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Sample records for haas-van alphen effect

  1. de Haas-van Alphen Effect of CeSb Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashita, Masahiro; Aoki, Haruyoshi; Haworth, Christopher; Matsumoto, Takehiko; Terashima, Taichi; Uji, Shinya; Terakura, Chieko; Miura, Takahiro; Uesawa, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takashi

    1998-11-01

    We report a de Haas-van Alphen effect study of CeSb in thehigh-field ferromagnetic (F)and intermediate-field antiferromagnetic (AFF1) phases.In the F phase, the frequencies ofthe electron surfaces increase monotonically with pressure.On the other hand, the frequency ofone particular hole surface increases with pressure,while those of the other hole surfaces decrease slightly.The effective masses of all the hole surfaces increase similarlywith pressure, while those of the electron surfaces change little.In the AFF1 phase, other hole surfaces than theparticular one have qualitatively different pressure dependencefrom that in the F phase.The frequency changes both in the Fand AFF1 phases can be explainedby taking the anisotropic p-f mixing model into account.However, it is difficult to understandthe changes of the effective masses in termsof the f content expected for the p-f mixing model.

  2. Quantum Oscillations without a Fermi Surface and the Anomalous de Haas-van Alphen Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2015-10-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect (dHvAE), describing oscillations of the magnetization as a function of magnetic field, is commonly assumed to be a definite sign for the presence of a Fermi surface (FS). Indeed, the effect forms the basis of a well-established experimental procedure for accurately measuring FS topology and geometry of metallic systems, with parameters commonly extracted by fitting to the Lifshitz-Kosevich (LK) theory based on Fermi liquid theory. Here we show that, in contrast to this canonical situation, there can be quantum oscillations even for band insulators of certain types. We provide simple analytic formulas describing the temperature dependence of the quantum oscillations in this setting, showing strong deviations from LK theory. We draw connections to recent experiments and discuss how our results can be used in future experiments to accurately determine, e.g., hybridization gaps in heavy-fermion systems.

  3. Fermiology and De Haas-van Alphen effect of {beta}-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.; Crabtree, G.W.; Carlson, K.D.; Wang, H.H.; Williams, J.M.

    1993-04-01

    The Fermi surface of the organic superconductor {beta}-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} investigated by measurements of the de Haas - van Alphen (dHvA) effect has been found to have the typical two-dimensional cylindrical form. A small amount of corrugation could be quantitatively determined by the distinctive angular dependence of beating nodes. the existence of up to four almost identical frequencies in the dHvA signal may be explained by magnetic interaction effects within the samples. Due to the 1/cos{Theta}- behavior of the effective mass spin-splitting zeros could be detected.

  4. Fermi surface of SrFe2P2 determined by de Haas-van Alphen effect

    SciTech Connect

    Analytis, J.G.

    2010-05-26

    We report measurements of the Fermi surface (FS) of the ternary iron-phosphide SrFe{sub 2}P{sub 2} using the de Haas-van Alphen effect. The calculated FS of this compound is very similar to SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, the parent compound of the high temperature superconductors. Our data show that the Fermi surface is composed of two electron and two hole sheets in agreement with bandstructure calculations. Several of the sheets show strong c-axis warping emphasizing the importance of three-dimensionality in the non-magnetic state of the ternary pnictides. We find that the electron and hole pockets have a different topology, implying that this material does not satisfy a ({pi},{pi}) nesting condition.

  5. De Haas-van Alphen Effect and Fermi Surface Properties in Ferromagnet LaCo2P2 and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Atsushi; Nakamura, Ai; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai; Harima, Hisatomo; Uchima, Kiyoharu; Hedo, Msato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    We grew single crystals of a ferromagnet LaCo2P2 and an antiferromagnet CaCo2P2, and clarified the magnetic properties by measuring the electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization. For LaCo2P2, we also carried out the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiment. Detected dHvA branches are well explained by the results of energy band calculations using a full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local spin density approximation, where the ferromagnetic state is assumed. The cyclotron effective masses are (2-3)m0 (m0: rest mass of an electron). The present relatively large cyclotron masses in LaCo2P2 are due to ferromagnetic correlations of Co-3d conduction electrons, which are compared with much larger cyclotron masses of (3-7)m0 for a nearly ferromagnet SrCo2P2.

  6. De Haas-van Alphen effect and energy gaps of a correlated two-dimensional electron system in an AlAs two-valley pseudospin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windisch, T.; Huang, X.; Dasgupta, S.; Rupprecht, B.; Heyn, Ch.; Bichler, M.; Fontcuberta I Morral, A.; Grayson, M.; Abstreiter, G.; Wilde, M. A.; Grundler, D.

    2009-11-01

    We report highly sensitive de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect measurements on a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in an AlAs quantum well. Here two valleys are occupied forming a pseudospin system. At 400 mK, the dHvA effect shows pronounced oscillations at filling factors ν=1 to four. In the quantum limit at ν=1 the data are consistent with an interaction-enhanced valley splitting, which exceeds the Zeeman spin splitting in a perpendicular field B . When tilting B the energy gap ΔE at ν=1 shows first an unexpectedly strong angular dependence and then remains constant. This suggests a crossover in the energy gap, most likely from a spin to a pseudospin gap. We attribute the strong initial dependence of ΔE on the tilt angle to skyrmion-type spin excitations. Surprisingly, the dHvA oscillation amplitudes do not display coincidence phenomena at higher filling factors. This is explained by the large valley splitting and avoided crossings of energy levels.

  7. High field magnetoresistance and de Haas-van Alphen effect in antiferromagnetic PrB/sub 6/ and NdB/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Kwok, W.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Nishihara, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Omi, T.; Komatsubara, T.

    1987-08-01

    The transport properties and the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect have been measured for antiferromagnetic PrB/sub 6/ and NdB/sub 6/. The number of conduction electrons is approximately one per unit cell. The magnetoresistance shows the existence of open orbits implying a multiply connected Fermi surface. The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance is roughly similar to that of the reference material, LaB/sub 6/. The dHvA data in PrB/sub 6/ shows both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic Fermi surfaces. The antiferromagnetic Fermi surface arises from new magnetic Brillouin zone boundaries and antiferromagnetic gaps introduced by the magnetic order, and the paramagnetic Fermi surface from magnetic breakdown through the small antiferromagnetic gaps in high field. Hybridization between the conduction electrons and the f electrons has been observed through the cyclotron masses, which in PrB/sub 6/ are three times larger than the corresponding masses of LaB/sub 6/. In NdB/sub 6/ only the antiferromagnetic Fermi surface, quite different from those of LaB/sub 6/ and PrB/sub 6/, has been observed. 26 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. de Haas-van Alphen oscillations for neutral atoms in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-07-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect is well known as an oscillatory variation of the magnetization of conductors as a function of the inverse magnetic field and the frequency is proportional to the area of the Fermi surface. Here, we show that an analogous effect can occur for neutral atoms with a nonvanishing magnetic moment interacting with an electric field. Under an appropriate field-dipole configuration, the neutral atoms subject to a synthetic magnetic field arrange themselves in Landau levels. Using the Landau-Aharonov-Casher (LAC) theory, we obtain the energy eigenfunctions and eigenvalues as well as the degeneracy of the system. In a strong effective magnetic field regime we present the quantum oscillations in the energy and effective magnetization of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic gas. From the dHvA period we determine the area of the Fermi circle of the atomic cloud.

  9. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the charge-density wave compound lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe3)

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, N.; Borzi, R.A.; Rost, A.; Mackenzie, A.P.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were measured in lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe{sub 3}) to probe the partially gapped Fermi surface resulting from charge density wave (CDW) formation. Three distinct frequencies were observed, one of which can be correlated with a FS sheet that is unaltered by CDW formation. The other two frequencies arise from FS sheets that have been reconstructed in the CDW state.

  10. High magnetic field calibration using de Haas-van Alphen oscillations in polycrystalline copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglio, William A.; Williams, Alan F.; Yannakopoulos, Anna; Grockowiak, Audrey; Tozer, Stan

    We provide a calibration for the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) frequency in polycrystalline copper, which may be used to standardize the measurement of magnetic fields, particularly in pulsed field environments, where direct observation of NMR is challenging. Using a reliable single-crystal model of the Fermi surface from coefficients that are traceable to a powder Al NMR reference, we computed Fermi surface extremal areas for evenly spaced directions around a sphere. Summing the peaks corresponding to extremal orbits according to the Lifshitz-Kosevich model, we arrive at a dHvA spectrum that corresponds to experimental observation. We find that actual maximum fields reached at the NHMFL-Pulsed Field Facility are slightly larger than previously determined. We appreciate generous primary support from the U. S. Department of Energy NNSA SSAA DE-NA0001979. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is supported by the National Science Foundataion, U. S. Department of Energy, and the State of Florida.

  11. Note on de Haas-van Alphen diamagnetism in thin, free-electron films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzesik, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the problem of de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) diamagnetic susceptibility oscillations in a thin, free-electron film trapped in a synthetic harmonic potential well. A treatment of this phenomenon at zero temperature was announced many years ago by Childers and Pincus (designated hereafter as CP), and we traverse initially much the same ground, but from a slightly different analytic perspective. That difference hinges around our use, in calculating the Helmholtz free energy F, of an inverse Laplace transform, Bromwich-type contour integral representation for the sharp distribution cutoff at Fermi level μ. The contour integral permits closed-form summation all at once over the discrete orbital Landau energy levels transverse to the magnetic field, and the energy associated with the in-plane canonical momenta ℏ k x and ℏ k z. Following such summation/integration, pole/residue pairs appear in the plane of complex transform variable s, a fourth-order pole at origin s = 0, and an infinite ladder, both up and down, of simple poles along the imaginary axis. The residue sum from the infinite pole ladder automatically engenders a Fourier series with period one in dimensionless variable μ/ ℏ ω (with effective angular frequency ω suitably defined), series which admits closed-form summation as a cubic polynomial within any given periodicity slot. Such periodicity corresponds to Landau levels slipping sequentially beneath Fermi level μ as the ambient magnetic field H declines in strength, and is manifested by the dHvA pulsations in diamagnetic susceptibility. The coëxisting steady contribution from the pole at origin has a similar cubic structure but is opposite in sign, inducing a competition whose outcome is a net magnetization that is merely quadratic in any given periodicity slot, modulated by a slow amplitude growth. Apart from some minor notes of passing discord, these simple algebraic structures confirm most of the CP formulae, and their graphic display

  12. De Haas-van Alphen Effect in Rh2Ga9 and Ir2Ga9 without Inversion Symmetry in the Crystal Structure and Related Compounds T2Al9 (T: Co, Rh, Ir) with Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Masataka; Teruya, Atsushi; Nakamura, Ai; Harima, Hisatomo; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2015-02-01

    We succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of Rh2Ga9 and Ir2Ga9 with the non-centrosymmetric (distorted Co2Al9-type) monoclinic structure by the Ga-self flux method, and carried out the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments. The Fermi surface is found to be split into two different Fermi surfaces, reflecting the non-centrosymmetric crystal structure. A magnitude of the antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction or a splitting energy between the two Fermi surfaces are determined to be 56 K for dHvA branch α and 45 K for branch β in Rh2Ga9, where these dHvA branches correspond to main Fermi surfaces. The present splitting values are compared with 290 and 130 K in Ir2Ga9, respectively. The splitting energy is found to be larger in the Ir-5d conduction electrons than in the Rh-4d conduction electrons. The split dHvA branches in Rh2Ga9 and Ir2Ga9 are also compared with the single dHvA branch in Co2Al9, Rh2Al9, and Ir2Al9 with inversion symmetry in the crystal structure.

  13. Fermi surface of MoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen measurements, and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Kündel, Jörg; Klemm, Matthias; Horn, Siegfried; Hofmann, Philip; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Eyert, Volker

    2009-03-01

    A comprehensive study of the electronic properties of monoclinic MoO2 from both an experimental and a theoretical point of view is presented. We focus on the investigation of the Fermi body and the band structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen measurements, and electronic structure calculations. For the latter, the full-potential augmented spherical wave method has been applied. Very good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is found. In particular, all Fermi surface sheets are correctly identified by all three approaches. Previous controversies concerning additional holelike surfaces centered around the Z and B points could be resolved; these surfaces were artifacts of the atomic-sphere approximation used in the old calculations. Our results underline the importance of electronic structure calculations for the understanding of MoO2 and the neighboring rutile-type early transition-metal dioxides. This includes the low-temperature insulating phases of VO2 and NbO2 , which have crystal structures very similar to that of molybdenum dioxide and display the well-known prominent metal-insulator transitions.

  14. Quantum Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen oscillation in a tight-binding model with electron and hole pockets for (TMTSF) 2NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2016-08-01

    Quantized Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation are studied theoretically in the tight-binding model for (TMTSF) 2NO3 , in which there are small pockets of electrons and holes due to the periodic potentials of anion ordering in the a direction. The magnetic field is treated by hoppings as complex numbers due to the phase caused by the vector potential, i.e., Peierls substitution. In realistic values of parameters and the magnetic field, the energy as a function of the magnetic field (Hofstadter butterfly diagram) is obtained. It is shown that the energy levels are broadened and the gaps are closed or almost closed periodically as a function of the inverse magnetic field, which is not seen in the semiclassical theory of the magnetic breakdown. The Hall conductance is quantized with an integer obtained by the Diophantine equation when the chemical potential lies in an energy gap. When electrons or holes are doped in this system, the Hall conductance is quantized in some regions of a magnetic field but it is not quantized in other regions of a magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels. The amplitude of the dHvA oscillation at zero temperature decreases as the magnetic field increases, while it is constant in the semiclassical Lifshitz Kosevich formula.

  15. De Hass-van Alphen effect in YBCO

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Freeman, B.L.; Hults, W.L.; King, J.C.; Mueller, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the de Haas-van Alphen effect in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.97} in pulsed, magnetic fields peaking at 100 T in powdered material with the field applied along the c-axis reveal two pieces of the Fermi surface. Their cross sections are 0.56 kT (0.054 {angstrom}{sup {minus}2}) and 0.78 kT (0.075 {angstrom}{sup {minus}2}) with effective masses of 2.8 and 4.4 respectively.

  16. Room temperature de Haas–van Alphen effect in silicon nanosandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagraev, N. T.; Grigoryev, V. Yu.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.; Mashkov, V. A.; Romanov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The negative-U impurity stripes confining the edge channels of semiconductor quantum wells are shown to allow the effective cooling inside in the process of the spin-dependent transport. The aforesaid promotes also the creation of composite bosons and fermions by the capture of single magnetic flux quanta on the edge channels under the conditions of low sheet density of carriers, thus opening new opportunities for the registration of the quantum kinetic phenomena in weak magnetic fields at high temperatures up to the room temperature. As a certain version noted above we present the first findings of the high temperature de Haas-van Alphen, 300K, and quantum Hall, 77K, effects in the silicon sandwich structure that represents the ultra-narrow, 2 nm, p-type quantum well (Si-QW) confined by the delta barriers heavily doped with boron on the n-type Si (100) surface. These data appear to result from the low density of single holes that are of small effective mass in the edge channels of p-type Si-QW because of the impurity confinement by the stripes consisting of the negative-U dipole boron centers which seems to give rise to the efficiency reduction of the electron-electron interaction.

  17. Effects of oxygen plasma etching on Sb2Te3 explored by torque detected quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuan; Heintze, Eric; Pracht, Uwe S.; Blankenhorn, Marian; Dressel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    De Haas-van Alphen measurements evidence that oxygen plasma etching strongly affects the properties of the three-dimensional topological insulator Sb2Te3. The quantum oscillations in magnetization down to low temperature (T ≥ 2 K) and high magnetic field (B ≤ 7 T) have been systematically investigated using a high-sensitive cantilever torque magnetometer. The effective mass and the oscillation frequency obtained from de Haas-van Alphen measurements first increase and then decrease as the oxygen plasma etching time increases from 0 to 12 min, corresponding to an up- and down-shift of the Dirac point. We establish the cantilever torque magnetometer as a powerful contactless tool to investigate the oxygen sensitivity of the surface state in topological insulators.

