Sample records for habitat influence life

  1. Life history strategy influences parasite responses to habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Froeschke, Götz; van der Mescht, Luther; McGeoch, Melodie; Matthee, Sonja

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic habitat use is a major threat to biodiversity and is known to increase the abundance of generalist host species such as rodents, which are regarded as potential disease carriers. Parasites have an intimate relationship with their host and the surrounding environment and it is expected that habitat fragmentation will affect parasite infestation levels. We investigated the effect of habitat fragmentation on the ecto- and endoparasitic burdens of a broad niche small mammal, Rhabdomys pumilio, in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Our aim was to look at the effects of fragmentation on different parasite species with diverse life history characteristics and to determine whether general patterns can be found. Sampling took place within pristine lowland (Fynbos/Renosterveld) areas and at fragmented sites surrounded and isolated by agricultural activities. All arthropod ectoparasites and available gastrointestinal endoparasites were identified. We used conditional autoregressive models to investigate the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite species richness and abundance of all recovered parasites. Host density and body size were larger in the fragments. Combined ecto- as well as combined endoparasite taxa showed higher parasite species richness in fragmented sites. Parasite abundance was generally higher in the case of R. pumilio individuals in fragmented habitats but it appears that parasites that are more permanently associated with the host's body and those that are host-specific show the opposite trend. Parasite life history is an important factor that needs to be considered when predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite and pathogen transmission. PMID:23954434

  2. Concurrent habitat and life history influences on effective/census population size ratios in stream-dwelling trout

    PubMed Central

    Belmar-Lucero, Sebastian; Wood, Jacquelyn L A; Scott, Sherylyne; Harbicht, Andrew B; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Fraser, Dylan J

    2012-01-01

    Lower effective sizes (Ne) than census sizes (N) are routinely documented in natural populations, but knowledge of how multiple factors interact to lower Ne/N ratios is often limited. We show how combined habitat and life-history influences drive a 2.4- to 6.1-fold difference in Ne/N ratios between two pristine brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations occupying streams separated by only 750 m. Local habitat features, particularly drainage area and stream depth, govern trout biomass produced in each stream. They also generate higher trout densities in the shallower stream by favoring smaller body size and earlier age-at-maturity. The combination of higher densities and reduced breeding site availability in the shallower stream likely leads to more competition among breeding trout, which results in greater variance in individual reproductive success and a greater reduction in Ne relative to N. A similar disparity between juvenile or adult densities and breeding habitat availability is reported for other species and hence may also result in divergent Ne/N ratios elsewhere. These divergent Ne/N ratios between adjacent populations are also an instructive reminder for species conservation programs that genetic and demographic parameters may differ dramatically within species. PMID:22822435

  3. Potential Habitats for Exotic Life Within the Life Supporting Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Johannes J.; Firneis, Maria G.; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2010-05-01

    Questions like "Are we alone in the universe?", "How unique is Earth as a planet?" or "How unique is water-based life in the universe?" still are nowhere near of being answered. In recent years, discussions on these topics are more and more influenced by questions whether water is really the only possible solvent, or which conditions are necessary for life to evolve in planetary habitats. A change in our present geocentric mindset on the existence of life is required, in order to address these new questions [see also 1]. In May 2009 a new research platform at the University of Vienna was initiated in order to contribute to the solution of these questions. One task is to find essential biomarkers relevant to the problem of the detection of exotic life. In this context exotic life means: life, which is not necessarily based on a double bond between carbon and oxygen (C=O) and not on water as the only possible solvent. At present little is known about metabolistic systems, which are not based on C=O or on metabolisms which are operative in alternative solvents and a high effort of future laboratory work is necessary to open this window for looking for exotic life. To address the whole spectrum of life the concept of a general life supporting zone is introduced in order to extend the classical habitable zone (which is based on liquid water on a planetary surface, [2]). The life supporting zone of a planetary system is composed of different single "habitable zones" for the liquid phases of specific solvents and composites between water and other solvents. Besides exoplanetary systems which seem to be the most promising place for exotic life in our present understanding, some potential places could also exist within our Solar System and habitats like the subsurface of Enceladus, liquid ethane/methane lakes on Titan or habitable niches in the Venus atmosphere will also be taken into account. A preliminary list of appropriate solvents and their abundances in the Solar System and beyond have been compiled. Dynamical investigations (related to the interior of superearths), but also heat transport regimes and potential cycles with exotic solvents as well as tidal heating processes and their influence on the thermal regime of the planets will help to define the regions of potential exotic life more precisely. Atmospheric and subsurface cycles which can take place in such habitats as well as cloud and droplet formation with and without cloud nuclei cores will further extend our knowledge on mechanisms relevant for the stability of these systems. Finally the question of suitable biomarkers, which can enable the observation of exotic habitats and their potential life forms will be considered in the research platform. In this context a special topic is also the bandwidth of photosynthesis: how is the influence of different atmospheric gases and what are the environment conditions for the chemical reactions of photosynthesis? First preliminary results for the life supporting zones of selected planetary systems will be presented. References: [1] NRC (National Research Council)(2007) The Limits of Organic Life in Planetary Systems, National Academies Press, Washington, DC 20001, ISBN 978-0-309-10484-5. [2] Kasting, J.F., Whitmore D.P. and Reynolds R.T. (1993) Icarus, 101, 109-128.

  4. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  5. Habitat filtering across tree life stages in tropical forest communities.

    PubMed

    Baldeck, C A; Harms, K E; Yavitt, J B; John, R; Turner, B L; Valencia, R; Navarrete, H; Bunyavejchewin, S; Kiratiprayoon, S; Yaacob, A; Supardi, M N N; Davies, S J; Hubbell, S P; Chuyong, G B; Kenfack, D; Thomas, D W; Dalling, J W

    2013-09-01

    Tropical tree communities are shaped by local-scale habitat heterogeneity in the form of topographic and edaphic variation, but the life-history stage at which habitat associations develop remains poorly understood. This is due, in part, to the fact that previous studies have not accounted for the widely disparate sample sizes (number of stems) that result when trees are divided into size classes. We demonstrate that the observed habitat structuring of a community is directly related to the number of individuals in the community. We then compare the relative importance of habitat heterogeneity to tree community structure for saplings, juveniles and adult trees within seven large (24-50 ha) tropical forest dynamics plots while controlling for sample size. Changes in habitat structuring through tree life stages were small and inconsistent among life stages and study sites. Where found, these differences were an order of magnitude smaller than the findings of previous studies that did not control for sample size. Moreover, community structure and composition were very similar among tree sub-communities of different life stages. We conclude that the structure of these tropical tree communities is established by the time trees are large enough to be included in the census (1 cm diameter at breast height), which indicates that habitat filtering occurs during earlier life stages. PMID:23843384

  6. Mid-Life Career Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heald, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Events common to all people, although in differing degrees, such as physiological and technological changes at mid-life, constitute important influences on career change and development in the mid-life period. (Author)

  7. Effects of Life History Strategy on Fish Distribution and Use of Estuarine Salt Marsh and Shallow-Water Flat Habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Meyer; Martin H. Posey

    2009-01-01

    To assess the potential for habitat isolation effects on estuarine nekton, we used two species with different dispersal abilities\\u000a and life history strategies, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) and pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) to examine: (1) distribution trends among estuarine shallow-water flat and various intertidal salt marsh habitats and (2)\\u000a the influence of salt marsh habitat size and isolation. Collections were conducted using

  8. Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes (Tripterygiidae)

    E-print Network

    Shima, Jeff

    Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes Habitat availability Habitat configuration Settlement Tripterygiidae To survive, most benthic marine organisms must find suitable settlement habitat. For reef fishes, settlement hab- itat is often structurally

  9. The habitat and nature of early life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. G. Nisbet; N. H. Sleep

    2001-01-01

    Earth is over 4,500 million years old. Massive bombardment of the planet took place for the first 500–700 million years, and the largest impacts would have been capable of sterilizing the planet. Probably until 4,000 million years ago or later, occasional impacts might have heated the ocean over 100 °C. Life on Earth dates from before about 3,800 million years

  10. Appendix 67 A Review of Bull Trout Life-History and Habitat Use in Relation to

    E-print Network

    and Improvement Opportunities #12;A REVIEW OF BULL TROUT (SALVELINUS CONFLUENTUS) LIFE-HISTORY AND HABITAT USE 1996 #12;#12;A Review of Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) Life-history and Habitat Use in Relation., and J. S. Baxter. 1996. A review of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) life-history and habitat use

  11. Habitat influences diet overlap in aquatic snake assemblages

    E-print Network

    Willson. J.D.

    fishes (n = 10). We collected >3700 prey items from snakes and compared diet composition among snake differences in diet composition, trophic niche overlap, site occupancy and detectability of five sympatricHabitat influences diet overlap in aquatic snake assemblages A. M. Durso1,3 , J. D. Willson2,3 & C

  12. The Virtual Habitat - a tool for Life Support Systems optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czupalla, Markus; Dirlich, Thomas; Harder, Jan; Pfeiffer, Matthias

    In the course of designing Life Support Systems (LSS) a great multitude of concepts for and various combinations of subsystems and components are developed. In order to find an optimal LSS solution, thus the right combination of subsystems, the parameters for the definition of the optimization itself have to be determined. The often times used Equivalent Systems Mass (ESM) based trade study approach for life support systems is well suited for phase A conceptual design evaluations. The ESM approach allows an efficient evaluation of LSS on a component or subsystem level. The necessary next step in the process is the design, evaluation and optimization of the LSS on a system level. For the system level LSS design a classic ESM-based trade study seems not to be able to provide the information that is necessary to evaluate the concept correctly. Important decisive criteria such as system stability, controllability and effectiveness are not represented in the ESM approach. These parameters directly and decisively impact the scientific efficiency of the crew, thereby the mission in total. Thus, for system level optimization these criteria must be included alongside the ESM in a new integral optimization method. In order to be able to apply such an integral criterion dynamic modeling of most involved LSS subsystems, especially of the human crew, is necessary. Only then the required information about the efficiency of the LSS, over time, e.g. the systems stability, becomes available. In an effort to establish a dynamic simulation environment for habitats in extreme environmental conditions, the "Virtual Habitat" tool is being developed by the Human Spaceflight Group of the Technische Universit¨t M¨nchen (TUM). The paper discussed here presents the concept of a u the virtual habitat simulation. It discusses in what way the simulation tool enables a prediction of system characteristics and required information demanded by an integral optimization criterion. In general the Virtual Habitat consists of four main modules each of which is subdivided into further, more detailed sub-modules. The four main modules of the simulation are the following: · Closed Environment Module (CEM)- monitoring of compounds in a closed environment · Crew Module (CM) - dynamic human simulation · Plant Module (PM) - dynamic plant simulation · P/C systems module (PCSM) - library of dynamic P/C subsystems The paper describes the character of each of the modules introducing the first results, which will be the first version of the metabolism, muscle and cardiovascular sub-modules of the crew module. In addition a dynamic closed environment module and the first dynamic plant model are presented and discussed. Further the modularity strategy and interfaceability of the submodels of the Virtual Habitat are discussed highlighting the resulting model limitations. Finally in the paper an outlook is given on the tasks remaining before the virtual habitat can be used to optimize life support systems on a system level. Among others the question of model correlation with existing simulations and data will be addressed.

  13. Does habitat fragmentation influence nest predation in the shortgrass prairie?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, M.N.; Skagen, S.K.; Kennedy, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of habitat fragmentation and vegetation structure of shortgrass prairie and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands on predation rates of artificial and natural nests in northeastern Colorado. The CRP provides federal payments to landowners to take highly erodible cropland out of agricultural production. In our study area, CRP lands have been reseeded primarily with non-native grasses, and this vegetation is taller than native shortgrass prairie. We measured three indices of habitat fragmentation (patch size, degree of matrix fragmentation, and distance from edge), none of which influenced mortality rates of artificial or natural nests. Vegetation structure did influence predation rates of artificial nests; daily mortality decreased significantly with increasing vegetation height. Vegetation structure did not influence predation rates of natural nests. CRP lands and shortgrass sites did not differ with respect to mortality rates of artificial nests. Our study area is only moderately fragmented; 62% of the study area is occupied by native grassland. We conclude that the extent of habitat fragmentation in our study area does not result in increased predation in remaining patches of shortgrass prairie habitat.

  14. Artificial structures influence fouling on habitat-forming kelps.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M

    2012-01-01

    The addition of artificial structures along urbanised shorelines is a global phenomenon. Such modifications of habitats have important consequences to the abundance of fouling organisms on primary substrata, but the influence on fouling of habitat-formers living on these structures is poorly understood. Fouling of habitat-forming kelps Ecklonia radiata on pier-pilings was compared to that on rocky reefs at three locations in Sydney Harbour. Kelps on pilings supported different assemblages of bryozoans from those on reefs. The abundances of bryozoans on kelps, in particular of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, were significantly greater on pilings. Differences were consistent in time and space. This indicates that the addition of artificial structures also affects fouling on secondary biogenic substrata, altering biodiversity and potentially facilitating the introduction and dispersal of non-indigenous epibiota. Understanding the processes that cause these patterns is necessary to allow sensible predictions about ecological effects of built structures. PMID:22452393

  15. Modified habitats influence kelp epibiota via direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Underwood, Antony J; Coleman, Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms. PMID:21755011

  16. Does maternal oviposition site influence offspring dispersal to suitable habitat?

    PubMed

    Warner, Daniel A; Mitchell, Timothy S

    2013-07-01

    Orientation and dispersal to suitable habitat affects fitness in many animals, but the factors that govern these behaviors are poorly understood. In many turtle species, hatchlings must orient and disperse to suitable aquatic habitat immediately after emergence from subterranean nests. Thus, the location of nest sites relative to aquatic habitats ideally should be associated with the direction of hatchling dispersal. At our study site, painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) nest to the west (on an island) and east (on the mainland) of a wetland, which determines the direction that hatchlings must travel to reach suitable aquatic habitat. To determine if hatchling orientation is intrinsically influenced by the location where their mothers nest, we employed a two-part cross-fostering experiment in the field, whereby half the eggs laid in mainland nests were swapped with half the eggs laid in island nests. Moreover, because C. picta hatchlings overwinter inside their nests, we performed a second cross-fostering experiment to fully decouple the effects of (1) the maternally chosen nest location, (2) the embryonic developmental location, and (3) the overwinter location. We released hatchlings into a circular arena in the field and found that turtles generally dispersed in a westerly direction, regardless of the maternally chosen nest location and independent of the locations of embryonic development and overwintering. Although this westerly direction was towards suitable aquatic habitat, we could not distinguish whether naïve hatchling turtles (i) use environmental cues/stimuli to orient their movement, or (ii) have an intrinsic bias to orient west in the absence of stimuli. Nevertheless, these findings suggest that the orientation behavior of naïve hatchling turtles during terrestrial dispersal is not dependent upon the location of maternally-chosen nest sites. PMID:23196739

  17. Habitat influence in the morphological diversity of coastal fish assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Marc; Lombarte, Antoni; Recasens, Laura; Maynou, Francesc; Tuset, Victor M.

    2015-05-01

    Ecological diversity based on quantitative data is widely used to characterize biological communities, but recently morphological and functional traits have also been used to analyse the structure of fish assemblages. This diversity and structure is usually linked to variables such as habitat complexity and composition, depth, and spatial and temporal variations. In this study, several fish assemblages off the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) were ecologically and morphologically analysed and compared. The morphological analysis was performed from body shape of fish species using geometric morphology. Moreover, a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyse the effect of local environmental variables such as habitat, locality and depth on the composition and abundance of assemblages. The results revealed greater differences among assemblages in the clustering performed from morphological data, which is linked to habitat complexity, than those shown by the ecological analysis. Moreover, the CCA analysis indicated that type of substratum and the location significantly influenced the composition and structure of the fish assemblages. These results evidenced that morphology provides different and complementary information than ecological analysis because it allows to predict the ecological and functional habits of species within the community, helping to improve the understanding of the fish assemblages structure.

  18. Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Moore

    2011-07-13

    Today we will be learning about the diffrent homes that animals have, also known as a habitat. There are many diffrent habitats around the world, and there are many types of animals that live within those habitats. The habitat game website at the bottom of the page will give you a chance to explore the diffrent habitats. Go through all the diffrent habitats and read about the animals and their homes along the way. Once you are done answer the following questions. 1. Why do you think animals live best in ...

  19. Biological structures and bottom type influence habitat choices made by Alaska flatfishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allan W Stoner; Richard H Titgen

    2003-01-01

    Habitats of flatfishes are ordinarily characterized on the basis of depth, sediment type, and temperature. However, features of the benthic environment such as structures created by sessile organisms and different bedforms may also influence habitat suitability. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that habitat choices made by juveniles of two economically important flatfishes, Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis Schmidt) and

  20. Habitat-based constraints on food web structure and parasite life cycles.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Wayne; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2014-04-01

    Habitat is frequently implicated as a powerful determinant of community structure and species distributions, but few studies explicitly evaluate the relationship between habitat-based patterns of species' distributions and the presence or absence of trophic interactions. The complex (multi-host) life cycles of parasites are directly affected by these factors, but almost no data exist on the role of habitat in constraining parasite-host interactions at the community level. In this study the relationship(s) between species abundances, distributions and trophic interactions (including parasitism) were evaluated in the context of habitat structure (classic geomorphic designations of pools, riffles and runs) in a riverine community (Raritan River, Hunterdon County, NJ, USA). We report 121 taxa collected over a 2-year period, and compare the observed food web patterns to null model expectations. The results show that top predators are constrained to particular habitat types, and that species' distributions are biased towards pool habitats. However, our null model (which incorporates cascade model assumptions) accurately predicts the observed patterns of trophic interactions. Thus, habitat strongly dictates species distributions, and patterns of trophic interactions arise as a consequence of these distributions. Additionally, we find that hosts utilized in parasite life cycles are more overlapping in their distributions, and this pattern is more pronounced among those involved in trophic transmission. We conclude that habitat structure may be a strong predictor of parasite transmission routes, particularly within communities that occupy heterogeneous habitats. PMID:24249118

  1. Habitat

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Idaho PTV

    2011-09-21

    This video segment from IdahoPTV's D4K explains the 4 basic requirements of a perfect habitat and what a niche is within a habitat. You'll see videos of different animals in their habitats, such as; bear, moose, spiders and mountain goats,

  2. Early Life Influences on Cognition: Lanarkshire 1936 

    E-print Network

    Sherlock, Laura

    2013-07-02

    Aims: Prenatal and early life influences are important in the development of childhood cognitive abilities. Birth weight may be seen as a marker of intrauterine nutrition and has been shown to be correlated with intelligence in childhood. The aims...

  3. Human disturbance and stage-specific habitat requirements influence snowy plover site occupancy during the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Webber, Alyson F; Heath, Julie A; Fischer, Richard A

    2013-04-01

    Habitat use has important consequences for avian reproductive success and survival. In coastal areas with recreational activity, human disturbance may limit use of otherwise suitable habitat. Snowy plovers Charadrius nivosus have a patchy breeding distribution along the coastal areas on the Florida Panhandle, USA. Our goal was to determine the relative effects of seasonal human disturbance and habitat requirements on snowy plover habitat use. We surveyed 303 sites for snowy plovers, human disturbance, and habitat features between January and July 2009 and 2010. We made multiple visits during three different sampling periods that corresponded to snowy plover breeding: pre-breeding, incubation, and brood-rearing and used multi-season occupancy models to examine whether human disturbance, habitat features, or both influenced site occupancy, colonization (probability of transition from an unoccupied site to an occupied site), and extinction (probability of transition from an occupied site to an unoccupied site). Snowy plover site occupancy and colonization was negatively associated with human disturbance and site extinction was positively associated with human disturbance. Interdune vegetation had a negative effect on occupancy and colonization, indicating that plovers were less likely to use areas with uniform, dense vegetation among dunes. Also, dune shape, beach debris, and access to low-energy foraging areas influenced site occupancy, colonization, and extinction. Plovers used habitat based on beach characteristics that provided stage-specific resource needs; however, human disturbance was the strongest predictor of site occupancy. In addition, vegetation plantings used to enhance dune rehabilitation may negatively impact plover site occupancy. Management actions that decrease human disturbance, such as symbolic fencing and signage, may increase the amount of breeding habitat available to snowy plovers on the Florida Panhandle and in other areas with high human activity. The specific areas that require this protection may vary across snowy plover life history stages. PMID:23610630

  4. Human disturbance and stage-specific habitat requirements influence snowy plover site occupancy during the breeding season

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Alyson F; Heath, Julie A; Fischer, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Habitat use has important consequences for avian reproductive success and survival. In coastal areas with recreational activity, human disturbance may limit use of otherwise suitable habitat. Snowy plovers Charadrius nivosus have a patchy breeding distribution along the coastal areas on the Florida Panhandle, USA. Our goal was to determine the relative effects of seasonal human disturbance and habitat requirements on snowy plover habitat use. We surveyed 303 sites for snowy plovers, human disturbance, and habitat features between January and July 2009 and 2010. We made multiple visits during three different sampling periods that corresponded to snowy plover breeding: pre-breeding, incubation, and brood-rearing and used multi-season occupancy models to examine whether human disturbance, habitat features, or both influenced site occupancy, colonization (probability of transition from an unoccupied site to an occupied site), and extinction (probability of transition from an occupied site to an unoccupied site). Snowy plover site occupancy and colonization was negatively associated with human disturbance and site extinction was positively associated with human disturbance. Interdune vegetation had a negative effect on occupancy and colonization, indicating that plovers were less likely to use areas with uniform, dense vegetation among dunes. Also, dune shape, beach debris, and access to low-energy foraging areas influenced site occupancy, colonization, and extinction. Plovers used habitat based on beach characteristics that provided stage-specific resource needs; however, human disturbance was the strongest predictor of site occupancy. In addition, vegetation plantings used to enhance dune rehabilitation may negatively impact plover site occupancy. Management actions that decrease human disturbance, such as symbolic fencing and signage, may increase the amount of breeding habitat available to snowy plovers on the Florida Panhandle and in other areas with high human activity. The specific areas that require this protection may vary across snowy plover life history stages. PMID:23610630

  5. Influences of livestock grazing on sage grouse habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Beck; Dean L.. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    Livestock grazing has been identified as one factor associated with the widespread decline and degradation of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat. We identi- fied n= 17 positive and negative impacts of livestock on sage grouse and habitat. Little information is currently available concerning the directs impacts of livestock grazing on sage grouse habitat. Indirect impacts are better understood than direct

  6. Food web stability: the influence of trophic flows across habitats.

    PubMed

    Huxel, G R; McCann, K

    1998-09-01

    In nature, fluxes across habitats often bring both nutrient and energetic resources into areas of low productivity from areas of higher productivity. These inputs can alter consumption rates of consumer and predator species in the recipient food webs, thereby influencing food web stability. Starting from a well-studied tritrophic food chain model, we investigated the impact of allochthonous inputs on the stability of a simple food web model. We considered the effects of allochthonous inputs on stability of the model using four sets of biologically plausible parameters that represent different dynamical outcomes. We found that low levels of allochthonous inputs stabilize food web dynamics when species preferentially feed on the autochthonous sources, while either increasing the input level or changing the feeding preference to favor allochthonous inputs, or both, led to a decoupling of the food chain that could result in the loss of one or all species. We argue that allochthonous inputs are important sources of productivity in many food webs and their influence needs to be studied further. This is especially important in the various systems, such as caves, headwater streams, and some small marine islands, in which more energy enters the food web from allochthonous inputs than from autochthonous inputs. PMID:18811452

  7. Life-history Habitat Matching in Invading Non-native Plant Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Stohlgren; Catherine Crosier; Geneva W. Chong; Debra Guenther; Paul Evangelista

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the literature on habitat matching in invading non-native plant species. Then we hypothesized that the\\u000a richness and cover of native annual and perennial plant species integrate complex local information of vegetation and soils\\u000a that would help to predict invasion success by similarly adapted non-native plant species. We tested these ‘life-history habitat\\u000a matching’ relationships in 603 0.1-ha plots,

  8. Habitat: importance, destruction, & Habitat: importance, destruction, &

    E-print Network

    Limburg, Karin E.

    Habitat: importance, destruction, & evaluation #12;Habitat: importance, destruction, & evaluation Organisms Habitat People Taxonomy Ecology Population dynamics Life history Stocking Introductions Population Biodiversity Genetics Restoration #12;What is habitat for fish? · Habitat for fish includes all of the physical

  9. INFLUENCE OF HABITAT CHARACTERISTICS ON WETLAND BIRD ABUNDANCE AND SPECIES RICHNESS AT ORDWAY PRAIRIE, SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-print Network

    INFLUENCE OF HABITAT CHARACTERISTICS ON WETLAND BIRD ABUNDANCE AND SPECIES RICHNESS AT ORDWAY OF HABITAT ON WETLAND BIRD ABUNDANCE AND SPECIES RICHNESS AT ORDWAY PRAIRIE, SOUTH DAKOTA This thesis CHARACTERISTICS ON WETLAND BIRD ABUNDANCE AND SPECIES RICHNESS AT ORDWAY PRAIRIE, SOUTH DAKOTA Mary C. Miller 2003

  10. Idea Habitats: How the Prevalence of Environmental Cues Influences the Success of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Jonah A.; Heath, Chip

    2005-01-01

    We investigate 1 factor that influences the success of ideas or cultural representations by proposing that they have a habitat, that is, a set of environmental cues that encourages people to recall and transmit them. We test 2 hypotheses: (a) fluctuation: the success of an idea will vary over time with fluctuations in its habitat, and (b)…

  11. Influence of Mowing Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis on Winter Habitat for Wildlife

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirk W. Davies; Jonathan D. Bates; Dustin D. Johnson; Aleta M. Nafus

    2009-01-01

    Mowing is commonly implemented to Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh (Wyoming big sagebrush) plant communities to improve wildlife habitat, increase forage production for livestock, and create fuel breaks for fire suppression. However, information detailing the influence of mowing on winter habitat for wildlife is lacking. This information is crucial because many wildlife species depended on

  12. Vocal and Visual Conspecific Cues Influence the Behavior of Chimney Swifts at Provisioned Habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leah Finity; Joseph J. Nocera

    2012-01-01

    Numerous species use socially derived information from conspecifics to evaluate the quality of potential habitat. We examine whether conspecific cues influence Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) behavior at uninhabited provisioned habitat, and whether their response in the pre- and post-breeding seasons differs. We used conspecific playbacks and decoys at 19 towers designed for the swift's nesting in southern Ontario, Canada, and

  13. INVERTEBRATE PRODUCTIVITY IN A SUBTROPICAL BLACKWATER RIVER: THE IMPORTANCE OF HABITAT AND LIFE HISTORY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ARTHUR C. BENKE; THOMAS C. VAN; DAVID M. GILLESPIE; FRED K. PARRISH

    1984-01-01

    Habitat and life history are critical elements in assessing the production dynamics of invertebrates and their role in aquatic ecosystems. We studied invertebrate productivity at two sites in a subtropical blackwater river (the Satilla) in the Lower Coastal Plain of Georgia, USA, and found that submerged wooden substrates, or snags, are heavily colonized by aquatic insects. We compared invertebrate productivity

  14. Salmon Life Histories, Habitats, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary

    E-print Network

    Salmon Life Histories, Habitats, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary Daniel J. Bottom NOAA of tidal wetlands could further limit the capacity of estuarine food webs to support juvenile salmon during the last century, contemporary salmon food webs still rely disproportionately on wetland

  15. The influence of selected timber management practices of habitat use by wild turkeys in East Texas 

    E-print Network

    Martin, David John

    1984-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE INFLUENCE OF SELECTED TIMBER MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON HABITAT USE BY WILD TURKEYS IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DAVID JOHN MARTIN approved as to style and content by...: Wendell G. Swank (Chairma nglis (Member) Andrew W. Ez (Member) Craig . McKinley (Member) Wallace G. Klussmann (Head of Department) May 1984 ABSTRACT The Influence of Selected Timber Management Practices on Habitat Use by Wild Turkeys in East...

  16. Fluorine-rich planetary environments as possible habitats for life.

    PubMed

    Budisa, Nediljko; Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In polar aprotic organic solvents, fluorine might be an element of choice for life that uses selected fluorinated building blocks as monomers of choice for self-assembling of its catalytic polymers. Organofluorine compounds are extremely rare in the chemistry of life as we know it. Biomolecules, when fluorinated such as peptides or proteins, exhibit a "fluorous effect", i.e., they are fluorophilic (neither hydrophilic nor lipophilic). Such polymers, capable of creating self-sorting assemblies, resist denaturation by organic solvents by exclusion of fluorocarbon side chains from the organic phase. Fluorous cores consist of a compact interior, which is shielded from the surrounding solvent. Thus, we can anticipate that fluorine-containing "teflon"-like or "non-sticking" building blocks might be monomers of choice for the synthesis of organized polymeric structures in fluorine-rich planetary environments. Although no fluorine-rich planetary environment is known, theoretical considerations might help us to define chemistries that might support life in such environments. For example, one scenario is that all molecular oxygen may be used up by oxidation reactions on a planetary surface and fluorine gas could be released from F-rich magma later in the history of a planetary body to result in a fluorine-rich planetary environment. PMID:25370378

  17. Comparative life history of female mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis , in tidal freshwater and oligohaline habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Brown-Peterson; Mark S. Peterson

    1990-01-01

    Synopsis  Female Gambusia affinis were collected from low salinity\\/near-neutral pH and tidal freshwater\\/low pH localities to document life history variation\\u000a between these two habitats. Mosquito fish were 2.7 times more abundant in low salinity\\/near-neutral pH (2.37 ± 0.72 ppt; pH\\u000a = 5.73 ± 0.11) than in tidal freshwater\\/low pH (0.27 ± 0.19 ppt; pH = 4.46 ± 0.18) habitats in Old

  18. The relative influence of habitat amount and configuration on genetic structure across multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Millette, Katie L; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong interest in understanding how habitat spatial structure shapes the genetics of populations, the relative importance of habitat amount and configuration for patterns of genetic differentiation remains largely unexplored in empirical systems. In this study, we evaluate the relative influence of, and interactions among, the amount of habitat and aspects of its spatial configuration on genetic differentiation in the pitcher plant midge, Metriocnemus knabi. Larvae of this species are found exclusively within the water-filled leaves of pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea) in a system that is naturally patchy at multiple spatial scales (i.e., leaf, plant, cluster, peatland). Using generalized linear mixed models and multimodel inference, we estimated effects of the amount of habitat, patch size, interpatch distance, and patch isolation, measured at different spatial scales, on genetic differentiation (F ST) among larval samples from leaves within plants, plants within clusters, and clusters within peatlands. Among leaves and plants, genetic differentiation appears to be driven by female oviposition behaviors and is influenced by habitat isolation at a broad (peatland) scale. Among clusters, gene flow is spatially restricted and aspects of both the amount of habitat and configuration at the focal scale are important, as is their interaction. Our results suggest that both habitat amount and configuration can be important determinants of genetic structure and that their relative influence is scale dependent. PMID:25628865

  19. The relative influence of habitat amount and configuration on genetic structure across multiple spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Millette, Katie L; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong interest in understanding how habitat spatial structure shapes the genetics of populations, the relative importance of habitat amount and configuration for patterns of genetic differentiation remains largely unexplored in empirical systems. In this study, we evaluate the relative influence of, and interactions among, the amount of habitat and aspects of its spatial configuration on genetic differentiation in the pitcher plant midge, Metriocnemus knabi. Larvae of this species are found exclusively within the water-filled leaves of pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea) in a system that is naturally patchy at multiple spatial scales (i.e., leaf, plant, cluster, peatland). Using generalized linear mixed models and multimodel inference, we estimated effects of the amount of habitat, patch size, interpatch distance, and patch isolation, measured at different spatial scales, on genetic differentiation (FST) among larval samples from leaves within plants, plants within clusters, and clusters within peatlands. Among leaves and plants, genetic differentiation appears to be driven by female oviposition behaviors and is influenced by habitat isolation at a broad (peatland) scale. Among clusters, gene flow is spatially restricted and aspects of both the amount of habitat and configuration at the focal scale are important, as is their interaction. Our results suggest that both habitat amount and configuration can be important determinants of genetic structure and that their relative influence is scale dependent. PMID:25628865

  20. Early Archaean collapse basins, a habitat for early bacterial life.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijman, W.

    For a better definition of the sedimentary environment in which early life may have flourished during the early Archaean, understanding of the basin geometry in terms of shape, depth, and fill is a prerequisite. The basin fill is the easiest to approach, namely from the well exposed, low-grade metamorphic 3.4 - 3.5 Ga rock successions in the greenstone belts of the east Pilbara (Coppin Gap Greenstone Belt and North Pole Dome) in West Australia and of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (Buck Ridge volcano-sedimentary complex) in South Africa. They consist of mafic to ultramafic volcanic rocks, largely pillow basalts, with distinct intercalations of intermediate to felsic intrusive and volcanic rocks and of silicious sediments. The, partly volcaniclastic, silicious sediments of the Buck Ridge and North Pole volcano-sedimentary complexes form a regressive-transgressive sequence. They were deposited close to base level, and experienced occasional emersion. Both North Pole Chert and the chert of the Kittys Gap volcano-sedimentary complex in the Coppin Gap Greenstone Belt preserve the flat-and-channel architecture of a shallow tidal environment. Thickness and facies distribution appear to be genetically linked to systems, i.e. arrays, of syn-depositionally active, extensional faults. Structures at the rear, front and bottoms of these fault arrays, and the fault vergence from the basin margin towards the centre characterize the basins as due to surficial crustal collapse. Observations in the Pilbara craton point to a non-linear plan view and persistence for the basin-defining fault patterns over up to 50 Ma, during which several of these fault arrays became superposed. The faults linked high-crustal level felsic intrusions within the overall mafic rock suite via porphyry pipes, black chert veins and inferred hydrothermal circulations with the overlying felsic lavas, and more importantly, with the cherty sediments. Where such veins surfaced, high-energy breccias, and in the case of the North Pole Chert huge barite growths, are juxtaposed with the otherwise generally low-energy sediments. Such localities are interpreted as sites of hydrothermal vents. Within this large-scale geological context, many environments on the micro-scale were habitable for life, such as hydrothermal vents and their vicinities, volcanic rock surfaces, subsurface sediments and sediment surfaces. These early collapse basins, hosting this bacterial life, are only partially comparable to Earthly analogues. A resemblance with Venus' coronae and the chaos terranes on Mars is suggested. This study forms part of an international project on Earth's Earliest Sedimentary Basins, supported by the Dutch Foundation Dr. Schürmannfonds. 2

  1. Food Web Stability: The Influence of Trophic Flows across Habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin McCann

    1998-01-01

    In nature, fluxes across habitats often bring both nu- ory, which plays a central role in consumer-resource in- trient and energetic resources into areas of low productivity from areas of higher productivity. These inputs can alter consumption teractions and food web dynamics. They further rates of consumer and predator species in the recipient food webs, suggested that multichannel omnivory can

  2. Accessible habitat for shorebirds: Factors influencing its availability and conservation implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collazo, J.A.; O'Harra, D. A.; Kelly, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    We examined the relationship between water levels and accessible habitat, and how accessible habitat influenced Dunlin (Calidris alpina) and Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) numbers in managed wetlands at Pea Island (North Carolina) and Merritt Island (Florida) National Wildlife Refuges in 1998 and 1999. At Pea Island we experimentally manipulated water levels, which also allowed us to examine the effects of water level fluctuations on prey base. We examined these relationships because access to foraging habitat by shorebirds is positively related to the length of their tarsometatarsus, and in the southeastern United States, small calidrids are a numerically important component of the two million migrants using inland and managed wetlands. We confirmed the importance of shallow waters for Dunlin and Semipalmated Sandpiper-numbers increased with increasing availability of 0-4 cm habitat. At Merritt Island, Dunlin use was inversely related to variability in water depth of 0-4 cm. Minimizing the frequency and amplitude of water level fluctuations associated with single-capped culverts is necessary to improve habitat quality. After adjusting for accessibility, spring habitat requirements for Dunlin and Semipalmated Sandpiper at Pea Island were met under nearly all abundance scenarios. We identified water level targets that maximize accessible habitat at Pea Island. In contrast, winter habitat requirements for Dunlin at Merritt Island were not met except in one scenario. Seasonally low prey density contributed to the shortfall, suggesting that allocating more habitat is the primary management option. Manipulating water levels at Pea Island did not adversely affect the density of eight shorebird prey species. Estimates of accessible habitat and other parameters (e.g., turnover rates, prey biomass) are essential to set and implement realistic shorebird habitat conservation goals.

  3. Toward an Identification of Resources Influencing Habitat Use in a Multi-Specific Context

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Emmanuelle; Said, Sonia; Hamann, Jean-Luc; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between animal behaviour and the environment are both shaping observed habitat use. Despite the importance of inter-specific interactions on the habitat use performed by individuals, most previous analyses have focused on case studies of single species. By focusing on two sympatric populations of large herbivores with contrasting body size, we went one step beyond by studying variation in home range size and identifying the factors involved in such variation, to define how habitat features such as resource heterogeneity, resource quality, and openness created by hurricane or forest managers, and constraints may influence habitat use at the individual level. We found a large variability among individual's home range size in both species, particularly in summer. Season appeared as the most important factor accounting for observed variation in home range size. Regarding habitat features, we found that (i) the proportion of area damaged by the hurricane was the only habitat component that inversely influenced roe deer home range size, (ii) this habitat type also influenced both diurnal and nocturnal red deer home range sizes, (iii) home range size of red deer during the day was inversely influenced by the biomass of their preferred plants, as were both diurnal and nocturnal core areas of the red deer home range, and (iv) we do not find any effect of resource heterogeneity on home range size in any case. Our results suggest that a particular habitat type (i.e. areas damaged by hurricane) can be used by individuals of sympatric species because it brings both protected and dietary resources. Thus, it is necessary to maintain the openness of these areas and to keep animal density quite low as observed in these hunted populations to limit competition between these sympatric populations of herbivores. PMID:22216164

  4. Influence of Mowing Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis on Winter Habitat for Wildlife

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirk W. Davies; Jonathan D. Bates; Dustin D. Johnson; Aleta M. Nafus

    2009-01-01

    Mowing is commonly implemented to Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh (Wyoming big sagebrush) plant communities to improve wildlife habitat, increase forage production\\u000a for livestock, and create fuel breaks for fire suppression. However, information detailing the influence of mowing on winter\\u000a habitat for wildlife is lacking. This information is crucial because many wildlife species depended on

  5. Influences of fluctuating flows on spawning habitat and recruitment success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, D. J.; Krause, C. W.; Novinger, D. C.

    2005-05-01

    Over the 50 years of daily peak power generation, no ramping restrictions, and loss of gravel due to operations of Philpott Dam, on Smith River, has created a wider, rectangular-shaped channel, with steeper banks. The pattern caused by channel degradation, tributary headcutting, bank erosion, and downstream aggradation has limited the length of productive habitat to between 3 and 10 river kilometers from the dam. Here the channel appears to contain key habitats where we found the highest redd densities, abundance, and spawner biomass for brown trout (Salmo trutta). Recruitment of brown trout to the fishable size classes is constrained by the daily hydropower peaking operations. The number of young brown trout produced each year was strongly related to the average magnitude of the peak flow and the duration of generation flows. Magnitude of peak flows also depressed abundance of native fishes. Although, brown trout actively removed fine sediment via redd construction and spawning, thereby increasing gravel permeability, the fine sediments from tributaries and bank erosion rapidly intruded into the spawning gravel in downstream reaches of the river. We recommend mitigating the effects of fluctuating releases from Philpott Dam through a combination of flow management and habitat improvement.

  6. Influence of habitat amount, arrangement, and use on population trend estimates of male Kirtland's warblers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donner, D.M.; Probst, J.R.; Ribic, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Kirtland's warblers (Dendroica kirtlandii) persist in a naturally patchy environment of young, regenerating jack pine forests (i.e., 5-23 years old) created after wildfires and human logging activities. We examined how changing landscape structure from 26 years of forest management and wildfire disturbances influenced population size and spatial dispersion of male Kirtland's warblers within their restricted breeding range in northern Lower Michigan, USA. The male Kirtland's warbler population was six times larger in 2004 (1,322) compared to 1979 (205); the change was nonlinear with 1987 and 1994 identified as significant points of change. In 1987, the population trend began increasing after a slowly declining trend prior to 1987, and the rate of increase appeared to slow after 1994. Total amount of suitable habitat and the relative area of wildfire-regenerated habitat were the most important factors explaining population trend. Suitable habitat increased 149% primarily due to increasing plantations from forest management. The relative amount and location of wildfire-regenerated habitat modified the distribution of males among various habitat types, and the spatial variation in their abundance across the primary breeding range. These findings indicate that the Kirtland's warbler male population shifted its use of habitat types temporally and spatially as the population increased and as the relative availability of habitats changed through time. We demonstrate that researchers and managers need to consider not only habitat quality, but the temporal and the spatial context of habitat availability and population levels when making habitat restoration decisions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  8. Influence of organic matter on collembolan communities in reedbed habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uteseny, K.; Drapela, T.; Frouz, J.

    2009-04-01

    The combination of the organic matter, micro-climatic environments and plant cover belongs to important factors for the distribution of soil meso-fauna, especially Collembola. There are no studies attending to these factors on collembolan communities in reedbed vegetation. The main goals of our investigation were therefore to compare diversity of Collembola in redbed habitats of Lake Neudsiedl, eastern Austria, and to assess particularly the role of organic matter with regard to the collembolan community structure. Soil samples were taken from April 1997 to October 1997 at fifteen study sites covered with Phragmatis australis of different age. Changes in the structure and composition of the assemblages of Collembola were examined.

  9. Deep-Seated Landslides Influence Topographic Variability and Salmon Habitat in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, H. W.; Fonstad, M. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    A well-accepted idea in geomorphology is that landforms control the type and distribution of biological habitat. However, the linkages between geomorphology and ecology remain poorly understood. In rivers, the geomorphic template controls the hydraulic environment, partly shaping the river ecosystem. But what processes shape the geomorphic template? Here, I examine how two hillslope processes dominant in the Oregon Coast Range, debris flows and deep-seated landslides, affect valley floor width and channel slope, key components of the geomorphic template in riverine ecosystems. I then investigate how patterns in potential salmon habitat differ between eleven streams dominated by deep-seated landslides and eleven streams dominated by debris flows. I show that terrain influenced by deep-seated landslides exhibits (1) valley widths that are more variable throughout the network but less locally variable, (2) more variable channel slopes, and (3) more potential salmon habitat as well as significantly more connectivity between habitat types.

  10. Feeding habitats of nesting wading birds: Spatial use and social influences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to relate social interactions to feeding-habitat use, 6 spp. of wading birds were observed near a major colony site in coastal North Carolina [USA]. Three spatial scales of habitat use were considered: the general orientation to and from the colony the habitat patch and the microhabitat. Departure-arrival directions of great egrets (Casmerodius albus), snowy egrets (Egretta thula), cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis), little blue herons (E. caerulea), tricolored herons (E. tricolor) and glossy ibises (Plegadis falcinellus) were monitored at the colony site to document coarse patterns of feeding-habitat use. Observations made at 5 different wetland sites to monitor between-habitat and within-habitat patterns for the 5 aquatic-feeding species. A broad and variable use of feeding habitat over time was indicated. At the coarsest scale (i.e., orientation at the colony) diffuse patterns, influenced little by either inter- or intraspecific social interaction, were found for all species. At the habitat patch level, only 1 of 5 wetland sites was relatively consistent in attracting feeding birds and its use increased from May-June. Few groups were seen at 4 of the 5 sites. At the 1 attractive site, the within-habitat patterns again were spatially variable over time, except for those of the abundant snowy egret, whose microhabitat preference was fairly consistent. Glossy ibises and snowy egrets frequently formed mixed-species groups, little blue herons were the least social and great egrets and tricolored herons generally occurred in groups of less than 10 birds but rarely in groups larger than 30. The close association between snowy egrets and glossy ibises appeared to be based on a beater-follower relationship: the probing nonvisually feeding ibises make prey more available to the followers. Local enhancement appeared to play a more important role than did any information-sharing at the colony.

  11. Interplay of robustness and plasticity of life-history traits drives ecotypic differentiation in thermally distinct habitats.

    PubMed

    Liefting, M; van Grunsven, R H A; Morrissey, M B; Timmermans, M J T N; Ellers, J

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic plasticity describes the ability of an individual to alter its phenotype in response to the environment and is potentially adaptive when dealing with environmental variation. However, robustness in the face of a changing environment may often be beneficial for traits that are tightly linked to fitness. We hypothesized that robustness of some traits may depend on specific patterns of plasticity within and among other traits. We used a reaction norm approach to study robustness and phenotypic plasticity of three life-history traits of the collembolan Orchesella cincta in environments with different thermal regimes. We measured adult mass, age at maturity and growth rate of males and females from heath and forest habitats at two temperatures (12 and 22 °C). We found evidence for ecotype-specific robustness of female adult mass to temperature, with a higher level of robustness in the heath ecotype. This robustness is facilitated by plastic adjustments of growth rate and age at maturity. Furthermore, female fecundity is strongly influenced by female adult mass, explaining the importance of realizing a high mass across temperatures for females. These findings indicate that different predicted outcomes of life-history theory can be combined within one species' ontogeny and that models describing life-history strategies should not assume that traits like growth rate are maximized under all conditions. On a methodological note, we report a systematic inflation of variation when standard deviations and correlation coefficients are calculated from family means as opposed to individual data within a family structure. PMID:25818389

  12. INFLUENCE OF FRESHWATER INPUT ON THE HABITAT VALUE OF OYSTER REEFS IN THREE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ESTUARIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to examine the influence of freshwater input on the habitat value of oyster reefs, a spatiotemporal comparison of reef-resident fishes and decapod crustaceans was conducted during three seasonally dry and three seasonally wet months in three Southwest Florida estuaries: ...

  13. Habitat surrounding patch reefs influences the diet and nutrition of the western rock lobster

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study the influence of habitat on the diet and nutrition of a common reef-associated generalist consumer, the western rock lobster Panulirus cygnus, was tested. Stable isotopes (13C/12C and 15N/14N) and gut contents were used to assess the diet of lobsters collected from ...

  14. Doctors Can Influence End-Of-Life Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_152964.html Doctors Can Influence End-of-Life Care Terminally ill patients of physicians who frequently ... patients enroll in hospice to improve end of life care," Obermeyer said. The study was published in ...

  15. Tektite 2 habitability research program: Day-to-day life in the habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlis, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Because it is widely agreed that the field of environmental psychology is quite young, it was determined that a sample of recorded observations from a representative mission should be included in the report on Tektite to give the professional reader a better feeling of normal day-to-day life in the isolated habitat. Names of the crew members have been replaced with numbers and some off-color words have been replaced by more acceptable slang; some remarks have been omitted that might lead to easy identification of the subjects. Otherwise, the following pages are exactly as transcribed during the late afternoons and the evenings of the mission.

  16. Joint Effects of Habitat Heterogeneity and Species’ Life-History Traits on Population Dynamics in Spatially Structured Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinping; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Both habitat heterogeneity and species’ life-history traits play important roles in driving population dynamics, yet there is little scientific consensus around the combined effect of these two factors on populations in complex landscapes. Using a spatially explicit agent-based model, we explored how interactions between habitat spatial structure (defined here as the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality) and species life-history strategies (defined here by species environmental tolerance and movement capacity) affect population dynamics in spatially heterogeneous landscapes. We compared the responses of four hypothetical species with different life-history traits to four landscape scenarios differing in the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality. The results showed that the population size of all hypothetical species exhibited a substantial increase as the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality increased, yet the pattern of population increase was shaped by species’ movement capacity. The increasing scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality promoted the resource share of individuals, but had little effect on the mean mortality rate of individuals. Species’ movement capacity also determined the proportion of individuals in high-quality cells as well as the proportion of individuals experiencing competition in response to increased spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality. Positive correlations between the resource share of individuals and the proportion of individuals experiencing competition indicate that large-scale spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality may mask the density-dependent effect on populations through increasing the resource share of individuals, especially for species with low mobility. These findings suggest that low-mobility species may be more sensitive to habitat spatial heterogeneity in spatially structured landscapes. In addition, localized movement in combination with spatial autocorrelation may increase the population size, despite increased density effects. PMID:25232739

  17. Post-settlement Life Cycle Migration Patterns and Habitat Preference of Coral Reef Fish that use Seagrass and Mangrove Habitats as Nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocheret de la Morinière, E.; Pollux, B. J. A.; Nagelkerken, I.; van der Velde, G.

    2002-08-01

    Mangroves and seagrass beds have received considerable attention as nurseries for reef fish, but comparisons have often been made with different methodologies. Thus, relative importance of different habitats to specific size-classes of reef fish species remains unclear. In this study, 35 transects in 11 sites of mangroves, seagrass beds and coral reef were surveyed daily, in and in front of a marine bay on the island of Curaçao (Netherlands Antilles). The density and size-frequency of nine reef fish species (including herbivores, zoobenthivores and piscivores) was determined during a five-month period using a single methodology, viz. underwater visual census. All species were ' nursery species ' in terms of their high densities of juveniles in mangroves or seagrass beds. Relative density distribution of the size-classes of the selected species over mangroves and seagrass beds suggested high levels of preference for either mangroves or seagrass beds of some species, while other species used both habitats as a nursery. Spatial size distribution of the nine species suggested three possible models for Post-settlement Life Cycle Migrations (PLCM). Haemulon sciurus, Lutjanus griseus, L. apodus, and Acanthurus chirurgus appear to settle and grow up in bay habitats such as mangroves and seagrass beds, and in a later stage migrate to the coral reef (Long Distance PLCM). Juveniles of Acanthurus bahianus and Scarus taeniopterus were found only in bay habitats at close proximity to the coral reef or on the reef itself, and their migration pattern concerns a limited spatial scale (Short Distance PLCM). Some congeneric species carry out either Long Distance PLCM or Short Distance PLCM, thereby temporarily alleviating competition in reef habitats. Haemulon flavolineatum, Ocyurus chrysurus and Scarus iserti displayed a Stepwise PLCM pattern in which smallest juveniles dwell in the mouth of the bay, larger individuals then move to habitats deeper into the bay, where they grow up to a (sub-) adult size at which they migrate to nearby coral reef habitats. This type of stepwise migration in opposite directions, combined with different preference for either mangroves or seagrass beds among (size-classes of) species, shows that reef fish using in-bay habitats during post-settlement life stages may do so by choice and not merely because of stochastic dispersal of their larvae, and underline the necessity of these habitats to Caribbean coral reef systems.

  18. MWSA's physical habitat approach - combining knowledge of habitat requirements with mechanisms of geomorphic and anthropogenic influence on stream channel form

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective environmental policy decisions benefit from stream habitat information that is accurate, precise, and relevant. The recent National Wadeable Streams Assessment (NWSA) carried out by the U.S. EPA required physical habitat information sufficiently comprehensive to facilit...

  19. Selective harvesting and habitat loss produce long-term life history changes in a mouflon population.

    PubMed

    Garel, Mathieu; Cugnasse, Jean-Marc; Maillard, Daniel; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Hewison, A J Mark; Dubray, Dominique

    2007-09-01

    We examined the long-term effects (28 years) of habitat loss and phenotype-based selective harvest on body mass, horn size, and horn shape of mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon) in southern France. This population has experienced habitat deterioration (loss of 50.8% of open area) since its introduction in 1956 and unrestricted selective hunting of the largest horned males since 1973. Both processes are predicted to lead to a decrease in phenotype quality by decreasing habitat quality and by reducing the reproductive contribution of individuals carrying traits that are targeted by hunters. Body mass and body size of both sexes and horn measurements of males markedly decreased (by 3.4-38.3%) in all age classes from the 1970s. Lamb body mass varied in relation to the spatiotemporal variation of habitat closure within the hunting-free reserve, suggesting that habitat closure explains part of these changes. However, the fact that there was no significant spatial variation in body mass in the early part of the study, when a decline in phenotypic quality already had occurred, provided support for the influence of selective harvesting. We also found that the allometric relationship between horn breadth and horn length changed over the study period. For a given horn length, horn breadth was lower during the second part of the study. This result, as well as changes in horn curve diameter, supports the interpretation that selective harvesting of males based on their horn configuration had evolutionary consequences for horn shape, since this phenotypic trait is less likely to be affected by changes in habitat characteristics. Moreover, males required more time (approximately four years) to develop a desirable trophy, suggesting that trophy hunting favors the reproductive contribution of animals with slow-growing horns. Managers should exploit hunters' desire for trophy males to finance management strategies which ensure a balance between the population and its environment. However, for long-term sustainable exploitation, harvest strategy should also ensure that selectively targeted males are allowed to contribute genetically to the next generations. PMID:17913127

  20. Predation and infanticide influence ideal free choice by a parrot occupying heterogeneous tropical habitats.

    PubMed

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Beissinger, Steven R

    2010-06-01

    The ideal free distribution (IFD) predicts that organisms will disperse to sites that maximize their fitness based on availability of resources. Habitat heterogeneity underlies resource variation and influences spatial variation in demography and the distribution of populations. We relate nest site productivity at multiple scales measured over a decade to habitat quality in a box-nesting population of Forpus passerinus (green-rumped parrotlets) in Venezuela to examine critical IFD assumptions. Variation in reproductive success at the local population and neighborhood scales had a much larger influence on productivity (fledglings per nest box per year) than nest site or female identity. Habitat features were reliable cues of nest site quality. Nest sites with less vegetative cover produced greater numbers of fledglings than sites with more cover. However, there was also a competitive cost to nesting in high-quality, low-vegetative cover nest boxes, as these sites experienced the most infanticide events. In the lowland local population, water depth and cover surrounding nest sites were related with F. passerinus productivity. Low vegetative cover and deeper water were associated with lower predation rates, suggesting that predation could be a primary factor driving habitat selection patterns. Parrotlets also demonstrated directional dispersal. Pairs that changed nest sites were more likely to disperse from poor-quality nest sites to high-quality nest sites rather than vice versa, and juveniles were more likely to disperse to, or remain in, the more productive of the two local populations. Parrotlets exhibited three characteristics fundamental to the IFD: habitat heterogeneity within and between local populations, reliable habitat cues to productivity, and active dispersal to sites of higher fitness. PMID:20135326

  1. REGULAR ARTICLE Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool

    E-print Network

    Adair, E. Carol

    REGULAR ARTICLE Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool dynamics: Bromus tectorum, storage, and release. Using the replacement of C3­C4 perennial grasses by the invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum as a case study, we investigated the influence of phenology and life span on pulse responses

  2. How do dispersal costs and habitat selection influence realized population connectivity?

    PubMed

    Burgess, Scott C; Treml, Eric A; Marshall, Dustin J

    2012-06-01

    Despite the importance of dispersal for population connectivity, dispersal is often costly to the individual. A major impediment to understanding connectivity has been a lack of data combining the movement of individuals and their survival to reproduction in the new habitat (realized connectivity). Although mortality often occurs during dispersal (an immediate cost), in many organisms costs are paid after dispersal (deferred costs). It is unclear how such deferred costs influence the mismatch between dispersal and realized connectivity. Through a series of experiments in the field and laboratory, we estimated both direct and indirect deferred costs in a marine bryozoan (Bugula neritina). We then used the empirical data to parameterize a theoretical model in order to formalize predictions about how dispersal costs influence realized connectivity. Individuals were more likely to colonize poor-quality habitat after prolonged dispersal durations. Individuals that colonized poor-quality habitat performed poorly after colonization because of some property of the habitat (an indirect deferred cost) rather than from prolonged dispersal per se (a direct deferred cost). Our theoretical model predicted that indirect deferred costs could result in nonlinear mismatches between spatial patterns of potential and realized connectivity. The deferred costs of dispersal are likely to be crucial for determining how well patterns of dispersal reflect realized connectivity. Ignoring these deferred costs could lead to inaccurate predictions of spatial population dynamics. PMID:22834378

  3. Influence of habitat structure on fish assemblage of an artificial reef in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hackradt, Carlos Werner; Félix-Hackradt, Fabiana Cézar; García-Charton, José Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Habitat complexity strongly influences reef fish community composition. An understanding of the underlying reasons for this relationship is important for evaluating the suitability of artificial reef (AR) habitats as a marine resource management tool. We studied the influence of AR habitat structure on fish assemblage composition off the southern coast of Brazil. We found that reef blocks with greater area and number of holes possessed the greatest fish species richness and abundance. Reef blocks with greater complexity had higher abundance of almost 30% of fish species present. Natural reef (NR) and AR were different in their fish species composition, trophic structure and categories of water column occupancy by fish (spatial categories). Although NR was more diverse and harboured more trophic levels, AR presented the higher abundances and the presence of distinct fish species that underlined their importance at a regional scale. The greater availability of sheltering habitat where hard substrate is scarce, together with their frequent use by economically important species, make AR a useful tool for coastal management when certain ecological conditions are met. PMID:22014376

  4. Communication breakdown? Habitat influences on black-capped chickadee dawn choruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingebjørg Jean K. Hansen; Ken A. Otter; Harry van Oort; Carmen I. Holschuh

    2005-01-01

    The dawn chorus of the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is a communication network that functions in the dissemination of essential information for both males and females. Habitat\\u000a type may influence the performance of this network, and if recognized, chickadees may attempt to behaviorally compensate for\\u000a detrimental changes in the form of increased movement. We studied the dawn chorus of 66

  5. Virtual Habitat -a dynamic simulation of closed life support systems -human model status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Czupalla, M. Sc.; Zhukov, Anton; Hwang, Su-Au; Schnaitmann, Jonas

    In order to optimize Life Support Systems on a system level, stability questions must be in-vestigated. To do so the exploration group of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is developing the "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB) dynamic LSS simulation software. V-HAB shall provide the possibility to conduct dynamic simulations of entire mission scenarios for any given LSS configuration. The Virtual Habitat simulation tool consists of four main modules: • Closed Environment Module (CEM) -monitoring of compounds in a closed environment • Crew Module (CM) -dynamic human simulation • P/C Systems Module (PCSM) -dynamic P/C subsystems • Plant Module (PM) -dynamic plant simulation The core module of the simulation is the dynamic and environment sensitive human module. Introduced in its basic version in 2008, the human module has been significantly updated since, increasing its capabilities and maturity significantly. In this paper three newly added human model subsystems (thermal regulation, digestion and schedule controller) are introduced touching also on the human stress subsystem which is cur-rently under development. Upon the introduction of these new subsystems, the integration of these into the overall V-HAB human model is discussed, highlighting the impact on the most important I/F. The overall human model capabilities shall further be summarized and presented based on meaningful test cases. In addition to the presentation of the results, the correlation strategy for the Virtual Habitat human model shall be introduced assessing the models current confidence level and giving an outlook on the future correlation strategy. Last but not least, the remaining V-HAB mod-ules shall be introduced shortly showing how the human model is integrated into the overall simulation.

