tube and shell exchanger) extending to near the well bottom. An experimental design consisting of multiple small tubes with headers at each end suspended just below the water surface appears to offer economic and heating capacity advantages. The paper describes design and construction details and New Zealand`s experience with downhole heat exchangers.

  12. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-02-28

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4kA was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized herein.

  13. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations.

  14. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations. PMID:23350029

  15. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  16. Water exchange dynamics around H3O+ and OH- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H3O+. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH- and find that the corresponding time scale is much smaller than that for H3O+.

  17. Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, J.

    1975-12-01

    A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

  18. Elastic electron-deuteron scattering beyond one-photon exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Kobushkin, A. P.; Krivenko-Emetov, Ya. D.; Dubnicka, S.

    2010-05-15

    We discuss elastic electron-deuteron (ed) scattering beyond the Born approximation. The reaction amplitude contains six generalized form factors, but only three linearly independent combinations of them (generalized charge, quadrupole, and magnetic form factors) contribute to the reaction cross section in second-order perturbation theory. We examine the two-photon exchange and find that it includes two types of diagrams, where two virtual photons are interacting with the same nucleon and where the photons are interacting with different nucleons. It is shown that the two-photon-exchange amplitude is strongly connected with the deuteron wave function at short distances.

  19. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  20. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Culver, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

  1. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  2. Determination of the cation-exchange capacity of muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.A.; Suter, U.W.

    2000-04-01

    High cation-exchange capacity (CEC) muscovite mica with a homoionic surface was prepared by replacing the Li{sup +} surface ions of partially delaminated Li-mica with K{sup +}. The CEC of this K-mica was determined by exchanging its surface cations with Cs{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, methylene blue (MB{sup +}), and copper triethylenetetramine [Cu(trien){sup 2+}]. The kinetics of these exchange reactions were studied and showed large differences depending on their relative affinities to mica. The NH{sub 4}{sup +}/K{sup +} exchange was slow, while the Cs{sup +} and Cu(trien){sup 2+}/K{sup +} exchange was fast. The MB{sup +}/K{sup +} exchange was quite slow and was not completed even after 99 h. Insufficient reaction time is one of the main reasons for the contradictory results reported in the literature for the CEC of aluminosilicates obtained by different methods. The CEC of mica can be photometrically measured by exchanging its surface cations with Cu(trien){sup 2+}.

  3. Stoichiometry of removal of natural organic matter by ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Treavor H; Singer, Philip C

    2008-01-15

    Five anion exchange resins, including a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin, were evaluated for removal of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) in the presence of bicarbonate and chloride. The charge density of SRFA, obtained by potentiometric titration, was used to perform charge balances for ion exchange reactions involving SRFA, bicarbonate, and chloride under different solution conditions. The results clearly show the equivalence of SRFA uptake and chloride release by ion exchange. Although the structure of the anion exchange resins did not affect the stoichiometry of the reaction, the polyacrylic resins did exhibit greater removal of SRFA than the polystyrene resins. The hindered removal of SRFA by the polystyrene resins was hypothesized to be a result of size exclusion. The MIEX resin, which has a polyacrylic structure, performed similarly to the other polyacrylic resins. For the MIEX resin, the separation factor for SRFA over chloride was approximately 8 times greater than for bicarbonate over chloride. This work provides an improved understanding of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM), inorganic anions, and anion exchange resins, and should result in more effective applications of ion exchange for the removal of NOM in the treatment of drinking water. PMID:18284170

  4. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  5. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  6. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  7. Deuterium Exchange in the Systems of H2O+/H2O and H3O+/H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Sen, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    Using tandem mass spectrometry various water ion interactions were observed. These reactions consisted of a series of charge transfer, proton transfer, and isotopic exchange steps. The experimental data sets consist of variations of ion abundances over a neutral pressure range. An expected sequence of isotopic exchange reactions is given along with differential equation solutions & reaction rate data.

  8. Gas exchange measurements in natural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Peng, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    Direct knowledge of the rates of gas exchange in lakes and the ocean is based almost entirely on measurements of the isotopes /sup 14/C, /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He. The distribution of natural radiocarbon has yielded the average rate of CO/sub 2/ exchange for the ocean and for several closed basin lakes. That of bomb produced radiocarbon has been used in the same systems. The /sup 222/Rn to /sup 226/Ra ratio in open ocean surface water has been used to give local short term gas exchange rates. The radon method generally cannot be used in lakes, rivers, estuaries or shelf areas because of the input of radon from sediments. A few attempts have been made to use the excess /sup 3/He produced by decay of bomb produced tritium in lakes to give gas transfer rates. The uncertainty in the molecular diffusivity of helium and in the diffusivity dependence of the rate of gas transfer holds back the application of this method. A few attempts have been made to enrich the surface waters of small lakes with /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H in order to allow the use of the /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He methods. While these studies give broadly concordant results, many questions remain unanswered. The wind velocity dependence of gas exchange rate has yet to be established in field studies. The dependence of gas exchange rate on molecular diffusivity also remains in limbo. Finally, the degree of enhancement of CO/sub 2/ exchange through chemical reactions has been only partially explored. 49 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  10. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XXIII Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Ch. II Regulatory Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  11. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South China," and (4) "The Use…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  13. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  14. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  15. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South China," and (4) "The Use

  16. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  17. Research Exchange, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These three issues of the "Research Exchange" focus on how better to conduct disability research and disseminate research results. The first issue examines the topic of human subject/human research participant protection, with a focus on research funded through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). It provides

  18. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  19. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  20. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  1. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

  2. Is the simplest chemical reaction really so simple?

    PubMed Central

    Jankunas, Justin; Sneha, Mahima; Zare, Richard N.; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C.; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F. Javier

    2014-01-01

    Modern computational methods have become so powerful for predicting the outcome for the H + H2 → H2 + H bimolecular exchange reaction that it might seem further experiments are not needed. Nevertheless, experiments have led the way to cause theorists to look more deeply into this simplest of all chemical reactions. The findings are less simple. PMID:24367084

  3. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  4. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides exam questions and solutions for a problem in amplification sequence of reactions, and a problem in applying group theory techniques and making spectral assignments and structural determination by qualitative arguments in the bonding in metal complexes. (CS)

  6. Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe2+ and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Pasakarnis, Timothy; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-11-20

    The reaction between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) has been extensively studied due to its role in contaminant reduction, trace-metal sequestration, and microbial respiration. Previous work has demonstrated that the reaction of Fe(2+) with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) results in the structural incorporation of Fe(2+) and an increase in the bulk Fe(2+) content of magnetite. It is unclear, however, whether significant Fe atom exchange occurs between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+), as has been observed for other Fe oxides. Here, we measured the extent of Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe(2+) and magnetite by reacting isotopically "normal" magnetite with (57)Fe-enriched aqueous Fe(2+). The extent of Fe atom exchange between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) was significant (54-71%), and went well beyond the amount of Fe atoms found at the near surface. Mössbauer spectroscopy of magnetite reacted with (56)Fe(2+) indicate that no preferential exchange of octahedral or tetrahedral sites occurred. Exchange experiments conducted with Co-ferrite (Co(2+)Fe(2)(3+)O(4)) showed little impact of Co substitution on the rate or extent of atom exchange. Bulk electron conduction, as previously invoked to explain Fe atom exchange in goethite, is a possible mechanism, but if it is occurring, conduction does not appear to be the rate-limiting step. The lack of significant impact of Co substitution on the kinetics of Fe atom exchange, and the relatively high diffusion coefficients reported for magnetite suggest that for magnetite, unlike goethite, Fe atom diffusion is a plausible mechanism to explain the rapid rates of Fe atom exchange in magnetite. PMID:22577839