  18. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, B. C.; Kopelevich, Y.; Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  19. de Haas-van Alphen measurements in Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, R.G.; Grienier, C.; Hall, D.

    1993-08-01

    dHvA measurements were made on the 32 K cubic superconductor Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} using a 50 Tesla pulsed field magnet at NHMFL (Los Alamos) and a 18 T superconducting magnet (LSU). Data were taken with the magnetic field aligned along the (001) direction, at 1.5 to 3.9 K. The pulsed fields were high enough to drive the system well into the normal state. Analysis shows that the frequencies of the observed dHvA oscillations arise from a several Fermi surface sheets. One cross section was nearly identical with that predicted by a new LDA calculation.

  20. Enhancement of the cyclotron effective mass in U0.03Th0.97Ru2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Yuji; Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Kimura, Noriaki; Yamamura, Tomoo; Fisk, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    Electronic states of a dilute uranium alloy U0.03Th0.97Ru2Si2 have been investigated by using de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements on single crystal samples. Quantum oscillations were successfully observed for the field along the principal axes. The dHvA frequency of the observed branches roughly agrees with those of the reference compound ThRu2Si2, indicating the change of Fermi surface volume is not significant. On the other hand, the dHvA amplitude is strongly diminished compared to ThRu2Si2. Furthermore, cyclotron effective masses for corresponding branches are strongly enhanced. The latter effects are indicative of the strong scattering as well as the mass renormalization due to 5f moments.

  1. Shubnikov-de Haas and high-field magnetoresistance effects in the A15 compound Nb/sub 3/Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Sellmyer, D.J.; Liebowitz, D.; Arko, A.J.; Fisk, Z.

    1980-09-01

    High-field magnetoresistance and Shubinikob-de Haas (SdH) effects were studied in the A15 compound Nb/sub 3/Sb in fields up to 215 kG. A change in the field dependence of the magnetoresistance for certain field directions above about 150 kG appears to signal the onset of magnetic breakdown. Five sets of SdH frequencies were observed, four of them closely corresponding to de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) frequencies observed by Arko et al. The fifth frequency has an extremely large amplitude, about 20% of the background magnetoresistance, and it is suggested that this also is due to magnetic breakdown. The results are compared with the ab initio band calculations of van Kellel et al., which can explain many of the observed features of the dHvA and SdH frequencies.

  2. Split Fermi Surface Properties based on the Relativistic Effect in Superconductor PdBiSe with the Cubic Chiral Crystal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakihana, Masashi; Nakamura, Ai; Teruya, Atsushi; Harima, Hisatomo; Haga, Yoshinori; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2015-03-01

    We grew single crystals of PdBiSe with the ullmannite-type cubic chiral structure and carried out de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments to clarify the Fermi surface properties. The Fermi surfaces are found to split into two different Fermi surfaces, reflecting the non-centrosymmetric crystal structure. A splitting energy between two nearly spherical Fermi surfaces named α and α' is determined as 1050-1260 K. These Fermi surfaces are identified to be due the band-149 and -150 electron Fermi surfaces centered at the Γ point from the results of full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) energy band calculations under consideration of a mass correction in the spin-orbit interaction for Bi-6p electrons based on the relativistic effect. The theoretical splitting energy between these Fermi surfaces is 1080-1150 K, which is in good agreement with the experimental value.

  3. Correlations and effects of pressure in Fe-pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, Roser

    2014-03-01

    In this talk we will explore the effects of correlations and pressure in Fe-based superconductors by considering a combination of density functional theory calculations and dynamical mean field theory and compare our results with recent ARPES and de Haas van Alphen experiments. We will discuss the importance of orbital-selective correlations in the 111 (LiFeAs, LiFeP) and 122 families (BaFe2As2,CaFe2As2, KFe2As2) and indicate how the topology of the Fermi surface, specially in KFe2As2, is influenced by these effects. In this context, we will show why MgFeGe, an isostructural and isoelectronic system to LiFeAs, doesn't superconduct. In the case of the 122 systems, we will predict and analyze changes in the electronic and magnetic properties under hydrostatic, tensile and compressive pressure and will discuss our results in relation to (i) superconductivity, (ii) magnetism and (iii) the mechanisms involved in the detwinning process of an orthorhombic iron-pnictide crystal a. Funding has been provided by the German Science Foundation (DFG).

  4. Field-Induced Lifshitz Transition without Metamagnetism in CeIrIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, D.; Seyfarth, G.; Pourret, A.; Gourgout, A.; McCollam, A.; Bruin, J. A. N.; Krupko, Y.; Sheikin, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report high magnetic field measurements of magnetic torque, thermoelectric power, magnetization, and the de Haas-van Alphen effect in CeIrIn5 across 28 T, where a metamagnetic transition was suggested in previous studies. The thermoelectric power displays two maxima at 28 and 32 T. Above 28 T, a new, low de Haas-van Alphen frequency with a strongly enhanced effective mass emerges, while the highest frequency observed at low field disappears entirely. This suggests a field-induced Lifshitz transition. However, longitudinal magnetization does not show any anomaly up to 33 T, thus ruling out a metamagnetic transition at 28 T.

  5. Confinement and inhomogeneous broadening effects in the quantum oscillatory magnetization of quantum dot ensembles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, F; Heedt, S; Goerke, S; Ibrahim, A; Rupprecht, B; Heyn, Ch; Hardtdegen, H; Schäpers, Th; Wilde, M A; Grundler, D

    2016-02-01

    We report on the magnetization of ensembles of etched quantum dots with a lateral diameter of 460 nm, which we prepared from InGaAs/InP heterostructures. The quantum dots exhibit 1/B-periodic de-Haas-van-Alphen-type oscillations in the magnetization M(B) for external magnetic fields B  >  2 T, measured by torque magnetometry at 0.3 K. We compare the experimental data to model calculations assuming different confinement potentials and including ensemble broadening effects. The comparison shows that a hard wall potential with an edge depletion width of 100 nm explains the magnetic behavior. Beating patterns induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) as measured in unpatterned and nanopatterned InGaAs/InP heterostructures are not observed for the quantum dots. From our model we predict that signatures of SOI in the magnetization could be observed in larger dots in tilted magnetic fields. PMID:26740509

  6. Field-Induced Lifshitz Transition without Metamagnetism in CeIrIn(5).

    PubMed

    Aoki, D; Seyfarth, G; Pourret, A; Gourgout, A; McCollam, A; Bruin, J A N; Krupko, Y; Sheikin, I

    2016-01-22

    We report high magnetic field measurements of magnetic torque, thermoelectric power, magnetization, and the de Haas-van Alphen effect in CeIrIn_{5} across 28 T, where a metamagnetic transition was suggested in previous studies. The thermoelectric power displays two maxima at 28 and 32 T. Above 28 T, a new, low de Haas-van Alphen frequency with a strongly enhanced effective mass emerges, while the highest frequency observed at low field disappears entirely. This suggests a field-induced Lifshitz transition. However, longitudinal magnetization does not show any anomaly up to 33 T, thus ruling out a metamagnetic transition at 28 T. PMID:26849611

  7. Intrinsic Perturbation of the Landau Levels in Metals and Semiconductors at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awobode, Ayodeji

    2009-03-01

    The de Haas--van Alphen effect in non-superconducting metals and semiconductors at very low temperatures is proposed as a test of an intrinsic perturbative term which appears in the Landau equation sequel to the modification of the Pauli equation. Corrections to the frequency (or period) of the de Haas--van Alphen oscillation in metals is calculated and shown to depend on the Fermi energy and the measured anomalous part of the electron magnetic moment. Precision measurement of the magneto-optical properties which arise from the motion of electrons in binary semiconductors placed in a weak magnetic field is also proposed as a means of observing very small changes in the.

  8. Shubnikov--de Haas effect in the superconducting state of an organic superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.; Wanka, S.; Hagel, J.; Ha''ussler, R.; Lo''hneysen, H. v.; Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Nixon, P. G.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.

    2000-11-01

    We report the observation of Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) oscillations in the mixed state of the organic superconductor {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (T{sub c}{approx}4.4K). At low temperatures the SdH oscillations persist clearly below the upper critical field B{sub c2}(0){approx}3.6T almost down to the field where the resistivity vanishes. Rather unusually, no additional damping of the SdH-signal amplitude -- as well as of the de Haas--van Alphen amplitude -- is observed in the superconducting state. This indicates that the damping in the vortex state of this quasi-two-dimensional superconductor is different in character to that observed for most three-dimensional materials.

  9. De Hass-van Alphen and magnetoresistance reveal predominantly single-band transport behavior in PdTe2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjian; Zhang, Jinglei; Zhu, Wenka; Zou, Youming; Xi, Chuanying; Ma, Long; Han, Tao; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jingrong; Xu, Junmin; Zhang, Lei; Pi, Li; Zhang, Changjin; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-01-01

    Research on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has grown rapidly over the past several years, from fundamental studies to the development of next generation technologies. Recently, it has been reported that the MX2-type PdTe2 exhibits superconductivity with topological surface state, making this compound a promising candidate for investigating possible topological superconductivity. However, due to the multi-band feature of most of TMDs, the investigating of magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations of these TMDs proves to be quite complicated. Here we report a combined de Hass-van Alphen effect and magnetoresistance studies on the PdTe2 single crystal. Our high-field de Hass-van Alphen data measured at different temperature and different tilting angle suggest that though these is a well-defined multi-band feature, a predominant oscillation frequency has the largest oscillation magnitude in the fast Fourier transformation spectra, which is at least one order of magnitude larger than other oscillation frequencies. Thus it is likely that the transport behavior in PdTe2 system can be simplified into a single-band model. Meanwhile, the magnetoresistance results of the PdTe2 sample can be well-fitted according to the single-band models. The present results could be important in further investigation of the transport behaviors of two-dimensional TMDs. PMID:27516134

  10. De Hass-van Alphen and magnetoresistance reveal predominantly single-band transport behavior in PdTe2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjian; Zhang, Jinglei; Zhu, Wenka; Zou, Youming; Xi, Chuanying; Ma, Long; Han, Tao; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jingrong; Xu, Junmin; Zhang, Lei; Pi, Li; Zhang, Changjin; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-01-01

    Research on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has grown rapidly over the past several years, from fundamental studies to the development of next generation technologies. Recently, it has been reported that the MX2-type PdTe2 exhibits superconductivity with topological surface state, making this compound a promising candidate for investigating possible topological superconductivity. However, due to the multi-band feature of most of TMDs, the investigating of magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations of these TMDs proves to be quite complicated. Here we report a combined de Hass-van Alphen effect and magnetoresistance studies on the PdTe2 single crystal. Our high-field de Hass-van Alphen data measured at different temperature and different tilting angle suggest that though these is a well-defined multi-band feature, a predominant oscillation frequency has the largest oscillation magnitude in the fast Fourier transformation spectra, which is at least one order of magnitude larger than other oscillation frequencies. Thus it is likely that the transport behavior in PdTe2 system can be simplified into a single-band model. Meanwhile, the magnetoresistance results of the PdTe2 sample can be well-fitted according to the single-band models. The present results could be important in further investigation of the transport behaviors of two-dimensional TMDs. PMID:27516134

  11. Fermi surface, magnetic, and superconducting properties in actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Settai, Rikio; Haga, Yoshinori; Machida, Yo; Izawa, Koichi; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai

    2014-08-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect, which is a powerful method to explore Fermi surface properties, has been observed in cerium, uranium, and nowadays even in neptunium and plutonium compounds. Here, we present the results of several studies concerning the Fermi surface properties of the heavy fermion superconductors UPt3 and NpPd5Al2, and of the ferromagnetic pressure-induced superconductor UGe2, together with those of some related compounds for which fascinating anisotropic superconductivity, magnetism, and heavy fermion behavior has been observed. xml:lang="fr"

  12. Heavy-electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    De Haas-van Alphen results demonstrated the existence of a Fermi surface at sufficiently low temperature and show that the entire Fermi surface involves heavy electrons. The phase transitions in their heavy-electron state are discussed. These are either magnetic or superconducting. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (WRF)

  13. Holographic non-Fermi liquid in a background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; He, Jianyang; Mukherjee, Anindya; Shieh, Hsien-Hang

    2010-08-01

    We study the effects of a nonzero magnetic field on a class of 2+1 dimensional non-Fermi liquids, recently found in [Hong Liu, John McGreevy, and David Vegh, arXiv:0903.2477.] by considering properties of a Fermionic probe in an extremal AdS4 black hole background. Introducing a similar fermionic probe in a dyonic AdS4 black hole geometry, we find that the effect of a magnetic field could be incorporated in a rescaling of the probe fermion’s charge. From this simple fact, we observe interesting effects like gradual disappearance of the Fermi surface and quasiparticle peaks at large magnetic fields and changes in other properties of the system. We also find Landau level like structures and oscillatory phenomena similar to the de-Haas-van Alphen effect.

  14. Itinerant 5 f Electrons and the Fermi Surface Properties in an Enhanced Pauli Paramagnet NpGe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Dai; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Homma, Yoshiya; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nakamura, Akio; Haga, Yoshinori; Settai, Rikio; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2005-08-01

    We succeeded in growing a high-quality single crystal of an enhanced Pauli paramagnet, NpGe3, by the Bi-flux method, and observed the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect. The topology of a Fermi surface is well explained by the relativistic linear augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) band calculations based on the 5 f itinerant band model. The Fermi surface consists of a nearly spherical electron-Fermi surface with necks along the < 100 > direction, forming a hollow ball, centered at the R point, which is derived from the single band. The cyclotron effective mass is in the range from 2.6 to 16 m0, which is enhanced approximately 3.5 times from the corresponding band mass.

  15. Ultrasonic probe of the AuZn Fermi surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Svitelskiy, O.; Suslov, A. V.; Singleton, J. M.; Lashley, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We, for the first time, apply the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique to explore the Fermi surface of the martensite phase of the single crystalline AuZn shape memory alloy. The ultrasonic measurements were performed in the magnetic fields of up to 45 T in the temperature range of 0.07 < T < 300 K. In the martensite phase (T < 64 K), the oscillations of the speed of the longitudinal sound wave propagating in the (110) direction indicated a strong acoustic de Haas - van Alphen effect. In addition to the earlier described oscillations with frequencies of 1140 and 4720 Tesla, we observed a new frequency of 120 Tesla, which was predicted theoretically. Corresponding effective masses were in favorable agreement with those expected from band structure calculations.

  16. Multi-orbits observed in superconducting Nb-doped Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Benjamin; Corbae, Paul; Li, Gang; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Qiu, Yunsheng; Hor, Yew San; Li, Lu

    Recently discovered superconducting niobium doped Bi2Se3 shows promise to realize new physical phenomenon including the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic ordering and possibly topological superconductivity. To understand the new physics showcased in this system, a detailed knowledge of the electronic structure is needed. We present the first observation of quantum oscillations in the magnetization (the de Haas-van Alphen effect) of Nb-doped Bi2Se3. In the fully superconducting crystal, two distinct orbits are observed, in sharp contrast to Bi2Se3, Cu-doped Bi2Se3, and Sr-doped Bi2Se3. The multiple frequencies observed in our quantum oscillations, combined with our electrical transport studies, indicate the multi-orbit nature of the electronic state of Nb-doped Bi2Se3.

  17. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surfaces of the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce2PdIn8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, K.; Klotz, J.; Gnida, D.; Harima, H.; Aoki, D.; Demuer, A.; Elgazzar, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Kaczorowski, D.; Sheikin, I.

    2015-09-01

    We report low-temperature de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect measurements in magnetic fields up to 35 T of the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce2PdIn8 . The comparison of the experimental results with band-structure calculations implies that the 4 f electrons are itinerant rather than localized. The cyclotron masses estimated at high field are only moderately enhanced, 8 m0 and 14 m0 , but are substantially larger than the corresponding band masses. The observed angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies suggests quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surfaces in agreement with band-structure calculations. However, the deviation from ideal two-dimensionality is larger than in CeCoIn5, to which Ce2PdIn8 bears a lot of similarities. This subtle distinction accounts for the different superconducting critical temperatures of the two compounds.