  6. Beyond a single life stage: investigating the effects of hydro-geomorphic processes on complementary types of fish habitat (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A.; Cienciala, P.

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between sediment dynamics (mobilization, transport, and deposition), channel boundary shape, and flow properties can form, modify, and disturb fish habitat in rivers. Although the closest linkages between hydro-geomorphic habitat template and fish populations occur during spawning and egg incubation, the same physical factors also define other, complementary types of habitat required for different activities and at different life stages. To gain a more holistic understanding of the relationship between channel processes and salmonid fish, we conducted a comprehensive study that linked spawning, incubation, and rearing habitat in a mountain stream in British Columbia. Field data on channel change, hydraulics, bed texture, and other channel properties was used to investigate and model spatial organization of habitat availability and disturbance. We have placed strong emphasis on ecologically relevant scale: the inquiry extended to four reaches, which cover the range of typical fish mobility in our study site, and adopted sub-meter resolution that enables identification of relevant habitat patches. In addition, recognizing the central role of channel hydraulics in the interactions between fish and the geomorphic habitat template, we have also explored the closely associated and important issue of how to reconcile measurement and modeling scales.

  7. Impact of crop production on air quality in life support dynamics in closed habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, T.

    1987-01-01

    Interest in human-designed closed habitats - where the substances needed for human life support are continuously regenerated from waste products - is growing, as apparent from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Closed Ecological Life Support Systems Program, the Soviet Union's Bios experiments, and the Biosphere II Project in Arizona. Nuclear-powered bases on the moon and Mars will have food-growing capabilities, and through gas-exchange processes these crops will alter the atmospheric composition. This study focuses on major gases tied to human life support: CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and water vapor. Since actual systems are years and likely decades away, simulation studies can indicate necessary further research and provide instruction about the predicted behavior of such systems. To look at the first-order plant dynamics, i.e., the production of O/sub 2/ and water vapor and the consumption of CO/sub 2/, a simulation model is constructed with crop, human, and waste subsystems. The plant can either share an atmosphere with the humans or be separate, linked by osmotic or mechanical gas exchangers. The crop subsystem is sketched. Stoichiometric equations for the biosynthesis of protein, carbohydrates, and lipids in the edible portion and carbohydrates, fiber, and lignin in the inedible portion govern growth, mimicking that currently observed in the latest hydroponic wheat experiments.

  8. The influence of fine-scale habitat features on regional variation in population performance of alpine White-tailed Ptarmigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, B.; Martin, K.

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed (explicitly or implicitly) that animals select habitat features to maximize fitness. However, there is often a mismatch between preferred habitats and indices of individual and population measures of performance. We examined the influence of fine-scale habitat selection on the overall population performance of the White-tailed Ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura), an alpine specialist, in two subdivided populations whose habitat patches are configured differently. The central region of Vancouver Island, Canada, has more continuous and larger habitat patches than the southern region. In 2003 and 2004, using paired logistic regression between used (n = 176) and available (n = 324) sites, we identified food availability, distance to standing water, and predator cover as preferred habitat components . We then quantified variation in population performance in the two regions in terms of sex ratio, age structure (n = 182 adults and yearlings), and reproductive success (n = 98 females) on the basis of 8 years of data (1995-1999, 2002-2004). Region strongly influenced females' breeding success, which, unsuccessful hens included, was consistently higher in the central region (n = 77 females) of the island than in the south (n = 21 females, P = 0.01). The central region also had a much higher proportion of successful hens (87%) than did the south (55%, P < 0.001). In light of our findings, we suggest that population performance is influenced by a combination of fine-scale habitat features and coarse-scale habitat configuration. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  9. Analysis of the Influence of Spatial Pattern in Habitat Selection Studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Design and analysis of wildlife habitat selection studies typically do not assess the effect of spatial pattern on the habitat selection process. Effects of landscape scale pattern on habitat selection cannot be accomplished without replicate study areas, because pattern is a single, albeit multifaceted, attribute of an area. For a single area, however, the influence of pattern-related characteristics, such as shape and edge shared with adjacent patches, can be estimated by using GLIM (McCullough and Neider 1983) procedures to model patch-specific frequency counts of animal use as a function of these parameters. This approach is evaluated and illustrated with simulated breeding-bird counts in a South Carolina study area for which a GIS land cover classification is available. A related technique for evaluating whether movement from patch to patch is selective is developed and illustrated for designs that involve collection of trajectory data from monitored individuals. These designs and analyses are feasible given current GIS and GPS technology. Statistical inferences from habitat selection studies should be interpreted within the context of a range of scales at which animals differentiate between patch attributes.

  10. Life-history traits predict species responses to habitat area and isolation: a cross-continental synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Ockinger; Oliver Schweiger; Thomas O. Crist; Diane M. Debinski; Jochen Krauss; Mikko Kuussaari; Jessica D. Petersen; Juha Poyry; Josef Settele; Riccardo Bommarco

    2010-01-01

    There is a lack of quantitative syntheses of fragmentation effects across species and biogeographic regions, especially with respect to species life-history traits. We used data from 24 independent studies of butterflies and moths from a wide range of habitats and landscapes in Europe and North America to test whether traits associated with dispersal capacity, niche breadth and reproductive rate modify

  11. Microbial Biogeography of Arctic Streams: Exploring Influences of Lithology and Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, Julia R.; Bowden, William B.; Giordano, Rosanna; Flinn, Michael B.; Crump, Byron C.

    2012-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene sequencing were used to explore the community composition of bacterial communities in biofilms on sediments (epipssamon) and rocks (epilithon) in stream reaches that drain watersheds with contrasting lithologies in the Noatak National Preserve, Alaska. Bacterial community composition varied primarily by stream habitat and secondarily by lithology. Positive correlations were detected between bacterial community structure and nutrients, base cations, and dissolved organic carbon. Our results showed significant differences at the stream habitat, between epipssamon and epilithon bacterial communities, which we expected. Our results also showed significant differences at the landscape scale that could be related to different lithologies and associated stream biogeochemistry. These results provide insight into the bacterial community composition of little known and pristine arctic stream ecosystems and illustrate how differences in the lithology, soils, and vegetation community of the terrestrial environment interact to influence stream bacterial taxonomic richness and composition. PMID:22936932

  12. Elk migration patterns and human activity influence wolf habitat use in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Abigail; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Middleton, Arthur D.; Jimenez, Mike; McWhirter, Douglas; Barber, Jarrett; Gerow, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the ecological dynamics underlying human–wildlife conflicts is important for the management and conservation of wildlife populations. In landscapes still occupied by large carnivores, many ungulate prey species migrate seasonally, yet little empirical research has explored the relationship between carnivore distribution and ungulate migration strategy. In this study, we evaluate the influence of elk (Cervus elaphus) distribution and other landscape features on wolf (Canis lupus) habitat use in an area of chronic wolf–livestock conflict in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA. Using three years of fine-scale wolf (n = 14) and elk (n = 81) movement data, we compared the seasonal habitat use of wolves in an area dominated by migratory elk with that of wolves in an adjacent area dominated by resident elk. Most migratory elk vacate the associated winter wolf territories each summer via a 40–60 km migration, whereas resident elk remain accessible to wolves year-round. We used a generalized linear model to compare the relative probability of wolf use as a function of GIS-based habitat covariates in the migratory and resident elk areas. Although wolves in both areas used elk-rich habitat all year, elk density in summer had a weaker influence on the habitat use of wolves in the migratory elk area than the resident elk area. Wolves employed a number of alternative strategies to cope with the departure of migratory elk. Wolves in the two areas also differed in their disposition toward roads. In winter, wolves in the migratory elk area used habitat close to roads, while wolves in the resident elk area avoided roads. In summer, wolves in the migratory elk area were indifferent to roads, while wolves in resident elk areas strongly avoided roads, presumably due to the location of dens and summering elk combined with different traffic levels. Study results can help wildlife managers to anticipate the movements and establishment of wolf packs as they expand into areas with migratory or resident prey populations, varying levels of human activity, and front-country rangelands with potential for conflicts with livestock.

  13. Effect of habitat preference on frond life span in three Cyathea tree ferns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Tzu Yun; Wang, Hsiang Hua; Lun Kuo, Yao; Kume, Tomonori

    2013-04-01

    It has been reported that plants living in various geographical areas had different physiological forms, as factors of microenvironment have strong impacts on physiological characters. However, the physiological characters of fronds have been scarcely reported in ferns. In this study, we investigated physiological differences in response to the habitat preference in the three tree ferns in northeast Taiwan, Cyathea lepifera, C. spinulosa, and C. podophylla, prefer to open site, edge of forest, and interior forest, respectively. The canopy openness above the individuals of C. lepifera, C. spinulosa and C. podophylla were 29.2 ± 14.10 , 7.0 ± 3.07 and 5.0 ± 2.24 %, respectively. Among three species, C. podophylla had the longest frond life span (13.0 ± 4.12 months) than the two others (C. lepifera (6.8 ± 1.29 months) and C. spinulosa (7.3 ±1.35 months). Our result supported the general patterns that shade intolerant species have a shorter leaf life span than shade tolerant species. The maximum net CO2 assimilation of C. lepifera, C. spinulosa and C. podophylla were 11.46 ± 1.34, 8.27 ± 0.69, and 6.34 ± 0.54 ?mol CO2 m-2 s-1, respectively. As well, C. lepifera had the highest photosynthetic light saturation point (LSP), while C. podophylla had the lowest LSP among these three tree ferns. These suggested that C. lepifera could be more efficient for capturing and utilizing light resources under the larger canopy openness condition than the other two species. We also found that frond C : N ratio were positively correlated with frond life span among species. C. podophylla, with the longest frond life span, had the highest frond C : N ratio (22.17 ± 1.95), which was followed by C. spinulosa (18.58 ± 1.37) and C. lepifera (18.68 ± 2.63) with shorter frond life span. The results were consistent to the theory that the fronds and leaves of shade intolerant species have high photosynthetic abilities with low C : N ratio. Key words: Canopy openness, frond life span, tree fern, Cyathea, frond C : N ratio

  14. The influence of mitigation on sage-grouse habitat selection within an energy development field.

    PubMed

    Fedy, Bradley C; Kirol, Christopher P; Sutphin, Andrew L; Maechtle, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Growing global energy demands ensure the continued growth of energy development. Energy development in wildlife areas can significantly impact wildlife populations. Efforts to mitigate development impacts to wildlife are on-going, but the effectiveness of such efforts is seldom monitored or assessed. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are sensitive to energy development and likely serve as an effective umbrella species for other sagebrush-steppe obligate wildlife. We assessed the response of birds within an energy development area before and after the implementation of mitigation action. Additionally, we quantified changes in habitat distribution and abundance in pre- and post-mitigation landscapes. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development at large spatial scales is well documented. We limited our research to directly within an energy development field in order to assess the influence of mitigation in close proximity to energy infrastructure. We used nest-location data (n = 488) within an energy development field to develop habitat selection models using logistic regression on data from 4 years of research prior to mitigation and for 4 years following the implementation of extensive mitigation efforts (e.g., decreased activity, buried powerlines). The post-mitigation habitat selection models indicated less avoidance of wells (well density ? = 0.18 ± 0.08) than the pre-mitigation models (well density ? = -0.09 ± 0.11). However, birds still avoided areas of high well density and nests were not found in areas with greater than 4 wells per km2 and the majority of nests (63%) were located in areas with ? 1 well per km2. Several other model coefficients differed between the two time periods and indicated stronger selection for sagebrush (pre-mitigation ? = 0.30 ± 0.09; post-mitigation ? = 0.82 ± 0.08) and less avoidance of rugged terrain (pre-mitigation ? = -0.35 ± 0.12; post-mitigation ? = -0.05 ± 0.09). Mitigation efforts implemented may be responsible for the measurable improvement in sage-grouse nesting habitats within the development area. However, we cannot reject alternative hypotheses concerning the influence of population density and intraspecific competition. Additionally, we were unable to assess the actual fitness consequences of mitigation or the source-sink dynamics of the habitats. We compared the pre-mitigation and post-mitigation models predicted as maps with habitats ranked from low to high relative probability of use (equal-area bins: 1 - 5). We found more improvement in habitat rank between the two time periods around mitigated wells compared to non-mitigated wells. Informed mitigation within energy development fields could help improve habitats within the field. We recommend that any mitigation effort include well-informed plans to monitor the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation actions that assess both habitat use and relevant fitness parameters. PMID:25835296

  15. The Influence of Mitigation on Sage-Grouse Habitat Selection within an Energy Development Field

    PubMed Central

    Fedy, Bradley C.; Kirol, Christopher P.; Sutphin, Andrew L.; Maechtle, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Growing global energy demands ensure the continued growth of energy development. Energy development in wildlife areas can significantly impact wildlife populations. Efforts to mitigate development impacts to wildlife are on-going, but the effectiveness of such efforts is seldom monitored or assessed. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are sensitive to energy development and likely serve as an effective umbrella species for other sagebrush-steppe obligate wildlife. We assessed the response of birds within an energy development area before and after the implementation of mitigation action. Additionally, we quantified changes in habitat distribution and abundance in pre- and post-mitigation landscapes. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development at large spatial scales is well documented. We limited our research to directly within an energy development field in order to assess the influence of mitigation in close proximity to energy infrastructure. We used nest-location data (n = 488) within an energy development field to develop habitat selection models using logistic regression on data from 4 years of research prior to mitigation and for 4 years following the implementation of extensive mitigation efforts (e.g., decreased activity, buried powerlines). The post-mitigation habitat selection models indicated less avoidance of wells (well density ? = 0.18 ± 0.08) than the pre-mitigation models (well density ? = -0.09 ± 0.11). However, birds still avoided areas of high well density and nests were not found in areas with greater than 4 wells per km2 and the majority of nests (63%) were located in areas with ? 1 well per km2. Several other model coefficients differed between the two time periods and indicated stronger selection for sagebrush (pre-mitigation ? = 0.30 ± 0.09; post-mitigation ? = 0.82 ± 0.08) and less avoidance of rugged terrain (pre-mitigation ? = -0.35 ± 0.12; post-mitigation ? = -0.05 ± 0.09). Mitigation efforts implemented may be responsible for the measurable improvement in sage-grouse nesting habitats within the development area. However, we cannot reject alternative hypotheses concerning the influence of population density and intraspecific competition. Additionally, we were unable to assess the actual fitness consequences of mitigation or the source-sink dynamics of the habitats. We compared the pre-mitigation and post-mitigation models predicted as maps with habitats ranked from low to high relative probability of use (equal-area bins: 1 – 5). We found more improvement in habitat rank between the two time periods around mitigated wells compared to non-mitigated wells. Informed mitigation within energy development fields could help improve habitats within the field. We recommend that any mitigation effort include well-informed plans to monitor the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation actions that assess both habitat use and relevant fitness parameters. PMID:25835296

  16. Virtual Habitat -a Dynamic Simulation of Closed Life Support Systems -Overall Status and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Anton; Schnaitmann, Jonas; Mecsaci, Ahmad; Bickel, Thomas; Markus Czupalla, M. Sc.

    In order to optimize Life Support Systems (LSS) on a system level, stability questions and closure grade must be investigated. To do so the exploration group of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is developing the "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB) dynamic LSS simulation software. The main advantages of the dynamic simulation of LSS within V-HAB are the possibilities to compose different LSS configurations from the LSS subsystems and conduct dynamic simulation of it to test its stability in different mission scenarios inclusive emergency events and define the closure grade of the LSS. Additional the optimization of LSS based on different criteria will be possible. The Virtual Habitat simulation tool consists of four main modules: • Closed Environment Module (CEM) -monitoring of compounds in a closed environment • Crew Module (CM) -dynamic human simulation • P/C Systems Module (PCSM) -dynamic P/C subsystems • Plant Module (PM) -dynamic plant simulation Since the first idea and version, the V-HAB simulation has been significantly updated increasing its capabilities and maturity significantly. The updates which shall be introduced concern all modules of V-HAB. In particular: Significant progress has been made in development of the human model. In addition to the exist-ing human sub-models three newly developed ones (thermal regulation, digestion and schedule controller) have been introduced and shall be presented. Regarding the Plant Module a wheat plant model has been integrated in the V-HAB and is being correlated against test data. Ad-ditionally a first version of the algae bioreactor model has been developed and integrated. In terms of the P/C System module, an innovative approach for the P/C subsystem modelling has been developed and applied. The capabilities and features of the improved V-HAB models and the overall functionality of the V-HAB are demonstrated in form of meaningful test cases. In addition to the presentation of the results, the correlation strategy for the Virtual Habitat simulation shall be introduced assessing the models current confidence level and giving an outlook on the future correlation strategy.

  17. Indigenous Microbiota and Habitat Influence Escherichia coli Survival More than Sunlight in Simulated Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Korajkic, Asja; Wanjugi, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The reported fate of Escherichia coli in the environment ranges from extended persistence to rapid decline. Incomplete understanding of factors that influence survival hinders risk assessment and modeling of the fate of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens. FIB persistence in subtropical aquatic environments was explored in outdoor mesocosms inoculated with five E. coli strains. The manipulated environmental factors were (i) presence or absence of indigenous microbiota (attained by natural, disinfected, and cycloheximide treatments), (ii) freshwater versus seawater, and (iii) water column versus sediment matrices. When indigenous microbes were removed (disinfected), E. coli concentrations decreased little despite exposure to sunlight. Conversely, under conditions that included the indigenous microbiota (natural), significantly greater declines in E. coli occurred regardless of the habitat. The presence of indigenous microbiota and matrix significantly influenced E. coli decline, but their relative importance differed in freshwater versus seawater. Cycloheximide, which inhibits protein synthesis in eukaryotes, significantly diminished the magnitude of E. coli decline in water but not in sediments. The inactivation of protozoa and bacterial competitors (disinfected) caused a greater decline in E. coli than cycloheximide alone in water and sediments. These results indicate that the autochthonous microbiota are an important contributor to the decline of E. coli in fresh and seawater subtropical systems, but their relative contribution is habitat dependent. This work advances our understanding of how interactions with autochthonous microbiota influence the fate of E. coli in aquatic environments and provides the framework for studies of the ecology of enteric pathogens and other allochthonous bacteria in similar environments. PMID:23811514

  18. Environmental variables, habitat discontinuity and life history shaping the genetic structure of Pomatoschistus marmoratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Wangüemert, Mercedes; Vergara-Chen, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Coastal lagoons are semi-isolated ecosystems exposed to wide fluctuations of environmental conditions and showing habitat fragmentation. These features may play an important role in separating species into different populations, even at small spatial scales. In this study, we evaluate the concordance between mitochondrial (previous published data) and nuclear data analyzing the genetic variability of Pomatoschistus marmoratus in five localities, inside and outside the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain) using eight microsatellites. High genetic diversity and similar levels of allele richness were observed across all loci and localities, although significant genic and genotypic differentiation was found between populations inside and outside the lagoon. In contrast to the F ST values obtained from previous mitochondrial DNA analyses (control region), the microsatellite data exhibited significant differentiation among samples inside the Mar Menor and between lagoonal and marine samples. This pattern was corroborated using Cavalli-Sforza genetic distances. The habitat fragmentation inside the coastal lagoon and among lagoon and marine localities could be acting as a barrier to gene flow and contributing to the observed genetic structure. Our results from generalized additive models point a significant link between extreme lagoonal environmental conditions (mainly maximum salinity) and P. marmoratus genetic composition. Thereby, these environmental features could be also acting on genetic structure of coastal lagoon populations of P. marmoratus favoring their genetic divergence. The mating strategy of P. marmoratus could be also influencing our results obtained from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Therefore, a special consideration must be done in the selection of the DNA markers depending on the reproductive strategy of the species.

  19. Degree of adaptive response in urban tolerant birds shows influence of habitat-of-origin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urban exploiters and adapters are often coalesced under a term of convenience as ‘urban tolerant’. This useful but simplistic characterisation masks a more nuanced interplay between and within assemblages of birds that are more or less well adapted to a range of urban habitats. I test the hypotheses that objectively-defined urban exploiter and suburban adapter assemblages within the broad urban tolerant grouping in Melbourne vary in their responses within the larger group to predictor variables, and that the most explanatory predictor variables vary between the two assemblages. A paired, partitioned analysis of exploiter and adapter preferences for points along the urban–rural gradient was undertaken to decompose the overall trend into diagnosable parts for each assemblage. In a similar way to that in which time since establishment has been found to be related to high urban densities of some bird species and biogeographic origin predictive of urban adaptation extent, habitat origins of members of bird assemblages influence the degree to which they become urban tolerant. Bird species that objectively classify as urban tolerant will further classify as either exploiters or adapters according to the degree of openness of their habitats-of-origin. PMID:24688881

  20. Genetic structure of Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico populations of sea bass, menhaden, and sturgeon: Influence of zoogeographic factors and life-history patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. W. Bowen; J. C. Avise

    1990-01-01

    To assess the influence of zoogeographic factors and life-history parameters (effective population size, generation length, and dispersal) on the evolutionary genetic structure of marine fishes in the southeastern USA, phylogeographic patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were compared between disjunct Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico populations in three coastal marine fishes whose juveniles require an estuarine or freshwater habitat for development.

  1. Influence of Mowing Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis on Winter Habitat for Wildlife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jonathan D.; Johnson, Dustin D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

    2009-07-01

    Mowing is commonly implemented to Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh (Wyoming big sagebrush) plant communities to improve wildlife habitat, increase forage production for livestock, and create fuel breaks for fire suppression. However, information detailing the influence of mowing on winter habitat for wildlife is lacking. This information is crucial because many wildlife species depended on A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis plant communities for winter habitat and consume significant quantities of Artemisia during this time . Furthermore, information is generally limited describing the recovery of A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis to mowing and the impacts of mowing on stand structure. Stand characteristics and Artemisia leaf tissue crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations were measured in midwinter on 0-, 2-, 4-, and 6-year-old fall-applied mechanical (mowed at 20 cm height) treatments and compared to adjacent untreated (control) areas. Mowing compared to the control decreased Artemisia cover, density, canopy volume, canopy elliptical area, and height ( P < 0.05), but all characteristics were recovering ( P < 0.05). Mowing A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis plant communities slightly increases the nutritional quality of Artemisia leaves ( P < 0.05), but it simultaneously results in up to 20 years of decrease in Artemisia structural characteristics. Because of the large reduction in A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis for potentially 20 years following mowing, mowing should not be applied in Artemisia facultative and obligate wildlife winter habitat. Considering the decline in A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis-dominated landscapes, we caution against mowing these communities.

  2. Influence of mowing Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis on winter habitat for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jonathan D; Johnson, Dustin D; Nafus, Aleta M

    2009-07-01

    Mowing is commonly implemented to Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh (Wyoming big sagebrush) plant communities to improve wildlife habitat, increase forage production for livestock, and create fuel breaks for fire suppression. However, information detailing the influence of mowing on winter habitat for wildlife is lacking. This information is crucial because many wildlife species depended on A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis plant communities for winter habitat and consume significant quantities of Artemisia during this time. Furthermore, information is generally limited describing the recovery of A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis to mowing and the impacts of mowing on stand structure. Stand characteristics and Artemisia leaf tissue crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations were measured in midwinter on 0-, 2-, 4-, and 6-year-old fall-applied mechanical (mowed at 20 cm height) treatments and compared to adjacent untreated (control) areas. Mowing compared to the control decreased Artemisia cover, density, canopy volume, canopy elliptical area, and height (P < 0.05), but all characteristics were recovering (P < 0.05). Mowing A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis plant communities slightly increases the nutritional quality of Artemisia leaves (P < 0.05), but it simultaneously results in up to 20 years of decrease in Artemisia structural characteristics. Because of the large reduction in A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis for potentially 20 years following mowing, mowing should not be applied in Artemisia facultative and obligate wildlife winter habitat. Considering the decline in A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis-dominated landscapes, we caution against mowing these communities. PMID:19159967

  3. Modeling Habitat Split: Landscape and Life History Traits Determine Amphibian Extinction Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Carlos Roberto; Coutinho, Renato M.; Azevedo, Franciane; Berbert, Juliana M.; Corso, Gilberto; Kraenkel, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Habitat split is a major force behind the worldwide decline of amphibian populations, causing community change in richness and species composition. In fragmented landscapes, natural remnants, the terrestrial habitat of the adults, are frequently separated from streams, the aquatic habitat of the larvae. An important question is how this landscape configuration affects population levels and if it can drive species to extinction locally. Here, we put forward the first theoretical model on habitat split which is particularly concerned on how split distance – the distance between the two required habitats – affects population size and persistence in isolated fragments. Our diffusive model shows that habitat split alone is able to generate extinction thresholds. Fragments occurring between the aquatic habitat and a given critical split distance are expected to hold viable populations, while fragments located farther away are expected to be unoccupied. Species with higher reproductive success and higher diffusion rate of post-metamorphic youngs are expected to have farther critical split distances. Furthermore, the model indicates that negative effects of habitat split are poorly compensated by positive effects of fragment size. The habitat split model improves our understanding about spatially structured populations and has relevant implications for landscape design for conservation. It puts on a firm theoretical basis the relation between habitat split and the decline of amphibian populations. PMID:23818967

  4. Distinguishing habitat types and the relative influences of environmental factors on patch occupancy for a butterfly metapopulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monte P. SanfordDennis; Dennis D. Murphy; Peter F. Brussard

    The goals of this study were to examine whether subjective habitat types may be segregated based on environmental variables\\u000a and whether the relative influences of environmental factors on patch occupancy differ among habitat types. We examined these\\u000a questions using a metapopulation of the butterfly Speyeria nokomis carsonensis, surveying sites for environmental characteristics and butterfly presence\\/absence over a 2-year period. Discriminant

  5. The Virtual Habitat - A tool for dynamic life support system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czupalla, M.; Zhukov, A.; Schnaitmann, J.; Olthoff, C.; Deiml, M.; Plötner, P.; Walter, U.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) model, which simulates on a system level the dynamics of entire mission scenarios for any given life support system (LSS) including a dynamic representation of the crew. We first present the V-HAB architecture. Thereafter we validate in selected case studies the V-HAB submodules. Finally, we demonstrate the overall abilities of V-HAB by first simulating the LSS of the International Space Station (ISS) and showing how close this comes to real data. In a second case study we simulate the LSS dynamics of a Mars mission scenario. We thus show that V-HAB is able to support LSS design processes, giving LSS designers a set of dynamic decision parameters (e.g. stability, robustness, effective crew time) at hand that supplement or even substitute the common Equivalent System Mass (ESM) quantities as a proxy for LSS hardware costs. The work presented here builds on a LSS heritage by the exploration group at the Technical University at Munich (TUM) dating from even before 2006.

  6. The importance of habitat and life history to extinction risk in sharks, skates, rays and chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    García, Verónica B; Lucifora, Luis O; Myers, Ransom A

    2007-01-01

    We compared life-history traits and extinction risk of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimaeras), a group of high conservation concern, from the three major marine habitats (continental shelves, open ocean and deep sea), controlling for phylogenetic correlation. Deep-water chondrichthyans had a higher age at maturity and longevity, and a lower growth completion rate than shallow-water species. The average fishing mortality needed to drive a deep-water chondrichthyan species to extinction (Fextinct) was 38–58% of that estimated for oceanic and continental shelf species, respectively. Mean values of Fextinct were 0.149, 0.250 and 0.368 for deep-water, oceanic and continental shelf species, respectively. Reproductive mode was an important determinant of extinction risk, while body size had a weak effect on extinction risk. As extinction risk was highly correlated with phylogeny, the loss of species will be accompanied by a loss of phylogenetic diversity. Conservation priority should not be restricted to large species, as is usually suggested, since many small species, like those inhabiting the deep ocean, are also highly vulnerable to extinction. Fishing mortality of deep-water chondrichthyans already exploited should be minimized, and new deep-water fisheries affecting chondrichthyans should be prevented. PMID:17956843

  7. Habitat preferences and life history of the red scorpion fish, Scorpaena notata, in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordines, F.; Quetglas, A.; Massutí, E.; Moranta, J.

    2009-12-01

    Scorpaena notata is a small, sedentary scorpaenid species widely distributed in the Mediterranean and adjacent waters of the Atlantic. In the western Mediterranean it inhabits coastal continental shelf bottoms. In the Balearic Islands, these bottoms are characterised by the presence of the facies with red algae, including both Peyssonnelia and mäerl beds. These beds enhance the structural complexity, biodiversity and secondary production of the soft bottoms. Due to the oceanographic conditions of the Islands, the facies with red algae are especially rich in terms of biomass and algal coverage, and are widespread distributed between 40 and 90 m depth, where trawlers exploiting the continental shelf operate. The present work studies the biology of S. notata and its relationship with habitat characteristics. Special attention is focused on the aspects related to fish condition and growth as a tool to assess the importance of the facies with red algae for fish. The reproduction period of S. notata in the Balearic Islands occurs in summer and is accompanied by a decrease in hepatic condition, as it happens in the adjacent area off the Iberian Peninsula; however, in contrast with this adjacent area, this period is accompanied by a decrease in somatic condition and an increase in feeding potential, which suggests that these could be adaptations to the higher oligotrophy of the Archipelago. The standardised algal biomass (mostly Rhodophyceae) present in the bottoms positively affected the abundance, somatic condition and feeding potential of S. notata. Individuals inhabiting bottoms with the highest algal biomass showed faster growth than the entire population analysed together. Both, the structural complexity and the availability of preys in the facies with red algae are revealed as advantageous traits for the life history of fish. Taking into account the importance of individual health for the overall success of the population, the indexes studied here could be a useful tool for identifying high quality or essential fish habitats. Our results highlight the importance of the facies with red algae as oasis of high productivity where benthic fish can circumvent the general oligotrophic conditions of the Mediterranean, and the necessity of urgent management measures in order to protect them from human impacts.

  8. Feeding ecology and life history variation of the blue tit in Mediterranean deciduous and sclerophyllous habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques Blondel; Alain Dervieux; Marie Maistre; Philippe Perret

    1991-01-01

    High variation in laying date and clutch size of the blue tit between a Mediterranean mixed habitat on the mainland, southern France, and a sclerophyllous habitat on the island of Corsica is hypothesized to be related to differences in the food supply. The diet of the nestlings and feeding frequencies were studied using camera nestboxes and electronic chronographs. Food items

  9. Plenty to eat, nothing to breathe: challenges to life in serpentinite habitats (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Crespo-Medina, M.; Lang, S. Q.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    When tectonic uplift exposes ultramafic rocks from the Earth's mantle to water from the surface, iron minerals are oxidized and release hydrogen gas (H2) in a set of geochemical reactions known collectively as serpentinization. The generation of high concentrations of H2 can also lead to abiotic synthesis of organic molecules, thereby providing an exothermic, abundant source of electron donors and organic carbon. The major biological challenges of serpentinization-influenced habitats appear to be the extremely high pH (typically pH 9-12), the associated lack of inorganic carbon, and the lack of electron acceptors due to the highly reducing conditions (1). These challenges are apparently overcome by the prolific archaeal and bacterial biofilms associated with the carbonate chimneys at the Lost City hydrothermal field. Cell densities exceed 109 cells per gram of chimney material (2). Phylogenetic, metagenomic, and experimental evidence indicate that the communities are supported by the copious quantities of H2, CH4, and sulphur fluxing from the chimneys, but the metabolic pathways and associated thermodynamic factors are still unclear (3). In particular, the oxidants that microbes couple with H2, CH4, and sulphur at Lost City remain a matter of speculation. The mystery of the oxidants has also featured in our recent explorations of continental sites of serpentinization. In strong contrast to the Lost City chimneys, these continental fluids tend to contain very little biomass (fewer than 102 cells per mL in the most extreme cases). Presumably, the anoxic, pH 12 fluids enriched in H2 and CH4 are flowing from subsurface habitats where there must be a surplus of reductants and carbon (4). Given the extremely reducing, anoxic conditions, though, oxidants are likely to be very limited in these environments. The ';oxidant limitation' hypothesis is particularly intriguing because of its counter-intuitive nature: to our knowledge, no other habitats on Earth have a surplus of reducants and a lack of oxidants. Other limitations must also be considered, including the extremely high pH and the possible lack of nitrogen, phosphorus, and trace metals. Comparisons of the bacterial communities at Lost City and continental serpentinite springs have highlighted the dynamic nature of the Lost City chimneys, where highly reducing hydrothermal fluids mix with oxidizing seawater (1,5). Consequently, a truly subsurface microbial community below Lost City remains to be detected and will require future sampling efforts to focus on the collection of high-quality, end-member hydrothermal fluids. References 1. Schrenk MO, Brazelton WJ, Lang SQ. 2013. Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 75:575-606. 2. Schrenk MO, Kelley DS, Bolton SA, Baross JA. 2004. Environ. Microbiol. 6:1086-1095. 3. Brazelton WJ, Mehta MP, Kelley DS, Baross JA. 2011. mBio2:4. doi:10.1128/mBio.00127-11. 4. Szponar, N., W.J. Brazelton, M.O. Schrenk, D.M. Bower, A. Steele, P.L. Morrill. 2013. Icarus. 224: 286-296. 5. Brazelton WJ, Schrenk MO, Kelley DS, Baross JA. 2006. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:6257-6270.

  10. The North Atlantic Ocean as habitat for Calanus finmarchicus: Environmental factors and life history traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melle, Webjørn; Runge, Jeffrey; Head, Erica; Plourde, Stéphane; Castellani, Claudia; Licandro, Priscilla; Pierson, James; Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Johnson, Catherine; Broms, Cecilie; Debes, Høgni; Falkenhaug, Tone; Gaard, Eilif; Gislason, Astthor; Heath, Michael; Niehoff, Barbara; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Pepin, Pierre; Stenevik, Erling Kaare; Chust, Guillem

    2014-12-01

    Here we present a new, pan-Atlantic compilation and analysis of data on Calanus finmarchicus abundance, demography, dormancy, egg production and mortality in relation to basin-scale patterns of temperature, phytoplankton biomass, circulation and other environmental characteristics in the context of understanding factors determining the distribution and abundance of C. finmarchicus across its North Atlantic habitat. A number of themes emerge: (1) the south-to-north transport of plankton in the northeast Atlantic contrasts with north-to-south transport in the western North Atlantic, which has implications for understanding population responses of C. finmarchicus to climate forcing, (2) recruitment to the youngest copepodite stages occurs during or just after the phytoplankton bloom in the east whereas it occurs after the bloom at many western sites, with up to 3.5 months difference in recruitment timing, (3) the deep basin and gyre of the southern Norwegian Sea is the centre of production and overwintering of C. finmarchicus, upon which the surrounding waters depend, whereas, in the Labrador/Irminger Seas production mainly occurs along the margins, such that the deep basins serve as collection areas and refugia for the overwintering populations, rather than as centres of production, (4) the western North Atlantic marginal seas have an important role in sustaining high C. finmarchicus abundance on the nearby coastal shelves, (5) differences in mean temperature and chlorophyll concentration between the western and eastern North Atlantic are reflected in regional differences in female body size and egg production, (6) regional differences in functional responses of egg production rate may reflect genetic differences between western and eastern populations, (7) dormancy duration is generally shorter in the deep waters adjacent to the lower latitude western North Atlantic shelves than in the east, (8) there are differences in stage-specific daily mortality rates between eastern and western shelves and basins, but the survival trajectories for cohort development from CI to CV are similar, and (9) early life stage survival is much lower in regions where C. finmarchicus is found with its congeners, C. glacialis and/or C. hyperboreus. This compilation and analysis provides new knowledge for evaluation and parameterisation of population models of C. finmarchicus and their responses to climate change in the North Atlantic. The strengths and weaknesses of modeling approaches, including a statistical approach based on ecological niche theory and a dynamical approach based on knowledge of spatial population dynamics and life history, are discussed, as well as needs for further research.

  11. Influence of habitat structure and resource availability on the movements of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Senger, S E; Tyson, R; Roitberg, B D; Thistlewood, H M A; Harestad, A S; Chandler, M T

    2009-06-01

    Habitat structure and resources availability may differentially influence movement between habitat patches. We examined fly movement decisions (stay or leave) at the scale of individual trees by measuring the response of marked Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae) to sweet cherry trees (Prunus avium) that were manipulated by changing the shape of the tree (structure treatment = normal or reduced) and the fruit load (fruit treatment = augmented, normal, or reduced). More than 600 observations were made at two field sites that differed in the average inter-tree distance: Senger site, 10.1 +/- 4.5 m; Tuemp site, 29.0 +/- 19.3 m. At the Senger site, flies were resighted most often in the normal structure-augmented fruit trees. At the Tuemp site, however, there were fewer transfers between trees, unusual tree preferences, and significant treatment interaction terms. Using a first principles diffusion model of attraction and by varying fly perceptual range to limit tree choice, we generated unusual tree preferences based on differential attraction to individual trees. Our results suggest that manipulating tree attractiveness may be a viable pest management strategy for closely spaced trees but not for dispersed trees. Further study into the relationship between the spatial arrangement of trees and the flies' ability to detect specific tree characteristics is warranted. PMID:19508793

  12. Psychosocial influences on blood pressure during daily life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A Carels; Andrew Sherwood; James A Blumenthal

    1998-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring allows frequent non-invasive blood pressure (BP) recordings in a variety of settings. Emerging evidence suggests that ABP is a better predictor of cardiovascular morbidity than clinic BP. Ambulatory blood pressure is influenced by a variety of physical, psychological and behavioral factors that comprise an individual's daily life. The present article reviews psychosocial research relating ABP

  13. Influence of chemical treatment on the life of drill bits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. I. Kantor; I. M. Nimets

    1983-01-01

    The quality of treatment of the bearing lug of a drill bit is most important in the life of a bit. Depth of carburized case, surface hardness of bearing path and shoulders, microstructure of the case, and mechanical properties of the core all determine the quality of the treatment. Optimum carbon content, mechanical properties, and influence of the carburized case

  14. Environmental Monitoring as Part of Life Support for the Crew Habitat for Lunar and Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Like other crewed space missions, future missions to the moon and Mars will have requirements for monitoring the chemical and microbial status of the crew habitat. Monitoring the crew habitat becomes more critical in such long term missions. This paper will describe the state of technology development for environmental monitoring of lunar lander and lunar outpost missions, and the state of plans for future missions.

  15. The influence of research scale on bald eagle habitat selection along the lower Hudson River, New York (USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Thompson; Kevin McGarigal

    2002-01-01

    As the concepts of landscape ecology have been incorporated into otherdisciplines, the influence of spatial patterns on animal abundance anddistribution has attracted considerable attention. However, there remains asignificant gap in the application of landscape ecology theories and techniquesto wildlife research. By combining landscape ecology techniques withtraditionalwildlife habitat analysis methods, we defined an ‘organism-centeredperspective’for breeding bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) alongthe Hudson

  16. The influence of research scale on bald eagle habitat selection along the lower Hudson River, New York (USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Thompson; Kevin McGarigal

    2002-01-01

    As the concepts of landscape ecology have been incorporated into other disciplines, the influence of spatial pat- terns on animal abundance and distribution has attracted considerable attention. However, there remains a sig- nificant gap in the application of landscape ecology theories and techniques to wildlife research. By combining landscape ecology techniques with traditional wildlife habitat analysis methods, we defined an

  17. The influence of local habitat and landscape composition on cavity-nesting birds in a forested mosaic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tara L. Warren; Matthew G. Betts; Antony W. Diamond; Graham J. Forbes

    2005-01-01

    Forest management influences both stand and landscape structure. While research exists on stand-scale habitat relationships for cavity-nesting birds, there are few studies at the landscape scale. In a managed forest, we characterised the influence of local vegetation on the occurrence of cavity-nesting bird species and determined whether landscape scale variables explained any of the remaining variation. We selected three spatial

  18. Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben P. Werling; Timothy D. Meehan; Claudio Gratton; Douglas A. Landis

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural landscapes, affecting natural enemies at multiple scales. We sampled five natural enemy families with sticky cards in three model biofuel habitats (corn, switchgrass and prairie; n=60) across southern Michigan and Wisconsin, comparing captures between habitats and relating them to the area of forest, annual crop and herbaceous perennial habitat in the landscape within

  19. Do Habitat Corridors Influence Animal Dispersal and Colonization in Estuarine Systems?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meaghan C. Darcy; David B. Eggleston

    2005-01-01

    Studies investigating animal response to habitat in marine systems have mainly focused on habitat preference and complexity. This study is one of the first to investigate the affect of benthic habitat corridors and their characteristics on dispersal and colonization by estuarine macrofuana. In this study, mark-recapture field experiments using artificial seagrass units (ASUs) assessed the effects of seagrass corridors, interpatch

  20. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the distribution of larval Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) at two spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, Christian E.; Close, David A.

    2004-01-01

    1. Spatial patterns in channel morphology and substratum composition at small (1a??10 metres) and large scales (1a??10 kilometres) were analysed to determine the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the distribution and abundance of larval lamprey. 2. We used a nested sampling design and multiple logistic regression to evaluate spatial heterogeneity in the abundance of larval Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and habitat in 30 sites (each composed of twelve 1-m2 quadrat samples) distributed throughout a 55-km section of the Middle Fork John Day River, OR, U.SA. Statistical models predicting the relative abundance of larvae both among sites (large scale) and among samples (small scale) were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to identify the 'best approximating' models from a set of a priori candidate models determined from the literature on larval lamprey habitat associations. 3. Stream habitat variables predicted patterns in larval abundance but played different roles at different spatial scales. The abundance of larvae at large scales was positively associated with water depth and open riparian canopy, whereas patchiness in larval occurrence at small scales was associated with low water velocity, channel-unit morphology (pool habitats), and the availability of habitat suitable for burrowing. 4. Habitat variables explained variation in larval abundance at large and small scales, but locational factors, such as longitudinal position (river km) and sample location within the channel unit, explained additional variation in the logistic regression model. The results emphasise the need for spatially explicit analysis, both in examining fish habitat relationships and in developing conservation plans for declining fish populations.

  1. Habitat complexity influences fine scale hydrological processes and the incidence of stormwater runoff in managed urban ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Alessandro; Hahs, Amy Kristin; Livesley, Stephen John

    2015-08-15

    Urban ecosystems have traditionally been considered to be pervious features of our cities. Their hydrological properties have largely been investigated at the landscape scale and in comparison with other urban land use types. However, hydrological properties can vary at smaller scales depending upon changes in soil, surface litter and vegetation components. Management practices can directly and indirectly affect each of these components and the overall habitat complexity, ultimately affecting hydrological processes. This study aims to investigate the influence that habitat components and habitat complexity have upon key hydrological processes and the implications for urban habitat management. Using a network of urban parks and remnant nature reserves in Melbourne, Australia, replicate plots representing three types of habitat complexity were established: low-complexity parks, high-complexity parks, and high-complexity remnants. Saturated soil hydraulic conductivity in low-complexity parks was an order of magnitude lower than that measured in the more complex habitat types, due to fewer soil macropores. Conversely, soil water holding capacity in low-complexity parks was significantly higher compared to the two more complex habitat types. Low-complexity parks would generate runoff during modest precipitation events, whereas high-complexity parks and remnants would be able to absorb the vast majority of rainfall events without generating runoff. Litter layers on the soil surface would absorb most of precipitation events in high-complexity parks and high-complexity remnants. To minimize the incidence of stormwater runoff from urban ecosystems, land managers could incrementally increase the complexity of habitat patches, by increasing canopy density and volume, preserving surface litter and maintaining soil macropore structure. PMID:25989202

  2. City life makes females fussy: sex differences in habitat use of temperate bats in urban areas

    PubMed Central

    Lintott, Paul R.; Bunnefeld, Nils; Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Minderman, Jeroen; Mayhew, Rebekah J.; Olley, Lena; Park, Kirsty J.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization is a major driver of the global loss of biodiversity; to mitigate its adverse effects, it is essential to understand what drives species' patterns of habitat use within the urban matrix. While many animal species are known to exhibit sex differences in habitat use, adaptability to the urban landscape is commonly examined at the species level, without consideration of intraspecific differences. The high energetic demands of pregnancy and lactation in female mammals can lead to sexual differences in habitat use, but little is known of how this might affect their response to urbanization. We predicted that female Pipistrellus pygmaeus would show greater selectivity of forging locations within urban woodland in comparison to males at both a local and landscape scale. In line with these predictions, we found there was a lower probability of finding females within woodlands which were poorly connected, highly cluttered, with a higher edge : interior ratio and fewer mature trees. By contrast, habitat quality and the composition of the surrounding landscape were less of a limiting factor in determining male distributions. These results indicate strong sexual differences in the habitat use of fragmented urban woodland, and this has important implications for our understanding of the adaptability of bats and mammals more generally to urbanization.

  3. Multi-scale patterns of habitat use by Roanoke logperch (Percina rex) in Virginia rivers: a comparison among populations and life stages.

    E-print Network

    Multi-scale patterns of habitat use by Roanoke logperch (Percina rex) in Virginia rivers) in Virginia rivers: a comparison among populations and life stages. Amanda Rosenberger (ABSTRACT) The Roanoke in three river systems in Virginia, including comparisons among rivers and life stages. The first study

  4. Societal Influences on Health and Life-styles

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, David D.

    1984-01-01

    Strong sociocultural forces affect individual attitudes toward health and choice of life-style. Economic deprivation fosters negative health behaviors. Positive health habits are reinforced by discrete societal groups. The news media, particularly television, disseminate much useful health information, though the overall educational value is diminished by the content of commercial messages and programming. The automobile is a major societal influence, but neither individual drivers nor the car manufacturers give enough priority to highway safety, leaving that role to governmental regulation. American industry is becoming a positive influence in the encouragement of good health habits, and fashion is lately an important ally in personal health maintenance. PMID:6523860

  5. Deep Reaching Gas-permeable Tectonic Faults of the Early Earth as Habitats for the Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, U.; Mayer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The discussion on the origin of life encounters difficulties when it comes to estimate the conditions of the early earth and to define plausible environments for the development of the first complex organic molecules. Until now, the role of the earth's crust has been more or less ignored. First continental crustal cores may have been developed some tens to hundreds of million years after formation of earth. Due to tectonic stress the proto continents were sheared by vertical strike-slip faults at an early stage. These deep-reaching open, interconnected tectonic faults may provide possible reaction habitats ranging from nano- to centimetre and even larger dimensions that sum up to several cubic kilometres for the formation of prebiotic molecules. Their fillings consist of supercritical and subcritical waters and supercritical and subcritical gases. Here, all necessary raw materials including phosphate for the development of prebiotic molecules exist in variable concentrations and in sufficient quantities. Furthermore, there are periodically changing pressure and temperature conditions, varying pH-values, metallic surfaces, clay minerals and a large number of catalysts. While cosmic and UV-radiation are excluded, nuclear radiation intervenes the chemical evolution of the molecules inside the crust. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is of crucial importance. It can be present in an almost pure form as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in a crustal depth less than 1 km (critical point of pure CO2: 74 bar; 31°C). Inside strike-slip faults, a two-phase system formed by supercritical CO2 in liquid water provides the environment for condensation and polymerisation of hydrogen cyanide, nucleobases, nucleotides and amino acids. ScCO2 is a non-polar solvent that is widely used in "green chemistry" (Anastas and Kirchhoff 2002) and enables the dissolution of non-polar reactants and their reactions normally occurring in the absence of water. Under the influence of periodically changing conditions (extreme earth tides played an important role for cyclic variations within the fluid-water-interface and for the development of gradients), the reaction products can be transferred into a neighbouring aqueous environment. Based on these conditions, prebiotic molecules could have been condensed to long-chained molecules, from which first cell structures could have been formed by chemical evolution. This hypothetical model for the origin of life can be used to design crucial experiments for the model's verification. Because all proposed processes could still occur in tectonic faults at the present time, it may be possible to detect and analyse the formation of prebiotic molecules in order to assess the validity of the proposed hypothesis. A clear indication of the geological provenience of corresponding organic substances arises, if these substances appear in racemic mixtures (e.g. d- and l-alanin), making them distinguishable from similar molecules of biological origin. Additionally, their isotopic composition can help to exclude a possible biological origin. Further on, the possible detection of these substances in fluid inclusions of quartz dykes of former deep crustal parts is another possible proof of the hypothesis. Keywords: origin, life, strike-slip faults, scCO2, prebiotic molecules

  6. Is onset of Tourette syndrome influenced by life events?

    PubMed

    Horesh, Netta; Zimmerman, Sharon; Steinberg, Tami; Yagan, Haim; Apter, Alan

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possible relationship between stressful life events, personality, and onset of Tourette syndrome in children. The study group included 93 subjects aged 7-18 years: 41 with Tourette syndrome (TS), 28 with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 24 healthy controls. Diagnoses were based on the Child Schedule for Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders (K-SADS). All children were tested with the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, Children's Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, Beck Depression Inventory or Children's Depression Inventory, the Life Experience Survey, and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory. The findings were compared among the groups. Subjects with Tourette syndrome and healthy controls had significantly less stressful life events than subjects with (OCD). There were no significant differences between the TS subjects and the healthy controls. This finding applied to total lifetime events, total lifetime negative events, and events in the year before and after illness onset. Subjects with TS and the healthy controls also showed a significantly lesser impact of life events than subjects with OCD. The Tourette syndrome group showed a significantly lesser impact of stressful life events than controls. Harm avoidance tended to be higher in the patients with Tourette syndrome and comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder than in patients with Tourette syndrome only. There seemed to be no association between life events, diagnosis, and personality. Although there is some research suggesting that tics can be influenced by the environment, the onset of Tourette syndrome does not seem to be related to stressful life events, nor to an interaction between stressful life events and personality. PMID:18217190

  7. Reproductive phenology, life-forms, and habitats of the Venezuelan Central Plain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NELSON RAMIREZ; Facultad Ciencias

    2002-01-01

    percentage of species with unripe fruits produced throughout the year was more seasonal for the disturbed area than for the other habitats. Mature fruit patterns showed an increase during the late rainy season for the ecotone and savanna. A large number of herbaceous (annual and perennial) and liana species flowered during the wet season, and a smaller fraction flowered during

  8. Life history strategies and habitat templets of tropical butterflies in north-eastern Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. Braby

    2002-01-01

    Three multivoltine species of satyrine butterflies in the genus Mycalesis (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) are narrowly sympatric in the wet–dry tropics of north-eastern Australia. They show a range of ecological strategies and adaptations associated with contrasting habitats and varying selective pressures. Two abiotic factors, namely favorability (the reciprocal of seasonal adversity) and predictability (broadly the reciprocal of disturbance), were examined as potential

  9. Does habitat heterogeneity in a multi-use landscape influence survival rates and density of a native mesocarnivore?

    PubMed

    Gese, Eric M; Thompson, Craig M

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between predators, prey, and habitat have long been of interest to applied and basic ecologists. As a native Great Plains mesocarnivore of North America, swift foxes (Vulpes velox) depended on the historic disturbance regime to maintain open grassland habitat. With a decline in native grasslands and subsequent impacts to prairie specialists, notably the swift fox, understanding the influence of habitat on native predators is paramount to future management efforts. From 2001 to 2004, we investigated the influence of vegetation structure on swift fox population ecology (survival and density) on and around the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, southeastern Colorado, USA. We monitored 109 foxes on 6 study sites exposed to 3 different disturbance regimes (military training, grazing, unused). On each site we evaluated vegetation structure based on shrub density, basal coverage, vegetation height, and litter. Across all sites, annual fox survival rates ranged from 0.50 to 0.92 for adults and 0.27 to 0.78 for juveniles. Among sites, population estimates ranged from 1 to 7 foxes per 10 km transect. Fox density or survival was not related to the relative abundance of prey. A robust model estimating fox population size and incorporating both shrub density and percent basal cover as explanatory variables far outperformed all other models. Our results supported the idea that, in our region, swift foxes were shortgrass prairie specialists and also indicated a relationship between habitat quality and landscape heterogeneity. We suggest the regulation of swift fox populations may be based on habitat quality through landscape-mediated survival, and managers may effectively use disturbance regimes to create or maintain habitat for this native mesocarnivore. PMID:24963713

  10. Crossing habitat boundaries: coupling dynamics of ecosystems through complex life cycles

    E-print Network

    Schreiber, Sebastian

    changes. Keywords Apparent competition, consumer subsidies, ecosystem dynamics, food webs, life resource model that accounts for the independent effects of two resources on consumer growth that consumers with complex life cycles can promote strong trophic cascades, stretching across ecosys- tems

  11. The influence of Shc proteins on life span in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jon J; Tran, Dianna; Giorgio, Marco; Griffey, Stephen M; Koehne, Amanda; Laing, Steven T; Taylor, Sandra L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Cortopassi, Gino A; Lloyd, K C Kent; Hagopian, Kevork; Tomilov, Alexey A; Migliaccio, Enrica; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; McDonald, Roger B

    2014-10-01

    The signaling molecule p66Shc is often described as a longevity protein. This conclusion is based on a single life span study that used a small number of mice. The purpose of the present studies was to measure life span in a sufficient number of mice to determine if longevity is altered in mice with decreased Shc levels (ShcKO). Studies were completed at UC Davis and the European Institute of Oncology (EIO). At UC Davis, male C57BL/6J WT and ShcKO mice were fed 5% or 40% calorie-restricted (CR) diets. In the 5% CR group, there was no difference in survival curves between genotypes. There was also no difference between genotypes in prevalence of neoplasms or other measures of end-of-life pathology. At 40% calorie restriction group, 70th percentile survival was increased in ShcKO, while there were no differences between genotypes in median or subsequent life span measures. At EIO, there was no increase in life span in ShcKO male or female mice on C57BL/6J, 129Sv, or hybrid C57BL/6J-129Sv backgrounds. These studies indicate that p66Shc is not a longevity protein. However, additional studies are needed to determine the extent to which Shc proteins may influence the onset and severity of specific age-related diseases. PMID:24336818

  12. Hunting influences the diel patterns in habitat selection by northern pintails Anas acuta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.; Miller, Michael R.; Overton, Cory T.; Yparraguirre, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Northern pintail Anas acuta (hereafter pintail) populations wintering within Suisun Marsh, a large estuarine managed wetland near San Francisco Bay, California,USA, have declined markedly over the last four decades. The reasons for this decline are unclear. Information on how hunting and other factors influence the selection of vegetation types and sanctuaries would be beneficial to manage pintail populations in SuisunMarsh. During 1991-1993, we radio-marked and relocated female pintails (individuals: N = 203, relocations: N = 7,688) within Suisun Marsh to investigate habitat selection during the non-breeding months (winter). We calculated selection ratios for different vegetation types and for sanctuaries, and examined differences in those ratios between hunting season (i.e. hunting and non-hunting), age (hatchyear and after-hatch-year), and time of day (daylight or night hours). We found that diel patterns in selection were influenced by hunting disturbance. For example, prior to the hunting season and during daylight hours, pintails selected areas dominated by brass buttons Cotula coronopifolia, a potentially important food source, usually outside of sanctuary boundaries. However, during the hunting season, pintails did not select brass buttons during daylight hours, but instead highly selected permanent pools, mostly within sanctuaries. Also, during the hunting season, pintails showed strong selection for brass buttons at night. Sanctuaries provided more area of permanent water pools than within hunting areas and appeared to function as important refugia during daylight hours of the hunting season. Wildlife managers should encourage large protected permanent pools adjacent to hunted wetlands to increase pintail numbers within wetland environments and responsibly benefit hunting opportunities while improving pintail conservation.