  7. Charge Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerl, Konrad

    2010-12-01

    Charge transfer, or charge exchange, describes a process in which an ion takes one or more electrons from another atom. Investigations of this fundamental process have accompanied atomic physics from its very beginning, and have been extended to astrophysical scenarios already many decades ago. Yet one important aspect of this process, i.e. its high efficiency in generating X-rays, was only revealed in 1996, when comets were discovered as a new class of X-ray sources. This finding has opened up an entirely new field of X-ray studies, with great impact due to the richness of the underlying atomic physics, as the X-rays are not generated by hot electrons, but by ions picking up electrons from cold gas. While comets still represent the best astrophysical laboratory for investigating the physics of charge transfer, various studies have already spotted a variety of other astrophysical locations, within and beyond our solar system, where X-rays may be generated by this process. They range from planetary atmospheres, the heliosphere, the interstellar medium and stars to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, where charge transfer may even be observationally linked to dark matter. This review attempts to put the various aspects of the study of charge transfer reactions into a broader historical context, with special emphasis on X-ray astrophysics, where the discovery of cometary X-ray emission may have stimulated a novel look at our universe.

  8. Polymethylmethacrylate open tubular ion exchange columns: nondestructive measurement of very small ion exchange capacities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Yang, Bingcheng; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2013-08-20

    We describe an approach to prepare an open tubular ion exchange (OTIE) column by coating a monolayer of anion exchange nanoparticle to a 16-20 μm bore polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) capillary. The latex nanoparticle was electrostatically attached to carboxylate groups on the inner wall of capillary, pretreated with strong base for hydrolyzing the ester. Several approaches to nondestructively measure ion exchange capacities (IEC) of the columns were examined: (a) adsorption-desorption of an intensely fluorescent ion, e.g. fluorescein, and off-line fluorometry, (b) loading a weakly retained ion (e.g., IO3(-)), frontal displacement by a strongly bound ion (e.g., Cl(-)), and online optical or conductometric boundary detection, and (c) similar to the above except displacement being accompanied by reaction (e.g., acid-base titration). To our knowledge, this is the first time on-column titration has been used to measure capacities. By using different pH displacer solutions, we demonstrate for the first time the possibility of pKa-differentiated ion exchange capacity measurements. The cation exchange capacity of bare PMMA capillaries was on the order of 1 pequiv/mm(2) with little dependence on time and temperature of hydrolysis conditions. After AS18 latex coating, the strong base anion exchange capacity was on the order of 10 pequiv/mm(2), very close to what would be estimated on the basis of monolayer coverage of the surface by individual latex particles. The latex used contained a significant, additional amount of weak base character, about the same as the strong base ion exchange capacity. PMID:23875750

  9. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  10. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  11. Lipid Exchange by Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipid species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization of the protein in the presence of a target lipid of interest. PMID:26695050

  12. Serial replica exchange.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Morten; Kim, Byungchan; Liu, Pu; Friesner, Richard A; Berne, B J

    2007-02-15

    Parallel tempering (or the replica exchange method (REM)) is a powerful method for speeding up the sampling of conformational states of systems with rough energy landscapes, like proteins, where stable conformational states can be separated by large energy barriers. The usual implementation of the REM is performed on local computer clusters (or parallel processors) where the different replicas must be run synchronously. Here, we present serial replica exchange (SREM), a method that is equivalent to the standard REM in terms of efficiency yet runs asynchronously on a distributed network of computers. A second advantage is the method's greatly enhanced fault tolerance, which enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home. For proof of concept, we apply the SREM to a single alanine dipeptide molecule in explicit water. We show that the SREM reproduces the thermodynamic and structural properties determined by the REM. PMID:17249714

  13. Serial Replica Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Morten; Kim, Byungchan; Liu, Pu; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Parallel tempering (or the replica exchange method (REM)) is a powerful method for speeding up the sampling of conformational states of systems with rough energy landscapes, like proteins, where stable conformational states can be separated by large energy barriers. The usual implementation of the REM is performed on local computer clusters (or parallel processors) where the different replicas must be run synchronously. Here, we present serial replica exchange (SREM), a method that is equivalent to the standard REM in terms of efficiency yet runs asynchronously on a distributed network of computers. A second advantage is the methods greatly enhanced fault tolerance, which enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home.1 For proof of concept, we apply the SREM to a single alanine dipeptide molecule in explicit water. We show that the SREM reproduces the thermodynamic and structural properties determined by the REM. PMID:17249714

  14. Geology Exchange Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Because geology professors cannot bring ore deposits from around the globe into their classrooms, the next best thing is to take their students to the deposits, according to David Norman, an associate professor of geochemistry at New Mexico Tech and Angus Moore of the Royal School of Mines. They organized a new exchange program between the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, N.M., and the Royal School of Mines in London, England. In May, 14 students from England toured deposits in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado; in the photograph, Norman (on the right) describes a rock from a New Mexico ore deposit to some of the visitors from England. In early June a contingency from New Mexico Tech began studying deposits in England, Spain, and Portugal. Norman and Moore say that the exchange program may be expanded next year.

  15. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  16. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  17. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  18. ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSES AND MECHANISMS IN GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent performance assessment calculations of a disposal system at Hanford, Washington for low activity waste glass show that a Na ion-exchange reaction can effectively increase the radionuclide release rate by over a factor of 1000 and so is a major factor that currently limits ...

  19. AGRICULTURAL EXCHANGE RATE DATA SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ERS data set contains annual and monthly data for exchange rates important to U.S. agriculture. It includes both nominal and real exchange rates for 80 countries (plus the European Union) as well as real trade-weighted exchange rate indexes for many commodities and aggregatio...

  20. Sorption of iron(III) from chromate solution by the aminocarboxylic ion exchanger ANKB-2

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanova, O.F.; Izmailova, D.R.; Kurolap, N.S.; Uglyanskaya, V.A.

    1986-12-20

    The possibility of iron(III) sorption by the amphoteric ion exchanger ANKB-2 from chromate solution and its superiority over the cation exchanger KU-23 (10/60) have been demonstrated. By means of IR spectroscopy it has been shown that iron(III) sorption from chromate solution by ANKB-2 proceeds via both ionic and coordination reactions. The proportion of these kinds of reaction does not depend on the Cr(VI) content of the initial solution.