  18. Topological change of the Fermi surface in ternary iron-pnictides with reduced c/a ratio: A dHvA study of CaFe2P2

    SciTech Connect

    Coldea, Amalia I.; Andrew, C.M.J.; Analytis, J.G.; McDonald, R.D.; Bangura, A.F.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; Carrington, A.; /Bristol U.

    2010-05-26

    We report a de Haas-van Alphen effect study of the Fermi surface of CaFe{sub 2}P{sub 2} using low temperature torque magnetometry up to 45 T. This system is a close structural analogue of the collapsed tetragonal non-magnetic phase of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We find the Fermi surface of CaFe{sub 2}P{sub 2} to differ from other related ternary phosphides in that its topology is highly dispersive in the c-axis, being three-dimensional in character and with identical mass enhancement on both electron and hole pockets ({approx} 1.5). The dramatic change in topology of the Fermi surface suggests that in a state with reduced (c/a) ratio, when bonding between pnictogen layers becomes important, the Fermi surface sheets are unlikely to be nested.

  19. On the quantum magnetic oscillations of electrical and thermal conductivities of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Reis, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Oscillating thermodynamic quantities of diamagnetic materials, specially graphene, have been attracting attention of the scientific community due to the possibility to experimentally map the Fermi surface of the material. These have been the case of the de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas effects, found on the magnetization and electrical conductivity, respectively. In this direction, managing the thermodynamic oscillations is of practical purpose, since from the reconstructed Fermi surface it is possible to access, for instance, the electronic density. The present work theoretically explores the quantum oscillations of electrical and thermal conductivities of a monolayer graphene under a crossed magnetic and electric fields. We found that the longitudinal electric field can increase the amplitude of the oscillations and this result is of practical and broad interest for both, experimental and device physics.

  20. Iron-based superconductors in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, Amalia I.; Braithwaite, Daniel; Carrington, Antony

    2013-01-01

    Here we review measurements of the normal and superconducting state properties of iron-based superconductors using high magnetic fields. We discuss the various physical mechanisms that limit superconductivity in high fields, and the information on the superconducting state that can be extracted from the upper critical field, but also how thermal fluctuations affect its determination by resistivity and specific heat measurements. We also discuss measurements of the normal state electronic structure focusing on measurement of quantum oscillations, particularly the de Haas-van Alphen effect. These results have determined very accurately, the topology of the Fermi surface and the quasi-particle masses in a number of different iron-based superconductors, from the 1111, 122 and 111 families.

  1. Concentration anomalies of the magnetization of HgSe:Fe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popenko, N.; Bekirov, B.; Ivanchenko, I.; Bludov, A.; Pashchenko, V.

    2014-10-01

    The field and temperature dependences of the magnetization of the semimagnetic semiconductor HgSe:Fe have been studied experimentally. The spin splitting of the Landau levels in the de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillations has been recorded in the iron impurity concentration interval of 7 × 1018 cm-3 < N Fe < 2 × 1019 cm-3. The effective area of the extreme cross section of the Fermi surface has been determined from the obtained dependences of the oscillation period on the iron concentration, and the concentration of the collectivized electrons under conditions of the stabilization of the Fermi level on the iron donor level has been estimated. The critical impurity concentration at which the sharp increase in the Curie-Weiss temperature occurs owing to the spontaneous spin polarization of the system of hybridized electron states in iron-doped mercury selenide has been determined.

  2. New insights on frequency combinations and ‘forbidden frequencies’ in the de Haas–van Alphen spectrum of κ-(ET)2Cu(SCN)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, Alain; Fortin, Jean-Yves; Vignolles, David; Laukhin, Vladimir N.; Kushch, Nataliya D.; Yagubskii, Eduard B.

    2016-07-01

    de Haas–van Alphen oscillations of the organic metal κ-(ET)2Cu(SCN)2 have been measured up to 55 T at liquid helium temperatures. The Fermi surface of this charge transfer salt is a textbook example of a linear chain of orbits coupled by magnetic breakdown. Accordingly, the oscillation spectrum is composed of linear combinations of the frequencies linked to the α and magnetic breakdown-induced β orbits. The field and temperature dependence of all the observed Fourier components, in particular the ‘forbidden frequency’ β -α which cannot correspond to a classical orbit, are quantitatively accounted for by analytical calculations based on a second order development of the free energy, i.e. beyond the first order Lifshitz–Kosevich formula.

  3. Measurements of the energy band gap and valence band structure of AgSbTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovovic, V.; Heremans, J. P.

    2008-06-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect, galvanomagnetic and thermomagnetic properties of high-quality crystals of AgSbTe2 are measured and analyzed. The transport properties reveal the material studied here to be a very narrow-gap semiconductor (Eg≈7.6±3meV) with ˜5×1019cm-3 holes in a valence band with a high density of states and thermally excited ˜1017cm-3 high-mobility (2200cm2/Vs) electrons at 300 K. The quantum oscillations are measured with the magnetic field oriented along the ⟨111⟩ axis. Taken together with the Fermi energy derived from the transport properties, the oscillations confirm the calculated valence band structure composed of 12 half-pockets located at the X -points of the Brillouin zone, six with a density-of-states effective mass mda∗≫0.21me and six with mdb∗≫0.55me , giving a total density-of-states effective mass, including Fermi pocket degeneracy, of md∗≈1.7±0.2me ( me is the free electron mass). The lattice term dominates the thermal conductivity, and the electronic contribution in samples with both electrons and holes present is in turn dominated by the ambipolar term. The low thermal conductivity and very large hole mass of AgSbTe2 make it a most promising p -type thermoelectric material.

  4. Critical phenemona at the martensitic transition in the shape-memory alloy gold-zinc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason; Darling, Tim; Thoma, D. J.; Chu, Fuming; Migliori, Albert; Hults, W. L.; Lopez, Michael; Batista, Cristian; Smith, J. L.; Lang, Brian; Woodfield, Brian

    2002-03-01

    Since the discovery of the shape-memory effect, the martensitic transition has been described within the framework of classical equilibrium thermodynamics as a first-order displacive transition. However, as we investigate the physical properties (elastic moduli,specific heat, and stress/strain measurements) through the martensitic transition in AuZn at cryogenic temperatures, we find clear signatures of recoverable plastic strain and a second-order (continuous) transition at 64.7 K. It is argued that the combination of equiatomic composition (removing internal strains) and a low transition temperature (reducing both diffusion and entropy effects) constrain the chemical potential and its derivatives to exhibit behavior that lies at the borderline between that of a first-order (discontinuous) and a continuous phase transition. For these reasons, we propose a critical point in composition-temperature space located at mole fraction, x = 0.5 Zn and T approximately 65 K, connecting two coexistence lines of first-order martensitic phase transitions. Further support of the critical point is based on resistivitiy data of N. Ridley and H. Pops, Met. Trans. 1, 2867 (1970), cold-stage optical results of H. Pops and T. B. Massalski, Trans. AIME 233, 728 (1965), and de Haas-van Alphen measurements of A. Beck, J. P. Jan, W. B. Pearson, and I. M. Templeton, Phil. Mag. 8, 351 (1963).

  5. Anomalous behaviour of critical fields near a superconducting quantum critical point in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzke, C.; Carrington, A.; Walmsley, P.; Malone, L.; Fletcher, J. D.; See, P.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; Kasahara, S.; Mazukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2014-03-01

    BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 presents one of the cleanest and clearest systems in which to study the influence of quantum critical fluctuations on high temperature superconductivity. In this material a sharp maximum in the magnetic penetration depth has been found at the quantum critical point (QCP x = 0 . 3) where Tc is maximal1. Specific heat and de Haas-van Alphen effect measurements2 show that this peak is driven by a corresponding increase in the quasiparticle effective mass. Based on these previous results a simple one-band theory would suggest that at the QCP we should expect a large increase in Hc 2 and a corresponding dip in Hc 1 . Actual measurements of these critical fields, which we present here, shows quite different behavior which we suggest is caused by an anomalous enhancement in the vortex core energy close to the QCP. 1 K.Hashimoto et.al., Science 336, 1554 (2012) 2 P.Walmsley, C.Putzke et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 257002 (2013) This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, EuroMagNET II, and KAKENHI from JSPS.

  6. Quantum oscillations in iron-based superconductors: BaFe2As2 vs. KFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Taichi; Kurita, Nobuyuki; Kimata, Motoi; Tomita, Megumi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi; Satsukawa, Hidetaka; Harada, Atsushi; Hazama, Kaori; Imai, Motoharu; Sato, Akira; Uji, Shinya; Kihou, Kunihiro; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kito, Hijiri; Tomioka, Yasuhide; Ito, Toshimitsu; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Liang, Tian; Nakajima, Masamichi; Ishida, Shigeyuki; Uchida, Shin-ichi; Saito, Taku; Fukazawa, Hideto; Kohori, Yoh; Harima, Hisatomo

    2013-07-01

    We present results of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation measurements on detwinned BaFe2As2 and de Haas-van Alphen oscillation measurements on KFe2As2. The Fermi surface of BaFe2As2 in the antiferromagnetic phase is found to consist of one hole and two electron pockets, all of which are three-dimensional and closed, and can reasonably be accounted for by LSD A band calculations. We find only moderate mass enhancements m*/mband of 2-3. In the case of KFe2As2, four quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface cylinders epsilon, α, ζ, and β are observed in qualitative agreement with previous ARPES data. In sharp contrast to BaFe2As2, agreement between the observed and LDA-calculated Fermi surface is poor: LDA calculations seem to predict wrong crystal-field splitting of Fe 3d states. Large effective masses up to 20 me, me being the free electron mass, are found. The Sommerfeld coefficient estimated from the observed Fermi surface and effective masses is consistent with the measured value of 93 mJ/K2mol [H. Fukazawa et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, SA118 (2011)] and is 8-9 times larger than the band value, indicating strong electronic correlations in KFe2As2.

  7. Recent developments in the determination of the amplitude and phase of quantum oscillations for the linear chain of coupled orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, Alain; Fortin, Jean-Yves

    2014-04-01

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations are studied for Fermi surfaces (FS) illustrating the model proposed by Pippard in the early sixties, namely the linear chain of orbits coupled by magnetic breakdown. This FS topology is relevant to many multiband quasi-two-dimensional (q-2D) organic metals such as κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2 and θ-(BEDT-TTF)4CoBr4(C6H4Cl2) which are considered in detail. Whereas the Lifshits-Kosevich model only involves a first order development of field- and temperature-dependent damping factors, second order terms may have significant contribution to the Fourier components amplitude for such q-2D systems at high magnetic field and low temperature. The strength of these second order terms depends on the relative value of the involved damping factors, which are in turns strongly dependent on parameters such as the magnetic breakdown field, effective masses and, most of all, effective Lande factors. In addition, the influence of field-dependent Onsager phase factors on the oscillation spectra is considered.

  8. Multiple Fermi surfaces in superconducting Nb-doped Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, B. J.; Corbae, Paul; Li, Gang; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Qiu, Y.; Medvedeva, J. E.; Hor, Y. S.; Li, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Topological insulator Bi2Se3 has shown a number of interesting physical properties. Doping Bi2Se3 with copper or strontium has been demonstrated to make the material superconducting and potentially even a topological superconductor. The recent discovery of superconducting niobium-doped Bi2Se3 reveals an exciting new physical phenomenon, the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic ordering, as well as signatures of an odd-parity p -wave superconducting order. To understand this new phenomenon, a detailed knowledge of the electronic structure is needed. We present an observation of quantum oscillations in the magnetization (the de Haas-van Alphen effect) of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 . In the fully superconducting crystal, two distinct orbits are observed, in sharp contrast to Bi2Se3 , Cu-doped Bi2Se3 , and Sr-doped Bi2Se3 . The multiple frequencies observed in our quantum oscillations, combined with our electrical transport studies, indicate the multi-orbit nature of the electronic state of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 .

  9. Coexistence of Weyl physics and planar defects in the semimetals TaP and TaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besara, T.; Rhodes, D. A.; Chen, K.-W.; Das, S.; Zhang, Q. R.; Sun, J.; Zeng, B.; Xin, Y.; Balicas, L.; Baumbach, R. E.; Manousakis, E.; Singh, D. J.; Siegrist, T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a structural study of the Weyl semimetals TaAs and TaP, utilizing diffraction and imaging techniques, where we show that they contain a high density of defects, leading to nonstoichiometric single crystals of both semimetals. Despite the observed defects and nonstoichiometry on samples grown using techniques already reported in the literature, de Haas-van Alphen measurements on TaP reveal quantum oscillations and a high carrier mobility, an indication that the crystals are of quality comparable to those reported elsewhere. Electronic structure calculations on TaAs reveal that the position of the Weyl points relative to the Fermi level shift with the introduction of vacancies and stacking faults. In the case of vacancies the Fermi surface becomes considerably altered, while the effect of stacking faults on the electronic structure is to allow the Weyl pockets to remain close to the Fermi surface. The observation of quantum oscillations in a nonstoichiometric crystal and the persistence of Weyl fermion pockets near the Fermi surface in a crystal with stacking faults point to the robustness of these quantum phenomena in these materials.

  10. Spin-zero anomaly in the magnetic quantum oscillations of a two-dimensional metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.; Gvozdikov, V. M.; Hagel, J.; Meeson, P. J.; Schlueter, J. A.; Ignatchick, O.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.; Davis, H.; Bergk, B.; Materials Science Division; Technische Univ. Dresden; Max-Planck Inst. Phys. Complex Systems; Univ. Bristol; Portland State Univ.

    2008-01-01

    We report on an anomalous behavior of the spin-splitting zeros in the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) signal of a quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor. The zeros as well as the angular dependence of the amplitude of the second harmonic deviate remarkably from the standard Lifshitz-Kosevich (LK) prediction. In contrast, the angular dependence of the fundamental dHvA amplitude as well as the spin-splitting zeros of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) signal follow the LK theory. We can explain this behavior of the dHvA signal by small chemical-potential (CP) oscillations and find a very good agreement between theory and experiment. A detailed wave-shape analysis of the dHvA oscillations corroborates the existence of an oscillating CP. We discuss the absence of the above spin-zero effect in the SdH signal and argue that in {beta}{double_prime}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} it can be explained by an incoherent variable range hopping interlayer transport which is insensitive to the small CP oscillations.

  11. Neutrality of a magnetized two-flavor quark superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Tanumoy; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effect of electric and color charge neutrality on the two-flavor color superconducting (2SC) phase of cold and dense quark matter in presence of constant external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon densities. Within the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we study the interdependent evolution of the quark's BCS gap and constituent mass with increasing density and magnetic field. While confirming previous results derived for the highly magnetized 2SC phase with color neutrality alone, we obtain new results as a consequence of imposing charge neutrality. In the charge neutral gapless 2SC phase (g2SC), a large magnetic field drives the color superconducting phase transition to a crossover, while the chiral phase transition is first order. At larger diquark-to-scalar coupling ratio GD/GS, where the 2SC phase is preferred, we see hints of the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit at a very large value of the magnetic field (B˜1019G), but this limit is strongly affected by Shubnikov de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of the gap, indicating the transition to a domain-like state.

  12. Two-dimensional Fermi surfaces in Kondo insulating SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang

    There has been renewed interest in Samarium Hexaboride, which is a strongly correlated heavy Fermion material. Hybridization between itinerant electrons and localized orbitals lead to an opening of charge gap at low temperature. However, the resistivity of SmB6 does not diverge at low temperature. Former studies suggested that this residual conductance is contributed by various origins. Recent theoretical developments suggest that the particular symmetry of energy bands of SmB6 may host a topologically non-trivial surface state, i.e., a topological Kondo insulator. To probe the Fermiology of the possible metallic surface state, we use sensitive torque magnetometry to detect the de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) effect due to Landau level quantization on flux-grown crystals, down to He-3 temperature and up to 45 Tesla. Our angular and temperature dependent data suggest two-dimensional Fermi Surfaces lie in both crystalline (001) and (101) surface planes of SmB6.

  13. Pressure dependence of the Fermi surface of hcp Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, J. E.; Beaudry, B. J.; Jepsen, O.