  13. Ecological constraints on breeding system evolution: the influence of habitat on brood desertion in Kentish plover.

    PubMed

    Kosztolányi, András; Székely, Tamas; Cuthill, Innes C; Yilmaz, K Tuluhan; Berberoglu, Süha

    2006-01-01

    1. One of the fundamental insights of behavioural ecology is that resources influence breeding systems. For instance, when food resources are plenty, one parent is able to care for the young on its own, so that the other parent can desert and became polygamous. We investigated this hypothesis in the context of classical polyandry when females may have several mates within a single breeding season, and parental duties are carried out largely by the male. 2. We studied a precocial wader, the Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus, that exhibits variable brood care such that the chicks may be raised by both parents, only by the female or, more often, only by the male. The timing of female desertion varies: some females desert their brood at hatching of the eggs and lay a clutch for a new mate, whereas other females stay with their brood until the chicks fledge. Kentish plovers are excellent organisms with which to study breeding system evolution, as some of their close relatives exhibit classical polyandry (Eurasian dotterel Eudromias morinellus, mountain plover Charadrius montanus), whereas others are polygynous (northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus). 3. Kentish plovers raised their broods in two habitats in our study site in southern Turkey: saltmarsh and lakeshore. Food intake was higher on the lakeshore than in the saltmarsh as judged from feeding behaviour of chicks and adults. As the season proceeded and the saltmarsh dried out, the broods moved toward the lakeshore. 4. As the density of plovers increased on lakeshore, the parents spent more time defending their young, and female parents stayed with their brood longer on the lakeshore. 5. We conclude that the influence of food abundance on breeding systems is more complex than currently anticipated. Abundant food resources appear to have profound implications on spatial distribution of broods, and the social interactions between broods constrain female desertion and polyandry. PMID:16903063

  14. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L.; Sankovich, Paul M.; Howell, Philip J.

    2002-12-01

    Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus exhibit a number of life history strategies. Stream-resident bull trout complete their life cycle in their natal tributaries. Migratory bull trout spawn in tributary streams where juvenile fish usually spend from one to four years before migrating to either a larger river (fluvial) or lake (adfluvial) where they rear before returning to the tributary stream to spawn (Fraley and Shepard 1989). These migratory forms occur where conditions allow movement from spawning locations to downstream waters that provide greater foraging opportunities (Dunham and Rieman 1999). Resident and migratory forms may occur together, and either form can produce resident or migratory offspring (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). The ability to migrate is important to the persistence of local bull trout populations (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). The identification of migratory corridors can help focus habitat protection efforts. Determining the life history form(s) that comprise local populations, the timing of seasonal movements, and the geographic extent of these movements are critical to bull trout protection and recovery efforts. This section describes work accomplished in 2001 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In the Grande Ronde and Walla Walla basins, we continued to monitor the movements of bull trout with radio transmitters applied in 1998 (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and 1999 (Hemmingsen, Gunckel and Howell 2001). No new radio transmitters were applied to bull trout of the upper John Day River subbasin, Mill Creek (Walla Walla Basin), or the Grande Ronde Basin in 2001. In Mill Creek, we used traps for the fourth consecutive year to obtain data on migrant bull trout. With these traps, we intended to determine the timing of bull trout movements both upstream and downstream, and to determine the relative abundance and size of migrant fish. No traps were operated in the John Day Basin in 2001.

  15. Factors Influencing Behavior and Transferability of Habitat Models for a Benthic Stream Fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K EVIN N. L EFTWICH

    1997-01-01

    We examined the predictive power and transferability of habitat-based models by comparing associations of tangerine darter Percina auruntiaca and stream habitat at local and regional scales in North Fork Holston River (NFHR) and Little River, Virginia. Our models correctly predicted the presence or absence of tangerine darters in NFHR for 64% (local model) and 78% (regional model) of the sampled

  16. The influence of stand age on wildlife habitat use in exotic Teak tree Tectona grandis plantations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard K. B. Jenkins; Kirsten Roettcher; Graham Corti

    2003-01-01

    Tropical dry woodlands provide important natural resources for both humans and wildlife, but woodlands situated outside protected areas are vulnerable to over-exploitation. In the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania, miombo woodland is converted into teak plantations and small, private farms, but the impact of this habitat change on wildlife populations is poorly understood. We assessed the frequency of habitat use of large

  17. Natural and anthropogenic influences on a red-crowned crane habitat in the Yellow River Delta Natural Reserve, 1992-2008.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Gao, Jay; Pu, Ruiliang; Ren, Liliang; Kong, Yan; Li, He; Li, Ling

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to assess the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic variables on the change of the red-crowned crane habitat in the Yellow River Nature Reserve, East China using multitempopral remote sensing and geographic information system. Satellite images were used to detect the change in potential crane habitat, from which suitable crane habitat was determined by excluding fragmented habitat. In this study, a principal component analysis (PCA) with seven variables (channel flow, rainfall, temperature, sediment discharge, number of oil wells, total length of roads, and area of settlements) and linear regression analyses of potential and suitable habitat against the retained principal components were applied to explore the influences of natural and anthropogenic factors on the change of the red-crowned crane habitat. The experimental results indicate that suitable habitat decreased by 5,935 ha despite an increase of 1,409 ha in potential habitat from 1992 to 2008. The area of crane habitat changed caused by natural drivers such as progressive succession, retrogressive succession, and physical fragmentation is almost the same as that caused by anthropogenic forces such as land use change and behavioral fragmentation. The PCA and regression analyses revealed that natural factors (e.g., channel flow, rainfall, temperature, and sediment discharge) play an important role in the crane potential habitat change and human disturbances (e.g., oil wells, roads, and settlements) jointly explain 51.8 % of the variations in suitable habitat area, higher than 48.2 % contributed by natural factors. Thus, it is vital to reduce anthropogenic influences within the reserve in order to reverse the decline in the suitable crane habitat. PMID:24526617

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBURBAN LAND USE ON HABITAT AND BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF COASTAL RHODE ISLAND STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our watershed ecosystems. The...

  19. Factors influencing farmland habitat use by shorebirds wintering in the Fraser River Delta, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lesley J. Evans Ogden; Shabtai Bittman; David B. Lank; F. Craig Stevenson

    2008-01-01

    Like many other coastal regions of the world, open-soil agricultural lands in the Fraser River Delta provide roosting and feeding habitat for non-breeding shorebirds that supplements intertidal habitat. Focusing on dunlin (Calidris alpina pacifica), black-bellied plover (Pluvialis squatorola), killdeer (Charadrius vociferus), and their avian predators (raptors), diurnal and nocturnal high tide surveys were conducted across the non-breeding period, October–April (1998–2000).

  20. Health Related Quality of Life and Influencing Factors among Welders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingxiang; Liu, Wuzhong; Zhu, Jun; Weng, Wei; Xu, Jiaming; Ai, Zisheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. Welders are exposed to many occupational hazards; these hazards might cause some occupational diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the health related quality of life (HRQL) of electric welders in Shanghai China and explore influencing factors to HRQL of welders. Methods 301 male welders (without pneumoconiosis) and 305 non-dust male workers in Shanghai were enrolled in this study. Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaires were applied in this cross-sectional study. Socio-demographic, working and health factors were also collected. Multiple stepwise regress analysis was used to identify significant factors related to the eight dimension scores. Results Six dimensions including role-physical (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health (GH), validity (VT), social function (SF), and mental health (MH) were significantly worse in welders compared to non-dust workers. Multiple stepwise regress analysis results show that native place, monthly income, quantity of children, drinking, sleep time, welding type, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), great events in life, and some symptoms including dizziness, discomfort of cervical vertebra, low back pain, cough and insomnia may be influencing factors for HRQL of welders. Among these factors, only sleep time and the use of PPE were salutary. Conclusions Some dimensions of HRQL of these welders have been affected. Enterprises which employ welders should take measures to protect the health of these people and improve their HRQL. PMID:25048102

  1. UNDERSTANDING HOW HARVEST INFLUENCES THE LIFE HISTORY AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF SHOVELNOSE STURGEON IN THE MIDDLE

    E-print Network

    UNDERSTANDING HOW HARVEST INFLUENCES THE LIFE HISTORY AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF SHOVELNOSE STURGEON HARVEST INFLUENCES THE LIFE HISTORY AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF SHOVELNOSE STURGEON IN THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI the Life History and Demographics of Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Middle Mississippi River MAJOR PROFESSORS

  2. Life history, habitat use and dispersal of a dune wolf spider (Pardosa monticola (Clerck, 1757) Lycosidae, Araneae) in the Flemish coastal dunes (Belgium)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dries Bonte; Jean-Pierre Maelfait

    2001-01-01

    Pardosa monticola (Araneae, Lycosidae) is a rare spider in Flanders. It is restricted to ther- mophilic mesotrophic (dune and heath) grasslands. Its life cycle and its habitat preference in the coastal dunes were analysed by interpreting data of more than 200 year-round pitfall-samplings. Viable populations are found in short dune grasslands (grazed by rabbits) and in mown young dune slacks.

  3. Influence of monsoon-related riparian phenology on yellow-billed cuckoo habitat selection in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Villarreal, Miguel; Van Riper, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus occidentalis), a Neotropical migrant bird, is facing steep population declines in its western breeding grounds owing primarily to loss of native habitat. The favoured esting habitat for the cuckoo in the south-western United States is low-elevation riparian forests and woodlands. Our aim was to explore relationships between vegetation phenology patterns captured by satellite phenometrics and the distribution of the yellow-billed cuckoo, and to use this information to map cuckoo habitat. Location: Arizona, USA. Methods: Land surface phenometrics were derived from satellite Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), bi-weekly time-composite, ormalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data for 1998 and 1999 at a resolution of 1 km. Fourier harmonics were used to analyse the waveform of the annual NDVI profile in each pixel. To create the models, we coupled 1998 satellite phenometrics with 1998 field survey data of cuckoo presence or absence and with point data that sampled riparian and cottonwood–willow vegetation types. Our models were verified and refined using field and satellite data collected in 1999. Results: The models reveal that cuckoos prefer areas that experience peak greenness 29 days later, are 36% more dynamic and slightly (< 1%) more productive than their average cottonwood–willow habitat. The results support a scenario in which cuckoos migrate northwards, following the greening of riparian corridors and surrounding landscapes in response to monsoon precipitation, but then select a nesting site based on optimizing the near-term foraging potential of the neighbourhood. Main conclusions: The identification of preferred phenotypes within recognized habitat can be used to refine future habitat models, inform habitat response to climate change, and suggest adaptation strategies. For example, models of phenotype preferences can guide management actions by identifying and prioritizing for conservation those landscapes that reliably exhibit highly preferred phenometrics on a consistent basis.

  4. Local habitat and landscape influence predation of bird nests on afforested Mediterranean cropland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Oliver, J. S.; Rey Benayas, J. M.; Carrascal, L. M.

    2014-07-01

    Afforestation programs such as the one promoted by the EU Common Agrarian Policy have contributed to spread tree plantations on former cropland. Nevertheless these afforestations may cause severe damage to open habitat species, especially birds of high conservation value. We investigated predation of artificial bird nests at young tree plantations and at the open farmland habitat adjacent to the tree plantations in central Spain. Predation rates were very high at both tree plantations (95.6%) and open farmland habitat (94.2%) after two and three week exposure. Plantation edge/area ratio and development of the tree canopy decreased predation rates and plantation area and magpie (Pica pica) abundance increased predation rates within tree plantations, which were also affected by land use types around plantations. The area of nearby tree plantations (positive effect), distance to the tree plantation edge (negative effect), and habitat type (mainly attributable to the location of nests in vineyards) explained predation rates at open farmland habitat. We conclude that predation rates on artificial nests were particularly high and rapid at or nearby large plantations, with high numbers of magpies and low tree development, and located in homogenous landscapes dominated by herbaceous crops and pastures with no remnants of semi-natural woody vegetation. Landscape planning should not favour tree plantations as the ones studied here in Mediterranean agricultural areas that are highly valuable for ground-nesting bird species.

  5. Habitat Associations, Life History and Diet of the Sabine Shiner Notropis sabinae

    E-print Network

    Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    of eastern Texas and eastward through central Louisiana to the Big Black and Yazoo drainage systems the gulf coast drainages exist in three river systems (White, Black and St. Francis rivers) in northern of the life history of N. sabinae from a stream system (Banita Creek and LaNana Bayou, Nacogdoches County

  6. Influence of early-life nutrition on mortality and reproductive success during a subsequent famine

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    -life conditions, no study on humans has demonstrated the predicted fitness benefit under low later-life nutrition of metabolic diseases. developmental plasticity | silver spoon | human life-history | DoHAD Nutrition duringInfluence of early-life nutrition on mortality and reproductive success during a subsequent famine

  7. Influence of chemical treatment on the life of drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, S.I.; Nimets, I.M.

    1983-03-01

    The quality of treatment of the bearing lug of a drill bit is most important in the life of a bit. Depth of carburized case, surface hardness of bearing path and shoulders, microstructure of the case, and mechanical properties of the core all determine the quality of the treatment. Optimum carbon content, mechanical properties, and influence of the carburized case microstructure on the contact strength are studied. At the Drogobych drill-bit plant, treatment of lugs is done on the OKB-2148 automatic line, by given cycle. The cycle is modified by this study; gas inlets, agitator fans, and buffer zones are added, to derive a higher quality lug. A few problems--carbon content of carbon-forming steel, brought into specification by a modified diffusion zone--are considered. Cutters are also treated. In general, then, the OKB-2148 line is recommended over the pack carburizing T-105 pit furnace.

  8. Fatty Acid Composition at the Base of Aquatic Food Webs Is Influenced by Habitat Type and Watershed Land Use

    PubMed Central

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn A.; Bartsch, Michelle R.; Nelson, John C.; Veldboom, Jason A.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in food resources strongly influences many aspects of aquatic consumer ecology. Although large-scale controls over spatial variation in many aspects of food resources are well known, others have received little study. Here we investigated variation in the fatty acid (FA) composition of seston and primary consumers within (i.e., among habitats) and among tributary systems of Lake Michigan, USA. FA composition of food is important because all metazoans require certain FAs for proper growth and development that cannot be produced de novo, including many polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Here we sampled three habitat types (river, rivermouth and nearshore zone) in 11 tributaries of Lake Michigan to assess the amount of FA in seston and primary consumers of seston. We hypothesize that among-system and among-habitat variation in FAs at the base of food webs would be related to algal production, which in turn is influenced by three land cover characteristics: 1) combined agriculture and urban lands (an indication of anthropogenic nutrient inputs that fuel algal production), 2) the proportion of surface waters (an indication of water residence times that allow algal producers to accumulate) and 3) the extent of riparian forested buffers (an indication of stream shading that reduces algal production). Of these three land cover characteristics, only intense land use appeared to strongly related to seston and consumer FA and this effect was only strong in rivermouth and nearshore lake sites. River seston and consumer FA composition was highly variable, but that variation does not appear to be driven by the watershed land cover characteristics investigated here. Whether the spatial variation in FA content at the base of these food webs significantly influences the production of economically important species higher in the food web should be a focus of future research. PMID:23940619

  9. Fatty acid composition at the base of aquatic food webs is influenced by habitat type and watershed land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn A.; Bartsch, Michelle R.; Nelson, John C.; Veldboom, Jason A.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in food resources strongly influences many aspects of aquatic consumer ecology. Although large-scale controls over spatial variation in many aspects of food resources are well known, others have received little study. Here we investigated variation in the fatty acid (FA) composition of seston and primary consumers within (i.e., among habitats) and among tributary systems of Lake Michigan, USA. FA composition of food is important because all metazoans require certain FAs for proper growth and development that cannot be produced de novo, including many polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Here we sampled three habitat types (river, rivermouth and nearshore zone) in 11 tributaries of Lake Michigan to assess the amount of FA in seston and primary consumers of seston. We hypothesize that among-system and among-habitat variation in FAs at the base of food webs would be related to algal production, which in turn is influenced by three land cover characteristics: 1) combined agriculture and urban lands (an indication of anthropogenic nutrient inputs that fuel algal production), 2) the proportion of surface waters (an indication of water residence times that allow algal producers to accumulate) and 3) the extent of riparian forested buffers (an indication of stream shading that reduces algal production). Of these three land cover characteristics, only intense land use appeared to strongly related to seston and consumer FA and this effect was only strong in rivermouth and nearshore lake sites. River seston and consumer FA composition was highly variable, but that variation does not appear to be driven by the watershed land cover characteristics investigated here. Whether the spatial variation in FA content at the base of these food webs significantly influences the production of economically important species higher in the food web should be a focus of future research.

  10. Fatty acid composition at the base of aquatic food webs is influenced by habitat type and watershed land use.

    PubMed

    Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Knights, Brent C; Bartsch, Lynn A; Bartsch, Michelle R; Nelson, John C; Veldboom, Jason A; Vallazza, Jon M

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in food resources strongly influences many aspects of aquatic consumer ecology. Although large-scale controls over spatial variation in many aspects of food resources are well known, others have received little study. Here we investigated variation in the fatty acid (FA) composition of seston and primary consumers within (i.e., among habitats) and among tributary systems of Lake Michigan, USA. FA composition of food is important because all metazoans require certain FAs for proper growth and development that cannot be produced de novo, including many polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Here we sampled three habitat types (river, rivermouth and nearshore zone) in 11 tributaries of Lake Michigan to assess the amount of FA in seston and primary consumers of seston. We hypothesize that among-system and among-habitat variation in FAs at the base of food webs would be related to algal production, which in turn is influenced by three land cover characteristics: 1) combined agriculture and urban lands (an indication of anthropogenic nutrient inputs that fuel algal production), 2) the proportion of surface waters (an indication of water residence times that allow algal producers to accumulate) and 3) the extent of riparian forested buffers (an indication of stream shading that reduces algal production). Of these three land cover characteristics, only intense land use appeared to strongly related to seston and consumer FA and this effect was only strong in rivermouth and nearshore lake sites. River seston and consumer FA composition was highly variable, but that variation does not appear to be driven by the watershed land cover characteristics investigated here. Whether the spatial variation in FA content at the base of these food webs significantly influences the production of economically important species higher in the food web should be a focus of future research. PMID:23940619

  11. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L.; Sankovich, Paul M.; Howell, Philip J.

    2001-11-01

    This section describes work accomplished in 2000 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In all three basins we continued to monitor the movements of bull trout with radio transmitters applied in 1998 (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and 1999 (Hemmingsen, Gunckel and Howell 2001). No new radio transmitters were applied to bull trout of the upper John Day River subbasin, Mill Creek (Walla Walla Basin), or the Grande Ronde Basin in 2000. We did implant radio transmitters in two bull trout incidentally captured in the John Day River near the confluence of the North Fork John Day River. In Mill Creek, we used traps to capture migrant bull trout to obtain data for the third successive year in this stream. With these traps, we intended to determine the timing of bull trout movements both upstream and downstream, and to determine the relative abundance, size and age of migrant fish. Because we captured migrant bull trout with traps for three years in the upper John Day River and its tributaries (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Buchanan, Gunckel, Shappart and Howell 2001; Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001; Hemmingsen, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and traps were no longer needed to capture bull trout for radio-tagging, no traps were operated in the John Day Basin in 2000.

  12. Influence of seasonal forcing on habitat use by bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearzi, Giovanni; Azzellino, Arianna; Politi, Elena; Costa, Marina; Bastianini, Mauro

    2008-12-01

    Bottlenose dolphins are the only cetaceans regularly observed in the northern Adriatic Sea, but they survive at low densities and are exposed to significant threats. This study investigates some of the factors that influence habitat use by the animals in a largely homogeneous environment by combining dolphin data with hydrological and physiographical variables sampled from oceanographic ships. Surveys were conducted year-round between 2003 and 2006, totalling 3,397 km of effort. Habitat modelling based on a binary stepwise logistic regression analysis predicted between 81% and 93% of the cells where animals were present. Seven environmental covariates were important predictors: oxygen saturation, water temperature, density anomaly, gradient of density anomaly, turbidity, distance from the nearest coast and bottom depth. The model selected consistent predictors in spring and summer. However, the relationship (inverse or direct) between each predictor and dolphin presence varied among seasons, and different predictors were selected in fall. This suggests that dolphin distribution changed depending on seasonal forcing. As the study area is relatively uniform in terms of bottom topography, habitat use by the animals seems to depend on complex interactions among hydrological variables, caused primarily by seasonal change and likely to determine shifts in prey distribution.

  13. Abstract The influence of environmental variables and habitat on growth and survival of juvenile gadoid

    E-print Network

    -dwelling poly- chaetes, sea cucumber mounds, macroalgae) were measured prior to fishing. Density of YOY Pacific cover by sea cucumber mounds and to salinity. No previous studies have documented fish utilizing sea cucumber mounds as habitat. Furthermore, eelgrass and macroalgae were inconsequential to cod distribution

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Winter habitat use does not influence spring arrival dates

    E-print Network

    the breeding phenology and produc- tivity of Yellow Warblers (Setophaga petechia) at the extreme north Setophaga petechia Introduction Studies have shown that the quality of winter habitat occupied by migrant) and American Redstart (Setophaga ruti- cilla; 44°N) populations reported in previous studies. In the arctic, we

  15. Habitat and Grazing Influence on Terrestrial Ants in Subtropical Grasslands and Savannas of Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maintenance of species diversity in modified and natural habitats is a central focus of conservation biology. The Iberá Nature Reserve (INR) protects highly diverse ecosystems in northeastern Argentina, including one of the largest freshwater wetlands in South America. Livestock grazing is one o...

  16. Stand age and habitat influences on salamanders in Appalachian cove hardwood forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Mark Ford; Brian R Chapman; Michael A Menzel; Richard H Odom

    2002-01-01

    We surveyed cove hardwood stands aged 15, 25, 50, and ?85 years following clearcutting in the southern Appalachian Mountains of northern Georgia to assess the effects of stand age and stand habitat characteristics on salamander communities using drift-fence array and pitfall methodologies from May 1994 to April 1995. Over a 60,060 pitfall trapnight effort, we collected 3937 salamanders represented by

  17. Stand age and habitat influences on salamanders in Appalachian cove hardwood forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Menzelc; Richard H. Odomd

    We surveyed cove hardwood stands aged 15, 25, 50, and 285 years following clearcutting in the southern Appalachian Mountains of northem Georgia to assess the effects of stand age and stand habitat characteristics on salamander communities using drift-fence array and pitfall methodologies from May 1994 to April 1995. Over a 60,060 pitfall trapnight effort, we collected 3937 salamanders represented by

  18. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    persistence. Key words: Centrocercus urophasianus; Colorado; energy disturbance; greater sage-grouse; linking models as a framework to quantify habitat value for wintering female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) inhabiting a 6,093-km2 study area in northwest Colorado and south-central Wyoming, USA, being

  19. Influence of prairie dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) on habitat heterogeneity and mammalian diversity in Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerardo Ceballos; Jesús Pacheco; Rurik List

    1999-01-01

    Prairie dogs are considered to be both a keystone species and an ecosystem engineer in grasslands. To partially test these hypotheses we evaluated burrow densities, soil removal, and mammal (i.e. rodents and carnivores) species composition, richness, diversity, and abundance in grasslands with and without prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in north-western Mexico. We measured habitat heterogeneity as a function of burrow

  20. Less is more: density influences the development of behavioural life skills in trout.

    PubMed

    Brockmark, S; Adriaenssens, B; Johnsson, J I

    2010-10-01

    Theory suggests that habitat structure and population density profoundly influence the phenotypic development of animals. Here, we predicted that reduced rearing density and increased structural complexity promote food search ability, anti-predator response and the ability to forage on novel prey, all behavioural skills important for surviving in the wild. Brown trout were reared at three densities (conventional hatchery density, a fourth of conventional hatchery density and natural density) in tanks with or without structure. Treatment effects on behaviour were studied on trout fry and parr, whereupon 20 trout from each of the six treatment groups were released in an enclosed natural stream and recaptured after 36 days. Fry reared at natural density were faster to find prey in a maze. Moreover, parr reared at natural density were faster to eat novel prey, and showed more efficient anti-predator behaviour than fish reared at higher densities. Furthermore, parr reared at reduced densities were twice as likely to survive in the stream as trout reared at high density. In contrast, we found no clear treatment effects of structure. These novel results suggest that reduced rearing densities can facilitate the development of behavioural life skills in captive animals, thereby increasing their contribution to natural production. PMID:20462903

  1. Simulating the influences of various fire regimes on caribou winter habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupp, T.S.; Olson, M.; Adams, L.G.; Dale, B.W.; Joly, Kyle; Henkelman, J.; Collins, W.B.; Starfield, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Caribou are an integral component of high-latitude ecosystems and represent a major subsistence food source for many northern people. The availability and quality of winter habitat is critical to sustain these caribou populations. Caribou commonly use older spruce woodlands with adequate terrestrial lichen, a preferred winter forage, in the understory. Changes in climate and fire regime pose a significant threat to the long-term sustainability of this important winter habitat. Computer simulations performed with a spatially explicit vegetation succession model (ALFRESCO) indicate that changes in the frequency and extent of fire in interior Alaska may substantially impact the abundance and quality of winter habitat for caribou. We modeled four different fire scenarios and tracked the frequency, extent, and spatial distribution of the simulated fires and associated changes to vegetation composition and distribution. Our results suggest that shorter fire frequencies (i.e., less time between recurring fires) on the winter range of the Nelchina caribou herd in eastern interior Alaska will result in large decreases of available winter habitat, relative to that currently available, in both the short and long term. A 30% shortening of the fire frequency resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in the area burned annually and an associated 41% decrease in the amount of spruce-lichen forest found on the landscape. More importantly, simulations with more frequent fires produced a relatively immature forest age structure, compared to that which currently exists, with few stands older than 100 years. This age structure is at the lower limits of stand age classes preferred by caribou from the Nelchina herd. Projected changes in fire regime due to climate warming and/or additional prescribed burning could substantially alter the winter habitat of caribou in interior Alaska and lead to changes in winter range use and/or population dynamics. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Xylem cavitation vulnerability influences tree species' habitat preferences in miombo woodlands.

    PubMed

    Vinya, Royd; Malhi, Yadvinder; Fisher, Joshua B; Brown, Nick; Brodribb, Timothy J; Aragao, Luiz E

    2013-11-01

    Although precipitation plays a central role in structuring Africa's miombo woodlands, remarkably little is known about plant-water relations in this seasonally dry tropical forest. Therefore, in this study, we investigated xylem vulnerability to cavitation for nine principal tree species of miombo woodlands, which differ in habitat preference and leaf phenology. We measured cavitation vulnerability (?(50)), stem-area specific hydraulic conductivity (K S), leaf specific conductivity (K L), seasonal variation in predawn water potential (?(PD)) and xylem anatomical properties [mean vessel diameter, mean hydraulic diameter, mean hydraulic diameter accounting for 95 % flow, and maximum vessel length (V L)]. Results show that tree species with a narrow habitat range (mesic specialists) were more vulnerable to cavitation than species with a wide habitat range (generalists). ?(50) for mesic specialists ranged between -1.5 and -2.2 MPa and that for generalists between -2.5 and -3.6 MPa. While mesic specialists exhibited the lowest seasonal variation in ?(PD), generalists displayed significant seasonal variations in ?(PD) suggesting that the two miombo habitat groups differ in their rooting depth. We observed a strong trade-off between K S and ?(50) suggesting that tree hydraulic architecture is one of the decisive factors setting ecological boundaries for principal miombo species. While vessel diameters correlated weakly (P > 0.05) with ?(50), V L was positively and significantly correlated with ?(50). ?(PD) was significantly correlated with ?(50) further reinforcing the conclusion that tree hydraulic architecture plays a significant role in species' habitat preference in miombo woodlands. PMID:23649755

  3. Environmental and human influences on trumpeter swan habitat occupancy in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, J.H.; Lindberg, M.S.; Johnson, D.S.; Schmultz, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 70-80% of the entire population of the Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus huccinator) depends for reproduction on wetlands in Alaska. This makes the identification of important habitat features and the effects of human interactions important for the species' long-term management. We analyzed the swan's habitat preferences in five areas throughout the state and found that swan broods occupied some wetland types, especially larger closed-basin wetlands such as lakes and ponds, at rates much higher than they occupied other wetland types, such as shrubby or forested wetlands. We also found a negative effect of transportation infrastructure on occupancy by broods in and around the Minto Flats State Game Refuge, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, and Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge. This finding is of particular interest because much of the Minto Flats refuge has recently been licensed for oil and gas exploration and parts of the Kenai refuge have been developed in the past. We also investigated the potential effects of the shrinkage of closed-basin ponds on habitat occupancy by nesting Trumpeter Swans. We compared nesting swans' use of ponds with changes in the ponds' size and other characteristics from 1982 to 1996 and found no relationships between occupancy and changes in pond size. However, we believe that the recent and rapid growth of Trumpeter Swan populations in Alaska may become limited by available breeding habitat, and anthropogenic and climate-induced changes to the swan's breeding habitats have the potential to limit future production. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of habitat on the reproductive biology of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent limpet Lepetodrilus fucensis (Vetigastropoda: Mollusca) from the Northeast Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noreen E. Kelly; Anna Metaxas

    2007-01-01

    Habitat selection by the hydrothermal vent limpet, Lepetodrilus fucensis, in Northeast Pacific hydrothermal vent ecosystems, may influence its reproductive output, as it occupies habitats with varying\\u000a physico-chemical conditions that reflect the availability of nutritional resources. Histological techniques were used to determine\\u000a size at first reproduction, gametogenesis, reproductive output, and fecundity in relation to shell length (SL), through examination\\u000a of the

  5. Seasonal Movement and Habitat Use by Subadult Bull Trout in the Upper Flathead River System, Montana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clint C. Muhlfeld; Brian Marotz

    2005-01-01

    Despite the importance of large-scale habitat connectivity to the threatened bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, little is known about the life history characteristics and processes influencing natural dispersal of migratory populations. We used radiotelemetry to investigate the seasonal movements and habitat use by subadult bull trout (i.e., fish that emigrated from natal streams to the river system) tracked for varying durations

  6. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  7. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  8. Influence of forest structure on habitat use by American marten in an industrial forest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. Payer; Daniel J. Harrison

    2003-01-01

    American marten (Martes americana) are associated with late-successional, coniferous forests throughout much of their range. In the northeastern US, however, marten also occur in forests dominated by mid-successional, mixed coniferous–deciduous and deciduous stands. Structural attributes other than forest-stand age and dominant overstory type may be important determinants of habitat quality for marten. To identify structural conditions associated with patterns of

  9. Hydrologic Reconnaissance of Wetland-Bird Habitat in Areas With Potential to be Influenced by Water Produced During Coalbed Methane Production in the Northern Powder River Basin, MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, S. G.; Sojda, R. S.

    2003-12-01

    The removal and disposal of ground water during production of coalbed methane has the potential to influence wetland-bird habitat in the Powder River Basin. Office analysis of wetland areas was conducted on National Wetland Inventory maps and Digital Orthophoto Quadrangles along the Tongue and Powder rivers in the northern Powder River Basin, Montana. Selected sites were palustrine emergent, large enough to be important to waterbirds, part of a wetland complex, not dependent on artificial water regimes, in an area with high potential for coalbed methane production, and judged to be accessible in the field. Several promising wetland areas were selected for field examination. Field investigation suggests that the most promising wetlands in oxbow cutoffs would not be productive sites. Only facultative not obligate wetland plants were observed, the topographic position of the wetlands suggested that flooding would be infrequent, and the stream flow would likely dilute the effect of produced water adjacent to these rivers. Fortuitously wetland-bird habitat not recognized on the National Wetland Inventory maps and Digital Orthophoto Quadrangles was observed along Rosebud Creek during the field reconnaissance. This habitat is not continuous. The lack of continuity is reflected in the soil surveys as well as in the reconnaissance field nvestigation. The Alluvial Land soil series corresponds to observed wetland areas but the extent of the wetland-bird habitat varies substantially within the soil unit. When the Korchea series is present, extensive wetland-bird habitat is not observed. Field and aerial photo analysis suggests that the presence of the habitat may be controlled by beaver, and/or by stratigraphic and structural elements that influence stream erosion. Human modification of the stream for irrigation purposes may impact habitat continuity in some areas. The "Rosebud" type wetland-bird habitat may have the potential to be influenced by coalbed methane water production and warrants further more detailed investigation to determine the areal extent of the habitat, to determine the factors that control the distribution of intermittent wetland-bird-habitat areas, and to better model whether and how water produced during coalbed methane development might influence wetland-bird habitat.

  10. Influence of 4-H Horse Project Involvement on Development of Life Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, K. P.; Karr-Lilienthal, L.

    2011-01-01

    Four-H horse project members who competed in non-riding horse contests were surveyed to evaluate the influence of their horse project participation on life-skill development. Contests in which youth competed included Horse Bowl, Demonstrations, Public Speaking, and Art. Youth indicated a positive influence on both life-skill development and horse…

  11. Hybridisation between two cyprinid fishes in a novel habitat: genetics, morphology and life-history traits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The potential role hybridisation in adaptive radiation and the evolution of new lineages has received much recent attention. Hybridisation between roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) and bream (Abramis brama L.) is well documented throughout Europe, however hybrids in Ireland occur at an unprecedented frequency, often exceeding that of both parental species. Utilising an integrated approach, which incorporates geometric morphometrics, life history and molecular genetic analyses we identify the levels and processes of hybridisation present, while also determining the direction of hybridisation, through the analysis of mitochondrial DNA. Results The presence of F2 hybrids was found to be unlikely from the studied populations, although significant levels of backcrossing, involving both parental taxa was observed in some lakes. Hybridisation represents a viable conduit for introgression of genes between roach and bream. The vast majority of hybrids in all populations studied exhibited bream mitochondrial DNA, indicating that bream are maternal in the majority of crosses. Conclusions The success of roach × bream hybrids in Ireland is not due to a successful self reproducing lineage. The potential causes of widespread hybridisation between both species, along with the considerations regarding the role of hybridisation in evolution and conservation, are also discussed. PMID:20529364

  12. Stressful Life Event Influences on Positive and Negative Psychological Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, John R.; Cohen, Lawrence H.

    Some research has suggested that positive life events may interact with negative life events during periods of high stress to buffer the effects of negative events. The relationships among positive and negative life events and positive and negative psychological status were examined in an investigation of the direct and mediating effects of…

  13. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Pronghorn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.; Cook, John G.; Armbruster, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    This is one of a series of publications that provide information on the habitat requirements of selected fish and wildlife species. Literature describing the relationship between habitat variables related to life requisites and habitat suitability for the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) are synthesized. These data are subsequently used to develop Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models. The HSI models are designed to provide information that can be used in impact assessment and habitat management.

  14. Paradata for 'Distribution, Habitat Use and Life History of Stream-dwelling Crayfish in the Spring River Drainage of Arkansas and Missouri with a Focus on the Imperiled Mammoth Spring Crayfish (Orconectes marchandi)'

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This record contains paradata for the resource 'Distribution, Habitat Use and Life History of Stream-dwelling Crayfish in the Spring River Drainage of Arkansas and Missouri with a Focus on the Imperiled Mammoth Spring Crayfish (Orconectes marchandi)'

  15. Landscape alterations influence differential habitat use of nesting buteos and ravens within sagebrush ecosystem: implications for transmission line development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A goal in avian ecology is to understand factors that influence differences in nesting habitat and distribution among species, especially within changing landscapes. Over the past 2 decades, humans have altered sagebrush ecosystems as a result of expansion in energy production and transmission. Our primary study objective was to identify differences in the use of landscape characteristics and natural and anthropogenic features by nesting Common Ravens (Corvus corax) and 3 species of buteo (Swainson's Hawk [Buteo swainsoni], Red-tailed Hawk [B. jamaicensis], and Ferruginous Hawk [B. regalis]) within a sagebrush ecosystem in southeastern Idaho. During 2007–2009, we measured multiple environmental factors associated with 212 nest sites using data collected remotely and in the field. We then developed multinomial models to predict nesting probabilities by each species and predictive response curves based on model-averaged estimates. We found differences among species related to nesting substrate (natural vs. anthropogenic), agriculture, native grassland, and edge (interface of 2 cover types). Most important, ravens had a higher probability of nesting on anthropogenic features (0.80) than the other 3 species (Artemisia spp.), favoring increased numbers of nesting ravens and fewer nesting Ferruginous Hawks. Our results indicate that habitat alterations, fragmentation, and forthcoming disturbances anticipated with continued energy development in sagebrush steppe ecosystems can lead to predictable changes in raptor and raven communities.

  16. Modeling the influence of Peromyscus leucopus body mass, sex, and habitat on immature Dermacentor variabilis burden.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad A; Foré, Stephanie A; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2012-12-01

    Immature (larvae and nymph) tick burden on rodents is an important determinant of adult tick population size and understanding infectious disease dynamics. The objective of this research was to build a descriptive model for immature Dermacentor variabilis burden on Peromyscus leucopus. Mice were live-trapped on two permanent grids in an old field and an early successional forest every other month between April and October, 2006-2009. Negative binomial regression was used to examine the association between immature D. variabilis burden and the host related variables of host habitat, body mass, and/or sex. The model containing all three variables had the lowest Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), corrected AIC (AICc), and greatest AICc weight. Immature D. variabilis burden was positively associated with mice with higher body mass, male mice, and those captured in the field habitat. These data are consistent with studies from other tick-rodent systems and suggest that single factor models do not describe host burden. Variables other than those that are related to the host may also be important in describing the tick burden on rodents. The next step is to examine variables that affect tick development rate and questing behavior. PMID:23181857

  17. Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD): Integrative Study of Marine Ice Sheet Stability and Subglacial Life Habitats (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulaczyk, S. M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Behar, A. E.; Christner, B. C.; Fisher, A. T.; Fricker, H. A.; Holland, D. M.; Jacobel, R. W.; Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Powell, R. D.; Priscu, J. C.; Scherer, R. P.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The WISSARD project is a large, NSF-funded, interdisciplinary initiative focused on scientific drilling, exploration, and investigation of Antarctic subglacial aquatic environments. The project consists of three interrelated components: (1) LISSARD - Lake and Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling, (2) RAGES - Robotic Access to Grounding-zones for Exploration and Science, and (3) GBASE - GeomicroBiology of Antarctic Subglacial Environments). A number of previous studies in West Antarctica highlighted the importance of understanding ice sheet interactions with water, either at the basal boundary where ice streams come in contact with active subglacial hydrologic and geological systems or at the marine margin where the ice sheet is exposed to forcing from the global ocean and sedimentation. Recent biological investigations of Antarctic subglacial environments show that they provide a significant habitat for life and source of bacterial carbon in a setting that was previously thought to be inhospitable. Subglacial microbial ecosystems also enhance biogeochemical weathering, mobilizing elements from long term geological storage. The overarching scientific objective of WISSARD is to examine the subglacial hydrological system of West Antarctica in glaciological, geological, microbiological, geochemical, and oceanographic contexts. Direct sampling will yield seminal information on these systems and test the overarching hypothesis that active hydrological systems connect various subglacial environments and exert major control on ice sheet dynamics, subglacial sediment transfer, geochemistry, metabolic and phylogenetic diversity, and biogeochemical transformations and geological records of ice sheet history. Technological advances during WISSARD will provide the US-science community with a capability to access and study sub-ice sheet environments. Developing this technological infrastructure will benefit the broader science community and it will be available for future use. Furthermore, these projects will pioneer an approach implementing recommendations from the National Research Council committee on Principles of Environmental Stewardship for the Exploration and Study of Subglacial Environments.

  18. Volcaniclastic habitats for early life on Earth and Mars: A case study from ˜3.5 Ga-old rocks from the Pilbara, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, Frances; Foucher, Frédéric; Cavalazzi, Barbara; de Vries, Sjoukje T.; Nijman, Wouter; Pearson, Victoria; Watson, Jon; Verchovsky, Alexander; Wright, Ian; Rouzaud, Jean-Noel; Marchesini, Daniele; Anne, Severine

    2011-08-01

    Within the context of present and future in situ missions to Mars to investigate its habitability and to search for traces of life, we studied the habitability and traces of past life in ˜3.5 Ga-old volcanic sands deposited in littoral environments an analogue to Noachian environments on Mars. The environmental conditions on Noachian Mars (4.1-3.7 Ga) and the Early Archaean (4.0-3.3 Ga) Earth were, in many respects, similar: presence of liquid water, dense CO 2 atmosphere, availability of carbon and bio-essential elements, and availability of energy. For this reason, information contained in Early Archaean terrestrial rocks concerning habitable conditions (on a microbial scale) and traces of past life are of relevance in defining strategies to be used to identify past habitats and past life on Mars. One such example is the 3.446 Ga-old Kitty's Gap Chert in the Pilbara Craton, NW. Australia. This formation consists of volcanic sediments deposited in a coastal mudflat environment and is thus a relevant analogue for sediments deposited in shallow water environments on Noachian Mars. Two main types of habitat are represented, a volcanic (lithic) habitat and planar stabilized sediment surfaces in sunlit shallow waters. The sediments hosted small (<1 ?m in size) microorganisms that formed colonies on volcanic particle surfaces and in pore waters within the volcanic sediments, as well as biofilms on stabilised sediment surfaces. The microorganisms included coccoids, filaments and rare rod-shaped organisms associated with microbial polymer (EPS). The preserved microbial community was apparently dominated by chemotrophic organisms but some locally transported filaments and filamentous mat fragments indicate that possibly photosynthetic mats formed nearby. Both microorganisms and sediments were silicified during very early diagenesis. There are no macroscopic traces of fossilised life in these volcanic sediments and sophisticated instrumentation and specialized sample preparation techniques are required to establish the biogenicity and syngenicity of the traces of past life. The fact that the traces of life are cryptic, and the necessity of using sophisticated instrumentation, reinforces the challenges and difficulties of in situ robotic missions to identify past life on Mars. We therefore recommend the return of samples from Mars to Earth for a definitive search for traces of life.

  19. Influence of extrinsic variables on activity and habitat selection of lowland tapirs ( Tapirus terrestris) in the coastal sand plain shrub, southern Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luiz Gustavo R. Oliveira-Santos; Luiz Carlos P. Machado-Filho; Marcos Adriano Tortato; Luisa Brusius

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to: 1. evaluate the circadian activity patterns of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) throughout the seasons and 2. study the influence of moonlight, temperature and rainfall on the activity patterns and habitat selection of this species, in the coastal sand shrub in southern Brazil. From June 2005 to June 2006, eight tapirs were monitored in

  20. The influence of disturbed habitat on the spatial ecology of Argentine black and white tegu (Tupinambis merianae), a recent invader in the Everglades ecosystem (Florida, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klug, Page E.; Reed, Robert N.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; McEachern, Michelle A.; Vinci, Joy J.; Craven, Katelin K.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.

    2015-01-01

    The threat of invasive species is often intensified in disturbed habitat. To optimize control programs, it is necessary to understand how degraded habitat influences the behavior of invasive species. We conducted a radio telemetry study to characterize movement and habitat use of introducedmale Argentine black and white tegus (Tupinambis merianae) in the Everglades of southern Florida from May to August 2012 at the core and periphery of the introduced range. Tegus at the periphery moved farther per day (mean 131.7 ± 11.6 m, n = 6) compared to tegus at the core (mean 50.3 ± 12.4 m, n = 6). However, activity ranges were not significantly smaller in the core (mean 19.4 ± 8.4 ha, n = 6) compared to periphery (mean 29.1 ± 5.2 ha, n = 6). Peripheral activity ranges were more linear due to activity being largely restricted to levee habitat surrounded by open water or marsh. Tegus were located in shrub or tree habitat (mean 96 %) more often than expected based on random locations (mean 58 %), and the percent cover of trees and shrubs was higher in activity ranges (mean 61 %) than the general study area (17 %). Our study highlighted the ability of tegus to spread across the Florida landscape, especially in linear disturbed habitats where increased movement occurred and in areas of altered hydrology where movement is not restricted by water.

  1. The Influence of Divorce on Traditional Life-Cycle Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Arthur J.

    1980-01-01

    Presents data and discussion comparing life-cycle measures of divorced women with those of women who had never divorced. Findings indicate that differences do exist in the timing of life-cycle events according to marital history, race, and education but that birth cohort association represents an overriding source of differential timing. (Author)

  2. Influence of Early Life Events on Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Robillard, Jean E; Segar, Jeffrey L

    2006-01-01

    The transition from the fetal to the extrauterine environment is associated with complex physiological adjustments and involves numerous cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adjustments to ensure successful adaptation to the postnatal life. While such changes are in response to the altered environment in which the newborn finds itself, external changes affecting the fetal environment could impact the integrity of these mechanisms and increase susceptibility to diseases later in life. The present article reviews some of the mechanisms involved in the transition from fetal to postnatal life and focuses of how our health as adults is dependent on the conditions we experienced in-utero. PMID:18528483

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal regeneration is influenced by life stage, ephrin signaling,

    E-print Network

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal regeneration is influenced by life stage, ephrin signaling functional regeneration of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons after femtosecond laser axotomy. We report in C. elegans neurons. axotomy laser femtosecond laser microsurgery Regeneration of neuronal processes

  4. Habitat use by the endangered Karner blue butterfly in oak woodlands: The influence of canopy cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grundel, Ralph; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Sulzman, Christina L.

    1998-01-01

    The Karner blue butterfly Lycaeides melissa samuelis is an endangered species residing in the Great Lakes and northeastern regions of the United States. Increased canopy cover is a major factor implicated in the decline of the Karner blue at many locales. Therefore, we examined how the butterfly's behavior varied with canopy cover. Adult males at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore used habitat under canopy openings for nearly 90% of their activities; females used openings and shaded areas more equally. The frequency of oviposition on the sole host plant, wild lupine Lupinus perennis, was highest under 30-60% canopy cover even though lupine was more abundant in more open areas. Larvae fed preferentially on larger lupine plants and on lupines in denser patches. However, lupines were generally large in the shade. Therefore, shade-related trade-offs existed between lupine abundance and distribution of larval feeding and oviposition. Also, heterogeneity of shading by sub-canopy woody vegetation was greater at oviposition sites than at sites where lupine did not grow. Given the importance of shade heterogeneity, a mixture of canopy opening and shades, on a scale similar to daily adult movement range, should be beneficial for this butterfly.

  5. Habitat use by the endangered Karner blue butterfly in oak woodlands: The influence of canopy cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grundel, R.; Pavlovic, N.B.; Sulzman, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Karner blue butterfly Lycaeides melissa samuelis is an endangered species residing in the Great Lakes and northeastern regions of the United States. Increased canopy cover is a major factor implicated in the decline of the Karner blue at many locales. Therefore, we examined how the butterfly's behavior varied with canopy cover. Adult males at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore used habitat under canopy openings for nearly 90% of their activities; females used openings and shaded areas more equally. The frequency of oviposition on the sole host plant, wild lupine Lupinus perennis, was highest under 30-60% canopy cover even though lupine was more abundant in more open areas. Larvae fed preferentially on larger lupine plants and on lupines in denser patches. However, lupines were generally larger in the shade. Therefore, shade-related trade-offs existed between lupine abundance and distribution of larval feeding and oviposition. Also, heterogeneity of shading by sub-canopy woody vegetation was greater at oviposition sites than at sites where lupine did not grow. Given the importance of shade heterogeneity, a mixture of canopy openings and shade, on a scale similar to daily adult movement range, should be beneficial for this butterfly.

  6. Influence of Reoperations on Long-Term Quality of Life After Restrictive Procedures: A Prospective Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruben Schouten; Dorothee C. M. S. Wiryasaputra; Francois M. H. van Dielen; Wim G. van Gemert; Jan Willem M. Greve

    2011-01-01

    Quality of life improves after bariatric surgery. However, long-term results and the influence of reoperations are not well\\u000a known. A prospective quality of life assessment before, 1 and 7 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)\\u000a and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) was performed in order to determine the influence of reoperations during follow-up.\\u000a One hundred patients were included in the study.

  7. Environmental, behavioral, and habitat variables influencing body temperature in radio-tagged bullsnakes, Pituophis catenifer sayi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Kapfer; M. J. Pauers; D. M. Reineke; J. R. Coggins; R. Hay

    2008-01-01

    Studies regarding the thermal ecology of snakes are important to understanding their life histories. Yet, little is known about the thermal ecology of the North American genus Pituophis, which includes the bullsnake (Pituophis catenifer sayi). In an attempt to determine which independent variables significantly affected the thermal ecology of free-ranging bullsnakes, we tracked 12–19 radio-tagged individuals weekly from 2003 to

  8. Habitat manipulation of Exposed Riverine Sediments (ERS) how does microhabitat, microclimate and food availability influence beetle distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshall, S. E.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2009-04-01

    Exposed riverine sediments (ERS) are frequently inundated areas of relatively un-vegetated, fluvially deposited sediment (sand, silt, gravel and pebble). These habitats provide an important interface allowing the interaction of aquatic and terrestrial habitats and species. ERS are highly valuable for many rare and specialist invertebrates particularly beetles. Within an area of ERS, beetle species richness tends to be highest along the water's edge. This higher species richness may be linked to: (1) the availability of food items in the form of emerging and stranded aquatic invertebrates and (2) favourable physical microhabitat conditions in terms of temperature and moisture. This paper explores the role of microclimate and food availability by creating areas of ‘water's edge' habitat in the centre of a gravel bar. Typically these areas are drier, reach higher temperatures and devoid of emerging aquatic invertebrate prey. Four 2m x 2m experimental plots were created: one wet plot, one wet- fed plot, one dry-fed plot and one dry plot (control). These plots were each replicated on three separate areas of ERS. Sixty colour marked ERS specialist ground beetles (Bembidion atrocaeruleum) were released into each plot to monitor beetle persistence and movement on and between plots. The plots were maintained wet using a capillary pump system, and fed with dried blood worms for 30 days. Sediment temperature (0.05 m depth) was measured at 15 minute intervals and spot measurements of surface temperature were taken daily. A hand search was carried out on 25% of each plot after 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. Significant temperature differences were observed between the wet and dry sediment and air temperature. The wet plots on average were 1.8oC cooler than the dry plots and had a reduced temperature range. Both wet and dry sediments remained significantly warmer than air temperature. The wet and wet-fed plots yielded significantly greater numbers of beetles and marked beetles than the dry and dry-fed plots; however, no significant difference was found between the wet and wet-fed plots. These results indicate that microhabitat in terms of increased moisture and lower temperature is the driving factor influencing beetle distribution and movement. Food alone is not as influential. ERS carabid beetles may be using lower temperatures and increased moisture as a cue for aquatic food availability.

