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1

Eating habits and behaviors  

MedlinePLUS

... to which someone brought cupcakes Stopping at a fast-food restaurant for breakfast and choosing high fat, high ... plan to buy (impulse buying) or eat at fast-food restaurants. Planning dinners at the beginning of the ...

2

Assessment of Adherence to Eating Habit and Exercise Components in a Behavioral Weight Control Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the augmental value of exercise to behavioral weight control programs has been suggested, demonstration of this value is dependent upon an assessment of adherence to change in eating habits and activity patterns. Self-report measures of adherence were obtained from overweight college women undergoing treatment that involved either dietary…

Zegman, Marilyn A.

3

The assessment of dietary habits in obese women: influence of eating behavior patterns.  

PubMed

The objective of this cross-sectional, observational study was to compare the dietary history and the 7-day record method to assess dietary habits in obese women. The second goal was to investigate whether eating behavior characteristics influence self-reported dietary intake. The study took place at the Obesity Outpatient Clinic, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. Subjects were 137 obese women with a mean age of 40 +/- 12 years and a mean body mass index of 38.2 +/- 6.0 kg/m2. Dietary intake was assessed both by the dietary history and by the 7-day record method. Resting energy expenditure was measured by continuous indirect calorimetry. Physical activity level was estimated using the Baecke questionnaire. To study different aspects of eating behaviour, the "Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire" was used. Absolute energy intake, as assessed by the 7-day record, was consistently lower than with the dietary history method. Sixteen percent of the obese women were overreporters while 66% clearly underreported energy intake, using dietary history as standard method. Restrained eating was associated with underreporting, while all aspects of emotional and external eating behavior were significantly higher in the group of overreporters. No relationship could be observed between the degree of underreporting and age, body weight or body mass index. Energy intake, as assessed by the dietary history method, correlated better with measured energy expenditure in obese subjects than the 7-day record. Eating behavior characteristics influence the accuracy of self-reported dietary intake in obese women. PMID:16777809

Vansant, Greet; Hulens, Mieke

4

Genetic Influences on Adolescent Eating Habits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Behavioral genetic research shows that variation in eating habits and food consumption is due to genetic and environmental factors. The current study extends this line of research by examining the genetic contribution to adolescent eating habits. Analysis of sibling pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add…

Beaver, Kevin M.; Flores, Tori; Boutwell, Brian B.; Gibson, Chris L.

2012-01-01

5

Genetic Influences on Adolescent Eating Habits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral genetic research shows that variation in eating habits and food consumption is due to genetic and environmental factors. The current study extends this line of research by examining the genetic contribution to adolescent eating habits. Analysis of sibling pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) revealed significant genetic influences on variance in an unhealthy

Kevin M. Beaver; Tori Flores; Brian B. Boutwell; Chris L. Gibson

2012-01-01

6

Genetic influences on adolescent eating habits.  

PubMed

Behavioral genetic research shows that variation in eating habits and food consumption is due to genetic and environmental factors. The current study extends this line of research by examining the genetic contribution to adolescent eating habits. Analysis of sibling pairs drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) revealed significant genetic influences on variance in an unhealthy eating habits scale (h(2) = .42), a healthy eating habits scale (h(2) = .51), the number of meals eaten at a fast-food restaurant (h(2) = .33), and the total number of meals eaten per week (h(2) = .26). Most of the remaining variance was due to nonshared environmental factors. Additional analyses conducted separately for males and females revealed a similar pattern of findings. The authors note the limitations of the study and offer suggestions for future research. PMID:21750320

Beaver, Kevin M; Flores, Tori; Boutwell, Brian B; Gibson, Chris L

2011-07-12

7

Eating habits of children with autism.  

PubMed

Autism is a developmental disorder characterized by severe deficits in social interaction and communication, as well as by stereotyped and repetitive behaviors. Children with autism frequently have significant eating difficulties with highly restricted range of food choices. Eating habits and patterns are often unusual and have an impact on family life. The purpose of this article was to review pertinent information regarding this complex developmental disorder and describe a recent study based on a parent survey of feeding patterns in children with autism to give a new perspective for both parents and professionals. PMID:12026389

Williams, P G; Dalrymple, N; Neal, J

8

Can Supermarkets Boost Healthy Eating Habits?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problems related to obesity as a result of changing dietary habits have generated discussions. This study aimed to make connections between institutional theory and presumable strategies that supermarkets may adopt to minimize problems related to poor nutrition. Eating habits, obesity and overweight indexes were analyzed, leading to the following problem: How can supermarkets contribute to fight epidemic obesity and at

Matheus Dill; Vitor Francisco Dalla Corte; Adriano Adelcino Anselmi; Carlos Alberto Oliveira; Maria Isabel Finger

2012-01-01

9

Eating Habits among Adolescents in Rural Southern Appalachia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 274 adolescents aged 14–16 years in rural Appalachia showed that unhealthy eating habits were prevalent. A few adolescents were teased about weight whereas 20.1% witnessed weight teasing almost everyday. Perception of parents’ healthy eating and better social support for healthy eating were associated with healthier eating habits.

Tiejian Wu; James Michael Stoots; James E. Florence; Michael R. Floyd; Jeromy Blake Snider; Ryan D. Ward

2007-01-01

10

Nurturing Healthy Eating Habits from the Start  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Daniel B. Kessler, MD, a developmental and behavioral pediatrician, provides guidance on establishing healthy eating patterns in the early years. He emphasizes the importance of the feeding relationship as an important part of a child's social and emotional development. How parents approach feeding and mealtime is about so much more than physical…

Kessler, Daniel B.

2012-01-01

11

Self-Regulatory Control and Habit Learning in the Development of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical evidence suggests that initial attempts to regulate weight gain quickly become habit-like in individuals with eating disorders. These behaviors are controlled excessively in patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and are controlled more intermittently, with periods of lost control, in patients with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). We suspect that abnormalities in frontostriatal systems that subserve self-regulatory control and habit learning may

Rachel Marsh; Joanna E. Steinglass; Kara Graziano; Bradley S. Peterson; B. Timothy Walsh

2007-01-01

12

Assessment of Eating Disordered Behaviors in Middle School Students Using the Kids’ Eating Disorders Survey (KEDS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eating disorders commonly develop during adolescence. In order to devise a prevention\\/education program, it is necessary to assess the presence of eating disordered behaviors in this population. The Kids’ Eating Disorders Survey (KEDS) was used to gather data on body dissatisfaction, exercise and eating habits and restricting\\/purging behaviors. School and health professionals administered the self-report questionnaire to eighth grade students

S. G. Affenito; E. J. Khu; K. Carroll

1998-01-01

13

Body Composition, Eating Behavior, Food-Body Concerns and Eating Disorders in Adolescent Girls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: Dieting is a behavioral phenomenon which is becoming more frequent among adolescents and the search for weight loss, through dieting, may result in an unbalanced nutrition both quantitatively and qualitatively. Our study intended to look at the eating habits and behavior on a cohort of adolescent girls to verify the presence of unbalanced diets and the prevalence of eating

V. Boschi; M. Siervo; P. D’Orsi; N. Margiotta; E. Trapanese; F. Basile; G. Nasti; A. Papa; O. Bellini; C. Falconi

2003-01-01

14

Characteristics of eating habits and physical activity in relation to body mass index among adolescents.  

PubMed

Objective: To assess eating habits and the level of physical activity in adolescents and develop a predictive model for the body mass index (BMI) based on these variables. Design: In this cross-sectional study, eating habits and the level of physical activity were assessed using a questionnaire validated in adolescents. Body mass and height collected during the last annual checkup were extracted from personal medical records. Subjects: The sample included 330 boys and 377 girls (mean age 15.8 ± 0.2 years) who were first-year high school students in the city of Belgrade, Serbia. Measures: Responses to each of the 14 questions about eating habits and 6 questions about physical activity were scored from the least (0) to the most (3) desired behaviors. These ratings were then averaged to arrive to an aggregate score for each domain. The BMI was calculated according to the standard method. A series of regression analyses was performed to derive the best model for predicting BMI in boys and girls based on individual eating habits and physical activity items, first separately and then combined. Results: In the sample, 24.5% of boys and 9.5% of girls were overweight or obese. Girls' eating habits were better than boys (mean aggregate score 2.3 ± 0.3 and 2.1 ± 0.3, respectively, p < 0.001), whereas the level of physical activity was greater in boys than girls (2.1 ± 0.6 vs 1.9 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). The differences between boys and girls in the BMI, eating habits, and physical activity remained significant after controlling for their knowledge about healthy eating and education level of their parents. Eating habits were a better predictor of BMI than physical activity, particularly in boys (R (2) = 0.13 vs R (2) = 0.02) compared to girls (R (2) = 0.04 vs R (2) = 0.01). Combining eating habits and physical activity in the multivariate model of BMI resulted in a better predictive accuracy in boys (R (2) = 0.17) but not girls (R (2) = 0.04). Conclusions: Eating habits and physical activity differ between adolescent boys and girls and can predict BMI, particularly in boys. The results suggest the need to develop gender-specific programs for promoting healthy lifestyle among adolescents in our country. PMID:24024767

Djordjevic-Nikic, Marina; Dopsaj, Milivoj

2013-08-01

15

America's Eating Habits: Changes and Consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individual chapters in this book provide different perspectives on the nutrition problems in the United States: what are the economic costs associated with unhealthy eating patterns; how do dietary patterns compare with dietary recommendations; how do national income and prices, advertising, health claims, and trends in eating away from home affect nutrient intake; how much do people know about nutrition

Anonymous

1999-01-01

16

When Teens' Eating Habits Become Unhealthy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eating disorders than may beset teenagers and seriously affect their health are discussed. Facts about causes, symptoms, and treatments for anorexia nervosa and bulimia, a disorder which involves overeating, followed by self-induced vomiting or purging, are presented. (PP)|

Lucas, Alexander R.

1984-01-01

17

America's Eating Habits. Changes and Consequences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Individual chapters in this book provide different perspectives on the nutrition problem in the United States: what are the economic costs associated with unhealth eating patterns; how do dietary patterns compare with dietary recommendations; how do natio...

E. Frazao

1999-01-01

18

Eating habits associated with Echinostoma malayanum infections in the Philippines.  

PubMed

A survey of 61 residents belonging to 12 pre-selected families (having at least one member positive for echinostomiasis malayanum) from Barangay Malibago, Echague, Isabela (northern Luzon) suggested that infections with Echinostoma malayanum follow a "familial trend". The parasite is endemic because the raw ingestion of Lymnaea (Bullastra) cumingiana, the second intermediate host in the Philippines, is a learned habit passed down from one generation to the next. A questionnaire on eating habits revealed that Lymnaea (Bullastra) cumingiana or "birabid" was usually prepared raw or half-cooked after treatment with salt or "bagoong" (salted fish paste). It was abundant in rice fields during the wet months of the year, thus implying a seasonal infection pattern since eating frequency was affected by availability. Those who ate this snail reported a long duration of indulgence with this habit. In contrast, Pila luzonica or "kuhol", the second intermediate host of E. ilocanum, is subjected to similar eating practices but is rarely ingested raw or "half-cooked". Other than snails, shrimps, fish (Tilapia sp.) and meat are also eaten raw. This suggests that the local population is potentially susceptible to other food-borne helminthiases. Extensive use of mass media and public health education is necessary to awaken the awareness of the people to the potential hazards associated with their traditional eating habits. PMID:1822888

Tangtrongchitr, A; Monzon, R B

1991-12-01

19

Fresh Food Program Promotes Healthy Eating Habits among Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Communities across the nation are fighting the increased incidence of childhood obesity and Type II diabetes. With funding from USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES), a group in Illinois is promoting environmental sustainability and healthy eating habits in young Americans. Seven Generations Ahead's "Fresh…

Kish, Stacy

2008-01-01

20

Hair mercury value and fish?eating habit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury levels in the hair segment close to the scalp were well correlated with fish?eating habits for residents on a small island in the south of Japanese mainlands. Mercury levels changed in segmented hair samples along with the distance from the scalp. The time of sprouting of hair segment in which the mercury level showed the peak coincided well with

Tsuguyoshi Suzuki; Akihiro Igata; Kiyoshige Niina

1979-01-01

21

The Influence of School Eating Environment on Children's Eating Behaviors: An Examination of the SNDA-III  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in the United States has prompted researchers to examine the factors that contribute to children’s food choices and consumption. Schools provide ample opportunities to teach children healthy eating habits, as well as create eating environments that are conducive to healthy eating behaviors. The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) provides federally assisted meals to

NeeleySabrinaM

2011-01-01

22

An Examination of Sex Differences in Relation to the Eating Habits and Nutrient Intakes of University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives: To examine sex differences in eating habits and nutrient intakes and explore whether eating habits mediate the effects of sex on nutrient intakes and whether sex moderates the effects of eating habits on nutrient intakes. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of eating habits and food-intake frequency in a convenience sample of college…

Li, Kin-Kit; Concepcion, Rebecca Y.; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Ebbeck, Vicki; Woekel, Erica; Readdy, R. Tucker

2012-01-01

23

Anxiety, restraint, and eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothesized that individual differences in eating behavior based on the distinction between obese and normal Ss could be demonstrated within a population of normal Ss classified as to the extent of restraint chronically exercised with respect to eating. Ss were 42 female college students. Restrained Ss resembled the obese behaviorally, and unrestrained Ss resembled normals. This demonstration was effected in

C. Peter Herman; Janet Polivy

1975-01-01

24

Eating behavior and other distracting behaviors while driving among patients with eating disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study sought to better characterize eating behavior, binge-eating behavior, and other potentially problematic, distracting behaviors while driving in patients with eating disorders. Forty patients with eating disorders who reported eating in their car at least once per week were included. Thirty subjects with eating disorders reported binge-eating while driving. A surprisingly high number of subjects reported engaging in

John Glass; James E Mitchell; Martina de Zwaan; Steve Wonderlich; Ross D Crosby; James Roerig; Melissa Burgard; Kathryn Lancaster; Janeen Voxland

2004-01-01

25

Weight Concerns, Problem Eating Behaviors, and Problem Drinking Behaviors in Female Collegiate Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared eating behaviors and alcohol drinking habits between female varsity college athletes and female controls (non-athletes). Data from a student survey indicated that self-reported problem drinking and eating behaviors existed in both groups at similar rates. There did not appear to be a significant relationship between self-reported alcohol…

Gutgesell, Margaret E.; Moreau, Kerrie L.; Thompson, Dixie L.

2003-01-01

26

Weight Concerns, Problem Eating Behaviors, and Problem Drinking Behaviors in Female Collegiate Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared eating behaviors and alcohol drinking habits between female varsity college athletes and female controls (non-athletes). Data from a student survey indicated that self-reported problem drinking and eating behaviors existed in both groups at similar rates. There did not appear to be a significant relationship between self-reported alcohol…

Gutgesell, Margaret E.; Moreau, Kerrie L.; Thompson, Dixie L.

2003-01-01

27

Predicting obesity from four eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity is a growing problem in the United States. Research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of obesity is vital. One past study examined four eating behaviors in relation to obesity: eating beyond satiety, snacking, night eating, and feeling hungry within three hours of eating. Only eating beyond satiety was associated with obesity. The present study examined these same eating

Tovah Yanover

2005-01-01

28

Executive personality traits and eating behavior.  

PubMed

Eating disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, commonly involve a dysregulation of behavior (e.g., a lack or excess of inhibition and impulsive eating patterns) that is suggestive of prefrontal dysfunction. Functional neuro-imaging studies show that prefrontal-subcortical systems play a role in eating behavior and appetite in healthy individuals, and that people with eating disorders have altered activity in these systems. Eating behavior is often disturbed by illnesses and injuries that impinge upon prefrontal-subcortical systems. This study examined relationships between executive functioning and eating behavior in healthy individuals using validated behavioral rating scales (Frontal Systems Behavior Scale and Eating Inventory). Correlations demonstrated that increased dysexecutive traits were associated with disinhibited eating and greater food cravings. There was also a positive association with cognitive restraint of eating, suggesting that increased compensatory behaviors follow disinhibited eating. These psychometric findings reinforce those of other methodologies, supporting a role for prefrontal systems in eating. PMID:14660070

Spinella, Marcello; Lyke, Jennifer

2004-01-01

29

Cognitive-Behavioral Theories of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an integrated cognitive-behavioral theory of eating disorders that is based on hypotheses developed over the past 30 years. The theory is evaluated using a selected review of the eating disorder literature pertaining to cognitive biases, negative emotional reactions, binge eating, compensatory behaviors, and risk factors for eating disorders. In general, hypotheses derived from cognitive-behavioral theories have been

Donald A. Williamson; Marney A. White; Emily York-Crowe; Tiffany M. Stewart

2004-01-01

30

Zolpidem-induced compulsive evening eating behavior.  

PubMed

Zolpidem is associated with an amnestic sleep-related eating disorder, but not with compulsive eating behaviors. A 57-year-old woman receiving zolpidem for insomnia showed compulsive evening eating behavior under a wakeful state. Her compulsive evening eating behavior disappeared when zolpidem treatment was halted. Here, we report her case. PMID:24045611

Kim, Hyung Ki; Kwon, Jun Tack; Baek, Jeehun; Park, Duck Su; Yang, Kwang Ik

31

Eating behavior of ballet dancers.  

PubMed

Ballet dancers are frequently regarded as having a higher risk of developing eating disorders (ED). This paper describes the eating habits and prevalence of ED in a group of female students from a dance academy in Rome, Italy. Participants were assessed with an array of measures conventionally employed (usually singly) in epidemiological studies of ED, namely: an anthropometrical-nutritional evaluation, the EAT, EDI, and BUT questionnaires, and the EDE interview. The 160 students who agreed to participate were evaluated anthropometrically, nutritionally and psychometrically and 83 underwent the EDE structured interview. Their calorie intake was insufficient in all age groups in terms of the nutritional standards required by their daily physical activity. EAT, EDI and BUT enhanced concerns about dieting, food intake control and body image. The significance of the correlations between calorie intake and the EAT Dieting and the EDI Perfectionism and Interceptive Awareness scores increased in function of age. Food, weight and body image concerns increased with age and length of time in the ballet environment The reduced calorie intake was not necessarily linked to the presence of psychopathological signs. PMID:11930986

Dotti, A; Fioravanti, M; Balotta, M; Tozzi, F; Cannella, C; Lazzari, R

2002-03-01

32

The Importance of Eating Behavior in Eating Disorders  

PubMed Central

A disturbance in eating behavior is the defining characteristic of the clinical eating disorders, Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder. Surprisingly little research has been devoted to assessing objectively the nature of the eating disturbances in these disorders, to elucidating what factors contribute to the development and persistence of these disturbances, or to describing how they change with treatment. This review, which is based on a Mars lecture delivered at the 2010 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior, reviews objective information about the nature of the disturbances of eating behavior in eating disorders. These data suggest that more detailed knowledge of eating behavior is an essential component of a full understanding of eating disorders and may provide a foundation for studies of pathophysiology and for the development of new treatment methods.

Walsh, B. Timothy

2011-01-01

33

Food-Related Beliefs, Eating Behavior, and Classroom Food Practices of Middle School Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Surveyed middle school teachers regarding their classroom food and eating behaviors. Using food (particularly candy) as student incentives was common. Most foods used did not support development of healthy eating habits. Many teachers did not role model healthy eating at school. Prevalent use of vending machines was reported. Correlates of…

Kubik, Martha Y.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Hannan, Peter J.; Story, Mary; Perry, Cheryl L.

2002-01-01

34

Food-Related Beliefs, Eating Behavior, and Classroom Food Practices of Middle School Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed middle school teachers regarding their classroom food and eating behaviors. Using food (particularly candy) as student incentives was common. Most foods used did not support development of healthy eating habits. Many teachers did not role model healthy eating at school. Prevalent use of vending machines was reported. Correlates of…

Kubik, Martha Y.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Hannan, Peter J.; Story, Mary; Perry, Cheryl L.