    1981-06-01

    The pressure dependence of Fermi-surface cross sections for principal symmetry directions has been investigated using solid He pressure generation techniques. Careful searches for de Haas-van Alphen signals were conducted from 2 to 9 kbar in both virgin fcc crystals and samples transformed from hcp to fcc. No sign of the frequency reported by Ribault was detected. Results are discussed in terms of theoretically calculated pressure-induced changes in the band structure and Fermi surface of the hcp phase of Yb.

  14. Anomalous hysteresis as evidence for a magnetic-field-induced chiral superconducting state in LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Urbano, R. R.; Goswami, P.; Tarantini, C.; Lv, B.; Kuhns, P.; Reyes, A. P.; Chu, C. W.; Balicas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetometry measurements in high-quality LiFeAs single crystals reveal a change in the sign of the magnetic hysteresis in the vicinity of the upper critical field Hc2, from a clear diamagnetic response dominated by the pinning of vortices to a considerably smaller net hysteretic response of opposite sign, which disappears at Hc2. If the diamagnetic response at high fields results from pinned vortices and associated screening supercurrents, this sign change must result from currents circulating in the opposite sense, which give rise to a small field-dependent magnetic moment below Hc2. This behavior seems to be extremely sensitive to the sample quality or stoichiometry, as we have observed it only in a few fresh crystals, which also display the de Haas van Alphen effect. We provide arguments against the surface superconductivity, the flux compression, and the random π junction scenarios, which have been previously put forward to explain a paramagnetic Meissner effect, below the lower critical field Hc1. The observed anomalous hysteresis at high fields will be compatible with the existence of chiral gap wave functions, which possess a field-dependent magnetic moment. Within a Landau-Ginzburg framework, we demonstrate how a (dx2-y2+idxy) or a (px+ipy) chiral superconducting component can be stabilized in the mixed state of s± superconductor, due to the combined effects of the magnetic field and the presence of competing pairing channels. The realization of a particular chiral pairing depends on the microscopic details of the strengths of the competing pairing channels.

  15. Superconducting properties of K1-xNaxFe2As2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, V.; Schottenhamel, W.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Efremov, D. V.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Aswartham, S.; Kumar, M.; Wurmehl, S.; Roslova, M.; Morozov, I. V.; Holzapfel, B.; Büchner, B.; Ahrens, E.; Troyanov, S. I.; Köhler, S.; Gati, E.; Knöner, S.; Hoang, N. H.; Lang, M.; Ricci, F.; Profeta, G.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure and partial Na substitution on the normal-state properties and the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of K1-xNaxFe2As2 single crystals were investigated. It was found that a partial Na substitution leads to a deviation from the standard T2 Fermi-liquid behavior in the temperature dependence of the normal-state resistivity. It was demonstrated that non-Fermi-liquid like behavior of the resistivity for K1-xNaxFe2As2 and some KFe2As2 samples can be explained by a disorder effect in the multiband system with rather different quasiparticle effective masses. Concerning the superconducting state our data support the presence of a shallow minimum around 2 GPa in the pressure dependence of Tc for stoichiometric KFe2As2. The analysis of Tc in K1-xNaxFe2As2 at pressures below 1.5 GPa showed that the reduction of Tc with Na substitution follows the Abrikosov-Gor'kov law with the critical temperature Tc0 of the clean system (without pair breaking), which linearly depends on the pressure. Our observations also suggest that Tc of K1-xNaxFe2As2 is nearly independent of the lattice compression produced by the Na substitution. Further, we theoretically analyzed the behavior of the band structure under pressure within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). A qualitative agreement between the calculated and the recently measured—in de Haas-van Alphen experiments [T. Terashima et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 134520 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.134520]—pressure dependencies of the Fermi-surface cross sections has been found. These calculations also indicate that the observed minimum around 2 GPa in the pressure dependence of Tc may occur without a change of the pairing symmetry.

  16. Large Cyclotron Mass and Large Ordered Moment in Ferromagnet CoS2 Compared with Paramagnet CoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Atsushi; Suzuki, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai; Honda, Fuminori; Nakamura, Ai; Nakashima, Miho; Amako, Yasushi; Harima, Hisatomo; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    We succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of the pyrite-type cubic compounds CoSe2 and CoS2 using the transport agent CoBr2 and measured the electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect. We confirmed that CoSe2 is an exchange-enhanced paramagnet revealing a broad maximum at around 50 K in the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility. The electronic specific heat coefficient is moderately large, γ = 18 mJ/(K2·mol). On the other hand, CoS2 is a ferromagnet with a Curie temperature TC = 122 K and an ordered moment μs = 0.93 μB/Co. The γ of 21 mJ/(K2·mol) of CoS2 is slightly larger than that of CoSe2. A large ordered moment, together with a large γ, is characteristic of CoS2 because CoS2 is a half-metallic spin state in the ferromagnetic state. Correspondingly, we detected a main dHvA branch with a large cyclotron effective mass of 13m0 in the dHvA experiments. The detected dHvA branches in CoS2 and CoSe2 are discussed on the basis of the results of energy band calculations, revealing a broken fourfold symmetry in the angular dependence of the dHvA frequency.

  17. Magnetic and Fermi Surface Properties of EuGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ai; Hiranaka, Yuichi; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Miura, Yasunao; Tsutsumi, Hiroki; Mori, Akinobu; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Mitamura, Katsuya; Hirose, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Kiyohiro; Honda, Fuminori; Settai, Rikio; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Harima, Hisatomo; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2013-10-01

    We grew a high-quality single crystal EuGa4 with the tetragonal structure by the Ga self-flux method, and measured the electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, high-field magnetization, specific heat, thermoelectric power and de Haas--van Alphen (dHvA) effect, together with the electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power under pressure. EuGa4 is found to be a Eu-divalent compound without anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility in the paramagnetic state and to reveal the same magnetization curve between H \\parallel [100] and [001] in the antiferromagnetic state, where the antiferromagnetic easy-axis is oriented along the [100] direction below a Néel temperature TN=16.5 K. The magnetization curve is discussed on the basis of a simple two-sublattice model. The Fermi surface in the paramagnetic state was clarified from the results of a dHvA experiment for EuGa4 and an energy band calculation for a non-4f reference compound SrGa4, which consists of a small ellipsoidal hole--Fermi surface and a compensated cube-like electron--Fermi surface with vacant space in center. We observed an anomaly in the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power at TCDW=150 K under 2 GPa. This might correspond to an emergence of the charge density wave (CDW). The similar phenomenon was also observed in EuAl4 at ambient pressure. We discussed the CDW phenomenon on the basis of the present peculiar Fermi surfaces.

  18. Anisotropic hydrodynamics, bulk viscosities, and r-modes of strange quark stars with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xuguang; Huang Mei; Rischke, Dirk H.; Sedrakian, Armen

    2010-02-15

    In strong magnetic fields the transport coefficients of strange quark matter become anisotropic. We determine the general form of the complete set of transport coefficients in the presence of a strong magnetic field. By using a local linear response method, we calculate explicitly the bulk viscosities {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} transverse and parallel to the B field, respectively, which arise due to the nonleptonic weak processes u+s{r_reversible}u+d. We find that for magnetic fields B<10{sup 17} G, the dependence of {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} on the field is weak, and they can be approximated by the bulk viscosity for the zero magnetic field. For fields B>10{sup 18} G, the dependence of both {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} on the field is strong, and they exhibit de Haas-van Alphen-type oscillations. With increasing magnetic field, the amplitude of these oscillations increases, which eventually leads to negative {zeta}{sub perpendicular} in some regions of parameter space. We show that the change of sign of {zeta}{sub perpendicular} signals a hydrodynamic instability. As an application, we discuss the effects of the new bulk viscosities on the r-mode instability in rotating strange quark stars. We find that the instability region in strange quark stars is affected when the magnetic fields exceed the value B=10{sup 17} G. For fields which are larger by an order of magnitude, the instability region is significantly enlarged, making magnetized strange stars more susceptible to r-mode instability than their unmagnetized counterparts.

  19. Low Temperature Physics at Yale in the late 30's through the early 50's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert

    2006-03-01

    The low temperature program at Yale was initiated by C. T. Lane (1904-1991) in the fall of 1937 when he was appointed to the teaching staff as an instructor in the department of Physics. Following his doctorate from McGill in 1929 he investigated the magnetic susceptibilities of ``soft'' metals supported by the National Research Council of Canada, the Commissioners of the 1851 Exhibition and a Sterling Fellowship at Yale. Arranged by Louis McKeehan, with 5000 from the new George Sheffield research fund, he started the construction of a Kapitza type helium liquefier. The machine was largely completed in the fall of 1939, yet liquid helium was not made until early December 1940 due to the need for extensive on line purification of the gas. Returning in 1945 from war research, Lane and Henry A. Fairbank (Ph.D 1944) continued the metals work along with new thrusts into Second Sound , properties of helium^ three impurities in liquid helium and starting in the 50's on rotating He II. In 1933 both Lane and Onsager were awarded Sterling Fellowships, which initiated a stimulating experimental- theoretical exchange continuing until they both retired. The best-known example was the rediscovery at Yale of the deHaas-van Alphen effect, previously observed only in bismuth, in zinc; where upon Onsager and his students provided new insights into our understanding of the Fermi surface of metals. With the development of new instrumentation one observed vast changes in experimental style during this period. The evolution of the production of liquid helium from Lane's device though the Collins machine to the commodity business of today now makes experiments of huge size and importance possible.

  20. Entropy and Fermi surface considerations in the nematic phase of Sr3Ru2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    The layered perovskite metal Sr3Ru2O7 has generated interest because of the discovery of nematic-like electrical transport properties at low temperatures [1]. The unusual properties are seen in the vicinity of a metamagnetic quantum critical point. They appear to be the result of the formation of a new phase, which can be observed only in the highest purity single crystals, with mean free paths of several thousand angstroms. Recently, my group has concentrated on understanding this phase and determining its boundaries using thermodynamic probes. In this talk I will review the physics that we believe underlies our observations, and then report on the recent progress, showing how measurements of the specific heat and magneto-caloric effect enable the determination of a complete ``entropy landscape'' of phase formation in the vicinity of a quantum critical point [2]. I will also discuss the discovery of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations within the putative electronic nematic phase [3]. [4pt] [1] R.A. Borzi, S.A. Grigera, J. Farrell, R.S. Perry, S. Lister, S.L. Lee, D.A. Tennant, Y. Maeno & A.P. Mackenzie, Science 315, 214 (2007). [0pt] [2] A.W. Rost, R.S. Perry, J.F. Mercure, A.P. Mackenzie & S.A. Grigera, Science 325, 1360 (2009). [0pt] [3] J.-F. Mercure, S. K. Goh, E. C. T. O'Farrell, R. S. Perry, M. L. Sutherland, A. Rost, S. A. Grigera, R. A. Borzi, P. Gegenwart and A. P. Mackenzie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 176401 (2009).

  1. Fermi Surface and Van Hove Singularities in the Itinerant Metamagnet Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7)

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, A.; Allan, M.P.; Mercure, J.F.; Meevasana, W.; Dunkel, R.; Lu, D.H.; Perry, R.S.; Mackenzie, A.P.; Singh, D.J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Baumberger, F.; /Scottish U. Research Reactor Ctr. /St. Andrews U.

    2011-01-04

    The low-energy electronic structure of the itinerant metamagnet Sr{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} is investigated by angle resolved photoemission and density functional calculations. We find well-defined quasiparticle bands with resolution limited line widths and Fermi velocities up to an order of magnitude lower than in single layer Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. The complete topography, the cyclotron masses and the orbital character of the Fermi surface are determined, in agreement with bulk sensitive de Haas - van Alphen measurements. An analysis of the dxy band dispersion reveals a complex density of states with van Hove singularities (vHs) near the Fermi level; a situation which is favorable for magnetic instabilities.

  2. First-principle calculations of the Berry curvature of Bloch states for charge and spin transport of electrons.

    PubMed

    Gradhand, M; Fedorov, D V; Pientka, F; Zahn, P; Mertig, I; Györffy, B L

    2012-05-30

    Recent progress in wave packet dynamics based on the insight of Berry pertaining to adiabatic evolution of quantum systems has led to the need for a new property of a Bloch state, the Berry curvature, to be calculated from first principles. We report here on the response to this challenge by the ab initio community during the past decade. First we give a tutorial introduction of the conceptual developments we mentioned above. Then we describe four methodologies which have been developed for first-principle calculations of the Berry curvature. Finally, to illustrate the significance of the new developments, we report some results of calculations of interesting physical properties such as the anomalous and spin Hall conductivity as well as the anomalous Nernst conductivity and discuss the influence of the Berry curvature on the de Haas-van Alphen oscillation. PMID:22575767

  3. Phase diagram of CeRh2Si2 under pressure studied by thermopower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio-Morales, A.; Pourret, A.; Knebel, G.; Aoki, D.; Braithwaite; Flouquet, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report the evolution of thermoelectric power under hydrostatic pressure up to 17 kbar and at low temperature in the heavy fermion compound CeRh2Si2. These measurements were performed using a thermoelectric setup specially designed for piston cylinder pressure cells. The suppression of the antiferromagnetic order (AF) into a paramagnetic order (PM) state was studied and the (T, P) phase diagram was precisely obtained. The different magnetic transitions at low temperature as a function of pressure, AF1-AF2 transition at P'c and AF1-PM transition at Pc, show significant changes in the thermoelectric signal. This support reconstructions of the Fermi surface in agreement with previous de Haas van Alphen experiments.

  4. Specific features of quantum oscillations of magnetization in quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnetic semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzebisashvili, D. M.; Khudaiberdyev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The specific features of quantum oscillations of the magnetization in quasi-two-dimensional wide-band-gap antiferromagnetic semimetals with a low concentration of charge carriers have been considered theoretically. It has been shown that, in these systems, the Fermi energy determined from the analysis of the frequency of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations according to the standard procedure can differ significantly from the true value. For the correct determination of the Fermi energy in the canted phase, it has been proposed to analyze quantum oscillations of the magnetization M not as a function of the inverse magnetic field 1/ H, but as a function of 1/cosγ, where the angle γ characterizes the inclination angle of the magnetic field with respect to the plane of the quasi-two-dimensional semimetal.

  5. Normal-state and superconducting properties of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, Y.; Nishizaki, S.; Yoshida, K.

    1996-12-01

    The authors discuss some of the current issues on the copper-free layered perovskite superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, for which a sharp transition at T{sub c} = 1.2 K has been reproducibly obtained. The normal state is characterized as an essentially two-dimensional Fermi liquid, and the coherent interlayer transport is established only at low temperatures. The cylindrical Fermi surface observed by de Haas-van Alphen experiments is consistent with other thermodynamic and transport properties. Although the specific heat jump across T{sub c} confirms the bulk superconductivity, the large residual T-linear term which correlates with the variation in T{sub c} is unusual and suggestive of unconventional pairing.

  6. Thermoelectric power quantum oscillations in the ferromagnet UGe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio Morales, A.; Pourret, A.; Knebel, G.; Bastien, G.; Taufour, V.; Aoki, D.; Yamagami, H.; Flouquet, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present thermoelectric power and resistivity measurements in the ferromagnet UGe2 as a function of temperature and magnetic field. At low temperature, huge quantum oscillations are observed in the thermoelectric power as a function of the magnetic field applied along the a axis. The frequencies of the extreme orbits are determined and an analysis of the cyclotron masses is performed following different theoretical approaches for quantum oscillations detected in the thermoelectric power. They are compared to those obtained by Shubnikov-de Haas experiments on the same crystal and previous de Haas-van Alphen experiments. The agreement of the different probes confirms thermoelectric power as an excellent probe to extract simultaneously both microscopic and macroscopic information on the Fermi surface properties. Band structure calculations of UGe2 in the ferromagnetic state are compared to the experiment.