  9. Ecological constraints on breeding system evolution: the influence of habitat on brood desertion in Kentish plover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAMÁS SZÉKELY; INNES C. CUTHILL; K. TULUHAN YILMAZ

    Summary 1. One of the fundamental insights of behavioural ecology is that resources influence breeding systems. For instance, when food resources are plenty, one parent is able to care for the young on its own, so that the other parent can desert and became polygamous. We investigated this hypothesis in the context of classical polyandry when females may have several

  10. Diversity in skeletal architecture influences biological heterogeneity and Symbiodinium habitat in corals.

    PubMed

    Yost, Denise M; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Fan, Tung-Yung; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Lee, Raymond W; Sogin, Emilia; Gates, Ruth D

    2013-10-01

    Scleractinian corals vary in response to rapid shifts in the marine environment and changes in reef community structure post-disturbance reveal a clear relationship between coral performance and morphology. With exceptions, massive corals are thought to be more tolerant and branching corals more vulnerable to changing environmental conditions, notably thermal stress. The typical responses of massive and branching coral taxa, respectively, are well documented; however, the biological and functional characteristics that underpin this variation are not well understood. We address this gap by comparing multiple biological attributes that are correlated with skeletal architecture in two perforate (having porous skeletal matrices with intercalating tissues) and two imperforate coral species (Montipora aequituberculata, Porites lobata, Pocillopora damicornis, and Seriatopora hystrix) representing three morphotypes. Our results reveal inherent biological heterogeneity among corals and the potential for perforate skeletons to create complex, three-dimensional internal habitats that impact the dynamics of the symbiosis. Patterns of tissue thickness are correlated with the concentration of symbionts within narrow regions of tissue in imperforate corals versus broad distribution throughout the larger tissue area in perforate corals. Attributes of the perforate and environmentally tolerant P. lobata were notable, with tissues ?5 times thicker than in the sensitive, imperforate species P. damicornis and S. hystrix. Additionally, P. lobata had the lowest baseline levels of superoxide and Symbiodinium that provisioned high levels of energy. Given our observations, we hypothesize that the complexity of the visually obscured internal environment has an impact on host-symbiont dynamics and ultimately on survival, warranting further scientific investigation. PMID:23992772

  11. Habitat-Mediated Facilitation and Counteracting Ecosystem Engineering Interactively Influence Ecosystem Responses to Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Eklöf, Johan S.; van der Heide, Tjisse; Donadi, Serena; van der Zee, Els M.; O'Hara, Robert; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of an ecosystem following disturbance can be severely hampered or even shift altogether when a point disturbance exceeds a certain spatial threshold. Such scale-dependent dynamics may be caused by preemptive competition, but may also result from diminished self-facilitation due to weakened ecosystem engineering. Moreover, disturbance can facilitate colonization by engineering species that alter abiotic conditions in ways that exacerbate stress on the original species. Consequently, establishment of such counteracting engineers might reduce the spatial threshold for the disturbance, by effectively slowing recovery and increasing the risk for ecosystem shifts to alternative states. We tested these predictions in an intertidal mudflat characterized by a two-state mosaic of hummocks (humps exposed during low tide) dominated by the sediment-stabilizing seagrass Zostera noltii) and hollows (low-tide waterlogged depressions dominated by the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina). In contrast to expectations, seagrass recolonized both natural and experimental clearings via lateral expansion and seemed unaffected by both clearing size and lugworm addition. Near the end of the growth season, however, an additional disturbance (most likely waterfowl grazing and/or strong hydrodynamics) selectively impacted recolonizing seagrass in the largest (1 m2) clearings (regardless of lugworm addition), and in those medium (0.25 m2) clearings where lugworms had been added nearly five months earlier. Further analyses showed that the risk for the disturbance increased with hollow size, with a threshold of 0.24 m2. Hollows of that size were caused by seagrass removal alone in the largest clearings, and by a weaker seagrass removal effect exacerbated by lugworm bioturbation in the medium clearings. Consequently, a sufficiently large disturbance increased the vulnerability of recolonizing seagrass to additional disturbance by weakening seagrass engineering effects (sediment stabilization). Meanwhile, the counteracting ecosystem engineering (lugworm bioturbation) reduced that threshold size. Therefore, scale-dependent interactions between habitat-mediated facilitation, competition and disturbance seem to maintain the spatial two-state mosaic in this ecosystem. PMID:21829719

  12. Distribution of fish in seagrass, mangroves and coral reefs: life-stage dependent habitat use in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Jaxion-Harm, Jessica; Saunders, James; Speight, Martin R

    2012-06-01

    Many coral reef fish exhibit habitat partitioning throughout their lifetimes. Such patterns are evident in the Caribbean where research has been predominantly conducted in the Eastern region. This work addressed the paucity of data regarding Honduran reef fish distribution in three habitat types (seagrass, mangroves, and coral reefs), by surveying fish on the islands of Utila and Cayos Cochinos off the coast of Honduras (part of the Mesoamerican barrier reef). During July 2nd - Aug 27th 2007 and June 22nd - Aug 17th, 2008, visual surveys (SCUBA and snorkel) were performed in belt transects in different areas: eleven coral reef, six seagrass beds, and six mangroves sites. Juvenile densities and total habitat surface area were used to calculate nursery value of seagrass and mangroves. A total of 113 fish species from 32 families were found during underwater surveys. Multi-dimensional analyses revealed distinct clusters of fish communities in each habitat type by separating fish associated with seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs. Coral reefs showed the highest mean fish species richness and were dominated by adult fish, while juvenile fish characterized seagrass beds and mangrove sites. Habitat use differed widely at the fish species level. Scarus iseri (Striped Parrotfish), the most abundant fish in this study, were found in all three habitat types, while Lutjanus apodus (Schoolmaster Snapper) juveniles were located primarily in mangroves before migrating to coral reefs. Many species used seagrass beds and mangroves as nurseries; however, the nursery value could not be generalized at the family level. Furthermore, for some fish species, nursery value varied between islands and sites. Our results suggest that connectivity of seagrass, mangrove, and coral reef sites at a species and site levels, should be taken into consideration when implementing policy and conservation practices. PMID:23894938

  13. The Influence of the Mass Media on the Life Plans of Rural Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillaste, G. G.

    2005-01-01

    Rural students, who live in the villages of Russia, are more resolved than ever to leave their native land. Their decision is influenced by the mass media, which plays a large role in determining their views and the way they relate to the world. In this article, the author examines the influence of the mass media on the life of rural students…

  14. Art Influencing Art: The Making of "An Extraordinary Life."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerper, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the creation of "An Extraordinary Life: The Story of a Monarch Butterfly." Selects this book because of the unprecedented decision to give the 1998 Orbis Pictus Award to both the author and the illustrator for a work in which text and illustration melded together. Develops an event model, revealing the creation of this illustrated…

  15. Prestraining and its influence on subsequent fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, S. [NYMA, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States). NASA Lewis Research Center; Halford, G.R.; McGaw, M.A. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An experimental program was conducted to study the damaging effects of tensile and compressive prestrains on the fatigue life of nickel-base, Inconel 718 superalloy at room temperature. To establish baseline fatigue behavior, virgin specimens with a solid uniform gage section were fatigued to failure under fully reversed strain control. Additional specimens were prestrained to 2, 5, and 10% (engineering strains) in the tensile direction and to 2% (engineering strain) in the compressive direction under stroke control and were subsequently fatigued to failure under fully reversed strain control. Experimental results are compared with estimates of remaining fatigue lives (after prestraining) using three life prediction approaches: (1) the linear damage rule (LDR), (2) the linear strain and life fraction rule (LSLFR), and (3) the nonlinear damage curve approach (DCA). The Smith-Watson-Topper parameter was used to estimate fatigue lives in the presence of mean stresses. Among the cumulative damage rules investigated, the best remaining fatigue life predictions were obtained with the nonlinear damage curve approach.

  16. Prestraining and its influence on subsequent fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Halford, G.R.; Mcgaw, M.A.; Kalluri, S.

    1995-03-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the damaging effects of tensile and compressive prestrains on the fatigue life of nickel-base, Inconel 718 superalloy at room temperature. To establish baseline fatigue behavior, virgin specimens with a solid uniform gage section were fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Additional specimens were prestrained to 2 percent, 5 percent, and 10 percent (engineering strains) in the tensile direction and to 2 percent (engineering strain) in the compressive direction under stroke-control, and were subsequently fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Experimental results are compared with estimates of remaining fatigue lives (after prestraining) using three life prediction approaches: (1) the Linear Damage Rule; (2) the Linear Strain and Life Fraction Rule; and (3) the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach. The Smith-Watson-Topper parameter was used to estimate fatigue lives in the presence of mean stresses. Among the cumulative damage rules investigated, best remaining fatigue life predictions were obtained with the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach.

  17. Prestraining and Its Influence on Subsequent Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Mcgaw, Michael A.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the damaging effects of tensile and compressive prestrains on the fatigue life of nickel-base, Inconel 718 superalloy at room temperature. To establish baseline fatigue behavior, virgin specimens with a solid uniform gage section were fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Additional specimens were prestrained to 2 percent, 5 percent, and 10 percent (engineering strains) in the tensile direction and to 2 percent (engineering strain) in the compressive direction under stroke-control, and were subsequently fatigued to failure under fully-reversed strain-control. Experimental results are compared with estimates of remaining fatigue lives (after prestraining) using three life prediction approaches: (1) the Linear Damage Rule; (2) the Linear Strain and Life Fraction Rule; and (3) the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach. The Smith-Watson-Topper parameter was used to estimate fatigue lives in the presence of mean stresses. Among the cumulative damage rules investigated, best remaining fatigue life predictions were obtained with the nonlinear Damage Curve Approach.

  18. The influence of habitats on female mobility in Central and Western Africa inferred from human mitochondrial variation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When studying the genetic structure of human populations, the role of cultural factors may be difficult to ascertain due to a lack of formal models. Linguistic diversity is a typical example of such a situation. Patrilocality, on the other hand, can be integrated into a biological framework, allowing the formulation of explicit working hypotheses. The present study is based on the assumption that patrilocal traditions make the hypervariable region I of the mtDNA a valuable tool for the exploration of migratory dynamics, offering the opportunity to explore the relationships between genetic and linguistic diversity. We studied 85 Niger-Congo-speaking patrilocal populations that cover regions from Senegal to Central African Republic. A total of 4175 individuals were included in the study. Results By combining a multivariate analysis aimed at investigating the population genetic structure, with a Bayesian approach used to test models and extent of migration, we were able to detect a stepping-stone migration model as the best descriptor of gene flow across the region, with the main discontinuities corresponding to forested areas. Conclusions Our analyses highlight an aspect of the influence of habitat variation on human genetic diversity that has yet to be understood. Rather than depending simply on geographic linear distances, patterns of female genetic variation vary substantially between savannah and rainforest environments. Our findings may be explained by the effects of recent gene flow constrained by environmental factors, which superimposes on a background shaped by pre-agricultural peopling. PMID:23360301

  19. Habitability: where lo look for life? Halophilic habitats: earth analogs to study Mars and Europá s habitability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Gómez; J. Gómez-Elvira; N. Rodríguez; J. F. Caballero Castrejón; R. Amils; J. A. Rodríguez-Manfredi

    2009-01-01

    Current Mars exploration is producing a considerable amount of information which requires comparison with terrestrial analogs in order to interpret and evaluate compatibility with possible extinct and\\/or extant life on the planet. The first astrobiological mission specially designed to detect life on Mars, the Viking missions, thought life unlikely, considering the amount of UV radiation bathing the surface of the

  20. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Negative Life Events From Late Childhood to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel P.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Whisman, Mark A.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.

    2012-01-01

    This multi-wave longitudinal study tested two quantitative genetic developmental models to examine genetic and environmental influences on exposure to negative dependent and independent life events. Participants (N = 457 twin pairs) completed measures of life events annually from ages 9 to 16. The same genetic factors influenced exposure to dependent events across time, and increased in magnitude during the transition to adolescence. Independent events were less genetically influenced than dependent events in boys, but not girls. Shared environmental influences decreased in magnitude as youth transitioned into adolescence. Nonshared environmental influences were mostly age-specific and contributed significantly to both types of events at all ages. Results provide theoretical implications for developmental risk pathways to stress exposure and stress-related psychopathology. PMID:23379294

  1. A study of air pollutants influencing life expectancy and longevity from spatial perspective in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; BingganWei; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Zhang, Fengying; Rosenberg, Mark; Yang, Linsheng; Huang, Jixia; Krafft, Thomas; Wang, Wuyi

    2014-07-15

    Life expectancy and longevity are influenced by air pollutants and socioeconomic status, but the extend and significance are still unclear. Better understanding how the spatial differences of life expectancy and longevity are affected by air pollutants is needed for generating public health and environmental strategies since the whole of China is now threatened by deteriorated air quality. 85 major city regions were chosen as research areas. Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) and Stepwise Regression (SR) were used to find the spatial correlations between health indicators and air pollutants, adjusted by per capita GDP(1). The results were, regions with higher life expectancy were mainly located in the east area and areas with good air quality, a regional difference of 10 ?g/m(3) in ambient air SO2(2) could cause adjusted 0.28 year's difference in life expectancy, a regional difference of 10 ?g/m(3) in ambient air PM10(3) could lead to a longevity ratio difference of 2.23, and per capita GDP was positively associating with life expectancy but not longevity ratio, with a regional difference of 10,000 RMB(4) associating with adjusted 0.49 year's difference in life expectancy. This research also showed the evidences that there exist spatially differences for ambient air PM10 and SO2 influencing life expectancy and longevity in China, and this influences were clearer in south China. PMID:24768912

  2. Influence of whitebark pine decline on fall habitat use and movements of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Costello, Cecily M; van Manen, Frank T; Haroldson, Mark A; Ebinger, Michael R; Cain, Steven L; Gunther, Kerry A; Bjornlie, Daniel D

    2014-05-01

    When abundant, seeds of the high-elevation whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis) are an important fall food for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Rates of bear mortality and bear/human conflicts have been inversely associated with WBP productivity. Recently, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) have killed many cone-producing WBP trees. We used fall (15 August-30 September) Global Positioning System locations from 89 bear years to investigate temporal changes in habitat use and movements during 2000-2011. We calculated Manly-Chesson (MC) indices for selectivity of WBP habitat and secure habitat (?500 m from roads and human developments), determined dates of WBP use, and documented net daily movement distances and activity radii. To evaluate temporal trends, we used regression, model selection, and candidate model sets consisting of annual WBP production, sex, and year. One-third of sampled grizzly bears had fall ranges with little or no mapped WBP habitat. Most other bears (72%) had a MC index above 0.5, indicating selection for WBP habitats. From 2000 to 2011, mean MC index decreased and median date of WBP use shifted about 1 week later. We detected no trends in movement indices over time. Outside of national parks, there was no correlation between the MC indices for WBP habitat and secure habitat, and most bears (78%) selected for secure habitat. Nonetheless, mean MC index for secure habitat decreased over the study period during years of good WBP productivity. The wide diet breadth and foraging plasticity of grizzly bears likely allowed them to adjust to declining WBP. Bears reduced use of WBP stands without increasing movement rates, suggesting they obtained alternative fall foods within their local surroundings. However, the reduction in mortality risk historically associated with use of secure, high-elevation WBP habitat may be diminishing for bears residing in multiple-use areas. PMID:24963393

  3. Influence of whitebark pine decline on fall habitat use and movements of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cecily M; van Manen, Frank T; Haroldson, Mark A; Ebinger, Michael R; Cain, Steven L; Gunther, Kerry A; Bjornlie, Daniel D

    2014-01-01

    When abundant, seeds of the high-elevation whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis) are an important fall food for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Rates of bear mortality and bear/human conflicts have been inversely associated with WBP productivity. Recently, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) have killed many cone-producing WBP trees. We used fall (15 August–30 September) Global Positioning System locations from 89 bear years to investigate temporal changes in habitat use and movements during 2000–2011. We calculated Manly–Chesson (MC) indices for selectivity of WBP habitat and secure habitat (?500 m from roads and human developments), determined dates of WBP use, and documented net daily movement distances and activity radii. To evaluate temporal trends, we used regression, model selection, and candidate model sets consisting of annual WBP production, sex, and year. One-third of sampled grizzly bears had fall ranges with little or no mapped WBP habitat. Most other bears (72%) had a MC index above 0.5, indicating selection for WBP habitats. From 2000 to 2011, mean MC index decreased and median date of WBP use shifted about 1 week later. We detected no trends in movement indices over time. Outside of national parks, there was no correlation between the MC indices for WBP habitat and secure habitat, and most bears (78%) selected for secure habitat. Nonetheless, mean MC index for secure habitat decreased over the study period during years of good WBP productivity. The wide diet breadth and foraging plasticity of grizzly bears likely allowed them to adjust to declining WBP. Bears reduced use of WBP stands without increasing movement rates, suggesting they obtained alternative fall foods within their local surroundings. However, the reduction in mortality risk historically associated with use of secure, high-elevation WBP habitat may be diminishing for bears residing in multiple-use areas. PMID:24963393

  4. Collective emotions online and their influence on community life

    E-print Network

    Chmiel, Anna; Thelwall, Mike; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Kappas, Arvid; Ho?yst, Janusz A

    2011-01-01

    E-communities, social groups interacting online, have recently become an object of interdisciplinary research. As with face-to-face meetings, Internet exchanges may not only include factual information but also emotional information - how participants feel about the subject discussed or other group members. Emotions are known to be important in affecting interaction partners in offline communication in many ways. Could emotions in Internet exchanges affect others and systematically influence quantitative and qualitative aspects of the trajectory of e-communities? The development of automatic sentiment analysis has made large scale emotion detection and analysis possible using text messages collected from the web. It is not clear if emotions in e-communities primarily derive from individual group members' personalities or if they result from intra-group interactions, and whether they influence group activities. We show the collective character of affective phenomena on a large scale as observed in 4 million po...

  5. Investigating the Impact of UV Radiation on High-Altitude Shallow Lake Habitats, Life Diversity, and Life Survival Strategies: Clues for Mars' Past Habitability Potential?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.; Kiss, K.; Acs, E.; Kovacs, G.; Chong, G.; Demergasso, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data and results from an ongoing project of astrobiological high-altitude expeditions investigating the highest and least explored perennial lakes on Earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes nearing and beyond 6,000 m in elevation. In the next five years, they will provide the first integrated long-term astrobiological characterization and monitoring of lacustrine environments and their biology for such altitude. These extreme lakes are natural laboratories. They provide the field data missing beyond 4,000 m to complete our understanding of terrestrial lakes and biota. Research on the effects of UV has been performed in lower altitude lakes and models of UV flux over time are being developed. Lakes showing a high content of dissolved organic material (DOM) shield organisms from UV. DOM acts as a natural sunscreen as it influences the water transparency, therefore is a determinant of photic zone depth. In sparsely vegetated alpine areas, lakes are clearer and offer less protection from UV to organisms living in the water. Transparent water and high UV irradiance may maximize the penetration and effect of UV radiation. Shallow-water communities in these lakes are particularly sensitive to UV radiation. The periphyton can live on various susbtrates. While on rocks, it includes immobile species that cannot seek low UV refuges unlike sediment-dwelling periphyton or alpine phytoflagellates which undergo vertical migration. Inhibition of algal photosynthesis by UV radiation has been documented in laboratory and showed that phytoplankton production is reduced by formation of nucleic acid lesions or production of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. Our project is providing the field data that is missing from natural laboratories beyond 4,000 m and will complement the vision of the effects of UV on life and its adaptation modes (or lack thereof).

  6. Habitat Use during Early Life History Infers Recovery Needs for Shovelnose Sturgeon and Pallid Sturgeon in the Middle Mississippi River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Quinton E. Phelps; Sara J. Tripp; James E. Garvey; David P. Herzog; David E. Ostendorf; Joseph W. Ridings; Jason W. Crites; Robert A. Hrabik

    2010-01-01

    Habitat use by wild age-0 shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus and pallid sturgeon S. albus was quantified by trawling macrohabitats (i.e., main channel, main-channel border, island, and artificial structures [e.g., wing dams]) in the middle Mississippi River during 1998–2007 (1,702 trawls; n = 1,507 age-0 sturgeon captured). Age-0 sturgeon catch rates were highest around artificial structures and island areas, while main-channel

  7. Collective Emotions Online and Their Influence on Community Life

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Anna; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Thelwall, Mike; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Kappas, Arvid; Ho?yst, Janusz A.

    2011-01-01

    Background E-communities, social groups interacting online, have recently become an object of interdisciplinary research. As with face-to-face meetings, Internet exchanges may not only include factual information but also emotional information – how participants feel about the subject discussed or other group members. Emotions in turn are known to be important in affecting interaction partners in offline communication in many ways. Could emotions in Internet exchanges affect others and systematically influence quantitative and qualitative aspects of the trajectory of e-communities? The development of automatic sentiment analysis has made large scale emotion detection and analysis possible using text messages collected from the web. However, it is not clear if emotions in e-communities primarily derive from individual group members' personalities or if they result from intra-group interactions, and whether they influence group activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, for the first time, we show the collective character of affective phenomena on a large scale as observed in four million posts downloaded from Blogs, Digg and BBC forums. To test whether the emotions of a community member may influence the emotions of others, posts were grouped into clusters of messages with similar emotional valences. The frequency of long clusters was much higher than it would be if emotions occurred at random. Distributions for cluster lengths can be explained by preferential processes because conditional probabilities for consecutive messages grow as a power law with cluster length. For BBC forum threads, average discussion lengths were higher for larger values of absolute average emotional valence in the first ten comments and the average amount of emotion in messages fell during discussions. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results prove that collective emotional states can be created and modulated via Internet communication and that emotional expressiveness is the fuel that sustains some e-communities. PMID:21818302

  8. Influence of Fire Mosaics, Habitat Characteristics and Cattle Disturbance on Mammals in Fire-Prone Savanna Landscapes of the Northern Kimberley

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Ian J.; Gibson, Lesley A.; Corey, Ben; Carnes, Karin; Fairman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patch mosaic burning, in which fire is used to produce a mosaic of habitat patches representative of a range of fire histories (‘pyrodiversity’), has been widely advocated to promote greater biodiversity. However, the details of desired fire mosaics for prescribed burning programs are often unspecified. Threatened small to medium-sized mammals (35 g to 5.5 kg) in the fire-prone tropical savannas of Australia appear to be particularly fire-sensitive. Consequently, a clear understanding of which properties of fire mosaics are most instrumental in influencing savanna mammal populations is critical. Here we use mammal capture data, remotely sensed fire information (i.e. time since last fire, fire frequency, frequency of late dry season fires, diversity of post-fire ages in 3 km radius, and spatial extent of recently burnt, intermediate and long unburnt habitat) and structural habitat attributes (including an index of cattle disturbance) to examine which characteristics of fire mosaics most influence mammals in the north-west Kimberley. We used general linear models to examine the relationship between fire mosaic and habitat attributes on total mammal abundance and richness, and the abundance of the most commonly detected species. Strong negative associations of mammal abundance and richness with frequency of late dry season fires, the spatial extent of recently burnt habitat (post-fire age <1 year within 3 km radius) and level of cattle disturbance were observed. Shrub cover was positively related to both mammal abundance and richness, and availability of rock crevices, ground vegetation cover and spatial extent of ?4 years unburnt habitat were all positively associated with at least some of the mammal species modelled. We found little support for diversity of post-fire age classes in the models. Our results indicate that both a high frequency of intense late dry season fires and extensive, recently burnt vegetation are likely to be detrimental to mammals in the north Kimberley. A managed fire mosaic that reduces large scale and intense fires, including the retention of ?4 years unburnt patches, will clearly benefit savanna mammals. We also highlighted the importance of fire mosaics that retain sufficient shelter for mammals. Along with fire, it is clear that grazing by introduced herbivores also needs to be reduced so that habitat quality is maintained. PMID:26121581

  9. Can socioeconomic trajectories during the life influence periodontal disease occurrence in adulthood? Hypotheses from a life-course perspective.

    PubMed

    S Schuch, H; G Peres, K; G Do, L; Peres, M A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic periodontal disease (CPD) is a highly prevalent, multifactorial, bacterially induced inflammatory disease, characterized by pathologic loss of periodontal attachment and alveolar bone with onset mostly in adulthood. While cross-sectional data have demonstrated significant associations between adverse socioeconomic position (SEP) and poor periodontal conditions, there is a gap in the literature on the understanding of how SEPs in different life stages impact on the occurrence of this disease later on. Life-course epidemiology offers different theoretical models to study the pathway of health and illness during the lifespan, and the hypothesis of the present study is that the relationship between SEP and CPD can be explained based on different life-course epidemiology theories: (a) critical period model; (b) critical period with modifier effect model; (c) accumulation of risk model; (d) chain-of-risk model. Under the first theoretical model, the association between SEP and CPD may be explained by an inflammatory hypothesis, considering that childhood adverse socioeconomic backgrounds alter the immunoinflammatory response that leads to disease in adulthood regardless of conditions later in life. The second model postulates that the early life SEP modifies the host immunoinflammatory response, and the risk of disease will be modified over the life-course by socio-behavioural influences. The third, "accumulation of risk model", may explain such relationship taking into account exposures during different periods of life. However, this model does not consider the moment when the exposure occurred, only taking into consideration the number of episodes during the life cycle. Finally, the potential explanation to the role of socioeconomic position on chronic periodontal disease, using a chain-of-risk model, is that early low SEP may cause social stress related to social hierarchies, what may, in turn, trigger endocrine, neural and immune changes, that reflect on elevated levels of cytokines, consequently turning these individuals more likely to develop periodontal disease. To summarize, this paper suggests potential explanations of the relationship between SEP during the lifespan and the occurrence of chronic periodontal disease in adult life, under a life-course framework. Longitudinal studies focusing on such relationship should be conducted, aiming to provide evidence regarding the hypotheses here called in question. PMID:25801483

  10. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

  11. The Influence of Dietary Fat Source on Life Span in Calorie Restricted Mice.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José A; Ramsey, Jon J; Tran, Dianna; Imai, Denise M; Koehne, Amanda; Laing, Steven T; Griffey, Stephen M; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Hagopian, Kevork; Villalba, José M; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; McDonald, Roger B

    2014-10-13

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends life span in several animal models. It has been proposed that a decrease in the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and especially n-3 fatty acids, in membrane phospholipids may contribute to life span extension with CR. Phospholipid PUFAs are sensitive to dietary fatty acid composition, and thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of dietary lipids on life span in CR mice. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to four groups (a 5% CR control group and three 40% CR groups) and fed diets with soybean oil (high in n-6 PUFAs), fish oil (high in n-3 PUFAs), or lard (high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids) as the primary lipid source. Life span was increased (p < .05) in all CR groups compared to the Control mice. Life span was also increased (p < .05) in the CR lard mice compared to animals consuming either the CR fish or soybean oil diets. These results indicate that dietary lipid composition can influence life span in mice on CR, and suggest that a diet containing a low proportion of PUFAs and high proportion of monounsaturated and saturated fats may maximize life span in animals maintained on CR. PMID:25313149

  12. INFLUENCE OF STREAM NETWORK-SCALE HABITAT OF A COASTAL OREGON WATERSHED ON COHO SALMON AND OTHER NATIVE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Western Ecology Division is undertaking research addressing catchment-scale dynamics of freshwater habitat productivity for native fishes. Through partnerships with state and federal agencies and private landowners, current field efforts focus on linkages among stream chemi...

  13. Influence of late-life cognitive activity on cognitive health

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Eisuke; Boyle, Patricia A.; Bennett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that late-life participation in mentally stimulating activities affects subsequent cognitive health. Methods: Analyses are based on 1,076 older persons without dementia at study onset participating in a longitudinal cohort study. They completed annual clinical evaluations for a mean of 4.9 years. Each evaluation included administration of a self-report scale about participation in mentally stimulating activities and a battery of cognitive performance tests. Previously established measures of cognitively stimulating activity and cognitive function were derived. We assessed the temporal sequence of activity changes in relation to functional changes in a series of cross-lagged panel models adjusted for age, sex, and education. Results: During the observation period, cognitive activity participation (estimate of mean annual change = ?0.066, SE = 0.005, p < 0.001) and cognitive functioning (estimate = ?0.077, SE = 0.005, p < 0.001) declined at rates that were moderately correlated (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). The level of cognitive activity in a given year predicted the level of global cognitive function in the following year, but the level of global cognition did not predict the subsequent level of cognitive activity participation. Cognitive activity showed the same pattern of unidirectional associations with measures of episodic and semantic memory, but its associations with working memory were bidirectional. Conclusions: The results suggest that more frequent mental stimulation in old age leads to better cognitive functioning. PMID:22491864

  14. The influence of geomorphology and sedimentary processes on shallow-water benthic habitat distribution: Esperance Bay, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, David A.; Brooke, Brendan P.; Collins, Lindsay B.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Baxter, Katrina J.; Bickers, Andy N.; Siwabessy, Paulus J. W.; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B.

    2007-03-01

    The mapping of seabed environments is fundamental to successful fisheries management and environmental monitoring, however, there is an emerging need to better characterise habitats based upon appropriate physical parameters. In this study, relationships between seabed geomorphology and the distribution of benthic habitats were examined using multibeam sonar, underwater video, predicted wave energy, and sediment data for Esperance Bay, part of the Recherche Archipelago. This shallow (<50 m), high energy, biogenic sediment dominated environment is located in temperate southwestern Australia. Exposure to wave energy appears to determine the distribution of unconsolidated substrate, and is the most useful regional scale predictor of rhodolith and seagrass habitats. Although they are intermittently smothered by mobile sediments, limestone reefs provide habitat for a wide range of sessile organisms, even in very high wave exposure environments. The distribution of rhodolith beds is related to poorly sorted sediments that contain high gravel, mud, and CaCO 3 percentages. Our results reveal that in the Recherche Archipelago, wave abrasion coupled with localised sediment transport and accumulation play a major role in increasing the diversity of inner shelf benthic habitats. This highlights the value of assessing geomorphic processes in order to better understand the distribution and structure of benthic habitats.

  15. Habitat stress initiates changes in composition, CO2 gas exchange and C-allocation as life traits in biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Colesie, Claudia; Green, T G Allan; Haferkamp, Ilka; Büdel, Burkhard

    2014-10-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are the dominant functional vegetation unit in some of the harshest habitats in the world. We assessed BSC response to stress through changes in biotic composition, CO2 gas exchange and carbon allocation in three lichen-dominated BSC from habitats with different stress levels, two more extreme sites in Antarctica and one moderate site in Germany. Maximal net photosynthesis (NP) was identical, whereas the water content to achieve maximal NP was substantially lower in the Antarctic sites, this apparently being achieved by changes in biomass allocation. Optimal NP temperatures reflected local climate. The Antarctic BSC allocated fixed carbon (tracked using (14)CO2) mostly to the alcohol soluble pool (low-molecular weight sugars, sugar alcohols), which has an important role in desiccation and freezing resistance and antioxidant protection. In contrast, BSC at the moderate site showed greater carbon allocation into the polysaccharide pool, indicating a tendency towards growth. The results indicate that the BSC of the more stressed Antarctic sites emphasise survival rather than growth. Changes in BSC are adaptive and at multiple levels and we identify benefits and risks attached to changing life traits, as well as describing the ecophysiological mechanisms that underlie them. PMID:24694713

  16. Influence of Life Stress on Depression: Moderation by a Polymorphism in the 5-HTT Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avshalom Caspi; Karen Sugden; Terrie E. Moffitt; Alan Taylor; Ian W. Craig; HonaLee Harrington; Joseph McClay; Jonathan Mill; Judy Martin; Antony Braithwaite; Richie Poulton

    2003-01-01

    In a prospective-longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort, we tested why stressful experiences lead to depression in some people but not in others. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene was found to moderate the influence of stressful life events on depression. Individuals with one or two copies of the short allele of

  17. Late-life depression and mortality: influence of gender and antidepressant use

    E-print Network

    Late-life depression and mortality: influence of gender and antidepressant use JOANNE RYAN The British Journal of Psychiatry 2008;192:12-8 #12;Background: Depression may increase the risk of mortality at risk of dying, as a function of depressive symptoms, gender and antidepressant use. Method: Adjusted

  18. Late life depression and incident activity limitations: influence of gender and symptom Isabelle Carrirea,b,*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Late life depression and incident activity limitations: influence of gender and symptom severity Background Mental disorders, especially depression, are one of the principal causes of disablement. Previous baseline depressive symptomatology and activity limitations were examined in a community-dwelling elderly

  19. Life History Influences on Holland Vocational Type Development. ASHE 1988 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C.

    The relative influence of selected life history experiences on the development of three vocational types (investigative, social, and enterprising) proposed by J. L. Holland is studied using causal modeling procedures. The lack of explicitness in the developmental postulates of Holland's theory is seen as a major deficiency. Among the principal…

  20. Factors Influencing Quality of Life of Hungarian Postmenopausal Women Screened by Osteodensitometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroti-Nagy, Agnes; Paulik, Edit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate factors influencing health related quality of life in Hungarian postmenopausal women who underwent osteodensitometry. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out; 359 women aged over 40 years were involved, attending the outpatient Bone Densitometry Centre of Szeged. Two kinds of tools were…

  1. Factors Influencing Health-Related Quality of Life of Overweight and Obese Children in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hee Soon; Park, Jiyoung; Ma, Yumi; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of overweight and obese children in Korea. This study employed a cross-sectional descriptive study design. A total of 132 overweight and obese children participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements included body mass index, percent body…

  2. The Influence of Life Roles and Readiness for Career Decision Making: The Case of Fabian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niles, Spencer G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses case study of Fabian, nontraditional college student who sought assistance at university counseling center in choosing a career path. Looks at influence of life roles, conceptualizes case using Super's Model of Readiness for Career Decision Making, identifies missing information, and suggests career counseling interventions. (NB)

  3. Factors Influencing Older Worker Quality of Life and Intent to Continue to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spokus, Diane

    2008-01-01

    High turnover has been a major problem in healthcare organizations. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among job characteristics, social support, and organizational characteristics on quality of the working life. Subsequently, the intent was to examine how those factors collectively influence turnover intention. A…

  4. "Your money or your life !" The influence of injury and fine expectations on helmet adoption

    E-print Network

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    "Your money or your life !" The influence of injury and fine expectations on helmet adoption among in 2011. The data measures the motorcyclists' subjective expectations of medical expenditures and fines by the traffic police modify motorcyclists' subjective expectations. Nonetheless, differences across individuals

  5. Ethnic differences in influences on quality of life at older ages: a quantitative analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MADHAVI BAJEKAL; DAVID BLANE; INI GREWAL; SAFFRON KARLSEN; JAMES NAZROO

    2004-01-01

    This article sets out to examine ethnic differences in the key influences on quality of life for older people in the context of the increasing health and wealth of British older people generally and the ageing of the post-1945 migrants. It is based on secondary multivariate analysis of the Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities of England and Wales. Respondents

  6. The Life Skills Program IPSY: Positive Influences on School Bonding and Prevention of Substance Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Victoria; Weichold, Karina; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a life skills program (LSP) for the prevention of adolescent substance misuse can have positive influences on a school context and on school bonding. The study also explored whether effects on alcohol use are mediated by positive effects on school bonding resulting from program participation. The LSP IPSY…

  7. 237Michel et al.: Habitat selection by reintroduced birds Habitat selection in reintroduced bird populations: a case study of Stewart Island

    E-print Network

    Jamieson, Ian

    237Michel et al.: Habitat selection by reintroduced birds Habitat selection in reintroduced bird are likely to influence animal movement and habitat choice, but few studies have evaluated their combined effect on habitat selection of translocatedbirds

  8. Habitat Use and Feeding Ecology of Riverine Juvenile American Shad

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Ross; Randy M. Bennett; James H. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    We examined premigratory populations of American shad Alosa sapidissima in the upper Delaware River to determine habitat and microhabitat use, differential prey use among habitat types, and habitat suitability indices for this previously unmodeled life stage. Both seining and diving techniques were used to quantify juveniles in six habitat types with six physical habitat covariables. Plankton and drift samples also

  9. Ontogenetic Habitat Shifts of Juvenile Bear Lake Sculpin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Ruzycki; Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh

    1999-01-01

    Bear lake sculpin Cottus extensus exhibit ontogenetic habitat shifts during their initial year of life. Distribution and habitat switching was measured with bimonthly bottom-trawl surveys repeated throughout the summer. Patterns of daily growth increments on otoliths were used to measure the history of habitat residence, individual size at the time of the habitat switch, and habitat-specific growth rates. Laboratory experiments

  10. Does choice influence quality of life for people with mild intellectual disabilities?

    PubMed

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-02-01

    Consumer choice is a key concept in developmental disability intervention, but relatively little quantitative research has focused on the relationship between choice and quality of life. This study used data from Washington state's Division of Developmental Disabilities 2002 National Core Indicators study (Human Services Research Institute, 2001a, 2001b) to examine the relationship between choice and 3 quality-of-life indicators: community inclusion, rights, and opportunities for relationships. Consumers (N = 224) with mild intellectual disabilities participated in the study. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the influence of type of living arrangement and choice on quality of life. Consumers who lived in the community and made more choices had higher scores on quality-of-life indicators. The findings have implications for disability policy, practice, and future research. PMID:18271608

  11. Does Thermal Variability Experienced at the Egg Stage Influence Life History Traits across Life Cycle Stages in a Small Invertebrate?

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kun; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Although effects of thermal stability on eggs have often been considered in vertebrates, there is little data thermal stability in insect eggs even though these eggs are often exposed in nature to widely fluctuating ambient conditions. The modularity of development in invertebrates might lead to compensation across life cycle stages but this remains to be tested particularly within the context of realistic temperature fluctuations encountered in nature. We simulated natural temperate fluctuations on eggs of the worldwide cruciferous insect pest, the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), while maintaining the same mean temperature (25°C±0°C, 25±4°C, 25±6°C, 25±8°C, 25±10°C, 25±12°C) and assessed egg development, survival and life history traits across developmental stages. Moderate fluctuations (25±4°C, 25±6°C) did not influence performance compared to the constant temperature treatment, and none of the treatments influenced egg survival. However the wide fluctuating temperatures (25±10°C, 25±12°C) slowed development time and led to an increase in pre-pupal mass, although these changes did not translate into any effects on longevity or fecundity at the adult stage. These findings indicate that environmental effects can extend across developmental stages despite the modularity of moth development but also highlight that there are few fitness consequences of the most variable thermal conditions likely to be experienced by Plutella xylostella. PMID:24911213

  12. Surface Habitat Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2009-01-01

    The Surface Habitat Systems (SHS) Focused Investment Group (FIG) is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) effort to provide a focused direction and funding to the various projects that are working on human surface habitat designs and technologies for the planetary exploration missions. The overall SHS-FIG effort focuses on directing and guiding those projects that: 1) develop and demonstrate new surface habitat system concepts, innovations, and technologies to support human exploration missions, 2) improve environmental systems that interact with human habitats, 3) handle and emplace human surface habitats, and 4) focus on supporting humans living and working in habitats on planetary surfaces. The activity areas of the SHS FIG described herein are focused on the surface habitat project near-term objectives as described in this document. The SHS-FIG effort focuses on mitigating surface habitat risks (as identified by the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office (LSSPO) Surface Habitat Element Team; and concentrates on developing surface habitat technologies as identified in the FY08 gap analysis. The surface habitat gap assessment will be updated annually as the surface architecture and surface habitat definition continues to mature. These technologies are mapped to the SHS-FIG Strategic Development Roadmap. The Roadmap will bring to light the areas where additional innovative efforts are needed to support the development of habitat concepts and designs and the development of new technologies to support of the LSSPO Habitation Element development plan. Three specific areas of development that address Lunar Architecture Team (LAT)-2 and Constellation Architecture Team (CxAT) Lunar habitat design issues or risks will be focused on by the SHS-FIG. The SHS-FIG will establish four areas of development that will help the projects prepare in their planning for surface habitat systems development. Those development areas are the 1) surface habitat concept definition, 2) inflatable surface habitat development, and 3) autonomous habitat operations, and 4) cross-cutting / systems engineering. In subsequent years, the SHS-FIG will solicit a call for innovations and technologies that will support the development of these four development areas. The other development areas will be assessed yearly and identified on the SHS-FIG s Strategic Development Roadmap. Initial investment projects that are funded by the Constellation Program Office (CxPO), LSSPO, or the Exploration Technology Development Projects (ETDP) will also be included on the Roadmap. For example, in one or two years from now, the autonomous habitat operations and testbed would collaborations with the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) and Automation for Operations ETDP projects, which will give the surface habitat projects an integrated habitat autonomy testbed to test software and systems. The SHS-FIG scope is to provide focused direction for multiple innovations, technologies and subsystems that are needed to support humans at a remote planetary surface habitat during the concept development, design definition, and integration phases of that project. Subsystems include: habitability, lightweight structures, power management, communications, autonomy, deployment, outfitting, life support, wireless connectivity, lighting, thermal and more.

  13. Physiological Consequences of Habitat Selection Raymond B. Huey

    E-print Network

    Huey, Raymond B.

    Physiological Consequences of Habitat Selection Raymond B. Huey TheAmerican Naturalist, Vol. 137 1991 PHYSIOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF HABITAT SELECTION Department of Zoology NJ-15, University, habitats influence an animal's physiological capacities and ultimately its demographic and ecological

  14. Assessing the Influence of Stream Flow on Avian Roosting Habitat in the Platte River Using Infrared Imaging and a Computational Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; Parker, R. S.

    2001-05-01

    Over a half a million sandhill cranes, and a number of endangered whooping cranes, migrate through central Nebraska and use the Central Platte River Valley for spring staging. Cranes roost at night on submerged sandbars located in wide sections of channel. During the last century, changes in flow regime, sediment supply and vegetation patterns along the river have altered the channel morphology, and suitable roosting habitat. We determined the ranges of depth and velocities utilized by roosting sandhill cranes at varying discharges along a 1-km study reach by comparing infrared images of crane distributions to values computed by a computational flow model. The ranges of depths and velocities utilized by roosting cranes changed in response to the quantities of habitat available in those ranges for a given stream flow. The densities of cranes within a roosting area and the spatial distribution of roosts were significantly influenced by stream flow. Higher flows produced roosts with high crane densities that were isolated by deep, high-velocity threads. Lower flows enabled cranes to spread out between sandbars and roosts became more contiguous and densities were significantly lower. As adaptive management continues on stream flow and habitat in the Central Platte River Valley computational flow models serve to guide these decisions.

  15. Local Habitat, Watershed, and Biotic Factors Influencing the Spread of Hybridization between Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Introduced Rainbow Trout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clint C. Muhlfeld; Thomas E. McMahon; Matthew C. Boyer; Robert E. Gresswell

    2009-01-01

    The invasion of nonnative fishes in freshwater systems is often facilitated by the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales. We evaluated the association of local habitat features (width, gradient, and elevation), watershed characteristics (mean and maximum summer water temperatures, the number of road crossings, and road density), and biotic factors (the distance to

  16. The influence of habitat, prey abundance, sex, and breeding success on the ranging behavior of Prairie Falcons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marzluff, J.M.; Kimsey, Bryan A.; Schueck, Linda S.; McFadzen, Mary E.; Vekasy, M.S.; Bednarz, James C.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the ranging behavior and habitat selection of radio-tagged Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) during the breeding season in southwestern Idaho. The distribution and numbers of Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii), the primary prey of Prairie Falcons in our study area, varied in response to drought during the study period. Prairie Falcons ranged over large areas (ca. 300 km2) and increased their foraging ranges in response to declining ground squirrels. Reptiles and birds were preyed upon most frequently when squirrels were rare. Males and females differed little in their use of space. Successful pairs ranged over smaller areas than non-nesters and unsuccessful pairs. Falcons nesting near habitat most suitable for ground squirrels ranged over smaller areas than those nesting farther from such habitat. Home ranges contained significantly more winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) and native perennial grasses (especially Poa secunda), and significantly less salt desert shrubs and exotic annual grasses than expected based on availability. Salt desert shrubs were found less than expected, based on availability in core areas within home ranges. Selection for winterfat and bluegrass in core areas was contingent upon selection at the larger scale of the home range; falcons with home ranges containing more winterfat and bluegrass than expected based on availability were less selective in their placement of core areas with respect to these habitats. We believe salient features of Prairie Falcon home ranges result largely from patchy distribution of landscape features associated with different densities and availabilities of Townsend's ground squirrels.

  17. Life in the Mosaic: Predicting changes in estuarine nursery production for juvenile fishes in response to sea-level rise with a landscape-based habitat production model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of critical habitat in estuarine fish nursery areas is an important conservation and management objective, yet response to changes in critical habitat is both equally important and harder to predict. Habitat can be viewed as a mosaic of both temporally variable en...

  18. Field ecology of a brood-caring dung beetle Kheper nigroaeneus habitat predictability and life history strategy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penelope B. Edwards

    1988-01-01

    Summary  The life history strategy of the dung beetleKheper nigroaeneus was studied in Mkuzi Game Reserve, South Africa.K. nigroaeneus, a large ball-rolling dung beetle, brood-cares a single offspring per nesting occasion. Adults emerged from the ground following\\u000a the first spring rain (?17 mm) in October or November, occasionally September, and trap catches were at a maximum 1–2 weeks\\u000a later. Females outnumbered

  19. GHOSTS OF HABITATS PAST: CONTRIBUTION OF LANDSCAPE CHANGE TO CURRENT HABITATS USED BY SHRUBLAND BIRDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVEN T. K NICK; JOHN T. R OTENBERRY

    2000-01-01

    Models of habitat associations for species often are developed with an im- plicit assumption that habitats are static, even though recent disturbance may have altered the landscape. We tested our hypothesis that trajectory and magnitude of habitat change influenced observed distribution and abundance of passerine birds breeding in shrubsteppe habitats of southwestern Idaho. Birds in this region live in dynamic

  20. Behavioral mechanisms of habitat segregation between sympatric species of Microtus : Habitat preference and interspecific dominance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan A. Randall

    1978-01-01

    Two species of microtine rodents are sympatric in eastern Washington, but they are segregated by habitat. Microtus montanus is found in the grass, and M. longicaudus occupies the shrub habitat. This investigation evaluated behavioral mechanisms controlling the distribution and asked the questions: (1) Are voles of either or both species occupying a preferred habitat? (2) Is a habitat preference influenced

  1. The relative effects of habitat loss, fragmentation, and degradation on population extinction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most prominent conservation concerns are typically habitat loss and habitat fragmentation. The role of habitat degradation has received comparatively little attention. But research has shown that the quality of habitat patches can significantly influence wildlife population d...

  2. Factors influencing health-related quality of life of Asians with anxiety disorders in Singapore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nan Luo; Calvin Soon-Leng Fones; Julian Thumboo; Shu-Chuen Li

    2004-01-01

    As little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Asians with anxiety disorders, we assessed HRQoL in Singaporeans with anxiety disorders and identified factors influencing their HRQoL. Outpatients with anxiety disorders (n = 119) attending a hospital psychiatric clinic completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). SF-36 score

  3. Organizational influences on the work life conflict and health of shiftworkers.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, Anne; Lawrence, Sandra A; Bohle, Philip; Brook, Christine

    2008-09-01

    This study examined organizational factors affecting the impact of shiftwork on work life conflict and subjective health. A model was proposed in which support from supervisors, support from colleagues, and team identity influence time-based work life conflict through two mediating variables: team climate and control over the working environment. Reduced conflict, in turn, produces enhanced psychological well-being and diminished physical symptoms. A structural equation model based on survey data from 530 nurses supported the proposed model. It also identified unpredicted direct links between team identity and physical symptoms, and between supervisor support and both control over the work environment and psychological well-being. The results indicate that organizational interventions focused on social support, team identity, team climate, and control can diminish the negative effects of shiftwork on work life conflict and health in shiftworkers. PMID:18304516

  4. Life-History Evolution on Tropidurinae Lizards: Influence of Lineage, Body Size and Climate

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Renata; Navas, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of life history variation is central to the evolutionary theory. In many ectothermic lineages, including lizards, life history traits are plastic and relate to several sources of variation including body size, which is both a factor and a life history trait likely to modulate reproductive parameters. Larger species within a lineage, for example tend to be more fecund and have larger clutch size, but clutch size may also be influenced by climate, independently of body size. Thus, the study of climatic effects on lizard fecundity is mandatory on the current scenario of global climatic change. We asked how body and clutch size have responded to climate through time in a group of tropical lizards, the Tropidurinae, and how these two variables relate to each other. We used both traditional and phylogenetic comparative methods. Body and clutch size are variable within Tropidurinae, and both traits are influenced by phylogenetic position. Across the lineage, species which evolved larger size produce more eggs and neither trait is influenced by temperature components. A climatic component of precipitation, however, relates to larger female body size, and therefore seems to exert an indirect relationship on clutch size. This effect of precipitation on body size is likely a correlate of primary production. A decrease in fecundity is expected for Tropidurinae species on continental landmasses, which are predicted to undergo a decrease in summer rainfall. PMID:21603641

  5. Movements and habitat use by PIT-tagged Atlantic salmon parr in early winter: The influence of anchor ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roussel, J.-M.; Cunjak, R.A.; Newbury, R.; Caissie, D.; Haro, A.

    2004-01-01

    1. Movements and habitat use by Atlantic salmon parr in Catamaran Brook, New Brunswick, were studied using Passive Integrated Transponder technology. The fish were tagged in the summer of 1999, and a portable reading system was used to collect data on individual positions within a riffle-pool sequence in the early winter of 1999. Two major freezing events occurred on November 11-12 (Ice 1) and November 18-19 (Ice 2) that generated significant accumulations of anchor ice in the riffle. 2. Individually tagged parr (fork length 8.4-12.6 cm, n = 15) were tracked from 8 to 24 November 1999. Over this period, emigration (40%) was higher from the pool than from the riffle. Of the nine parr that were consistently located, seven parr moved <5 m up- or downstream, and two parr moved more than 10 m (maximum 23 m). Parr moved significantly more by night than by day, and diel habitat shifts were more pronounced in the pool with some of the fish moving closer to the bank at night. 3. During Ice 2, there was relatively little movement by most of the parr in the riffle beneath anchor ice up to 10 cm in thickness. Water temperature was 0.16??C above the freezing point beneath anchor ice, suggesting the existence of suitable habitats where salmon parr can avoid supercooling conditions and where they can have access to low velocity shelters. To our knowledge, these are the first data on habitat use by Atlantic salmon parr under anchor ice.

  6. Habitat Fragmentation and Ecological Traits Influence the Prevalence of Avian Blood Parasites in a Tropical Rainforest Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Laurance, Susan G. W.; Jones, Dean; Westcott, David; Mckeown, Adam; Harrington, Graham; Hilbert, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In the tropical rainforests of northern Australia, we investigated the effects of habitat fragmentation and ecological parameters on the prevalence of blood-borne parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) in bird communities. Using mist-nets on forest edges and interiors, we sampled bird communities across six study sites: 3 large fragments (20–85 ha) and 3 continuous-forest sites. From 335 mist-net captures, we recorded 28 bird species and screened 299 bird samples with PCR to amplify and detect target DNA. Of the 28 bird species sampled, 19 were infected with Plasmodium and/or Haemoproteus and 9 species were without infection. Over one third of screened birds (99 individuals) were positive for Haemoproteus and/or Plasmodium. In forest fragments, bird capture rates were significantly higher than in continuous forests, but bird species richness did not differ. Unexpectedly, we found that the prevalence of the dominant haemosporidian infection, Haemoproteus, was significantly higher in continuous forest than in habitat fragments. Further, we found that ecological traits such as diet, foraging height, habitat specialisation and distributional ranges were significantly associated with blood-borne infections. PMID:24124541

  7. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.S.; Fuller, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  8. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central west Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat.

  9. The Influence of Free Space Environment in the Mission Life Cycle: Material Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Burns, Howard; De Groh, Kim

    Abstract The natural space environment has a great influence on the ability of space systems to perform according to mission design specification. Understanding the natural space environment and its influence on space system performance is critical to the concept formulation, design, development, and operation of space systems. Compatibility with the natural space environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the space system. Space systems being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to space environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural space environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, material selection, ground processing, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risks. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural space environment on the space system and its components. This paper will discuss the influence of the natural space environment in the mission life cycle with a specific focus on the role of material selection.

  10. Intercohort density dependence drives brown trout habitat selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllón, Daniel; Nicola, Graciela G.; Parra, Irene; Elvira, Benigno; Almodóvar, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Habitat selection can be viewed as an emergent property of the quality and availability of habitat but also of the number of individuals and the way they compete for its use. Consequently, habitat selection can change across years due to fluctuating resources or to changes in population numbers. However, habitat selection predictive models often do not account for ecological dynamics, especially density dependent processes. In stage-structured population, the strength of density dependent interactions between individuals of different age classes can exert a profound influence on population trajectories and evolutionary processes. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of fluctuating densities of both older and younger competing life stages on the habitat selection patterns (described as univariate and multivariate resource selection functions) of young-of-the-year, juvenile and adult brown trout Salmo trutta. We observed all age classes were selective in habitat choice but changed their selection patterns across years consistently with variations in the densities of older but not of younger age classes. Trout of an age increased selectivity for positions highly selected by older individuals when their density decreased, but this pattern did not hold when the density of younger age classes varied. It suggests that younger individuals are dominated by older ones but can expand their range of selected habitats when density of competitors decreases, while older trout do not seem to consider the density of younger individuals when distributing themselves even though they can negatively affect their final performance. Since these results may entail critical implications for conservation and management practices based on habitat selection models, further research should involve a wider range of river typologies and/or longer time frames to fully understand the patterns of and the mechanisms underlying the operation of density dependence on brown trout habitat selection.

  11. Characterisation of juvenile flatfish habitats in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ann-Britt; Sundblad, Göran; Bergström, Ulf

    2009-04-01

    Survival and growth of the earliest life-stages is considered a key factor in determining the abundance of many marine fish species. For flatfishes, the availability of high quality nursery areas is essential for successful recruitment. Regarding the Baltic Sea, there are large gaps in knowledge on factors that influence the distribution of flatfishes during this sensitive stage. To identify the characteristics of important nursery areas in the Baltic for flounder ( Platichthys flesus) and turbot ( Psetta maxima), a field survey with push net sampling was conducted in the northern Baltic proper during autumn 2006. The sampling stations were stratified to cover several different habitat types defined by substrate and wave exposure. Apart from density of young-of-the-year (YOY) flatfishes, a number of ecological characteristics of the habitat were recorded. Physical habitat variables included substrate type, salinity, depth, turbidity, vegetation and habitat structure. Variables describing biotic processes, such as prey availability and abundance of competitors, were also sampled. The relationships between the spatial distribution of species and these ecological characteristics were fitted to presence/absence data of juvenile flatfish using generalized additive models (GAM). The best habitat descriptors for flounder in order of contribution were: substrate, habitat structure, salinity, wave exposure and occurrence of filamentous algae. Positive effects of increasing wave exposure, salinity and structure were detected while a high cover of filamentous algae had a negative effect. Sand and gravel were preferred over soft and stony substrates. For turbot the best habitat descriptors in order of contribution were: occurrence of filamentous algae, substrate and turbidity. Turbot showed a preference for areas with a low cover of filamentous algae, high turbidity and sandy substrate. Prey availability and abundance of competitors were not included in the models, indicating that the distribution of flatfishes at the scales studied (tens of kilometres) is mainly governed by physical habitat properties. These results constitute the basis for future efforts on mapping of essential flatfish habitats in the Baltic Sea.

  12. Early life influences on the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonnappa, Samatha

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not simply a disease of old age that is largely restricted to heavy smokers, but may be associated with insults to the developing lung during foetal life and the first few years of postnatal life, when lung growth and development are rapid. A better understanding of the long-term effects of early life factors, such as intrauterine growth restriction, prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke and other pollutants, preterm delivery and childhood respiratory illnesses, on the subsequent development of chronic respiratory disease is imperative if appropriate preventive and management strategies to reduce the burden of COPD are to be developed. The extent to which insults to the developing lung are associated with increased risk of COPD in later life depends on the underlying cause, timing and severity of such derangements. Suboptimal conditions in utero result in aberrations of lung development such that affected individuals are born with reduced lung function, which tends to remain diminished throughout life, thereby increasing the risk both of wheezing disorders during childhood and subsequent COPD in genetically susceptible individuals. If the current trend towards the ever-increasing incidence of COPD is to be reversed, it is essential to minimize risks to the developing lung by improvements in antenatal and neonatal care, and to reduce prenatal and postnatal exposures to environmental pollutants, including passive tobacco smoke. Furthermore, adult physicians need to recognize that lung disease is potentially associated with early life insults and provide better education regarding diet, exercise and avoidance of smoking to preserve precious reserves of lung function in susceptible adults. This review focuses on factors that adversely influence lung development in utero and during the first 5 years of life, thereby predisposing to subsequent COPD. PMID:23439689

  13. Effects of habitat structure on the epifaunal community in Mussismilia corals: does coral morphology influence the richness and abundance of associated crustacean fauna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Marcos M.; Neves, Elizabeth; Johnsson, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    Coral habitat structures increase abundance and richness of organisms by providing niches, easy access to resources and refuge from predators. Corals harbor a great variety of animals; the variation in coral species morphology contributes to the heterogeneity and complexity of habitat types. In this report, we studied the richness and abundance of crustaceans (Decapoda, Copepoda, Peracarida and Ostracoda) associated with three species of Mussismilia exhibiting different growth morphologies, in two different coral reefs of the Bahia state (Caramuanas and Boipeba-Moreré, Brazil). Mussismilia hispida is a massive coral; M. braziliensis also has a massive growth pattern, but forms a crevice in the basal area of the corallum; M. harttii has a meandroid pattern. PERMANOVA analysis suggests significant differences in associated fauna richness among Mussismilia species, with higher values for M. harttii, followed by M. braziliensis and later by M. hispida. The same trend was observed for density, except that the comparison of M. braziliensis and M. hispida did not show differences. Redundancy and canonical correspondence analysis indicated that almost all of the crustacean species were more associated with the M. harttii colonies that formed a group clearly separated from colonies of M. braziliensis and M. hispida. We also found that the internal volume of interpolyp space, only present in M. harttii, was the most important factor influencing richness and abundance of all analyzed orders of crustaceans.