  1. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  2. DNA strand exchange and RecA homologs in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Scott; Bishop, Douglas K

    2015-01-01

    Homology search and DNA strand-exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand-exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved. PMID:25475089

  3. Single- and double-charge exchange at low pion energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of pion single- and double-charge exchange reactions at incident energies of 25 to 65 MeV leading to isobaric analog states, and in the case of double-charge exchange leading to the ground state of the residual nucleus. The crucial role of the higher nuclear transparency at low pion energies for the analysis of the data in terms of single and double scattering is demonstrated. The large effects on double-charge exchange produced by the spatial correlations in nuclear wave functions are evident. The data on 1f{sub 7/2} nuclei at 35 MeV are used to establish the general validity of a shell-model-based two-amplitude model for these transitions. Recent measurements of the energy dependence between 25 and 65 MeV of double-charge exchange cross sections at forward angles are presented and discussed. 33 refs., 19 figs.

  4. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  5. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between horizontal phase space (x; x{prime}) and longitudinal phase space (z; {delta}). Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e. mapping x to z, x{prime} to {delta}, z to x and {delta} to x{prime} are suggested. Methods to mitigate the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are discussed. Some applications of the phase space exchanger and the feasibility of an emittance exchange experiment with the proposed chicane-type beam line at SLAC are discussed.

  6. Lightweight Long Life Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    A shuttle orbiter flight configuration aluminum heat exchanger was designed, fabricated, and tested. The heat exchanger utilized aluminum clad titanium composite parting sheets for protection against parting sheet pin hole corrosion. The heat exchanger, which is fully interchangeable with the shuttle condensing heat exchanger, includes slurpers (a means for removing condensed water from the downstream face of the heat exchanger), and both the core air passes and slurpers were hydrophilic coated to enhance wettability. The test program included performance tests which demonstrated the adequacy of the design and confirmed the predicted weight savings.

  7. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two exam questions are presented. One suitable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate courses in organic chemistry, is on equivalent expressions for the description of several pericyclic reactions. The second, for general chemistry students, asks for an estimation of the rate of decay of a million-year-old Uranium-238 sample. (BB)

  8. Process for the exchange of crystalline zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.; Brady, M.; Humphries, A.

    1984-07-10

    This invention relates to exchanging the sodium contained in a crystalline zeolite by partially removing sodium by exchange with another cation, partially drying the exchanged zeolite and re-exchanging the dried zeolite.

  9. Molecular recognition in cation-exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidko, Evgeny A.; van Santen, Rutger A.

    The concepts of confinement- and molecular recognition-driven chemical reactivity of cation-exchanged zeolites is illustrated by our recent results from periodic and cluster density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The reactivity of alkali-earth- and alkaline-exchanged low-silica zeolites for selective photo-oxidation of alkenes with molecular oxygen and for N2O4 disproportionation is shown to be mainly due to the specific arrangement and the size of the cations in the zeolite cage. An attempt is made to separate the effects of basicity of the framework, the Lewis acidity of the extra-framework cations and the electrostatic field in the zeolite cage as well as its geometrical properties for the respective reactions. The importance of the favorable adsorption fashion of the reagents controlled by noncovalent interactions with the microporous matrix is shown. The role of the weak interactions with the zeolite walls and the factors, which determine the preference for a particular adsorption mode, are discussed by the example of light alkanes adsorption to Mg- and Ca-exchanged faujasites.

  10. Exchange current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holze, R.

    This document is part of Volume 9 `Electrochemistry', Subvolume A, of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. The document introduces into the chapter of exchange current densities at an electrode surface. In the document the kinetic equations for the processes at an electrode in contact with an electrolyte solution are derived and the various method of determining the exchange current densities are presented. The methods treated in the document are: current density versus electrode potential curves (current-potential curves), thin-layer voltammetry, coulostatic method, potential step method, cyclic potential step method, impedance method, faradaic rectification, faradaic distortion method, galvanostatic method, galvanostatic single pulse method, galvanostatic double pulse method, galvanostatic current interruption, cyclic current step method, dropping mercury electrode, open-circuit method, chronopotentiometry, chronocoulometric method, direct current polarography, alternating current polarography, oscillographic polarography, pulse polarography, miscellaneous polarographic methods, rotating disc electrode, controlled hydrodynamic convection, turbulent pipe flow, stirred solution, radiotracer (radiochemical) method, derivative cyclic voltabsorptometry, circular dichronic spectroelectrochemical method, mixed potential method. Hints for the usage of the tables in this chapter terminate the document.

  11. Exchange lists: revised 1986.

    PubMed

    Franz, M J; Barr, P; Holler, H; Powers, M A; Wheeler, M L; Wylie-Rosett, J

    1987-01-01

    A committee composed of members of The American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association has revised Exchange List for Meal Planning. Changes were made, as deemed necessary, on the basis of nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes as understood in 1986. Major changes include rewriting the text to make it more useful in the education of persons with diabetes; changing the order of the exchange lists to emphasize a high-carbohydrate, high-fiber diet, as well as to better reflect the order of foods in menu planning; adding symbols to foods high in fiber and sodium; changing nutritive values for the starch/bread and fruit lists; adding lists of combination foods, free foods, and foods recommended only for occasional use; developing a data base; and initiating a plan for field testing and evaluation. The committee also developed a simplified meal planning tool, Healthy Food Choices, to be used for initial or "survival" level education. In poster format, foods are grouped by calories into six food groups. Approximate portion sizes of commonly used foods are listed. Blank lines are provided for the nutrition counselor to write in a suggested menu or meal plan for the client. Because the booklet does not use the word "diabetes" specifically, it is appropriate as a general teaching tool. PMID:3794130

  12. Leprosy type 1 reaction (formerly reversal reaction).

    PubMed

    Naafs, Bernard; van Hees, Colette L M

    2016-01-01

    Nerve damage leading to impairment and permanent disability is the major problem in the course of a leprosy infection. Most of the damage occurs during two types of leprosy reactions, type 1 reaction (T1R) and type 2 reaction (T2R). Timely and adequate treatment may prevent this damage. Particular T1R reactions, however, are often diagnosed too late and are even missed. Clinical symptoms and warning signs are therefore covered, as are the immunology and pathophysiology of nerve damage. The differences between upgrading and downgrading, old terms but still relevant, are explained. Methods to detect reactions and to monitor their treatment are given. Triggering factors, the mechanisms of the reactions, including autoimmunity, and the presence of physical compression are discussed. Treatment over the years is placed in its context, and based on this information a treatment schedule is recommended. PMID:26773622

  13. Kinetics of tritium removal from heavy water by exchange with deuterochloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.

    1983-03-14

    A technique was developed to determine the rate and equilibrium constants for the base-catalyzed exchange of tritium from ehavy water to deuterochloroform. An activation energy and entropy were also calculated. These quantities are comparable with those reported in the literature for a similar reaction involving the exchange of deuterium from deuterochloroform to water. It was found that the exchange reaction occurred predominately between the dissolved reactants in the D/sub 2/O and CDCl/sub 3/ phases. The rate constant is a strong direct function of temperature while the equilibrium constant is a weak inverse function.