  7. Landau quantization and spin-momentum locking in topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2016-05-01

    SmB6 has been predicted to be a strong topological Kondo insulator and experimentally it has been confirmed that at low temperatures the electrical conductivity only takes place at the surfaces of the crystal. Quantum oscillations and ARPES measurements revealed several Dirac cones on the (001) and (101) surfaces of the crystal. We considered three types of surface Dirac cones with an additional parabolic dispersion and studied their Landau quantization and the expectation value of the spin of the electrons. The Landau quantization is quite similar in all three cases and would give rise to very similar de Haas-van Alphen oscillations. The spin-momentum locking, on the other hand, differs dramatically. Without the additional parabolic dispersion the spins are locked in the plane of the surface. The parabolic dispersion, however, produces a gradual canting of the spins out of the surface plane.

  8. Split Fermi Surface Properties in Ullmannite NiSbS and PdBiSe with the Cubic Chiral Crystal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakihana, Masashi; Teruya, Atsushi; Nishimura, Kengo; Nakamura, Ai; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Haga, Yoshinori; Harima, Hisatomo; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2015-09-01

    We grew single crystals of ullmannite NiSbS and PbBiSe with the cubic chiral structure and carried out electrical resistivity, specific heat, and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments to clarify their Fermi surface properties. The Fermi surfaces were found to split into two, reflecting the non-centrosymmetric crystal structure. The splitting energies between the two nearly spherical electron Fermi surfaces named α and α' were determined as 220 K in NiSbS and 1050 K in PdBiSe for H || [100] or [001]. This difference in splitting energies between the two compounds originates mainly from the fact that the spin-orbit interactions of Ni-3d, Sb-5p, and S-3p electrons in NiSbS are smaller in magnitude than those of Pd-4d, Bi-6p, and Se-4p electrons in PdBiSe, respectively.

  9. A brief update of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a correlated electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.

    2010-02-24

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the capabilities of state-of-the-art angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the field of experimental condensed matter physics. Due to the advancement of the detector technology and the high flux light sources, ARPES has become a powerful tool to study the low energy excitations of solids, especially those novel quantum materials in which many-body physics are at play. To benchmark today's state-of-the-art ARPES technique, we demonstrate that the precision of today's ARPES has advanced to a regime comparable to the bulk-sensitive de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements. Finally, as an example of new discoveries driven by the advancement of the ARPES technique, we summarize some of our recent ARPES measurements on underdoped high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprates, which have provided further insight into the complex pseudogap problem.

  10. Field-Induced Metal-Insulator Transition in a Two-Dimensional Organic Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.; Wanka, S.; Hagel, J.; Lo''hneysen, H. v.; Qualls, J. S.; Brooks, J. S.; Balthes, E.; Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Mohtasham, J.

    2001-01-15

    The quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {beta}''-( BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5} CH{sub 2}CF {sub 2}SO{sub 3} (T{sub c}{approx}4.4 K) shows very strong Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) oscillations which are superimposed on a highly anomalous steady background magnetoresistance, R{sub b} . Comparison with de Haas--van Alphen oscillations allows a reliable estimate of R{sub b} which is crucial for the correct extraction of the SdH signal. At low temperatures and high magnetic fields insulating behavior evolves. The magnetoresistance data violate Kohler's rule, i.e., cannot be described within the framework of semiclassical transport theory, but converge onto a universal curve appropriate for dynamical scaling at a metal-insulator transition.

  11. Crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase in Fe-doped Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Na Hyun; Lee, Kyujoon; Kim, Jinsu; Jang, Jungwon; Kim, Jinhee; Jung, Myung-Hwa

    2014-06-01

    In Fe-doped Bi2Te3, we have observed higher mobility, larger linear magnetoresistance, and anomalous quantum oscillations. The angle dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations gives two different periodicities depending on the angle from the c-axis. The low-angle SdH period is identified with a surface origin, while the high-angle period is against the surface origin. The high-angle SdH period well agrees with the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) period with a bulk origin. The physical parameters obtained from the quantum oscillations support the crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase by Fe doping in Bi2Te3.

  12. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  13. Hole Fermi surface in Bi2Se3 probed by quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, B. A.; Desrat, W.; Maude, D. K.; Orlita, M.; Potemski, M.; Martinez, G.; Hor, Y. S.

    2016-04-01

    Transport and torque magnetometry measurements are performed at high magnetic fields and low temperatures in a series of p-type (Ca-doped) Bi2Se3 crystals. The angular dependence of the Shubnikov-de Haas and de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillations enables us to determine the Fermi surface of the bulk valence band states as a function of the carrier density. At low density, the angular dependence exhibits a downturn in the oscillations frequency between 0∘ and 90∘, reflecting a bag-shaped hole Fermi surface. The detection of a single frequency for all tilt angles rules out the existence of a Fermi surface with different extremal cross sections down to 24 meV. There is therefore no signature of a camelback in the valence band of our bulk samples, in accordance with the direct band gap predicted by G W calculations.

  14. Crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase in Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Na Hyun; Lee, Kyujoon; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Jinsu; Jang, Jungwon; Kim, Jinhee

    2014-06-23

    In Fe-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, we have observed higher mobility, larger linear magnetoresistance, and anomalous quantum oscillations. The angle dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations gives two different periodicities depending on the angle from the c-axis. The low-angle SdH period is identified with a surface origin, while the high-angle period is against the surface origin. The high-angle SdH period well agrees with the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) period with a bulk origin. The physical parameters obtained from the quantum oscillations support the crossover between two-dimensional surface state and three-dimensional bulk phase by Fe doping in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  15. Determination of surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    ), and the presence of contaminants, all of which are averaged over when probed in photoemission studies. The quasi two-dimensional USb{sub 2} has a layered tetragonal structure that is easily cleaved and has been extensively studied by a number of different techniques, such as resistivity, Hall effect measurements, photoemission and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen, neutron diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and U{sup 238} Mossbauer spectroscopy techniques. Here, we provide local information about the surfaces of this interesting compound, which we find to contain a high density of defects.

  16. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    , all of which are averaged over when probed in photoemission studies. The quasi two-dimensional USb{sub 2} has a layered tetragonal structure that is easily cleaved and has been extensively studied by a number of different techniques, such as resistivity, Hall effect measurements, photoemission and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen, neutron diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and U{sup 238} Mossbauer spectroscopy techniques. Here, we provide local information about the surfaces of this interesting compound, which we find to contain a high density of defects.

  17. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect in size-quantized diamagnetic film

    SciTech Connect

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate the oscillating magnetocaloric effect on a size-quantized diamagnetic film in a transverse magnetic field. We obtain the analytical expression for the thermodynamic potential in case of the arbitrary spectrum of carriers. The entropy change is shown to be the oscillating function of the magnetic field and the film thickness. The nature of this effect is the same as for the de Haas–van Alphen effect. The magnetic part of entropy has a maximal value at some temperature. Such behavior of the entropy is not observed in magneto-ordered materials. We discuss the nature of unusual behavior of the magnetic entropy. We compare our results with the data obtained for 2D and 3D cases.

  18. Zeeman effect of the topological surface states revealed by quantum oscillations up to 91 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Wei, Wei; Yang, Fangyuan; Zhu, Zengwei; Guo, Minghua; Feng, Yang; Yu, Dejing; Yao, Mengyu; Harrison, Neil; McDonald, Ross; Zhang, Yuanbo; Guan, Dandan; Qian, Dong; Jia, Jinfeng; Wang, Yayu

    2015-12-01

    We report quantum oscillation studies on the B i2T e3 -xSx topological insulator single crystals in pulsed magnetic fields up to 91 T. For the x =0.4 sample with the lowest bulk carrier density, the surface and bulk quantum oscillations can be disentangled by combined Shubnikov-de Haas and de Hass-van Alphen oscillations, as well as quantum oscillations in nanometer-thick peeled crystals. At high magnetic fields beyond the bulk quantum limit, our results suggest that the zeroth Landau level of topological surface states is shifted due to the Zeeman effect. The g factor of the topological surface states is estimated to be between 1.8 and 4.5. These observations shed new light on the quantum transport phenomena of topological insulators in ultrahigh magnetic fields.

  19. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  20. Magnetic and Fermi Surface Properties of Ferromagnets EuPd2 and EuPt2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ai; Akamine, Hiromu; Ashitomi, Yousuke; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Tatetsu, Yasutomi; Maehira, Takahiro; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-08-01

    We succeeded in growing single crystals of the ferromagnets EuPd2 and EuPt2 with the Laves-type cubic structure by the Bridgman method, namely, heating constituting materials in a Mo crucible up to a high temperature of about 1500 °C. The ferromagnetic properties of EuPd2 and EuPt2 with Curie temperatures of 74 and 100 K, respectively, were confirmed from the results of electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements. The ordered moment is 7 μB/Eu, revealing the Eu-divalent ferromagnetism. The present Eu-divalent electronic state is found to be robust against high pressures of up to 8 GPa and is not changed into the Eu-trivalent state. We also carried out de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments for EuPd2. The detected dHvA branches in EuPd2 are well explained by the relativistic linearized augmented plane wave (RLAPW) energy band calculations for SrPd2, revealing a closed hole Fermi surface and compensated four closed electron Fermi surfaces.

  1. Evidence of Topological Nodal-Line Fermions in ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jin; Tang, Zhijie; Liu, Jinyu; Liu, Xue; Zhu, Yanglin; Graf, David; Myhro, Kevin; Tran, Son; Lau, Chun Ning; Wei, Jiang; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2016-07-01

    A Dirac nodal-line semimetal phase, which represents a new quantum state of topological materials, has been experimentally realized only in a few systems, including PbTaSe2 , PtSn4 , and ZrSiS. In this Letter, we report evidence of nodal-line fermions in ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe probed in de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillations. Although ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe share a similar layered structure with ZrSiS, our studies show the Fermi surface (FS) enclosing a Dirac nodal line has a 2D character in ZrSiTe, in contrast with 3D-like FS in ZrSiSe and ZrSiS. Another important property revealed in our experiment is that the nodal-line fermion density in this family of materials (˜1020 cm-3 ) is much higher than the Dirac fermion density of other topological materials with discrete nodes. In addition, we have demonstrated ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe single crystals can be thinned down to 2D atomic thin layers through microexfoliation, which offers the first platform to explore exotic properties of topological nodal-line fermions in low dimensions.

  2. Unusual magnetic quantum oscillations in organic metals at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.; Wanka, S.; Hagel, J.; Qualls, J. S.; Brooks, J. S.; Balthes, E.; Schweitzer, D.; Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.

    2000-04-04

    The authors report on Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) results for the highly two-dimensional (2D) organic superconductors {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} ({Tc} = 3.5 K) and {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} ({Tc} = 4.4 K). The SdH oscillations of both materials show an apparent deviation from the well-understood 2D dHvA signal at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. For {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, the mechanism leading to this behavior still needs to be clarified. For {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, an anomalous steady background part of the magnetoresistance seems to account for the observed discrepancies.

  3. Fermiology of the organic superconductor {beta}''-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Wosnitza, J.

    1998-07-29

    We present a detailed Fermi-surface (FS) investigation of the quasi two-dimensional (2D) organic superconductor (T{sub c} {approx} 4.5 K) {beta}{double_prime}(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. In line with previous investigations, de Haas-van Alphen measurements in pulsed fields up to 60 T show a single oscillation frequency, F{sub 0} = 200 T, which corresponds to a FS size of about 5% of the first Brillouin zone. Angular dependent magnetoresistance oscillations (AMROs) are utilized for the exact determination of the in-plane FS, which is found to be a strongly elongated ellipsoid with an axes ratio of about 1:9. Transport measurements in static fields up to 33 T show an unusual temperature dependence of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) signal, i.e., a decrease of the SdH amplitude with decreasing temperature.

  4. Heavy fermions, quantum criticality, and unconventional superconductivity in filled skutterudites and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Bohdan

    2015-05-14

    The main goal of this program was to explore the possibility of novel states and behaviors in Pr-based system exhibiting quantum critical behavior, PrOs₄Sb₁₂. Upon small changes of external parameter, such as magnetic field, physical properties of PrOs₄Sb₁₂ are drastically altered from those corresponding to a superconductor, to heavy fermion, to field-induced ordered phase with primary quadrupolar order parameter. All these states are highly unconventional and not understood in terms of current theories thus offer an opportunity to expand our knowledge and understanding of condensed matter. At the same time, these novel states and behaviors are subjects to intense international controversies. In particular, two superconducting phases with different transition temperatures were observed in some samples and not observed in others leading to speculations that sample defects might be partially responsible for these exotic behaviors. This work clearly established that crystal disorder is important consideration, but contrary to current consensus this disorder suppresses exotic behavior. Superconducting properties imply unconventional inhomogeneous state that emerges from unconventional homogeneous normal state. Comprehensive structural investigations demonstrated that upper superconducting transition is intrinsic, bulk, and unconventional. The high quality of in-house synthesized single crystals was indirectly confirmed by de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillation measurements. These measurements, for the first time ever reported, spanned several different phases, offering unprecedented possibility of studying quantum oscillations across phase boundaries.

  5. Superconducting and Fermi Surface Properties of Single Crystal Zr2Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Atsushi; Kakihana, Masashi; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Aoki, Dai; Honda, Fuminori; Nakamura, Ai; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Harima, Hisatomo; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-03-01

    We succeeded in growing single crystals of a superconductor Zr2Co with the tetragonal structure by the Bridgman method and carried out electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments. Superconductivity is a characteristic revealing that the electronic specific heat at 1.45 K in the form of Ce/T in the superconducting state increases not linearly but as a function of √{H} up to a magnetic field close to the upper critical field Hc2 = 11 kOe. The superconducting transition temperature Tsc is found to increase markedly with increasing pressure from Tsc = 5.2 K at ambient pressure to 9.5 K at 8 GPa. From the dHvA experiment, several kinds of dHvA branches are detected, which are well explained by the results of the energy band calculation. The main conduction electrons are Zr-4d and Co-3d electrons.

  6. Direct, experimental evidence of the Fermi surface in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi, H.; Kaiser, J.H.; Rayner, S.L.; West, R.N. ); Liu, J.Z.; Shelton, R. ); Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Solal, F.; Fluss, M.J. )

    1991-04-29

    We report new measurements of the electron-positron momentum spectra of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} performed with ultra-high statistical precision. These data differ from previous results in two significant respects: They show the D{sub 2} symmetry appropriate for untwinned crystals and, more importantly, they show unmistakable, statistically significant, discontinuities that are evidence of a major Fermi surface section. These results provide a partial answer to a question of special significance to the study of high temperature superconductors i.e. the distribution of the electrons in the material, the electronic structure. Special consideration has been given both experimentally and theoretically to the existence and shape of a Fermi surface in the materials and to the superconducting gap. There are only three experimental techniques that can provide details of the electronic structure at useful resolutions. They are angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation, ACAR, angle resolved photo emission, PE, and de Haas van Alphen measurements. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  7. The Magnetic Ordering of Heavy Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordström, Lars

    1998-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic structures of the rare earth metals with hcp structure (Gd--Tm) are calculated by a full-potential LAPW method, which allows for non-collinear magnetism within the local approximation to spin-density functional theory. The 4f electrons are taken as localized, but their spin moment constrained as to fulfil Russel-Saunders coupling, polarizes the itinerant valence electrons. It is found that there are two competing magnetic structures; the ferromagnetic state, which dominates for the left-most elements (Gd and Tb), and a planar helical wave, which is found to have lowest energy for the last elements Er and Tm. In Ho the competition between the two leads to a compromise --- a helical cone. This trend is in accordance with the experimental situation. The mechanism behind the stabilization of the helical wave is confirmed to be an opening of a partial gap at the so-called ``webbing'' of the Fermi surface. This feature is found to exhibit nesting, a fact which is known both from earlier non-spin-polarized calculations and de Haas-van Alphen measurements. In contrast to prevailing models and earlier more primitive calculations, this nesting is found to exist for all elements, i.e. even for gadolinium. Instead, the magnitude of the spin splitting of the valence electrons due to the magnetic 4f states, is found to be an important quantity which has been missed out in the standard models for the magnetic structure of the rare earths.