2002-01-01

35

School feeding programs' role in forming eating habits.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To identify teaching managers' perceptions regarding the relationship of school feeding and the promotion of healthy eating habits among students. METHODS A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was developed in the city of Guarulhos (Southeast Brazil). Key informants from municipal public schools were interviewed. Public schools were selected (n=13) and classified as to the level of social exclusion, size and economic activity of the region where the school was located. Pedagogic coordinators and school principals were individually interviewed with semi-structured questions. RESULTS From school principals and pedagogical coordinators' perceptions, three categories were identified: Food in the school context; School feeding program's role and the Concept of food and nutrition security, which indicate that they considered meals as part of school routine in order to attain physiological needs of energy and nutrients. Their answers also indicated that they did not consider school meals as a pedagogical action related to their specific responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between the school feeding and the formation of eating habits is not a topic usually discussed between the different professionals involved with health and education. The implementation of health promoting policies will only be possible after a debate about how schools and their pedagogical team adopt the program guidelines and how the professionals decode these strategies in daily activities. PMID:24142314

Cervato-Mancuso, Ana Maria; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Araki, Erica Lie; Bógus, Claudia Maria

2013-09-01

36

Dopamine and binge eating behaviors  

PubMed Central

Central dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the motivational aspects of eating and food choices. This review focuses on human and animal data examining the importance of dopamine on binge eating behaviors. Early works examining dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of bulimic individuals suggested decreased dopamine turnover during the active phase of the illness. While neuroimaging studies of dopamine mechanisms in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are limited, genetic studies in humans have implicated an increased frequency of dopamine transporter and associated D2 receptor polymorphisms with binge pathology. Recent examinations of rodent models of dietary-induced binge eating (DIBE) have investigated plausible dopamine mechanisms involved in sustaining binge eating behaviors. In DIBE models, highly palatable foods (fats, sugars and their combination), as well as restricted access conditions appear to promote ingestive responses and result in sustained dopamine stimulation within the nucleus accumbens. Taken together with studies examining the comorbidity of illicit drug use and eating disorders, the data reviewed here support a role for dopamine in perpetuating the compulsive feeding patterns of BN and BED. As such, we propose that sustained stimulation of the dopamine systems by bingeing promoted by preexisting conditions (e.g., genetic traits, dietary restraint, stress, etc.) results in progressive impairments of dopamine signaling. To disrupt this vicious cycle, novel research-based treatment options aiming at the neural substrates of compulsive eating patterns are necessary.

Bello, Nicholas T.; Hajnal, Andras

2010-01-01

37

Culture and maternal influences on daughter's body image and eating habits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine how mothers across different cultures (African American and Caucasian American) living in the society influence their daughter's body image and eating habits. Specifically, the study examined daughters' perceptions of mothers' influence on body image and eating habits. Participants included a total of 210 African American and Caucasian American females from the Psychology

Paige N Wettern

2011-01-01

38

Obesity and the Unbalanced Energy Equation: Exercise versus Eating Habit Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared relative effectiveness of exercise and eating habit change individually and in combination for weight loss and physical conditioning. Results indicated significant improvement for all treatment groups. Groups who exercised showed most improvement in physical fitness. Combining exercise and eating habit change yielded best results in…

And Others; Dahlkoetter, JoAnn

1979-01-01

39

Obesity and the Unbalanced Energy Equation: Exercise versus Eating Habit Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared relative effectiveness of exercise and eating habit change individually and in combination for weight loss and physical conditioning. Results indicated significant improvement for all treatment groups. Groups who exercised showed most improvement in physical fitness. Combining exercise and eating habit change yielded best results in…

And Others; Dahlkoetter, JoAnn

1979-01-01

40

Development of healthy eating habits early in life. Review of recent evidence and selected guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Encouraging healthy eating habit development early in life is a way to prevent the onset of diet-related diseases. This review focuses on the period ranging from the beginning of complementary feeding until the age of 3 years. Its first objective was to review relevant themes in the most recent literature on the development of healthy eating habits in this period.

Camille Schwartz; Petra A. M. J. Scholtens; Amandine Lalanne; Hugo Weenen; Sophie Nicklaus

2011-01-01

41

Behavioral Treatment of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral conceptualizations of anorexia nervosa and bulimia emphasize the notion that the symptoms of these disorders are acquired through processes of conditioning or learning. Behavioral therapy interventions have largely focused on reduction of the phobic-like anxiety associated with eating and weight gain, along with \\

James P. McGee; Kathleen T. McGee

1986-01-01

42

The relationships between eating habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, and body mass index among baby boomers.  

PubMed

The study was to examine the eating habits of baby boomers and to investigate the relationship of these and other lifestyle habits on their reported body mass indices (BMI). A questionnaire was administered by mail to a random sample of people aged 40 years and above, drawn from the Electoral Rolls in Victoria, Australia. Part of the questionnaire contained questions about the respondents' eating habits, smoking status and alcohol use, as well as self reported heights and weights and demographic characteristics. Eight hundred and forty-four people (out of 1470) returned usable questionnaires. Statistically significant differences were found between the eating habits of men and women. Generally, more women snacked on high energy dense foods (e.g., confectionery). More men took larger mouthfuls than women. The eating habits of women appeared to be more formal than men's. Four constructs named: unconstrained eating, traditional eating style, gulping, and chocolate and junk food were derived from the eating behaviour literature. Structural equation modelling showed that eating behaviour was associated with BMI along with current smoking, ex-smoking status, alcohol consumption, and demographics. Eating habits and other lifestyle behaviours appear to be associated with BMI though in different pathways for men and women. PMID:21986185

Worsley, Anthony; Wang, Wei C; Hunter, Wendy

2011-09-29

43

Overcoming picky eating. Eating enjoyment as a central aspect of children's eating behaviors.  

PubMed

Picky eating is a relatively common problem during childhood, and parents lack clear strategies with which to decrease picky eating. This study examined whether increasing eating enjoyment and cooking enjoyment might give opportunities to decrease picky eating. Parents (n=305), mainly mothers with children between 6 and 12 years of age (53.8% boys; 46.2% girls), completed a questionnaire on pressure and restriction, eating enjoyment, and picky eating, and cooking enjoyment. Path analyses were performed to examine the mediating role of eating enjoyment. The final model provided a good fit to the data and explained 33% variance in picky eating. A strong inverse association between eating enjoyment and picky eating was found (?=-.44). Significant direct effects were found between cooking enjoyment and picky eating (?=-.16) and restriction and picky eating (?=.18). Eating enjoyment partly mediated the association between cooking enjoyment and picky eating. Results showed pressure had only an indirect effect on picky eating through eating enjoyment. Eating enjoyment serves as an important and central factor in children's picky-eating behavior. High controlling practices might create a negative environment around food and healthy eating and so decrease eating enjoyment and increase picky eating. PMID:22245133

van der Horst, Klazine

2012-01-04

44

Eating as an Automatic Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continued growth of the obesity epidemic at a time when obesity is highly stigmatizing should make us ques- tion the assumption that, given the right information and motivation, people can successfully reduce their food intake over the long term. An alternative view is that eat- ing is an automatic behavior over which the environment has more control than do

Deborah A. Cohen; Thomas A. Farley

45

Differences in eating and lifestyle habits between first- and sixth-year medical students from Zagreb.  

PubMed

Eating and lifestyle habits of first (n=169) and sixth (n=272) year students, aged 18 to 26 years, attending a Medical School in Zagreb, were compared related to the years of study. A self-administered questionnaire created for this study incorporated a food frequency questionnaire. Both year students reported similar number of meals per day, irregular consumption of meals, skipping breakfast, frequency of vegetables, fruits, cereals, sweets, milk and dairy products consumption, body mass index (BMI) calculated from self-reported weight and height and alcohol consumption. Significant differences between groups were observed in consuming supper (p = 0.001), being on diet (p = 0.032), intake of supplements (p = 0.041), meat (p < 0.001), dried meat (p = 0.027), coffee and tea consumption (p = 0.016), physical activity (p = 0.041; p = 0.016), and smoking (p = 0.029). This study showed non-healthy eating arid lifestyle behavior among Medical School students. We observed association between the year of study, and some of the eating habits and lifestyle factors. PMID:21874711

Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Jelini?, Jagoda Doko; Matani?, Dubravka; Pucarin-Cvetkovi?, Jasna; Bergman Markovi?, Biserka; Senta, Ankica

2010-12-01

46

Eating at the university canteen. Associations with socioeconomic status and healthier self-reported eating habits in France.  

PubMed

French university canteens offer structured meals at a fixed moderate price. We examined whether eating regularly at university canteens was associated with socioeconomic status (SES) or dietary practices. The study data came from a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1723 students aged 18-24 years, in their first year of university in 2005-2006, enrolled in the universities of southeastern France (response rate=71%). Self-reported dietary practices were collected with a behavioral questionnaire. Adjusted logistic regressions showed that eating regularly at university canteens was less frequent among students with less than € 300 monthly resources and not living with their families (OR=0.68 [95%CI: 0.49-0.94]). It was also positively associated, regardless of SES, with the consumption of at least five servings of fruit/vegetables daily (OR=1.42 [1.05-1.92]) and one serving of meat/fish daily (OR=1.41 [1.13-1.76]) but not with either restricting fatty food (OR=1.04 [0.81-1.33]) or never/rarely adding salt to food (OR=1.06 [0.85-1.32]). Eating regularly at university canteens was less frequent among less well-off students and was positively associated with some healthier self-reported dietary habits. Further research is needed to confirm these results in the overall student population in France and to understand the determinants of university canteen utilization. PMID:21094667

Guagliardo, Valérie; Lions, Caroline; Darmon, Nicole; Verger, Pierre

2010-11-20

47

Participation in Athletic Activitiesand Eating Disordered Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the following study was to examine the relationship between participation in athletic and exercise activities and eating disordered behavior among a college student population. A sample of 853 undergraduate students completed the EAT-26 and indicated participation in athletic activities to determine eating disorder-related dieting and exercise attitudes and behaviors. Results demonstrate that participation in recreational activities correlates

Dana Heller Levitt

2008-01-01

48

Cognitive-Behavioral Theories of Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an integrated cognitive-behavioral theory of eating disorders that is based on hypotheses developed over the past 30 years. The theory is evaluated using a selected review of the eating disorder literature pertaining to cognitive biases, negative emotional reactions, binge eating, compensatory behaviors, and risk factors for…

Williamson, Donald A.; White, Marney A.; York-Crowe, Emily; Stewart, Tiffany M.

2004-01-01

49

Cognitive-Behavioral Theories of Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents an integrated cognitive-behavioral theory of eating disorders that is based on hypotheses developed over the past 30 years. The theory is evaluated using a selected review of the eating disorder literature pertaining to cognitive biases, negative emotional reactions, binge eating, compensatory behaviors, and risk factors for…

Williamson, Donald A.; White, Marney A.; York-Crowe, Emily; Stewart, Tiffany M.

2004-01-01

50

[Eating habits of a group of professional volleyball players].  

PubMed

The aim of the research was an analysis of the eating habits of professional volleyball players according to their sex and age. The research has been carried out on a group of 210 men players and women players at the age of 13-25, representatives of sports clubs in Ostro?eka, My?lenice, Bydgoszcz and Warszawa. The research has revealed a limited realisation of rational diets by both men and women players. The most common mistakes made by them include a smaller number of meals during the day than recommended (especially among men), taking up training on empty stomach and insufficient frequency of consumption of dairy products, fish, vegetables and fruit. The research has also revealed excessive consumption of sweets, sweet sparkling drinks and fast food (mainly among men). The examined players to some extent only apply regular strategies of rehydration of their organisms. A high percentage of them do not pay attention to supplementation of liquids after an effort or they drink a lot of liquids at one time. The most frequently chosen drinks were mineral water and isotonic drinks. Supplementation was applied by a small percentage of the players, mainly men, who most often chose vitamins, Izostar, creatine, L-carnitine and HMB. PMID:21735984

Gacek, Maria

2011-01-01

51

Using Nutrition Labeling as a Potential Tool for Changing Eating Habits of University Dining Hall Patrons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the influence of the nutritional labeling Nutrition Bytes on the eating habits of adults eating in dining halls at a Midwestern university and to assess differences between sexes. Dining hall patrons (114 men, 91 women) 19 years of age or older voluntarily completed a descriptive 15-item written questionnaire that examined the

Judy A. Driskell; Marian C. Schake; Hillary A. Detter

2008-01-01

52

Eating and drinking habits of young London-based Irish men: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study is based on interviews with young Irish men living in London, regarding their diets and their views on healthy eating. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Interviewees gave various reasons for adopting unhealthy eating habits, including the cost of healthy foods, their lack of time and ability to cook, and their prioritisation of drinking alcohol. Views

Aidan Kelly; Karen Ciclitira

2011-01-01

53

Factors Influencing Healthy Eating Habits Among College Students: An Application of the Health Belief Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poor eating habits are an important public health issue that has large health and economic implications. Many food preferences are established early, but because people make more and more independent eating decisions as they move through adolescence, the transition to independent living during the university days is an important event. To study the phenomenon of food selection, the heath belief

Sameer Deshpande; Michael D. Basil; Debra Z. Basil

2009-01-01

54

Eating habits, health attitudes and obesity indices among medical students in northern Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical students represent not only the final but also the most crucial opportunity for education in the field of healthy lifestyles and nutritional habits. Eating habits and obesity indices among medical students in southern Greece were described almost a decade ago. However, there is a lack of current, relevant data concerning students living in northern Greece. The purpose of the

Michael Chourdakis; Thrasivoulos Tzellos; Georgios Papazisis; Konstantinos Toulis; Dimitrios Kouvelas

2010-01-01

55

I don't like crumbs on my keyboard: eating behaviors of World of Warcraft players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer gamers are often categorized as being unhealthy due to lack of physical activity and poor eating habits. This mixed methods study revealed that computer gamers, specifically World of Warcraft players, are highly conscious of their food choices and eating decisions either because they value their health or because certain foods impede game play. In order to facilitate healthy behaviors

Natalie DeWitt; David Lohrmann

2011-01-01

56

Relationship between stress, eating behavior, and obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress is thought to influence human eating behavior and has been examined in animal and human studies. Our understanding of the stress-eating relation is confounded by limitations inherent in the study designs; however, we can make some tentative conclusions that support the notion that stress can influence eating patterns in humans. Stress appears to alter overall food intake in two

Susan J. Torres; Caryl A. Nowson

2007-01-01

57

Sex and Gender Differences in Eating Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we review the research literature on sex and gender differences in hunger and eating behavior. If you ask people about these types of differences in hunger and eating, they will readily identify some: women exhibit certain distinctive cravings during pregnancy and certain phases of the menstrual cycle; men eat more than women do; men are more likely

C. Peter Herman; Janet Polivy

58

Weight Teasing and Disordered Eating Behaviors in Adolescents: Longitudinal Findings From Project EAT (Eating Among Teens)  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE. To assess whether weight-related teasing predicts the development of binge eating, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and frequent dieting among male and female adolescents. METHODS. A prospective study was conducted with an ethnically and socioeconom- ically diverse sample of 2516 adolescents who completed surveys at both time 1 (1998 -1999) and time 2 (2003-2004) of the Project EAT (Eating Among

Jess Haines; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer; Marla E. Eisenberg; Peter J. Hannan

2010-01-01

59

Behavioral management of night eating disorders  

PubMed Central

Night eating syndrome (NES) is a form of disordered eating associated with evening hyperphagia (overeating at night) and nocturnal ingestions (waking at night to eat). As with other forms of disordered eating, cognitive and behavioral treatment modalities may be effective in reducing NES symptoms. This review presents evidence for a variety of behavioral treatment approaches, including behavioral therapy, phototherapy, behavioral weight loss treatment, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. A more detailed overview of cognitive-behavioral therapy for NES is provided. All of these studies have been case studies or included small samples, and all but one have been uncontrolled, but the outcomes of many of these approaches are promising. Larger randomized controlled trials are warranted to advance NES treatment literature. With the inclusion of NES in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a “Feeding or Eating Disorder Not Elsewhere Classified,” more sophisticated, empirically-supported, behaviorally-based treatment approaches are much needed.

Berner, Laura A; Allison, Kelly C

2013-01-01

60

Weight Concerns, Problem Eating Behaviors, and Problem Drinking Behaviors in Female Collegiate Athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare eating behaviors and alcohol drinking habits between 2 groups of female college students: varsity athletes and controls (nonathletes). Design and Setting: We obtained descriptive data using an anonymous, self-report survey instrument. The instrument assessed eating habits and behaviors as well as alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors. Subjects: One hundred forty-nine female varsity athletes and 209 female controls (nonathletes) from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I universities. Measurements: Data collected included weight and desired weight, meal patterns, methods of gaining or losing weight, details of past or current eating problem, 2-week alcohol consumption quantity and frequency (binge drinking), and problem alcohol behaviors. We used chi-square analysis for nominal data and t tests and multivariate analysis of variance for interval data. Results: Compared with athletes, nonathletes ate fewer meals, and more of them reported feeling that they were too heavy and lied about their weight-control practices. Neither group reported high rates of pathologic behaviors such as vomiting. Nearly 18% of athletes and 26% of controls reported a past or current eating disorder. Athletes did not differ from controls in reported 2-week alcohol consumption, including binge drinking (nearly 50% of both groups). Conclusions: Self-reported problem drinking and eating behaviors exist in both athletes and controls but not at different rates. This finding may be a result of coach, athletic trainer, and peer-group counseling at these 2 schools or a general trend for lower rates of unhealthy behaviors among female athletes.

Moreau, Kerrie L.; Thompson, Dixie L.

2003-01-01

61

The health and eating habits of young children in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

To eat is indispensable for the maintenance of life and also for living a good and healthy life. Especially during childhood when children develop their physical functions as well as mental aspects, the need is considered to be very important. However, children cannot choose their own parents and are obliged to eat what is given to them. In other words,

Emiko Hannah Ishigaki

1991-01-01

62

Differences exist in the eating habits of university men and women at fast-food restaurants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast-food restaurant eating habits of a group of college students at a large Midwestern land-grant university were determined and evaluated by sex. A 2-page questionnaire was developed, which assessed the subjects' frequency of eating meals and snacks at fast-food restaurants, the predominate types of fast-food restaurants patronized, and the factors influencing food choices at fast-food restaurants. Questionnaires were completed by

Judy A. Driskell; Brian R. Meckna; Narissa E. Scales

2006-01-01

63

Serum fatty acid composition as a marker of eating habits in normal and diabetic subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is known that the Japanese people have had healthy eating habits, which may explain their low incidence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). In the present study, in order to examine dietary habits such as fish consumption, the serum fatty acids from 190 normal people in their 30s and 50s living in Tokyo were surveyed. Furthermore, the fatty acid composition

Takashi Hasegawa; Mieko Oshima

1999-01-01

64

Eating habits of preschool children with high migrant status in Switzerland according to a new food frequency questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of eating habits in young children from multicultural backgrounds has seldom been conducted. Our objectives were to study the reproducibility and the results of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) developed to assess changes in eating habits of preschool children with a high migrant population, in the context of a multidisciplinary multilevel lifestyle intervention. Three kindergarten classes (53% from migrant

Vincent Ebenegger; Pedro Marques-Vidal; Jérôme Barral; Susi Kriemler; Jardena J. Puder; Andreas Nydegger

2010-01-01

65

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) adapted for binge eating disorder (BED). Women with BED (N = 44) were randomly assigned to group DBT or to a wait-list control condition and were administered the Eating Disorder Examination in addition to measures of weight, mood, and affect regulation at baseline and posttreatment. Treated women evidenced significant improvement

Christy F. Telch; W. Stewart Agras; Marsha M. Linehan

2001-01-01

66

The relationships among psychiatric medications, eating behaviors, and weight.  