  14. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The

  15. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  16. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen exchange between three HF molecules, with particular emphasis on the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using an extended basis, we have located the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(sub 3h) symmetry, and the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(sub 3h) symmetry. The energies of the exchange reation were then evaluated at the correlated level, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons. Several correlation treatments were used, namely, configration interaction with single and double excitations, coupled-pair functional, and coupled-cluster methods. We are thus able to measure the effect of accounting for size-extensivity. Zero-point corrections to the correlated level energetics were determined using analytic second derivative techniques at the SCF level. Our best calculations, which include the effects of connected triple excitations in the coupled-cluster procedure, indicate that the trimer is bound by 9 +/- 1 kcal/mol relative to three separate monomers, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The barrier to concerted hydrogen exchange is 15 kcal/mol above the trimer, or only 4.7 kcal/mol above three separated monomers. Thus the barrier to hydrogen exchange between HF molecules via this termolecular process is very low.

  17. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  18. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  19. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  20. [Plasma exchange therapy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    By the Kawasaki disease, it is important that treatment is effective before the tenth day of illness when a coronary lesion can occur, and it is a well-known fact that early disappearance of inflammation leads directly to the onset restraint of the coronary lesions. Plasma exchange (PE) removes inflammatory cytokine and chemokines in the blood for Kawasaki disease directly and suppresses the inflammation early. The treatment result of the PE for the IVIG-resistant Kawasaki disease is so good, and if it could be started before particularly coronary lesion develops, we will expect an extremely big effect. In addition, when immunoglobulin therapy, steroid pulse therapy or neutrophilic elastase inhibitor therapy is invalid, we can perform PE therapy with the insurance applica- tion in Japan. PMID:25518418

  1. The International Power Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The International Power Exchange (IPEX) is an on-line bulletin board enabling utilities and other subscibers to advertise Wholesale Power. Bulk Transmission and Emission Allowances for sale or purchase. IPEX was created in response of the electric utility industry for a 24-hour per day, 7-day per week, computer-based communication system. The system provides instant access to market prices allowing a subscriber to increase their span of of knowledge when needing to buy or sell energy. The IPEX database provides information for trend analysis and other market research activities. IPEX was designed for investor-owned utilities, generation and transmission cooperatives, municipal organizations, and independent power producers. Capabilities and procedures for using the IPEX are discussion in some detail.

  2. Cross-Shelf Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  3. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  4. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  5. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  6. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress. PMID:26747520

  7. The Continental Power Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiak, S.

    1994-12-31

    Information technology, coupled with an environment of deregulation, provides competitive opportunities in the Next-Hour marketplace. This emerging market will allow electric power buyers, sellers and transmission service providers to efficiently take advantage of all available information and to make better business decisions. The creation of a nationwide integrated computer and telecommunications network dramatically improves the efficiency achieved by existing approaches to arranging Next-Hour bulk power transactions. By using a cutting edge computer and telecommunications system, dispatchers can easily enter the Next-Hour marketplace to offer energy for exchange or to consumate opportunities offered by others. Computer systems can track transactions, issue invoices and settle accounts. These same computers can continually supply dispatchers with information regarding system reliability as well. The benefits are improved cost effectiveness and improved reliability.

  8. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  9. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  10. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  11. Preparation of an Ester-Containing Grignard Reagent by Halogen-Metal Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, students carry out a halogen-metal exchange reaction of methyl 2-iodobenzoate with isopropylmagnesium chloride in THF at 0C to afford 2-carbomethoxyphenylmagnesium chloride, which is treated with "p"-methoxybenzaldehyde to give a lactone (phthalide) product. This reaction introduces students to the modern method of

  12. Preparation of an Ester-Containing Grignard Reagent by Halogen-Metal Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, students carry out a halogen-metal exchange reaction of methyl 2-iodobenzoate with isopropylmagnesium chloride in THF at 0°C to afford 2-carbomethoxyphenylmagnesium chloride, which is treated with "p"-methoxybenzaldehyde to give a lactone (phthalide) product. This reaction introduces students to the modern method of…

  13. Analysis of titanium/carbon steel heat exchanger fire

    SciTech Connect

    Prine, B.A. )

    1992-04-01

    In the past fifteen years two serious titanium fires have occurred at scrap dealer facilities. Both incidents involved the cutting of titanium/carbon steel heat exchangers by scrap metal dealers. This paper reviews the properties of titanium and carbon steel under extreme conditions and the oxy-acetylene cutting process relevant to its potential for initiating titanium fires. The probable modes of propagation involved in these specific incidents are considered. The formation of low melting eutectic mixtures and the Thermite reaction are both felt to contribute to the incident once initiated. Alternate methods of cutting titanium/carbon steel exchangers are discussed.

  14. The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between nitrate and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Masanori; Poulson, Simon R.

    2013-10-01

    The oxygen isotope exchange rate between nitrate and water was measured at a temperature of 50-80 °C and pH -0.6 to 1.1. Oxygen isotope exchange is a first-order reaction, with the exchange rate being strongly affected by both reaction temperature and pH, with increased rates of isotope exchange at higher temperatures and lower pH values. The rate of oxygen isotope exchange under natural conditions is extremely slow, with an estimated half-life for isotope exchange of 5.5 × 109 years at 25 °C and pH 7. The extremely slow rate of oxygen isotope exchange between nitrate and water under typical environmental conditions illustrates that nitrate-δ18O signatures (and also nitrate δ17O and Δ17O signatures) associated with various nitrate sources, as well as isotope compositions produced by biogeochemical processes, will be preserved. Hence, it is valid to use the value of nitrate-δ18O to investigate the sources and biogeochemical behavior of nitrate, in a similar manner to the use of sulfate-δ18O signatures to study the sources and biogeochemical behavior of sulfate. Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation factors have been determined, although quantification of the nitrate-water equilibrium fractionation factor is not possible due to the presence of nitrate as both protonated (i.e. HNO3) and unprotonated forms (i.e. NO3-) under the experimental conditions, and the difficulty in accurately calculating nitrate speciation in low pH, high ionic strength solutions.

  15. Myristate exchange on the Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, L U; Milne, K G; Werbovetz, K A; Englund, P T

    1996-01-01

    The glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor of the Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) is unique in having exclusively myristate as its fatty acid component. We previously demonstrated that the myristate specificity is the result of two independent pathways. First, the newly synthesized free GPI, which is not myristoylated, undergoes fatty acid remodeling to replace both its fatty acids with myristate. Second, the myristoylated precursor, glycolipid A, undergoes a myristate exchange reaction, detected by the replacement of unlabeled myristate by [3H]myristate. Remodeling and exchange have different enzymatic properties and apparently occur in different subcellular compartments. We now demonstrate that the GPI anchor linked to VSG is the major substrate for myristate exchange. VSG can be efficiently labeled with [3H]myristate by exchange in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor that prevents new VSG synthesis and thus anchor addition to protein. Not only is newly synthesized VSG subject to exchange, but mature VSG, possibly recycling from the cell surface, also undergoes myristate exchange. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8577736

  16. Investigation of Alkali Ion Exchange Processes in Na-Al-Si Glass Using Ion beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Baer, D. R.; Icenhower, J. P.; Engelhard, M. H.; McGrail, B. P.