  8. Fermi Surface of Donor and Acceptor Graphite Intercalation Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guonan

    The Fermi surfaces and the electronic properties of the donor-type stage-1 C_8K and stage-2 C_{24}K, as well as the acceptor-type stage-2 BiCl_3, stage-3 HgCl_2 and stage-3 SbF _5 graphite intercalation compounds were investigated by means of the de Haas-van Alphen effect. The dHvA spectra of the stage-1 C_8 K exhibit two dHvA frequencies, 3126 T and 4250 T. The corresponding effective masses were 0.86 m _0 and 0.92 m_0, respectively. The angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies for a direction within +/-18^circ of the c-axis showed that there are both three-dimensional and two dimensional parts of the Fermi surfaces in C _8K. The three-dimensional Fermi surface has a cross-sectional area corresponding to the dHvA frequency of 3126 T. The charge transfer per potassium atom measured from the dHvA effect is 0.97. This implies that the potassium is ionized completely. These dHvA experimental results support both the Tatar and Rabii model and the revised Ohno, Nakao and Kamimura model for C_8K. Two dominant dHvA frequencies were obtained in stage-2 C_{24}K. They are 286 T and 2570 T, respectively. The predictions of Blinowski's model are in agreement with the experimental data. The charge transfer per potassium is found to be 0.88. This suggests that the potassium s-band is above the Fermi level in C_{24}K. The dHvA measurements for the acceptor compounds show that the stage-2 BiCl_3 GIC had two dHvA frequencies, 327T and 1012T, and each stage -3 compound had three dominant frequencies. They are 121T, 523T and 664T for HgCl_2, and 172T, 656T and 852T for SbF_5. The cyclotron masses corresponding to the dHvA frequencies for these compounds were measured from the temperature dependence of the dHvA amplitudes. The theoretical predictions of the dHvA frequencies and the cyclotron masses from the Blinowski's band models for stage-2 and stage-3 compounds are in agreement with the experimental results. The angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies show that the Fermi

  9. Shell structure and classical orbits in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kaori

    understanding of these phenomena, we apply a recently developed trace formula for broken symmetry to this system. The system of quantum dots is more interesting than metal clusters in that its size can be much larger and the effect of magnetic fields on the electronic shell structure is observable for readily available field strengths. We examine the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of a circular quantum dot with the two limiting cases of mean-field potential for a small and large number of confined electrons. The shell structure rejected in these magnetic properties are compared in the two cases and are interpreted through short classical orbits. In particular, the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations that appear in the strong-field limit, superimposed on the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the magnetization, are explained in terms of the shortest orbits that go along the edge of the system.

  10. Fermi surface and magnetic structure of rare-earth-Ga3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasini, Maurizio; Kontrym-Sznajd, Grazyna; Ferro, Gianclaudio; Czopnik, Andrzej

    2002-03-01

    The measurement of the 2-dimensional angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), providing a 2D projection of the two-photon electron-positron momentum density, ρ(p), is a powerful tool to investigate the electronic structure of intermetallic compounds. Utilising tomographic reconstruction techniques (G Kontrym-Sznajd et al Mat. Scie. Forum 255-257) 754 (1997) and references therein., the experiment has the unique ability to sample the Brillouin Zone of truly 3-dimensional systems in a cartesian mesh, thus determining their Fermi surface (FS). Our studies have addressed the commensurate and incommensurate antiferromagnetic structures of TmGa3 and ErGa_3, respectively. For both compounds the FSs resulting from the 2D-ACAR experiments are in fair agreement with de Haas van Alphen measurements and with band structure calculations which constrain the 4f electrons to retain a local atomic character (M Biasini at al Phys. Rev. Lett 86), 4616, (2001).. Nevertheless, we discover different nesting features along the [110] directions which can account for the magnetic structures of the two compounds. Moreover, we propose methods to estimate the density of states at the Fermi energy (E_F) and the electronic contribution to the specific heat, γ. We obtain N(E_F)=17 states/ (Ryd cell), γ=2.8 (mJ/mole K^2) and N(E_F)=16 states/ (Ryd cell), γ=2.7 (mJ/mole K^2) for TmGa3 and ErGa_3, respectively.

  11. Skutterudites under pressure: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Swetarekha; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-03-07

    Ab initio results on the band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface (FS) properties of LaRu{sub 4}X{sub 12} (X = P, As, Sb) are presented at ambient pressure as well as under compression. The analysis of density of states reveals the major contribution at the Fermi level to be mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. We have a complicated Fermi surface with both electron and hole characters for all the three compounds which is derived mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. There is also a simpler FS with hole character derived from the P-p{sub z} orbital for LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} and Ru-d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital in the case of As and Sb containing compounds. More interestingly, Fermi surface nesting feature is observed only in the case of the LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12}. Under compression, we observe the topology of the complicated FS sheet of LaRu{sub 4}As{sub 12} to change around V/V{sub 0} = 0.85, leading to a behaviour similar to that of a multiband superconductor, and in addition, we have two more hole pockets centered around Γ at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 for the same compound. Apart from this, we find the hole pocket to vanish at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 in the case of LaRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and the opening of the complicated FS sheet gets reduced. The de Haas van Alphen calculation shows the number of extremal orbits in the complicated sheet to change in As and Sb containing compounds under compression, where we also observe the FS topology to change.

  12. Heavy-Fermion Superconductivity in URANIUM-PLATINUM(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putikka, William Oliver

    A phenomenological spin fluctuation model for superconductivity in the heavy-fermion metal UPt _3 is presented. The wavevector dependence of the interaction is assumed to be the same as the wavevector dependent magnetic susceptibility extracted from the neutron scattering experiments of Aeppli, et al. The other input for the calculation is the Fermi surface of UPt _3. Single particle band calculations done for UPt_3 give a Fermi surface which is very anisotropic. Despite the presence of strong correlations in UPt_3 the Fermi surface derived from band calculations is confirmed by the de Haas-van Alphen measurements of Taillefer, et al. However, the calculated band masses are smaller than the observed masses by a factor of 20. UPt_3 can thus be described at low temperatures in its normal state as a Fermi liquid, with very massive quasiparticles. The model considered here for the superconducting state is the pairing of the heavy quasiparticles by means of the spin fluctuation mediated interaction. A phase diagram is derived in terms of two dimensionless parameters giving the relative strength of the local repulsive part of the interaction and the in plane ferromagnetic interaction compared to the nearest neighbor antiferromagnetic interaction. s -, p- and d-wave phases are possible. The symmetry of the gap function favored by this model is the E_ {1g} representation of D_ {rm 6h}. To determine the symmetry of the gap function for this two dimensional representation the fourth order terms in the Ginzburg-Landau free energy are considered. The resulting gap function has a line of nodes in the basal plane and point nodes along the c -axis. A qualitative comparison of calculated properties for UPt_3 with this d-wave gap function to measured properties is given. Emphasis is on the observed power law temperature dependences for many low temperature properties and the difficulties in identifying the nodal structure due to impurity scattering. A discussion of the limitations

  13. Competing order, Fermi surface reconstruction, and quantum oscillations in underdoped high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimov, Ivailo; Goswami, Pallab; Jia, Xun; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2008-10-01

    We consider incommensurate order parameters for electrons on a square lattice which reduce to d -density wave order when the ordering wave vector Q is close to Q0=(π/a,π/a) , a being the lattice spacing and describe the associated charge and current distributions within a single-harmonic approximation that conserves current to lowest order. Such incommensurate orders can arise at the mean-field level in extended Hubbard models, but the main goal here is to explore thoroughly the consequences within a Hartree-Fock approximation. We find that Fermi surface reconstruction in the underdoped regime can correctly capture the phenomenology of the recent quantum oscillation experiments that suggest incommensurate order, in particular the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of the magnetization in high fields and very low temperatures in presumably the mixed state of these superconductors. For 10% hole doping in YBa2Cu3O6+δ , we find in addition to the main frequency around 530 T arising from the electron pocket and a hole frequency at around 1650 T, a new low frequency from a smaller hole pocket at 250 T for which there are some indications that require further investigations. The oscillation corresponding to the electron pocket will be further split due to bilayer coupling, but the splitting is sufficiently small to require more refined measurements. The truly incommensurate d -density wave breaks both time reversal and inversion, but the product of these two symmetry operations is preserved. The resulting Fermi surface splits into spin-up and spin-down sectors that are inversion conjugates. Each of the spin sectors results in a band structure that violates reflection symmetry, which can be determined in spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopies. For those experiments such as the current photoemission experiments or the quantum oscillation measurements that cannot resolve the spin components, the bands will appear to be symmetric because of the equal mixture of

  14. Photoemission studies of classic and novel thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greanya, Viktoria Augusta

    Thermoelectric materials have been studied vigorously since the 1950s. Recent advances in materials synthesis and theory have rejuvinated the field in the last decade. The thermoelectric properties of materials are related to their electronic structure. In addition, many of these materials behave quasi-low-dimensionally, making them ideal candidates for study using angle resolved and angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES and AIPES). We report the first detailed study of the valence band electronic structure of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and CsBi 4Te6 using ARPES and AIPES. Experimental results are compared with local density approximation (LDA) band structure calculations and (when available) with de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas experiments. Bi2Te3 is currently the best room temperature thermoelectric material known. Dispersions of the valence bands were determined using ARPES. A six-fold k-space degeneracy in the valence band maximum is found. The quasi-two-dimensional nature of the electronic structure was demonstrated by the weakly dispersive bands along the Gamma-Z direction. The density of states (DOS) for this material was also studied using AIPES. Spectra were taken at multiple photon energies. Six valence band peaks were found. Good correspondence with the calculated DOS was found. Bi2Se3 is isostructural to Bi2Te 3 but its thermoelectric performance is significantly worse. The valence band dispersions for this material have been determined, as well as the DOS. We find the valence band maximum to be located at Gamma. Ten easily identifiable bands are seen within 4 eV of the Fermi level. The energy bands in the Gamma-Z direction are found to be flatter than those predicted by theory. The APES measurements revealed a total of nine bands, which correspond well to the calculated DOS. CsBi4Te6 is a novel thermoelectric material, recently discovered in the chemistry department of Michigan State University. This material exhibits quasi

  15. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-02-15

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined.

  16. Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 550 Side Effects WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS? WHO GETS SIDE EFFECTS? ... t assume that you will get every side effect that’s listed! Most people have few or only ...

  17. A Poetic Journey: The Transfer and Transformation of German Strategies for Moral Education in Late Eighteenth-Century Dutch Poetry for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlevliet, Sanne; Dekker, Jeroen J. H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular Dutch educational enlightenment authors was Hieronymus van Alphen. His three volumes of "Little Poems for Children" published in 1778 and 1782 were extremely successful, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Inspired by the German poets Christian Felix Weisse and Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann, Van Alphen brought about an…

  18. Thermal Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Sylvia S.; Coutant, Charles C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effect of temperature on the biosphere water, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes the effects of temperature on growth, production, and embryonic and larval development. A list of 401 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. "Further Effects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  20. Thermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Harrelson, M.E.; Talmadge, S.S.; Cravens, J.B.

    1984-06-01

    A literature review is presented of recent studies on the role of temperature effects and change in temperature caused by thermal power plants on aquatic life. Several of these studies involve the use of models that allow testing of hypotheses concerning the effects of temperature on fish and insects. 91 references.

  1. Gauging Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foord, Kathleen A.; Haar, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Books by education experts and speakers at national professional conferences have inspired many school leaders to initiate professional learning communities (PLCs). Sustaining them effectively to raise student achievement is another matter. How can one know whether a PLC is moving toward a desired outcome? Measuring effectiveness requires an…

  2. Effective Schools Require Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Michelle; Davis, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    At long last, scholars and policy makers have come to realize what most school administrators have known for years--that effective schools require both outstanding teachers and strong leaders. Although there is considerable research about the characteristics of effective school leaders and the strategies principals can use to help manage…

  3. Health Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter . Additional information regarding the health effects of climate change and references to supporting literature can be found ... globalchange.gov/engage/activities-products/NCA3/technical-inputs . Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health ...

  4. Physical properties of single crystalline BaSn{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xiao; Budko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2012-01-30

    We present a comprehensive study of the binary intermetallic superconductor, BaSn{sub 5}. High-quality single crystalline BaSn{sub 5} was grown out of a Sn flux. Detailed thermodynamic and transport measurements were performed to study BaSn{sub 5}'s normal and superconducting state properties. This material appears to be a strongly coupled, multiband superconductor. H{sub c2}(T) is almost isotropic. De Haas–van Alphen oscillations were observed and two effective masses were estimated from the FFT spectra. Hydrostatic pressure causes a decrease in the superconducting transition temperature at the rate of ≈−0.053 ± 0.001 K/kbar.

  5. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  6. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2014 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: anaerobic wastewater and sludge treatment, biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, membrane biological treatment, sewage sludge pyrolysis, natural treatment, resource recovery, electrolysis, oxidation and adsorption treatment. PMID:26420108

  7. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  8. Sleeper Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Daphne; Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.

    2007-01-01

    Early experience preserves and refines many capabilities that emerge prenatally. Here we describe another role that it plays--establishing the neural substrate for capabilities that emerge at a much later point in development. The evidence comes from sleeper effects: permanent deficits when early experience was absent in capabilities that normally…

  9. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk

  10. Blazhko Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teays, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The cause of the Blazhko effect, the long-term modulation of the light and radial velocity curves of some RR Lyr stars, is still not understood. The observational characteristics of the Blazhko effect are discussed. Some preliminary results are presented from two recent campaigns to observe RR Lyr, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer along with ground-based spectroscopy and photometry, throughout a pulsation cycle, at a variety of Blazhko phases. A set of ultraviolet light curves have been generated from low dispersion IUE spectra. In addition, the (visual) light curves from IUE's Fine Error Sensor are analyzed using the Fourier decomposition technique. The values of the parameters Psi(sub 21) and R(sub 21) at different Blazhko phases of RR Lyr span the range of values found for non-Blazhko variables of similar period.

  11. Zeeman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The splitting of a spectral line into two, three or more components, that occurs when the source of that line lies within a magnetic field. This phenomenon is named after the Dutch physicist, Pieter Zeeman (1865-1943), who discovered the effect in the laboratory, in 1896. The separation of the components of a line is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and the number of components,...

  12. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  13. Erosion Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater in this THEMIS image is a model illustration to the effects of erosion on Mars. The degraded crater rim and several landslides observed in crater walls is evidence to the mass wasting of materials. Layering in crater walls also suggests the presence of materials that erode at varying rates.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 31.6, Longitude 44.3 East (315.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  14. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings. PMID:22386164

  15. Microbial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lamborg, M.R.; Hardy, R.W.F.; Paul, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    The postulated doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ is not likely to have direct effect on soil microbial activity because during the growing season, the concentration of CO/sub 2/ in the soil atmosphere is already ten to fifty times higher than existing atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Based on all available experimental information, it is estimated that a doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ will cause an increase in primary productivity of 10 to 40% depending on locale. The increase in biomass will, in turn, produce a limitation of available soil nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus. Increased organic carbon together with nitrogen and/or phosphorus limitation will result in a preferential increase in nitrogen fixation and mycorrhizal activities as the expedient means for supplying required nutrients to sustain the predicted increase in primary productivity. Therefore, increased emphasis should be placed on fundamental research related to soil microbiology with special reference to nitrogen-fixing, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria, and to the mycorrhizal fungi. 111 references, 2 figures.

  16. Effective Teaching/Effective Urban Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Dyan; Charner-Laird, Megin; Kirkpatrick, Cheryl L.; Szczesiul, Stacy Agee; Gordon, Pamela J.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers the ways in which 17 novice teachers define and describe effective urban teaching and the stark contrasts that these teachers draw between effective urban teaching and effective teaching. The authors find that descriptions of students played a considerable role when participants made distinctions between effective teaching…

  17. Social Context Effects on School Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Murphy, Joseph

    In this two-part paper, an attempt is made to examine the relationship between social contexts and effective schools and specifically to contribute to the development of a conceptual model for understanding how social contexts influence the operation of effective schools and student learning. In the first part, school effects research is drawn…

  18. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  19. Improving School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John, Ed.; Mortimore, Peter, Ed.

    School effectiveness is an issue that has preoccupied researchers and policymakers for 3 decades. To study how ineffective schools become effective and what constitutes an effective school, the Improving School Effectiveness Project was carried out in Scotland from 1995 to 1997. This project forms the basis of discussion in this book, which has 11…

  20. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  1. Regulation with placebo effects.