PubMed

To help address gaps in information about the links that exist between psychiatric medications and weight changes, an investigation of relationships among select psychotropic agents (i.e., mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and second-generation antipsychotics {SGAs}), eating behaviors, and weight was conducted. Data from a cross-sectional study of food habits in 97 individuals with mood disorders was used. Variables measured included use of psychotropic agents, measures of cognitive dietary restraint and disinhibition from the Three Factor Eating Behavior Questionnaire (TFEQ), psychiatric functioning, reported weight gain and measured BMI. The TFEQ measures were compared to population norms. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined the relationships among the psychotropic agents, eating behaviors, and weight. Indicators of cognitive dietary restraint and disinhibition were higher than population norms (p's<0.05 to 0.0001). Depression was associated with restraint (rho=0.21, p<0.05). BMI was associated with disinhibition (p<0.05); antidepressant use appeared to moderate weight for those taking SGAs and mood stabilizers (p<0.05). Exploration of the interacting mechanisms of psychotropic agents and attention to eating attitudes and behaviors of individuals taking psychiatric medications might lessen pharmaceutical-induced weight gain. Prospective research on large samples that can make comparisons to those who are untreated is needed. PMID:23557818

Davison, Karen M

2013-02-09

67

Effects of Nutrition Health Intervention on Pupils' Nutrition Knowledge and Eating Habits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of nutrition health intervention on pupils' nutrition knowledge and eating habits from grade seven to grade nine. The study was part of the ENHPS (since 2008, Schools for Health in Europe (SHE)) program in Finland, and more specifically its sub-project titled "From Puijo to the World…

Raiha, Teija; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Enkenberg, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Vesa

2012-01-01

68

Parental feeding styles and adolescents’ healthy eating habits. Structure and correlates of a Costa Rican questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study designed and validated a questionnaire aimed at examining parental feeding styles to encourage healthy eating habits among Costa Rican adolescents. Adolescents (n=133; mean age 15.4 years), and their parents, participated in the study. The parents completed a parental feeding style questionnaire, and the adolescents completed 3-day food records. Confirmatory factor analyses suggest four distinct parental feeding styles, (a)

Rafael Monge-Rojas; Vanesa Smith-Castro; Uriyoán Colon-Ramos; Carlos Garita-Arce; Marta Sánchez-López; Anne Chinnock

2010-01-01

69

Eating Habits of 7-12 YearOld Children in Tabriz, Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 Abstract: This study aimed to identify the eating habits of second and fifth graders from Tabriz, Iran. A total of 160 pupils were selected through random sampling at ?ehit Sobhani Elementary School in the Kutb district of Tabriz. The sample consisted of 80 girls and 80 boys; 83 second graders and 78 fifth graders. Pupils' BMI measures showed that

F. Pinar Cakiroglu; Mahsa Malek

2007-01-01

70

Obesity and eating habits among college students in Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: During the last few decades, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) experienced rapid socio-cultural changes caused by the accelerating economy in the Arabian Gulf region. That was associated with major changes in the food choices and eating habits which, progressively, became more and more \\

Abdallah S Al-Rethaiaa; Alaa-Eldin A Fahmy; Naseem M Al-Shwaiyat

2010-01-01

71

The Breakfast-Eating Habits of Inner City High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This cross-sectional, descriptive correlational research study describes the breakfast-eating habits of 846 inner-city high school students. Fifty-seven percent of students reported skipping breakfast on the day of the survey, despite the free hot-breakfast program at their high school. Significantly more girls than boys skipped breakfast, and…

Sweeney, Nancy M.; Horishita, Naomi

2005-01-01

72

Validity of Retrospective Reports of Eating Behavior from the Eating Disorder Examination.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Eating Disorder Examination (EDE, Cooper and Fairburn 1987) is the most widely used instrument for the diagnosis of eating disorders. The EDE relies on retrospective self-report to obtain eating behavior information. However, there is growing evidence...

J. M. Stone

1999-01-01

73

Childhood obesity: food, nutrient, and eating-habit trends and influences.  

PubMed

The need has never been greater to support healthy eating and physical activity in children and youth; the numbers of overweight and obese children have doubled and tripled, respectively, over the past 3 decades. Poor eating habits, including inadequate intake of vegetables, fruit, and milk, and eating too many high-calorie snacks, play a role in childhood obesity. Grain products provide the highest percentage (31%) of daily calories, followed by "other foods," which have limited nutritional value (22% of daily calories). Snacks account for 27% of total daily calories, which is more than the calories consumed at breakfast (18%) and lunch (24%), but not dinner (31%). For Canadians older than 4 years of age, more than 41% of daily snack calories come from other foods, such as chips, chocolate bars, soft drinks, fruit drinks, sugars, syrup, preserves, fats, and oils. Habits that protect against childhood obesity include eating more vegetables and fruit, eating meals with family, and being physically active. Children's food habits and choices are influenced by family, caregivers, friends, schools, marketing, and the media. Successful interventions for preventing childhood obesity combine family- and school-based programs, nutrition education, dietary change, physical activity, family participation, and counseling. PMID:17622277

Roblin, Lynn

2007-08-01

74

Exploring eating and activity behaviors with parent-child dyads using event history calendars.  

PubMed

Despite advances in science, the prevalence of childhood obesity persists and outcomes remain inconsistent. An event history calendar (EHC) is a tool to facilitate understanding of family life dynamics influencing eating and activity choices. This tool uses reflection to assess temporally linked behavior in the context of life events so that choices related to eating and activity are more explicit. Fourteen parent-child (6-14 years) dyads completed an EHC and interview 2 months following a healthy eating/activity intervention. Phenomenological analysis revealed themes including "awareness" of activity/eating behaviors, "healthy lessons," "family time," and "barriers" to change. The EHC facilitated participant communication and understanding by making connections between behaviors, habits, and events in family context, so that eating and activity behaviors could be realistically reviewed. This tool has potential to guide development of individualized interventions through barrier identification and goal establishment in research and clinical settings to help counteract childhood obesity over time. PMID:23783521

Danford, Cynthia A; Martyn, Kristy K

2013-06-19

75

Eating habits and obesity among Lebanese university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In the past year Lebanon has been experiencing a nutritional transition in food choices from the typical Mediterranean diet to the fast food pattern. As a consequence, the dietary habits of young adults have been affected; thus, overweight and obesity are increasingly being observed among the young. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of overweight

Najat Yahia; Alice Achkar; Abbass Abdallah; Sandra Rizk

2008-01-01

76

Obesity and eating habits among college students in Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background During the last few decades, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) experienced rapid socio-cultural changes caused by the accelerating economy in the Arabian Gulf region. That was associated with major changes in the food choices and eating habits which, progressively, became more and more "Westernized". Such "a nutritional transition" has been claimed for the rising rates of overweight and obesity which were recently observed among Saudi population. Therefore, the objectives of the current work were to 1) determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in a sample of male college students in KSA and 2) determine the relationship between the students' body weight status and composition and their eating habits. Methods A total of 357 male students aged 18-24 years were randomly chosen from College of Health Sciences at Rass, Qassim University, KSA for the present study. A Self-reported questionnaire about the students' eating habits was conducted, and their body mass index (BMI), body fat percent (BF%), and visceral fat level (VFL) were measured. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software, and the Chi-square test was conducted for variables. Results The current data indicated that 21.8% of the students were overweight and 15.7% were obese. The total body fat exceeded its normal limits in 55.2% of the participants and VFL was high in 21.8% of them. The most common eating habits encountered were eating with family, having two meals per day including breakfast, together with frequent snacks and fried food consumption. Vegetables and fruits, except dates, were not frequently consumed by most students. Statistically, significant direct correlations were found among BMI, BF% and VFL (P < 0.001). Both BMI and VFL had significant inverse correlation with the frequency of eating with family (P = 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). Similar correlations were also found between BMI and snacks consumption rate (P = 0.018), as well as, between VFL and the frequency of eating dates (P = 0.013). Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for strategies and coordinated efforts at all levels to reduce the tendency of overweight, obesity and elevated body fat, and to promote healthy eating habits in our youth.

2010-01-01

77

Eating Behaviors and Perceived Eating Problems of children Diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactiytty Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eating disorders (ED) are a comorbid criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities (LD). The Children's Eating Behavior Inventory (CEBI) was distributed to parents\\/guardians of children (N = 115) aged eight to fourteen, attending a private school and clinically diagnosed with ADHD or LD. The CEBI provides an eating behavior (EB) score and a parent-perceived eating problems

S. R. McCray; J. Silagyi-Rebovich

1999-01-01

78

Behavioral management of night eating disorders.  

PubMed

Night eating syndrome (NES) is a form of disordered eating associated with evening hyperphagia (overeating at night) and nocturnal ingestions (waking at night to eat). As with other forms of disordered eating, cognitive and behavioral treatment modalities may be effective in reducing NES symptoms. This review presents evidence for a variety of behavioral treatment approaches, including behavioral therapy, phototherapy, behavioral weight loss treatment, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. A more detailed overview of cognitive-behavioral therapy for NES is provided. All of these studies have been case studies or included small samples, and all but one have been uncontrolled, but the outcomes of many of these approaches are promising. Larger randomized controlled trials are warranted to advance NES treatment literature. With the inclusion of NES in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a "Feeding or Eating Disorder Not Elsewhere Classified," more sophisticated, empirically-supported, behaviorally-based treatment approaches are much needed. PMID:23569400

Berner, Laura A; Allison, Kelly C

2013-03-28

79

Does Eating out Inhibit Nutrition Behavior? A Sociological Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: Identify differences between eating behaviors at home and when eating away from homeThe purposes of this study were to determine if: 1) eating out presents barriers to eating nutritionally, and 2) are nutritional food choices of greater or lesser concern when eating away from home. A social survey of Midwest restaurant customers was conducted to ascertain if their

S. A. Gilmore; J. J. Huss; S. Sapp

1997-01-01

80

Dieting Practices and Eating Behaviors of Elderly Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

167 community dwelling elderly women (60-97y; X = 74y, SD = 8y) were interviewed to determine current and previous dieting practices, as well as current eating behaviors. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and the restraint subscale of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire were used, not for diagnostic purposes, but for identification of dieting attitudes and behaviors in these elderly women.

L. A. Vaughan; K. A. Merrill

1995-01-01

81

Binge Eating and Eating-Related Cognitions and Behavior in Ethnically Diverse Obese Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine binge eating and eating-related cognitions and behavior in a sample of ethnically diverse women who are severely obese and seeking bariatric surgery.Research Methods and Procedures: Female bariatric surgery candidates (62 African Americans, 18 Latinas, 130 whites) completed questionnaires on binge eating and eating-related cognitions and behavior and completed a structured clinical interview to confirm binge-eating disorder diagnosis.Results:

Lisa A. P. Sánchez-Johnsen; Maureen Dymek; John Alverdy; Daniel le Grange

2003-01-01

82

Eating habits in relation to body fatness and gender in adolescents – results from the ‘SWEDES’ study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To investigate if eating habits among adolescents are related to body fatness and gender.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Obesity Unit, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden, 2001–2002.Subjects:Two hundred and seventy-five girls and 199 boys, aged 16–17 years.Method:Questionnaires were used for dietary intake and meal frequency, BodPod for measuring body fatness (BF%). In all, 169 girls and 128 boys were classified as adequate reporters (AR) of energy

K Vågstrand; B Barkeling; H B Forslund; K Elfhag; Y Linné; S Rössner; A-K Lindroos

2007-01-01

83

High Toxoplasma Seroprevalence Associated with Meat Eating Habits of Locals in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A serosurvey of Toxoplasma gondii infection in apparently healthy subjects (n=404) living in Achham (n=215) and Dang (n=189) districts in western Nepal was carried out. An interview with 249 participants, each representing a household, was also conducted. This interview pertained to their meat eating habits and the keeping of cats in their houses. Toxoplasma antibodies were detected by using the

Shiba Kumar Rai; Takeo Matsumura; Kazuo Ono; Ayako Abe; Kazuko Hirai; Ganesh Rai; Katsumi Sumi; Koji Kubota; Shoji Uga; Hari Govinda Shrestha

1999-01-01

84

Stressful Life Events and Disordered Eating Behaviors: Findings from Project EAT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations between stressful life events and disordered eating behaviors were examined in 1708 older adolescents. Stressful life events were positively associated with extreme weight control behaviors and binge eating in both male and female respondents, emphasizing the importance of screening for disordered eating behaviors among adolescents who report experiencing stressful life events.

Katie Loth; Patricia van den Berg; Marla E. Eisenberg; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer

2008-01-01

85

Stressful life events and disordered eating behaviors: findings from Project EAT.  

PubMed

Associations between stressful life events and disordered eating behaviors were examined in 1708 older adolescents. Stressful life events were positively associated with extreme weight control behaviors and binge eating in both male and female respondents, emphasizing the importance of screening for disordered eating behaviors among adolescents who report experiencing stressful life events. PMID:18848681

Loth, Katie; van den Berg, Patricia; Eisenberg, Marla E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2008-06-24

86

Eating habits and risk of esophageal cancers: a population-based case–control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Eating behaviors, such as the timing, speed of eating, and frequently consuming hot drinks, fried, spicy, or barbecued foods\\u000a may be associated with increased risks of esophageal cancer. We analyzed data from a population-based case–control study to\\u000a examine whether eating behaviors are associated with risk of esophageal cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle

Torukiri I. Ibiebele; Adele R. Taylor; David C. Whiteman; Jolieke C. van der Pols

2010-01-01

87

Raw-fish-eating behavior and fishborne zoonotic trematode infection in people of northern Vietnam.  

PubMed

Raw fish consumption in restaurants, for example, Sashimi style, is popular worldwide. In Vietnam, raw fish dishes are also traditionally prepared and consumed in private households. However, the habits of eating raw or otherwise inadequately cooked fish can be associated with risks of acquiring fishborne zoonotic trematode (FZT) infection. The present study was done in a fish-farming community in Nam Dinh, Vietnam, to obtain information about habits of eating raw fish dishes and risks for human FZT infection. Discussions were held in different groups divided by gender and age on raw-fish-eating behavior. A total of 180 household members were interviewed and their stool samples analyzed to identify risk factors of FZT infection. There was awareness about the risk of liver fluke infections from eating raw fish. However, many older people accepted these risks and continued eating raw fish, as they know effective drug treatment is available. Raw fish dishes are consumed at social gatherings from shared plates and dipping sauces using the same chop sticks. This is likely to pose risks of crosscontamination with FZT metacercariae to different food items as indicated by the finding that 25.8% of household members that stated not to have eaten raw fish were infected. In total, 32.2% fish farm household members were infected with FZT. The odds of FZT infection was 2.3 times higher (p?=?0.013) for those eating raw fish than for those who did not eat raw fish. Among the people eating raw fish, those eating raw fish in restaurants had 3.6 times higher odds of FZT infection (p?=?0.009) than people eating raw fish at home. A successful program to control FZT must be based on in-depth knowledge on the social and anthropological determinants of people's raw-fish-eating behavior and hygiene practices as well as production of FZT-free fish for human consumption. PMID:21117922

Phan, Van Thi; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Do, Dung Trung; Dalsgaard, Anders

2010-11-30

88

Parents' Perceptions of Their Children's Weight, Eating Habits, and Physical Activities at Home and at School  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionParental perceptions of their young children's weight and habits may play an important role in determining whether children develop and maintain healthy lifestyles. This study was conducted to determine perceptions of parents of third-grade children in an urban school setting regarding their children's weight, eating habits, and physical activities.

Elvira Jaballas; Dorothy Clark-Ott; Carla Clasen; Adrienne Stolfi; Marianne Urban

2011-01-01

89

Eating Behavior in Junior High School Females.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Surveyed 175 female junior high school students in an effort to ascertain both their present eating behavior and their attitudes regarding dieting and concern about body weight. Many subjects appeared to have considered these matters as early as elementary school. Limitations and implications of these findings are discussed. (RJM)|

Moreno, Addys B.; Thelen, Mark H.

1995-01-01

90

Anxiety of young female athletes with disordered eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence rate of disordered eating behaviors in young female athletes and to compare the anxiety levels of the athletes with or without disordered eating behaviors. Female athletes (n=243) of 15 to 25 years old from the city, Edirne, in Turkey participated our study. Disordered eating behaviors and anxiety levels of participants were

Erdal Vardar; Selma Arzu Vardar; Cem Kurt

2007-01-01

91

Evaluation of an Eating Disorders Prevention Curriculum on Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Female College  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of an eating disorders prevention curriculum on eating attitudes and behaviors of female college students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an academic college course on eating attitudes and behaviors of female college students. Methods: Two hundred and twenty female college students (19.4 ± 2.6 years old) participated in either the intervention

Amy Beth Magnuson

2010-01-01

92

Eating disordered behaviors and media exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  This study examined this relationship between eating disordered behaviors and exposure to ideal-type media in a sample of\\u000a South African university students, who could be expected to have reasonably high levels of media exposure. Possible underlying\\u000a reasons for this complex relationship were also investigated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  It examined the relationship via both quantitative (using a questionnaire that included the EAT-26 and a

Tara Carney; Johann Louw

2006-01-01

93

Applying behavior analysis to clinical problems: review and analysis of habit reversal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a review and analysis of habit reversal, a multicomponent procedure developed by Azrin and Nunn (1973, 1974) for the treatment of nervous habits, tics, and stuttering. The article starts with a discussion of the behaviors treated with habit reversal, behavioral covariation among habits, and functional analysis and assessment of habits. Research on habit reversal and simplified versions

RAYMOND G. MILTENBERGER; R. WAYNE FUQUA; D W Woods

1998-01-01

94

Short- and long-term eating habit modification predict weight change in overweight, post-menopausal women: results from the WOMAN Study  

PubMed Central

Background Standard behavioral obesity treatment produces poor long-term results. Focusing on healthy eating behaviors, rather than caloric intake, may be an alternative strategy. Furthermore, important behaviors might differ for short- vs. long-term weight control. Objective To describe and compare associations between changes in eating behaviors and weight after 6 and 48 months Design Secondary analysis of data collected during a randomized weight loss intervention trial with 48-month follow-up Participants 465 overweight and obese postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women on the Move through Activity and Nutrition (WOMAN) Study Main outcome measures Changes in weight from baseline to 6 and 48 months. Statistical analyses performed Linear regression models examined the associations between 6- and 48-month changes in eating habits assessed by the Conner Diet Habit Survey and changes in weight. Analyses were conducted in the combined study population and stratified by randomization group. Results At 6 months in the combined population, weight loss was independently associated with decreased desserts (p<0.001), restaurant eating (p=0.042), sugar-sweetened beverages (p=0.009), and fried foods (p<0.001), and increased fish consumption (p=0.003). Results were similar in intervention participants; only reduced desserts and fried foods associated with weight loss in controls. At 48 months in the combined population, weight loss was again associated with decreased desserts (p=0.003) and sugar-sweetened beverages (p=0.011), but also decreased meats/cheeses (p=0.024) and increased fruits/vegetables (p<0.001). Decreased meats/cheeses predicted weight loss in intervention participants; desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages, and fruits/vegetables were independently associated in controls. Conclusions Changes in eating behaviors were associated with weight change, though important behaviors differed for short- and long-term weight change and by randomization group. Future studies should determine whether interventions targeting these behaviors could improve long-term obesity treatment outcomes.

Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Kinzel, Laura S.; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee; Chang, Yue-fang; Kuller, Lewis H.

2012-01-01

95

[Daily eating habits of obese women living in Rocinha Shanytown (Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil)].  

PubMed

This article presents conclusions of research conducted at Ensp/Fiocruz, as part of a master's degree course. One of the objectives of the research to investigate the eating habits of women living in the Rocinha Shantytown (Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil) from a socio-anthropological perspective. The results revealed that the eating habits of the group were repetitive, with few variations in the menu consisting basically of rice, bean, sugars and fats. We further observed the rejection of industrialized and canned products. This food consumption pattern seems to conform to Brazilian food culture revealing the preservation of the national identity based on feeding habits. Consequently, it is necessary to set aside presuppositions regarding the relationship between food consumption and obesity, especially with respect to the predominant idea of changes in diet with the incorporation of a "modern" or "western" diet that prevail in studies in the field of nutrition in Brazil. In this sense, we signaled the need to reassert a multidimensional approach for studies about food and nutrition in the country. This proposal involves overcoming restricted conceptual outlooks and the creation of new avenues of investigation. PMID:21709995

Ferreira, Vanessa Alves; Magalhães, Rosana

2011-06-01

96

College Student Stress: A Predictor of Eating Disorder Precursor Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eating disorders are compulsive behaviors that can consume a person's life to the point of becoming life threatening. Previous research found stress associated with eating disorders. College can be a stressful time. If stress predicted precursor behaviors to eating disorders, then counselors would have a better chance to help students sooner.…

Shelton, Virginia L.; Valkyrie, Karena T.

2010-01-01

97

Environmental influences on children's physical activity and eating habits in a rural Oregon County.  

PubMed

PURPOSE. To identify environmental barriers and facilitators of children's physical activity and healthy eating in a rural county. DESIGN. Community-based participatory research using mixed methods, primarily qualitative. SETTING. A rural Oregon county. SUBJECTS. Ninety-five adults, 6 high school students, and 41 fifth-grade students. MEASURES. In-depth interviews, focus groups, Photovoice, and structured observations using the Physical Activity Resource Assessment, System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity, Community Food Security Assessment Toolkit, and School Food and Beverage Marketing Assessment Tool. ANALYSIS. Qualitative data were coded by investigators; observational data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The findings were triangulated to produce a composite of environmental barriers and assets. RESULTS. Limited recreational resources, street-related hazards, fear of strangers, inadequate physical education, and denial of recess hindered physical activity, whereas popularity of youth sports and proximity to natural areas promoted physical activity. Limited availability and high cost of healthy food, busy lifestyles, convenience stores near schools, few healthy meal choices at school, children's being permitted to bring snacks to school, candy used as incentives, and teachers' modeling unhealthy eating habits hindered healthy eating, whereas the agricultural setting and popularity of gardening promoted healthy eating. CONCLUSIONS. This study provides data on a neglected area of research, namely environmental determinants of rural childhood obesity, and points to the need for multifaceted and multilevel environmental change interventions. PMID:22040399

Findholt, Nancy E; Michael, Yvonne L; Jerofke, Linda J; Brogoitti, Victoria W

98

[Too fat, too thin?--bodily self-perception and eating habits of teenagers in Bremen].  