    2001-03-01

    Glass and ceramic waste forms are proposed for the stabilization and immobilization of high level wastes. Recent findings show that Na ion exchange reaction can effectively increase the release of radionuclides from the glass matrix. We investigated the Na ion exchange processes and mechanisms using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The glass samples with fixed Na_2O and variable Al_2O3 concentrations were exposed to different times at 23^oC in a single pass flow-through apparatus, which contained aqueous D2 ^18O solution, supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica. The results show that the Na exchange rate is much higher than the matrix dissolution rate. On the basis of the depth distributions of Na, D, and ^18O, three different zones (reaction, transition and diffusion zones) were identified. The samples with higher amounts of Al content have a significantly narrower reaction zone than the low Al content glass samples.

  17. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  18. EXCHANGE. Volume 9-92

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  19. Advances in heat exchanger design

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, R.K.; Pearson, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on heat exchangers. Topics considered at the conference included an experimental verification of general correlations for single-phase turbulent flow in ribbed tubes, longitudinal laminar flow through isosceles triangular and rectangular rod bundles, and the design of helical-tube multi-start coil heat exchangers.

  20. Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

  1. The NESACS Exchange with Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Morton Z.; Tanner, Ruth; Strem, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS) is going to host visit to the representatives of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) at their annual exchange program this year. The delegation is expected to spotlight the ACS international effects, in addition to the advantages of the exchange between the two organizations.

  2. StarBright Learning Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This article features StarBright Learning Exchange, a program that provides a cross-cultural exchange between Australian and South African early childhood educators. The program was originated when its president, Carol Allen, and her colleague, Karen Williams, decided that they could no longer sit by and watch the unfolding social catastrophe that…

  3. In situ NRA study of hydrogen isotope exchange in self-ion damaged tungsten exposed to neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelj, S.; Založnik, A.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Vavpetič, P.; Pelicon, P.; Čadež, I.

    2016-02-01

    Isotope exchange was studied in-situ by Nuclear Reaction Analysis in the bulk of self-ion damaged tungsten at 600 K. Both variations of isotope exchange of H by D and of D by H were measured. The deuterium isothermal desorption was also studied and evaluated in order to be able to resolve the self-desorption from the isotope exchange at 600 K. The isotope exchange was also studied on the surface by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis at 480 K and 380 K. The exchange mechanism was effective both on the surface and in the bulk of damaged tungsten. A simple model was introduced to describe the exchange efficiency on the surface and in the bulk obtaining the exchange cross sections on the surface and in bulk. In both cases an isotope effect was observed, where the exchange of H atoms by D atoms was more efficient than for the reverse sequence.

  4. Cumulative Significance of Hyporheic Exchange and Biogeochemical Processing in River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical reactions in rivers that decrease excessive loads of nutrients, metals, organic compounds, etc. are enhanced by hydrologic interactions with microbially and geochemically active sediments of the hyporheic zone. The significance of reactions in individual hyporheic flow paths has been shown to be controlled by the contact time between river water and sediment and the intrinsic reaction rate in the sediment. However, little is known about how the cumulative effects of hyporheic processing in large river basins. We used the river network model NEXSS (Gomez-Velez and Harvey, submitted) to simulate hyporheic exchange through synthetic river networks based on the best available models of network topology, hydraulic geometry and scaling of geomorphic features, grain size, hydraulic conductivity, and intrinsic reaction rates of nutrients and metals in river sediment. The dimensionless reaction significance factor, RSF (Harvey et al., 2013) was used to quantify the cumulative removal fraction of a reactive solute by hyporheic processing. SF scales reaction progress in a single pass through the hyporheic zone with the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone for a specified distance. Reaction progress is optimal where the intrinsic reaction timescale in sediment matches the residence time of hyporheic flow and is less efficient in longer residence time hyporheic flow as a result of the decreasing proportion of river flow that is processed by longer residence time hyporheic flow paths. In contrast, higher fluxes through short residence time hyporheic flow paths may be inefficient because of the repeated surface-subsurface exchanges required to complete the reaction. Using NEXSS we found that reaction efficiency may be high in both small streams and large rivers, although for different reasons. In small streams reaction progress generally is dominated by faster pathways of vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms. Slower exchange beneath meandering river banks mainly has importance only in large rivers. For solutes entering networks in proportion to water inputs it is the lower order streams that tend to dominate cumulative reaction progress.

  5. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  6. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  7. Excitation of giant resonances via direct reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of electric giant multipole resonances are discussed. The parameters of the giant quadrupole resonance are now firmly established by an extensive set of measurements. The GQR is providing a significant influence in other areas of nuclear physics. The monopole resonance has now been established and its observation has provided the first direct measure of the nuclear compressibility. A strong case for the existence of a giant octupole resonance is now being made through a variety of hadron reactions. However, the supply of giant multipole resonances has not been exhausted. The newer techniques such as higher energy proton scattering, charge exchange reactions, heavy-ion scattering and pion reactions offer considerable hope for identifying new resonances during the next few years.

  8. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  9. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  10. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood transfusion. The reaction occurs when the red blood cells that were given during the transfusion are destroyed by the person's immune system. There are other types of allergic transfusion reactions that do not cause hemolysis.

  11. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental treatment trigger a hypersensitivity reaction? A: Some dental materials used by the dentist can cause a hypersensitivity reaction in certain individuals. Potential allergens include the metals in amalgam (silver) fillings, crowns and bridges, and orthodontic wires; ...

  12. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  13. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  14. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, Angelo R. [Marple Township, Delaware County, PA

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

  15. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, A.R.

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

  16. Refractive lens exchange.

    PubMed

    Alio, Jorge L; Grzybowski, Andrzej; El Aswad, Amr; Romaniuk, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Advances in small incision surgery have enabled cataract surgery to evolve from being concerned primarily with the safe removal of the opaque crystalline lens to a procedure refined to yield the best possible postoperative refractive result. As the outcomes of cataract surgery have improved, the use of lens surgery as a refractive modality in patients without cataracts (clear lens extraction) has increased in popularity. The removal of the crystalline lens for refractive purposes, or so-called refractive lens exchange (RLE), offers distinct advantages over corneal refractive surgery in selected cases. Nevertheless, in some middle-aged patients with high refractive errors, corneal refractive surgery can be a safe and effective treatment. In addition, the use of multifocal lenses offers an alternative for the correction of presbyopia. A further advantage of RLE is that it simultaneously eliminates the need for cataract surgery in the future. The keys for success in RLE are effectiveness and consistency in the refractive outcome, providing at the same time surgical and postoperative safety. To achieve these goals, adequate indications following strict risk/benefit criteria and refractive precision based on accurate preoperative protocols for IOL calculation and selection are mandatory, together with an appropriate choice of surgical procedure based on the surgeon's skills, minimizing complications. PMID:25127929

  17. Energy-Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  18. The heat pipe exchanger with controllable heat exchanging area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, M.; Takasu, S.; Kurihara, M.; Taneda, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Nakayama, H.

    1984-03-01

    The heat transfer rate through the heat exchanger in an industrial boiler that burns heavy oils must be controlled so as not to decrease the exhaust gas temperature below the dew point of sulfuric acid. Two systems of heat pipe exchangers are examined: one controls the heat exchange area of the condenser section of the heat pipes and the other uses the variable conductance heat pipes. The characteristics of these two systems are described. The temperatures at various points and the gas quantity are plotted against the boiler loads. The maintainability and operational reliability of both systems are demonstrated.