  14. Foraging habits in a generalist predator: sex and age influence habitat selection and resource use among bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sam Rossman; McCabe, Elizabeth Berens; Nelio B. Barros; Hasand Gandhi; Peggy H. Ostrom; Stricker, Craig A.; Randall S. Wells

    2015-01-01

    This study examines resource use (diet, habitat use, and trophic level) within and among demographic groups (males, females, and juveniles) of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We analyzed the ?13C and ?15N values of 15 prey species constituting 84% of the species found in stomach contents. We used these data to establish a trophic enrichment factor (TEF) to inform dietary analysis using a Bayesian isotope mixing model. We document a TEF of 0‰ and 2.0‰ for ?13C and ?15N, respectively. The dietary results showed that all demographic groups relied heavily on low trophic level seagrass-associated prey. Bayesian standard ellipse areas (SEAb) were calculated to assess diversity in resource use. The SEAb of females was nearly four times larger than that of males indicating varied resource use, likely a consequence of small home ranges and habitat specialization. Juveniles possessed an intermediate SEAb, generally feeding at a lower trophic level compared to females, potentially an effect of natal philopatry and immature foraging skills. The small SEAb of males reflects a high degree of specialization on seagrass associated prey. Patterns in resource use by the demographic groups are likely linked to differences in the relative importance of social and ecological factors.

  15. Explaining variance of avian malaria infection in the wild: the importance of host density, habitat, individual life-history and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avian malaria (Plasmodium sp.) is globally widespread, but considerable variation exists in infection (presence/absence) patterns at small spatial scales. This variation can be driven by variation in ecology, demography, and phenotypic characters, in particular those that influence the host’s resistance. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the host’s initial immune responses to combat parasitic invasion. However, long-term ROS exposure can harm the host and the redox response therefore needs to be adjusted according to infection stage and host phenotype. Here we use experimental and correlational approaches to assess the relative importance of host density, habitat composition, individual level variation and redox physiology for Plasmodium infection in a wild population of great tits, Parus major. Results We found that 36% of the great tit population was infected with Plasmodium (22% P. relictum and 15% P. circumflexum prevalence) and that patterns of infection were Plasmodium species-specific. First, the infection of P. circumflexum was significantly higher in areas with experimental increased host density, whereas variation in P. relictum infection was mainly attributed to age, sex and reproduction. Second, great tit antioxidant responses – total and oxidizied glutathione - showed age- , sex- and Plasmodium species-specific patterns between infected and uninfected individuals, but reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) showed only a weak explanatory power for patterns of P. relictum infection. Instead ROM significantly increased with Plasmodium parasitaemia. Conclusions These results identify some key factors that influence Plasmodium infection in wild birds, and provide a potential explanation for the underlying physiological basis of recently documented negative effects of chronic avian malaria on survival and reproductive success. PMID:23565726

  16. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  17. WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION IV #12;#12;353USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Section Overview Wildlife Habitat Relations and Habitat Fragmentation section on wildlife habitat relations and habitat fragmentation in hardwood rangelands from this symposium

  18. Estimating the influence of life satisfaction and positive affect on later income using sibling fixed effects

    PubMed Central

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Oswald, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether there is a connection between income and psychological well-being is a long-studied issue across the social, psychological, and behavioral sciences. Much research has found that richer people tend to be happier. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether happier individuals perform better financially in the first place. This possibility of reverse causality is arguably understudied. Using data from a large US representative panel, we show that adolescents and young adults who report higher life satisfaction or positive affect grow up to earn significantly higher levels of income later in life. We focus on earnings approximately one decade after the person’s well-being is measured; we exploit the availability of sibling clusters to introduce family fixed effects; we account for the human capacity to imagine later socioeconomic outcomes and to anticipate the resulting feelings in current well-being. The study’s results are robust to the inclusion of controls such as education, intelligence quotient, physical health, height, self-esteem, and later happiness. We consider how psychological well-being may influence income. Sobel–Goodman mediation tests reveal direct and indirect effects that carry the influence from happiness to income. Significant mediating pathways include a higher probability of obtaining a college degree, getting hired and promoted, having higher degrees of optimism and extraversion, and less neuroticism. PMID:23169627

  19. Influence of temperature on the life-cycle of Globodera spp.

    PubMed

    Blok, V; Kaczmarek, A; Palomares-Rius, J E

    2011-01-01

    The potato cyst nematodes (PCN) G. rostochiensis (Woll.) and G. pallida (Stone) are the most economically important pests of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in the UK and are widespread in ware potato growing regions in Europe. The new EU directive 2007/33/EC which came into effect July 1, 2010 aims to control their spread and limit further increases in populations. We are investigating the role of temperature in the life cycle of PCN to assess how this effects population multiplication in relation to managing PCN. Hatching and nematode development are stages in the life cycle that are affected by temperature and thus are important life stages that can be examined to determine the impact of temperature on the length of time required for one generation to be completed and the potential for final populations to increase on different potato genetic backgrounds. In some conditions a partial or complete second generation has also been observed within the growing season. Females have been observed on the surface of tubers and "pecking" skin damage can occur which may be a result of a second generation. We are investigating the influence of temperature on the potential for a second generation or the induction of diapause. PMID:22696942

  20. Influence of Weight Gain Rate on Early Life Nutritional Status and Body Composition of Children

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Taís Cristina Araújo; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the influence of the weight gain rate at 4–6 months on nutritional status and body composition in children between 4 and 7 years of age. Methods. Retrospective cohort study, sample of 257 children. Data collection was performed in two stages, with the first relating to retrospective data of weight gain from birth to the first 4–6 months of life in the patient records. Measurements of weight, height, waist circumference, and body composition in children between ages 4 and 7 years were obtained. Nutritional status was assessed by the BMI/age. Control variables, such as pregnancy, breastfeeding, lifestyle, and sociodemographics, were studied. Descriptive analysis and multiple linear regression were performed. Results. In the nutritional status assessment, the prevalence of overweight observed was 24.9%. After adjusting for control variables, it was found that the increase of the WGR at 4–6 months of age explained the occurrence of higher BMI/age, percentage of total body fat, body fat percentage in the android region, and waist circumference in children between 4 and 7 years of age. Conclusion. The increase of the WGR in the first months of life can lead to the occurrence of higher values of parameters of nutritional status and body composition in later life. PMID:25538953

  1. How does asthma influence the daily life of children? Results of focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQL) brings together various aspects of an individual's subjective experience that relate both directly and indirectly to health, disease, disability, and impairment. Although asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood, information on pediatric patients' views on asthma-specific HRQL has not been described before. The aim of this study was to establish the components of asthma-specific HRQL, as experienced by primary school-aged asthmatic children. The generated components will be used to develop an individualized HRQL instrument for childhood asthma. Methods Primary school-aged asthmatic children were invited to participate in three consecutive focus group sessions. A total of five focus groups were formed. Two reviewers independently 1) identified trends in the statements and relations between HRQL components, 2) clustered the components into a small number of domains and, 3) made a model on asthma-specific HRQL based on the transcribed statements of the children. The results were compared between the two reviewers and resulted in a final model. Results Asthma influenced the life of the children physically, emotionally and socially. The most important components of HRQL were the effects on, and consequences of asthma on peer relationships (e.g., being bullied), the dependence on medication, shortness of breath, cough, limitations in activities and limitations due to the response on cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusion The outcome of the focus group meetings indicates that asthma influences the life of children in various ways. Not all essential components of HRQL, according to the children, are part of existing asthma-specific HRQL instruments. PMID:20074334

  2. Hyperlink Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is designed to help students understand the complexity of nature by utilizing an online illustration of the ways in which various elements of a rainforest ecosystem are interconnected. Students will map the online habitat and create their own hyperlink habitat, either in print or on the Web, for a local ecosystem. When they are finished, they can submit their work to the Discovery Channel School.

  3. Ecological Interactions in Dinosaur Communities: Influences of Small Offspring and Complex Ontogenetic Life Histories

    PubMed Central

    Codron, Daryl; Carbone, Chris; Clauss, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs’ successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S) distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record), in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora). Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods), in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey exists in mammals larger than 21.5 kg, and it seems a similar minimum prey-size threshold could have affected dinosaurs as well. PMID:24204749

  4. Habitat Persistence Underlies Intraspecific Variation in the Dispersal Strategies of Planthoppers

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Habitat Persistence Underlies Intraspecific Variation in the Dispersal Strategies of Planthoppers HABITAT PERSISTENCE UNDERLIES INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN THE DISPERSAL STRATEGIES OF PLANTHOPPERS1 ROBERTF temporary habitats, and life history theorists have often hypothesized an inverse relationship between

  5. Mycorrhizal Associations, Life History, and Habitat Characteristics of the Endangered Terrestrial Orchid Spiranthes parksii Correll and Sympatric Congener Spiranthes cernua: Implications for Conservation 

    E-print Network

    Ariza, Martha C

    2013-12-10

    . parksii and sympatric congener Spiranthes cernua were investigated by the use of in situ, and ex situ methods. The central research objective was to investigate the orchid-fungal relationship and its distribution in natural habitats and to provide critical...

  6. Life expectancy of modular Ti6Al4V hip implants: influence of stress and environment.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Ryu, J J; Karra, P; Shrotriya, P; Tvergaard, V; Gaisser, M; Weik, T

    2011-11-01

    Stress dependent electrochemical dissolution is identified as one of the key mechanisms governing surface degradation in fretting and crevice corrosion of biomedical implants. The present study focuses on delineating the roles of mechanical stress and chemical conditions on the life expectancy of modular hip implants. First, material removal on a stressed surface of Ti6Al4V subjected to single asperity contact is investigated experimentally to identify the influence of contact load, in-plane stress and chemical environment on mean wear rates. A range of known stress levels are applied to the specimen while its surface is mechanically stimulated in different non-reactive to oxidizing aqueous environments. Evolution of surface degradation is monitored, and its mechanism is elucidated. This phase allows estimation of Preston Constant which is later used in the analysis. Second phase of the work is semi-analytical and computational, where, based on the estimated Preston constant and other material and process parameters, the scratch propensity (consisting of magnitude of scratch depth and their frequency per unit area) due to micro-motion in modular hip implants is estimated. The third phase views these scratches as initial notches and utilizes a mixed-mode fatigue crack propagation model to estimate the critical crack length for onset of instability. The number of loading cycles needed to reach this critical crack length is then labeled as the expected life of the implant under given mechanical and chemical conditions. Implications of different material and process conditions to life expectancy of orthopedic implants are discussed. It is observed that transverse micro-motion, compared to longitudinal micro-motion, plays a far more critical role in determining the implant life. Patient body weight, as well as proximity of the joint fluid to its iso-electric point play key roles in determining wear rates and associated life expectancies of modular hip implants. Sustained aeration of joint fluid, as well as proper tolerancing of mating surfaces, along with a proper choice of material microstructure may be utilized to extend implant life. PMID:22098898

  7. The influence of habitat and environment on smallmouth bass ( Micropterus dolomieu) nest sites and nest success in northern Lake Michigan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Kaemingk; Alexander Clem; Tracy L. Galarowicz

    2011-01-01

    Information on smallmouth bass nesting ecology is lacking in northern Lake Michigan, despite available information for other Great Lakes ecosystems. Our objectives were to identify factors that influenced nesting sites and nest success in a smallmouth bass population in northern Lake Michigan. Temperature, substrate firmness, and lake bottom rugosity were measured and related to the number of smallmouth bass nests

  8. INFLUENCE OF HOST AND LARVAL HABITAT DISTRIBUTION ON THE ABUNDANCE OF AFRICAN MALARIA VECTORS IN WESTERN KENYA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NOBORU MINAKAWA; PAMELA SEDA; GUIYUN YAN

    2002-01-01

    The abundance of anopheline mosquitoes varies substantially among houses within the same villages. Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is highly anthropophilic, and Anopheles arabiensis is zoophilic; thus, it is often hypoth- esized that the abundance of An. gambiae and An. arabiensis in a house is associated with the distribution of livestock and humans. In this paper we examined the influence of

  9. Influence of oceanic factors on Anguilla anguilla (L.) over the twentieth century in coastal habitats of the Skagerrak, southern Norway.

    PubMed

    Durif, Caroline M F; Gjøsaeter, Jakob; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2011-02-01

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) is distributed in coastal and inland habitats all over Europe, but spawns in the Sargasso Sea and is thus affected by both continental and oceanic factors. Since the 1980s a steady decline has been observed in the recruitment of glass eels to freshwater and in total eel landings. The eel is considered as critically endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List of species. The Skagerrak beach seine survey from Norway constitutes the longest fishery-independent dataset on yellow/silver eels (starting in 1904). The Skagerrak coastal region receives larvae born in the Sargasso Sea spawning areas that have followed the Gulf Stream/North Atlantic Drift before they penetrate far into the North Sea. The Skagerrak coastal time series is therefore particularly valuable for exploring the impacts of oceanic factors on fluctuations in eel recruitment abundance. Analyses showed that Sargasso Sea surface temperature was negatively correlated with eel abundance, with a lag of 12 years revealing a cyclic and detrimental effect of high temperatures on the newly hatched larvae. The North Atlantic Oscillation index and inflow of North Atlantic water into the North Sea were negatively correlated with eel abundance, with a lag of 11 years. Increased currents towards the North Atlantic during high North Atlantic Oscillation years may send larvae into the subpolar gyre before they are ready to metamorphose and settle, resulting in low recruitment in the northern part of the distribution area for these years. The Skagerrak time series was compared with glass eel recruitment to freshwater in the Netherlands (Den Oever glass eel time series), and similar patterns were found revealing a cycle linked to changes in oceanic factors affecting glass eel recruitment. The recent decline of eels in the Skagerrak also coincided with previously documented shifts in environmental conditions of the North Sea ecosystem. PMID:20798112

  10. Effects of water management, connectivity, and surrounding land use on habitat use by frogs in rice paddies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Naito, Risa; Yamasaki, Michimasa; Lmanishi, Ayumi; Natuhara, Yosihiro; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2012-09-01

    In Japan, rice paddies play an important role as a substitute habitat for wetland species, and support rich indigenous ecosystems. However, since the 1950s, agricultural modernization has altered the rice paddy environment, and many previously common species are now endangered. It is urgently necessary to evaluate rice paddies as habitats for conservation. Among the species living in rice paddies, frogs are representative and are good indicator species, so we focused on frog species and analyzed the influence of environmental factors on their habitat use. We found four frog species and one subspecies (Hyla japonica, Pelophylax nigromaculatus, Glandirana rugosa, Lithobates catesbeianus, and Pelophylax porosa brevipoda) at our study sites in Shiga prefecture. For all but L. catesbeianus, we analyzed the influence of environmental factors related to rice paddy structure, water management and availability, agrochemical use, connectivity, and land use on breeding and non-breeding habitat use. We constructed generalized additive mixed models with survey date as the smooth term and applied Akaike's information criterion to choose the bestranked model. Because life histories and biological characteristics vary among species, the factors affecting habitat use by frogs are also expected to differ by species. We found that both breeding and non-breeding habitat uses of each studied species were influenced by different combinations of environmental factors and that in most cases, habitat use showed seasonality. For frog conservation in rice paddies, we need to choose favorable rice paddy in relation to surrounding land use and apply suitable management for target species. PMID:22943781

  11. Influence of habitat amount, arrangement, and use on population trend estimates of male Kirtland’s warblers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deahn M. Donner; John R. Probst; Christine A. Ribic

    2008-01-01

    Kirtland’s warblers (Dendroica kirtlandii) persist in a naturally patchy environment of young, regenerating jack pine forests (i.e., 5–23 years old) created after\\u000a wildfires and human logging activities. We examined how changing landscape structure from 26 years of forest management and\\u000a wildfire disturbances influenced population size and spatial dispersion of male Kirtland’s warblers within their restricted\\u000a breeding range in northern Lower Michigan, USA.

  12. Influence of dams and habitat condition on the distribution of redhorse ( Moxostoma ) species in the Grand River watershed, Ontario

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott M. Reid; Nicholas E. Mandrak; Leon M. Carl; Chris C. Wilson

    2008-01-01

    Redhorse, Moxostoma spp., are considered to be negatively affected by dams although this assertion is untested for Canadian populations. One\\u000a hundred and fifty-one sites in the Grand River watershed were sampled to identify factors influencing the distribution of\\u000a redhorse species. Individual species of redhorse were captured from 3 to 32% of sites. The most widespread species were golden\\u000a redhorse, M.

  13. Proportionate Responses to Life Events Influence Clinicians’ Judgments Of Psychological Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nancy S.; Paulus, Daniel J.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Khalife, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Psychological abnormality is a fundamental concept in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; APA, 2000) and in all clinical evaluations. How do practicing clinical psychologists use the context of life events to judge the abnormality of a person’s current behaviors? The appropriate role of life-event context in assessment has long been the subject of intense debate and scrutiny among clinical theorists, yet relatively little is known about clinicians’ own judgments in practice. We propose a proportionate-response hypothesis, such that judgments of abnormality are influenced by whether the behaviors are a disproportionate response to past events, rendering them difficult to understand or explain. We presented licensed, practicing clinical psychologists (N=77) with vignettes describing hypothetical people’s behaviors (disordered, mildly distressed, or unaffected) that had been preceded by either traumatic or mildly distressing events. Experts’ judgments of abnormality were strongly and systematically influenced by the degree of mismatch between the past event and current behaviors in strength and valence, such that the greater the mismatch, the more abnormal the person seemed. A separate, additional group of clinical psychologists (N=20) further confirmed that the greater the degree of mismatch, the greater the perceived difficulty in understanding the patient. These findings held true across clinicians of different theoretical orientations and in disorders for which these patterns of judgments ran contrary to formal recommendations in the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000). The rationality of these effects and implications for clinical decision science are discussed. PMID:22142425

  14. Comorbid Influences on Generic Health-Related Quality of Life in COPD: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Manuel B.; Wacker, Margarethe E.; Vogelmeier, Claus F.; Leidl, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and of loss of disability-adjusted life years worldwide. It often is accompanied by the presence of comorbidity. Objectives To systematically review the influence of COPD comorbidity on generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods A systematic review approach was used to search the databases Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library for studies evaluating the influence of comorbidity on HRQoL in COPD. Identified studies were analyzed according to study characteristics, generic HRQoL measurement instrument, COPD severity and comorbid HRQoL impact. Studies using only non-generic instruments were excluded. Results 25 studies met the selection criteria. Seven studies utilized the EQ-5D, six studies each used the SF-36 or SF-12. The remaining studies used one of six other instruments each. Utilities were calculated by four EQ-5D studies and one 15D study. Patient populations covered both early and advanced stages of COPD and ranged from populations with mostly stage 1 and 2 to studies with patients classified mainly stage 3 and 4. Evidence was mainly created for cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety as well as diabetes but also for quantitative comorbid associations. Strong evidence is pointing towards the significant negative association of depression and anxiety on reduced HRQoL in COPD patients. While all studies found the occurrence of specific comorbidities to decrease HRQoL in COPD patients, the orders of magnitude diverged. Due to different patient populations, different measurement tools and different concomitant diseases the study heterogeneity was high. Conclusions Facilitating multimorbid intervention guidance, instead of applying a parsimony based single disease paradigm, should constitute an important goal for improving HRQoL of COPD patients in research and in clinical practice. PMID:26168154

  15. Essential Fish Habitat and Critical Habitat

    E-print Network

    Essential Fish Habitat and Critical Habitat: A comparison NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service #12;Essential fish habitat (EFH) is identified for species managed in Fishery Management Plans under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Essential fish habitat is the habitat necessary

  16. Peanut sensitisation and allergy: influence of early life exposure to peanuts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rachel L; Miles, Lisa M; Lunn, Joanne; Devereux, Graham; Dearman, Rebecca J; Strid, Jessica; Buttriss, Judith L

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate the influence of early life exposure (maternal and childhood) to peanuts and the subsequent development of sensitisation or allergy to peanuts during childhood. Studies were identified using electronic databases and bibliography searches. Studies that assessed the impact of non-avoidance compared with avoidance or reduced quantities of peanuts or peanut products on either sensitisation or allergy to peanuts, or both outcomes, were eligible. Six human studies were identified: two randomised controlled trials, two case-control studies and two cross-sectional studies. In addition, published animal and mechanistic studies, relevant to the question of whether early life exposure to peanuts affects the subsequent development of peanut sensitisation, were reviewed narratively. Overall, the evidence reviewed was heterogeneous, and was limited in quality, for example, through lack of adjustment for potentially confounding factors. The nature of the evidence has therefore hindered the development of definitive conclusions. The systematic review of human studies and narrative expert-led reviews of animal studies do not provide clear evidence to suggest that either maternal exposure, or early or delayed introduction of peanuts in the diets of children, has an impact upon subsequent development of sensitisation or allergy to peanuts. Results from some animal studies (and limited evidence from human subjects) suggest that the dose of peanuts is an important mediator of peanut sensitisation and tolerance; low doses tend to lead to sensitisation and higher doses tend to lead to tolerance. PMID:20100372

  17. Ghosts of habitats past: Contribution of landscape change to current habitats used by shrubland birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, Steven T.; Rotenberry, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Models of habitat associations for species often are developed with an implicit assumption that habitats are static, even though recent disturbance may have altered the landscape. We tested our hypothesis that trajectory and magnitude of habitat change influenced observed distribution and abundance of passerine birds breeding in shrubsteppe habitats of southwestern Idaho. Birds in this region live in dynamic landscapes undergoing predominantly large-scale, radical, and unidirectional habitat change because wildfires are converting shrublands into expanses of exotic annual grasslands. We used data from field surveys and satellite image analyses in a series of redundancy analyses to partition variances and to determine the relative contribution of habitat change and current landscapes. Although current habitats explained a greater proportion of total variation, changes in habitat and measures of habitat richness and texture also contributed to variation in abundance of Horned Larks (Eremophila alpestris), Brewera??s Sparrows (Spizella breweri), and Sage Sparrows (Amphispiza belli). Abundance of birds was insensitive to scale for nonspatial habitat variables. In contrast, spatial measures of habitat richness and texture in the landscape were significant only at large spatial scales. Abundance of Horned Larks, Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Brewera??s Sparrows, but not Sage Thrashers (Oreoscoptes montanus) or Sage Sparrows, was positively correlated with changes toward stable habitats. Because dominant habitat changes were toward less stable conditions, regional declines of those birds in shrubsteppe habitats reflect current landscapes as well as the history, magnitude, and trajectory of habitat change.

  18. Detectability in Audio-Visual Surveys of Tropical Rainforest Birds: The Influence of Species, Weather and Habitat Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alexander S.; Marques, Tiago A.; Shoo, Luke P.; Williams, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Indices of relative abundance do not control for variation in detectability, which can bias density estimates such that ecological processes are difficult to infer. Distance sampling methods can be used to correct for detectability, but in rainforest, where dense vegetation and diverse assemblages complicate sampling, information is lacking about factors affecting their application. Rare species present an additional challenge, as data may be too sparse to fit detection functions. We present analyses of distance sampling data collected for a diverse tropical rainforest bird assemblage across broad elevational and latitudinal gradients in North Queensland, Australia. Using audio and visual detections, we assessed the influence of various factors on Effective Strip Width (ESW), an intuitively useful parameter, since it can be used to calculate an estimate of density from count data. Body size and species exerted the most important influence on ESW, with larger species detectable over greater distances than smaller species. Secondarily, wet weather and high shrub density decreased ESW for most species. ESW for several species also differed between summer and winter, possibly due to seasonal differences in calling behavior. Distance sampling proved logistically intensive in these environments, but large differences in ESW between species confirmed the need to correct for detection probability to obtain accurate density estimates. Our results suggest an evidence-based approach to controlling for factors influencing detectability, and avenues for further work including modeling detectability as a function of species characteristics such as body size and call characteristics. Such models may be useful in developing a calibration for non-distance sampling data and for estimating detectability of rare species. PMID:26110433

  19. Alcohol Response and Consumption in Adolescent Rhesus Macaques: Life History and Genetic Influences

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, Melanie L.; Lindell, Stephen G.; Chen, Scott; Higley, J. Dee; Suomi, Stephen J.; Heilig, Markus; Barr, Christina S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of alcohol by adolescents is a growing problem and has become an important research topic in the etiology of the alcohol use disorders. A key component of this research has been the development of animal models of adolescent alcohol consumption and alcohol response. Due to their extended period of adolescence, rhesus macaques are especially well-suited for modeling alcohol-related phenotypes that contribute to the adolescent propensity for alcohol consumption. In this review, we discuss studies from our laboratory that have investigated both the initial response to acute alcohol administration and the consumption of alcohol in voluntary self-administration paradigms in adolescent rhesus macaques. These studies confirm that adolescence is a time of dynamic change both behaviorally and physiologically, and that alcohol response and alcohol consumption are influenced by life history variables such as age, sex, and adverse early experience in the form of peer-rearing. Furthermore, genetic variants that alter functioning of the serotonin, endogenous opioid, and corticotropin releasing hormone systems are shown to influence both physiological and behavioral outcomes, in some cases interacting with early experience to indicate gene by environment interactions. These findings highlight several of the pathways involved in alcohol response and consumption, namely reward, behavioral dyscontrol, and vulnerability to stress, and demonstrate a role for these pathways during the early stages of alcohol exposure in adolescence. PMID:20113875

  20. How emotional abilities modulate the influence of early life stress on hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Aust, Sabine; Alkan Härtwig, Elif; Koelsch, Stefan; Heekeren, Hauke R; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-07-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is known to have considerable influence on brain development, mental health and affective functioning. Previous investigations have shown that alexithymia, a prevalent personality trait associated with difficulties experiencing and verbalizing emotions, is particularly related to ELS. The aim of the present study was to investigate how neural correlates of emotional experiences in alexithymia are altered in the presence and absence of ELS. Therefore, 50 healthy individuals with different levels of alexithymia were matched regarding ELS and investigated with respect to neural correlates of audio-visually induced emotional experiences via functional magnetic resonance imaging. The main finding was that ELS modulated hippocampal responses to pleasant (>neutral) stimuli in high-alexithymic individuals, whereas there was no such modulation in low-alexithymic individuals matched for ELS. Behavioral and psychophysiological results followed a similar pattern. When considered independent of ELS, alexithymia was associated with decreased responses in insula (pleasant > neutral) and temporal pole (unpleasant > neutral). Our results show that the influence of ELS on emotional brain responses seems to be modulated by an individual's degree of alexithymia. Potentially, protective and adverse effects of emotional abilities on brain responses to emotional experiences are discussed. PMID:23685776

  1. Multi-scale geomorphic and hydrogeologic influences on bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning habitat in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, J. R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Woessner, W. W.; Muhlfeld, C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated multi-scale hydrogeomorphic influences on the distribution and abundance of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning in snowmelt- dominated streams of the upper Flathead River basin, northwestern Montana. Bull trout redds were primarily found in unconfined alluvial valley reaches (74%), which were strongly influenced by hyporheic and groundwater-stream water exchange. A considerable proportion of redds (26%), however, were patchily distributed in confined valley reaches. Among all reaches and subreaches, the abundance of redds increased with increased bankfull dimensionless shear stress and decreased with reach-average streambed grain size (p < 0.05). Within these selected reaches and subreaches, redd occurrence tended to be associated with the finest available textural facies (i.e., gravel and small cobble substrates) in concave-up bedforms with downwelling intragravel flows. Streambed temperatures tracked stream water diurnal temperature cycles to a depth of at least 25 cm. Groundwater provided substantial thermal moderation of stream water for several high-density spawning reaches. Our spawning gravel competence results indicate that bull trout select spawning areas that are potentially susceptible to flooding-induced scour during the fall and winter incubation period.

  2. Factors influencing quality of life in patients during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    ?mijewska-Tomczak, Ma?gorzata; Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Hojan, Katarzyna; Golusi?ski, Wojciech; Ruci?ska, Anna; Adamska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy (RT) in combination with chemotherapy is a standard of care for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The RT is associated with side effects, which impact on quality of life (QoL). Thus, the aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to investigate the impact of RT on the QoL of patients with HNSCC during RT. Material and methods From September 2008 to February 2010, 205 patients with locally advanced HNSCC were enrolled. The data pertaining to their QoL were collected using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the EORTC Head and Neck Module (QLQ-H&N35) and then all items were transformed to a 0-100 scale according to the guidelines of the EORTC. The following clinical factors were chosen to study their potential influence on the QoL; site of primary, clinical stage, and methods of therapy: RT vs. chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Additionally, the sociodemographic factors (age, gender, education, habit of smoking) were studied. Results Deterioration of almost all scales and items in the QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire were noted at the end of RT. The following factors negatively influenced the QoL: age < 60 years (p < 0.05), female gender (p < 0.05), habit of smoking (p < 0.01), advanced clinical stage (III and IV) (p < 0.05), site of primary (larynx, hypopharynx) (p < 0.01), and CRT (p < 0.01). Conclusions Our study showed that RT significantly negatively influenced QoL at the end of the RT course. Additionally, this study demonstrated that age, gender, smoking habit, tumor site, and clinical stage of disease showed a significant effect on the QoL of HNSCC patients during RT. PMID:25624853

  3. Habitat structure is more important than vegetation composition for local-level management of native

    E-print Network

    Queensland, University of

    Habitat structure is more important than vegetation composition for local-level management negatively influenced by increased soil compaction. Significant floristic characteristics were considered to be important as structural, rather than compositional, habitat elements. Therefore, habitat structure, rather

  4. Habitat Quality Affects Early Physiology and Subsequent Neuromotor Development of Juvenile Black-Capped Chickadees

    PubMed Central

    Grava, Thibault; Fairhurst, Graham D.; Avey, Marc T.; Grava, Angelique; Bradley, James; Avis, Jillian L.; Bortolotti, Gary R.; Sturdy, Christopher B.; Otter, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    In songbirds, the ability to learn and render the species-specific song is influenced by the development of both the song nuclei in the brain and the syrinx (bird's vocal apparatus) early in the bird's life. In black-capped chickadees (Poecille atricapillus), habitat quality is known to affect song structure, with birds in high-quality habitat (mature forest) having a higher song consistency than birds in low-quality habitat (young forest). Although this difference is suspected to stem from differences in development, the developmental status of juvenile birds in either habitat remains unexplored. In this study, we used ptilochronology and feather corticosterone to compare the conditional state of juvenile chickadees in young and mature forest during two distinct periods of song learning - the sensory phase, which occurs prior to settlement, and the sensorimotor phase, which occurs post-settlement. A sample of juvenile males was captured and euthanized several weeks prior to their first breeding season to compare the development of song center nuclei and syrinx in both habitats. The corticosterone levels of natally-grown feathers were greater among birds that settled in mature than young forests - as these feathers were grown pre-settlement, they reflect differences in physiology during the sensory phase. This difference in conditional state is reflected by differences in syrinx and song center nuclei development later during the sensorimotor phase - birds in young forest have smaller syrinx, and moderately-larger RA, than birds in mature forest. Those differences could be responsible for the difference in consistency in song structure observed across habitats. The difference in physiological state across habitats, combined with potential compounding effect of differences in winter resources between habitats, could influence the difference in syrinx and neural development seen in juvenile males during the early spring, and influence the male's ability to learn and render their species-specific song. PMID:23951257

  5. Behavioral, Physiologic, and Habitat Influences on the Dynamics of Puumala virus Infection in Bank Voles (Clethrionomys glareolus)

    PubMed Central

    Chalon, Patrice; de Jaegere, Florence; Karelle-Bui, Lucie; Mees, Georges; Brochier, Bernard; Rozenfeld, Francine; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Populations of bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) were monitored during a 4-year study in southern Belgium to assess the influence of agonistic behavior, reproductive status, mobility, and distribution of the rodents on the dynamics of Puumala virus (abbreviation: PUUV; genus: Hantavirus) infection. Concordance was high between data from serologic testing and results of viral RNA detection. Wounds resulting from biting or scratching were observed mainly in adult rodents. Hantavirus infection in adults was associated with wounds in the fall, i.e., at the end of the breeding season, but not in spring. In addition, sexually active animals were significantly more often wounded and positive for infection. Hantavirus infection was associated with higher mobility in juvenile and subadult males. Seroconversions observed 6 months apart also occurred more frequently in animals that had moved longer distances from their original capture point. During nonepidemic years, the distribution of infection was patchy, and positive foci were mainly located in dense ground vegetation. PMID:12194769

  6. Interactions between habitat heterogeneity and food affect reproductive output in a top predator.

    PubMed

    Byholm, Patrik; Nikula, Ari; Kentta, Jussi; Taivalmäki, Jukka-Pekka

    2007-03-01

    1. Habitat heterogeneity has important repercussions for species abundance, demography and life-history patterns. While habitat effects have been more thoroughly studied in top-down situations (e.g. in association with predation), their role in bottom-up situations (e.g. in association with food abundance) has been less explored and the underlying mechanism(s) behind the ecological patterns have not commonly been identified. 2. With material from 1993 to 2003, we test the hypothesis that the reproduction of Finnish northern goshawks Accipiter gentilis (L.) is bottom-up limited by habitat composition, especially in situations where the density of their main prey (grouse) is low. Special emphasis was placed on identifying the mechanism(s) behind potential habitat effects. 3. While laying date and large-scale variation in the main prey density (but not habitat composition) were related to the number of eggs goshawks laid, small-scale differences in alternative prey density between different territories later influenced how many young were fledged via the mechanism of habitat-dependent partial-brood loss. As a result of this mechanism, a difference in nestling condition also arose between goshawk territories with differing habitat compositions. 4. As the relative proportions of different landscape elements in a given landscape is a function of large-scale differences in geomorphology and land use, this means that the reproductive performance of goshawks as averaged over larger scales can be understood correctly only in respect to the fact that habitat gradients differ across landscapes. 5. In addition to being one of the first papers identifying the mechanism of partial brood loss as being primarily responsible for the habitat-specific differences in the production of young, this study further illustrates the need to identify small-scale mechanisms to correctly understand the large-scale patterns of reproductive performance in territorial species. The repercussions of the observed habitat effect for local population development are discussed. PMID:17302847

  7. WILDLIFE HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat change statistics were used to estimate the effects of alternative future scenarios for agriculture on non-fish vertebrate diversity in Iowa farmlands. Study areas were two watersheds in central Iowa of about 50 and 90 square kilometers, respectively. Future scenarios w...

  8. Habitat Observations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Association of Zoos and Aquariums

    2009-01-01

    In this outdoor activity, learners discover the wonders of the habitat surrounding them. After reading "The Empty Lot," a picture book by Dale Fife, learners observe and record in writing what happens in the natural environment around them. Spending time outdoors observing nature can help learners better understand and appreciate the world in which we live.

  9. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. R. Migliaro; P. Contreras; S. Bech; A. Etxagibel; M. Castro; R. Ricca; K. Vicente

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR) and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG) consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S) and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS) also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG) consisted of

  10. Influences of welding processes on fatigue life of cruciform joints of pressure vessel grade steels containing LOP defects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Balasubramanian; B Guha

    2000-01-01

    The influences of two welding processes, namely, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW), on fatigue life of cruciform joints, containing lack of penetration (LOP) defects, have been studied. Load carrying cruciform joints were fabricated from high strength, quenched and tempered steels of pressure vessel (ASTM 517 ‘F’) grade. Fatigue crack growth experiments were carried out

  11. Influences of Children's and Adolescents' Action-Control Processes on School Achievement, Peer Relationships, and Coping with Challenging Life Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldhof, G. John; Little, Todd D.

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation represents a core aspect of human functioning that influences positive development across the life span. This chapter focuses on the action-control model, a key facet of self-regulation during childhood and early adolescence. The authors discuss the development of action-control beliefs, paying particular attention to their…

  12. Woody debris, voles, and trees: Influence of habitat structures (piles and windrows) on long-tailed vole populations and feeding damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas P. Sullivan; Druscilla S. Sullivan

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) has many ecological functions ranging from conservation of biodiversity to long-term ecosystem productivity. Wildlife habitat, in particular, has been the focus of CWD investigations aimed at maintaining mammal species in managed forests. Piles and windrows of post-harvest woody debris could be designed to provide connectivity and habitat across clearcut openings for a wide array of mammalian

  13. Foraging requirements of the endangered long-fingered bat: the influence of micro-habitat structure, water quality and prey type

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Biscardi; D. Russo; V. Casciani; D. Cesarini; M. Mei; L. Boitani

    2007-01-01

    Myotis capaccinii is one of the most endangered Mediterranean bats. We radio tracked 21 adult individuals to assess foraging range and analyse micro-habitat selection around a nursery roost in central Italy. Habitats were characterized by development of riparian vegetation, distance between banks, degree of water clutter and levels of water pollution (expressed by macro-benthic bioindicators). Diet was also analysed to

  14. The Family Context of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence on the Behavioral Phenotype and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leann E.; Greenberg, Jan; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis In this review, we report the findings from our longitudinal program of research examining the bidirectional influences of the family environment on the behavioral phenotype of autism, and describe a newly developed family psychoeducation program, titled Transitioning Together, designed to reduce family stress, address behavior problems, and improve the overall quality of life of adolescents with autism and their families. In our search for characteristics of the family environment that influence the behavioral phenotype of adolescents and adults with autism, we focus on both positive dimensions of family life, such as warmth and positive remarks that may promote adaptive behavior in individuals with autism, as well as negative dimensions, such as high levels of criticism that may result in an escalation of behavior problems. We find that high levels of maternal warmth and positive remarks are associated with the abatement of behavior problems over time, while high levels of maternal criticism are associated with increasing levels of behavior problems in adolescents and adults with autism. These patterns of relationships have been replicated in a longitudinal study of families of children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome, and are consistent with other studies examining the impact of the family on the behavior of children with developmental disabilities. These findings suggest that the family environment is an important target for interventions not only to reduce family stress but also to improve the behavioral functioning of children, adolescents or adults with ASD. Building upon a well-developed intervention for families of individuals with psychiatric conditions, we report on the development of Transitioning Together, a psychoeducation program targeted to families with adolescents with autism who are approaching high school exit, a difficult transition stage for individuals with autism that is often marked by negative changes in behavior problems. The 8-week Transitioning Together program involves education on a variety of topics relevant to ASD and guided practice in helping families better manage problem behavior in adolescents with autism. Preliminary data suggest that the program can improve the parent-child relationship and increase parental expressions of warmth. A case study is presented that illustrates how Transitioning Together helps reduce family stress and improve the overall quality of the family environment. We conclude the article with a discussion of directions for future research on best practices in working with families of children, adolescents and adults with autism. PMID:24231173

  15. Habitat and Scale Shape the Demographic Fate of the Keystone Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus in Mediterranean Macrophyte Communities

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Patricia; Tomas, Fiona; Pinna, Stefania; Farina, Simone; Roca, Guillem; Ceccherelli, Giulia; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Demographic processes exert different degrees of control as individuals grow, and in species that span several habitats and spatial scales, this can influence our ability to predict their population at a particular life-history stage given the previous life stage. In particular, when keystone species are involved, this relative coupling between demographic stages can have significant implications for the functioning of ecosystems. We examined benthic and pelagic abundances of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus in order to: 1) understand the main life-history bottlenecks by observing the degree of coupling between demographic stages; and 2) explore the processes driving these linkages. P. lividus is the dominant invertebrate herbivore in the Mediterranean Sea, and has been repeatedly observed to overgraze shallow beds of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and rocky macroalgal communities. We used a hierarchical sampling design at different spatial scales (100 s, 10 s and <1 km) and habitats (seagrass and rocky macroalgae) to describe the spatial patterns in the abundance of different demographic stages (larvae, settlers, recruits and adults). Our results indicate that large-scale factors (potentially currents, nutrients, temperature, etc.) determine larval availability and settlement in the pelagic stages of urchin life history. In rocky macroalgal habitats, benthic processes (like predation) acting at large or medium scales drive adult abundances. In contrast, adult numbers in seagrass meadows are most likely influenced by factors like local migration (from adjoining rocky habitats) functioning at much smaller scales. The complexity of spatial and habitat-dependent processes shaping urchin populations demands a multiplicity of approaches when addressing habitat conservation actions, yet such actions are currently mostly aimed at managing predation processes and fish numbers. We argue that a more holistic ecosystem management also needs to incorporate the landscape and habitat-quality level processes (eutrophication, fragmentation, etc.) that together regulate the populations of this keystone herbivore. PMID:22536355

  16. Influence of stream habitat and land use on benthic macroinvertebrate indicators of stream quality of selected above-tidal streams in the Houston-Galveston Area Council service area, Texas, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    During 1997?98, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council, collected stream-habitat and benthic macroinvertebrate data for 31 reaches on above-tidal streams in the Council service area near Houston, Texas. Stream-habitat, land-use and population, and benthic aquatic insect metrics were determined for the 31 reaches. Statistical analyses were used to determine the stream-habitat, land-use and population, and aquatic insect variables that are strongly intercorrelated and that explain the greatest amount of variation between the reaches. Comparison of stream-habitat and biological integrity scores computed for each of the 31 reaches indicated (1) reaches generally had larger stream-habitat integrity scores in drainage areas that were heavily forested and had fewer people per square mile, (2) larger biological integrity scores were significantly correlated with larger stream-habitat integrity scores, and (3) urban reaches generally had more simplified stream-habitat conditions and smaller biological integrity scores. Seven reaches in the study area were selected as reference reaches on the basis of high stream-habitat integrity and high biological integrity. The reference-reaches median biological integrity score was equaled or exceeded by three reaches (one on Spring Creek and two on Cypress Creek) that are on the State of Texas 303(d) list of threatened or impaired waters with respect to aquatic life. This indicates that direct measures of biological integrity could be used to supplement surrogate-based designations of biological integrity such as the State list. A statistically significant multiple-regression model was developed that uses independent variables that can be obtained without field-intensive studies to predict the biological integrity score for a reach. The deviation from the model?s predicted score with the score based on biological sampling can be used to interpret the degree of biological impairment in a reach. Data from reaches outside the group of reaches used in this study are needed to test the validity of the multiple-regression model.

  17. PROGRAM TO ASSIST IN TRACKING CRITICAL HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    PATCH is a spatially explicit, individual-based, life history simulator designed to project populations of territorial terrestrial vertebrate species through time. PATCH is ideal for investigations involving wildlife species that are mobile habitat specialists. PATCH's data req...

  18. Slipping through the Cracks: Rubber Plantation Is Unsuitable Breeding Habitat for Frogs in Xishuangbanna, China

    PubMed Central

    Behm, Jocelyn E.; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of tropical forests into agriculture may present a serious risk to amphibian diversity if amphibians are not able to use agricultural areas as habitat. Recently, in Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province – a hotspot of frog diversity within China – two-thirds of the native tropical rainforests have been converted into rubber plantation agriculture. We conducted surveys and experiments to quantify habitat use for breeding and non-breeding life history activities of the native frog species in rainforest, rubber plantation and other human impacted sites. Rubber plantation sites had the lowest species richness in our non-breeding habitat surveys and no species used rubber plantation sites as breeding habitat. The absence of breeding was likely not due to intrinsic properties of the rubber plantation pools, as our experiments indicated that rubber plantation pools were suitable for tadpole growth and development. Rather, the absence of breeding in the rubber plantation was likely due to a misalignment of breeding and non-breeding habitat preferences. Analyses of our breeding surveys showed that percent canopy cover over pools was the strongest environmental variable influencing breeding site selection, with species exhibiting preferences for pools under both high and low canopy cover. Although rubber plantation pools had high canopy cover, the only species that bred in high canopy cover sites used the rainforest for both non-breeding and breeding activities, completing their entire life cycle in the rainforest. Conversely, the species that did use the rubber plantation for non-breeding habitat preferred to breed in low canopy sites, also avoiding breeding in the rubber plantation. Rubber plantations are likely an intermediate habitat type that ‘slips through the cracks’ of species habitat preferences and is thus avoided for breeding. In summary, unlike the rainforests they replaced, rubber plantations alone may not be able to support frog populations. PMID:24040026

  19. OIKOS 98: 8797, 2002 Population history and life history influence the migration rate of

    E-print Network

    Hanski, Ilkka

    ) that is not present in the release area, where there is only Plantago lanceolata, the preferred host plant of females. First, Veronica-preferring females had higher emigration rate than Plantago-preferring females from the Plantago-con- taining release patches, demonstrating that the individual perception of habitat quality

  20. Foundations for an Ontology of Environment and Habitat

    E-print Network

    Bennett, Brandon

    Foundations for an Ontology of Environment and Habitat Brandon BENNETT 1 School of Computing to the spatial and material structure of the world. Since habitats are es- sentially associated with lives the spatial extensions of habitats to be characterised in terms of the possible `life trajectories' of organ

  1. Habitat for Age0 Shovelnose Sturgeon and Pallid Sturgeon in a Large River: Interactions among Abiotic Factors, Food, and Energy Intake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawn R. Sechler; Quinton E. Phelps; Sara J. Tripp; James E. Garvey; David P. Herzog; David E. Ostendorf; Joseph W. Ridings; Jason W. Crites; Robert A. Hrabik

    2012-01-01

    The main stems of large rivers throughout the world have been highly modified with little consideration for effects on fishes that rely on these areas to complete their life histories. Particularly important is the ability of riverine habitats to provide foraging opportunities for young fish. We explored how temperature, flow, and food availability influenced diet content, prey selection (Strauss's linear

  2. Physical habitat template of lotic systems: Recovery in the context of historical pattern of spatiotemporal heterogeneity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. LeRoy Poff; J. V. Ward

    1990-01-01

    Spatial and temporal environmental heterogeneity in lotic ecosystems can be quantitatively described and identified with characteristic\\u000a levels of ecological organization. The long-term pattern of physicochemical variability in conjunction with the complexity\\u000a and stability of the substratum establishes a physical habitat template that theoretically influences which combinations of\\u000a behavioral, physiological and life history characteristics constitute appropriate “ecological strategies” for persistence\\u000a in

  3. RESTORATION OF STREAM PHYSICAL HABITAT AND FOOD RESOURCES: INFLUENCE ON JUVENILE COHO GROWTH AND SALMON DERIVED NUTRIENT INCORPORATION IN COASTAL OREGON STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT - Stream restoration in Western Oregon and Washington includes physical habitat improvement and salmon carcass additions. However, few studies examine the effects of carcass placement on juvenile fish in western Oregon, and in particular the interaction with physical hab...

  4. Fuzzy modelling of Atlantic salmon physical habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Hilaire, André; Mocq, Julien; Cunjak, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Fish habitat models typically attempt to quantify the amount of available river habitat for a given fish species for various flow and hydraulic conditions. To achieve this, information on the preferred range of values of key physical habitat variables (e.g. water level, velocity, substrate diameter) for the targeted fishs pecies need to be modelled. In this context, we developed several habitat suitability indices sets for three Atlantic salmon life stages (young-of-the-year (YOY), parr, spawning adults) with the help of fuzzy logic modeling. Using the knowledge of twenty-seven experts, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, we defined fuzzy sets of four variables (depth, substrate size, velocity and Habitat Suitability Index, or HSI) and associated fuzzy rules. When applied to the Romaine River (Canada), median curves of standardized Weighted Usable Area (WUA) were calculated and a confidence interval was obtained by bootstrap resampling. Despite the large range of WUA covered by the expert WUA curves, confidence intervals were relatively narrow: an average width of 0.095 (on a scale of 0 to 1) for spawning habitat, 0.155 for parr rearing habitat and 0.160 for YOY rearing habitat. When considering an environmental flow value corresponding to 90% of the maximum reached by WUA curve, results seem acceptable for the Romaine River. Generally, this proposed fuzzy logic method seems suitable to model habitat availability for the three life stages, while also providing an estimate of uncertainty in salmon preferences.

  5. COASTAL SUBMERGED VEGETATION: AQUATIC HABITAT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic vegetation is one of the most widespread and important types of aquatic habitat, in part because of the exceptional productivity of the plants. Aquatic vegetation also strongly influences local physical and chemical habitat conditions of significance to fish and shellfis...

  6. Mars habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The College of Engineering & Architecture at Prairie View A&M University has been participating in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program since 1986. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allowed the involvement of students and faculty throughout the College of Engineering & Architecture for the last five years. The research goal for the 1990-1991 year is to design a human habitat on Mars that can be used as a permanent base for 20 crew members. The research is being conducted by undergraduate students from the Department of Architecture.

  7. Microstructural Influence on Deformation and Fatigue Life of Composites Using the Generalized Method of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Murthy, P.; Bednarcyk, B. A.; Pineda, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A fully coupled deformation and damage approach to modeling the response of composite materials and composite laminates is presented. It is based on the semi-­-analytical generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model as well as its higher fidelity counterpart, HFGMC, both of which provide closed-form constitutive equations for composite materials as well as the micro scale stress and strain fields in the composite phases. The provided constitutive equations allow GMC and HFGMC to function within a higher scale structural analysis (e.g., finite element analysis or lamination theory) to represent a composite material point, while the availability of the micro fields allow the incorporation of lower scale sub­-models to represent local phenomena in the fiber and matrix. Further, GMC's formulation performs averaging when applying certain governing equations such that some degree of microscale field accuracy is surrendered in favor of extreme computational efficiency, rendering the method quite attractive as the centerpiece in a integrated computational material engineering (ICME) structural analysis; whereas HFGMC retains this microscale field accuracy, but at the price of significantly slower computational speed. Herein, the sensitivity of deformation and the fatigue life of graphite/epoxy PMC composites, with both ordered and disordered microstructures, has been investigated using this coupled deformation and damage micromechanics based approach. The local effects of fiber breakage and fatigue damage are included as sub-models that operate on the microscale for the individual composite phases. For analysis of laminates, classical lamination theory is employed as the global or structural scale model, while GMC/HFGMC is embedded to operate on the microscale to simulate the behavior of the composite material within each laminate layer. A key outcome of this study is the statistical influence of microstructure and micromechanics idealization (GMC or HFGMC) on the overall accuracy of unidirectional and laminated composite deformation and fatigue response.

  8. Habitat-specific foraging of prothonotary warblers: Deducing habitat quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Foraging behavior often reflects food availability in predictable ways. For example, in habitats where food availability is high, predators should attack prey more often and move more slowly than in habitats where food availability is low. To assess relative food availability and habitat quality, I studied the foraging behavior of breeding Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea) in two forest habitat types, cypress-gum swamp forest and coastal-plain levee forest. I quantified foraging behavior with focal animal sampling and continuous recording during foraging bouts. I measured two aspects of foraging behavior: 1) prey attack rate (attacks per minute), using four attack maneuvers (glean, sally, hover, strike), and 2) foraging speed (movements per minute), using three types of movement (hop, short flight [???1 m], long flight [>1 m]). Warblers attacked prey more often in cypress-gum swamp forest than in coastal-plain levee forest. Foraging speed, however, was not different between habitats. I also measured foraging effort (% time spent foraging) and relative frequency of attack maneuvers employed in each habitat; neither of these variables was influenced by forest type. I conclude that Prothonotary Warblers encounter more prey when foraging in cypress-gum swamps than in coastal-plain levee forest, and that greater food availability results in higher density and greater reproductive success for birds breeding in cypress-gum swamp.

  9. The relationship between overall quality of life and its subdimensions was influenced by culture: analysis of an international database

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil W. Scotta; Peter M. Fayersa; Neil K. Aaronsonc; Andrew Bottomleyd; Alexander de Graeffe; Mogens Groenvoldf; Michael Kollerh; Morten A. Petersenf

    Objective: To investigate whether geographic and cultural factors influence the relationship between the global health status quality of life (QL) scale score of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire and seven other sub- scales representing fatigue, pain, physical, role, emotional, cognitive, and social functioning. Study Design and Setting: A large international database of QLQ-C30 responses

  10. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  11. Influence of spirituality on cool down reactions, work engagement, and life satisfaction in anthroposophic health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Büssing, Arndt; Lötzke, Désirée; Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between "cool down reactions" (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53?±?10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to "cool down reactions." Significant predictors of "cool down reactions" were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R (2) = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R (2) = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of "cool down reactions," work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' "cool down reactions," but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work. PMID:25694789

  12. Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between “cool down reactions” (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53?±?10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to “cool down reactions.” Significant predictors of “cool down reactions” were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R2 = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R2 = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of “cool down reactions,” work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' “cool down reactions,” but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work. PMID:25694789

  13. [Examination about the influence for daily life that nail and skin disorders induced by docetaxel in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Kohama, Keisuke; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Ishitobi, Makoto; Masuda, Hiroko; Ogawa, Masami; Todaka, Kinuyo; Tanaka, Tomi; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Nakamori, Shoji; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents for the breast cancer patients. However, it has also experienced as toxicities causing nail diformation and skin trouble, and is considered as adverse elements other than edema and neurotoxicity. It is expected to have tremendous influence on women's daily life-decrease in quality of life. Nail and skin toxicity might occur among patients treated with docetaxel more frequently than evidence in the clinical medical records. Therefore, we have conducted a questionnaire investigation, targeting the patients who had been treated with docetaxel. Between March, 2004 and February, 2006, 52 patients, who had been prescribed docetaxel at the time of the surgery, or for their relapse, became subject to the evaluation. Skin impediments have found most during the second and the third courses; the contents include discomfort towards their beauty and housework. Influence to their daily life that the patients feel do not necessarily match the contents that doctors have recognized. In conclusion, this investigation evidenced that the troubles on quality of life such as nail and skin troubles, should be paid more attention, as well as major side effects such as edema, neutropenia, and neurotoxicity. PMID:19381034

  14. Influences on employee perceptions of organizational work–life support: Signals and resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monique Valcour; Ariane Ollier-Malaterre; Christina Matz-Costa; Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes; Melissa Brown

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictors of employee perceptions of organizational work–life support. Using organizational support theory and conservation of resources theory, we reasoned that workplace demands and resources shape employees' perceptions of work–life support through two mechanisms: signaling that the organization cares about their work–life balance and helping them develop and conserve resources needed to meet work and nonwork responsibilities. Consistent

  15. Fragmentation of habitats used by neotropical migratory birds in Southern Appalachians and the neotropics

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, S.M.; Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Offerman, H.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Recent declines in North American breeding populations have sparked great concern over the effects of habitat fragmentation. Neotropical migrant birds use and are influenced by two biomes during a single life span. Yet assessment of the relative importance of changes in tropical wintering areas versus temperate breeding areas is complicated by regional variation in rates and extent of habitat change. Landscape-level measurements of forest fragmentation derived from remotely-sensed data provide a means to compare the patterns of habitat modification on the wintering and breeding grounds of migrant birds. This study quantifies patterns of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and tropical Amazon and relates these patterns to the resource needs of neotropical migrant birds. Study sites were selected from remotely-sensed images to represent a range of forest fragmentation (highly fragmented landscape to continuous forest).