PubMed

A study of about 600 eighth grade students by the Bremen Department of Health show that overweight and the risk of an eating disorder are widespread among teenagers in Bremen. In the school year 2008/2009 a quota sample of eighth graders was questioned in regard to their dietary habits, their bodily self-perception and their eating behaviour, and they were weighed and measured. 21% of the students were overweight, 10% were even obese. Our studies showed that the share of overweight students had doubled between the beginning and the end of primary school and only increased marginally after that. The students' bodily self-perception frequently did not correspond to their actual body weight, not only among those who were overweight, but also among those with an objectively normal body weight. In one in 7 of the teenagers with normal body weight, furthermore, we found signs of disrupted eating behaviour. The actuality of the topic of eating disorders for the health of teenagers becomes apparent when taking into account further results of the study. If, moreover, we bring to mind the long-term consequences of overweight and the often massive adverse effects through illnesses like anorexia or bulimia, it becomes clear that the disruptions addressed here should be a central concern for prevention. The study presented here shows where interventions are most needed. PMID:21249625

Horstkotte, E

2011-01-19

99

Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors Among Male Collegiate Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male athletes have been hypothesized to be at increased risk for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors due to unique pressures in the sport environment. In this study, 203 male collegiate athletes from three universities completed the Questionnaire for Eating Disorder Diagnosis (QEDD; Mintz, O'Halloran, Mulholland, & Schneider, 1997) as well as provided information on binge eating and pathogenic weight control

Trent A. Petrie; Christy Greenleaf; Justine Reel; Jennifer Carter

2008-01-01

100

Stress-induced laboratory eating behavior in obese women with binge eating disorder.  

PubMed

Aim of the study was to compare the microstructural eating behavior of obese patients with and without binge eating disorder (BED) after stress induction in laboratory. Seventy-one female subjects were investigated (mean BMI 36.9). Thirty-five fulfilled criteria for BED. A 2×2 factorial design with repeated measurement (stress vs. no stress) on the second factor was applied. Stress was induced by the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and chocolate pudding served as laboratory food. Variables of eating behavior were measured by a universal eating monitor (UEM). Only in participants with BED stress was associated with an increase in the initial eating rate and a diminished deceleration of eating at the end of the meal. Generally, BED subjects ate with larger size of spoonfuls during the laboratory meal than non BED controls. The eating behavior of obese patients with binge eating disorder seems to be significantly affected by stress. The stress-induced eating behavior of BED patients is characterized by a stronger motivation to eat (indicated by a fast initial eating rate) as well as by a lack of satiety perception (indicated by less deceleration of eating rate). PMID:22200410

Schulz, S; Laessle, R G

2011-12-16

101

Vision and Eating Behavior in Obese Subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Vision is one of a number of factors influencing the amount of food consumed during a meal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of vision on the microstructure of the eating behavior of obese subjects.Research Methods and Procedures: Eighteen obese subjects with a body mass index (mean ± SD) of 39.1 ± 6.3 kg\\/m2 twice

Britta Barkeling; Yvonne Linné; Eva Melin; Pål Rooth

2003-01-01

102

Lunch eating behavior of preschool children  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine the eating behavior of preschool children offered chocolate-flavored or plain milk at lunch, food consumption by 135 children, aged 18–66 months, was measured. Four different menus were served six times during a 12-week period, each menu being presented twice with each of three test beverages, plain milk (18.1 kcal\\/oz), sucrose-sweetened chocolate milk (29.4 kcal\\/oz), or aspartame-sweetened chocolate milk

Josephine F Wilson

2000-01-01

103

Independent contribution of parental migrant status and educational level to adiposity and eating habits in preschool children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Objective:Little is known about the precise role of parental migrant status (MS) and educational level (EL) on adiposity and various eating habits in young children. Therefore, we assessed their independent contribution in preschoolers.Subjects\\/Methods:Of 655 randomly selected preschoolers, 542 (5.1±0.6 years; 71% of parental MS and 37% of low parental EL) were analysed. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Eating

V Ebenegger; P-M Marques-Vidal; A Nydegger; J Laimbacher; I Niederer; F Bürgi; V Giusti; P Bodenmann; S Kriemler; J J Puder

2011-01-01

104

Reliability and validity of the Family Eating and Activity Habits Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this work was to develop and test an instrument that will identify the factors that facilitate childhood obesity and monitor the environmental changes and family behavior modifications associated with weight loss.Design and methods:The relevant factors that affect obesity and weight loss in children were divided into four scales: activity level, stimulus exposure, eating related to hunger,

M Golan; A Weizman

1998-01-01

105

Personality traits and eating habits in a large sample of Estonians.  

PubMed

Objectives: Diet has health consequences, which makes knowing the psychological correlates of dietary habits important. Associations between dietary habits and personality traits were examined in a large sample of Estonians (N = 1,691) aged between 18 and 89 years. Method: Dietary habits were measured using 11 items, which grouped into two factors reflecting (a) health aware and (b) traditional dietary patterns. The health aware diet factor was defined by eating more cereal and dairy products, fish, vegetables and fruits. The traditional diet factor was defined by eating more potatoes, meat and meat products, and bread. Personality was assessed by participants themselves and by people who knew them well. The questionnaire used was the NEO Personality Inventory-3, which measures the Five-Factor Model personality broad traits of Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness, along with six facets for each trait. Gender, age and educational level were controlled for. Results: Higher scores on the health aware diet factor were associated with lower Neuroticism, and higher Extraversion, Openness and Conscientiousness (effect sizes were modest: r = .11 to 0.17 in self-ratings, and r = .08 to 0.11 in informant-ratings, ps < 0.01 or lower). Higher scores on the traditional diet factor were related to lower levels of Openness (r = -0.14 and -0.13, p < .001, self- and informant-ratings, respectively). Conclusions: Endorsement of healthy and avoidance of traditional dietary items are associated with people's personality trait levels, especially higher Openness. The results may inform dietary interventions with respect to possible barriers to diet change. PMID:22268715

Mõttus, René; Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri; Deary, Ian J; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres

2012-01-23

106

On the relationship between emotional and external eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is a strong relationship between emotional and external eating, separate subscales for these behaviors have been constructed in the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. This study tries to establish whether this distinction is justified. We studied relationships among self-reported 1.(1) degree of emotional and external eating behavior2.(2) problems with 2.1.(a) emotional distress and relationships,2.2.(b) stimulus-boundness (inappropriate amounts of either

W. Miles Cox

1995-01-01

107

Associations between eating patterns, dietary intakes and eating behaviors in premenopausal overweight women.  

PubMed

The regulation of energy intake is complex and many biological, psychosocial and environmental influences have been identified. To our knowledge, no study has yet investigated how eating patterns could mediate associations between eating behaviors and self-reported energy intake in premenopausal overweight women. Therefore, objectives of this study were to examine associations between eating behaviors and eating patterns in premenopausal overweight women and to test if eating patterns could mediate the associations between eating behaviors and self-reported energy intake. Women completed a 3-day food record and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire was used to assess eating behaviors (dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger). In the total sample of women, flexible restraint was negatively (r=-0.18; p=0.03) and binge eating severity was positively (r=0.24; p=0.004) associated with self-reported energy intake. Moreover, flexible restraint was positively associated with the proportion of energy intake at breakfast (r=0.24; p=0.004), whereas disinhibition and binge eating severity were positively associated with the proportion of energy intake from snacks consumed after 5:00 pm (r=0.22, p=0.007 and r=0.22, p=0.01, respectively). In addition, mediational analyses showed that proportion of energy intake from snacks consumed after 5:00 pm explained 24.1% of the association between binge eating severity and self-reported energy intake. In conclusion, these results suggest that eating patterns are important factors to consider in order to explain the associations between eating behaviors and self-reported energy intake. PMID:22365804

Leblanc, Vicky; Provencher, Véronique; Bégin, Catherine; Gagnon-Girouard, Marie-Pierre; Corneau, Louise; Tremblay, Angelo; Lemieux, Simone

2012-01-09

108

Primary and secondary control over eating behaviors.  

PubMed

The relationships between subjective control, body image, and eating behaviors were examined within the framework of the Optimization in Primary and Secondary Control model (OPS model; Heckhausen, 1999). This model characterizes control as an adaptive and strategic process in which the target of control includes internal as well as external states, and in which the purpose is either to facilitate goal pursuit by engaging with the goal or managing the consequences of goal failure by disengaging from the goal. A convenience sample of 180 Australian women (age: M=26.49, SD=5.03) completed the Optimization of Primary and Secondary Control Scale (OPS scale Heckhausen, 1999), as well as measures of attitudinal and behavioral factors comprising Stice's (1994) dual-pathway model of bulimia. A series of path analyses revealed that the control strategies involved in goal engagement are directly associated with increased dietary restraint and purging, whereas the control strategies involved in goal disengagement are indirectly associated with these factors, and with negative affect, by way of reduced body dissatisfaction and reduced frequency of appearance comparisons. These results suggest that goal engagement strategies, which are typically adaptive in other contexts, are associated with potentially hazardous attitudes and behaviors in the context of the body. The results also suggest that an ability to disengage from body weight goals is associated with a reduced likelihood of developing disordered eating. PMID:20850056

de Souza, Megan; Mussap, Alexander J; Cummins, Robert A

2010-05-26

109

Family Support Is Associated With Behavioral Strategies for Healthy Eating Among Latinas.  

PubMed

Background. Healthy eating is important for obesity control. Dietary interventions target the adoption of behavioral strategies to increase fiber and decrease fat consumption. However, little is known about the contributions of psychosocial factors to the use of these strategies. Purpose. This study examined psychosocial correlates of behavioral strategies for healthy eating among Latinas. Method. Participants included 361 Latino mothers living along the U.S.-Mexico border in California. Data included measures of sociodemographics, acculturation, and psychosocial determinants of healthy eating. A 30-item dietary behavioral strategies scale assessed strategies to increase fiber and decrease fat consumption. Results. Family interactions regarding dietary habits (? = .224, p < .001) and financial status (? = .148, p = .029) were associated with the use of strategies to decrease fat consumption. Positive family interactions regarding dietary habits (? = .226, p < .001), fewer barriers to obtaining fruits and vegetables (? = -.207, p < .001), and more family support for vegetable purchasing (? = .070, p = .047) were associated with use of strategies to increase fiber consumption. Conclusions. Future interventions would benefit from improving family systems associated with healthy eating. PMID:23711676

Schmied, Emily A; Parada, Humberto; Horton, Lucy A; Madanat, Hala; Ayala, Guadalupe X

2013-05-27

110

The impact of female adolescents' attitudes toward advertising, locus of control, self-efficacy on body image and eating habits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to examine female adolescents' perceptions of advertising, locus of control and self-efficacy in relationship to eating habits and body image. The participants of the study included 182 female students who attended a public, suburban high school. A demographic survey was included to obtain data on personal characteristics, family characteristics, and media exposure. Seven instruments

Patricia Madej

1998-01-01

111

A Cluster-Analytical Approach towards Physical Activity and Eating Habits among 10-Year-Old Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose was to investigate whether clusters--based on physical activity (PA) and eating habits--can be found among children, and to explore subgroups' characteristics. A total of 1725 10-year olds completed a self-administered questionnaire. K-means cluster analysis was based on the weekly quantity of vigorous and moderate PA, the excess…

Sabbe, Dieter; De Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Legiest, E.; Maes, L.

2008-01-01

112

Eating habits and body weight profiles among undergraduate students in UiTM Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poor eating habits, smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity may augment risk for developing obesity. Obesity, known as a condition of abnormal excess body fat, is associated with a large number of debilitating and life-threatening disorders, such as major increase in associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other non-communicable diseases. This study determined the body weight profiles based on World Health Organization

Muhammad Anwar Nawab Khan; Nur Aimi Mohamad; Mohammed Abdul Hameed; Nahlah Elkudssiah Ismail

2011-01-01

113

Acculturation, weight status, and eating habits among Chinese-American preschool children and their primary caregivers: A pilot study  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study investigated acculturation, eating habits, and weight status among 53 Chinese-American children and their primary caregivers. Caregivers’ mean acculturation score was 2.1, indicating low acculturation. Caregivers’ mean body mass index (BMI) was 23.3; 21% were overweight (BMI is greater ...

114

Disturbed eating behaviors and eating disorders in type 1 diabetes: Clinical significance and treatment recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Girls and women with type 1 diabetes have increased rates of disturbed eating behaviors and clinically significant eating\\u000a disorders than their nondiabetic peers. Type 1 diabetes is strongly associated with several empirically supported eating disorder\\u000a risk factors (eg, higher body mass index, increased body weight and shape dissatisfaction, low self-esteem and depression,\\u000a and dietary restraint). It may be that specific

Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri

2009-01-01

115

Individual and Environmental Influences on Adolescent Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food choices of adolescents are not consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Food intakes tend to be low in fruits, vegetables, and calcium-rich foods and high in fat. Skipping meals is also a concern among adolescents, especially girls. Factors influencing eating behaviors of adolescents need to be better understood to develop effective nutrition interventions to change eating behaviors. This

MARY STORY; DIANNE NEUMARK-SZTAINER; SIMONE FRENCH

2002-01-01

116

Prevalence of Eating-Disordered Behaviors Among Fashion Merchandising Majors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female subjects from a Midwestern university were studied to determine whether eating-disordered behaviors are more prevalent among Fashion Merchandising majors than among other students. The authors hypothesized that Fashion Merchandising majors, due to exposure to media definitions of ideal body shape and weight, might be more susceptible to weight preoccupation and disordered eating behaviors than other students. All subjects completed

Maija Petersons; Elaine Phillips; Nancy Steinhaus

1996-01-01

117

Cognitive Treatments for Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) is applicable to all eating disorders but has been most intensively studied in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN). CBT is designed to alter abnormal attitudes about body shape and weight, replace dysfunctional dieting with normal eating habits, and develop coping skills for resisting binge eating and purging. CBT is effective in reducing all core features of

G. Terence Wilson; Christopher G. Fairburn

1993-01-01

118

Habitability and Behavioral Issues of Space Flight.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews group behavioral issues from past space missions and simulations such as the Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test, Skylab missions, and Shuttle Spacelab I mission. Makes recommendations for future flights concerning commandership, crew selection, and ground-crew communications. Pre- and in-flight behavioral countermeasures are…

Stewart, R. A., Jr.

1988-01-01

119

Determinants of disordered eating behaviors among Israeli adolescent girls.  

PubMed

Eating behaviors were assessed by a modified SCOFF questionnaire in a National representative cross-sectional study among 2978 Israeli schoolgirls. The mean age was 14.7. Thirty percent met the criteria for disordered eating. Being Jewish or underweight reduced the odds for disordered eating. The following increased the risk: dieting, early onset of menarche, being overweight or obese, and suffering from constipation. School socio-economic status, physical activity, and smoking status were not contributory. These results help identify possible interventions to prevent the development of disordered eating behaviors. PMID:18307114

Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan; Natamba, Barnabas K; Goldsmith, Rebecca; Shimony, Tal; Berry, Elliot M

120

Behavioral and Emotional Antecedents and Consequences of Binge Eating in Bulimic and Binge Eating College Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recent studies have indicated that bulimia, characterized by binge eating followed by depressed mood and purging, is increasing. To investigate the behavioral and emotional antecedents and consequences of binge eating in women, 22 female college students (14 diagnosed bulimics, 8 binge eaters) completed self-monitoring forms for four binges.…

Katzman, Melanie A.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

121

[Educational nutritional intervention as an effective tool for changing eating habits and body weight among those who practice physical activities].  

PubMed

The scope of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two methods of educational nutritional intervention together with women who practice regular physical activities by fostering the adoption of healthy eating habits. The study population consisted of 52 women aged between 19 and 59 who frequented the Academia da Cidade Program in Aracaju in the State of Sergipe. The study was a randomized comparison of two intervention groups and was of the pre-test/post-test variety. The educational activities were based on two protocols - one less intensive (P1 Group) and one more intensive (P2 Group) - over a period of two months. The variables analyzed were nutritional knowledge, anthropometric measurements and changes in eating habits. The changes identified were improvement in eating habits and reduction in weight and Body Mass Index for the P2 group. The modifications identified referred mainly to increased consumption of fruit and vegetables, reduction of fat in cooking, reduction in the volume of food eaten per meal and increased meal frequency. In relation to nutritional knowledge, only 2 of the 12 questions showed significant changes. The most intensive method proved effective in changing dietary habits leading to weight loss. PMID:23358760

Teixeira, Pryscila Dryelle Sousa; Reis, Bruna Zavarize; Vieira, Diva Aliete dos Santos; Costa, Dayanne da; Costa, Jamille Oliveira; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão; Wartha, Elma Regina Silva de Andrade; Netto, Raquel Simões Mendes

2013-02-01

122

On the relationship between emotional and external eating behavior.  

PubMed

Although there is a strong relationship between emotional and external eating, separate subscales for these behaviors have been constructed in the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. This study tries to establish whether this distinction is justified. We studied relationships among self-reported ( 1) degree of emotional and external eating behavior and (2) problems with (a) emotional distress and relationships, (b) stimulus-boundness (inappropriate amounts of either too much or too little exercise, work, leisure activities, and spending money), and (c) problems with substance use (alcohol, illicit drugs, nicotine, or caffeine) in a sample of female students. No relationships were found between either type of eating behavior and problems with substance use. Furthermore, the significant relationship between emotional and external eating behavior and stimulus-boundness disappeared in the subsample who had problems with overeating. The fact that in all samples emotional eating was significantly related to problems with emotional distress and relationships (anxiety, depression, phobias, suicidal acts or ideations, intimate relations, and sexual contacts) but external eating was not, suggests that the two types of eating behaviors refer to independent constructs. Thus, the use of separate scales to measure these theoretically different aspects of overeating seems warranted. PMID:8712056

Van Strien, T; Schippers, G M; Cox, W M

123

A Study of Snack Consumption, Night-Eating Habits, and Nutrient Intake in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

This study was performed to identify dietary behavior such as snack consumption, night-eating and nutrients intake associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The study was conducted on 219 normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects and 44 GDM subjects by using a questionnaire including dietary behavior, food frequency and 3-day food record. The mean age, OGTT, and delivery weight of GDM subjects were statistically higher than those in NGT. A larger proportion of NGT subjects consumed black coffee (49.8%) while the majority of GDM subjects (61.4%) drank mixed coffee with sugar and cream. Dairy products were the most frequently consumed snack item in NGT subjects (40.7%), while fruits were most frequently consumed food item in GDM subjects (34.4%). Many of NGT subjects (49.8%) answered that they hardly took night-eating snacks whereas most of GDM subjects (61.4%) took night-eating snacks more than once a week. For change of taste preference, the proportion of NGT subjects who showed less preference for salty taste (33.3%) or greasy taste (16.9%) was higher than that of GDM subjects (11.4%). Nutrient intakes of energy, fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), carbohydrate, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin C, and vitamin E in GDM group were significantly higher than those in NGT group. Nutrient densities of SFA and vitamin C in GDM group were higher and nutrient density of calcium was lower than those in NGT group. Taken together, it is recommended to reduce night-eating snack and choose less salty and fatty foods, black-coffee rather than coffee with cream and sugar, and more dairy products to prevent GDM.

Park, Hee-jin; Lee, JinJu; Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Hyun Ah

2013-01-01

124

Macronutrient intake, eating habits, and exercise as moderators of menstrual distress in healthy women.  

PubMed

The present investigation studied the relationship between symptoms of menstrual distress and macronutrient intake, eating behavior, and exercise in healthy women. Twenty-six normally menstruating women with no complaints of menstrual distress completed a disguised questionnaire on menstrual symptoms and monitored the type and amount of food consumed as well as the type and duration of exercise during a full menstrual cycle. Menstrual cycle phases were determined by the presence of menses, ovarian hormonal assays, and basal temperature monitoring. Reports of pain, water retention, negative affect, behavior change, and arousal were significantly higher (p < .05 or better) in the perimenstruum when compared to the follicular and luteal phases. During the perimenstruum, a higher energy intake of carbohydrate was associated with higher ratings of negative affect (p < .01) and impaired performance/decreased activity (p < .05). Lower energy intake of protein was associated with higher ratings of well being (p < .05). Overeating and dieting behavior were related to greater water retention (p < .01), autonomic reactions (p < .05), and appetite (p < .05). The amount of aerobic exercise in contrast to the intensity was related to lower water retention (p < .01), autonomic reactions (p < .05), and appetite (p < .01). Carbohydrate consumption, eating behavior, and regular exercise are reliably associated with menstrual distress and deserving of experimental evaluation as treatment interventions for menstrual distress. PMID:7480561

Johnson, W G; Carr-Nangle, R E; Bergeron, K C

125

Eating behaviors are risk factors for the development of overweight.  