  19. 76 FR 28358 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Off-Exchange Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 55409 (Sept. 10, 2010... Act. Regulation of Off-Exchange Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 3281 (Jan. 20, 2010) (Proposed CFTC Retail Forex Rule). \\13\\ See Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76...

  20. Hear Exchange Assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2003-05-27

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  1. Heat exchange assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2004-06-08

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  2. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  3. Custom, contract, and kidney exchange.

    PubMed

    Healy, Kieran; Krawiec, Kimberly D

    2012-01-01

    In this Essay, we examine a case in which the organizational and logistical demands of a novel form of organ exchange (the nonsimultaneous, extended, altruistic donor (NEAD) chain) do not map cleanly onto standard cultural schemas for either market or gift exchange, resulting in sociological ambiguity and legal uncertainty. In some ways, a NEAD chain resembles a form of generalized exchange, an ancient and widespread instance of the norm of reciprocity that can be thought of simply as the obligation to “pay it forward” rather than the obligation to reciprocate directly with the original giver. At the same time, a NEAD chain resembles a string of promises and commitments to deliver something in exchange for some valuable consideration--that is, a series of contracts. Neither of these salient "social imaginaries" of exchange--gift giving or formal contract--perfectly meets the practical demands of the NEAD system. As a result, neither contract nor generalized exchange drives the practice of NEAD chains. Rather, the majority of actual exchanges still resemble a simpler form of exchange: direct, simultaneous exchange between parties with no time delay or opportunity to back out. If NEAD chains are to reach their full promise for large-scale, nonsimultaneous organ transfer, legal uncertainties and sociological ambiguities must be finessed, both in the practices of the coordinating agencies and in the minds of NEAD-chain participants. This might happen either through the further elaboration of gift-like language and practices, or through a creative use of the cultural form and motivational vocabulary, but not necessarily the legal and institutional machinery, of contract. PMID:23461002

  4. Temperature dependence of exchange field in exchange-spring magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, J. H.; Sun, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. R.; Zhang, H. W.; Shen, B. G.

    2001-06-15

    Pr{sub 8}Fe{sub 88}B{sub 4} ribbons prepared by melt spinning have been investigated by x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermomagnetic analysis, atom force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interface device magnetometer. The results show that the annealed ribbons consist of the Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and {alpha}-Fe phases. The magnetization of soft {alpha}-Fe phase remains parallel to the magnetization of the hard Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase for fields less than the exchange field (H{sub ex}). The exchange field in exchange-spring magnets, determined from the demagnetization curves measured at various temperatures, increases with decreasing grain size and measure temperature. The temperature dependence of exchange field was analyzed qualitatively by the expression H{sub ex}=(AK){sup 1/2}/(M{sub s}t). {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Structural Insight into the Ion-Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Li, Hua; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David B.; Belmares, Ricardo; Jiang, Youxing

    2012-06-19

    Sodium/calcium (Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}) exchangers (NCX) are membrane transporters that play an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} for cell signaling. We demonstrated the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-exchange function of an NCX from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX{_}Mj) and report its 1.9 angstrom crystal structure in an outward-facing conformation. Containing 10 transmembrane helices, the two halves of NCX{_}Mj share a similar structure with opposite orientation. Four ion-binding sites cluster at the center of the protein: one specific for Ca{sup 2+} and three that likely bind Na{sup +}. Two passageways allow for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} access to the central ion-binding sites from the extracellular side. Based on the symmetry of NCX{_}Mj and its ability to catalyze bidirectional ion-exchange reactions, we propose a structure model for the inward-facing NCX{_}Mj.

  6. IAESTE Exchange Development and Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishita, Yusuke

    The International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience is an Association of National Committees representing academic, industrial and students interests. Participation in the IAESTE exchange is open to bona fide students attending courses at Universities, Institutes of Technology and similar Institutions of Higher Education. This Report contains the Activities of IAESTE with its history and the detail on the bilateral exchanges, study fields, training periods and other useful information. We also look to the future as we continue our journey to improve our Association in partnership with our Academics, Employers and Students.

  7. Heat exchanger with ceramic elements

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01

    An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

  8. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  9. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  10. Deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid: Monitoring the reaction kinetics via low-temperature optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Corval, A.; Casalegno, R.; Astilean, S.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    1992-06-25

    In the deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid, this reaction is monitored via low-temperature optical spectroscopy to observe the proton-deuterium rate of exchange between the solvent and solute molecules. Of the 14 pentacene protons, 6 have an exchange rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining 8. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Marriage exchanges, seed exchanges, and the dynamics of manioc diversity

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; McKey, Doyle B.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2011-01-01

    The conservation of crop genetic resources requires understanding the different variables—cultural, social, and economic—that impinge on crop diversity. In small-scale farming systems, seed exchanges represent a key mechanism in the dynamics of crop genetic diversity, and analyzing the rules that structure social networks of seed exchange between farmer communities can help decipher patterns of crop genetic diversity. Using a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches, we investigated the relationships between regional patterns of manioc genetic diversity in Gabon and local networks of seed exchange. Spatially explicit Bayesian clustering methods showed that geographical discontinuities of manioc genetic diversity mirror major ethnolinguistic boundaries, with a southern matrilineal domain characterized by high levels of varietal diversity and a northern patrilineal domain characterized by low varietal diversity. Borrowing concepts from anthropology—kinship, bridewealth, and filiation—we analyzed the relationships between marriage exchanges and seed exchange networks in patrilineal and matrilineal societies. We demonstrate that, by defining marriage prohibitions, kinship systems structure social networks of exchange between farmer communities and influence the movement of seeds in metapopulations, shaping crop diversity at local and regional levels. PMID:22042843

  12. Nonlocal exchange correlation in screened-exchange densityfunctional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang; Spataru, Catalin D.; Louie,Steven G.

    2007-04-22

    We present a systematic study on the exchange-correlationeffects in screened-exchange local density functional method. Toinvestigate the effects of the screened-exchange potential in the bandgap correction, we have compared the exchange-correlation potential termin the sX-LDA formalism with the self-energy term in the GWapproximation. It is found that the band gap correction of the sX-LDAmethod primarily comes from the downshift of valence band states,resulting from the enhancement of bonding and the increase of ionizationenergy. The band gap correction in the GW method, on the contrary, comesin large part from the increase of theconduction band energies. We alsostudied the effects of the screened-exchange potential in the totalenergy by investigating the exchange-correlation hole in comparison withquantum Monte Carlo calculations. When the Thomas-Fermi screening isused, the sX-LDA method overestimates (underestimates) theexchange-correlation hole in short (long) range. From theexchange-correlation energy analysis we found that the LDA method yieldsbetter absolute total energy than sX-LDA method.

  13. 75 FR 53366 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; EDGA... Securities Exchange LLC; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE Amex LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Designation of Longer Period...