  16. Influence of life history strategies on sensitivity, population growth and response to climate for sympatric alpine birds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The life history strategy of a species can influence how populations of that species respond to environmental variation. In this study, we used a matrix modeling approach to examine how life history differences among sympatric rock and white-tailed ptarmigan affect the influence of demographic rates on population growth (?) and the potential response to a changing climate. Rock ptarmigan have a slower life history strategy than white-tailed ptarmigan in the study region with lower annual reproductive effort but higher adult survival. Results Based on data from a 5-year field study, deterministic estimates of ? indicated that populations were stable for rock ptarmigan (??=?1.01), but declining for white-tailed ptarmigan (??=?0.96). The demographic rates with the highest elasticity for rock ptarmigan were the survival of after-second year females, followed by juvenile survival and success of the first nest. For white-tailed ptarmigan, juvenile survival had the highest elasticity followed by success of the first nest and survival of second-year females. Incorporating stochasticity into the demographic rates led to a 2 and 4% drop in ? for rock and white-tailed ptarmigan respectively. Using data from the first three years we also found that population growth rates of both species were depressed following an increased frequency of severe years, but less so for rock ptarmigan which showed greater resilience under these conditions. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that populations of closely related species can vary in their response to environmental change as a consequence of life history differences. Rock ptarmigan, with a slower life history, are more responsive to demographic rates that influence survival and older life stages but this response is tempered by the extent of variability in each of the rates. Thus, predictions need to consider both aspects in modeling population response to a varying climate. Juvenile survival was a highly influential rate for both species, but the period from independence to first breeding is a poorly understood stage for many bird species. Additional study on juvenile survival, the influence of density dependence and the effects of predators as the mechanism driving survival-reproduction tradeoffs are all areas requiring further study. PMID:22747571

  17. Volcaniclastic habitats for early life on Earth and Mars: A case study from ?3.5 Ga-old rocks from the Pilbara, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances Westall; Frédéric Foucher; Barbara Cavalazzi; Sjoukje T. de Vries; Wouter Nijman; Victoria Pearson; Jon Watson; Alexander Verchovsky; Ian Wright; Jean-Noel Rouzaud; Daniele Marchesini; Severine Anne

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of present and future in situ missions to Mars to investigate its habitability and to search for traces of life, we studied the habitability and traces of past life in ?3.5Ga-old volcanic sands deposited in littoral environments an analogue to Noachian environments on Mars. The environmental conditions on Noachian Mars (4.1–3.7Ga) and the Early Archaean (4.0–3.3Ga) Earth

  18. Early-life dietary spray-dried plasma influences immunological and intestinal injury responses to later-life Salmonella typhimurium challenge.

    PubMed

    Boyer, P E; D'Costa, S; Edwards, L L; Milloway, M; Susick, E; Borst, L B; Thakur, S; Campbell, J M; Crenshaw, J D; Polo, J; Moeser, A J

    2015-03-14

    Increasing evidence supports the concept that early-life environmental influences, including nutrition and stress, have an impact on long-term health outcomes and disease susceptibility. The objective of the present study was to determine whether dietary spray-dried plasma (SDP), fed during the first 2 weeks post-weaning (PW), influences subsequent immunological and intestinal injury responses to Salmonella typhimurium challenge. A total of thirty-two piglets (age 16-17 d) were weaned onto nursery diets containing 0, 2·5 % SDP (fed for 7 d PW) or 5 % SDP (fed for 14 d PW), and were then fed control diets (without SDP), for the remainder of the experiment. At 34 d PW (age 50 d), pigs were challenged with 3 × 10? colony-forming units of S. typhimurium. A control group (non-challenged) that was fed 0 % SDP in the nursery was included. At 2 d post-challenge, the distal ileum was harvested for the measurement of inflammatory, histological and intestinal physiological parameters. S. typhimurium challenge induced elevated ileal histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO), IL-8 and TNF, and increased intestinal permeability (indicated by reduced transepithelial voltage (potential difference) and elevated 4 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD4) flux rates). Compared with S. typhimurium-challenged controls (0 % SDP), pigs fed the 5 % SDP-14 d diet exhibited reduced ileal histological scores, MPO levels, IL-8 levels and FD4 flux rates. Pigs fed the 5 % SDP-14 d nursery diet exhibited increased levels of plasma and ileal TNF-? in response to the challenge, compared with the other treatments. These results indicate that inclusion of SDP in PW diets can have an influence on subsequent immunological and intestinal injury responses induced by later-life S. typhimurium challenge. PMID:25671331

  19. Influences on the Quality of Work and Nonwork Life: Two Decades in Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loscocco, Karyn A.; Roschelle, Anne R.

    1991-01-01

    This 20-year review examines (1) determinants of job satisfaction and work commitment and (2) the trend toward connecting work and nonwork life, emphasizing life satisfaction, marital satisfaction, and emotional well-being. Issues related to the influx of women in the labor force are highlighted. (297 references) (SK)

  20. Vitamin E status and quality of life in the elderly: influence of inflammatory processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucile Capuron; Aurélie Moranis; Nicole Combe; Florence Cousson-Gélie; Dietmar Fuchs; Véronique De Smedt-Peyrusse; Pascale Barberger-Gateau; Sophie Layé

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is a characteristic of aging that may lead to alterations in health status and quality of life. In addition to intrinsic biological factors, recent data suggest that poor nutritional habits may largely contribute to this condition. The present study aimed at assessing mental and physical components of quality of life and at determining their relationship to

  1. Aquatic Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Betsy Hedberg

    2003-01-01

    This lesson plan will help students to understand that the way a community disposes of its wastewater may negatively affect local aquatic habitats, that it is possible to find wastewater-disposal methods that do not pollute, and that both governments and citizens can take action to ensure that waste water will be disposed of in a way that is not destructive. As part of the lesson, students will discuss the definition of "wastewater", how it is disposed of, invite a guest speaker to class, and write proposals to local government officials either suggesting improvements or commending their current procedures. Adaptations for older students, discussion questions, an evaluation rubric, extension activities, suggested readings, a vocabulary, and links to related sites accompany the lesson.

  2. POSTFLEDGING SURVIVAL AND MOVEMENT IN DICKCISSELS (SPIZA AMERICANA): IMPLICATIONS FOR HABITAT MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorelle I. Berkeley; John P. McCarty; L. LaReesa Wolfenbarger

    2007-01-01

    When land managers incorporate the habitat needs of grassland birds into their planning, they typically rely on management recommendations based on habitat use by adults during nesting. Habitat requirements for other critical life stages are seldom known and may diff er from those of nesting adults. Using radio- telemetry, we examined survival and habitat use by juvenile Dickcissels (Spiza ameri-

  3. Red king crab ( Paralithodes camtschaticus) early post-settlement habitat choice: Structure, food, and ontogeny

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodi L. Pirtle; Allan W. Stoner

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about nursery habitat function for red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus), a commercially important species that associates with complex benthic habitats from settlement through the first two years of life. During settlement, the red king crab actively seeks complex benthic habitats, with high availability of vertical structure and crevice space. Habitat choice for early juvenile red king crab

  4. Using dynamic simulations and automated decision tools to design lunar habitats

    E-print Network

    Kortenkamp, David

    05ICES-72 Using dynamic simulations and automated decision tools to design lunar habitats Scott-time integrated control in designing and sizing habitat life support systems. The integration of these three, we used a typical lunar surface habitat. Large numbers of habitat configurations were rapidly tested

  5. Acute Pain and a Motivational Pathway in Adult Rats: Influence of Early Life Pain Experience

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lucie A.; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background The importance of neonatal experience upon behaviour in later life is increasingly recognised. The overlap between pain and reward pathways led us to hypothesise that neonatal pain experience influences reward-related pathways and behaviours in adulthood. Methodology/Principal Findings Rat pups received repeat plantar skin incisions (neonatal IN) or control procedures (neonatal anesthesia only, AN) at postnatal days (P)3, 10 and 17. When adult, rats with neonatal ‘pain history’ showed greater sensory sensitivity than control rats following acute plantar skin incision. Motivational behaviour in the two groups of rats was tested in a novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) paradigm. The sensitivity of this paradigm to pain-induced changes in motivational behaviour was shown by significant increases in the time spent in the central zone of the arena (43.7±5.9% vs. 22.5±6.7%, p<0.05), close to centrally placed food treats, and decreased number of rears (9.5±1.4 vs. 19.2±2.3, p<0.001) in rats with acute plantar skin incision compared to naive, uninjured animals. Rats with a neonatal ‘pain history’ showed the same pain-induced behaviour in the novelty-induced hypophagia paradigm as controls. However, differences were observed in reward-related neural activity between the two groups. Two hours after behavioural testing, brains were harvested and neuronal activity mapped using c-Fos expression in lateral hypothalamic orexin neurons, part of a specific reward seeking pathway. Pain-induced activity in orexin neurons of control rats (18.4±2.8%) was the same as in uninjured naive animals (15.5±2.6%), but in those rats with a ‘pain history’, orexinergic activity was significantly increased (27.2±4.1%, p<0.01). Furthermore the extent of orexin neuron activation in individual rats with a ‘pain history’ was highly correlated with their motivational behaviour (r?=??0.86, p?=?0.01). Conclusions/Significance These results show that acute pain alters motivational behaviour and that neonatal pain experience causes long-term changes in brain motivational orexinergic pathways, known to modulate mesolimbic dopaminergic reward circuitry. PMID:22470556

  6. The Influence of Early-Life Events on Human Capital, Health Status, and Labor Market Outcomes Over the Life Course().

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rucker C; Schoeni, Robert F

    2011-09-01

    Using national data from the U.S., we find that poor health at birth and limited parental resources (including low income, lack of health insurance, and unwanted pregnancy) interfere with cognitive development and health capital in childhood, reduce educational attainment, and lead to worse labor market and health outcomes in adulthood. These effects are substantial and robust to the inclusion of sibling fixed effects and an extensive set of controls. The results reveal that low birth weight ages people in their 30s and 40s by 12 years, increases the probability of dropping out of high school by one-third, lowers labor force participation by 5 percentage points, and reduces labor market earnings by roughly 15 percent. While poor birth outcomes reduce human capital accumulation, they explain only 10 percent of the total effect of low birth weight on labor market earnings. Taken together, the evidence is consistent with a negative reinforcing intergenerational transmission of disadvantage within the family; parental economic status influences birth outcomes, birth outcomes have long reaching effects on health and economic status in adulthood, which in turn leads to poor birth outcomes for one's own children. PMID:23412970

  7. Clinal variation in seed traits influencing life cycle timing in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Picó, F Xavier; Tonsor, Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    Early life-history transitions are crucial determinants of lifetime survival and fecundity. Adaptive evolution in early life-history traits involves a complex interplay between the developing plant and its current and future environments. We examined the plant's earliest life-history traits, dissecting an integrated suite of pregermination processes: primary dormancy, thermal induction of secondary dormancy, and seasonal germination response. We examined genetic variation in the three processes, genetic correlations among the processes, and the scaling of germination phenology with the source populations' climates. A spring annual life history was associated with genetic propensities toward both strong primary dormancy and heat-induced secondary dormancy, alone or in combination. Lineages with similar proportions of winter and spring annual life history have both weak primary dormancy and weak thermal dormancy induction. A genetic bias to adopt a spring annual strategy, mediated by rapid loss of primary dormancy and high thermal dormancy induction, is associated with a climatic gradient characterized by increasing temperature in summer and rainfall in winter. This study highlights the importance of considering combinations of multiple genetically based traits along a climatic gradient as adaptive strategies differentiating annual plant life-history strategies. Despite the genetic-climatic cline, there is polymorphism for life-history strategies within populations, classically interpreted as bet hedging in an unpredictable world. PMID:23106707

  8. A general approach to the analysis of habitat selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kneib; Felix Knauer; Helmut Küchenhoff

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of animal habitat selection aims at the detection of selective usage of habitat types and the identification\\u000a of covariates influencing their selection. The results not only allow for a better understanding of the habitat selection\\u000a process but are also intended to help improve the conservation of animals. Usually, habitat selection by larger animals is\\u000a assessed by radio-tracking or

  9. Life history attributes of the threatened Australian snake (Stephens banded snake Hoplocephalus stephensii, Elapidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Fitzgerald; Richard Shine; Francis Lemckert

    Whether or not a species is threatened by habitat change is influenced by its life-history traits as well as by the nature and severity of the threatening process. Detailed studies of declining taxa can clarify reasons for their vulnerability, both in proximate terms (e.g., taxa with slow growth, delayed maturation, low fecundity and infrequent reproduction will be poorly suited to

  10. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Campbell, Lance [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-15

    In 2002 with support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), an interagency research team began investigating salmon life histories and habitat use in the lower Columbia River estuary to fill significant data gaps about the estuary's potential role in salmon decline and recovery . The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided additional funding in 2004 to reconstruct historical changes in estuarine habitat opportunities and food web linkages of Columbia River salmon (Onchorhynchus spp.). Together these studies constitute the estuary's first comprehensive investigation of shallow-water habitats, including selected emergent, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. Among other findings, this research documented the importance of wetlands as nursery areas for juvenile salmon; quantified historical changes in the amounts and distributions of diverse habitat types in the lower estuary; documented estuarine residence times, ranging from weeks to months for many juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha); and provided new evidence that contemporary salmonid food webs are supported disproportionately by wetland-derived prey resources. The results of these lower-estuary investigations also raised many new questions about habitat functions, historical habitat distributions, and salmon life histories in other areas of the Columbia River estuary that have not been adequately investigated. For example, quantitative estimates of historical habitat changes are available only for the lower 75 km of the estuary, although tidal influence extends 217 km upriver to Bonneville Dam. Because the otolith techniques used to reconstruct salmon life histories rely on detection of a chemical signature (strontium) for salt water, the estuarine residency information we have collected to date applies only to the lower 30 or 35 km of the estuary, where fish first encounter ocean water. We lack information about salmon habitat use, life histories, and growth within the long tidal-fresh reaches of the main-stem river and many tidally-influenced estuary tributaries. Finally, our surveys to date characterize wetland habitats within island complexes distributed in the main channel of the lower estuary. Yet some of the most significant wetland losses have occurred along the estuary's periphery, including shoreline areas and tributary junctions. These habitats may or may not function similarly as the island complexes that we have surveyed to date. In 2007 we initiated a second phase of the BPA estuary study (Phase II) to address specific uncertainties about salmon in tidal-fresh and tributary habitats of the Columbia River estuary. This report summarizes 2007 and 2008 Phase II results and addresses three principal research questions: (1) What was the historic distribution of estuarine and floodplain habitats from Astoria to Bonneville Dam? (2) Do individual patterns of estuarine residency and growth of juvenile Chinook salmon vary among wetland habitat types along the estuarine tidal gradient? (3) Are salmon rearing opportunities and life histories in the restoring wetland landscape of lower Grays River similar to those documented for island complexes of the main-stem estuary? Phase II extended our analysis of historical habitat distribution in the estuary above Rkm 75 to near Bonneville Dam. For this analysis we digitized the original nineteenth-century topographic (T-sheets) and hydrographic (H-sheets) survey maps for the entire estuary. Although all T-sheets (Rkm 0 to Rkm 206) were converted to GIS in 2005 with support for the USACE estuary project, final reconstruction of historical habitats throughout the estuary requires completion of the remaining H-sheet GIS maps above Rkm 75 and their integration with the T-sheets. This report summarizes progress to date on compiling the upper estuary H-sheets above Rkm 75. For the USACE estuary project, we analyzed otoliths from Chinook salmon collected near the estuary mouth in 2003-05 to estimate variability in estuary residence times among juvenile out migrants. In Phase II we expanded these analyses to comp

  11. Influence of Habitat and Climate Variables on Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Community Distribution, as Revealed by a Case Study of Facultative Plant Epiphytism under Semiarid Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Torrecillas, E.; Torres, P.; Querejeta, J. I.; Roldán, A.

    2013-01-01

    In semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems, epiphytic plant species are practically absent, and only some species of palm trees can support epiphytes growing in their lower crown area, such as Phoenix dactylifera L. (date palm). In this study, we focused on Sonchus tenerrimus L. plants growing as facultative epiphytes in P. dactylifera and its terrestrial forms growing in adjacent soils. Our aim was to determine the possible presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in these peculiar habitats and to relate AMF communities with climatic variations. We investigated the AMF community composition of epiphytic and terrestrial S. tenerrimus plants along a temperature and precipitation gradient across 12 localities. Epiphytic roots were colonized by AMF, as determined by microscopic observation; all of the epiphytic and terrestrial samples analyzed showed AMF sequences from taxa belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota, which were grouped in 30 AMF operational taxonomic units. The AMF community composition was clearly different between epiphytic and terrestrial root samples, and this could be attributable to dispersal constraints and/or the contrasting environmental and ecophysiological conditions prevailing in each habitat. Across sites, the richness and diversity of terrestrial AMF communities was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the most recent growing season. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between climate variables and AMF richness and diversity for epiphytic AMF communities, which suggests that the composition of AMF communities in epiphytic habitats appears to be largely determined by the availability and dispersion of fungal propagules from adjacent terrestrial habitats. PMID:24038687

  12. Influences on the Use of the "Fishing: Get in the Habitat! MinnAqua Leader's Guide" and Implications for Curriculum Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athman Ernst, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The "Fishing: Get in the Habitat! MinnAqua Leader's Guide" is a curriculum created by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for educators working primarily with children in grades three through five in formal and nonformal education settings. Like many agency-developed supplemental educational resources, the Leader's Guide is available…

  13. Bird use of logging gaps in a subtropical mountain forest: The influence of habitat structure and resource abundance in the Yungas of Argentina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gustavo A. Zurita; Gustavo A. Zuleta

    2009-01-01

    Selective logging is one of the main economical activities in tropical and subtropical forests. While most of the effects of this activity on bird communities have been studied by comparing exploited vs. non-exploited areas; the use of human-created treefall gaps by birds is relatively unknown. We studied habitat structure, resource abundance (fruits, flowers and arthropods) and bird activity in logging

  14. Indoor Gateball’s Influence on Life Satisfaction and the Prevention of Falls by the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kwon-Young

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of indoor gateball exercise on life satisfaction and the prevention of falls by the elderly. [Subjects] Sixteen elderly subjects aged 65 or more, residents in nursing care facilities, were randomly divided into two groups. [Methods] One group performed indoor gateball exercise for 30 minutes a day, five times per week. The Tetrax fall index and life satisfaction were measured before and after four weeks of gateball exercise. [Results] The indoor gate ball exercise group showed significant improvements in the fall index and life satisfaction. [Conclusion] The indoor gateball exercise used in this study should be considered as a therapeutic method for the elderly, for improving their life satisfaction and because of its effectiveness in preventing falls. PMID:25540489

  15. Influence of Asymmetrical Waveform on Low-Cycle Fatigue Life of Micro Solder Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Yoshihiko; Kariya, Yoshiharu

    2010-02-01

    The effects of waveform symmetry on the low-cycle fatigue life of the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu alloy have been investigated, using micro solder joint specimens with approximately the same volume of solder as is used in actual products. Focusing on crack initiation life, fatigue tests on Sn-Ag-Cu micro solder joints using asymmetrical triangular waveforms revealed no significant reduction in fatigue life. A slight reduction in fatigue life at low strain ranges caused by an increase in the fatigue ductility exponent, which is the result of a weakening microstructure due to loads applied at high temperature for long testing time, was observed. This was due to the fact that grain boundary damage, which has been reported in large-size specimens subjected to asymmetrical triangular waveforms, does not occur in Sn-Ag-Cu micro size solder joints with only a small number of crystal grain boundaries.

  16. The Influence of Mortality and Socioeconomic Status on Risk and Delayed Rewards: A Life History Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Tybur, Joshua M.; Delton, Andrew W.; Robertson, Theresa E.

    2012-01-01

    Why do some people take risks and live for the present, whereas others avoid risks and save for the future? The evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that preferences for risk and delay in gratification should be influenced by mortality and resource scarcity. A series of experiments examined how mortality cues influenced decisions involving risk preference (e.g., $10 for sure vs. 50% chance of $20) and temporal discounting (e.g., $5 now vs. $10 later). The effect of mortality depended critically on whether people grew up in a relatively resource-scarce or resource-plentiful environment. For individuals who grew up relatively poor, mortality cues led them to value the present and gamble for big immediate rewards. Conversely, for individuals who grew up relatively wealthy, mortality cues led them to value the future and avoid risky gambles. Overall, mortality cues appear to propel individuals toward diverging life history strategies as a function of childhood socioeconomic status, suggesting important implications for how environmental factors influence economic decisions and risky behaviors. PMID:21299312

  17. The influence of mortality and socioeconomic status on risk and delayed rewards: a life history theory approach.

    PubMed

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Tybur, Joshua M; Delton, Andrew W; Robertson, Theresa E

    2011-06-01

    Why do some people take risks and live for the present, whereas others avoid risks and save for the future? The evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that preferences for risk and delay in gratification should be influenced by mortality and resource scarcity. A series of experiments examined how mortality cues influenced decisions involving risk preference (e.g., $10 for sure vs. 50% chance of $20) and temporal discounting (e.g., $5 now vs. $10 later). The effect of mortality depended critically on whether people grew up in a relatively resource-scarce or resource-plentiful environment. For individuals who grew up relatively poor, mortality cues led them to value the present and gamble for big immediate rewards. Conversely, for individuals who grew up relatively wealthy, mortality cues led them to value the future and avoid risky gambles. Overall, mortality cues appear to propel individuals toward diverging life history strategies as a function of childhood socioeconomic status, suggesting important implications for how environmental factors influence economic decisions and risky behaviors. PMID:21299312

  18. Organism responses to habitat fragmentation and diversity: Habitat colonization by estuarine macrofauna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David B Eggleston; Ward E Elis; Lisa L Etherington; Craig P Dahlgren; Martin H Posey

    1999-01-01

    Ecologists increasingly recognize that their choice of spatial scales may influence greatly their interpretation of ecological systems, and that small changes in the patchiness of habitat resources can produce abrupt, sometimes dramatic shifts in distribution and abundance patterns of a species. Moreover, identification of scale- and habitat-dependent ecological patterns are central to management efforts aimed at predicting the response of

  19. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic influences on life history expression: metabolism and parentally induced temperature influences on embryo development rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Nikilson, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic processes are assumed to underlie life history expression and trade-offs, but extrinsic inputs are theorised to shift trait expression and mask trade-offs within species. Here, we explore application of this theory across species. We do this based on parentally induced embryo temperature as an extrinsic input, and mass-specific embryo metabolism as an intrinsic process, underlying embryonic development rate. We found that embryonic metabolism followed intrinsic allometry rules among 49 songbird species from temperate and tropical sites. Extrinsic inputs via parentally induced temperatures explained the majority of variation in development rates and masked a relationship with metabolism; metabolism explained a minor proportion of the variation in development rates among species, and only after accounting for temperature effects. We discuss evidence that temperature further obscures the expected interspecific trade-off between development rate and offspring quality. These results demonstrate the importance of considering extrinsic inputs to trait expression and trade-offs across species.

  20. Subsurface microbial habitats on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boston, P. J.; Mckay, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    We developed scenarios for shallow and deep subsurface cryptic niches for microbial life on Mars. Such habitats could have considerably prolonged the persistence of life on Mars as surface conditions became increasingly inhospitable. The scenarios rely on geothermal hot spots existing below the near or deep subsurface of Mars. Recent advances in the comparatively new field of deep subsurface microbiology have revealed previously unsuspected rich aerobic and anaerobic microbal communities far below the surface of the Earth. Such habitats, protected from the grim surface conditions on Mars, could receive warmth from below and maintain water in its liquid state. In addition, geothermally or volcanically reduced gases percolating from below through a microbiologically active zone could provide the reducing power needed for a closed or semi-closed microbial ecosystem to thrive.

  1. Influence of gamma-irradiation, growth retardants and coatings on the shelf life of winter guava fruits (Psidium guajava L.).

    PubMed

    Pandey, S K; Joshua, Jean E; Bisen; Abhay

    2010-01-01

    Experiment was conducted to study the effect of gamma irradiation, growth retardants and coatings (coconut oil, mustard oil and liquid paraffin) on shelf life of winter guava fruits during storage. The results revealed that the superiority of coconut oil coating over other post harvest treatments. Physiological loss in weight (7.1%), marketable fruits retained over control (86.7%), total soluble solid (16.1%), ascorbic acid (195 mg/100 g pulp) and total sugar (10%) of fruit were positively influenced by coconut oil coating up to 12 days of storage. The treatment was found significantly effective in increasing the post harvest life of fruits for 12 days over control without adversely affecting the fruit quality. Coconut oil coating gave highest consumer acceptability while, maintaining sufficient level of total soluble solids and sugar content in fruits. PMID:23572614

  2. Does Human-Induced Habitat Modification Influence the Impact of Introduced Species? A Case Study on Cavity-Nesting by the Introduced Common Myna ( Acridotheres tristis) and Two Australian Native Parrots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grarock, Kate; Lindenmayer, David B.; Wood, Jeffrey T.; Tidemann, Christopher R.

    2013-10-01

    Introduced species pose a major threat to biodiversity across the globe. Understanding the impact of introduced species is critical for effective management. Many species around the world are reliant on tree cavities, and competition for these resources can be intense: threatening the survival of native species. Through the establishment of 225 nest boxes, we examined the relationship between tree density and the abundance and nesting success of three bird species in Canberra, Australia. The common myna ( Acridotheres tristis) is an introduced species in Australia, and the crimson rosella ( Platycercus elegans) and eastern rosella ( Platycercus eximius) are native species. We then investigated the impact of common myna nest box occupation on crimson rosella and eastern rosella abundance. Tree density significantly influenced the abundance and cavity-nesting of all three species. Common myna abundance (birds per square kilometer) was greatest at low tree density sites (101.9 ± 22.4) and declined at medium (45.4 ± 10.1) and high (9.7 ± 3.6) tree density sites. The opposite pattern was observed for the crimson rosella, with greater abundance (birds per square kilometer) at high tree density sites (83.9 ± 9.3), declining over medium (61.6 ± 6.4) and low (31.4 ± 3.9) tree density sites. The eastern rosella was more abundant at medium tree density sites (48.6 ± 8.0 birds per square kilometer). Despite the strong influence of tree density, we found a significant negative relationship between common myna nest box occupancy and the abundance of the crimson rosella ( F 1,13 = 7.548, P = 0.017) and eastern rosella ( F 1,13 = 9.672, P < 0.001) at some sites. We also observed a slight increase in rosella nesting interruptions by the common myna at lower tree densities (high: 1.3 % ± 1.3, medium: 6.6 % ± 2.2, low: 12.7 % ± 6.2), although this increase was not statistically significant ( F 2,40 = 2.435, P = 0.100). Our study provides the strongest evidence to date for the negative impact of the common myna on native bird abundance through cavity-nesting competition. However, due to the strong influence of habitat on species abundance and nesting, it is essential to investigate the impacts of introduced species in conjunction with habitat variation. We also suggest one component of introduced species management could include habitat restoration to reduce habitat suitability for introduced species.

  3. Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 minutes, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients. PMID:19729492

  4. Influence of craniosacral therapy on anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 minutes, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients. PMID:19729492

  5. Giant protist Nummulites and its Eocene environment: Life span and habitat insights from ?18O and ?13C data from Nummulites and Venericardia, Hampshire basin, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purton, Louise M. A.; Brasier, Martin D.

    1999-08-01

    Nummulites are virtually extinct, giant marine protists that reached up to 160 mm diameter during the warmest climatic phase of the Cenozoic. Until now, their life span and paleoenvironmental tolerance have remained enigmatic. Pioneering the use of high-resolution drilling techniques in Nummulites, we show that both N. laevigatus and coeval bivalve Venericardia planicosta from the Lutetian of Hampshire, United Kingdom (ca. 50 42.5 Ma), underwent strong, annual alternations in carbon and oxygen isotopes, possibly reflecting tolerance of broad environmental variation. Our data demonstrate a life span of at least 5 yr for N. laevigatus, and we estimate that the largest species may have lived for more than 100 yr.

  6. Quantifying the effect of habitat availability on species distributions.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Geert; Fieberg, John; Brasseur, Sophie; Matthiopoulos, Jason

    2013-11-01

    1. If animals moved randomly in space, the use of different habitats would be proportional to their availability. Hence, deviations from proportionality between use and availability are considered the tell-tale sign of preference. This principle forms the basis for most habitat selection and species distribution models fitted to use-availability or count data (e.g. MaxEnt and Resource Selection Functions). 2. Yet, once an essential habitat type is sufficiently abundant to meet an individual's needs, increased availability of this habitat type may lead to a decrease in the use/availability ratio. Accordingly, habitat selection functions may estimate negative coefficients when habitats are superabundant, incorrectly suggesting an apparent avoidance. Furthermore, not accounting for the effects of availability on habitat use may lead to poor predictions, particularly when applied to habitats that differ considerably from those for which data have been collected. 3. Using simulations, we show that habitat use varies non-linearly with habitat availability, even when individuals follow simple movement rules to acquire food and avoid risk. The results show that the impact of availability strongly depends on the type of habitat (e.g. whether it is essential or substitutable) and how it interacts with the distribution and availability of other habitats. 4. We demonstrate the utility of a variety of existing and new methods that enable the influence of habitat availability to be explicitly estimated. Models that allow for non-linear effects (using b-spline smoothers) and interactions between environmental covariates defining habitats and measures of their availability were best able to capture simulated patterns of habitat use across a range of environments. 5. An appealing aspect of some of the methods we discuss is that the relative influence of availability is not defined a priori, but directly estimated by the model. This feature is likely to improve model prediction, hint at the mechanism of habitat selection, and may signpost habitats that are critical for the organism's fitness. PMID:23550611

  7. Habitat of early life: Solar X-ray and UV radiation at Earth's surface 4–3.5 billion years ago

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Cnossen; Jorge Sanz-Forcada; Fabio Favata; Olivier Witasse; Tanja Zegers; Neil F. Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Solar X-ray and UV radiation (0.1–320 nm) received at Earth's surface is an important aspect of the circumstances under which life formed on Earth. The quantity that is received depends on two main variables: the emission of radiation by the young Sun and its extinction through absorption and scattering by the Earth's early atmosphere. The spectrum emitted by the Sun

  8. Narratives: A Key to Uncovering Mother-Daughter Influences on Life and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelardin, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of narrative counseling in helping women understand the influence of mother-daughter relationships on their career development. Presents exercises to use in counseling. (Contains 34 references.) (SK)

  9. The influence of habitat availability and landscape structure on the distribution of wood cricket ( Nemobius sylvestris ) on the Isle of Wight, UK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niels C. Brouwers; Adrian C. Newton

    2009-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the landscape ecology of woodland invertebrate species with limited dispersal ability.\\u000a An investigation was therefore conducted within woodland fragments in an agricultural landscape for the flightless wood cricket\\u000a (Nemobius sylvestris) on the Isle of Wight, UK. The current pattern of distribution of the species, established during a field survey, was related\\u000a to measures of habitat

  10. The influence of floodplain habitat on the quantity and quality of riverine phytoplankton carbon produced during the flood season in San Francisco Estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peggy W. Lehman; Ted Sommer; Linda Rivard

    2008-01-01

    Primary productivity, community respiration, chlorophyll a concentration, phytoplankton species composition, and environmental factors were compared in the Yolo Bypass floodplain and\\u000a adjacent Sacramento River in order to determine if passage of Sacramento River through floodplain habitat enhanced the quantity\\u000a and quality of phytoplankton carbon available to the aquatic food web and how primary productivity and phytoplankton species\\u000a composition in these

  11. Influence of recycling rate increase of aseptic carton for long-life milk on GWP reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Lúcia Mourad; Eloisa E. C. Garcia; Gustavo Braz Vilela; Fernando Von Zuben

    2008-01-01

    Tetra Pak, through intensive cooperation with its supply chain, increased the post-consumer recycling rate of the aseptic packaging for long-life milk in the last 10 years. In continuation of a previous study that presented a superior overall performance in terms of reduction of the consumption of natural resources, air emissions and most of the water emissions, the objective of the

  12. Vitamin E status and quality of life in the elderly: influence of inflammatory processes

    PubMed Central

    Capuron, Lucile; Moranis, Aurélie; Combe, Nicole; Cousson-Gélie, Florence; Fuchs, Dietmar; De Smedt-Peyrusse, Véronique; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Layé, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is a characteristic of aging that may lead to alterations in health status and quality of life. In addition to intrinsic biological factors, recent data suggest that poor nutritional habits may largely contribute to this condition. The present study aimed at assessing mental and physical components of quality of life and at determining their relationship to vitamin E status, inflammation and tryptophan (TRP) metabolism in the elderly. Sixty-nine elderly subjects recruited from the Three-City (3C) cohort study participated in the study. Quality of life was assessed using the medical outcomes study (MOS) 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). Biological assays included the measurement of plasma vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), inflammatory markers, including interleukin (IL)-6 and C reactive protein (CRP), and TRP metabolism. Results showed that participants with poor physical health status, as assessed by the SF-36, exhibited lower circulating concentrations of alpha-tocopherol together with increased concentrations of inflammatory markers. Similarly, poor mental health scores on the SF-36 were associated with lower concentrations of alpha-tocopherol, but also with decreased concentrations of TRP. These findings indicate that nutritional status, notably as it relates to vitamin E, is associated with immune function and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:19930773

  13. The influence of birthweight and intrauterine environment on adiposity and fat distribution in later life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I Rogers

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the association between birthweight and body mass index (BMI) and obesity in later life.METHODS: Included in the review were papers appearing in Medline since 1966 and identified using the search terms obesity, body fat, waist, body constitution, birthweight and birth weight. Further papers were identified by examining bibliographies.RESULTS: There is good evidence that there

  14. Does Cognitive Impairment Influence Quality of Life among Nursing Home Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Clark, Daniel; Perkins, Anthony; Arling, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the relationship between cognitive status and quality of life (QOL) of Minnesota nursing home (NH) residents and the relationship between conventional or Alzheimer's special care unit (SCU) placement and QOL. The study may inform development of dementia-specific quality measures. Design and Methods: Data for analyses came…

  15. Influences of Marriage, Motherhood, and Other Life Events on Australian Women's Employment Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Melissa; Lucke, Jayne; Lee, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The study contributes to the understandings of how women negotiate work and family over the life course by investigating what factors impact young women's aspirations for full time, part-time, and other forms of work. Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) with its nationally representative sample of Australian…

  16. Influence of Life Cycle Stage on Family Social Climate and Attitudes Toward the Residential Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Marjorie

    The existing physical forms of housing are not always compatible with prevalent social patterns. To investigate the relationship between family system characteristics and attitudes about residential space, 64 Indiana families in 4 stages of the family life cycle (early years with no children, crowded years with at least one preschool child, peak…

  17. Does Corporate Governance and Ownership Structure Influence Performance? Evidence from Taiwan Life Insurance Companies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li-Ying Huang; Tzy-yih Hsiao; Gene C. Lai

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the relation between corporate governance and performance and the relation between ownership structure and performance in the Taiwanese life insurance industry. We use the value-added approach of data envelopment analysis (DEA) to measure performance. For our first performance measure, which uses premium income as the output variable, we find evidence that proportion of management shareholding, family-controlled insurers,

  18. The Influence of Subjective Life Expectancy on Retirement Transition and Planning: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Barbara; Hesketh, Beryl; Loh, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the construct of subjective life expectancy (SLE), or the estimation of one's probable age of death. Drawing on the tenets of socioemotional selectivity theory (Carstensen, Isaacowitz, & Charles, 1999), we propose that SLE provides individuals with their own unique mental model of remaining time that is likely to affect their…

  19. Can settlement in natal-like habitat explain maladaptive habitat selection?

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Walter H.; Palmer, Michael W.; Banfield, Nathan; Meyer, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    The study of habitat selection has long been influenced by the ideal free model, which maintains that young adults settle in habitat according to its inherent quality and the density of conspecifics within it. The model has gained support in recent years from the finding that conspecifics produce cues inadvertently that help prebreeders locate good habitat. Yet abundant evidence shows that animals often fail to occupy habitats that ecologists have identified as those of highest quality, leading to the conclusion that young animals settle on breeding spaces by means not widely understood. Here, we report that a phenomenon virtually unknown in nature, natal habitat preference induction (NHPI), is a strong predictor of territory settlement in both male and female common loons (Gavia immer). NHPI causes young animals to settle on natal-like breeding spaces, but not necessarily those that maximize reproductive success. If widespread, NHPI might explain apparently maladaptive habitat settlement. PMID:23804619

  20. Can settlement in natal-like habitat explain maladaptive habitat selection?

    PubMed

    Piper, Walter H; Palmer, Michael W; Banfield, Nathan; Meyer, Michael W

    2013-08-22

    The study of habitat selection has long been influenced by the ideal free model, which maintains that young adults settle in habitat according to its inherent quality and the density of conspecifics within it. The model has gained support in recent years from the finding that conspecifics produce cues inadvertently that help prebreeders locate good habitat. Yet abundant evidence shows that animals often fail to occupy habitats that ecologists have identified as those of highest quality, leading to the conclusion that young animals settle on breeding spaces by means not widely understood. Here, we report that a phenomenon virtually unknown in nature, natal habitat preference induction (NHPI), is a strong predictor of territory settlement in both male and female common loons (Gavia immer). NHPI causes young animals to settle on natal-like breeding spaces, but not necessarily those that maximize reproductive success. If widespread, NHPI might explain apparently maladaptive habitat settlement. PMID:23804619

  1. Do major life events influence physical activity among older adults: the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major life events are associated with a change in daily routine and could thus also affect habitual levels of physical activity. Major life events remain largely unexplored as determinants of older adults’ participation in physical activity and sports. This study focused on two major life events, widowhood and retirement, and asked whether these major life events were associated with moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sports participation. Methods Data from the first (1992–93) and second (1995–96) wave of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA), a prospective cohort study among Dutch adults aged 55 and older, were used. Change in marital status and employment status between baseline and follow-up was assessed by self-report. Time spent in MVPA (min/d) and sports participation (yes/no) was calculated based on the LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire. The association of retirement and widowhood with MVPA and sports participation was assessed in separate multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses, respectively. Results Widowhood - N=136 versus 1324 stable married- was not associated with MVPA (B= 3.5 [95%CI:-57.9;64.9]) or sports participation (OR= 0.8 [95%CI:0.5;1.3]). Retired participants (N= 65) significantly increased their time spent in MVPA (B= 32.5 [95%CI:17.8;47.1]) compared to participants who continued to be employed (N= 121), but not their sports participation. Age was a significant effect modifier (B= 7.5 [90%CI:-1.1;13.8]), indicating a greater increase in MVPA in older retirees. Discussion Our results suggest that the associations found varied by the two major life events under investigation. MVPA increased after retirement, but no association with widowhood was seen. PMID:23245568

  2. Relating Habitat and Climatic Niches in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Barnagaud, Jean-Yves; Devictor, Vincent; Jiguet, Frédéric; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Le Viol, Isabelle; Archaux, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Predicting species' responses to the combined effects of habitat and climate changes has become a major challenge in ecology and conservation biology. However, the effects of climatic and habitat gradients on species distributions have generally been considered separately. Here, we explore the relationships between the habitat and thermal dimensions of the ecological niche in European common birds. Using data from the French Breeding Bird Survey, a large-scale bird monitoring program, we correlated the habitat and thermal positions and breadths of 74 bird species, controlling for life history traits and phylogeny. We found that cold climate species tend to have niche positions in closed habitats, as expected by the conjunction of the biogeographic history of birds' habitats, and their current continent-scale gradients. We also report a positive correlation between thermal and habitat niche breadths, a pattern consistent with macroecological predictions concerning the processes shaping species' distributions. Our results suggest that the relationships between the climatic and habitat components of the niche have to be taken into account to understand and predict changes in species' distributions. PMID:22427891

  3. Habitat of early life: Solar X-ray and UV radiation at Earth's surface 4-3.5 billion years ago

    E-print Network

    I. Cnossen; J. Sanz-Forcada; F. Favata; O. Witasse; T. Zegers; N. F. Arnold

    2007-02-20

    Solar X-ray and UV radiation (0.1-320 nm) received at Earth's surface is an important aspect of the circumstances under which life formed on Earth. The quantity that is received depends on two main variables: the emission of radiation by the young Sun and its extinction through absorption and scattering by the Earth's early atmosphere. The spectrum emitted by the Sun when life formed, between 4 and 3.5 Ga, was modeled here, including the effects of flares and activity cycles, using a solar-like star that has the same age now as the Sun had 4-3.5 Ga. Atmospheric extinction was calculated using the Beer-Lambert law, assuming several density profiles for the atmosphere of the Archean Earth. We found that almost all radiation with a wavelength shorter than 200 nm is attenuated effectively, even by very tenuous atmospheres. Longer-wavelength radiation is progressively less well attenuated, and its extinction is more sensitive to atmospheric composition. Minor atmospheric components, such as methane, ozone, water vapor, etc., have only negligible effects, but changes in CO2 concentration can cause large differences in surface flux. Differences due to variability in solar emission are small compared to this. In all cases surface radiation levels on the Archean Earth were several orders of magnitude higher in the 200-300 nm wavelength range than current levels in this range. That means that any form of life that might have been present at Earth's surface 4-3.5 Ga must have been exposed to much higher quantities of damaging radiation than at present.

  4. Significant life experience: Exploring the lifelong influence of place-based environmental and science education on program participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Corrie Ruth

    Current research provides a limited understanding of the life long influence of nonformal place-based environmental and science education programs on past participants. This study looks to address this gap, exploring the ways in which these learning environments have contributed to environmental identity and stewardship. Using Dorothy Holland's approach to social practice theory's understanding of identity formation, this study employed narrative interviews and a close-ended survey to understand past participants' experience over time. Participants from two place-based environmental education programs and one science-inquiry program were asked to share their reflections on their program experience and the influence they attribute to that experience. Among all participants, the element of hands-on learning, supportive instructors, and engaging learning environments remained salient over time. Participants of nature-based programs demonstrated that these programs in particular were formative in contributing to an environmental stewardship identity. Social practice theory can serve as a helpful theoretical framework for significant life experience research, which has largely been missing from this body of research. This study also holds implications for the fields of place-based environmental education, conservation psychology, and sustainability planning, all of which look to understand and increase environmentally sustainable practices.

  5. Evidence that life history characteristics of wild birds influence infection rates and exposure to influenza A viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Craig R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Pearce, John M.; Terenzi, John; Sedinger, James S.; Ip, Hon S.

    2013-01-01

    We report on life history characteristics, temporal, and age-related effects influencing the frequency of occurrence of avian influenza (AI) viruses in four species of migratory geese breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. Emperor geese (Chen canagica), cackling geese (Branta hutchinsii), greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons), and black brant (Branta bernicla), were all tested for active infection of AI viruses upon arrival in early May, during nesting in June, and while molting in July and August, 2006–2010 (n = 14,323). Additionally, prior exposure to AI viruses was assessed via prevalence of antibodies from sera samples collected during late summer in 2009 and 2010. Results suggest that geese are uncommonly infected by low pathogenic AI viruses while in Alaska. The percent of birds actively shedding AI viruses varied annually, and was highest in 2006 and 2010 (1–3%) and lowest in 2007, 2008, and 2009 (95% for emperor geese, a species that spends part of its life cycle in Asia and is endemic to Alaska and the Bering Sea region, compared to 40–60% for the other three species, whose entire life cycles are within the western hemisphere. Birds <45 days of age showed little past exposure to AI viruses, although antibodies were detected in samples from 5-week old birds in 2009. Seroprevalence of known age black brant revealed that no birds <4 years old had seroconverted, compared to 49% of birds ?4 years of age.

  6. Factors influencing the end of the service life of protective gloves used in car repair shops: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Irzma?ska; Agnieszka, Stefko; Katarzyna, Dy?ska-Kukulska

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an end-of-service-life study on 2 kinds of protective gloves designed for workplaces in which workers are exposed to mineral oils and mechanical factors. The authors developed their own end-of-service-life study method that takes into account factors occurring during real-life use of protective gloves. The examined gloves were subjected to mechanical, chemical, and physical factors. The objective of the study was to compare the protective in new gloves subjected to a laboratory simulation test and in gloves used at workplaces in car repair shops. A further goal was to design a glove assessment procedure that would ensure comprehensive analysis of the actual level of performance provided by gloves exposed to selected chemical and mechanical factors as well as subjected to the influence of temperature and humidity, mechanical damage, and chemical degradation of material. The results lead to the conclusion that simultaneous exposure of protective gloves to mechanical, chemical, and physical factors significantly decreases their performance levels. Furthermore, similar performance levels were obtained for gloves subjected to laboratory simulation tests and for those used in the workplace. PMID:24965322

  7. Sexual dysfunction during methadone maintenance treatment and its influence on patient's life and treatment: a qualitative study in South China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yinghua; Zhang, Di; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Wen; He, Qun; Jahn, Heiko J; Li, Xin; Chen, Jun; Hu, Pei; Ling, Li

    2013-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has become an important modality of substitution treatment for opioid addicts in China since 2006. However, data are limited regarding the change in sexual function from heroin use to MMT and the influence of sexual dysfunction (SD) during MMT on patient's life and treatment. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 male and 14 female MMT patients, five of their partners, and three clinicians. The interviews took place in four MMT clinics in Guangdong Province between August 2010 and February 2011. The patients and their partners were asked separately for their perceptions of patient's sexual function during MMT, and the influence of SD on personal/family life and treatment. The main SD problems patients perceived were libido inhibition and decreased sexual pleasure. Methadone was thought to have a stronger inhibition effect on sexual desire than heroin. SD decreased quality of patient's sexual life and damaged intimate relationships. There was a gender difference in coping with SD. Men generally tended to refuse, escape, or alienate their partners. Women tended to hide sexual listlessness, endure sexual activity and tried to satisfy their partners. SD might increase risk of voluntary dropout from treatment and illicit drug use during treatment. Patients with SD did not get any effective therapy from clinicians and they also lacked skills on coping with SD-related problems. Sexual dysfunction prevented patients from reconstructing a normal intimate relationship, and affected stability of maintenance treatment. Response to patient's SD and SD-related problems from clinicians was inadequate. There is a need to develop a clinical guide to deal with both SD itself and SD-related problems. PMID:23092392

  8. Western habitats - Session summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, K.; Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Determining the status of all habitats in the nine western states considered in this symposium is a difficult task. The authors of habitat status papers commented that the diversity of habitat classification systems limited their ability to relate habitat status to raptors. Differences of scale, objectives and survey design have hindered integration of habitat classification methods used by land managers with the habitat relationships understood by wildlife biologists, but examples now exist for successful integration of these methods. We suggest that land managers and wildlife biologists use common survey and classification schemes so that data can be combined and that results will be applicable over broader areas.

  9. Adolescents' perspectives of parental practices influence diabetic adherence and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether perceived parental support and different parenting styles were related to adherence to diabetes management, metabolic control, and perceived quality of life of adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Adolescents between 12 and 18 years of age (N = 102) diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for at least one year participated. Parents were classified into one of four groups (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or neglectful) based on their adolescents' surveyed perceptions of their general support and their overall responsiveness and demandingness. Perceived parental support was significantly correlated with adherence. Adolescents who perceived their parents to have authoritative parenting styles also had better adherence to their prescribed treatment plan as well as better perceived quality of life. Adolescents experience better management outcomes when adolescents and parents become interdependent by working together to achieve these outcomes. PMID:24027952

  10. Influence of host origin on host choice of the parasitoid Dinarmus basalis: does upbringing influence choices later in life?

    PubMed

    Sankara, F; Dabiré, L C B; Ilboudo, Z; Dugravot, S; Cortesero, A M; Sanon, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of volatile compounds from four secondary host plants on the ability of Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to locate, recognize, and parasitize its host, 4(th)instar larvae or pupae of Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). To examine this, strains of D. basalis were transferred from cow-pea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae)) to pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) and two varieties of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds. The ability of D. basalis females to recognize the volatile compounds emanating from their complex host plant was tested by using a Y-tube olfactometer and a three-dimensional device. The results suggest that when females have a choice between pure air and the air emanating from their complex host of origin, they are attracted to the air tainted by the volatile compounds they have become accustomed to. They spent significantly more time (p < 0.0001) in the branch of the tube leading to the odorous air than in the tube leading to the pure air. When females from pigeon pea seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4(th)instar larvae, the familiar odor of pigeon pea seeds were most attractive. When females from Bambara groundnut (white and striped) seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4(th)instar larvae, they were significantly attracted to the odour of cowpea seeds. In the three-dimensional system, the females from the four strains did not appear to have any preference for a given type of seed containing 4(th)instar larvae or pupae. The parasitism rate remained high on all four types of seeds used. These results show that the use of D. basalis as a biological control agent is possible in host changing situations where C. maculatus starts to attack other legumes. The results of this study also provide information supporting the behavioral plasticity of D. basalis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the adaptive phenomena of biological control agents is discussed in the context of the development of adequate methods of pest control. PMID:25373173

  11. Influence of Host Origin on Host Choice of the Parasitoid Dinarmus basalis: Does Upbringing Influence Choices Later in Life?

    PubMed Central

    Sankara, F.; Dabiré, L. C. B.; Ilboudo, Z.; Dugravot, S.; Cortesero, A. M.; Sanon, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of volatile compounds from four secondary host plants on the ability of Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to locate, recognize, and parasitize its host, 4th instar larvae or pupae of Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). To examine this, strains of D. basalis were transferred from cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae)) to pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) and two varieties of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds. The ability of D. basalis females to recognize the volatile compounds emanating from their complex host plant was tested by using a Y-tube olfactometer and a three-dimensional device. The results suggest that when females have a choice between pure air and the air emanating from their complex host of origin, they are attracted to the air tainted by the volatile compounds they have become accustomed to. They spent significantly more time (p < 0.0001) in the branch of the tube leading to the odorous air than in the tube leading to the pure air. When females from pigeon pea seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4th instar larvae, the familiar odor of pigeon pea seeds were most attractive. When females from Bambara groundnut (white and striped) seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4th instar larvae, they were significantly attracted to the odour of cowpea seeds. In the three-dimensional system, the females from the four strains did not appear to have any preference for a given type of seed containing 4th instar larvae or pupae. The parasitism rate remained high on all four types of seeds used. These results show that the use of D. basalis as a biological control agent is possible in host changing situations where C. maculatus starts to attack other legumes. The results of this study also provide information supporting the behavioral plasticity of D. basalis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the adaptive phenomena of biological control agents is discussed in the context of the development of adequate methods of pest control. PMID:25373173

  12. Influence of Motor Symptoms upon the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Gómez-Esteban; J. J. Zarranz; E. Lezcano; B. Tijero; A. Luna; F. Velasco; I. Rouco; I. Garamendi

    2007-01-01

    We studied the impact of various motor and nonmotor symptoms upon quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The study comprised 110 patients with PD (age: 68.6 years, course of the disease: 7.6 years). The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS; I–IV) and Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) were recorded. We recorded the correlations between years of disease and

  13. Food availability and nest predation influence life history traits in Audouin's gull, Larus audouinii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Oro; Roger Pradel; Jean-Dominique Lebreton

    1999-01-01

    The effects of food availability and nest predation on several life history traits such as adult survival, dispersal, and\\u000a reproductive performance were assessed in an Audouin's gull (Larus audouinii) colony during the period 1992–1997. The amounts of fish discarded from trawlers were used as a measure of food availability,\\u000a and a trawling moratorium which partially overlapped with the breeding season

  14. Influence of age on Medicare expenditures and medical care in the last year of life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman G. Levinsky; Wei Yu; Arlene S. Ash; Mark A. Moskowitz; Gail Gazelle; Oolga Saynina; Ezekiel J. Emanuel

    2001-01-01

    CONTEXT: Expenditures for Medicare beneficiaries in the last year of life decrease with increasing age. The cause of this phenomenon is uncertain.\\u000aOBJECTIVES: To examine this pattern in detail and evaluate whether decreases in aggressiveness of medical care explain the phenomenon.\\u000aDESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Analysis of sample Medicare data for beneficiaries aged 65 years or older from Massachusetts (n

  15. The Influence of Genetic Factors and Life Stress on Depression Among Adolescent Girls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy Silberg; Andrew Pickles; Michael Rutter; John Hewitt; Emily Simonoff; Hermine Maes; Rene Carbonneau; Lenn Murrelle; Debra Foley; Lindon Eaves

    1999-01-01

    Background: The possible causes of greater depres- sion among adolescent girls were investigated by exam- ining variation in the influence of genetic and environ- mental risk factors among 182 prepubertal female, 237 prepubertal male, 314 pubertal female, and 171 puber- tal male twin pairs from the Virginia Twin Study of Ado- lescent Behavioral Development. Objectives: To compare the trajectory of

  16. Current Life Concerns of Early Adolescents and Their Mothers: Influence of Maternal HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Mellins, Claude Ann; Block, Megan

    2003-01-01

    This study examined influences of maternal HIV on concerns among inner-city minority families. Findings indicated that beyond concerns reported by early adolescent children of HIV-negative mothers, concerns of children of HIV-positive mothers included mothers' sickness and death, adult responsibilities, and uncertainty about their futures.…

  17. Enchanted Learning: Biomes-Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by Enchanted Learning, this kid-friendly Biome-Habitats website introduces children to many of the earth's biomes. Although the site provides basic information about many different biomes, the main emphasis is on the animals that live in each habitat. From the homepage, site visitors can link to almost twenty separate biome / habitat sites including Desert, Cave, Savanna, and Coral Reef-just too name a few. Each site presents a brief introduction covering general characteristics, such as plant life and climate, and then provides links to many separate animal pages ranging from grasshoppers to eagles. The animal pages feature nice diagrams (that can be printed out for coloring) and basic information about anatomy, diet and more. The Biome-Habitats homepage also contains a simple chart listing differences between biomes including elements such as amount of water, temperature range, and soil quality. (Note: While the site asks for a $20 / year donation, it is free to use and requires no registration or fee).

  18. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  19. Influence of an Intensive, Field-Based Life Science Course on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Environmental Science Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth-Nare, Amy

    2015-05-01

    Personal and professional experiences influence teachers' perceptions of their ability to implement environmental science curricula and to positively impact students' learning. The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine what influence, if any, an intensive field-based life science course and service learning had on preservice teachers' self-efficacy for teaching about the environment and to determine which aspects of the combined field-based course/service learning preservice teachers perceived as effective for enhancing their self-efficacy. Data were collected from class documents and written teaching reflections of 38 middle-level preservice teachers. Some participants (n = 18) also completed the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument at the beginning and end of the semester. Both qualitative and quantitative data analyses indicated a significant increase in PSTs' personal efficacies for environmental teaching, t(17) = 4.50, p = .000, d = 1.30, 95 % CI (.33, .90), but not outcome expectancy, t(17) = 1.15, p = .268, d = .220, 95 % CI (-.06, .20). Preservice teachers reported three aspects of the course as important for enhancing their self-efficacies: learning about ecological concepts through place-based issues, service learning with K-5 students and EE curriculum development. Data from this study extend prior work by indicating that practical experiences with students were not the sole factor in shaping PSTs' self-efficacy; learning ecological concepts and theories in field-based activities grounded in the local landscape also influenced PSTs' self-efficacy.