PubMed

This research aimed to characterize eating behavior in a sample of Chilean adults according to their gender and body mass index and to analyze the possible links between these variables and abnormal eating behaviors. We hypothesized that there would be significant differences in the eating behavior of normal-weight and overweight people, and also between men and women. Further, we hypothesized that overweight participants would show more abnormal eating behaviors than their normal-weight counterparts. Two hundred ninety-two participants (205 women and 87 men, age range 18-64 years) were evaluated with a battery of self-administered questionnaires. Mean body mass index was 26.58 kg/m(2) (women 26.22 kg/m(2), men 27.41 kg/m(2)), that is, within the overweight range. Participants with overweight (BMI ?25 kg/m(2)) tended to eat faster and in greater quantities, selected more hyper-calorie foods, and engaged in a greater number of abnormal eating behaviors of various kinds. The results suggest that, in addition to what people eat, the question of how people eat may also contribute to the rapid increase in the levels of overweight and obesity in the Chilean population. PMID:24074737

Oda-Montecinos, Camila; Saldaña, Carmina; Andrés, Ana

2013-08-29

126

A brief assessment of eating habits and weight gain in a Mediterranean cohort.  

PubMed

Assessment of eating habits (EH) through closed questions could be an alternative tool to assess diet as a predictor of weight change in epidemiological studies. The aim was to assess the association between baseline EH and the risk of weight gain or becoming overweight/obese in a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort (the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra Project) of 10 509 participants. The baseline questionnaire included ten short questions with two possible answers: yes or no. We calculated a baseline EH score, categorised in quartiles, positively weighting answers on more fruit, vegetables, fish and fibre and less meat, sweets and pastries, fat, butter, fatty meats and added sugar in drinks. Reducing the consumption of meat or fat and removing fat from meat were significantly associated with lower weight gain. The partial correlation coefficient between EH score and weight change was - 0·033 (P = 0·001). We observed 1063 cases of incident overweight/obesity among 7217 participants without overweight/obesity at baseline. Trying to eat more fruit, fish or fibre and less meat was inversely significantly associated with incident overweight/obesity. Those participants in the upper quartile of the score were at a 38 % (adjusted OR 0·62; 95 % CI 0·48, 0·81) lower risk of developing overweight/obesity during the follow-up compared with those in the lower quartile. However, the receiver-operating characteristic curves for the model with and without the EH score were materially identical. Despite the apparent significant inverse association, this score had a low predictive value for future weight gain and for incident overweight/obesity in a Mediterranean population, although some EH were independently and positively associated with weight gain. PMID:21138604

Zazpe, Itziar; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Serrano-Martínez, Manolo; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel

2010-12-08

127

ERPs to stimulus identification in persons with restrained eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Restrained eating is an eating behavior in which hunger and satiety are not the only triggers for starting or ending a meal. Rather, cognitive factors control food consumption in these persons. The present study served to investigate cortical stimulus processing in restrained and unrestrained eaters by means of event-related potentials (ERPs). ERPs should differ between these two groups and this

Peter Hachl; Corinna Hempel; Reinhard Pietrowsky

2003-01-01

128

Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Binge Eating in Adolescent Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Whereas effective treatments exist for adults with recurrent binge eating, developmental factors specific to adolescents point to the need for a modified treatment approach for youth. We adapted an existing cognitive behavioral therapy treatment manual for adults with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (Fairburn, 2008) for use with…

Yarborough, Bobbi Jo; DeBar, Lynn L.; Firemark, Alison; Leung, Sue; Clarke, Gregory N.; Wilson, G. Terence

2013-01-01

129

Planned Behavior Theory and Healthy Eating of Greek Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main purpose of the current study was to examine the intention of Greek adults to adopt healthy eating. A secondary purpose was to examine if the eating behavior differs according to demographics or other character- istics such as the age, body mass index, residence, participation in physical activities and family income. A total of 80 adults participated by filling

Fevronia Karkaletsi; Emmanuil Skordilis; Dimitra Koutsouki

130

The Effects of Peer Influence on Disordered Eating Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Peer influence has been found to be correlated with a host of harmful health behaviors. However, little research has been conducted investigating the relationship between peer influence and disordered eating. The present study surveyed 6th-, 7th-, and 8th-grade girls and boys using the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and Inventory of Peer…

Meyer, Tiffany A.; Gast, Julie

2008-01-01

131

Personal identities and disordered eating behaviors in Mexican American women.  

PubMed

Eating disorder behaviors are prevalent in Latina populations. This study tested Schwartz's (2006) theoretical view that a broad array of personal identities serves as an internal resource during acculturation and prevents internalization of dysfunctional weight related beliefs. Sixty-six Mexican American women completed measures of personal identities, fat self-definition, eating disorder symptoms and acculturation. Results show that few positive and many negative personal identities predict higher eating disorder scores and effects are mediated through the fat self-definition. Characteristics of personal identities may influence internalization of cultural values related to weight. Interventions focused on overall identity may prevent eating disorders in Latinas. PMID:20434070

Stein, Karen Farchaus; Corte, Colleen; Ronis, David L

2010-02-17

132

Acculturation, weight status, and eating habits among Chinese-American preschool children and their primary caregivers: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated acculturation, eating habits, and weight status among 53 Chinese-American children and their primary caregivers. Caregivers' mean acculturation score was 2.1, indicating low acculturation. Caregivers' mean body mass index (BMI) was 23.3; 21% were overweight (BMI ? 25). Children's mean BMI was 16.6; 17% were overweight (BMI ? 95th percentile). The food groups most commonly consumed at the

Debby K. Demory-Luce; Miriam Morales; Theresa Nicklas

2005-01-01

133

Effect of altered eating habits and periods during Ramadan fasting on intraocular pressure, tear secretion, corneal and anterior chamber parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo determine whether altered eating habits and periods, especially the pre-dawn meal, during Ramadan fasting have any significant effect on intraocular pressure (IOP), tear secretion, corneal and anterior chamber parameters.MethodsIOP, basal tear secretion (BTS), reflex tear secretion (RTS), and Pentacam measurements of 31 healthy volunteers were performed at 0800 and 1600 hours during Ramadan fasting and 1 month later during

H Kerimoglu; B Ozturk; K Gunduz; B Bozkurt; U Kamis; M Okka

2010-01-01

134

A cluster-analytical approach towards physical activity and eating habits among 10-year-old children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose was to investigate whether clus- ters—based on physical activity (PA) and eating habits—can be found among children, and to explore subgroups' characteristics. A total of 1725 10-yearoldscompletedaself-administeredques- tionnaire. K-means cluster analysis was based on the weekly quantity of vigorous and moderate PA, the excess index (weekly consumption of sugar and\\/or fat) and the daily diversity index. Chi-squares tested

Dieter Sabbe; I. De Bourdeaudhuij; E. Legiest; L. Maes

2008-01-01

135

Eating Habits, Health Status, and Concern about Health: A Study among 1641 Employees in the German Metal Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Nutrition has been found to be associated with sociodemographic characteristics and concern about health. There is limited knowledge, however, of associations between blue-collar worker's diet, morbidity, and health care utilization.Methods. We conducted a survey on eating habits, physical symptoms, health care utilization, health status, and concern about health in two German metal companies. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to

Birgit Reime; Peter Novak; Jürgen Born; Elisabeth Hagel; Volker Wanek

2000-01-01

136

Weight perception in female athletes: Associations with disordered eating correlates and behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although weight perception is associated with disordered eating correlates and unhealthy eating behavior, it is unclear whether these associations exist in specific female populations at greater risk of disordered eating (i.e., athletes). The aim of this study was to examine associations between weight perception and disordered eating correlates (perfectionism and social physique anxiety (SPA)) and eating behavior in female athletes.

Anne M. Haase

2011-01-01

137

Nutritional status and eating habits of older Manitobans after relocating to a personal care home.  

PubMed

We explored the effect of relocating to a personal care home (PCH) on older adults' nutritional status and eating habits. Fourteen Caucasian older adults (F=57%) with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation = 9.79) consented to participate. Anthropometric information (height, weight, bioelectrical impedance analysis), biochemical and clinical information (diagnoses, data from scales measuring risk or function), and dietary information (three-day plate waste analysis) were collected at time points A (two to three months after relocation) and B (six to seven months after relocation) through face-to-face interviews and medical chart reviews, and from nursing staff. At time B, cognitive function declined (z = -2.185, p<0.05) and the number of medications prescribed increased (z = -2.00, p<0.05). Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were insufficient among 83% of participants at both time points. Mean serum albumin was 34.4 ± 7.2 g/L at time B, and the prevalence of potential nutritional risk increased from 57% to 77%. Dietary intake was inadequate at both time points. Nutritional risk became more prevalent at time B. Protein-energy malnutrition and other nutritional inadequacies may result if dietary intakes do not improve. Strategies to improve dietary intakes should be implemented within PCHs to reduce potential malnutrition. PMID:21645429

Sitter, Melissa; Lengyel, Christina

2011-01-01

138

The effectiveness of an interactive multimedia program to influence eating habits.  

PubMed

An interactive multimedia program to encourage individuals to decrease their dietary fat consumption and to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables was developed and evaluated at two worksites. The program presented content tailored to the user by gender, content interests, race, and age group. It was tested using a randomized treatment and wait list control design (n = 517). Repeated-measures ANOVAs indicated significant intervention effects after 30 days for self-reported consumption of fat and of fruits and vegetables, for stage of change to adopt a low-fat diet, for intention and self-efficacy to reduce dietary fat, and for attitude toward the importance of diet. In addition, 60-day follow-up of the treatment subjects found that program effects were maintained on all measures. Within- subject analyses showed that program effects were replicated with the wait list group at 30 days. These results demonstrate the potential for short-exposure interactive programs to positively impact eating habits of employee populations. PMID:15140849

Irvine, A Blair; Ary, Dennis V; Grove, Dean A; Gilfillan-Morton, Lynn

2004-06-01

139

Health Habits and Coping Behaviors Among Practicing Physicians  

PubMed Central

Practicing physicians on the full-time academic and clinical (volunteer) faculty of an urban university department of medicine (N = 211) completed questionnaires that examined their coping behaviors, health habits, life satisfaction, job stress, conflict between work and home life, health status and moods. Attempts to organize and restructure work activities were more frequently practiced by physicians who were more satisfied with work. Socializing, exercising and discussing feelings with others were not associated with any measures of physician health status, job stress, conflict or satisfaction. Those with higher scores on a health habits index tended to be less anxious, experienced less job stress, less conflict between work and home life and were more satisfied with their lives in general. Full-time academic faculty engaged in fewer positive or negative coping behaviors than clinical faculty. There were few strong intercorrelations among the various positive and negative coping behaviors or health habits; physicians often simultaneously engaged in both positive and negative activities, indicating complex patterns of coping behaviors that were not dramatically associated with life or work satisfaction.

Linn, Lawrence S.; Cope, Dennis; Leake, Barbara; Yager, Joel

1986-01-01

140

Do Preoperative Eating Behaviors Influence Weight Loss After Biliopancreatic Diversion?  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: The presence of disturbed eating patterns can affect the short- and long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery. Data about the influence of preoperative eating patterns on outcomes after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) are lacking. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of preoperative eating behavior in patients' selection for biliopancreatic diversion. METHODS: Sixty-one consecutive patients who underwent BPD were evaluated for the present study. For each patient, the following preoperative eating patterns were evaluated: sweet eating, snacking, hyperphagia, and gorging. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) at 3, 6, and 12 months in the groups of patients with different eating patterns at the preoperative evaluation. RESULTS: At the preoperative evaluation, snacking was found in 31 patients (50.8 %), sweet eating in 15 patients (24.6 %), hyperphagia in 48 patients (78.7 %), and gorging in 45 patients (73.8 %). For each eating behavior, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative BMI and weight loss at 3, 6, and 12 months between the group of patients with and the group of patients without the eating pattern considered. At the analysis of variance in the four groups of patients presenting the eating patterns considered, there was no difference in mean preoperative BMI (P?=?0.66), %EWL at 3 months (P?=?0.62), %EWL at 6 months (P?=?0.94), and %EWL at 12 months (P?=?0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative eating behaviors do not represent reliable outcome predictors for BPD, and they should not be used as a selection criterion for patients who are candidates to this operation. PMID:23546651

Facchiano, Enrico; Scaringi, Stefano; Quartararo, Giovanni; Alpigiano, Giovanna; Liscia, Gadiel; Pavoni, Vittorio; Lucchese, Marcello

2013-04-01

141

Cognitive Behavior Therapy of Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent episodes of uncontrollable eating, even when not hungry, until uncomfortably full, occurring at least twice a week for a 6-month period. This is differentiated from bulimia nervosa (BN) by the lack of compensatory mechanisms such as purging\\/laxative abuse. There are significantly higher levels of psychiatric symptoms in patients with BED as compared

V. Vaidya

2006-01-01

142

Orthorexia nervosa: a frequent eating disordered behavior in athletes.  

PubMed

Striving for enhancing athletic performance, many sportsmen undergo rigid dietary habits, which could lead to eating disorders (EDs) or Orthorexia Nervosa (ON), a psychopathological condition characterized by the obsession for high quality food. The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence of ON in athletes and to verify the relationship between ON and EDs. Five-hundred-seventy-seven athletes and 217 matched controls were administered the following tests: ORTO-15, Eating Attitude Test 26 (EAT-26), Body Uneasiness Test (BUT) and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale (YBC-EDS). High positivity to ORTO-15 (28%) and EAT-26 (14%) emerged in athletes, whereas a high rate of BUT positivity was evident among controls (21%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that independent predictors of ON are previous dieting, age, positivity to YBC-EDS, positivity to EAT-26, competition level, and number of YBC-EDS preoccupations and rituals. Sharing many features with both EDs and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, ON represents a crossroad between these pathologic conditions and might compromise the health state of an athlete. Therefore, coaches should consider important to detect symptoms of EDs and ON in their athletes. PMID:22361450

Segura-García, C; Papaianni, M C; Caglioti, F; Procopio, L; Nisticò, C G; Bombardiere, L; Ammendolia, A; Rizza, P; De Fazio, P; Capranica, L

2012-02-21

143

Predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors among gay Hispanic men.  

PubMed

Gay men are a vulnerable population at risk for a number of health disparities, but little is known about eating disorders among gay Hispanic men. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of eating attitudes and behaviors with alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors to determine predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of gay Hispanic men. Significant numbers of the participants were at risk for eating disorders (13%), alcohol abuse (18%), body image disturbance (29%), depression (25%), low self-esteem (12%), and high-risk sexual behaviors (34%). Alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors were significant predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors and accounted for 38% of the variance in eating attitudes and behaviors. Nurses providing care to this population of gay men must be aware of this cluster of related mental health conditions that are experienced by these men. Addressing and treating these health conditions as a group of related mental health conditions are necessary. More research is needed to further explore this cluster of health issues among gay Hispanic men. PMID:22449559

De Santis, Joseph P; Layerla, Dennys Martin; Barroso, Susana; Gattamorta, Karina A; Sanchez, Michael; Prado, Guillermo J

2011-10-12

144

Individual and environmental influences on adolescent eating behaviors.  

PubMed

Food choices of adolescents are not consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Food intakes tend to be low in fruits, vegetables, and calcium-rich foods and high in fat. Skipping meals is also a concern among adolescents, especially girls. Factors influencing eating behaviors of adolescents need to be better understood to develop effective nutrition interventions to change eating behaviors. This article presents a conceptual model based on social cognitive theory and an ecological perspective for understanding factors that influence adolescent eating behaviors and food choices. In this model, adolescent eating behavior is conceptualized as a function of individual and environmental influences. Four levels of influence are described: individual or intrapersonal influences (eg, psychosocial, biological); social environmental or interpersonal (eg, family and peers); physical environmental or community settings (eg, schools, fast food outlets, convenience stores); and macrosystem or societal (eg, mass media, marketing and advertising, social and cultural norms). PMID:11902388

Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone

2002-03-01

145

Rational Habits and Uncertain Prices: Simulating Gasoline Consumption Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

When consumers are forward-looking with respect to their demand for a habit-forming good, traditional measures of price elasticity are misleading. In particular, such measures will underestimate sensitivity to long-run shifts - and therefore underestimate the potential effect of policy instruments that act through price. Correcting elasticities for the behavior of the price process requires a model with forward-looking consumers, a

K. Rebecca Scott

2012-01-01

146

Development of Eating Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

As can be seen throughout this book, childhood and adolescent obesity is of great concern. Obesity during childhood and adolescence\\u000a has been associated with physical, behavioral, and academic difficulties (Anderson & Butcher, 2006; Datar & Sturm, 2006).\\u000a This chapter will discuss developmental patterns related to normative eating habits as well as eating patterns associated\\u000a with problematic eating. Given that the

Vicky Phares; Jessica Curley; Ariz Rojas

147

[Orthorexia nervosa. A new eating behavior disorder?].  

PubMed

New eating behavior disorders such as bigorexia (muscle dysmorphia) and orthorexia are appearing in developed countries. These disorders have not been officially recognized so that they are not classified as independent entities. The term orthorexia comes from the Greek word orthos (straight, proper) and orexia (appetite). It is characterized by the pathological obsession for biologically pure food, which leads to important dietary restrictions. Orthorexic patients exclude foods from their diets that they consider to be impure because they have herbicides, pesticides or artificial substances and they worry in excess about the techniques and materials used in the food elaboration. This obsession leads to loss of social relationships and affective dissatisfactions which, in turn, favors obsessive concern about food. In orthorexia, that patient initially wants to improve his/her health, treat a disease or lose weight. Finally, the diet becomes the most important part of their lives. We present a clinical case that responds to the characteristics of orthorexia. The differential diagnosis with chronic delusional disorder, anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder is carried out. PMID:15704033

Catalina Zamora, M L; Bote Bonaechea, B; García Sánchez, F; Ríos Rial, B

148

Discrepancies between implicit and explicit motivation and unhealthy eating behavior.  

PubMed

Many people change their eating behavior as a consequence of stress. One source of stress is intrapersonal psychological conflict as caused by discrepancies between implicit and explicit motives. In the present research, we examined whether eating behavior is related to this form of stress. Study 1 (N=53), a quasi-experimental study in the lab, showed that the interaction between the implicit achievement motive disposition and explicit commitment toward an achievement task significantly predicts the number of snacks consumed in a consecutive taste test. In cross-sectional Study 2 (N=100), with a sample of middle-aged women, overall motive discrepancy was significantly related to diverse indices of unsettled eating. Regression analyses revealed interaction effects specifically for power and achievement motivation and not for affiliation. Emotional distress further partially mediated the relationship between the overall motive discrepancy and eating behavior. PMID:20545817

Job, Veronika; Oertig, Daniela; Brandstätter, Veronika; Allemand, Mathias

2010-06-01

149

Eating habits of preschool children with high migrant status in Switzerland according to a new food frequency questionnaire.  

PubMed

Assessment of eating habits in young children from multicultural backgrounds has seldom been conducted. Our objectives were to study the reproducibility and the results of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) developed to assess changes in eating habits of preschool children with a high migrant population, in the context of a multidisciplinary multilevel lifestyle intervention. Three kindergarten classes (53% from migrant backgrounds) in French-speaking Switzerland were randomly selected and included 16 girls and 28 boys (mean age +/- SD, 5.4 +/- 0.7 years). The FFQ was filled out twice within a 4-week interval by the parents. Spearman rank correlations between the first and the second FFQ for the 39 items of the food questions were as follows: low (r < 0.50) for 8 (7 P < .05 and 1 nonsignificant), moderate (0.50 or= 0.70) for 9 (all P < .01). In addition, 28 of 39 intraclass correlation coefficients were high (>0.50, all P < .01). Eighty-six percent of the children ate breakfast at home daily, but only 67% had lunch at home. The percentages of children eating at least once a week in front of the TV were as follows: 50% for breakfast, 33% for lunch, 38% for dinner, and 48% for snacks. Forty percent of children asked their parents to buy food previously seen in advertisements and ate fast food between once a week and once a month. Children generally consumed foods with a high-energy content. The FFQ yielded good test-retest reproducibility for most items of the food questions and gave relevant findings about the eating habits of preschool children in areas with a high migrant population. PMID:20226995

Ebenegger, Vincent; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Barral, Jérôme; Kriemler, Susi; Puder, Jardena J; Nydegger, Andreas

2010-02-01

150

[Eating practices and behavior in the urban environment: a study in downtown São Paulo  

PubMed

This study focuses on the implications of urban life style on eating habits and the related symbolic representations. Theoretical references used to approach the food experience are the concepts of social representation and habitus. The methodology consisted of a qualitative analysis of interviews with 21 administrative employees and field observations made at commercial establishments in downtown São Paulo, such as snack bars and restaurants. Study of eating behavior and practices was developed along two planes: food actually eaten and food desired. Results were classified into three segments: "ingesting and digesting affection", "determinants of social representations of eating practices", and "rituals in eating practices". Due to their origin in a domestic universe, symbolic aspects associated with food have a strong affective matrix. Concrete conditions of the urban environment associated with the subject's financial limits establish a structure of values and feelings compatible with the subject's possibilities. The study addresses both the abbreviation of food rituals and its implications on food behavior as well as features of the present urban food pattern. PMID:10886885

Diez Garcia RW

1997-07-01

151

[Promotion of healthy eating habits by schools: a methodological proposal for training courses for educators and school cafeteria owners].  