  14. 75 FR 51138 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Exchange Act Release Nos. 62251 (June 10, 2010), 75 FR 34183 (June 16, 2010); 62252 (June 10, 2010), 75 FR...; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; EDGA... Securities Exchange LLC; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; National Stock Exchange,......

  15. Surface Exchange and Bulk Diffusivity of LSCF as SOFC Cathode: Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Isotope Exchange Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Horita, Teruhisa; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-05-05

    The oxygen diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange coefficient (k) of a typical SOFC cathode material, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) were characterized by both electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) and oxygen isotope exchange (IE) methods. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted at 800°C for small step changes in partial pressure of oxygen (P{sub O{sub 2}} ), both decreasing and increasing, from 0.02 atm to 0.20 atm. The results revealed P{sub O{sub 2}} dependent hysteresis with the reduction process requiring more equilibration time than oxidation. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that the surface exchange coefficient is a function of the final oxygen partial pressure in an isothermal system. In addition, both forward and backward oxygen reduction reaction constants, which are vital for the fundamental understanding of SOFC cathode reaction mechanisms, are investigated based on the relationship between surface exchange coefficient and P{sub O{sub 2}} . The direct comparisons between the results from both ECR and IE were presented and the possible experimental errors in both methods were discussed.

  16. Deuterium isotopic exchangeability of resin and amber at low thermal stress under hydrous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Tappert, R.; Wolfe, A. P.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrous deuterium-exchange experiments have shown that a significant fraction of the original D/H composition of bulk kerogens, bitumens and expelled oils may participate in isotopic exchange reactions during burial diagenesis. However, it is unknown to what extent plant-derived secondary metabolites, namely resins and their fossil counterpart amber, exchange hydrogen isotopes following their biosynthesis. This situation hinders the application of resin D/H measurements in paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Here, we assess explicitly hydrogen exchange in resins and ambers using a series of immersion experiments in deuterated (D-enriched) waters over a period of several months at several temperatures. We are especially interested in assessing whether significant H-isotopic exchange occurs between resins and meteoric waters during early thermal maturation and polymerization. At 90°C, equivalent to ~3km of burial in most diagenetic regimes, modern conifer and angiosperm resins have an average post-metabolic H exchange of 4.6%, compared to only 1.1% for mature, polymerized ambers. At 55°C the degree of exchange is considerably lower: 1.9% for resins and 0.6% for ambers. These results indicate that most D/H isotopic exchange occurs prior to polymerization reactions, thereby confirming that D/H measurements from amber constitute a potentially sensitive proxy for environmental change.

  17. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  18. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  19. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  20. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  1. Liquid droplet heat exchanger studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Hedges, D. E.; Yungster, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent analytical and experimental investigations of the liquid droplet heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for space power applications are described. The performance of the LDHX is compared to that of a conventional heat exchanger for heat rejection applications in a Brayton cycle, using the mass-specific heat exchanger effectiveness as a figure of merit. It is shown that the LDHX has an order of magnitude advantage over the conventional heat exchanger. Furthermore, significant improvement in cycle efficiency and power to mass ratio is possible. Two-phase flow experiments in a laboratory scale LDHX, using air and water as the two media, show very good agreement with the quasi-one-dimensional model used in the parametric studies.

  2. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Diemer, Sanna L.; Kristensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Brian; Beeren, Sophie R.; Pittelkow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system. PMID:26378519

  3. Ion exchange - Simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Finn, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for simulating multicomponent adsorption by ion-exchange resins was adapted for use as both an ASPEN-callable module and as a free-standing simulator of the ion-exchange bed. Four polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonic acid resins have been characterized for three principal ions. It is concluded that a chelating resin appears appropriate as a heavy-metal trap. The same ASPEN-callable module is used to model this resin when Wilson parameters can be obtained.

  4. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  5. Electroforming thin channel heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.P.

    1991-06-01

    Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has shown that thin channel heat exchangers can be produced on bimetallic mandrels by the stack and plate method. Depth to width ratios of 100 to 1 are easily produced, with other ratios dependent on heating or cooling requirements. Mass production of these plates may be possible using reel to reel'' methods. Future generations of heat exchangers may be produced via composite electroforming, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD). 6 refs.

  6. Investigation of the gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of aromatic dicarboxylic acids in a quadrupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated aromatic dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Experimental results showed significant differences in the rate and extent of exchange when the relative position of the carboxylic acid groups varied. Spontaneous and near complete exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom occurred when the carboxylic acid groups were in the meta-position, whereas no additional exchange was observed for either the ortho- or para-isomers or for the structurally similar naphthalic acid. Computational investigations support the participation of several possible exchange mechanisms with the contribution of each relying heavily on the relative orientation of the acid moieties. A relay mechanism that bridges the deprotonation site and the labile hydrogen site appears to be responsible for the H/D exchange of not only the labile hydrogen atom of isophthalic acid, but also for the formation of a stable carbanion and corresponding subsequent exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom. The impact of hydrogen bonding on the relay mechanism is demonstrated by the reaction of phthalic acid as the extent and rate of reaction are greatly retarded by the favorable interaction of the two carboxylic acid groups. Finally, a flip-flop mechanism is likely responsible for the exchange of both terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid where the reactive sites are too remote for exchange via relay.

  7. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bazin, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Lee, J.; McDaniel, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Tsang, M. B.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Souza, R. T. de; Hudan, S.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Lukyanov, S.; Mocko, M.; Wallace, M. S.; Obertelli, A.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2009-06-12

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions {sup 9}Be({sup 9}C,{sup 8}B+X)Y and {sup 9}Be({sup 8}B,{sup 7}Be+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  8. The Biginelli Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Crouch, R. David

    2001-08-01

    The utilization of the Biginelli reaction, a one-pot condensation of an aldehyde, a b-keto ester, and urea, is described. This reaction involves a number of individual steps, each of which is accessible to first-year organic students. The product, a 3,4-dihydropyrimidinone, is a member of a medicinally useful class of compounds. The reaction is simple to perform and the product precipitates from solution in an extremely pure form.

  9. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineralmore » surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.« less

  10. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineral surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.

  11. Effects of diatomic reagent alignment on the A + BC reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattengill, M. D.; Zare, R. N.; Jaffe, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A computational study is reported on the A + BC - AB + C bimolecular exchange reaction in which BC is aligned with respect to the approach direction of atom A so that the initial rotational angular momentum vector of BC is either parallel (or equivalently antiparallel) or perpendicular to the initial velocity vector of A. The calculations employ a modification of the extended LEPS potential, which permits straightforward generation of noncollinear minimum energy reaction paths. The calculations clearly demonstrate that diatomic reagent alignment can markedly affect the nature of reaction product early partitioning; they also demonstrate that diatomic reagent alignment affects reactive cross sections.