    PubMed

    Malani, Anup

    2008-12-01

    A growing scientific literature supports the existence of placebo effects from a wide range of health interventions and for a range of medical conditions. This Article reviews this literature, examines the implications for law and policy, and suggests future areas for research on placebo effects. In particular, it makes the case for altering the drug approval process to account for, if not credit, placebo effects. It recommends that evidence of placebo effects be permitted as a defense in cases alleging violations of informed consent or false advertising. Finally, it finds that tort law already has doctrines such as joint and several liability to account for placebo effects. Future research on placebo effects should focus on whether awareness of placebo effects can disable these effects and whether subjects can control their own placebo effects. PMID:19353835

  2. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    PubMed

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting. PMID:16292233

  3. Memory effects in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  4. Side Effects (Management)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  5. Effective College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses other writings on effective college teaching and then presents his list of necessary characteristics for the effective teacher, stressing the interpersonal dimension of the teaching-learning situation. (MF)

  6. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified the effectiveness of Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the e...

  7. Emotional Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Emotional Side Effects In this section you can learn more about ... Finding and Paying for Treatment Treatments and Side Effects Survivorship: During and After Treatment Children and Cancer ...

  8. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  9. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  10. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  11. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  12. Effective Schools Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.; Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    Research studies that have focused on identifying the characteristics or correlates of elementary and secondary schools that are unusually effective are reviewed, concentrating on the "effective schools" movement. Research on effective schools supports the conclusion that they rank high on certain characteristics frequently referred to as…

  13. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  14. Special Effects Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Jennifer; Valenta, Carol

    This guide accompanies "Special Effects," a 40-minute IMAX film and "Special Effects II", a multimedia, interactive traveling exhibit designed by the California Museum of Science and Industry. The exhibit focuses on the underlying scientific and technical processes of special effects from the earliest motion picture to state-of-the-art digital…

  15. Characteristics of Effective Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetten, David A.; Cameron, Kim S.

    THe confusing and often contradictory literature on organizational effectiveness is reviewed briefly, followed by a discussion of the leading models of effectiveness, their relative applicability to colleges and universities, questions for guiding the design of a specific study of organizational effectiveness, and guidelines for effective…

  16. Effective Teachers of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David; Poulson, Louise; Fox, Richard

    A study was commissioned to help the Teacher Training Agency and teachers in England to understand more clearly how effective teachers help children to become literate. Research aims were to: identify the key factors of what effective teachers know, understand, and do that enables them to put effective literacy teaching into practice; identify the…

  17. Quasi-two-dimensional spin-split Fermi-liquid behavior of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, N.; Mielke, C.H.; Rickel, D.G.; Wosnitza, J.; Qualls, J.S.; Brooks, J.S.; Balthes, E.; Schweitzer, D.; Heinen, I.; Strunz, W.

    1998-10-01

    Measurements of both the magnetization and magnetotransport of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} (BEDT-TTF is bisethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalene) in magnetic fields extending to 60 T at 0.4 K and 20 T at 35 mK are reported. Strong eddy currents observed in the magnetization are found to exhibit critical currentlike behavior. This might be connected with the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect, as proposed previously for {alpha}-phase salts. The strong two dimensionality leads to an apparent fall of the effective mass together with an overall suppression of the amplitude of the magnetic quantum oscillations at high magnetic fields or very low temperatures. These effects are more pronounced for the Shubnikov{endash}de Haas (SdH) effect but clearly visible also for the de Haas{endash}van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations. The apparent fall of the effective mass and the deviations of the dHvA signal from the behavior predicted by the standard Lifshitz-Kosevich theory can quantitatively be explained by the influence of chemical-potential oscillations on the wave form in a two-dimensional, spin-split Fermi liquid. The much stronger deviations from the conventional behavior in the transport data hint to an additional mechanism unique to the SdH effect. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. The butterfly effect of the "butterfly effect".

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J

    2009-07-01

    The "Butterfly Effect" metaphor states with variance that the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil can cause a tornado in Texas. This metaphor has become part of the common vernacular of Western culture. In this paper I discuss the origins of the metaphor, examine its current usage within popular culture, and present an argument as to why it is popular. I propose that the metaphor is a type of semantic attractor, a narrative device with invariant meaning but audience-specific contextualization. Finally I address whether the Butterfly Effect metaphor is a good example of itself. PMID:19527619

  19. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  20. Effect identification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic medical records means there are now vast data resources available for comparative effectiveness research (CER). In concert with conventional randomized controlled trials, CER holds great promise for advancing our understanding of how different therapeutic treatments yield different health outcomes in different settings and with different populations. But in a research culture fixated on estimating correlations and p-values, the threat of misinterpretation of results and improper CER inferences is troubling. Accordingly, this paper aims to shore up the inferential foundations of CER by introducing the fundamentals of effect identification, which is the process of identifying or teasing out empirically defensible causal effects from competing explanations. Three primary requirements of effect identification-positivity, exchangeability, and consistency- are explained and simple exampled are given. The take home message is that so-called big data from medical records may not yield better or more useful results. Advances will come only when the right question is addressed with the appropriate data and methods. PMID:25848556

  1. Running effective meetings, running effective groups.

    PubMed

    Ogborn, S E

    1994-12-01

    Meetings are effective if they meet the objectives of each person involved in the least amount of time possible. Different strategies are needed for different types of meetings. Different leadership styles are necessary depending on the members' personality preferences and the stages of the group's development. Good leaders know how to adapt to these preferences and stages. PMID:10139146

  2. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  3. Atomic lighthouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Kaiser, R.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Bachelard, R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  4. Dynamic ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Gilbert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A research program is underway at the NASA Langley Research Center to study the effect of rate of descent on ground effects. A series of powered models were tested in the Vortex Research Facility under conditions with rate of descent and in the 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel under identical conditions but without rate of descent. These results indicate that the rate of descent can have a significant impact on ground effects particularly if vectored or reversed thrust is used.

  5. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency. PMID:25401364

  6. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  7. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  8. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  9. The Kaye Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, "The Kaye effect", as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid…

  10. Dimensions of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimberly, Ronald C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of teacher effectiveness in college departments of sociology, anthropology, and social work. Five types of teacher effectiveness were found to be potentially useful for student, faculty, and administrative purposes. They include teacher task responsiveness, respect for students, teacher capability, student development, and…

  11. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. The polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  13. Organizational Effectiveness of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    1982-01-01

    Because organizational effectiveness of schools is difficult to define, a model is needed to explain the complexities of the concept. Two models offer some promise. One is the goal model, which defines effectiveness as the degree to which organizations meet or surpass their goals (either official or operational). The other is the system resource…

  14. Developing Effective Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T.J.

    In this introductory work, the main principles on which British companies are basing management development programs are presented, and stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial talent are set forth: stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial t"lent are set forth: program planning based on clear objectives and communication;…

  15. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  16. Overview of atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rote, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Effluents from the transportation system are the major cause of Satellite Power System related atmospheric effects. These effects are discussed and include inadvertent weather modification, air quality degradation, compositional changes in the stratosphere and mesosphere, formation of noctilucent clouds, plasma density changes, airglow enhancements, and changes in composition and dynamics of the plasmasphere and magnetosphere.

  17. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  18. Music Teacher Effectiveness Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Manny

    Although relatively few studies exist, a review of the research reveals some common characteristics of an effective music teacher. Effective music teachers tend to be extroverted, enthusiastic, and care sincerely for their students. Such teachers are competent in musicianship (particularly in diagnosing and correcting musical errors and in using…

  19. Interdependence and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the differential effects of task design and reward system design on group functioning in a large U.S. corporation; the effectiveness of "hybrid" groups (having tasks and rewards with both individual and group elements); and how individuals' autonomy preferences moderate their responses to interdependence. Groups performed best when…

  20. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  1. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  2. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  3. Effects on Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of controlled and modified atmospheres on insects is reviewed and summarized in this chapter. Traditionally, controlled and modified atmospheres are used to store and preserve fresh fruits and vegetables. The effects on insects and the potential of these treatments are secondary to the...

  4. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  5. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  6. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  7. PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF STATINS

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James K.; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. In clinical trials, statins are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. Indeed, recent studies indicate that some of the cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins involve improving endothelial function, enhancing the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibiting the thrombogenic response. Furthermore, statins have beneficial extrahepatic effects on the immune system, CNS, and bone. Many of these pleiotropic effects are mediated by inhibition of isoprenoids, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules. In particular, inhibition of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho, Ras, and Rac, whose proper membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation, may play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins. PMID:15822172

  8. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  9. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  10. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  11. Cardiovascular Effects of Felypressin

    PubMed Central

    Cecanho, Rodrigo; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Ranali, José

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of felypressin (FEL) were studied in Wistar rats. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements were taken in awake rats treated with vasopressin (AVP), FEL, or epinephrine (EPI). Each group received either an intravenous (IV) or an intracerebroventricular V1 receptor antagonist, saline, area postrema removal, or sham surgery. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls (P < .05) were applied. Felypressin and AVP induced a pressor effect, and bradycardia was inhibited by IV V1 antagonist. Intracerebroventricular V1 antagonist and area postrema removal enhanced their pressor effects. Epinephrine induced a higher pressor effect and a similar bradycardia that was not affected by the treatments. It was concluded that FEL depends on V1 receptors to induce pressor and bradycardic effects, and that it produces a high relationship between bradycardia and mean arterial pressure variation depending on area postrema and central V1 receptors. These effects are potentially less harmful to the cardiovascular system than the effects of EPI. PMID:17177590

  12. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  13. Improving engineering effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiero, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Methodologies to improve engineering productivity were investigated. The rocky road to improving engineering effectiveness is reviewed utilizing a specific semiconductor engineering organization as a case study. The organization had a performance problem regarding new product introductions. With the help of this consultant as a change agent the engineering team used a systems approach to through variables that were effecting their output significantly. Critical factors for improving this engineering organization's effectiveness and the roles/responsibilities of management, the individual engineers and the internal consultant are discussed.

  14. Health Effects of Tsunamis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Specific Types of Emergencies Health Effects of Tsunamis Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... environmental hazards. The majority of deaths associated with tsunamis are related to drownings, but traumatic injuries are ...

  15. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  16. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions to the different drugs. The doctors, nurses, and pharmacists will describe what to look out for in ... will be monitored very closely by doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to make sure that all side effects are ...

  17. Cardiovascular Effects of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological changes resulting from long term weightlessness are reviewed and activities conducted to study cardiovascular deconditioning at NASA Ames are discussed. Emphasis is on using monkeys in chair rest, water immersion, and tilt table studies to simulate space environment effects.

  18. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  19. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  20. Systems effectiveness evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicely, H. P., Jr.; Givens, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Eight integrated computer programs provide needed capability to reduce man-hours needed to perform routine monitoring and assessment of effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability of large electronic equipment systems.

  1. Evaluating teaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, J M; Fields, J; Imle, M; Mowery, M; Tanner, C A; Perrin, N; Stewart, B J

    1995-12-01

    Major reform in nursing education is underway, with increased emphasis being placed on the importance of the teacher-student relationship. An instrument for evaluation of teaching effectiveness, developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University School of Nursing, attempts to capture the student's perception of the quality of the teacher-student relationship as well as other salient aspects of teaching practices. The evaluation tool contains 26 items evaluating teaching effectiveness and 14 items that evaluate the course. The teaching effectiveness items yield five scales including: knowledge and expertise, facilitative teaching methods, communication style, use of own experiences, and feedback. Psychometric testing has been completed and there is evidence of construct validity in relation to teaching effectiveness and internal consistency reliability for the five scales. PMID:8583255

  2. Comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J A; Schaefer, P W; Romero, J M; Rabinov, J D; Sanelli, P C; Manchikanti, L

    2014-09-01

    The goal of comparative effectiveness research is to improve health care while dealing with the seemingly ever-rising cost. An understanding of comparative effectiveness research as a core topic is important for neuroradiologists. It can be used in a variety of ways. Its goal is to look at alternative methods of interacting with a clinical condition, ideally, while improving delivery of care. While the Patient-Centered Outcome Research initiative is the most mature US-based foray into comparative effectiveness research, it has been used more robustly in decision-making in other countries for quite some time. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence of the United Kingdom is a noteworthy example of comparative effectiveness research in action. PMID:24874531

  3. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  4. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  6. Cytogenetic effects of cyclamates

    SciTech Connect

    Jemison, E.W.; Brown, K.; Rivers, B.; Knight, R.

    1984-01-01

    PHA-stimulated human peripheral lymphocytes were used as a model system for assessing the in vitro effects of calcium cyclamate. Techniques of autoradiography, cytological staining, cell counting, liquid scintillation and karyotyping were used to study the cytogenetic damage and biochemical effects of calcium cyclamate when assayed in 24 hour intervals for 96 hours. The cells were exposed to 10(-2) and 10(-3) molar concentrations of calcium cyclamate in TC 199 medium with fetal calf serum and antibiotics. It was noted that the addition of cyclamate increased mitotic rate of lymphocyte cells in cultures. It was determined that calcium cyclamate impaired the synthesis of deoxribonunucleic acid (as depicted by decreased incorporation of tritiated thymidine), reduced grain counts in autoradiographs and increased chromosome aberrations in cyclamate treated PHA stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Morphological changes and growth rates showed significant effects. These studies indicate that calcium cyclamate has variable significant effects on leucocytes growth and chromosome morphology.

  7. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... you or your family member has ever had heat stroke, or suffered from the condition in a previous surgery, be sure to tell the physician anesthesiologist. Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or ...

  8. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  9. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  10. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  11. "Side" effects: a misnomer.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The tragic results for the babies of patients prescribed thalidomide, although they can indeed be termed "side" effects, hardly warrant so slight an epithet, and Dr Joyce in his paper would like the term to be dropped in favour of "additional" effects of drugs. Despite extensive clinical trials before drugs are put before the prescribing doctor, side effects cannot be entirely anticipated or eliminated, and indeed many are not harmful. However, it is important, Dr Joyce argues, for information to the doctor from the patient and from the doctor to the manufacturer to be collected and evaluated. Only in this way can effects of drugs other than those intended be drawn to the notice of the manufacturer. The commentary by two practising physicians emphasizes the ambiguities in the descriptive literature accompanying a new drug. Dr Herxheimer and Dr Higgs would like to see some sort of panel to be established to reassess drugs in the light of observations on their effects and "side" effects on patients, a task which the existing Committee on Safety of Medicines could not at the moment undertake. A medical need for a new drug should be established before it is manufactured, let alone offered to the general practitioner. PMID:823336

  12. Effective Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto

    In this chapter we study a particular case of multiphase systems, namely two-phase materials in which one of the phases is randomly dispersed in the other, so that the composite can be viewed on a macroscale as an effective continuum, with well defined properties. In general, the theoretical determination of the parameter for an effective medium requires, as a rule, the solution of a corresponding transport problem at the microscale, which takes into account the morphology of the system and its evolution. As the mathematical problem is well-posed on a microscale, this can be accomplished using, for example, the multiple scale approach shown in Chap. 11 ; however, the task requires massive computations and is therefore difficult to implement from the practical standpoint. Here, instead, we focus on a deterministic approach to the problem, where the geometry and spatial configuration of the particles comprising the included phase are given and the solution to the microscale problem is therefore sought analytically. As examples, we study the effective thermal conductivity of solid reinforced materials (Sect. 10.1), the effective viscosity of non-colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.2), the effective permeability of porous materials (10.3) and the effective self- and gradient diffusivities of colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.4). Then, in Sect. 10.5, an alternative dynamic definition of the transport coefficients is considered, which can also serve as a basis to determine the effective properties of complex systems.