PubMed

The project entitled Promotion of Health Eating Habits by Schools, operating in the Federal District of Brazil since 2001, encourages good eating habits in the school community within the context of promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing chronic non-communicable diseases. The current article presents and analyzes a methodology to train preschool and elementary educators and school cafeteria owners. The workshops included theoretical classes, practical activities, and educational games and were evaluated on the basis of expansion and applicability of knowledge, in addition to implementation of the 10 steps to a healthy school cafeteria. The proposed pedagogical activities were verified by an analysis of the teachers' workshop folders. The overall evaluation was positive, with expansion of knowledge (p < 0.05) among participants for the three workshop modules. The objectives laid out in the workshop folders were reached by 44% of the teachers. In the implementation of the healthy cafeteria, positive results were observed when comparing the pre and post-training periods. The methodology helped expand knowledge for both teachers and cafeteria owners, highlighting the school community as a prime space for promoting healthy eating. PMID:18670711

Schmitz, Bethsáida de Abreu Soares; Recine, Elisabetta; Cardoso, Gabriela Tavares; da Silva, Juliana Rezende Melo; Amorim, Nina Flávia de Almeida; Bernardon, Renata; Rodrigues, Maria de Lourdes Carlos Ferreirinha

2008-01-01

152

Vegetarian Students in Their First Year of College: Are They at Risk for Restrictive or Disordered Eating Behaviors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compared restrictive and disordered eating behaviors in vegetarian versus non-vegetarian first-year college students. The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the abbreviated Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) were used to assess eating behaviors (n=330). The mean restrictive DEBQ and the EAT-26 scores of vegetarians were…

Trautmann, Julianne; Rau, Stephanie I.; Wilson, Mardell A.; Walters, Connor

2008-01-01

153

Vegetarian Students in Their First Year of College: Are They at Risk for Restrictive or Disordered Eating Behaviors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared restrictive and disordered eating behaviors in vegetarian versus non-vegetarian first-year college students. The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the abbreviated Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) were used to assess eating behaviors (n=330). The mean restrictive DEBQ and the EAT-26 scores of vegetarians were…

Trautmann, Julianne; Rau, Stephanie I.; Wilson, Mardell A.; Walters, Connor

2008-01-01

154

[Physical activity, eating behavior, and pathology].  

PubMed

Intense physical activity has been reported in patients with eating disorders, and hyperactivity can be found in more than 80% in severe stages. The beginning of food restriction occurs at earlier ages if there is an intense physical activity; body dissatisfaction is more intense among patients who practice exercise; and the presence of intense activity in anorexia nervosa usually precedes to the restrictive diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of exercise at the beginning of the eating disorder, and to analyze possible differences in the kind of exercise, according to age, sex and diagnostic subgroups. In order to evaluate the exercise 745 patients were assessed by the Eating Disorders Examination (EDE). The presence of physical activity (driving to caloric consumption, weight loss or modification of body shape), kind of activity, and its intensity were considered. Only the presence of moderate or high intensity clearly related with the mentioned objectives was considered. 407 patients (54.63%) engaged in exercise: 68.96% with anorexia, 68.96% with bulimia, and 34.73% with other non-specified eating disorders. There were not significant differences between men and women. Hyperactivity was the most frequent (47.42%), followed by gym activity (25.79%). Taking into account the different clinic subgroups, we could observe significant differences. To assess eating disorders, a correct evaluation of the physical activity should be necessary in order to include this aspect in treatment programs. PMID:19137991

Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Estébanez Humanes, Sonia; Santiago Fernández, María José

2008-09-01

155

Risk behaviors for eating disorders in Brazilian dancers.  

PubMed

This study investigated the frequency of risk behaviors for eating disorders and their association with anthropometric, demographic, and socioeconomic variables in Brazilian professional dancers. Portuguese-language versions of the Eating Attitudes Test and of the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE) were applied to 39 female and 22 male dancers considered to be some of the best classical ballet performers in Brazil. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Risk behaviors for eating disorders were observed in 31% of the dancers. Those who had a percentage of body fat above (PR=4.04; 95% CI=1.42-11.47) or below (PR=3.57; 95% CI=1.04-12.24) what is considered normal for the profession, and those who lived alone (PR=3.13; 95% CI=1.16-8.48) presented higher risk for eating disorders. In conclusion, the frequency of risk behaviors for eating disorders among the Brazilian dancers was high, which seems to be associated with the physical requirements of the profession. Those who are outside the BF% expected for dancers and those who live alone are the groups most vulnerable to developing eating disorders, and thus are the ones which are most in need of receiving special attention in regard to the intervention measures. PMID:20148375

Ribeiro, L G; da Veiga, G V

2010-02-10

156

Food attitudes, eating behavior, and the information underlying food attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined healthiness perceptions and how the information underlying food attitudes more generally relate to attitudes and behaviors. Participants completed attitudinal measures and various card-sorting tasks in which they rank ordered foods (pictures and\\/or nutrition labels) in terms of healthiness. Taste was found to be a stronger predictor of attitudes and past eating behavior than other information underlying attitudes

Shelley N. Aikman; Kate E. Min; Dan Graham

2006-01-01

157

Childhood Body-Focused Behaviors and Social Behaviors as Risk Factors of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The risk factors for adolescent eating disorders are poorly understood. It is generally agreed, however, that interactions with one’s body and interactions with others are two important features in the development of anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Therefore, we assessed a variety of childhood body-focused behaviors and childhood social behaviors in eating-disordered patients as compared to non-eating-disordered subjects. Method: We

Barbara Mangweth; Armand Hausmann; Claudia Danzl; Thomas Walch; Claudia I. Rupp; Wilfried Biebl; James I. Hudson; Harrison G. Pope Jr.

2005-01-01

158

Eating behavior in obese and overweight persons with and without anhedonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in body mass index and eating behavior in obese and overweight persons with and without anhedonia during a weight loss intervention study. Psychiatric diagnostics were based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders. Eating behavior was assessed by the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-18) and binge eating by the Binge

Anna-Maria Keränen; Elsi Rasinaho; Helinä Hakko; Markku Savolainen; Sari Lindeman

2010-01-01

159

Gender differences in dependency, separation, object relations and pathological eating behavior and attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in eating behaviors and attitudes and the related constructs of dependency, separation, object relations, and eating disorder behavior. One hundred and forty-one undergraduate students were recruited from introductory psychology courses and completed measures of the forementioned constructs. Females had significantly higher scores on the Eating Attitude Test and Eating Self-Efficacy

Steven K Huprich; Stephanie D Stepp; Ariel Graham; Lacey Johnson

2004-01-01

160

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge eating as a behavioral attempt to influence, change, or control painful emotional states. With

Debra L. Safer; Jennifer L. Couturier; James Lock

2007-01-01

161

Self-recognition of eating-disordered behavior in college women: further evidence of poor eating disorders "mental health literacy"?  

PubMed

Self-recognition of eating-disordered behavior was examined among female college students (n?=?94) with a high level of bulimic-type eating disorder symptoms. A vignette was presented describing a fictional young woman with bulimia nervosa. Participants were asked whether they might currently have a problem such as the one described, while also completing self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms, general psychological distress, and functional impairment. Less than half (47.9%) of participants believed that they currently had a problem with their eating. In both bivariate and multivariable analysis, the variables most strongly associated with self-recognition were overall levels of eating disorder psychopathology, prior treatment for an eating problem, and the use of self-induced vomiting as a means of controlling weight or shape. No other eating disorder behaviors were independently associated with self-recognition. The findings support the hypothesis that young women with eating disorder symptoms may be unlikely, or at least less likely, to recognize a problem with their eating behavior when that behavior does not entail self-induced vomiting. Health promotion and early intervention programs for eating disorders may need to address the perception that, among young women of normal or above-average body weight, only problems with eating that involve self-induced vomiting are pathological. PMID:23767672

Gratwick-Sarll, Kassandra; Mond, Jonathan; Hay, Phillipa

2013-01-01

162

Dieting Behavior and Alcohol Use Behaviors among National Eating Disorders Screening Program Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Research has shown that college students have elevated rates of alcohol use and problematic eating behaviors. The current study focused on the relationships between dieting behaviors and alcohol use among a sample of undergraduates attending National Eating Disorder Screening Program. Method: All participants (n=70, 100% female,…

Heidelberg, Natalie F.; Correia, Christopher J.

2009-01-01

163

When do we eat? Ingestive behavior, survival, and reproductive success.  

PubMed

The neuroendocrinology of ingestive behavior is a topic central to human health, particularly in light of the prevalence of obesity, eating disorders, and diabetes. The study of food intake in laboratory rats and mice has yielded some useful hypotheses, but there are still many gaps in our knowledge. Ingestive behavior is more complex than the consummatory act of eating, and decisions about when and how much to eat usually take place in the context of potential mating partners, competitors, predators, and environmental fluctuations that are not present in the laboratory. We emphasize appetitive behaviors, actions that bring animals in contact with a goal object, precede consummatory behaviors, and provide a window into motivation. Appetitive ingestive behaviors are under the control of neural circuits and neuropeptide systems that control appetitive sex behaviors and differ from those that control consummatory ingestive behaviors. Decreases in the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels enhance the stimulatory effects of peripheral hormones on appetitive ingestive behavior and the inhibitory effects on appetitive sex behavior, putting a new twist on the notion of leptin, insulin, and ghrelin "resistance." The ratio of hormone concentrations to the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels may generate a critical signal that schedules conflicting behaviors, e.g., mate searching vs. foraging, food hoarding vs. courtship, and fat accumulation vs. parental care. In species representing every vertebrate taxa and even in some invertebrates, many putative "satiety" or "hunger" hormones function to schedule ingestive behavior in order to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates. PMID:23911282

Schneider, Jill E; Wise, Justina D; Benton, Noah A; Brozek, Jeremy M; Keen-Rhinehart, Erin

2013-07-30

164

Female Collegiate Athletes: Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors assessed the prevalence of pathogenic eating and weight-control behaviors among female college athletes, using a psychometrically valid measure. Participants: Participants were 204 college athletes (M age = 20.16 years, SD = 1.31 years) from 17 sports at 3 universities. On average, they participated in their sport for 10.88…

Greenleaf, Christy; Petrie, Trent A.; Carter, Jennifer; Reel, Justine J.

2009-01-01

165

Female Collegiate Athletes: Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The authors assessed the prevalence of pathogenic eating and weight-control behaviors among female college athletes, using a psychometrically valid measure. Participants: Participants were 204 college athletes (M age = 20.16 years, SD = 1.31 years) from 17 sports at 3 universities. On average, they participated in their sport for 10.88…

Greenleaf, Christy; Petrie, Trent A.; Carter, Jennifer; Reel, Justine J.

2009-01-01

166

The influence of nutrition knowledge on eating behavior – the role of grade level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eating behaviors of children and adolescents are important in establishing adults’ preferences and behaviors. Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that could influence an adolescent’s eating behavior. Therefore the relationship between nutrition knowledge and eating behaviors of adolescents was examined in this research project. The participants were students from a middle school in Ohio. The students were asked to

Mahshid Pirouznia

2001-01-01

167

Hearty Habits. Don't Eat Your Heart Out. 15-18 Year Olds.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this illustrated guide is to teach 15-18 year old students that all healthy Americans, 2 years of age or older, should eat in a way that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol to help reduce the risk of heart disease. The theme reflected throughout the manual is that changes in eating patterns help lower blood cholesterol levels…

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

168

The Neurocognitive Connection between Physical Activity and Eating Behavior  

PubMed Central

As obesity rates increase worldwide, health care providers require methods to instill the lifestyle behaviors necessary for sustainable weight loss. Designing effective weight loss interventions requires an understanding of how these behaviors are elicited, how they relate to each other, and whether they are supported by common neurocognitive mechanisms. This may provide valuable insights to optimize existing interventions and develop novel approaches to weight control. Researchers have begun to investigate the neurocognitive underpinnings of eating behavior and the impact of physical activity on cognition and the brain. This review attempts to bring these somewhat disparate, yet interrelated lines of literature together in order to examine a hypothesis that eating behavior and physical activity share a common neurocognitive link. The link pertains to executive functions, which rely on brain circuits located in the prefrontal cortex. These advanced cognitive processes are of limited capacity and undergo relentless strain in the current obesogenic environment. The increased demand on these neurocognitive resources as well as their overuse and/or impairment may facilitate impulses to overeat, contributing to weight gain and obesity. This impulsive eating drive may be counteracted by physical activity due to its enhancement of neurocognitive resources for executive functions and goal-oriented behavior. By enhancing the resources that facilitate “top-down” inhibitory control, increased physical activity may help compensate and suppress the hedonic drive to overeat. Understanding how physical activity and eating behaviors interact on a neurocognitive level may help to maintain a healthy lifestyle in an obesogenic environment.

Joseph, Richard J.; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Bond, Dale S.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

2012-01-01

169

Adult active transportation: adding habit strength to the theory of planned behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Many health behaviors have a history of repetition and, as a result, may become habitual. Because including a measure of habit strength may add depth to current theoretical models on health behavior, the present study explored the issue of habit strength within the context of the theory of planned behavior regarding adult bicycle use as a means of transportation.

Bruijn de G. J; S. P. J. Kremers; A. S. Singh; Putte van den B; Mechelen van W

2009-01-01

170

Adult active transportation: adding habit strength to the Theory of Planned Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many health behaviors have a history of repetition and, as a result, may become habitual. Because including a measure of habit strength may add depth to current theoretical models on health behavior, the present study explored the issue of habit strength within the context of the theory of planned behavior regarding adult bicycle use as a means of transportation.

Bruijn de G. J; S. P. J. Kremers; A. Singh; Putte van den B; Mechelen van W

2009-01-01

171

Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to healthy eating behaviors in urban Native American youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To investigate the efficacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict healthy eating behavior in a group of urban Native American youth. METHODS: Native American boys and girls (n = 139), ages 9–18 years old, were given a self-administered survey to assess eating behavior using the TBP constructs (intention, attitude, subjective norm, barriers, self-efficacy, and perceived behavioral

Stefanie A Fila; Chery Smith

2006-01-01

172

Longitudinal Associations Between Externalizing Behavior and Dysfunctional Eating Attitudes and Behaviors: A Community-Based Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated longitudinal associations between externalizing behavior and dysfunctional eating attitudes and behaviors. Participants were girls drawn from the community-based Minnesota Twin Family Study and assessed at ages 11, 14, and 17. Cross-sectional correlations indicated that the strength of the associations between externalizing behavior and dysfunctional eating attitudes and behaviors increased over time. Mixed-model analyses indicated that earlier externalizing

Naomi R. Marmorstein; Kristin M. von Ranson; William G. Iacono; Paul A. Succop

2007-01-01

173

Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS), are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals.

Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; Paavonen, Juulia E; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Sarenius, Susan; Kallman, Tiia; Jarvela, Irma; von Wendt, Lennart

2005-01-01

174

Parental influences on children's eating behavior and relative weight.  

PubMed Central

We investigated the relationship between selected parent behaviors, child mealtime behavior, and infant relative weight. Subjects were 7 male and 7 female children varying in age from 12 to 30 months (mean = 23.9 months). Each subject and parents were observed during the dinnertime meal on two occasions using the BATMAN (Bob and Tom's Method of Assessing Nutrition). The children spent 58% of the mealtime eating. They spent very little time making active decisions about what and how much they ate (food requests = 2% of the time; food refusals = 1% of the time). We found significant correlations between child relative weight and (a) parental prompts to eat (r = .81, p less than .001), (b) parental food offers (r = .51, p less than .05), and (c) parental encouragement to eat (r = .82, p less than .001). Thus, the present study suggests a relationship between certain parental variables and the relative weight of their children.

Klesges, R C; Coates, T J; Brown, G; Sturgeon-Tillisch, J; Moldenhauer-Klesges, L M; Holzer, B; Woolfrey, J; Vollmer, J

1983-01-01

175

Associations between friends' disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors.  

PubMed

Dieting, unhealthy weight control and muscle-enhancing behaviors are common among adolescents: friends are a probable source of influence on these behaviors. The present study uses data provided by nominated friends to examine associations between friends' disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors and participants' own behaviors in a diverse sample of American youth. Male and female adolescents (mean age = 14.4) completed surveys and identified their friends from a class roster; friends' survey data were then linked to each participant. Participants (N = 2126) who had at least one nominated friend were included in the analytic sample. Independent variables were created using the same weight control and muscle-enhancing behaviors reported by nominated friends, and were used in logistic regression models to test associations between participants' and their friends' behaviors, stratified by gender. Results indicated that dieting, disordered eating and muscle-enhancing behaviors were common in this sample, and selected friends' behaviors were associated with the same behaviors in participants. For example, girls whose friends reported extreme weight control behaviors had significantly greater odds of using these behaviors than girls whose friends did not report these same behaviors (OR = 2.39). This research suggests that friends' weight- and shape-related behaviors are a feature of social relationships, and is the first report demonstrating these associations for muscle-enhancing behaviors. Capitalizing on the social element may be important to the development of increasingly effective intervention and prevention programs. PMID:23010337

Eisenberg, Marla E; Wall, Melanie; Shim, Jin Joo; Bruening, Meg; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2012-09-01

176

Impact of learning nutrition on medical students: their eating habits, knowledge and confidence in addressing dietary issues of patients.  

PubMed

Nutrition is an important component in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases and is a cornerstone in strategies for disease prevention and health promotion. Despite the acknowledged importance of nutrition, there is evidence to indicate that the nutrition training of medical students is inadequate in both quality and quantity. The study aimed to know the dietary/eating habits of medical students, assess their knowledge on nutrition and to assess their confidence in addressing the dietary issues of patients. It was a cross-sectional study conducted on final year medical students, interns and postgraduate students of Moti Lal Nehru Government Medical College, Allahabad. The sampling was purposive and a total of 218 participated in the study voluntarily. Overall 55% of the students were less knowledgeable and only 45% of them were more knowledgeable. Most (62%) postgraduates were more knowledgeable (p < 0.001). Majority of them (89.9%) were having healthy eating habits. There was no association between their healthy habits and more knowledge (p > 0.340). Only 45.4% of them were confident in assessing the diet of patients and 44% of them were confident in recommending change of diet in patients. However this study shows no association between increase in the level of knowledge and confidence levels of the students (p > 0.339 and p > 0.109) suggesting that we need to incorporate innovative teaching methods to increase their confidence. Most students (79%) said that the medical curriculum was either just enough or not enough in preparing them to deal with the dietary issues of patients and 55% of them were of the opinion that the faculty should be trained in nutrition. The study results intend to stimulate active consideration of proper role of nutrition learning in medical education. PMID:23469565

Shaikh, Shama; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Khan, Maroof A

2011-12-01

177

Eating Behaviors of Older African Americans: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: The study applies the theory of planned behavior to explain the fruit and vegetable eating behaviors, a broad construct consisting of preparing, self-monitoring, and consuming fruits and vegetables, of older African Americans. DESIGN AND METHODS: Structural equation modeling was used to examine the applicability of the theory of planned behavior with data from 211 older African American women and men (73% women, 26% men; median age range of 57-63 years) participating in a larger intervention study. RESULTS: Attitudes about eating fruit and vegetables, subjective social norms, and perceived behavioral control were related to older African Americans' intentions to consume fruits and vegetables. Social norms and behavioral intentions were associated with fruit and vegetable eating behaviors. Perceived control did not moderate the influence of behavioral intentions on actual behavior. IMPLICATIONS: Results indicated that the theory of planned behavior can be used to explain variation in older African Americans' eating behavior. This study also emphasizes the value of considering broader behavioral domains when employing the theory of planned behavior rather than focusing on specific behaviors. Furthermore, social service programs aimed at reducing the incidence of diseases commonly associated with poor eating behaviors among older African Americans must consider promoting not only fruit and vegetable consumption but also related behaviors including preparing and self-monitoring by eliminating structural, cognitive, and normative constraints. PMID:23241919

O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Wickrama, Kandauda K A S; Ralston, Penny A; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Harris, Cynthia M; Coccia, Catherine; Young-Clark, Iris; Lemacks, Jennifer

2012-12-14

178

Analysis of eating behavior in restaurants based on leftover food  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently in the restaurant businesses, it has become more difficult to design contents of dishes because customers' preferences have become diverse. Leftover meals are good indicators to elucidate customers' satisfaction and eating behaviors. This study examines what causes customers to leave food uneaten-particularly addressing their attributes, motivations, and situations-by conducting interviews of customer groups and measuring their leftovers. Results show

Takeshi Shimmura; Takeshi Takenaka

2010-01-01

179

Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Female College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors assessed the influences of several risk factors--self-esteem, history of unwanted sexual contact (USC), depression, and sorority membership--on eating-related and weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Findings provide support for the roles of self-esteem, depression, and USC on restricting attitudes. According to the authors' model,…

Veazey Morris, Katherine D.; Parra, Gilbert R.; Stender, Sarah R. S.