  12. Carbon isotopic exchange between dissolved inorganic and organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Freeman, K. H.; House, C. H.; Arthur, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    The pools of inorganic and organic carbon are often considered to be separate and distinct. Isotopic exchange between the inorganic and organic carbon pools in natural waters is rarely considered plausible at low temperatures owing to kinetic barriers to exchange. In certain circumstances, however carboxyl carbon of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may be subject to exchange with the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool. We report results from an isotopic labeling experiment that resulted in rapid methanogen-catalyzed isotopic exchange between DIC and the carboxyl carbon of acetate. This exchange rapidly mixes the isotopic composition of the DIC pool into the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) acetate pool. This exchange is likely associated with the reversible nature of the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase enzyme. In nature, many decarboxylase enzymes are also reversible and some can be shown to facilitate similar exchange reactions. Those decarboxylase enzymes that are important in lignin decomposition and other organic carbon (OC) transformations may help to mask the isotopic composition of the precursor DOC with as much as 15% contribution from DIC. Though this dilution is unlikely to matter in soils where DOC and DIC are similar in composition, this exchange may be extremely important in systems where the stable or radioisotope composition of DOC and DIC differ significantly. As an example of the importance of this effect, we demonstrate that the stable and radiocarbon isotopic composition of fluvial DOC could be altered by mixing with marine DIC to produce a DOC composition similar to those observed in the deep marine DOC pool. We hypothesize that this exchange resolves the conundrum of apparently old (>5 kyr) marine-derived DOC. If most of the carboxyl carbon of pre-aged, terrestrial-derived DOC (15% of total carbon) is subject to exchange with marine DIC, the resulting carbon isotopic composition of deep DOC will be similar to that observed in deep marine studies. DOC observed in the deep ocean might therefore have a terrestrial DOC carbon skeleton with a carboxyl-rich component that is marine in origin.

  13. Radical reactions of borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Takuji; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2014-12-28

    Borohydrides are an important class of reagents in both organic and inorganic chemistry. Though popular as hydride-transfer reagents for reduction, since earlier work from the 1970s, borohydride reagents have also been known to serve as hydrogen-transfer reagents. In pursuit of greener tin hydride substitutes, recent progress has been made to mediate radical C-C bond forming reactions, including Giese reactions, radical carbonylation and addition to HCHO reactions, with borohydride reagents. This review article focuses on state-of-the-art borohydride based radical reactions, also covering earlier work, kinetics and some DFT calculations with respect to the hydrogen transfer mechanism. PMID:25349957

  14. Tissue Reaction and Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Melsen, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Tissue reaction to orthodontic force has been a subject of research with the purpose of providing the orthodontists with information necessary for the application of a force system that can generate a maximum of tooth movement and modeling of the alveolar process with a minimum of damage. Traditionally, the studies of bone biological reactions have been distinguishable from those performed by bone biologists. This has led to a controversy regarding both the terminology and perception of the reaction to mechanical perturbation. The present chapter, with its basis in bone biology, surveys the attempts by orthodontists to optimize the tissue reaction and shorten treatment time. PMID:26599116

  15. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  16. Reactions to tetanus toxoid*

    PubMed Central

    White, W. G.; Barnes, G. M.; Barker, E.; Gall, D.; Knight, P.; Griffith, A. H.; Morris-Owen, R. M.; Smith, J. W. G.

    1973-01-01

    In a factory population the occurrence of reactions to tetanus toxoid was recorded after 6740 injections. The incidence of general reactions was 0·3% and of local reactions 2·6%. The local reaction rate to the first injection of the basic immunization course was 0·9%, to the second injection 2·7%, and to the third injection 7·4%. To booster injections the rate was 1·6%. The local reaction rate was appreciably higher in women than in men — 14·4% and 5·7% respectively in the case of the third injection — and the incidence among women increased with age. Tetanus vaccine containing 10 Lf of toxoid caused fewer reactions than one containing 20 Lf, but a reduction in the content of aluminium adjuvant did not affect the reaction rate. Almost all reactors were found to have a satisfactory serum antitoxin concentration at the time of the reaction or developed a satisfactory immunity within 1-6 months. Skin tests were made in 32 hypersensitive patients. Neither the diluent, thiomersal preservative, nor the culture medium appeared to be responsible for hypersensitivity. The degree of hypersensitivity elicited by a special highly purified toxoid was only very slightly less than that elicited by the commercially pure toxoid. It is suggested that reactions are largely due to the toxoid antigen itself rather than to impurities or other components of the vaccine. PMID:4515879

  17. Surface Exchange and Shape Transitions of PbSe Quantum Dots during Overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Abtin, L.; Springholz, G.; Holy, V.

    2006-12-31

    Epitaxial overgrowth of PbSe quantum dots is shown to drastically affect their shape and composition due to anion exchange reactions. As shown by scanning tunneling microscopy, for PbTe capping layers this results in a complete truncation of the dots. Introduction of EuTe into the cap layer leads to an effective suppression of the anion exchange process. This preserves the original dot pyramids and induces a large stress concentration on the surface which further alters the overgrowth process.

  18. Cooling exothermic regenerator with endothermic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sapre, A.V.

    1993-06-01

    A fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) process is described wherein a heavy hydrocarbon feed having a boiling point above about 650 F is catalytically cracked in an FCC unit by direct contact with an inventory of hot regenerated cracking catalyst to lighter products and spent catalyst which is regenerated to produce hot regenerated catalyst, by: a. catalytically cracking the feed in a catalytic cracking reactor operating at conditions to produce a cracking reactor effluent mixture comprising cracked products and spent catalyst containing coke and strippable hydrocarbons; b. separating the cracking reactor effluent mixture into a cracked product rich vapor phase and a solids rich spent catalyst phase comprising strippable hydrocarbons and coked catalyst; c. stripping at least a portion of the spent catalyst phase to produce stripped coked catalyst; d. regenerating at least a portion of the stripped coked catalyst in a catalyst regeneration means to produce hot regenerated catalyst which is recycled to the catalytic cracking reactor; the process characterized by cooling at least a portion of the FCC catalyst inventory by indirect heat exchange against an endothermic chemical reaction in an endothermic cooler having two isolated sections, an FCC catalyst side section and an endothermic cooler reactant side section by: e. removing at least a portion of the FCC catalyst from the FCC unit and charging same to an inlet of the endothermic cooler; f. charging an endothermically reactive reactant selected from the group of ethane, propane, butane, light naphtha, and heavy naphtha to an inlet of the endothermic cooler reactant side of the heat exchange means; g. heating the endothermically reactive reactant, by indirect heat exchange with the FCC catalyst, to a temperature sufficient to drive the endothermic reaction and produce endothermic reaction products which are removed as a product and simultaneously remove heat from the FCC catalyst and produce cooled FCC catalyst.

  19. Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Morio

    Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

  20. Reactions of tetraphenyltitanium with organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Vyshinskaya, L.I.; Vasil'eva, G.A.

    1987-12-10

    As a result of the reactions of tetraphenyltitanium with dibasic organic acids high yields were obtained of new thermally stable titanium(III) complexes: phenyltitanium(III)carboxylates. Under the action of proton-active reagents (hydrochloric acid, cyclopentadiene, methanol) the latter break down with the breakage of titanium-phenyl bond. The proposed structure was based on IR- and ESR-spectral data. The dinuclear structure of the complexes was established on the basis of a study of the triplet structure of the ESR spectra, which showed the existence of intermolecular titanium-titanium exchange through methylene groups of the dicarboxylate bridges.