  20. Inbreeding depression in an insect with maternal care: influences of family interactions, life stage and offspring sex.

    PubMed

    Meunier, J; Kölliker, M

    2013-10-01

    Although inbreeding is commonly known to depress individual fitness, the severity of inbreeding depression varies considerably across species. Among the factors contributing to this variation, family interactions, life stage and sex of offspring have been proposed, but their joint influence on inbreeding depression remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that these three factors jointly shape inbreeding depression in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia. Using a series of cross-breeding, split-clutch and brood size manipulation experiments conducted over two generations, we first showed that sib mating (leading to inbred offspring) did not influence the reproductive success of earwig parents. Second, the presence of tending mothers and the strength of sibling competition (i.e. brood size) did not influence the expression of inbreeding depression in the inbred offspring. By contrast, our results revealed that inbreeding dramatically depressed the reproductive success of inbred adult male offspring, but only had little effect on the reproductive success of inbred adult female offspring. Overall, this study demonstrates limited effects of family interactions on inbreeding depression in this species and emphasizes the importance of disentangling effects of sib mating early and late during development to better understand the evolution of mating systems and population dynamics. PMID:23981229

  1. MODELING PHYSICAL HABITAT PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonid populations can be affected by alterations in stream physical habitat. Fish productivity is determined by the stream's physical habitat structure ( channel form, substrate distribution, riparian vegetation), water quality, flow regime and inputs from the watershed (sedim...

  2. Influences on Bythotrephes longimanus life-history characteristics in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Vanderploeg, Henry A.; Warner, David M.; Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Nalepa, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    We compared Bythotrephes population demographics and dynamics to predator (planktivorous fish) and prey (small-bodied crustacean zooplankton) densities at a site sampled through the growing season in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Erie. Although seasonal average densities of Bythotrephes were similar across lakes (222/m2 Erie, 247/m2 Huron, 162/m2 Michigan), temporal trends in abundance differed among lakes. In central Lake Erie where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by small individuals (60%), where planktivorous fish densities were high (14,317/ha), and where a shallow water column limited availability of a deepwater refuge, the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a small mean body size, large broods with small neonates, allocation of length increases mainly to the spine rather than to the body, and a late summer population decline. By contrast, in Lake Michigan where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by large individuals (72%) and planktivorous fish densities were lower (5052/ha), the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a large mean body size (i.e., 37–55% higher than in Erie), small broods with large neonates, nearly all growth in body length occurring between instars 1 and 2, and population persistence into fall. Life-history characteristics in Lake Huron tended to be intermediate to those found in Lakes Michigan and Erie, reflecting lower overall prey and predator densities (1224/ha) relative to the other lakes. Because plasticity in life history can affect interactions with other species, our findings point to the need to understand life-history variation among Great Lakes populations to improve our ability to model the dynamics of these ecosystems.

  3. Research on Chinese Life Cycle-Based Wind Power Plant Environmental Influence Prevention Measures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanxi; Xu, Jianling; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The environmental impact of wind power plants over their life cycle is divided into three stages: construction period, operation period and retired period. The impact is mainly reflected in ecological destruction, noise pollution, water pollution and the effect on bird migration. In response to these environmental effects, suggesting reasonable locations, reducing plant footprint, optimizing construction programs, shielding noise, preventing pollution of terrestrial ecosystems, implementing combined optical and acoustical early warning signals, making synthesized use of power generation equipment in the post-retired period and using other specific measures, including methods involving governance and protection efforts to reduce environmental pollution, can be performed to achieve sustainable development. PMID:25153474

  4. Habitat patches & landscape in protecting species I. Habitat v. landscape

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    1 Habitat patches & landscape in protecting species I. Habitat v. landscape II. The landscape on non-reserve lands Approaches to solving conservation problems I. Habitat v. landscapes in conservation A. Habitat ­ Habitat Selection ­ a species' use of a habitat type at frequencies that differ from

  5. Habitat modification affects recruitment of abalone in central New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. David AguirreDouglas; Douglas C. McNaught

    2011-01-01

    The habitat experienced during early life-history stages can determine the number and quality of individuals that recruit\\u000a to adult populations. In a field experiment, biogenic habitat complexity was manipulated (presence or absence of foliose macroalgae)\\u000a at two depths (2–3 m and 5–6 m) and the habitat-dependent effects on recruitment of the black foot abalone (Haliotis iris) were examined at three field sites

  6. Symbiotic state influences life-history strategy of a clonal cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Brian L; Dimond, James L; Muller-Parker, Gisèle

    2014-08-22

    Along the North American Pacific coast, the common intertidal sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima engages in facultative, flexible symbioses with Symbiodinium muscatinei (a dinoflagellate) and Elliptochloris marina (a chlorophyte). Determining how symbiotic state affects host fitness is essential to understanding the ecological significance of engaging in such flexible relationships with diverse symbionts. Fitness consequences of hosting S. muscatinei, E. marina or negligible numbers of either symbiont (aposymbiosis) were investigated by measuring growth, cloning by fission and gonad development after 8.5-11 months of sustained exposure to high, moderate or low irradiance under seasonal environmental conditions. Both symbiotic state and irradiance affected host fitness, leading to divergent life-history strategies. Moderate and high irradiances led to a greater level of gonad development in individuals hosting E. marina, while high irradiance and high summer temperature promoted cloning in individuals hosting S. muscatinei and reduced fitness of aposymbiotic anemones. Associating with S. muscatinei may contribute to the success of A. elegantissima as a spatial competitor on the high shore: (i) by offsetting the costs of living under high temperature and irradiance conditions, and (ii) by promoting a high fission rate and clonal expansion. Our results suggest that basic life-history characteristics of a clonal cnidarian can be affected by the identity of the endosymbionts it hosts. PMID:25009060

  7. POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS

    E-print Network

    POTENTAIL HABITAT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVERS ON COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES PROPERTY A Report to Colorado). To identify potential habitat on current and future Colorado Springs Utilities property, the Utility funded a habitat survey conducted by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program at Colorado State University. METHODS

  8. Urban Areas. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview discusses the city as an ecosystem, changing urban habitats, urban wildlife habitats, values of wildlife, habitat management, and…

  9. Differential influence of the 5-HTTLPR genotype, neuroticism and real-life acute stress exposure on appetite and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Capello, Aimée E M; Markus, C Rob

    2014-06-01

    Stress or negative mood often promotes energy intake and overeating. Since the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is found to mediate stress vulnerability as well as to influence energy intake, this gene may also influence the negative effects of stress exposure on overeating. Moreover, since stress proneness also reflects cognitive stress vulnerability - as often defined by trait neuroticism - this may additionally predispose for stress-induced overeating. In the present study it was investigated whether the 5-HTTLPR genotype interacted with neuroticism on changes in mood, appetite and energy intake following exposure to a real-life academic examination stressor. In a balanced-experimental design, homozygous S-allele and L-allele carriers (N?=?94) with the lowest and highest neuroticism scores were selected from a large database of 5-HTTLPR genotyped students. Mood, appetite and energy intake were measured before and after a 2-hour academic examination and compared with a control day. Examination influenced appetite for particular sweet snacks differently depending on 5-HTTLPR genotype and neuroticism. S/S compared with L/L subjects reported greater examination stress, and this was accompanied by a more profound post-stress increase in appetite for sweet snacks. Data also revealed a 5-HTTLPR genotype by trait neuroticism interaction on energy intake, regardless of examination. These results consolidate previous assumptions of 5-HTTLPR involvement in stress vulnerability and suggest 5-HTTLPR and neuroticism may influence stress-induced overeating depending on the type of food available. These findings furthermore link previous findings of increased risk for weight gain in S/S-allele carriers, particularly with high scores on trait neuroticism, to increased energy intake. PMID:24630938

  10. Population viability impacts of habitat additions and subtractions: A simulation experiment with endangered kangaroo rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species viability is influenced by the quality, quantity and configuration of habitat. For species at risk, a principal challenge is to identify landscape configurations that, if realized, would improve a population?s viability or restoration potential. Critical habitat patche...

  11. Quality of life for our patients: how media images and messages: influence their perceptions.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ellen R

    2008-02-01

    Media messages and images shape patients' perceptions about quality of life (QOL) through various "old" media-literature, film, television, and music-and so-called "new" media-the Internet, e-mail, blogs, and cell phones. In this article, the author provides a brief overview of QOL from the academic perspectives of nursing, psychology, behavioral medicine, multicultural studies, and consumer marketing. Selected theories about mass communication are discussed, as well as new technologies and their impact on QOL in our society. Examples of media messages about QOL and the QOL experience reported by patients with cancer include an excerpt from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio interview with author Carol Shields, the 60 Minutes television interview focusing on Elizabeth Edwards (wife of presidential candidate John Edwards), and an excerpt from the 1994 filmThe Shawshank Redemption. Nurses are challenged to think about how they and their patients develop their perceptions about QOL through the media. PMID:18258574

  12. Influence of natural extracts on the shelf life of modified atmosphere-packaged pork patties.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José M; Sineiro, Jorge; Amado, Isabel R; Franco, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this study four natural extracts from tea (TEA), grape (GRA), chestnut (CHE) and seaweed (SEA) with potential antioxidant activity were evaluated in pork patties. During 20 days of storage in modified atmosphere packs at 2°C, pH, colour, lipid oxidation and microbial spoilage parameters of raw minced porcine patties were examined and compared with a synthetic antioxidant (BHT) and control (CON) batch. Due to their higher polyphenol content, GRA and TEA extracts were the most effective antioxidants against lipid oxidation, also limiting colour deterioration. In addition, both natural extracts led to a decrease of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Pseudomonas and psychotropic aerobic bacteria compared to the control. Among the four natural compounds tested, tea and grape extracts showed the most potential as alternatives to commercial antioxidants, for increasing the quality and extending the shelf-life of porcine patties. PMID:24008060

  13. Factors Influencing the Quality of Life (Qol) Among Thai Older People in a Rural Area of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    HONGTHONG, Donnapa; SOMRONGTHONG, Ratana; WARD, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The population prevalence of older people has been growing worldwide. Quality of Life (QoL) among older people is a significant public health concern. Hence, this study aimed to assess level of QoL and factors influencing QoL among rural Thai older people. Methods: The study was undertaken in Phayao Province where is one of the top ten provinces with the highest index of Thai aging. A district in this province was purposively selected to be the study area and the quota-sampling technique was used for sample collection, totally 400 older people participated according to Taro Yamane. The WHO QoL-Old was employed to interview elderly QoL. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the factors influencing QoL among the older people. Results: Over two-thirds of older people (68.5%) had QoL at fair level. The vast majority (96%) had high scores for Activity Daily Living (ADL). Approximately one-fifth (20.5%) reported current smoking and 31.7% reported ever drinking during previous year. Following univariate analysis, nine factors – gender, age, education, working, income, present illness, drinking, ADL, and participating in elderly club were identified as being significantly associated with QoL (P <0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed four factors predictive of QoL among elderly: ADL, income, alcohol drinking, and present illness (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Physical function, health status and financial were the predictor of QoL among elderly. Noticeably, drinking was one predictive factor of QoL but only among moderate drinkers. Hence, healthy life style should be considered as key areas in attempts to promote QoL among elderly people.

  14. Responses of mammals to habitat edges: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Z. Lidicker

    1999-01-01

    Life generates discontinuites (boundaries) in the distribution of matter and energy. One class of these constitutes the edges between habitat-types; these are fundamental structures in landscape functioning, and hence are of central importance in conservation biology. The symposium on which this series of papers is based focused on the responses of mammals to habitat edges. A diversity of views are

  15. Wetlands. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP). Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  16. Deserts. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP). Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  17. Grasslands. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP). Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  18. Temperate Forests. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP). Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  19. How Nature Works. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP). Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  20. Plant origin and ploidy influence gene expression and life cycle characteristics in an invasive weed

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Amanda K; Manter, Daniel K; Bowman, Gillianne; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2009-01-01

    Background Ecological, evolutionary and physiological studies have thus far provided an incomplete picture of why some plants become invasive; therefore we used genomic resources to complement and advance this field. In order to gain insight into the invasive mechanism of Centaurea stoebe we compared plants of three geo-cytotypes, native Eurasian diploids, native Eurasian tetraploids and introduced North American tetraploids, grown in a common greenhouse environment. We monitored plant performance characteristics and life cycle habits and characterized the expression of genes related to constitutive defense and genome stability using quantitative PCR. Results Plant origin and ploidy were found to have a significant effect on both life cycle characteristics and gene expression, highlighting the importance of comparing appropriate taxonomic groups in studies of native and introduced plant species. We found that introduced populations of C. stoebe exhibit reduced expression of transcripts related to constitutive defense relative to their native tetraploid counterparts, as might be expected based on ideas of enemy release and rapid evolution. Measurements of several vegetative traits were similar for all geo-cytotypes; however, fecundity of tetraploids was significantly greater than diploids, due in part to their polycarpic nature. A simulation of seed production over time predicts that introduced tetraploids have the highest fecundity of the three geo-cytotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that characterizing gene expression in an invasive species using populations from both its native and introduced range can provide insight into the biology of plant invasion that can complement traditional measurements of plant performance. In addition, these results highlight the importance of using appropriate taxonomic units in ecological genomics investigations. PMID:19309502

  1. Influence of obesogenic behaviors on health-related quality of life in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Louie, Jimmy C Y; Flood, Victoria M; Burlutsky, George; Hardy, Louise L; Baur, Louise A; Mitchell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the combined effects of obesogenic behaviors on quality of life (QOL) in adolescents. Of 2353 Sydney schoolchildren surveyed (median age 12.7 years), 1,213 were re-examined 5 years later at age 17-18. Children completed activity and food-frequency questionnaires. An unhealthy behavior score was calculated, allocating 1 point for the following: <60 minutes of total physical activity/ day; ?2 hours of screen time/ day; consumed salty snack foods and/or confectionery ?5 times per week; ?1 serves of soft drinks and/or cordial/ day; and not consuming both ?2 serves of fruit and ?3 serves of vegetables/ day. Health-related QOL was assessed by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). The prevalence of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 lifestyle risk factors was 4.2%, 17.1%, 30.7%, 30.5%, 13.9% and 3.6%, respectively. After multivariable- adjustment, children engaging in 5 versus 0 unhealthy behaviors had 9.2-units lower PedsQL physical summary score (ptrend=0.001), five years later. Boys reporting 4 or 5 lifestyle risk factors compared to their peers reporting none or one at baseline, had lower total and physical summary scores at follow-up, ptrend=0.02 and 0.01, respectively. Girls engaging in 4 or 5 versus 0 or 1 unhealthy behaviors, had 4.6-units lower physical summary score (ptrend=0.04), five years later. The number of obesogenic lifestyle risk factors was independently associated with subsequent poorer QOL, particularly physical health, during adolescence. These findings underscore the importance of targeting lifestyle behaviors to promote general well-being and physical functioning in adolescents. PMID:24561980

  2. Spatiotemporal patterns and habitat associations of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) invading salmon-rearing habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, David J.; Olden, Julian D.; Torgersen, Christian E.

    2012-01-01

    1. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) have been widely introduced to fresh waters throughout the world to promote recreational fishing opportunities. In the Pacific Northwest (U.S.A.), upstream range expansions of predatory bass, especially into subyearling salmon-rearing grounds, are of increasing conservation concern, yet have received little scientific inquiry. Understanding the habitat characteristics that influence bass distribution and the timing and extent of bass and salmon overlap will facilitate the development of management strategies that mitigate potential ecological impacts of bass. 2. We employed a spatially continuous sampling design to determine the extent of bass and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) sympatry in the North Fork John Day River (NFJDR), a free-flowing river system in the Columbia River Basin that contains an upstream expanding population of non-native bass. Extensive (i.e. 53 km) surveys were conducted over 2 years and during an early and late summer period of each year, because these seasons provide a strong contrast in the river's water temperature and flow condition. Classification and regression trees were applied to determine the primary habitat correlates of bass abundance at reach and channel-unit scales. 3. Our study revealed that bass seasonally occupy up to 22%of the length of the mainstem NFJDR where subyearling Chinook salmon occur, and the primary period of sympatry between these species was in the early summer and not during peak water temperatures in late summer. Where these species co-occurred, bass occupied 60–76% of channel units used by subyearling Chinook salmon in the early summer and 28–46% of the channel units they occupied in the late summer. Because these rearing salmon were well below the gape limitation of bass, this overlap could result in either direct predation or sublethal effects of bass on subyearling Chinook salmon. The upstream extent of bass increased 10–23 km (2009 and 2010, respectively) as stream temperatures seasonally warmed, but subyearling Chinook salmon were also found farther upstream during this time. 4. Our multiscale analysis suggests that bass were selecting habitat based on antecedent thermal history at a broad scale, and if satisfactory temperature conditions were met, mesoscale habitat features (i.e. channel-unit type and depth) played an additional role in determining bass abundance. The upstream extent of bass in the late summer corresponded to a high-gradient geomorphic discontinuity in the NFJDR, which probably hindered further upstream movements of bass. The habitat determinants and upstream extent of bass were largely consistent across years, despite marked differences in the magnitude and timing of spring peak flows prior to bass spawning.5. The overriding influence of water temperature on smallmouth bass distribution suggests that managers may be able limit future upstream range expansions of bass into salmon-rearing habitat by concentrating on restoration activities that mitigate climate- or land-use-related stream warming. These management activities could be prioritised to capitalise on survival bottlenecks in the life history of bass and spatially focused on landscape knick points such as high-gradient discontinuities to discourage further upstream movements of bass.

  3. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana R. Warren; Madeleine M. Mineau; Eric J. Ward; Clifford E. Kraft

    2010-01-01

    Stream pH and stream habitat have both been identified as important environmental features influencing total fish biomass\\u000a in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass,\\u000a stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from three tributary systems in the northeastern United States. The habitat\\u000a metrics included total pool

  4. The application of predicted habitat models to investigate the spatial ecology of demersal fish assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cordelia H. Moore; Euan S. Harvey; Kimberly Van Niel

    2010-01-01

    Benthic habitats are known to influence the abundance and richness of demersal fish assemblages; however, little is known\\u000a about how habitat structure and composition influences these distributions at very fine scales. We examined how the benthic\\u000a environment structures marine fish assemblages using high-resolution bathymetry and accurate predicted benthic habitat maps.\\u000a Areas characterised by a mosaic of habitat patches supported the

  5. Influence of administration method on oral health-related quality of life assessment using the Oral Health Impact Profile.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Daniel R; John, Mike T; Schierz, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the administration method used to collect oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) data is largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether OHRQoL information obtained using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) differed with different methods of collection (personal interview, via telephone or as a self-administered questionnaire). The OHRQoL was measured using the German version of the OHIP. The instrument was administered to each of 42 patients using three different methods, in a randomized order, about 1 wk apart. The test-retest reliability coefficient for the repeated OHIP assessment across the three methods of administration, and the magnitude of the variance component for administration method, were determined, characterizing the degree of OHIP score variation that is caused by this factor. Whereas OHIP mean score differences of 3.9 points were present between administration methods, the reliability coefficient of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.85-0.95) indicated that 90% of the OHIP score variation was caused by differences between subjects (and not by the administration method or measurement error). The variance component for administration method explained 0.5% of the OHIP score variation. In conclusion, the method of administration (personal interview, telephone interview or self-administered questionnaire) did not influence substantially OHIP scores in prosthodontic patients. PMID:21244515

  6. Divergent pathways to influence: Cognition and behavior differentially mediate the effects of optimism on physical and mental quality of life in Chinese university students.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Jonathan E; Yang, Fang; Pang, Joyce S; Lai, Ching-Man; Ho, Roger Cm; Mak, Kwok-Kei

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has indicated that both cognitive and behavioral variables mediate the positive effect of optimism on quality of life; yet few attempts have been made to accommodate these constructs into a single explanatory framework. Adopting Fredrickson's broaden-and-build perspective, we examined the relationships between optimism, self-rated health, resilience, exercise, and quality of life in 365 Chinese university students using path analysis. For physical quality of life, a two-stage model, in which the effects of optimism were sequentially mediated by cognitive and behavioral variables, provided the best fit. A one-stage model, with full mediation by cognitive variables, provided the best fit for mental quality of life. This suggests that optimism influences physical and mental quality of life via different pathways. PMID:24165861

  7. Effects of Gravity on Cells, Tissues, and Organisms: Their Implications on Habitat and Human Support in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will demonstrate that gravity plays a major role in advanced human life support in a closed habitat. The examples include, but are not limited to, control of purity in drinking water supplies (application of biocides), control of urine in space rodent habitats and operation of space septic tanks (waste management). Our goal is to understand and determine possible mechanisms that describe the process by which cells anchor to a substrate to form dynamic, vibrant communities of cells which influence human health in absence of gravity. The balance of all forces (mechanotransduction) acting on a cell will determine whether a cell thrives and multiplies or dies in a process called apoptosis and/or necrosis. The balance of forces are tightly coupled to the transport of nutrients and metabolic products (biochemotransduction) to and from the cell interface. We will highlight our effort to improve astronaut health by showing that microgravity life support systems have to be designed differently from those on Earth.

  8. Genetic structure in the Amazonian catfish Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii: influence of life history strategies.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Vallejos, F M; Duponchelle, F; Desmarais, E; Cerqueira, F; Querouil, S; Nuñez, J; García, C; Renno, J-F

    2014-08-01

    The Dorado or Plateado (Gilded catfish) Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii (Pimelodidae, Siluriformes) is a commercially valuable migratory catfish performing the largest migration in freshwaters: from the Amazonian headwaters in the Andean foothills (breeding area) to the Amazon estuary (nursery area). In spite of its importance to inform management and conservation efforts, the genetic variability of this species has only recently begun to be studied. The aim of the present work was to determine the population genetic structure of B. rousseauxii in two regions: the Upper Madera Basin (five locations in the Bolivian Amazon) and the Western Amazon Basin (one regional sample from the Uyucalí-Napo-Marañon-Amazon basin, Peru). Length polymorphism at nine microsatellite loci (284 individuals) was used to determine genetic variability and to identify the most probable panmictic units (using a Bayesian approach), after a significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed in the overall dataset (Western Amazon + Upper Madera). Bayesian analyses revealed at least three clusters in admixture in the five locations sampled in the Bolivian Amazon, whereas only two of these clusters were observed in the Western Amazon. Considering the migratory behaviour of B. rousseauxii, different life history strategies, including homing, are proposed to explain the cluster distribution. Our results are discussed in the light of the numerous threats to the species survival in the Madera basin, in particular dam and reservoir construction. PMID:25038864

  9. Telescience concept for habitat monitoring and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl; Johnson, Vicki; Mian, Arshad

    1988-01-01

    The operational environment for life sciences on the Space Station will incorporate telescience, a new set of operational modes for conducting science and operations remotely. This paper presents payload functional requirements for Space Station Life Sciences habitat monitoring and control and describes telescience concepts and technologies which meet these requirements. Special considerations for designing sensors and effectors to accommodate future evolutions in technology are discussed.

  10. The Influence of Obesity-Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on BMI Across the Life Course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Lim, Unhee; Fowke, Jay H.; Love, Shelly-Ann; Fesinmeyer, Megan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Vertilus, Shawyntee; Ritchie, Marilyn D.; Prentice, Ross L.; Pankow, Jim; Monroe, Kristine; Manson, JoAnn E.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Hong, Ching P.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haessler, Jeff; Gross, Myron D.; Goodloe, Robert; Franceschini, Nora; Carlson, Christopher S.; Buyske, Steven; B?žková, Petra; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Matise, Tara C.; Crawford, Dana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Peters, Ulrike; North, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is limited as to whether heritable risk of obesity varies throughout adulthood. Among >34,000 European Americans, aged 18–100 years, from multiple U.S. studies in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Consortium, we examined evidence for heterogeneity in the associations of five established obesity risk variants (near FTO, GNPDA2, MTCH2, TMEM18, and NEGR1) with BMI across four distinct epochs of adulthood: 1) young adulthood (ages 18–25 years), adulthood (ages 26–49 years), middle-age adulthood (ages 50–69 years), and older adulthood (ages ?70 years); or 2) by menopausal status in women and stratification by age 50 years in men. Summary-effect estimates from each meta-analysis were compared for heterogeneity across the life epochs. We found heterogeneity in the association of the FTO (rs8050136) variant with BMI across the four adulthood epochs (P = 0.0006), with larger effects in young adults relative to older adults (? [SE] = 1.17 [0.45] vs. 0.09 [0.09] kg/m2, respectively, per A allele) and smaller intermediate effects. We found no evidence for heterogeneity in the association of GNPDA2, MTCH2, TMEM18, and NEGR1 with BMI across adulthood. Genetic predisposition to obesity may have greater effects on body weight in young compared with older adulthood for FTO, suggesting changes by age, generation, or secular trends. Future research should compare and contrast our findings with results using longitudinal data. PMID:23300277

  11. Influence of pain severity on health-related quality of life in Chinese knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-Long; Zheng, Yu-Xin; Gao, Ning-Yang; Wang, Xue-Zong; Chen, Bo; Gu, Xin-Feng; Yuan, Weian; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Ting; Zhan, Hong-Sheng; Shi, Yin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship among pain and other symptoms intensity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Chinese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: The study was cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational. A convenience sample of 466 patients with knee OA was recruited in the study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration of disease, and Kellgren- Lawrence (KL) scores were recorded. HRQoL and symptoms were assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) index in participants. Results: The sample was predominantly female (82%) with mean age 56.56 years and mean BMI 24.53 kg/m2. We found that WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the majority of SF-36 subscale scores in knee OA patients (P < 0.05). There were no correlations between BMI, duration of disease, KL score and the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores in patients (P > 0.05). In addition, there was a significant correlation between age and PCS, gender and MCS in patients (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed, WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores. WOMAC-pain score had the strongest relationship with SF-36 PCS and MCS scores. Conclusions: In summary, pain severity has a greater impact on HRQoL than patient characteristics, other joint symptoms and radiographic severity in Chinese knee OA patients. Relieving of knee symptoms may help to improve patients’ HRQOL. The study provided the evidence that relieving pain should be the first choice of therapy for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26064371

  12. Do modified habitats have direct or indirect effects on epifauna?

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, E M; Zagal, C J; Chapman, M G; Underwood, A J

    2009-10-01

    Replacing natural habitats with artificial structures such as pier-pilings, jetties, and seawalls has important consequences to abundances of biota. It is, however, not often known whether these are direct (the novel habitat alters abundances of some species) or indirect (the novel habitat directly alters some aspect of the behavior or ecology of some species, which, in turn, alter abundances of other species). Marine animals in some modified habitats in Sydney Harbour provide experimental opportunities to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. Covers of bryozoans and hydroids were greater on kelp growing on pilings than on kelp growing on natural reefs. The epifauna may be affected directly by the pilings or indirectly, i.e., the structure affects characteristics of the kelp which, in turn, influence covers of epifauna. Thus, differences in covers of epifauna on kelp can be due to: (1) factors associated with the primary habitats (pilings vs. reefs), (2) differences between characteristics of the kelp found in each habitat, or (3) an interaction between these factors (habitat and/or type of kelp). Kelp were experimentally transplanted between pilings and reefs, demonstrating that properties of the habitat directly affected covers of epifauna, which were not influenced by the type of kelp that grows on pilings or rocky reefs. Manipulative experiments to unconfound multiple components of habitats influencing disturbances to biota are needed to understand human impacts on natural systems. PMID:19886503

  13. Spatiotemporal variability of stream habitat and movement of three species of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, J.H.; Angermeier, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Relationships between environmental variability and movement are poorly understood, due to both their complexity and the limited ecological scope of most movement studies. We studied movements of fantail (Etheostoma flabellare), riverweed (E. podostemone), and Roanoke darters (Percina roanoka) through two stream systems during two summers. We then related movement to variability in measured habitat attributes using logistic regression and exploratory data plots. We indexed habitat conditions at both microhabitat (i.e., patches of uniform depth, velocity, and substrate) and mesohabitat (i.e., riffle and pool channel units) spatial scales, and determined how local habitat conditions were affected by landscape spatial (i.e., longitudinal position, land use) and temporal contexts. Most spatial variability in habitat conditions and fish movement was unexplained by a site's location on the landscape. Exceptions were microhabitat diversity, which was greater in the less-disturbed watershed, and riffle isolation and predator density in pools, which were greater at more-downstream sites. Habitat conditions and movement also exhibited only minor temporal variability, but the relative influences of habitat attributes on movement were quite variable over time. During the first year, movements of fantail and riverweed darters were triggered predominantly by loss of shallow microhabitats; whereas, during the second year, microhabitat diversity was more strongly related (though in opposite directions) to movement of these two species. Roanoke darters did not move in response to microhabitat-scale variables, presumably because of the species' preference for deeper microhabitats that changed little over time. Conversely, movement of all species appeared to be constrained by riffle isolation and predator density in pools, two mesohabitat-scale attributes. Relationships between environmental variability and movement depended on both the spatiotemporal scale of consideration and the ecology of the species. Future studies that integrate across scales, taxa, and life-histories are likely to provide greater insight into movement ecology than will traditional, single-season, single-species approaches. ?? 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  14. A comparative evaluation of the influence the Boys & Girls Club and Keystone Club programs had on alumni in regards to career and life experiences 

    E-print Network

    Swigert, Tamra Ann

    2009-05-15

    Boys and Girls Club kept me out of prison. It kept me focused in school and on life; and has made me a productive citizen in the society. (Boys & Girls Club alum) This qualitative study evaluated and compared the influence of the Boys & Girls Club...

  15. Susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum life stages exposed to elevated temperatures during heat treatments of a pilot flour mill: influence of sanitation, temperatures attained among mills floors, and costs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of sanitation on responses of life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was investigated in a pilot flour mill subjected to three, 24 hour heat treatments using forced-air gas heaters. Two sanitation levels, dusting of wheat flour an...

  16. Environmental constraints influencing survival of an African parasite in a north temperate habitat: effects of temperature on development within the host.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, R C; York, J E; Stott, L C; Everard, A L E; Chapple, S J; Tinsley, M C

    2011-07-01

    The monogenean Protopolystoma xenopodis has been established in Wales for >40 years following introduction with Xenopus laevis from South Africa. This provides an experimental system for determining constraints affecting introduced species in novel environments. Parasite development post-infection was followed at 15, 20 and 25°C for 15 weeks and at 10°C for ?1 year and correlated with temperatures recorded in Wales. Development was slowed/arrested at ?10°C which reflects habitat conditions for >6 months/year. There was wide variation in growth at constant temperature (body size differing by >10 times) potentially attributable in part to genotype-specific host-parasite interactions. Parasite density had no effect on size but host sex did: worms in males were 1·8 times larger than in females. Minimum time to patency was 51 days at 25°C and 73 days at 20°C although some infections were still not patent at both temperatures by 105 days p.i. In Wales, fastest developing infections may mature within one summer (about 12 weeks), possibly accelerated by movements of hosts into warmer surface waters. Otherwise, development slows/stops in October-April, delaying patency to about 1 year p.i., while wide variation in developmental rates may impose delays of 2 years in some primary infections and even longer in secondary infections. PMID:21733261

  17. Influence of habitat structure and mouth dynamics on avifauna of intermittently-open estuaries: A study of four small South African estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terörde, Anja I.; Turpie, Jane K.

    2013-07-01

    Habitat composition was a major factor in determining waterbird species composition and abundance, particularly the area of floodplain and vegetated channel in four intermittently open estuaries (IOEs) in the warm-temperate coastal biogeographical region of South Africa. Average bird densities on the four estuaries varied from 0.5 to 4.2 birds per hectare, and community composition differed significantly between estuaries. However, the considerable variation in abundance of macrophytes did not have a detectable effect on waterbirds. Under closed mouth conditions, piscivorous birds dominated the avifauna. Each estuary's avifauna responded differently in terms of changes in feeding guild composition when the mouth opened. Bird abundance changed immediately after breaching, but not consistently. Diversity was significantly higher under open-mouth conditions for three of the four estuaries, and species composition was significantly different from that under closed-mouth conditions at all four estuaries. Changes in mouth dynamics as a result of climate change, water abstraction and artificial breaching could lead to significant changes in estuarine fauna.

  18. Habitat patches & landscape in protecting species I. Habitat v. landscape

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    1 Habitat patches & landscape in protecting species I. Habitat v. landscape II. The landscape on non-reserve lands Approaches to solving conservation problems I. Habitat v. landscapes in conservation A. Habitat ­ the physical and biological surroundings of an organism Habitat Selection ­ a species

  19. Effects of spatial habitat heterogeneity on habitat selection and annual fecundity for a migratory forest songbird

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerri L. Cornell; Therese M. Donovan

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how spatial habitat patterns influence abundance and dynamics of animal populations is a primary goal in landscape\\u000a ecology. We used an information-theoretic approach to investigate the association between habitat patterns at multiple spatial\\u000a scales and demographic patterns for black-throated blue warblers (Dendroica caerulescens) at 20 study sites in west-central Vermont, USA from 2002 to 2005. Sites were characterized by:

  20. The influence of social stigma and discriminatory experience on psychological distress and quality of life among rural-to-urban migrants in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2010-07-01

    The global literature has revealed a potential negative impact of social stigma on both physical and mental health among stigmatized individuals; however, the mechanisms through which social stigma affects the individual's quality of life and mental health are not well understood. This research simultaneously examines the relationships of several determinants and mediating factors of psychological distress and quality of life. Data were collected through a cross-sectional survey among 1006 adult (predominantly male) rural-to-urban migrants in 2004-2005 in Beijing, China. Participants reported on their perceived social stigma, discriminatory experiences in daily life, preparation for migration, discrepancy between expectation and reality, coping with stigma-related stress, psychological distress, and quality of life. Structural equation modeling was performed. We found that perceived social stigma and discriminatory experiences had direct negative effects on psychological distress and quality of life among rural-to-urban migrants. Expectation-reality discrepancy mediated the effects of perceived social stigma and discriminatory experiences on psychological distress and quality of life; coping mediated the effect of social stigma on quality of life. Psychological distress was associated with quality of life. Preparation prior to migration was positively related to coping skills, which were positively related to quality of life. We conclude that perceived social stigma and daily discriminatory experiences have a significant influence on psychological distress and quality of life among rural-to-urban migrants. Pre-migration training with a focus on establishment of effective coping skills and preparation of migration may be helpful to improve their quality of life and mental health. PMID:20403653

  1. Influence of melatonin supplementation on serum antioxidative properties and impact of the quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Pierzchala, K; Sowa, P; Polaniak, R; Kukla, M; Hartel, M

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and sunlight's ultraviolet radiation was proved. Oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenic traits of MS. Melatonin possesses antioxidative properties and regulates circadian rhythms. Several studies have reported that the quality of life is worse in patients with MS than in healthy controls, with a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances, depression and fatigue. The aim of study was to evaluate 5 mg daily melatonin supplementation over 90 days on serum malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and its' influence on impact of the quality of life of MS patients. A case-control prospective study was performed on 102 MS patients and 20 controls matched for age and sex. The EDSS, MRI examinations and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) questionnaire was completed. Marked increase in serum MDA concentration in all MS patients groups was observed and after melatonin treatment decreased significantly in interferons-beta and glatiramer acetate-treated groups, but not in mitoxantrone-treated group. A significant increase in SOD activity compared to controls only in glatiramer acetate-treated group was observed. After 3 months melatonin supplementation the SOD activity increased compared to initial values in interferons beta-treated groups. A significant increase in both MSIS-29-PHYS and MSIS-29-PSYCH items mean scores only in the MX group as compared to other groups was observed. There were no significant differences in mean MSIS-29-PHYS was observed before and after melatonin therapy. Melatonin supplementation caused a decrease in mean MSIS-29-PSYCH scores compared to initial values in interferons beta-treated groups. Finding from our study suggest that melatonin can act as an antioxidant and improves reduced quality in MS patients. PMID:25179086

  2. Caesarean Section: Could Different Transverse Abdominal Incision Techniques Influence Postpartum Pain and Subsequent Quality of Life? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Quaranta, Michela; Cosmi, Erich; D’Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Ambrosini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The choice of the type of abdominal incision performed in caesarean delivery is made chiefly on the basis of the individual surgeon’s experience and preference. A general consensus on the most appropriate surgical technique has not yet been reached. The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to compare the two most commonly used transverse abdominal incisions for caesarean delivery, the Pfannenstiel incision and the modified Joel-Cohen incision, in terms of acute and chronic post-surgical pain and their subsequent influence in terms of quality of life. Electronic database searches formed the basis of the literature search and the following databases were searched in the time frame between January 1997 and December 2013: MEDLINE, EMBASE Sciencedirect and the Cochrane Library. Key search terms included: “acute pain”, “chronic pain”, “Pfannenstiel incision”, “Misgav-Ladach”, “Joel Cohen incision”, in combination with “Caesarean Section”, “abdominal incision”, “numbness”, “neuropathic pain” and “nerve entrapment”. Data on 4771 patients who underwent caesarean section (CS) was collected with regards to the relation between surgical techniques and postoperative outcomes defined as acute or chronic pain and future pregnancy desire. The Misgav-Ladach incision was associated with a significant advantage in terms of reduction of post-surgical acute and chronic pain. It was indicated as the optimal technique in view of its characteristic of reducing lower pelvic discomfort and pain, thus improving quality of life and future fertility desire. Further studies which are not subject to important bias like pre-existing chronic pain, non-standardized analgesia administration, variable length of skin incision and previous abdominal surgery are required. PMID:25646621

  3. Caesarean section: could different transverse abdominal incision techniques influence postpartum pain and subsequent quality of life? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Quaranta, Michela; Cosmi, Erich; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Ambrosini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The choice of the type of abdominal incision performed in caesarean delivery is made chiefly on the basis of the individual surgeon's experience and preference. A general consensus on the most appropriate surgical technique has not yet been reached. The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to compare the two most commonly used transverse abdominal incisions for caesarean delivery, the Pfannenstiel incision and the modified Joel-Cohen incision, in terms of acute and chronic post-surgical pain and their subsequent influence in terms of quality of life. Electronic database searches formed the basis of the literature search and the following databases were searched in the time frame between January 1997 and December 2013: MEDLINE, EMBASE Sciencedirect and the Cochrane Library. Key search terms included: "acute pain", "chronic pain", "Pfannenstiel incision", "Misgav-Ladach", "Joel Cohen incision", in combination with "Caesarean Section", "abdominal incision", "numbness", "neuropathic pain" and "nerve entrapment". Data on 4771 patients who underwent caesarean section (CS) was collected with regards to the relation between surgical techniques and postoperative outcomes defined as acute or chronic pain and future pregnancy desire. The Misgav-Ladach incision was associated with a significant advantage in terms of reduction of post-surgical acute and chronic pain. It was indicated as the optimal technique in view of its characteristic of reducing lower pelvic discomfort and pain, thus improving quality of life and future fertility desire. Further studies which are not subject to important bias like pre-existing chronic pain, non-standardized analgesia administration, variable length of skin incision and previous abdominal surgery are required. PMID:25646621

  4. Gender roles and their influence on life prospects for women in urban Karachi, Pakistan: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tazeen S.; Krantz, Gunilla; Gul, Raisa; Asad, Nargis; Johansson, Eva; Mogren, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Background Pakistan is a patriarchal society where men are the primary authority figures and women are subordinate. This has serious implications on women's and men's life prospects. Objective The aim was to explore current gender roles in urban Pakistan, how these are reproduced and maintained and influence men's and women's life circumstances. Design Five focus group discussions were conducted, including 28 women representing employed, unemployed, educated and uneducated women from different socio-economic strata. Manifest and latent content analyses were applied. Findings Two major themes emerged during analysis: ‘Reiteration of gender roles’ and ‘Agents of change’. The first theme included perceptions of traditional gender roles and how these preserve women's subordination. The power gradient, with men holding a superior position in relation to women, distinctive features in the culture and the role of the extended family were considered to interact to suppress women. The second theme included agents of change, where the role of education was prominent as well as the role of mass media. It was further emphasised that the younger generation was more positive to modernisation of gender roles than the elder generation. Conclusions This study reveals serious gender inequalities and human rights violations against women in the Pakistani society. The unequal gender roles were perceived as static and enforced by structures imbedded in society. Women routinely faced serious restrictions and limitations of autonomy. However, attainment of higher levels of education especially not only for women but also for men was viewed as an agent towards change. Furthermore, mass media was perceived as having a positive role to play in supporting women's empowerment. PMID:22065609

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Habitat, breeding performance, diet and individual age

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Nadir

    of the Barn Owl Tyto alba, we assessed the influence of the landscape structure on breeding performance structure Á Home range habitat Á Habitat preference Á GIS Á Tyto alba Introduction Changes in agricultural and Gutierrez 2007). The Barn Owl (Tyto alba) has a worldwide distribution range (Taylor 1994), and populations

  6. Blue whale habitat and prey in the California Channel Islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul C. Fiedler; Stephen B. Reilly; Roger P. Hewitt; David Demer; Valerie A. Philbrick; Susan Smith; Wesley Armstrong; Donald A. Croll; Bernie R. Tershy; Bruce R. Mate

    1998-01-01

    Whale Habitat and Prey Studies were conducted off southern California during August 1995 (WHAPS95) and July 1996 (WHAPS96) to (1) study the distribution and activities of blue whales and other large whales, (2) survey the distribution of prey organisms (krill), and (3) measure physical and biological habitat variables that influence the distribution of whales and prey. A total of 1307

  7. Habitat associations of American badgers in southeastern British Columbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clayton D. Apps; Nancy J. Newhouse; Trevor A. Kinley

    2002-01-01

    American badgers (Taxidea taxus) are endangered in British Columbia due to habitat loss and human-caused mortality. To better understand human impacts and to promote conservation planning, we described badger habitat rela- tionships. At two spatial scales, we analyzed selection by 12 radio-implanted resident badgers for soil composition, for - est overstory, land cover, vegetation productivity, terrain, and human influence. At

  8. Phenotype management: a new approach to habitat restoration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason V. Watters; Sean C. Lema; Gabrielle A. Nevitt

    2003-01-01

    The goal of habitat restoration is to provide environmental conditions that promote the maintenance and growth of target populations. But rarely is it considered how the allocation of resources influences the diversity of phenotypes in these populations. Here we present a framework for considering how habitat restoration can shape the development and expression of phenotypes. We call this approach phenotype

  9. Habitat Specialization in Tropical Continental Shelf Demersal Fish Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M.; Harvey, Euan S.; Heyward, Andrew J.; Twiggs, Emily J.; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n?=?304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1–10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10–30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30–110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected habitats through which fish can migrate. PMID:22761852

  10. Habitat selection influences sex distribution, morphology, tissue biochemistry, and parasite load of juvenile coho salmon in the West Fork Smith River, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the strong influence of water temperature on salmonid physiology and behavior, in the summers of 2004 and 2005 we studied juvenile male and female coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in two reaches of Oregon?s West Fork Smith River with different thermal profiles. Our goals we...

  11. India Habitat Centre

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The India Habitat Centre(IHC) was created in New Delhi, India, to "provide a physical environment [to] serve as a catalyst for a synergetic relationship between individuals and institutions working in diverse habitat related areas." Their website gives visitors a generous glimpse into what it is like to enjoy such features as the "Habitat Film Club", "Habitat Learning Centre", and the "IHC Visual Arts Gallery". Like a multi-faceted community center, the IHC houses a "Habitat Library & Resource Centre" and offers a monthly "Habitat Walk", among other activities. The "Habitat Walk" gives community members the opportunity to visit various natural and historical sites, and provides several pages of background on the sites that visitors can download or print from the "Habitat Walk" link on the website. The center also reaches out and empowers the community by encouraging students and non-students to participate in their annual contest for the Habitat Young Visionary Award, a photography fellowship, and in the recent past, internships in a non-governmental organization.

  12. Habitat specialization through germination cueing: a comparative study of herbs from forests and open habitats

    PubMed Central

    ten Brink, Dirk-Jan; Hendriksma, Harmen Pieter; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims This study examined the adaptive association between seed germination ecology and specialization to either forest or open habitats across a range of evolutionary lineages of seed plants, in order to test the hypotheses that (1) species' specialization to open vs. shaded habitats is consistently accompanied by specialization in their regeneration niche; and (2) species are thereby adapted to utilize different windows of opportunity in time (season) and space (habitat). Methods Seed germination response to temperature, light and stratification was tested for 17 congeneric pairs, each consisting of one forest species and one open-habitat species. A factorial design was used with temperature levels and diurnal temperature variation (10 °C constant, 15–5 °C fluctuating, 20 °C constant, 25–15 °C fluctuating), and two light levels (light and darkness) and a cold stratification treatment. The congeneric species pair design took phylogenetic dependence into account. Key Results Species from open habitats germinated better at high temperatures, whereas forest species performed equally well at low and high temperatures. Forest species tended to germinate only after a period of cold stratification that could break dormancy, while species from open habitats generally germinated without cold stratification. The empirically derived germination strategies correspond quite well with establishment opportunities for forest and open-habitat plant species in nature. Conclusions Annual changes in temperature and light regime in temperate forest delimit windows of opportunity for germination and establishment. Germination strategies of forest plants are adaptations to utilize such narrow windows in time. Conversely, lack of fit between germination ecology and environment may explain why species of open habitats generally fail to establish in forests. Germination strategy should be considered an important mechanism for habitat specialization in temperate herbs to forest habitats. The findings strongly suggest that phases in the plant life cycle other than the established phase should be considered important in adaptive specialization. PMID:23186835

  13. Exploring factors influencing asthma control and asthma-specific health-related quality of life among children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about factors contributing to children’s asthma control status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The study objectives were to assess the relationship between asthma control and asthma-specific HRQoL in asthmatic children, and to examine the extent to which parental health literacy, perceived self-efficacy with patient-physician interaction, and satisfaction with shared decision-making (SDM) contribute to children’s asthma control and asthma-specific HRQoL. Methods This cross-sectional study utilized data collected from a sample of asthmatic children (n?=?160) aged 8–17 years and their parents (n?=?160) who visited a university medical center. Asthma-specific HRQoL was self-reported by children using the National Institutes of Health’s Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric Asthma Impact Scale. Satisfaction with SDM, perceived self-efficacy with patient-physician interaction, parental health literacy, and asthma control were reported by parents using standardized measures. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to test the hypothesized pathways. Results Path analysis revealed that children with better asthma control reported higher asthma-specific HRQoL (??=?0.4, P?influenced their asthma-specific HRQoL. However, parental factors such as perceived self-efficacy with patient-physician interaction and satisfaction with shared decision-making indirectly influenced children’s asthma control status and asthma-specific HRQoL. PMID:23432913

  14. Genes in Streams: Using DNA to Understand the Movement of Freshwater Fauna and Their Riverine Habitat

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jane Hughes (Griffith University; Australian Rivers Institute)

    2009-07-01

    Today, decisions regarding the management and conservation of populations are often informed to some degree by population genetics. A fundamental measure sought by decisionmakers is the degree of connectivity between populations, which, when approached from a genetic perspective, may be influenced by many factors, making it difficult to generalize across taxa, habitats, or life histories. In the case of freshwater-limited fauna, the shared constraint of habitat structure (e.g., a dendritic stream network) imposed on all species in the system simplifies the task. A number of models have been proposed that predict how populations of taxa with different life-history traits and dispersal capabilities interact within structured freshwater habitats of this kind. In this article, we summarize these models and illustrate the general patterns of phylogeographic structure expected to occur under different scenarios of freshwater population connectivity. Additionally, we describe how the genetic structure of stream inhabitants can reflect historical changes in the physical structure of streams and thus open a window on past patterns of connectivity. A greater understanding of these concepts will contribute to an improved multidisciplinary approach to managing freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Aquatic Life and Habitat Inventory Assessment

    E-print Network

    Belzer, Wayne

    of the upper Pecos and 5 at Langtry to be low. Primarily pollution tolerant species were collected and no intolerant species were collected. Fish collected included red shiners, gambusia, carp, shad, sheepshead minnows, plains killifish and some sunfish.... The assessment of the collection from the Orla site also exhibited a limited/intermediate index value. The fish study collected 8 species comprised mostly of red shiners, silversides and gulf killifish. Reasons cited for the low diversity and abundance...

  16. Aquatic Life and Habitat Inventory Assessment 

    E-print Network

    Belzer, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    higher. The index for fish is still only limited but the number of different species is greater with the inclusion of blacktail shiners and gar. The index is not higher due to the increased diversity because the species are all still pollution...

  17. Pretreatment factors significantly influence quality of life in cancer patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin [Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)]. E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Scott, Charles [RTOG Headquarters, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the impact of pretreatment factors on quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. Methods and Materials Pretreatment QOL (via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], version 2) was obtained in 1,428 patients in several prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials including nonmetastatic head-and-neck (n = 1139), esophageal (n = 174), lung (n = 51), rectal (n = 47), and prostate (n = 17) cancer patients. Clinically meaningful differences between groups were defined as a difference of 1 standard error of measurement (SEM). Results The mean FACT score for all patients was 86 (20.7-112) with SEM of 5.3. Statistically significant differences in QOL were observed based on age, race, Karnofsky Performance Status, marital status, education level, income level, and employment status, but not by gender or primary site. Using the SEM, there were clinically meaningful differences between patients {<=}50 years vs. {>=}65 years. Hispanics had worse QOL than whites. FACT increased linearly with higher Karnofsky Performance Status and income levels. Married patients (or live-in relationships) had a better QOL than single, divorced, or widowed patients. College graduates had better QOL than those with less education. Conclusion Most pretreatment factors meaningfully influenced baseline QOL. The potentially devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis, particularly in young and minority patients, must be addressed.

  18. Habitat filters in fungal endophyte community assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal endophytes can influence host health, and more broadly, can instigate trophic cascades with effects scaling to the ecosystem level. Despite this, biotic mechanisms of endophyte community assembly are largely unknown. We used maize to investigate three potential habitat filters in endophyte co...

  19. Linking Demographic Processes of Juvenile Corals to Benthic Recovery Trajectories in Two Common Reef Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Doropoulos, Christopher; Ward, Selina; Roff, George; González-Rivero, Manuel; Mumby, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical reefs are dynamic ecosystems that host diverse coral assemblages with different life-history strategies. Here, we quantified how juvenile (<50 mm) coral demographics influenced benthic coral structure in reef flat and reef slope habitats on the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Permanent plots and settlement tiles were monitored every six months for three years in each habitat. These environments exhibited profound differences: the reef slope was characterised by 95% less macroalgal cover, and twice the amount of available settlement substrata and rates of coral settlement than the reef flat. Consequently, post-settlement coral survival in the reef slope was substantially higher than that of the reef flat, and resulted in a rapid increase in coral cover from 7 to 31% in 2.5 years. In contrast, coral cover on the reef flat remained low (~10%), whereas macroalgal cover increased from 23 to 45%. A positive stock-recruitment relationship was found in brooding corals in both habitats; however, brooding corals were not directly responsible for the observed changes in coral cover. Rather, the rapid increase on the reef slope resulted from high abundances of broadcast spawning Acropora recruits. Incorporating our results into transition matrix models demonstrated that most corals escape mortality once they exceed 50 mm, but for smaller corals mortality in brooders was double those of spawners (i.e. acroporids and massive corals). For corals on the reef flat, sensitivity analysis demonstrated that growth and mortality of larger juveniles (21–50 mm) highly influenced population dynamics; whereas the recruitment, growth and mortality of smaller corals (<20 mm) had the highest influence on reef slope population dynamics. Our results provide insight into the population dynamics and recovery trajectories in disparate reef habitats, and highlight the importance of acroporid recruitment in driving rapid increases in coral cover following large-scale perturbation in reef slope environments. PMID:26009892

  20. Population ecology of house mice in unstable habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1979-01-01

    (1) The relationships between habitat change and house mouse populations were studied by monthly live trapping in a corn-wheat-hay rotation on a small Maryland farm. (2) Population density reached 53.0/ha in a wheat/hay field in October and 25.4/ha in corn in September. Populations increased by immigration as wheat or corn grew and ripened and decreased by emigration as hay became tall and dense. (3) Survival rates were high in winter in the relatively stable habitat of the wheat/hay field; they were Iow throughout the summer in both fields, and were reduced by corn harvest, less so by wheat harvest. If they were related to population density or increase, or to breeding condition, the relationships were obscured by the overriding influence of habitat change. (4) In the spring, when the population in the hay field 'crashed,' essentially the entire population moved from long-established ranges in the hay field to the field of ripening wheat, where new ranges were established. In the new field, fewer than 30% of the old associations between individuals persisted. (5) Individual mice maintained home ranges (88.1 + 6.1 m in length) in the same general area during their residence in a field. Ranges shifted from month to month, perhaps in response to changes in populations and habitat; exploratory travels and other movements also modified home range behaviour. (6) Minimum life expectancy (residence time) was greater from November (4-5 months) than from June/July (1-2 months). Maximum individual age was 17 months. (7) The demographic pattern fell at the r extreme of the r-K continuum. Mice bred from May to October matured and produced litters rapidly, produced several litters in a season, and had a high turnover rate. (8) It was concluded that migration was a primary mechanism of population regulation in the cropfield mosaic and that it was driven by habitat change, a system in contrast to those described for house mice in confined conditions.

  1. The Habitat Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Project is a multiday, differentiated, interdisciplinary environmental science lesson that incorporates skill-building and motivational strategies to internalize ecosystem vocabulary. Middle school students research an animal, display its physical characteristics on a poster, build a three-dimensional habitat and present their work…

  2. Schoolyard Habitat Project Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Rich

    This project aims to provide basic steps for students to restore and create wildlife habitats on school grounds. Four chapters are included in this guide, and each chapter is divided into teacher and student sections. Chapter 1 provides necessary information for starting a habitat project. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 discuss the details for the Forest…

  3. Rocky Intertidal Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource describes the rocky intertidal habitats of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and their biological diversity, distribution patterns, temporal changes, links to other habitats and assemblages, and management issues. Supporting materials include photos, tables, figures, and in-text definitions.

  4. Habitat Fragmentation and Interspecific

    E-print Network

    83 Chapter 4 Habitat Fragmentation and Interspecific Competition: Implications for Lynx Conservation Steven W. Buskirk, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, P.O. Box 3166 Blvd., Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada Abstract--Habitat fragmentation and interspecific competition

  5. Animal Habitat MEA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    jennifer zagarella

    2012-07-31

    Animal Habitat MEA is where the students will help a pet store choose which habitat they should buy to house their snake and lizard families. The students will solve an open-ended problem and give details on the process that they used to solve the problem.

  6. Home Sweet Habitat

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-03-01

    This lesson demonstrates how students can compare and contrast different types of habitats. The lesson provides the opportunity for students to apply reading concepts while encountering nonfiction text. This lesson provides students with the opportunity to read and discuss various nonfiction selections about habitats and includes a jigsaw learning activity.