2011-01-01

180

A Naturalistic Investigation of Eating Behavior in Bulimia Nervosa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated parameters of eating behavior in subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). BN and female comparison (FC) subjects monitored hourly over several days their food intake, mood, hunger, social circumstances, and experiences of unpleasant events. BN subjects reported more positive moods prior to consuming a meal, and more negative moods prior to…

Davis, Ron; And Others

1988-01-01

181

Peer contributions to adolescents' eating, exercise, and weight control behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between adolescents' peer crowd affiliation, their own concern about weight and appearance, peers' concern about weight and appearance, and their eating, exercise, and weight control behaviors. Given the rise in rates of obesity as well as the numbers of adolescents engaging in risky methods of weight control, it is

Eleanor Race Mackey

2007-01-01

182

Gender-Related Self-Discrepancies and Bulimic Eating Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explored the link between development of bulimic eating behavior and suppression of masculine traits in adolescence. German high school students completed a sex role inventory. Among girls, higher risk of developing bulimia appeared to be caused by increasing discrepancies between actual and ideal self-concept on masculine-typed personality…

Klingenspor, Barbara

2002-01-01

183

A Naturalistic Investigation of Eating Behavior in Bulimia Nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the parameters of eating behavior in subjects meeting the diagnosis of bulimia nervosa (BN). Twenty BN and 24 female comparison (FC) subjects monitored hourly over a number of consecutive days their food intake, mood, hunger, social circumstances, and experiences of unpleasant events. Compared with FC subjects, BN subjects reported more positive moods relative to their typical moods

Ron Davis; Richard J. Freeman; David M. Garner

1988-01-01

184

A Naturalistic Investigation of Eating Behavior in Bulimia Nervosa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigated parameters of eating behavior in subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). BN and female comparison (FC) subjects monitored hourly over several days their food intake, mood, hunger, social circumstances, and experiences of unpleasant events. BN subjects reported more positive moods prior to consuming a meal, and more negative moods prior…

Davis, Ron; And Others

1988-01-01

185

Women, Weight Dissatisfaction and Subclinical Eating Disorder Attitudes and Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of body weight dissatisfaction and sub clinical eating disorder attitudes and behaviors in both normal and overweight glucose intolerant non diabetic women. Sixty one glucose-intolerant women, age 45±10 years (mean ±SD) confirmed with a 4 hour glucose tolerance test were referred to a registered dietitian between May and December 1997.

G Sikand; J. E. Carter; R Balucanag; J Hsu

1998-01-01

186

The Effects of Eating Behaviors and Exercise Patterns on the Processing of Food and Exercise Related Stimuli  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for eating disorders has established a link between cognitive processes and unhealthy eating behaviors. However, the relationship between individual differences in unhealthy eating behaviors that are not related to clinical eating disorders, such as overeating and restrained eating, and the processing of food related verbal stimuli remains undetermined. Furthermore, the cognitive processes that

Carrie Potter

2009-01-01

187

Latent Profile Analysis to Determine the Typology of Disinhibited Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify children and adolescents into subtypes based on the overlap of disinhibited eating behaviors--eating in the absence of hunger, emotional eating, and subjective and objective binge eating. Method: Participants were 411 youths (8-18 years) from the community who reported on their…

Vannucci, Anna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Field, Sara E.; Mooreville, Mira; Reina, Samantha A.; Kozlosky, Merel; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

2013-01-01

188

Latent Profile Analysis to Determine the Typology of Disinhibited Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify children and adolescents into subtypes based on the overlap of disinhibited eating behaviors--eating in the absence of hunger, emotional eating, and subjective and objective binge eating. Method: Participants were 411 youths (8-18 years) from the community who reported on their…

Vannucci, Anna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Field, Sara E.; Mooreville, Mira; Reina, Samantha A.; Kozlosky, Merel; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

2013-01-01

189

Gender-Related Self-Discrepancies and Bulimic Eating Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore a hypothetical link between the development of bulimic eating behavior and the suppression of masculine traits in adolescence. Discrepancies between the actual and the ideal self were examined as precursors of negative self-evaluation and binge–purge behavior. Using the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (Bem, 1974), 821 German students between the ages of 13 and

Barbara Klingenspor

2002-01-01

190

Female Collegiate Athletes: Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The authors assessed the prevalence of pathogenic eating and weight-control behaviors among female college athletes, using a psychometrically valid measure. Participants: Participants were 204 college athletes (M age = 20.16 years, SD = 1.31 years) from 17 sports at 3 universities. On average, they participated in their sport for 10.88 years (SD = 16.68 years) and on their college

Christy Greenleaf; Trent A. Petrie; Jennifer Carter; Justine J. Reel

2009-01-01

191

Mindfulness Moderates the Relationship Between Disordered Eating Cognitions and Disordered Eating Behaviors in a Non-Clinical College Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological flexibility and mindfulness are two related, but distinct, regulation processes that have been shown to be at\\u000a the core of psychological wellbeing. The current study investigated whether these two processes independently moderated the\\u000a association between disordered eating cognitions and psychological distress as well as the relation between disordered eating\\u000a cognitions and disordered eating behaviors. Non-clinical, ethnically diverse college undergraduates

Akihiko Masuda; Matthew Price; Robert D. Latzman

192

Why Do You Regulate What You Eat? Relationships Between Forms of Regulation, Eating Behaviors, Sustained Dietary Behavior Change, and Psychological Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 3 studies, the authors examined how autonomous and controlled forms of motivation for the regulation of eating behaviors were related to self-reported eating behaviors, and sustained dietary behavior change. Studies 1 and 2 supported the factorial structure and the psychometric properties of a scale designed to measure different forms of regulation as defined by Self-Determination Theory. A motivational model

Luc G. Pelletier; Stéphanie C. Dion; Monika Slovinec-D'Angelo; Robert Reid

2004-01-01

193

Municipal policies and plans of action aiming to promote physical activity and healthy eating habits among schoolchildren in Stockholm, Sweden: a cross-sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Promoting physical activity and healthy eating habits by structural measures that reach most children in a society is presumably the most sustainable way of preventing development of overweight and obesity in childhood. The main purpose of the present study was to analyse whether policies and plans of action at the central level in municipalities increased the number of measures

Karin Guldbrandsson; Karin Modig Wennerstad; Finn Rasmussen

2009-01-01

194

Sociotropic cognition and eating disordered attitudes and behavior in young adults.  

PubMed

Sociotropic cognition is a mindset characterized by a strong need for social approval and fear of interpersonal rejection. Sociotropic cognition has been associated with depression and health risk behavior in women, but few studies have specifically addressed eating disordered attitudes and behaviors, and studies including men are lacking. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of sociotropic cognition on eating-related attitudes and behaviors in men and women. Participants were N=362 undergraduate students (51% female; mean age=19.2±1.43) who completed measures of sociotropic cognition, depressed mood, eating disordered attitudes and behaviors, body shape satisfaction, and physical activity. Using hierarchical regression, the results demonstrated that sociotropic cognition was associated with greater dietary restraint, body shape, eating, and weight concerns, emotional eating, and global eating disordered score. Body shape dissatisfaction and emotional eating were found to mediate the relationship between sociotropic cognition and eating disordered behaviors. Sociotropic cognition appears to be an important predictor of body shape dissatisfaction and eating disordered behaviors in a non-clinical sample. Individuals high in sociotropic cognition may engage in eating disordered behavior in response to fears of social evaluation. These findings have implications for prevention and treatment of eating disorders. Cognitive-behavioral intervention strategies are suggested to reduce sociotropic cognition and its influence on eating disordered behavior. PMID:23557802

Pedlow, C Teal; Niemeier, Heather M

2012-10-10

195

Humanizing outer space: architecture, habitability, and behavioral health  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space architecture is the theory and practice of designing and building environments for humans in outer space. In our present century professional astronauts and cosmonauts will remain a focus for space architects, but new designs must better accommodate passengers (tourists and industrial workers) and settlers who set forth to establish off-world societies. Psychologists and architects can work together to assure good spaceflight behavioral health, defined by a lack of neuropsychiatric dysfunction, and the presence of high levels of personal adjustment, cordial interpersonal relations, and positive interactions with the physical and social environments. By designing and constructing facilities that are occupant centered and activity oriented, architects increase habitability thereby decreasing environmental challenges to behavioral health. Simulators and spaceflight-analogous environments make it possible to test design solutions prior to their deployment in space. This paper concludes with suggestions for increasing collaboration between architects and psychologists. These include increased sharing of hypotheses and data, articulating complementary research styles, and mutual advocacy for early, potent, and sustained involvement in mission planning and execution.

Harrison, Albert A.

2010-03-01

196

Parental influences on laboratory eating behavior in obese and non-obese children  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To determine parental influence on obesity, eating behavior of 80 obese and normal weight children (aged 8–12 y) was investigated in the laboratory.DESIGN: A controlled repeated measurement design was used. The mother was either present or absent while the child was eating in the laboratory.MEASUREMENTS: The eating style was measured by recording cumulative eating curves with a universal eating

RG Laessle; H Uhl; B Lindel; A Müller

2001-01-01

197

Teasing and disordered eating behaviors in Spanish adolescents.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the associations between peer teasing and body dissatisfaction (BD), emotional symptoms, drive for thinness (DT), and abnormal eating behaviors, as well as to analyze the mediating role of gender and body mass index (BMI) in such disorders. We screened 57,997 school children between 13 and 16 years of age. Scores in weight-related teasing and competency-related teasing were higher among girls, as well as overweight or obese individuals. Weight-teasing correlated more strongly with abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors, whereas competency-teasing correlated with emotional symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that weight-teasing is significantly and independently associated with BD, especially in boys. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association between weight-teasing and abnormal eating in girls, although its predictive value was very low (Exp(B) = 1.009). Mediation analysis and Path analysis showed the mediating role of DT in this association. Interventions on teasing do not seem to be a priority in eating disorder prevention programs. PMID:23241090

Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Rubio, Teresa; Plumed, Javier; Barberá, María; Serrano, Marisa; Gimeno, Natalia; Conesa, Llanos; Ruiz, Elías; Rojo-Bofill, Luis; Beato, Luis; Livianos, Lorenzo

2013-01-01

198

The effect of shift-work on food intake and eating habits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shift work on food intake and eating patterns in order to assess the impact of this on health. A total of 36 shift workers were measured anthropometrically and were asked to complete food diaries for six consecutive days, and a lifestyle questionnaire. The results revealed night workers did not

S. L. Reeves; E. Newling-Ward; C. Gissane

2004-01-01

199

What Older Adults Find Useful for Maintaining Healthy Eating and Exercise Habits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 29 adults 60 years of age and older enrolled in the SENIOR Project, a health promotion intervention study designed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and exercise among communitydwelling older adults. The focus groups explored the motivations of older adults to eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables and\\/or

Mary L. Greaney; Faith D. Lees; Geoffrey W. Greene; Phillip G. Clark

2004-01-01

200

Predicting active school travel: The role of planned behavior and habit strength  

PubMed Central

Background Despite strong support for predictive validity of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) substantial variance in both intention and behavior is unaccounted for by the model’s predictors. The present study tested the extent to which habit strength augments the predictive validity of the TPB in relation to a currently under-researched behavior that has important health implications, namely children’s active school travel. Method Participants (N?=?126 children aged 8–9?years; 59?% males) were sampled from five elementary schools in the west of Scotland and completed questionnaire measures of all TPB constructs in relation to walking to school and both walking and car/bus use habit. Over the subsequent week, commuting steps on school journeys were measured objectively using an accelerometer. Hierarchical multiple regressions were used to test the predictive utility of the TPB and habit strength in relation to both intention and subsequent behavior. Results The TPB accounted for 41?% and 10?% of the variance in intention and objectively measured behavior, respectively. Together, walking habit and car/bus habit significantly increased the proportion of explained variance in both intention and behavior by 6?%. Perceived behavioral control and both walking and car/bus habit independently predicted intention. Intention and car/bus habit independently predicted behavior. Conclusions The TPB significantly predicts children’s active school travel. However, habit strength augments the predictive validity of the model. The results indicate that school travel is controlled by both intentional and habitual processes. In practice, interventions could usefully decrease the habitual use of motorized transport for travel to school and increase children’s intention to walk (via increases in perceived behavioral control and walking habit, and decreases in car/bus habit). Further research is needed to identify effective strategies for changing these antecedents of children’s active school travel.

2012-01-01

201

THE ASSOCIATION OF EATING BEHAVIOR WITH RISK FOR MORBIDITY IN OLDER WOMEN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Although an influence of eating behavior on dietary intake and physiology has been documented in several studies, the extent to which eating behavior influences long-term health is uncertain. Current dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger were assessed using the Eating Inventory in 1252 nonsmo...

202

Perceptions of University Staff About Disordered Eating Behaviors in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of overt eating disorders, as well as more obscure disordered eating behaviors, on college campuses is well documented. However, the ability of staff to identify students with eating disorders, and therefore enable referral for treatment, is questionable; it is theorized that part of this difficulty may be due to perceptions that disordered behaviors and attitudes are, in fact,

S. S. Dahlheimer; T. F. Moraca

1998-01-01

203

The role of involvement and variety-seeking in eating out behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Eating out behaviors vary from one individual to another. However, there is no conceptually underpinned typology to explain this phenomenon effectively. This paper aims to develop a conceptually underpinned typology of eating out attitudes and to distinguish differences based on demographics and actual eating out behaviors. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This study proposes a typology using a 2×2 matrix (high

Srikanth Beldona; Andrew P. Moreo; Gokul Das Mundhra

2010-01-01

204

Cognitive behavior therapy for eating disorders: progress and problems.  

PubMed

Beginning with the application of operant conditioning principles as part of inpatient treatment, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN) has been insufficiently studied. Its efficacy remains in question. By contrast, manual-based CBT is the first-line treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa (BN) although its effects are limited. More effective methods are needed for non-responders to current therapy. Despite its well-established efficacy, CBT for BN is relatively rarely used in the US. Research on dissemination is a priority. Modified CBT and behavioral weight control programs seem comparably effective in reducing binge eating in Binge Eating Disorder (BED). Long-term maintenance of weight loss in these obese patients, however, remains a challenge. Self-help and other brief, cost-effective methods work for subsets of both BN and BED patients, demonstrating that treatment be administered within a stepped-care framework. PMID:10402697

Wilson, G T

1999-07-01

205

Risky Eating Behaviors of Young Adults—Implications for Food Safety Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young adults engage in risky eating behaviors like eating raw\\/undercooked foods of animal origin that put them at increased risk for foodborne disease. This cross-sectional survey assessed the self-reported risky eating behaviors of young adults enrolled in higher education as a part of a large-scale survey administered over 10 months. Par- ticipants (N4,343) completed a risky eating question- naire by

CAROL BYRD-BREDBENNER; JACLYN MAURER ABBOT; VIRGINIA WHEATLEY; DONALD SCHAFFNER; CHRISTINE BRUHN; LYDIA BLALOCK

206

A Continuum of Nonclinical Eating Disorders: A Review of Behavioral and Psychological Correlates and Suggestions for Intervention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews research which distinguishes various points along the continuum from normal eating habits to clinically diagnosed eating disorders. Focuses on nonclinical intermediate points and proposes intervention strategies for women experiencing difficulties with weight, body image, and/or eating. Contends further research is necessary for greater…

Kalodner, Cynthia R.; Scarano, Gina M.

1992-01-01

207

Improving Eating Behaviors in Dementia Using Behavioral Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this experimental pilot study was to determine the short- and long-term efficacy of directed verbal prompts and positive reinforcement on the level of eating independence (LEI) of elderly nursing home patients with dementia. Twenty-four subjects from a dementia unit were randomly selected and randomly assigned to three experimental groups and three control groups. The LEI scale was

Mary Louise Coyne; Lois Hoskins

1997-01-01

208

Eating behavior in obese and overweight persons with and without anhedonia.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in body mass index and eating behavior in obese and overweight persons with and without anhedonia during a weight loss intervention study. Psychiatric diagnostics were based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders. Eating behavior was assessed by the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-18) and binge eating by the Binge Eating Scale (BES). Out of 82 participants, 20 (24.4%) reported experiencing anhedonia at least once during the study period. Those suffering from anhedonia scored significantly higher values in BES at baseline and at follow-up. They also reported more uncontrolled and emotional eating at the first follow-up. Overall, persons suffering from anhedonia achieved a poorer outcome in weight loss compared to those without anhedonia. Anhedonia was associated with uncontrolled eating, emotional eating, and binge eating, all of which may have contributed to the poorer outcomes achieved in weight loss. PMID:20801180

Keränen, Anna-Maria; Rasinaho, Elsi; Hakko, Helinä; Savolainen, Markku; Lindeman, Sari

2010-08-27

209

Eating Behaviors and Overweight among Adolescents: A Population-Based Survey in Japan  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between eating behaviors and overweight among population-based adolescents in Japan. Methods. Study subjects comprised adolescents in the seventh grade (age range, 12–13 years) from Ina, a town in Saitama Prefecture, Japan, between 1999 and 2008. The height and weight of the subjects were measured, and information concerning eating behaviors (eating speed and eating until full) was obtained using a self-administered questionnaire. Results. Among boys (n = 1586), fast eating speed significantly increased the odds ratio (OR) for overweight when compared with medium eating speed, regardless of eating until full or not; moreover, a more marked increase in the OR was observed among boys eating until full (OR: 2.78, 95% confidence interval: 1.76–4.38) than among those not eating until full (2.43, 1.41–4.20). Among girls (n = 1542), fast eating speed led to a significant increase in the OR in those eating until full; however, no significant increases were observed in the OR in those eating quickly and not until full. Conclusions. Among adolescents, fast eating speed was associated with overweight; furthermore, the combination of both fast eating speed and eating until full may have a significant effect on overweight.

Shirasawa, Takako; Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Hoshino, Hiromi; Tajima, Naoko; Kokaze, Akatsuki

2013-01-01

210

Do fasting and life style eating habits in Ramadan affect headache?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of the study is to investigate whether fasting and lifestyle habits in Ramadan have any effect on headaches. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This cross-sectional study was carried out in the state of Qatar for a period from 13 October to 13 November 2004. A total of 1,200 fasting Muslims aged between 18 to 65 years were approached and

Abdulbari Bener; Abdulaziz Azhar; Mohammed Bessisso

2007-01-01

211

Gender Perspectives on Adolescent Eating Behaviors: A Study on the Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Junior Secondary Students in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This research aimed to investigate the eating attitudes and behaviors of junior secondary students in Hong Kong, with a specific focus on possible gender differences. Design: A survey was conducted in 2005 to solicit data about participants' food knowledge, eating attitudes and behavior, perceptions of cooking skills and body weight,…

Lai Yeung, Wai-ling Theresa

2010-01-01

212

Latent Profile Analysis to Determine the Typology of Disinhibited Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objective We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify children and adolescents into subtypes based on the overlap of disinhibited eating behaviors—eating in the absence of hunger, emotional eating, and subjective and objective binge eating. Method Participants were 411 youth (8–18y) from the community who reported on their disinhibited eating patterns. A subset (n=223) ate ad libitum from two test meals. Results LPA produced five subtypes that were most prominently distinguished by objective binge eating (OBE; n=53), subjective binge eating (SBE; n=59), emotional eating (EE; n=62), a mix of emotional eating and eating in the absence of hunger (EE-EAH; n=172), and no disinhibited eating (No-DE; n=64). Accounting for age, sex, race, BMI-z, the four disinhibited eating groups had more problem behaviors than no disinhibited eating (p=.001). OBE and SBE subtypes had greater BMI-z, percent fat mass, disordered eating attitudes, and trait anxiety than EE, EAH-EE, and No-DE subtypes (ps<.01). However, the OBE subtype reported the highest eating concern (p<.001) and the OBE, SBE, and EE subtypes reported higher depressive symptoms than EE-EAH and No-DE subtypes. Across both test meals, OBE and SBE consumed less percent protein and higher percent carbohydrate than the other subtypes (ps<.02), adjusting for age, sex, race, height, lean mass, percent fat mass, and total intake. EE also consumed greater percent carbohydrate and lower percent fat compared than EE-EAH and No-DE (ps<.03). The SBE subtype consumed the least total calories (p=.01). Discussion We conclude that behavioral subtypes of disinhibited eating may be distinguished by psychological characteristics and objective eating behavior. Prospective data are required to determine whether subtypes predict the onset of eating disorders and obesity.