  13. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  14. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    PubMed Central

    Kavalipati, Narasaraju; Shah, Jay; Ramakrishan, Ananthraman; Vasnawala, Hardik

    2015-01-01

    Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe. PMID:26425463

  15. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  16. The negative repetition effect.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Peterson, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising negative repetition effect, in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and across pairs, the target words were drawn from a small set of categories. In the repetition condition, the pairs were initially presented in a random order and then presented a 2nd time blocked by the category of the target words. In the single presentation condition, the pairs were presented only in the blocked order. Participants in the former condition recalled fewer target words on a free recall test despite having seen the word pairs twice (the negative repetition effect). This phenomenon is explored in a series of 5 experiments assessing 3 theoretical accounts of the effect. The experiments demonstrate that the negative repetition effect generalizes over multiple encoding conditions (reading and generative encoding), over different memory tests (free and cued recall), and over delay (5 min and 2 days). The results argue against a retrieval account and a levels-of-processing account but are consistent with the item-specific-relational account, the account upon which the effect was initially predicated. PMID:23421508

  17. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  18. Cyclone vibration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.C.; Tillery, M.I.

    1981-09-01

    A Government Accounting Office review of coal mine dust sampling procedures recommended studies be performed to determine accuracy and precision of dust measurements taken with current equipment. The effects of vibration on the 10-mm Dorr-Oliver nylon cyclone run at a flow rate of 2 L/min were investigated. A total of 271 samples were taken during 95 tests. All tests lasted about 7 h each and were performed inside a 19 l capacity aerosol chamber. Coal dust concentrations of about 2 mg/m/SUP/3 in air and a respirable fraction of 25-30% were used. The effects of a variety of vibration frequencies and stroke lengths were tested in two modes (horizontal and vertical). At most frequencies and stroke lengths, vibration was found to have an insignificant effect on cyclone performance.

  19. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  20. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  1. Effective Documentation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1997-01-01

    Quality assurance programs provide a very effective means to monitor and evaluate medical care. Quality assurance involves: (1) Identify a problem; (2) Determine the source and nature of the problem; (3) Develop policies and methods to effect improvement; (4) Implement those polices; (5) Monitor the methods applied; and (6) Evaluate their effectiveness. Because this definition of quality assurance so closely resembles the Nursing Process, the health unit staff was able to use their knowledge of the nursing process to develop many forms which improve the quality of patient care. These forms include the NASA DFRC Service Report, the occupational injury form (Incident Report), the patient survey (Pre-hospital Evaluation/Care Report), the Laboratory Log Sheet, the 911 Run Sheet, and the Patient Assessment Stamp. Examples and steps which are followed to generate these reports are described.

  2. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  3. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    PubMed

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-06-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:26417709

  5. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David R; Medina, Douglas J; Hawk, Larry W; Fosco, Whitney D; Richards, Jerry B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect "accelerated-HRE." Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior. PMID:24409128

  6. Photostimulated even acoustoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelev, G. M.; Shon, N. Kh.; Tsurkan, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Photostimulated photogalvanic (PG) and acoustogalvanic (AG) currents in a semiconductor placed in the field of two linearly polarized electromagnetic waves with frequencies Omega sub 1 = 2Omega sub 2 are analyzed. These currents affect the probability of electron scattering and the HF acoustic flux field. Under specified double laser illumination the system comprising an electron gas and photons becomes noncentrosymmetric, which leads to the PG and AG effects. The AG effect represents a contribution to the acoustoelectric current that is linear according to intensity and even according to the acoustic wave vector.

  7. Enhancing board effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Curran, Connie R; Totten, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Like any other job, board work is associated with specific competencies. Competencies are the combination of knowledge, skills, personal characteristics, and behaviors needed to perform a job or task effectively. Boards are only as strong as their weakest member. Board education should focus on improving the knowledge and skills of the board and individual members and on overall board performance. Assessment of individual board member performance is designed to evaluate the trustee's knowledge of board roles and responsibilities and the expectations of board members. Board effectiveness is built through competency-based board member recruitment and selection; board member education and development; and evaluation of board, board member, and meeting performance. PMID:21291066

  8. [Cytoprotective effects of bilirubin].

    PubMed

    Vítek, L

    2005-01-01

    Bilirubin, a major product of heme catabolism, belongs to compounds with pleiotropic biologic effects. For a long time bilirubin was considered as a metabolite dangerous for human health, neonatologists know well serious clinical complication of neonatal jaundice called bilirubin encephalopathy. Nevertheless, recent data has demonstrated that bilirubin exhibits potent antioxidant and even anti-inflammatory effects with substantial clinical impacts. The aim of the present study was to summarize present knowledge in this rapidly evolving field and suggest further possible clinical consequences. PMID:15981989

  9. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  10. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  11. Modeling Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  12. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  13. Magnetic Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes in continuous media predicts the existence of a magnetic Nernst effect that results from a magnetic analog to the Seebeck effect in a ferromagnet and magnetophoresis occurring in a paramagnetic electrode in contact with the ferromagnet. Thus, a voltage that has DC and AC components is expected across a Pt electrode as a response to the inhomogeneous magnetic induction field generated by magnetostatic waves of an adjacent YIG slab subject to a temperature gradient. The voltage frequency and dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic induction field are quite distinct from that of spin pumping.

  14. Nonequilibrium effects in Isoscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Dorso, C. O.; Lopez, J. A.

    2007-02-12

    In this work we study within a simple model different properties of the system that allow us to understand the properties of the isoscaling observable. We first show that isoscaling is a general property of fragmenting systems. We show this by using a simple generalized percolation model. We show that the usual isoscaling property can be obtained in the case of bond percolation in bichromatic lattices with any regular topology. In this case the probabilities of each color (isospin) are independent. We then explore the effect of introducing 'non-equilibrium' effects.

  15. Contamination effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The in-situ optical surface measurement system is a facility designed to study the deleterious effects of particulate materials on the surface reflectivities of optical materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). This arrangement is designed to simulate the on-orbit effects of contamination and degradation of optical surfaces. This simulation is accomplished through the use of non-coherent VUV sources illuminating optical surfaces located in a high vacuum chamber. Several sources of contamination are employed. The reflectivity is measured both at the specular reflection as well as at two scattered positions, forward and reverse. The system components are described and an operating procedure is given.

  16. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobo, Amber Leann

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has shown that there is a correlation between teacher characteristics (e.g., pedagogical knowledge, teacher preparation/certification) and student achievement. Current political contexts call for the utilization of student achievement data to measure the effectiveness of our education systems. A solid research base of how teacher…

  17. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MANGANESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effects of manganese were studied in a town on the coast of Dalmatia in which a ferromanganese plant has been operating since before World War II. The study focused on the question of whether the exposure to manganese can cause a higher incidence of respiratory dis...

  18. Designing "Educationally Effective" Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses data from a curriculum intervention project designed to introduce new forms of discussion, seen as educationally effective, into the primary classroom. While the introduction of talk as an aid to learning is premised on a social approach to learning, such interventions are often evaluated in terms of cognitive benefits and…

  19. Effects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the subject rising the following topics and subtopics: I. Nuclear explosions: heat, nuclear radiation, and radioactive fallout; II. Effects: radiation sickness, burns, blast injuries, and equivalent areas of death; III. Nuclear war: battlefield, regional, intercontinental - counterforce, and intercontinental - counter-city and industry. There are two appendices. 34 references, 32 figures.

  20. Qualities of Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Richard, Holly B.; Catano, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    You know how important principals are in advancing student achievement and school success, but it's not been exactly clear which components of the principal's job are the highest priority... until now. Following on the results-based approach from the ASCD best-seller "Qualities of Effective Teachers", James Stronge and his coauthors explain how…

  1. Effective Use of Usenet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1992-01-01

    Continues a description of the Usenet computer network that began in the previous issue. The effective use of Usenet is discussed, including how to screen out unwanted information, the most helpful newsgroups to access, and setting up news reader software. Ideas for library outreach services via Usenet are also suggested. (LRW)

  2. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  3. Contaminant effects on fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, V.W.; Hodson, P.V.; Nriagu, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the effects of water pollution on fish and fisheries. Topics include: monitoring lead pollution in fish, metallothionein and acclimation to heavy metals in fish, modeling approaches, appraising the status of fisheries, and assessing the health of aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Effects on saltwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, D.J.; Oshida, P.S.; Wilkes, F.G.; Mearns, A.J.; Ginn, T.C.; Carr, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    A review of the literature reveals numerous articles dealing with the uptake of metals by marine organisms. Cadmium, copper, zinc, and methyl mercury have been shown to have toxic effects on fish, oysters, clams, lobsters, and other marine animals. Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the accumulation of these metals. 237 references.

  5. Is Effective Teaching Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Helen; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the ecological validity of using observation-based scores to evaluate individual teachers' effectiveness, mirroring their use by school administrators. Using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, the authors asked (a) how similar are teachers' emotional support, classroom organization, and instructional support scores from…

  6. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  7. Teaching Effective Interviewing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Frankie

    Through careful preparation and followup, students can insure successful job interviews. If they evaluate their own skills and expectations and assess employer characteristics before interviews, they can increase their credibility with interviewers and make more effective job decisions. If they anticipate irrelevant or illegal questions on such…

  8. Heterologous vaccine effects.

    PubMed

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Aaby, Peter; Shann, Frank; Netea, Mihai G; Levy, Ofer; Louis, Jacques; Picot, Valentina; Greenberg, Michael; Warren, William

    2016-07-25

    The heterologous or non-specific effects (NSEs) of vaccines, at times defined as "off-target effects" suggest that they can affect the immune response to organisms other than their pathogen-specific intended purpose. These NSEs have been the subject of clinical, immunological and epidemiological studies and are increasingly recognized as an important biological process by a growing group of immunologists and epidemiologists. Much remain to be learned about the extent and underlying mechanisms for these effects. The conference "Off-target effects of vaccination" held in Annecy-France (June 8-10 2015) intended to take a holistic approach drawing from the fields of immunology, systems biology, epidemiology, bioinformatics, public health and regulatory science to address fundamental questions of immunological mechanisms, as well as translational questions about vaccines NSEs. NSE observations were examined using case-studies on live attenuated vaccines and non-live vaccines followed by discussion of studies of possible biological mechanisms. Some possible pathways forward in the study of vaccines NSE were identified and discussed by the expert group. PMID:27312214

  9. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2012-01-01

    Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia) and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia). The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the “glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones” of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-17-37 and GLP17-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP). GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine), central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius) and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health. PMID:22701844

  10. Building Effective Afterschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashola, Olatokunbo S.

    Through a comprehensive review of various afterschool programs across the United States, this resource provides a practical overview of the research and best practices that can be easily adapted and applied in the development of highly effective afterschool programs. chapters focus on: (1) "Why Afterschool Programs?" (benefits, challenges, and…

  11. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  12. Effective Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parratt, Smitty

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of understanding nonverbal communication in enhancing the personal and work relationships of interpreters and increasing their effectiveness in meeting the needs of customers. Discusses the mystique of body language, cultural variation in the use of gestures, the stages of an encounter, interpreting gesture clusters, and…

  13. Case 26: Somogyi effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This individual has a classic manifestation of the Somogyi effect, which is fasting morning hyperglycemia in response to hypoglycemia in the early morning and late night hours. The danger is that if night-time blood glucose levels are not measured, the physician may interpret the patient as having h...

  14. Alexandrite effect spectropyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2006-08-01

    Alexandrite crystal is commonly used for making alexandrite laser, and it also has a less-known phenomenon called the alexandrite effect that refers to the color change between different light sources. A novel spectropyrometer for temperature measurement of a radiating body utilizing the alexandrite effect is introduced. The alexandrite effect method for temperature measurement is based on the relationship between the temperature of blackbody and the hue-angle in the CIELAB color space. The alexandrite effect spectropyrometer consists of an optical probe, a spectrometer, a computer, and an alexandrite filter. It measures the spectral power distribution of a radiating body through the alexandrite filter, calculates the hue-angle, and determines the temperature. The spectropyrometer is suitable for temperature measurement of any radiating body with or without spectral lines in its spectral power distribution from 1000 K to 100000 K. The spectropyrometer is particularly useful for high to ultrahigh temperature measurement of any radiating bodies with spectral line emissions, such as electric arcs and discharges, plasmas, and high temperature flames.

  15. Tips for Effective Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Kevin F.

    2009-01-01

    School business officials' days are filled with numbers and reports--audits, balance sheets, check registers, financial statements, journal entries, vouchers, and warrant reports, just to name a few. Those are all important tools that school business officers use to manage the financial resources of the district effectively. However, they are also…

  16. Resources for Effective Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walline, Jane K.

    A special studies institute on resources for effective teaching was designed to train newly appointed or potential Curriculum Resource Consultants (CRC) who work in conjunction with special education instructional materials centers in Michigan. Objectives of the workshop sequences included the development of teacher-training competencies in the…

  17. Commentary: Expanding on Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelham, William E., Jr.; Massetti, Greta M.

    2003-01-01

    Atkins, Graczyk, Frazier, and Abdul-Adil (2003) make the point that there have been three limitations of mental health services for children and families in low-income, urban settings: (a) accessibility; (b) effectiveness; and (c) sustainability. Their article focuses extensively on improving access and addressing issues of sustainability in…

  18. Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the results of an NRA funded program entitled Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase that received funding through a NASA NRA (NRA8-31) and was monitored by personnel in the NASA Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Program. The NASA Project number was 02029. The Satellite Contamination and Materials Outgassing Knowledgebase (SCMOK) was created as a part of the earlier NRA8-20. One of the previous tasks and part of the previously developed Knowledgebase was to accumulate data from facilities using QCMs to measure the outgassing data for satellite materials. The main object of this current program was to increase the number of material outgassing datasets from 250 up to approximately 500. As a part of this effort, a round-robin series of materials outgassing measurements program was also executed that allowed comparison of the results for the same materials tested in 10 different test facilities. Other programs tasks included obtaining datasets or information packages for 1) optical effects of contaminants on optical surfaces, thermal radiators, and sensor systems and 2) space environmental effects data and incorporating these data into the already existing NASA/SEE Knowledgebase.

  19. Using Your Library Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennepin County Library, Minnetonka, MN.

    This collection of materials for a three-hour instructional program for young people and adults in the effective use of the public library includes an introduction to the program, a teaching guide for the librarian, a packet of materials for students, and a summary of 90 evaluations of the program as it was presented at two area libraries and…

  20. Teacher Effectiveness: A Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Myrtle

    1969-01-01

    This document summarizes the highlights of research on teacher effectiveness and concludes with recommendations based on a synthesis of this past work. The various methodologies that have been used are discussed, from rating scales to objective observation techniques, such as OScAR and the ecological studies. The major problems in teacher…

  1. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  2. DCPS Effective Schools Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    DCPS is committed to providing "all" students with the caliber of education they deserve. The goal of the DCPS Effective Schools Framework is to ensure that every child, in every classroom, has access to a high-quality and engaging standards-based instructional program, and that all school supports are aligned to support teaching and learning. The…

  3. Globalisation, Effectiveness and Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimore, Peter

    This paper reports principally on two studies, prompted by research on school effectiveness in the United States and England, which indicate globalization is beginning to affect school improvement. The first study cites case studies of two schools--from working-class, multi-ethnic, poorly educated areas of Singapore and London--to determine if…

  4. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles looks at computerization and unions in Australia, France, and India; bargaining agreements about technological innovation in India, the United Kingdom, and the United States; and the effects of technology on the labor force in the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and the United States. (SK)

  5. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products. PMID:23715638

  6. Effective Thinking Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Rod

    1997-01-01

    Effective Thinking Outdoors (ETO) is an organization that teaches thinking skills and strategies via significant outdoor experiences. Identifies the three elements of thinking as creativity, play, and persistence; presents a graphic depiction of the problem-solving process and aims; and describes an ETO exercise, determining old routes of travel…

  7. Effective Intervention for Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Randie; Kellner, Millicent H.; Green, Stuart; Elias, Maurice J.

    2012-01-01

    Most professional educators are aware that every school should have an effective approach to harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB) prevention in which every member of the school community participates. Regardless of the approach a school takes, all students and all staff members should be knowledgeable participants who have been trained to…

  8. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  9. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  10. Evaluating Effective Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthen, Vaughn E.; Dougher, M. Kirk

    This paper outlines the purposes, professional obligations, and key components to consider when providing effective evaluation in psychotherapy supervision. An overview of various methods for gathering supervision data for evaluation purposes is provided including self-reporting; process notes; video and audiotaping; live observation; co-therapy;…