  7. An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Habitat Restoration Projects with Emphasis on Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary, 2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.; Thom, R.; Whiting, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-11-01

    Habitat restoration in the Columbia River estuary (CRE) is an important off-site mitigation action in the 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), an operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The CRE, defined as the tidally influenced stretch of river from the mouth to Bonneville Dam 146 miles upstream, is part of the migration pathway for anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin, including salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Salmon in various stages of life, from fry to adults, use tidal channels and wetlands in the CRE to feed, find refuge from predators, and transition physiologically from freshwater to saltwater. Over the last 100 years, however, the area of some wetland habitats has decreased by as much as 70% because of dike and levee building, flow regulation, and other activities. In response to the decline in available habitat, the BiOp's Reasonable and Prudent Alternative (RPA) included mandates to 'develop a plan addressing the habitat needs of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the estuary' (RPA Action 159) and 'develop and implement an estuary restoration program with a goal of protecting and enhancing 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats' (RPA Action 160). To meet Action 159 and support Action 160, this document develops a science-based approach designed to improve ecosystem functions through habitat restoration activities in the CRE. The CRE habitat restoration program's goal and principles focus on habitat restoration projects in an ecosystem context. Since restoration of an entire ecosystem is not generally practical, individual habitat restoration projects have the greatest likelihood of success when they are implemented with an ecosystem perspective. The program's goal is: Implementation of well-coordinated, scientifically sound projects designed to enhance, protect, conserve, restore, and create 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats to aid rebuilding of ESA-listed salmon populations and native species using the CRE. The program's underlying principles are: (1) projects are founded on the best available ecological restoration science, implemented in an ecosystem context, and developed with the intent to restore relevant ecological processes; (2) projects incorporate adaptive management practices with testable hypotheses to track ecological responses to a given restoration effort; and (3) projects are implemented in a coordinated, open process and scientific results from monitoring and evaluation are communicated widely and readily accessible. With this goal and these principles in mind, we developed an approach for CRE habitat restoration. The intent of this document is to provide a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. The stepwise approach to CRE habitat restoration outlined is somewhat general and broad because the available scientific information is incomplete, e.g., juvenile salmon usage of various CRE wetland habitats. As new data become available, a more specific, detailed plan than was possible here can be produced as an outgrowth of this document. In conclusion, this document provides a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. As more experience is gained with CRE habitat restoration and scientific uncertainties are resolved, this document should be used as a basis for a detailed habitat restoration plan that specifically addresses (1) which habitat types offer the greatest ecological benefit to salmon, (2) the location of potential sites that if restored would likely provide these habitat types, and (3) how and when the restoration work should be done. This document supports the use of adaptive management so that all elements of salmonid habitat restoration actions in the CRE are under continual evaluation and revision at both the project and program levels. Lessons learned from curre

  8. Habitat quality and population density drive occupancy dynamics of snowshoe hare in variegated landscapes

    E-print Network

    and population density. We examined the relative influence of area, structural isolation, habitat quality, local be able to use, or move through, many habitat types of differing quality, area and isolation may be less610 Habitat quality and population density drive occupancy dynamics of snowshoe hare in variegated

  9. Effects of oak barrens habitat management for Karner blue butterfly ( Lycaeides samuelis) on the avian community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric M. Wood; Anna M. Pidgeon; Claudio Gratton; Timothy T. Wilder

    The federally endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides samuelis) is the focal species for a conservation plan designed to create and maintain barrens habitats. We investigated whether habitat management for Karner blue butterflies influences avian community structure at Fort McCoy Military Installation in Wisconsin, USA. From 2007 through 2009 breeding bird point count and habitat characteristic data were collected at 186

  10. Patterns of bird abundance and habitat use in rice fields of the Kanto Plain, central Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taku Maeda

    2001-01-01

    Rice fields, the most widespread cropland in Japan, provide important habitat for birds, but few studies have examined bird communities that are influenced by agriculture in rice fields. I studied the seasonal pattern of bird abundance and their habitat preferences in terms of agricultural habitats in the rice fields of the central Kanto Plain, central Japan. In total, 19 waterbird

  11. EVALUATION OF THE RELATIVE SUITABILITY OF POTENTIAL JAGUAR HABITAT IN NEW MEXICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KURT A. MENKE; CHARLES L. HAYES

    We conducted a spatial analysis of potential habitat for the jaguar (Panthera onca) in New Mexico. We used a geographic information system (GIS) model to combine data layers for landscape features influencing suitability for jaguar habitat, and created a composite potential habitat map. The model predicted two areas with the highest probability of being able to support jaguars in New

  12. RioGrande Wild Turkey Life History and Management Calendar 

    E-print Network

    Locke, Shawn; Cathey, James; Collier, Bret; Hardin, Jason

    2008-05-08

    This calendar is for landowners and managers who want to manage and improve their wild turkey habitat. The calendar is in easy-to-follow chart form and shows important annual events pertaining to wild turkey life history, habitat management...

  13. Lugworm ( Abarenicola affinis) in seagrass and unvegetated habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerlitz, Stefan; Berkenbusch, Katrin; Probert, P. Keith

    2015-06-01

    In Otago, southern New Zealand, the lugworm Abarenicola affinis resides in neighbouring tidal inlets with and without seagrass ( Zostera muelleri). A comparison of abundance, body size and biomass of A. affinis between seagrass habitat (Papanui Inlet) and unvegetated habitat (Hoopers Inlet) showed little seasonal variation of these parameters in each habitat and relatively similar abundances between both habitats. In contrast, lugworm biomass was considerably lower in the seagrass habitat due to the lack of large individuals compared with unvegetated habitat. In the seagrass habitat, there was a significant negative influence of Z. muelleri below-ground biomass on abundance and biomass of A. affinis, indicating that seagrass affected lugworm burrowing and/or feeding processes. In contrast to the unvegetated habitat, where lugworms spread relatively evenly across the intertidal area, lugworms were mostly restricted to the upper intertidal zone in the seagrass habitat. The findings suggest that the extensive seagrass bed in the mid and low intertidal zones of Papanui Inlet limited lugworm distribution in an otherwise suitable habitat. Whereas small lugworms colonised seagrass areas, the largest individuals occurred only in unvegetated sediment and seemed to be more hampered by the presence of seagrass than smaller individuals. The findings highlight negative feedback between antagonistic ecosystem engineers, with the potential of seagrass physical structures (autogenic engineering) to impact negatively on lugworm activity (allogenic engineering).

  14. Effects of habitat modification on coastal fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Wen, C K-C; Pratchett, M S; Shao, K-T; Kan, K-P; Chan, B K K

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of anthropogenic modification of coastal habitats on fish assemblages in Taiwan, comparing the abundance, species richness and taxonomic composition of fishes on natural v. artificial habitats. While there was no significant variation in the abundance or richness of fishes between natural and artificial habitats, the species composition of fishes in artificial habitats was significantly different from that of natural habitats. Natural reefs were characterized by greater abundance of Stethojulis spp. (Labridae), Abudefduf spp. (Pomacentridae) and Thalassoma spp. (Labridae), whereas anthropogenic habitats were dominated by Parupeneus indicus (Mullidae), Pempheris oualensis (Pempheridae) and Parapriacanthus ransonneti (Pempheridae). In general, it appears that specialist reef-associated species are being replaced with fishes that are much more generalist in their habitat-use. The loss of natural coastal habitats may threaten some species that cannot live in anthropogenically altered habitats, though the overall abundance and diversity of coastal fishes was not significantly different between natural and artificial habitats in Taiwan. PMID:21078026

  15. Influence of Self-Reported Chronic Rhinosinusitis on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Chun-Quan; Guo, Cui; Shen, Shuang-Quan; Xu, Geng; Shi, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a frequently occurring chronic respiratory disease. There is evidence that effective treatment of CRS can improve patients’ quality of life, but the data regarding the extent to which CRS impairs patients’ quality of life (QoL) is sparse. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-reported CRS on health-related QoL and to determine whether the influence was associated with gender, age and socio-economic status. A four-stage random sampling method was used to select the participants from the general population in Guangzhou, China. All participants were interviewed face-to-face at their homes using a standardized questionnaire. The health-related QoL of each participant was assessed using the SF-36 Health Survey. The scores of the SF-36 after adjusting for gender, age, socioeconomic conditions, smoking and some important comorbid conditions were compared between the CRS group and the non-CRS group using analysis of covariance. A multiple linear regression model with interaction terms was established to determine whether CRS affected QoL to the same degree across the different subpopulations. Among a total of 1,411 participants aged at least 15 years, 118 persons (8.4%) had self-reported CRS. Subjects with CRS had an increased prevalence of allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gout than subjects without CRS. The CRS group had lower scores in all eight domains and the physical and mental component summary than those without CRS (P<0.05), and the greatest differences were in role emotional function (RE), general health (GH) and role physical function (RP). The impairments of the CRS participants in RE and RP were greater among the females than the males. Moreover, physical domains were affected to greater degrees among the elderly and those with high-level education. In conclusion, CRS is a common chronic disorder. Persons with self-reported CRS perceived themselves as having impaired QoL in both the physical and mental domains. These findings shed new light on the health burden of CRS and should be taken into account by clinicians involved in the care of CRS patients. PMID:25978550

  16. Habitat destruction, habitat restoration and eigenvectoreigenvalue relations

    E-print Network

    Helsinki, University of

    patches to the meta- population capacity of the landscape. The mathematical results presented * Department of Ecology and Systematics, Metapopulation Research Group, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65; accepted 25 July 2002 Abstract According to metapopulation theory, the capacity of a habitat patch network

  17. The age of island-like habitats impacts habitat specialist species richness.

    PubMed

    Horsák, Michal; Hájek, Michal; Spitale, Daniel; Hájková, Petra; Díte, Daniel; Nekola, Jeffrey C

    2012-05-01

    While the effects of contemporaneous local environment on species richness have been repeatedly documented, much less is known about historical effects, especially over large temporal scales. Using fen sites in the Western Carpathian Mountains with known radiocarbon-dated ages spanning Late Glacial to modern times (16 975-270 cal years before 2008), we have compiled richness data from the same plots for three groups of taxa with contrasting dispersal modes: (1) vascular plants, which have macroscopic propagules possessing variable, but rather low, dispersal abilities; (2) bryophytes, which have microscopic propagules that are readily transported long distances by air; and (3) terrestrial and freshwater mollusks, which have macroscopic individuals with slow active migration rates, but which also often possess high passive dispersal abilities. Using path analysis we tested the relationships between species richness and habitat age, area, isolation, and altitude for these groups. When only matrix-derived taxa were considered, no significant positive relation was noted between species richness and habitat size or age. When only calcareous-fen specialists were considered, however, habitat age was found to significantly affect vascular plant richness and, marginally, also bryophyte richness, whereas mollusk richness was significantly affected by habitat area. These results suggest that in inland insular systems only habitat specialist (i.e., interpatch disperser and/or relict species) richness is influenced by habitat age and/or area, with habitat age becoming more important as species dispersal ability decreases. PMID:22764496

  18. Life of a Gypsy Moth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity will enable students to identify the gypsy moth and understand its life cycle and habitat needs. There is a link to information on the history and profile of the gypsy moth and a related quiz.

  19. Antarctic ecosystems as models for extraterrestrial surface habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. D. Wynn-Williams; H. G. M Edwards

    2000-01-01

    Surface habitats in Antarctic deserts are near the limits of life on Earth and resemble those hypothesized for early Mars. Cyanobacteria dominate the transient riverbeds, stromatolitic sediments in ice-covered lakes, and endolithic communities in translucent rock. There is still no direct evidence of photosynthetic life on early Mars, but cyanobacteria are amongst the earliest microbes detectable in the fossil record

  20. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, J.F.; Thomas, R.G.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1982-10-01

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from /sup 60/Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation.

  1. 25(OH)D2 Half-Life Is Shorter Than 25(OH)D3 Half-Life and Is Influenced by DBP Concentration and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Assar, S.; Harnpanich, D.; Bouillon, R.; Lambrechts, D.; Prentice, A.; Schoenmakers, I.

    2014-01-01

    Context: There is uncertainty over the equivalence of vitamins D2 and D3 to maintain plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the plasma half-lives of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 in two distinct populations with different dietary calcium intake and 25(OH)D status. Participants: Healthy men (aged 24 and 39 y), resident in The Gambia (n = 18) or the United Kingdom (n = 18) participated in the study. Interventions: The intervention included an oral tracer dose of deuterated-25(OH)D2 and deuterated-25(OH)D3 (both 40 nmol). Blood samples were collected over 33 days. Main Outcome Measures: 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 plasma half-lives, concentrations of 25(OH)D, and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and DBP genotypes were measured. Results: 25(OH)D2 half-life [mean (SD)] [13.9 (2.6) d] was shorter than 25(OH)D3 half-life [15.1 (3.1) d; P = .001] for countries combined, and in Gambians [12.8 (2.3) d vs 14.7 (3.5) d; P < .001], but not in the United Kingdom [15.1 (2.4) d vs 15.6 (2.5) d; P = .3]. 25(OH)D concentration was 69 (13) and 29 (11) nmol/L (P < .0001), and the DBP concentration was 259 (33) and 269 (23) mg/L (P = .4) in The Gambia and United Kingdom, respectively. Half-lives were positively associated with plasma DBP concentration for countries combined [25(OH)D2 half-life: regression coefficient (SE) 0.03 (0.01) d per 1 mg/L DBP, P = .03; 25(OH)D3 half-life: 0.04 (0.02) d, P = .02] and in Gambians [25(OH)D2 half-life: 0.04 (0.01) d; P = .02; 25(OH)D3 half-life: 0.06 (0.02) d, P = .01] but not in UK participants. The DBP concentration × country interactions were not significant. DBP Gc1f/1f homozygotes had shorter 25(OH)D2 half-lives compared with other combined genotypes (P = .007) after correction for country. Conclusions: 25(OH)D2 half-life was shorter than 25(OH)D3 half-life, and half-lives were affected by DBP concentration and genotype. The stable isotope 25(OH)D half-life measurements provide a novel tool to investigate vitamin D metabolism and vitamin D expenditure and aid in the assessment of vitamin D requirements. PMID:24885631

  2. Observing Wetland Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Observing Wetland Habitats contains tips on finding wetlands to explore and wetland scavenger hunt observation sheets that can be used as a starting point for discovery. While on their scavenger hunt, students can look for adaptations in plants and animals that help them live in a partially wet habitat. After the students have finished their scavenger hunt, they can share what they've seen and heard.

  3. Safeguarding saproxylic fungal biodiversity in Apennine beech forest priority habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Oriana; Lunghini, Dario; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The FAGUS LIFE Project (LIFE11/NAT/IT/135) targets two European priority habitats, i.e. Habitat 9210* Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex, and Habitat 9220* Apennine beech forests with Abies alba, within two National Parks: Cilento, Vallo di Diano and Alburni; Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga. The current limited distribution of the target habitats is also due to the impact of human activities on forest systems, such as harvesting and grazing. The FAGUS project aims at developing and testing management strategies able to integrate the conservation of priority forest habitats (9210* and 9220*) and the sustainable use of forest resources. In order to assess the responses to different management treatments the BACI monitoring design (Before-After, Control-Intervention) has been applied on forest structure and diversity of focus taxa before and after experimental harvesting treatments. Conventional management of Apennine beech forests impacts a wealth of taxonomic groups, such as saproxylic beetles and fungi, which are threatened throughout Europe by the lack of deadwood and of senescing trees, and by the homogeneous structure of managed forests. Deadwood has been denoted as the most important manageable habitat for biodiversity in forests not only for supporting a wide diversity of organisms, but also for playing a prominent role in several ecological processes, creating the basis for the cycling of photosynthetic energy, carbon, and nutrients stored in woody material. Especially fungi can be regarded as key group for understanding and managing biodiversity associated with decaying wood. The before-intervention field sampling was carried out in Autumn 2013 in 33 monitoring plots across the two national Parks. The occurrence at plot level of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota sporocarps was surveyed. All standing and downed deadwood with a minimum diameter of 10 cm was sampled for sporocarps larger than 1 mm, and information on decay class and fungal morphogroups was recorded. Our results confirm Apennine beech forests as important repositories of saproxylic fungal diversity. We identified species of high scientific concern, in both National Parks. The most represented genus is Mycena with six and five species in the sampling units of "Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga" and "Cilento,Vallo di Diano and Alburni" national Parks respectively. Within the "Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga National Park" the area of Incodara is of special interest due to the occurrence of the species Ossicaulis lignatilis, which is among the 21 identified indicator species for assessing conservation value of beech forests in Europe. A consistent group of Ascomycota species, including Biscogniauxia nummularia, Bisporella citrina, Diatrype disciformis, Kretzschmaria deusta, Nemania serpens, and Xylaria hypoxylon, was tightly associated with coarse woody debris in "Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga National Park" plots. The decay stage seemed to exert a major influence on both species richness and their spatial patterns, with coarse woody debris in the intermediate to late stages of decay being the richest in species. (471 words)

  4. Influence of Nutritional Deprivations in Early Life on Learning Behavior of Rats as Measured by Performance in a Water Maze

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD H. BARNES; SUSAN ROBERTSON CUNNOLD

    Learning behavior was studied in rats that were subjected to different forms of nutritional deprivation in early life. Food deprivation during the first 3 weeks of life was achieved by increasing the number of rat pups nursing from one lactating female. At 3 weeks of age rats were weaned and some were fed an extremely low protein diet for 8

  5. Early life experiences as determinants of leadership role occupancy: The importance of parental influence and rule breaking behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce J. Avolio; Maria Rotundo; Fred O. Walumbwa

    2009-01-01

    The limited behavioral genetics research reported in the leadership literature has not investigated the degree to which early life experiences predict future emergence into leadership roles. This is the first study to focus on parenting style and early life experiences of rule breaking, and their relationships to leadership roles assumed in adulthood, while controlling for genetic and personality contributions. Using

  6. Analysing the influences of weld size on fatigue life prediction of FCAW cruciform joints by strain energy concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Balasubramanian; B Guha

    1999-01-01

    The effect of weld size on fatigue life of flux cored arc welded (FCAW) cruciform joints containing lack of penetration (LOP) defect has been analysed by using the strain energy density factor (SEDF) concept. Moreover, new fracture mechanics equations have been developed to predict the fatigue life of the cruciform joints. Load carrying cruciform joints were fabricated from ASTM 517

  7. Living Things and their Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. D.

    2006-10-11

    Students will learn how to tell the difference between living and non-living organisms and their habitats. Our class has just learned about living things and their habitats. Use this webquest to create your own living things and their habitats. Remember a living thing: Grows Moves Reproduces A Habitat is a place (home) for living things. A habitat provides four important things: 1. Food 2. Shelter 3. Space 4. Water Now you get to decide ...

  8. A conceptual framework for end-of-life care: a reconsideration of factors influencing the integrity of the human person.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Marie T; Mock, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we examine emerging themes in the research and theoretical literature on care at the end of life to develop a conceptual framework to guide further research in this area. The integrity of the human person is the organizing concept, and the spiritual domain is at the core of the psychological, physical, and functional domains. This framework extends beyond previous frameworks for care at the end of life by including the relationship of the health professional and the health care organization to the integrity of the person. Also, outcomes in this framework extend beyond quality of life and comfort to include patient decision-making methods and achievement of life goals. Attention is given to the cultural dimension of personhood in our multicultural society, and the definition of end of life is expanded to include both the acute phase of terminal illness and the frailty of health associated with advanced age. PMID:15599868

  9. Are deep-water corals important habitats for fishes?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Auster

    High densities of fishes in aggregations of deep-water corals (e.g., of the genera Primnoa, Paragorgia, Paramuricea) do not necessarily indicate that corals are important habitats in terms of population processes. Frequency dependent distribution models provide a basis for assessing the role of deep-water corals. It is necessary to understand the overall habitat-related distributions of fish species, at particular life history

  10. Stream Habitat Types: Their Fish Assemblages and Relationship to Flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luther P. Aadland

    1993-01-01

    To simplify selection of target species for instream flow studies, 114 fish species–life stage combinations in six Minnesota streams were assigned membership in six habitat-preference guilds based on the habitat type supporting their highest densities. Shallow pools (<60 cm deep and velocities <30 cm\\/s) were preferred by most of the young-of-the-year fishes. Slow riffles (<60 cm deep and velocities 30–59

  11. Traumatic episodes experienced during the genocide period in Rwanda influence life circumstances in young men and women 17 years later

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During Rwanda’s genocide period in 1994, about 800,000 people were killed. People were murdered, raped and seriously injured. This retrospective study investigated prevalence and frequency of traumatic episodes and associated psychosocial effects in young adults in Rwanda over the lifetime, during the genocide period and in the past three years. Methods This is a cross-sectional population-based study conducted among men and women, aged 20 to 35 years, residing in the Southern province of Rwanda. The study population, randomly selected in a multi stage procedure, included 477 females and 440 males. Data collection was performed through individual interviewing with a structured questionnaire during the period December 2011- January 2012. The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire was used to assess traumatic episodes. All data was sex-disaggregated. Differences between groups were measured by chi square and Fischer’s exact test. Associations with socio-demographic and psychosocial factors were estimated by use of odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals in bi- and multivariate analyses. Results The participants in this study were 3 to 18 years of age in 1994, the year of the genocide. Our sample size was 917 participants, 440 men and 477 women. Women were to a higher extent exposed to traumatic episodes than men during their lifetime, 83.6% (n = 399) and 73.4% (n = 323), respectively. During the genocide period, 37.5% of the men/boys and 35.4% of the women/girls reported such episodes while in the past three years (2009-2011) 25.0% of the men and 23.1% of the women did. Women were more exposed to episodes related to physical and sexual violence, while men were exposed to imprisonment, kidnapping and mass killings. Victims of such violence during the genocide period were 17 years later less educated although married (men OR 1.47; 0.98-2.19; women OR 1.54; 1.03-2.30), without children (men OR 1.59; 1.08-2.36; women OR 1.86; 1.11-3.08) and living under extremely poor circumstances. Conclusion The participants in this population-based study witnessed or experienced serious traumatic episodes during the genocide, which influenced their life circumstances 17 years later. Such traumatic episodes are however still taking place. The reasons for this need further investigation. PMID:24373422

  12. Exploring trophic strategies of exotic caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda): Comparison between habitat types and native vs introduced distribution ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Macarena; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Lacerda, Mariana Baptista; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Masunari, Setuko

    2014-02-01

    The trophic ecology of non-native species is a key aspect to understand their invasion success and the community effects. Despite the important role of caprellid amphipods as trophic intermediates between primary producers and higher levels of marine food webs, there is very little information on their feeding habits. This is the first comprehensive study on the trophic strategies of two co-occurring introduced caprellids in the Spanish coasts: Caprella scaura and Paracaprella pusilla. The diet of 446 specimens of C. scaura and 230 of P. pusilla was analyzed to investigate whether there were differences in the feeding habits in relation to habitat characteristics (natural vs artificial hard substrata), type of host substrata (bryozoans and hydroids) and native vs introduced distribution ranges (Brazil vs Spain). Results revealed differences in diet preferences of the two species that have important implications for their trophic behaviour and showed a limited food overlap, which may favour their coexistence in introduced areas. In general terms, P. pusilla is a predator species, showing preference by crustacean prey in all of its life stages, while C. scaura feeds mainly on detritus. Although no sex-related diet shifts were observed in either of the species, evidence of ontogenetic variation in diet of C. scaura was found, with juveniles feeding on more amount of prey than adults. No diet differences were found between native and introduced populations within the same habitat type. However, P. pusilla exhibited a shift in its diet when different habitats were compared in the same distribution area, and C. scaura showed a flexible feeding behaviour between different host substrata in the same habitat type. This study shows that habitat characteristics at different scales can have greater influence on the feeding ecology of exotic species than different distribution ranges, and support the hypothesis that a switch between feeding strategies depending on habitat characteristics could favour invasion success.

  13. Effects of asteroid and comet impacts on habitats for lithophytic organisms - A synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles S. Cockell; Pascal Lee; Paul Broady; Darlene S. S. Lim; Gordon R. Osinski; John Parnell; Christian Koeberl; Lauri Pesonen; Johanna Salminen

    2005-01-01

    Asteroid and comet impacts can have a profound influence on the habitats available for lithophytic microorganisms. Using evidence from the Haughton impact structure, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic, we describe the role of impacts in influencing the nature of the lithophytic ecological niche. Impact-induced increases in rock porosity and fracturing can result in the formation of cryptoendolithic habitats. In some cases

  14. Early Life Lung Antioxidant Levels and Response to Ozone: Influence of Sex and Maturation in Wistar Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Epidemiologic studies of air pollution effects on respiratory health report significant modification by sex. Studies of children suggest stronger effects among boys in early life and girls in later childhood. In adults, particularly the elderly, studies report stronger...

  15. Influence of early-life nutrition on mortality and reproductive success during a subsequent famine in a preindustrial population

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Adam D.; Rickard, Ian J.; Lummaa, Virpi

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with insufficient nutrition during development often experience poorer later-life health and evolutionary fitness. The Predictive Adaptive Response (PAR) hypothesis proposes that poor early-life nutrition induces physiological changes that maximize fitness in similar environments in adulthood and that metabolic diseases result when individuals experiencing poor nutrition during development subsequently encounter good nutrition in adulthood. However, although cohort studies have shown that famine exposure in utero reduces health in favorable later-life conditions, no study on humans has demonstrated the predicted fitness benefit under low later-life nutrition, leaving the evolutionary origins of such plasticity unexplored. Taking advantage of a well-documented famine and unique datasets of individual life histories and crop yields from two preindustrial Finnish populations, we provide a test of key predictions of the PAR hypothesis. Known individuals from fifty cohorts were followed from birth until the famine, where we analyzed their survival and reproductive success in relation to the crop yields around birth. We were also able to test whether the long-term effects of early-life nutrition differed between individuals of varying socioeconomic status. We found that, contrary to predictions of the PAR hypothesis, individuals experiencing low early-life crop yields showed lower survival and fertility during the famine than individuals experiencing high early-life crop yields. These effects were more pronounced among young individuals and those of low socioeconomic status. Our results do not support the hypothesis that PARs should have been favored by natural selection and suggest that alternative models may need to be invoked to explain the epidemiology of metabolic diseases. PMID:23918366

  16. Proportional hazards life table models: an illustrative analysis of socio-demographic influences on marriage dissolution in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Menken; James Trussell; Debra Stempel; Ozer Babakol

    1981-01-01

    The proportional hazards life table is a recently developed approach to the analysis of survival data when mortality risks\\u000a vary among individuals. It assumes that at a given age (or duration since the start of a life) the force of mortality is a\\u000a constant (specific to that age) multiplied by a proportionality factor which is determined by the characteristics of

  17. Ringed seal post-moulting movement tactics and habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Carla; Kovacs, Kit M; Ims, Rolf A; Fedak, Michael A; Lydersen, Christian

    2008-02-01

    Intra-specific and intra-population variation in movement tactics have been observed in many species, sometimes in association with alternative foraging techniques or large-scale habitat selection. However, whether animals adjust their small-scale habitat selection according to their large-scale tactics has rarely been studied. This study identified two large-scale movement tactics in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) during their non-breeding, post-moulting period. First-passage times (FPT) were used to explore these large-scale patterns. Subsequently, habitat selection was quantified by modelling the FPTs as a function of habitat attributes using Cox proportional hazards models. Some seals moved far offshore into areas preferentially containing 40-80% ice coverage, while other individuals spread along the coasts of Svalbard concentrating their time near glacier fronts. Both tactics resulted in ringed seals being in highly productive areas where they had access to ice-platforms to rest. When offshore, habitat selection was influenced mainly by sea ice concentration and season. Late in the season (autumn), increased risk of leaving an area was identified, even when ice conditions were still favourable, reflecting their need to return to over-wintering/breeding areas before the fjords of the archipelago freeze. For ringed seals that remained inshore, habitat use intensities were influenced mainly by the distance to glacier fronts and season. These animals were already close to their over-wintering habitat and hence their risk of leaving an area decreased as winter approached. This study of ringed seals habitat selection reveals how they fulfil their biological requirements in this dynamic, heterogeneous habitat. Individuals within the same population employed two distinct large-scale movement tactics, adjusting their decisions for small-scale habitat selection accordingly. This flexibility in ringed seal spatial ecology during summer and fall is expected to result in increased population viability in this high Arctic environment. PMID:17990001

  18. Conservation of remnant populations of Colchicum autumnale - The relative importance of local habitat quality and habitat fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriaens, Dries; Jacquemyn, Hans; Honnay, Olivier; Hermy, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Semi-natural habitat is extremely vulnerable to habitat fragmentation and degradation since its socio-economic value has decreased substantially during the last century in most parts of Europe. We evaluated the relative effects of habitat fragmentation and local environmental conditions on population structure and reproductive performance of the long-lived corm geophyte Colchicum autumnale in 17 highly fragmented populations. Habitat isolation did not affect patch occupancy, population structure or plant performance. In contrast, population size and local environment strongly affected population structure and reproductive performance. Densities of all life stages increased with increasing population size. Large populations also showed a higher reproductive performance and a larger proportion of new recruits. Relationships with local growth conditions pointed towards the importance of an open grassland sward for flower and fruit set and the presence of microsites for successful sexual recruitment. These results suggest that the distribution of C. autumnale consists of an assemblage of basically unconnected populations that are remnants of formerly larger populations. This is in accordance with the species' ability to grow clonally, allowing long-term persistence under deteriorating conditions that occurred during a long period of habitat fragmentation. In conclusion, our results indicate that local habitat and population size are more important than habitat fragmentation (i.e. calcareous grassland isolation and surface area) and argue in favour of a management that is primarily focused on local habitat restoration. This is preferentially accomplished by reintroducing grazing practices, complemented by regular setback of spontaneous succession towards forest.

  19. Habitat for Humanity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    Founded in 1976, Habitat for Humanity has constructed over 175,000 houses, which provides homes for over 1 million people. While the organization's most famous volunteer may be former President Jimmy Carter, the group is always on the lookout for other interested parties who would like to give generously of their time. The organization's website contains information on the history of Habitat, along with information about donating and volunteering for the organization. To get a sense of the scope of their work, visitors will want to take a look at the "Where We Build" section of the site. Utilizing a clickable map, visitors can learn about their different home-building efforts in the countries they serve. To really delve into the work of the organization, visitors would do well to peruse the latest edition of Habitat's "Faces and Places" magazine, which contains articles on rural poverty housing initiatives.

  20. The Influence of God and Providence on Happiness and the Quality of Life of Patients Benefiting from Aesthetic Medicine Treatments in Poland.

    PubMed

    Gal?ba, Anna; Bajurna, Beata

    2015-08-01

    The research reveals the impact of a belief in god and god's Providence on the happiness and quality of life of patients benefiting from aesthetic medicine treatments in Poland (country where over 90 % of society declare to be deeply devout). The work also examines age and sex of the patients benefiting from beauty treatments (botulinum toxin, fillers, medical peels and needle mesotherapy), their quality of life and also the impact of various factors, including God and Divine Providence on their happiness. The research shows the analysis of factors influencing the successes or failures in the past year and presents the comparison of patients who have benefited from the aesthetic medicine treatments (cosmetic medicine) to the common average Polish citizens. PMID:25822880

  1. Habitat Relations Habitat and Landscape Effects on Abundance

    E-print Network

    Habitat Relations Habitat and Landscape Effects on Abundance of Missouri's Grassland Birds ROBERT B and western Missouri, grasslands comprising most contemporary grasslands. Most grasslands are used as pasture or hayfields. Native grasses largely have been

  2. Life in the Ocean

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Norma Goddard

    This site is designed to teach elementary students about ocean life. Through images and large text, it provides basic information and descriptions of animals that live in various ocean habitats, including: Sandy Beach, Tide Pool, Kelp Forest, and the Open Seas.

  3. habitat with botanists ( ) 

    E-print Network

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    in Texas. T ty-f op 1 tto b d f d d (~S ocellatus) were monitored in 1990-1991 using ultrasonic biotelemetry in Lake Fairfield, Tx. Habitat, water temperature and dissolved oxygen level occupied were recorded for each fish located. Palmetto bass... tolerance is similar or a little greater than that found in striped bass (Douglas and Jahn 1987) . R d d (~S' *ll t ) d p 1 tt b h similiar food habits (Dolman 1985) as well as possibly occupying the same reservoir habitats. Red drum and palmetto bass...

  4. Habitats of the World

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades K-5. It focuses on habitats of the Earth and how animals and plants adapt to the conditions in which they live. Students divide into groups and research different habitats and how animals and plants have adapted to live in them. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  5. The influence of dynamic strain ageing on stress response and strain-life relationship in low cycle fatigue of 316L(N) stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.S.; Sandhya, R.; Valsan, M.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Materials Development Div.] [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Materials Development Div.; Sastry, D.H. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Metallurgy] [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1997-11-15

    It has been recognized that the essential prerequisite for accurate prediction of low cycle fatigue life (LCF) at elevated temperatures is the determination of rate controlling time dependent damage process that influences the cyclic deformation and fracture behavior of alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.25 < T/T{sub m} < 0.55, where T{sub m} is melting point in Kelvin), where the effects of time dependent processes such as creep and oxidation are found to be minimal, the drastic reduction in low cycle fatigue life observed with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate in alloys such as type 04 stainless steel, Nimonic PE 16 superalloy and Haynes 188 superalloy has been ascribed primarily to the deleterious effects of dynamic strain ageing (DSA). These alloys displayed anomalous cyclic hardening and an increase of maximum cyclic stress with increasing temperature or decreasing strain rate due to DSA. The nitrogen alloyed 316L stainless steel is currently used for a variety of components in the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Although the temperature range of application of 316L(N) in LMFBRs encompass the domain in which DSA is active, to-date there has been little information available on the effects of DSA on cyclic behavior of 316L(N) stainless steel (SS). The present investigation is therefore focused on assessing the effects of DSA on LCF life and cyclic stress response of 316L(N) SS. The influence of DSA on cyclic strain-life relationship has also been examined in the regime where other time dependent mechanisms such as creep and oxidation are virtually absent.

  6. Methods for evaluating riparian habitats with applications to management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platts, William S.; Armour, C.L.; Booth, G.D.; Bryant, M.; Bufford, J.L.; Cuplin, P.; Jensen, S.; Lienkaemper, G.W.; Minshall, G.W.; Monsen, S.T.; Nelson, R.L.; Sedell, J.R.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Riparian area planning and management is a major national issues today--something that should have been the case a century ago. A century of additive effects of land use has resulted in major impacts on many riparian stream habitats and their fisheries, wildlife, and domestic livestock use. Before scientists can evaluate the influences of various land and water uses on riparian environments, they must first understand these environments. This means being able to detect and measure with confidence the natural and artificial variation and instantaneous conditions of the riparian habitat. These conditions must then be related to the production capability of riparian habitat and any extraneous factors affecting this production potential.

  7. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin E. Doherty; David E. Naugle; Brett L. Walker; Jon M. Graham

    2008-01-01

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the

  8. Habitat manipulation to mitigate the impacts of invasive arthropod pests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mattias JonssonSteve; Steve D. Wratten; Doug A. Landis; Jean-Marie L. Tompkins; Ross Cullen

    2010-01-01

    Exotic invaders are some of the most serious insect pests of agricultural crops around the globe. Increasingly, the structure\\u000a of landscape and habitat is recognized as having a major influence on both insect pests and their natural enemies. Habitat\\u000a manipulation that aims at conserving natural enemies can potentially contribute to safer and more effective control of invasive\\u000a pests. In this

  9. Quantification of fish habitat in selected reaches of the Marmaton and Marais des Cygnes Rivers, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Richards, Joseph M.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Norman, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation, undertook a study to quantify fish habitat by using relations between streamflow and the spatial and temporal distributions of fish habitat at five sites in the Marmaton and Marais des Cygnes Rivers in western Missouri. Twenty-six fish habitat categories were selected for nine species under varying seasonal (spring, summer, and fall), diel (summer day and night), and life-stage (spawning, juvenile, and adult) conditions. Physical habitat characteristics were determined for each category using depth, velocity, and channel substrate criteria. Continuous streamflow data were then combined with the habitat-streamflow relations to compile a habitat time series for each habitat category at each site. Fish habitat categories were assessed as to their vulnerability to habitat alteration based on critical life stages (spawning and juvenile rearing periods) and susceptibility to habitat limitations from dewatering or high flows. Species categories representing critical life stages with physical habitat limitations represent likely bottlenecks in fish populations. Categories with potential bottlenecks can serve as indicator categories and aid managers when determining the flows necessary for maintaining these habitats under altered flow regimes. The relation between the area of each habitat category and streamflow differed greatly between category, season, and stream reach. No single flow maximized selected habitat area for all categories or even for all species/category within a particular season at a site. However, some similarities were noted among habitat characteristics, including the streamflow range for which habitat availability is maximized and the range of streamflows for which a habitat category area is available at the Marmaton River sites. A monthly habitat time series was created for all 26 habitat categories at two Marmaton River sites. A daily habitat time series was created at three Marais des Cygnes River sites for two periods: 1941 through 1963 (pre-regulation) and 1982 through 2003 (post-regulation). The habitat category with the highest median area in spring was paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) with normalized areas of up to 2,000 square meters per 100 meters of stream channel. Flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) habitat area generally was the category area most available in summer and fall. Differences in daily selected habitat area time series between pre- and post-regulation time periods varied by species/category and by site. For instance, whereas there was a decline in the distribution of spring spawning habitat for suckermouth minnow (Phenacobius mirabilis) and slenderhead darter (Percina phoxocephala) from pre- to post-regulation periods at all three sites, the 25 to 75 percentile habitat area substantially increased for paddlefish under post-regulation conditions. Potential habitat area for most species was maximized at the Marmaton River sites at flows of about 1 to 10 cubic meters per second, whereas median monthly streamflows ranged from less than 1 to 20 cubic meters per second depending on site and season. Paddlefish habitat was available beginning at higher flows than other categories (4 to 7 cubic meters per second) and also maximized at higher flows (greater than 50 to 100 cubic meters per second). Selected potential habitat area was maximized for most species at the Marais des Cygnes River sites at flows of about 1 to 50 cubic meters per second, whereas median monthly streamflows ranged from 4 to 55 cubic meters per second depending on site and season. The range of streamflows for which selected habitat area was available in summer and fall was substantially less at the channelized Marais des Cygnes River site when compared to the non-channelized sites, and, therefore, the susceptibility of categories to high-flow habitat limitations was greater at this site. The channelized reach was more unifor

  10. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211-3029 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  11. Influence of complications and extent of weight loss on quality of life after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Rea; D. E. Yarbrough; R. R. Leeth; T. D. Leath; R. H. Clements

    2007-01-01

    Introduction  Obesity decreases health-related quality of life, but bariatric surgery improves it. This study evaluates the effect of laparoscopic\\u000a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, postoperative complications, and percentage of excess body weight loss on quality of life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  SF-36v.1 questionnaires were administered preoperative (n = 505), 1 year (n = 237) and 2 years (n = 106) following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Analysis was

  12. The areal extent of brown shrimp habitat suitability in Mobile Bay, Alabama, USA: targeting vegetated habitat restoration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa M. Smith; Janet A. Nestlerode; Linda C. Harwell; Pete Bourgeois

    2010-01-01

    The availability of wetlands and shallow water habitats significantly influences Gulf of Mexico (GOM) penaeid shrimp fishery\\u000a productivity. However, the GOM region has the highest rate of wetland loss in the USA. Protection and management of these\\u000a vital GOM habitats are critical to sustainable shrimp fisheries. Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) are a major component of GOM fisheries. We present an

  13. Chapter 7: Habitat Fragmentation Fragmentation & Heterogeneity

    E-print Network

    Gottgens, Hans

    into smaller & isolated parcels. Consequences (Lindenmayer & Franklin 2002) · Habitat loss · Subdivision of habitat · Patch isolation · Edge effects FRAMENTATION #12;A conceptual illustration of habitat loss, isolation, and fragmentation #12;NE China Miombo Africa Bayfield (WI) Maraba Africa Fragmentation: Habitat

  14. MAINE MARINE WORM HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    WORM provides a generalized representation at 1:24,000 scale of commercially harvested marine worm habitat in Maine, based on Maine Department of Marine Resources data from 1970's. Original maps were created by MDMR and published by USF&WS as part of the ""&quo...

  15. Modeling sensitive elasmobranch habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. Grazia; Muñoz, Facundo; Conesa, David; López-Quílez, Antonio; Bellido, José Marí; a

    2013-10-01

    Basic information on the distribution and habitat preferences of ecologically important species is essential for their management and protection. In the Mediterranean Sea there is increasing concern over elasmobranch species because their biological (ecological) characteristics make them highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Their removal could affect the structure and function of marine ecosystems, inducing changes in trophic interactions at the community level due to the selective elimination of predators or prey species, competitors and species replacement. In this study Bayesian hierarchical spatial models are used to map the sensitive habitats of the three most caught elasmobranch species (Galeus melastomus, Scyliorhinus canicula, Etmopterus spinax) in the western Mediterranean Sea, based on fishery-dependent bottom trawl data. Results show that habitats associated with hard substrata and sandy beds, mainly in deep waters and with a high seabed gradient, have a greater probability registering the presence of the studied species than those associated with muddy shallow waters. Temperature and chlorophyll-? concentration show a negative relationship with S. canicula occurrence. Our results identify some of the sensitive habitats for elasmobranchs in the western Mediterranean Sea (GSA06 South), providing essential and easy-to-use interpretation tools, such as predictive distribution maps, with the final aim of improving management and conservation of these vulnerable species.

  16. Sage-grouse Habitats and

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    Monitoring of Greater Sage-grouse Habitats and Populations Station Bulletin 80 October 2003 College-1142. Cover photograph by N.A. Burkepile #12;Monitoring of Greater Sage-grouse Habitats and Populations John W. Connelly Kerry P. Reese Michael A. Schroeder October 2003 #12;Monitoring of Greater Sage-grouse Habitats

  17. Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    #12;Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat Peter T. Harris Senior Marine Science Advisor #12;Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat. DOI: © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.2012 10.1016/B978-0-12-385140-6.00058-X Seamounts, Ridges, and Reef Habitats of American Samoa Dawn J. Wright1

  18. How much habitat is enough?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Fahrig

    2001-01-01

    If conservation efforts are to be successful, it is critical that we understand the relationship between habitat loss and the probability of population extinction. Available evidence suggests a threshold amount of habitat loss at which the probability of population extinction increases from near-zero to near-one following a small additional loss of habitat. The main factors thought to determine this extinction

  19. THE HABITAT CONCEPT IN ORNITHOLOGY

    E-print Network

    CHAPTER 2 THE HABITAT CONCEPT IN ORNITHOLOGY Theory and Applications WILLIAM M. BLOCK and LEONARD A. BRENNAN 1. INTRODUCTION Ornithologists have played a key role in the development of the habitat concept]., 1989; Morrison et a].,1992). The application of the term "habitat" has been used as a unifying

  20. How Adult Children Influence Older Parents' Mental Health: Integrating Stress-Process and Life-Course Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Bierman, Alex; Schieman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we integrate insights from the life-course and stress-process perspectives to argue that adult children's negative treatment of parents, as well as negative events that children experience, detrimentally affect elderly parents' mental health over time. We argue that these strains may affect mothers more than fathers, and blacks more…

  1. The Influence of Supports Strategies, Environmental Factors, and Client Characteristics on Quality of Life-Related Personal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claes, Claudia; Van Hove, Geert; Vandevelde, Stijn; van Loon, Jos; Schalock, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The concept of quality of life (QOL) is increasingly being used as a support provision and outcomes evaluation framework in the field of intellectual disability (ID). The present study used a hierarchical multiple regression research design to determine the role that available supports strategies, environmental factors, and client characteristics…

  2. Institutional Culture and Policies Influence on Do?Not?Resuscitate Decision-­ Making at the End of Life

    E-print Network

    Dzeng, Elizabeth; Colaianni, Alessandra; Roland, Martin; Chander, Geetanjali; Smith, Thomas J.; Kelly, Michael P.; Barclay, Stephen; Levine, David

    2015-04-06

     life  and  in  particular  regarding  resuscitation  decisions.       5   Studies  have  shown  that  survival  to  discharge  after  CPR  is  highly  unlikely  in  certain  conditions  such  as...  sepsis  or  metastatic  cancer,  and  is  near  zero  when  irreversible  dying  is  imminent10,11.  Offering  CPR  when  not  clinically  indicated  can  cause  harm12,13.  On  the  other  hand...

  3. Family Resources and Mid-Life Level of Education: A Longitudinal Study of the Mediating Influence of Childhood Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Otter, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on the concept of parental involvement, popular among educators and policy-makers, in investigating differences in level of attained education by family background. The question is if parental involvement in children's schooling at age 14 acts as a mediator between family resources and mid-life level of attained education.…

  4. Parental Influence on Children's Chronic Abdominal Pain Experiences: Exploring the Relationship between Parental Protective Behaviors and Child Quality of Life

    E-print Network

    Kessler, Emily D.

    2011-08-31

    restriction) and Quality of Life (QoL) in a clinical population of children with chronic abdominal pain, while including age and gender as potential moderators. Medical records from initial evaluation at a tertiary pain clinic were reviewed for 430 child...

  5. The influence of material build up around artificial defects on rolling contact fatigue life and failure mechanism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Dommarco; P. C. Bastias; C. A. Rubin; G. T. Hahn

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results obtained in tests conducted to evaluate the evolution of wear tracks and artificial defects under rolling contact fatigue (RCF) loading and its effect on RCF life. The experiments were conducted on specimens of different materials commonly used in rolling bearings and gears. The artificial defects were introduced with the rounded tip of a Rockwell-C type

  6. Early Life Events Carry Over to Influence Pre-Migratory Condition in a Free-Living Songbird

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg W. Mitchell; Christopher G. Guglielmo; Nathaniel T. Wheelwright; Corey R. Freeman-Gallant; D. Ryan Norris

    2011-01-01

    Conditions experienced during development can have long-term consequences for individual success. In migratory songbirds, the proximate mechanisms linking early life events and survival are not well understood because tracking individuals across stages of the annual cycle can be extremely challenging. In this paper, we first use a 13 year dataset to demonstrate a positive relationship between 1st year survival and

  7. Sex differences in child-onset, life-course-persistent conduct disorder. A review of biological influences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Eme

    2007-01-01

    Sex is widely acknowledged to be an important factor in understanding many aspects of behavior, not the least of which is antisocial behavior. When antisocial behavior manifests itself in the domain of juvenile psychopathology, it often takes the form of a type of conduct disorder (CD) that begins in childhood and is life-course-persistent. There is an overwhelming consensus that there

  8. Impact assessment of dam construction and forest management for Japanese macaque habitats in snowy areas.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Sakamaki-Enari, Haruka

    2014-03-01

    Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their northernmost habitats represent a keystone species and play a central role in heavy snowfall ecosystems. However, distributions have been restricted by pre-war hunting, and populations are facing issues of natural forest losses caused by new dam constructions and massive conifer plantations. In the present study, we predicted the influences of these environmental conditions on macaque habitats during each season, and evaluated the effect of natural forest restoration as a mitigation measure. We constructed multiple habitat suitability models on the basis of different forest change scenarios, by using maximum entropy modeling (Maxent). We predicted the influence of each scenario by calculating the habitat unit (habitat quality?×?habitat quantity). We made the following predictions: (1) the influences of environmental conditions on habitat models vary seasonally, but dam construction destroys the optimum macaque habitats in every season; (2) restoration of conifer plantations to semi-natural forests does not always contribute to the improvement of total habitat unit, except in snowy seasons; and (3) in comparison with encouraging natural forest restoration in plantation areas and maintaining the standard-rotation plantation management, the implementation of long-rotation plantation in existing plantation areas provides more suitable alternative habitats for macaques in non-snowy seasons. PMID:24532181

  9. An Interpolation Method for Stream Habitat Assessments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth R. Sheehan; Stuart A. Welsh

    2009-01-01

    Interpolation of stream habitat can be very useful for habitat assessment. Using a small number of habitat samples to predict the habitat of larger areas can reduce time and labor costs as long as it provides accurate estimates of habitat. The spatial correlation of stream habitat variables such as substrate and depth improves the accuracy of interpolated data. Several geographical

  10. Environmental signals for seed germination reflect habitat adaptations in four temperate Caryophyllaceae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Vandelook; D. Van de Moer; J. A. Van Assche

    2008-01-01

    Summary 1. Requirements for dormancy break and seed germination are specific for all species and depend chiefly on phylogeny, geographical distribution, habitat preference and life cycle. Studying germina- tion requirements of closely related species with a similar geographic distribution allows one to attribute variation in germination requirements to differences in habitat preference between the species. 2. We investigated requirements for

  11. Energetic consequences of sex-related habitat segregation in wintering American kestrels ( Falco sparverius )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel R. Ardia

    2002-01-01

    Behavioural dominance can cause individuals to use less-preferred habitats, with potentially important life- history consequences. In the American kestrel, Falco sparverius, females exclude males from preferred open areas; I hypothesized that this sex-related habitat segregation leads to energetic consequences for males. I predicted that males would show decreased body condition over winter, while females would not, and that females would

  12. Rain Forests. Habitat Ecology Learning Program (H.E.L.P.), Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY.

    The goal of this guide is to address a major environmental dilemma: worldwide habitat destruction and the disappearance of species. This guide is one of six that are included in the Habitat Ecology Learning Program (HELP), a holistic life science curriculum that involves students in an in-depth study of ecology. HELP includes six teaching guides…

  13. Ichthyoplankton Assemblages of Coastal West-Central Lake Erie and Associated Habitat Characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. McKenna Jr.; Bruce M. Davis; Mary C. Fabrizio; Jacqueline F. Savino; Thomas N. Todd; Michael Bur

    2008-01-01

    Early life stage survival often determines fish cohort strength and that survival is affected by habitat conditions. The structure and dynamics of ichthyoplankton assemblages can tell us much about biodiversity and fish population dynamics, but are poorly understood in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes, where most spawning and nursery habitats exist. Ichthyoplankton samples were collected with a neuston net

  14. Alternatives for the protection and restoration of sturgeons and their habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond C. P. Beamesderfer; Ruth A. Farr

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the life history and habitat requirements of sturgeons, alternatives for their protection and restoration in North America, and a typical protection and enhancement program in the Columbia River. Sturgeon are uniquely adapted to mainstem river systems which are characterized by their large scale, diverse habitats, and dynamic nature. Adaptations include mobility, opportunistic food habits, delayed maturation, longevity,

  15. Macroscale Assessment of American Shad Spawning and Nursery Habitat in the Mattaponi and Pamunkey Rivers, Virginia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donna Marie Bilkovic; Carl H. Hershner; John E. Olney

    2002-01-01

    Variation in habitat suitability can alter the growth and mortality of early life stages of fishes but is often difficult to measure, quantify, and apply to the entire system. We designed and tested habitat suitability index (HSI) models incorporating both proximate riverine parameters and surrounding landscape features as determinates of optimal spawning and nursery areas for American shad Alosa sapidissima.

  16. Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System

    E-print Network

    Institute #12;Species-Function Matrix Lowland Mixed Conifer Habitat Type (Potential) Function 1 Function 4 Eats Terrestrial Invertebrates American Beaver 1 Pileated Woodpecker 1 1 1 Black Bear 1 1 1 1 Black-tailed Deer 1 1 Steelhead Salmon 1 1 #12;Habitat-Function Matrix Lowland Mixed Conifer Habitat

  17. The influence of sex on life shortening and tumor induction in CBA/Cne mice exposed to x rays or fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Di Majo, V.; Coppola, M.; Rebessi, S.; Saran, A. [ENEA, CR-Casaccia, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    An experimental study of male and female CBA/Cne mice was set up at Casaccia primarily to investigate the influence of sex on long-term survival and tumor induction after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Mice were whole-body-irradiated at 3 months of age with fission-neutron doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.8 Gy at the RSV-TAPIRO reactor (mean neutron energy 0.4 MeV, in terms of kerma, y{sub D} = 51.5 KeV/{mu}m), or with 250 KVp X-ray doses of 1, 3, 5 and 7 Gy. Control and irradiated animals were then followed for their entire life span. As a general finding, male CBA/Cne mice appear more susceptible to tumori-genesis than females. In particular, the incidences of induced acute myeloid leukemia and malignant lymphomas are significant only in male mice. Benign and malignant solid tumors of many types are observed in mice of both sexes, the most frequent being in the lung, liver and ovary. However, evidence for a radiation response is limited to the case of Harderian gland neoplasms. In addition, a comparison of the observed frequency of all irradiated compared to unirradiated animals bearing solid tumors shows that the total tumor occurrence is not altered markedly by radiation exposure. A decrease in survival time is observed for both sexes and radiation types and correlates well with increasing dose. Moreover, both sex and radiation quality appear to influence the life shortening. A similar dose dependence of survival time is found when tumor-free animals alone are considered, suggesting a non-specific component of life-shortening. 18 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Influence of sociodemographic and neighbourhood factors on self rated health and quality of life in rural communities: findings from the Agriproject in the Republic of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Tay, J.; Kelleher, C.; Hope, A.; Barry, M.; Gabhainn, S. N.; Sixsmith, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the influence of sociodemographic and neighbourhood factors on self rated health, quality of life, and perceived opportunities for change (as one measure of empowerment) in rural Irish communities. Design: Pooled data from cross sectional surveys two years apart. Setting: Respondents in four randomly selected rural district electoral divisions with a population size of between 750 and 2000. Participants: 1738 rural dwellers aged 15–93, 40.5% men, interviewed at two time points. Main outcome measures: Determinants of self rated health (SRH), quality of life (QOL), and perceived opportunities for change, rated on a closed option Likert scale and assessed in multivariate logistic regression models. Main results: Overall 23.8% of the sample reported poor SRH, 22.2% poor QOL, and 50.1% low perceived opportunities for change. Low financial security and dissatisfaction with work were each significantly associated with poor SRH (OR = 1.96 (1.50 to 2.56) and 1.54 (1.11 to 2.14)), with poor QOL (OR = 2.04 (1.56 to 2.68) and 1.87 (1.34 to 2.61). Concern about access to public services was significantly predictive of SRH (OR = 1.47 (1.11 to 1.94)) rather than access to health care (that is, hospital and GP services). There were distinct sex specific patterns and a generational effect for educational status in men. Variables associated with social networks and social support were less strongly predictive of SRH and QOL when economic measures were accounted for. Conclusion: Inter-relations between indicators of health status, wellbeing, and deprivation are not well studied in rural communities. Material deprivation has a direct influence on both health status and quality of life, although immediate sources of support are relatively well preserved. PMID:15483305

  19. Influence of DDD rate response pacing with integrated double sensors on physical efficiency and quality of life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugeniusz Pilat; Rafal Mlynarski; Agnieszka Wlodyka; Wlodzimierz Kargul

    Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the use of a double sensor gives additional benefits for patients in improving physical efficiency as well as quality of life (QoL) as compared to the accelero- meter sensor alone. Methods and results The presented research is a prospective, randomized, single-blind clinical trial. Double-sensor (accelerometer and minute-ventilation) pacemakers (Guidant, Pulsar

  20. Influence of flux cored arc welded cruciform joint dimensions on fatigue life of ASTM 517 `F' grade steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Balasubramanian; B Guha

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to predict the fatigue life of flux-cored arc-welded (FCAW) cruciform joints containing lack of penetration (LOP) defects. High strength, quenched and tempered steel (ASTM 517 `F' grade) has been used as the base material throughout the investigation. The design of experiments (DoE) concept has been used to optimize the required number of experiments. Fatigue