Vannucci, Anna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Field, Sara E.; Mooreville, Mira; Reina, Samantha A.; Kozlosky, Merel; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

2012-01-01

213

Examining the Social Effects of Habit Behaviors Exhibited by Individuals with Mental Retardation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined social perceptions of and the social impairment experienced by individuals with mental retardation who exhibit various habit behaviors. In addition, we evaluated the reliability and validity of the Social Acceptance Scale (SAS). In experiment 1, 108 college students were randomly assigned to one of four habit conditions (motor tic, vocal tic, trichotillomania, and fingernail biting). In each

Ethan S. Long; Douglas W. Woods; Raymond G. Miltenberger; R. W. Fuqua; Peter J. Boudjouk

1999-01-01

214

Eating habits in older people in Greece: the role of age, dental status and chewing difficulties.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of age-related parameters on the dietary preferences in a Greek community-dwelling sample. 130 participants aged between 18 and 92 years were interviewed and clinically examined. Data were collected on their socio-demographic characteristics, their dental status, the oral complaints, their chewing difficulties and the frequency of eating a variety of food types. The results revealed that increasing age was associated with increased frequency of consumption of fish, grains and vegetables. Impaired dental status and chewing difficulties did not affect the frequency of eating meat and other "difficult to chew" food, but it was related to more frequent consumption of softer food (chicken, fish, grains, and dairy products). The older Greeks did not exclude any food type from their diet, because of dental impairment. To overcome chewing problems they used various preparing methods to consume their favorite food. The dietary patterns of the older participants adhere to the traditional Mediterranean diet greater than those of the younger ones, revealing the various cultural and social parameters which influence food selection. PMID:20399518

Kossioni, Anastassia; Bellou, Olga

215

Self-Silencing, Emotional Awareness, and Eating Behaviors in College Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-silencing (or the suppression of expressing one's thoughts, feelings, and needs) can have a negative impact on the mental health of women, from depression to disordered eating behaviors. The authors examined the relationship between self-silencing and disordered eating as well as intuitive eating. The authors also explored whether emotional…

Shouse, Sarah H.; Nilsson, Johanna

2011-01-01

216

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge…

Safer, Debra L.; Couturier, Jennifer L.; Lock, James

2007-01-01

217

Agentic and communal personality traits: Relations to disordered eating behavior, body shape concern, and depressive symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to examine links between agentic and communal personality traits and disordered eating behavior and related problems (i.e., body shape concern and depressive symptoms) in a sample of 298 undergraduates. As predicted, unmitigated agency was positively associated with uncontrolled eating, and unmitigated communion was positively related to emotional eating and fasting for at least 24 h in order

Catherine E. Mosher; Sharon Danoff-Burg

2008-01-01

218

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge…

Safer, Debra L.; Couturier, Jennifer L.; Lock, James

2007-01-01

219

Risk for Eating Disorders in a School-Based Twin Sample: Are Twins Representative of the General Population for Eating Disordered Behavior?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigated the validity of the representativeness assumption in twin studies of eating pathology by examining whether twins are representative of the general population for eating disorder behavior. Eating disorder behaviors were quantified by a 21-item risk measure in two school-based female adolescent samples:

Kelly L. Klump; Pamela K. Keel; Gloria R. Leon; Jayne A. Fulkerson

1999-01-01

220

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Fluoxetine as Adjuncts to Group Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Although binge eating disorder is a common and distressing concomitant of obesity, it has not yet been established whether affected individuals presenting to behavioral weight control programs should receive specialized treatments to supplement standard treatment. This study was designed to examine the added benefit of two adjunctive interventions, individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, offered in the context

Michael J. Devlin; Juli A. Goldfein; Eva Petkova; Huiping Jiang; Pamela S. Raizman; Sara Wolk; Laurel Mayer; Janel Carino; Dara Bellace; Claudia Kamenetz; Ilyse Dobrow; B. Timothy Walsh

2005-01-01

221

Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease—how to promote healthy eating habits in populations?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The obesity epidemic brings with it an increase in related diseases, like diabetes mellitus, and subsequently cardiovascular\\u000a disease. Traditional dietary guidelines have focused on food composition rather than energy balance.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims  To identify promising approaches towards promoting healthy eating and lifestyle patterns. Implementation strategies were also\\u000a sought.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  A review of the pertinent literature based on MEDLINE searches.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Weight loss subsequent to

C. von Schacky

2008-01-01

222

Stress-Induced Binge Eating: A Behavior Analytic Approach to Assessment and Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Responses to acute or chronic stress may include behaviors, such as alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and altered eating\\u000a patterns. In connection with the stress-eating relation, some researchers have suggested that certain stressors (e.g., psychological\\u000a or emotional) may influence the direction (i.e., increase or decrease) of a person’s eating response. In a recent study, Connors\\u000a and Morse (Int J Eat Disord

Michael J. CameronRussell; Russell W. Maguire; Jennifer McCormack

2011-01-01

223

Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as diabulimia, as a form of weight control. It has been clearly shown that ED in type 1 diabetics are associated with impaired metabolic control, more frequent episodes of ketoacidosis and an earlier than expected onset of diabetes-related microvascular complications, particularly retinopathy. The management of these conditions requires a multidisciplinary team formed by an endocrinologist/diabetologist, a nurse educator, a nutritionist, a psychologist and, frequently, a psychiatrist. The treatment of type 1 diabetes patients with DEB and ED should have the following components: diabetes treatment, nutritional management and psychological therapy. A high index of suspicion of the presence of an eating disturbance, particularly among those patients with persistent poor metabolic control, repeated episodes of ketoacidosis and/or weight and shape concerns are recommended in the initial stage of diabetes treatment, especially in young women. Given the extent of the problem and the severe medical risk associated with it, more clinical and technological research aimed to improve its treatment is critical to the future health of this at-risk population.

Larranaga, Alejandra; Docet, Maria F; Garcia-Mayor, Ricardo V

2011-01-01

224

Eating on the Run: A Qualitative Investigation of Fast Food Student Employees and Social Network Influences on Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity is a complex public health problem, whose influences range from genetic to lifestyle to environmental to economic factors. In this project, I will investigate how social networks influence eating behaviors. Through a series of 30—45 minute interviews with students working in fast-food restaurants, I will gather data on contextual features of eating as a fast-food worker. I will do

Catherine A. Womack

2009-01-01

225

Chronic stress exposure may affect the brain's response to high calorie food cues and predispose to obesogenic eating habits.  

PubMed

Exaggerated reactivity to food cues involving calorically-dense foods may significantly contribute to food consumption beyond caloric need. Chronic stress, which can induce palatable "comfort" food consumption, may trigger or reinforce neural pathways leading to stronger reactions to highly rewarding foods. We implemented functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether chronic stress influences activation in reward, motivation and executive brain regions in response to pictures of high calorie and low calorie foods in thirty women. On separate lab visits, we also assessed food intake from a snack food buffet and circulating cortisol. In women reporting higher chronic stress (HCS), pictures of high calorie foods elicited exaggerated activity in regions of the brain involving reward, motivation, and habitual decision-making. In response to pictures of high calorie food, higher chronic stress was also associated with significant deactivation in frontal regions (BA10; BA46) linked to strategic planning and emotional control. In functional connectivity analysis, HCS strengthened connectivity between amygdala and the putamen, while LCS enhanced connectivity between amygdala and the anterior cingulate and anterior prefrontal cortex (BA10). A hypocortisolemic signature and more consumption of high calorie foods from the snack buffet were observed in the HCS group. These results suggest that persistent stress exposure may alter the brain's response to food in ways that predispose individuals to poor eating habits which, if sustained, may increase risk for obesity. PMID:23954410

Tryon, Matthew S; Carter, Cameron S; Decant, Rashel; Laugero, Kevin D

2013-08-16

226

Eating Habits and Body-weights of Students of the University of Belgrade, Serbia: A Cross-sectional Study  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this survey was to quantify the prevalence of overweight and obesity among a sample of students in Belgrade University, Serbia and to describe their main eating habits. A total of 1,624 questionnaire responses were analyzed (response rate 97.3%). The students were recruited during mandatory annual check-ups in April-June 2009. All subjects completed the questionnaire; height (in cm) and weight (in km) were measured by two physicians. Results were assessed statistically. Almost every fourth male student was overweight. Strikingly, 15% of female students were underweight. Highly-significant difference was found between average body mass index (BMI) of male and female students (F=317.8, p=0.001). Students’ BMI did not correlate with average family income or with the frequency of taking breakfast (p=-0.064, p=0.152 for males and ?=0.034, p=0.282 for females respectively). There is a growing demand for global health strategies which would encourage healthy body-image and figure; thus, these initiatives should mobilize the society on a national and international level.

Tepavcevic, Darija B. Kisic; Popovic, Aleksandra; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

2013-01-01

227

Eating habits and appetite control in the elderly: the anorexia of aging.  

PubMed

Although a high prevalence of overweight is present in elderly people, the main concern in the elderly is the reported decline in food intake and the loss of the motivation to eat. This suggests the presence of problems associated with the regulation of energy balance and the control of food intake. A reduced energy intake causing body weight loss may be caused by social or physiological factors, or a combination of both. Poverty, loneliness, and social isolation are the predominant social factors that contribute to decreased food intake in the elderly. Depression, often associated with loss or deterioration of social networks, is a common psychological problem in the elderly and a significant cause of loss of appetite. The reduction in food intake may be due to the reduced drive to eat (hunger) resulting from a lower need state, or it arises because of more rapidly acting or more potent inhibitory (satiety) signals. The early satiation appears to be predominantly due to a decrease in adaptive relaxation of the stomach fundus resulting in early antral filling, while increased levels and effectiveness of cholecystokinin play a role in the anorexia of aging. The central feeding drive (both the opioid and the neuropeptide Y effects) appears to decline with age. Physical factors such as poor dentition and ill-fitting dentures or age-associated changes in taste and smell may influence food choice and limit the type and quantity of food eaten in older people. Common medical conditions in the elderly such as gastrointestinal disease, malabsorption syndromes, acute and chronic infections, and hypermetabolism often cause anorexia, micronutrient deficiencies, and increased energy and protein requirements. Furthermore, the elderly are major users of prescription medications, a number of which can cause malabsorption of nutrients, gastrointestinal symptoms, and loss of appetite. There is now good evidence that, although age-related reduction in energy intake is largely a physiologic effect of healthy aging, it may predispose to the harmful anorectic effects of psychological, social, and physical problems that become increasingly frequent with aging. Poor nutritional status has been implicated in the development and progression of chronic diseases commonly affecting the elderly. Protein-energy malnutrition is associated with impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, and ultimately increased morbidity and mortality. An increasing understanding of the factors that contribute to poor nutrition in the elderly should enable the development of appropriate preventive and treatment strategies and improve the health of older people. PMID:12834202

Donini, Lorenzo M; Savina, Claudia; Cannella, Carlo

2003-03-01

228

The impact of food branding on children's eating behavior and obesity.  

PubMed

Branding is a technique used by the food industry to create a recognizable image to attract consumers and hopefully boost sales of the product. Children recognize food brands from a young age, but their impact on the development of eating behaviors and obesity is unclear. In addition, the notion that some branding techniques may be used to increase intake of healthful foods, like fruits and vegetables, has not been rigorously investigated. Three laboratory-based intake studies designed to test the impact of common food brands on children's eating habits are presented. In the first study, four to six year-old children (n=43) were exposed to ad libitum test-meals where foods were presented either with or without their associated branding. In the second study, a novel food brand based Stroop task was developed and tested to assess children's cognitive response to food brands, and following this procedure, seven to nine year-old children (n=41) ate ad libitum test-meals consisting of foods packaged with or without a logo from a popular fast food restaurant. Finally, a pilot intervention was conducted with four to five year-old children (n=16) to demonstrate the efficacy of using licensed (spokes) characters to package and promote intake of fruits and vegetables. These studies demonstrate that branding is an important influence on what and how much children eat, but some children may be more susceptible to these influences than others. Future studies are needed to better understand the influence that child age, sex, and obesity has on response to food branding and marketing. PMID:22450261

Keller, Kathleen L; Kuilema, Laura G; Lee, Norman; Yoon, Joyce; Mascaro, Brittany; Combes, Anne-Laure; Deutsch, Bryan; Sorte, Kathryn; Halford, Jason C G

2012-03-16

229

Physical Similarity and Twin Resemblance for Eating Attitudes and Behaviors: A Test of the Equal Environments Assumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Equal Environments Assumption (EEA) in twin studies of eating pathology was investi- gated by examining the hypothesis that twin resemblance for eating attimdes and behaviors is affected by their degree of physical similarity. Eating attimdes and behaviors were assessed in 338 female adolescent twin pairs with a revised version of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EOI). General physical similarity as

Kelly L. Klump; Amanda Holly; William G. Iacono; Matt McGue; Laura E. Willson

2000-01-01

230

Physical Similarity and Twin Resemblance for Eating Attitudes and Behaviors: A Test of the Equal Environments Assumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Equal Environments Assumption (EEA) in twin studies of eating pathology was investigated by examining the hypothesis that twin resemblance for eating attitudes and behaviors is affected by their degree of physical similarity. Eating attitudes and behaviors were assessed in 338 female adolescent twin pairs with a revised version of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). General physical similarity as well

Kelly L. Klump; Amanda Holly; William G. Iacono; Matt McGue; Laura E. Willson

2000-01-01

231

Nutritional Knowledge and Eating Behaviors of Female, Collegiate Swimmers  

PubMed Central

Background Female athletes often have inadequate diets due to lack of nutritional knowledge and nutritional misconceptions. Poor nutrition may lead to an increased chance of developing the Female Athlete Triad, a trio of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mass. Physical therapists, as part of a healthcare team, must be prepared to address nutritional issues, recognize signs and symptoms of the female athlete triad, and make the appropriate intervention or referral. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the nutritional knowledge of female collegiate swimmers and how effectively they apply their nutritional knowledge to their everyday eating habits. Methods Eighty-five female collegiate swimmers from six Michigan universities completed a nutritional knowledge questionnaire and a 24-hour food recall survey. Demographic, nutritional, and statistical data were analyzed. Results The mean score on nutritional knowledge test was 54.53/76 (71.75% correct). Mean total caloric intake of swimmers was 3229.10 calories per day. Ninety-five point nine percent did not meet the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for all three macronutrients. No difference in total mean survey score existed between the three collegiate divisions. Conclusion This study suggests that athletes lack knowledge of nutrition, healthy food choices, components of a well-balanced diet, and the implications of nutrition on performance.

Morris, Jennifer; Morris, Chad; Schaefer, Katharine

2009-01-01

232

Relationship between needs driving eating occasions and eating behavior in midlife women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the relationship between type of eating occasion based on need state segments experienced by 200 midlife women (46±6 years) and food group, nutrient, and energy intake. Women completed an Eating Occasion Questionnaire for 3 eating occasions over a 3-day period for which they maintained diet records. Cluster analysis segmented 559 eating

Noriko Sudo; Dennis Degeneffe; Houa Vue; Koel Ghosh; Marla Reicks

2009-01-01

233

Influence of Parents’ Eating Behaviors and Child Feeding Practices on Children’s Weight Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the effects of mothers’ and fathers’ eating behaviors, child feeding practices, and BMI on percentage body fat and BMI in their children.Research Methods and Procedures: Four hundred fifty-eight parents (239 mothers, 219 fathers) were asked to complete two questionnaires: the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and the Child Feeding Questionnaire, which measure dimensions of parent eating behavior and child

Darcy L. Johannsen; Neil M. Johannsen; Bonny L. Specker

2006-01-01

234

The Relationship of Childhood Adiposity to Parent Body Mass Index and Eating Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To better understand risk factors for the development of obesity in early childhood, we examined the association between children’s adiposity and their parents’ eating behavior and body mass index (BMI).Research Methods and Procedures: Parents of 85 white children 36 months of age (49 boys and 36 girls) completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire measuring three dimensions of parent eating behavior:

Robert C. Whitaker; Cindy M. Deeks; Amy E. Baughcum; Bonny L. Specker

2000-01-01

235

Relationship of obesity to job stress and eating behavior in male Japanese workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To examine a possible relationship between obesity, job stress, and eating behavior in male Japanese workers.Method:A questionnaire on life style, job stress, and eating behavior was conducted with 208 male workers aged 19–60 years (33.7±12.3 years) in a manufacturing industry in Japan. Height and weight were measured in an annual health examination. The relation between obesity, job stress, and eating

N Nishitani; H Sakakibara

2006-01-01

236

Eating Disorder Behaviors Are Increasing: Findings from Two Sequential Community Surveys in South Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEvidence for an increase in the prevalence of eating disorders is inconsistent. Our aim was to determine change in the population point prevalence of eating disorder behaviors over a 10-year period.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsEating disorder behaviors were assessed in consecutive general population surveys of men and women conducted in 1995 (n = 3001, 72% respondents) and 2005 (n = 3047, 63.1% respondents).

Phillipa J. Hay; Jonathan Mond; Petra Buttner; Anita Darby; R. Srinivasa Murthy

2008-01-01

237

Impact of Weight Reduction on Eating Behaviors and Quality of Life: Influence of the Obesity Degree  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground:To examine the effects of a short-term weight reducing program on body composition, eating behaviors, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) of sedentary obese women characterized by different obesity degrees. Methods:44 women with a BMI under 34.9 kg\\/m2 and 39 women with a BMI above 35 kg\\/m2 were studied. Fat mass and lean mass (electrical bioimpedance), eating behaviors (Three-Factor Eating

Eléonor Riesco; Nadia Rossel; Coralie Rusques; Marie Mirepoix; Vicky Drapeau; Frédéric Sanguignol; Pascale Mauriège

2009-01-01

238

Eating Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

Eating disorders are illnesses in which the victims suffer severe disturbances in their eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. Those suffering from eating disorders typically become obsessed with food and their body ...

239

Are the Eating and Exercise Habits of Successful Weight Losers Changing?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether the diet and exercise behaviors of successful weight losers entering the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) have changed between 1995 and 2003.Research Method and Procedures: Participants (N = 2708) were members of the NWCR who enrolled in intermittent years since 1995. Participants had lost an average of 33.1 kg and

Suzanne Phelan; Holly R. Wyatt; James O. Hill; Rena R. Wing

2006-01-01

240

Understanding gardening and dietary habits among youth garden program participants using the Theory of Planned Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sedentary lifestyles, along with diets low in fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates, and high in fat and total energy are increasing among youth. These unhealthy behaviors contribute to an increase in childhood overweight, which is associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Healthful dietary behaviors, such as eating a balanced and varied diet may be addressed in garden-based

Lauren Lautenschlager; Chery Smith

2007-01-01

241

Heritability of Eating Behavior Assessed Using the DEBQ (Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire) and Weight-related Traits: The Healthy Twin Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heritability of eating behavior and body weight–related traits in Asian populations has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of eating behavior and the body weight–related traits of current weight and self-reported past weight among twins and their families. Study subjects were 2,144 Korean, adult, same-sex twins and their families at the ages

Joohon Sung; Kayoung Lee; Yun-Mi Song; Mi Kyeong Lee; Dong-Hun Lee

2010-01-01

242

The role of family status and ethnic group on body image and eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: to examine the role of ethnic group and family status on body dissat- isfaction and eating behavior. Method: One hundred women (Asian mothers and daughters, n = 50; white mothers and daughters, n = 50) completed a questionnaire about their per- ceived ethnic identity (acculturation), body image, and eating behavior. Results: The results showed no matching between mothers and

Jane Ogden; Charlotte Elder

1998-01-01

243

Psychiatric Comorbidity in Women with Disordered Eating Behavior: A National Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used data collected by Statistics Canada in the Mental Health and Well-being cycle of the Canadian Community Health Survey (N = 20,211) to examine the associations between disordered eating behavior and selected mood, anxiety and substance use disorders in adult women grouped in three age groups. Significant associations between disordered eating behaviors and major depression, substance dependence and

Tahany Gadalla; Niva Piran

2008-01-01

244

Survey on Dysfunctional Eating Behavior in Adult Persons with Intellectual Disability Living in the Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Prevalence of dysfunctional eating behavior was investigated in 311 adult persons with mental retardation living in the West Coast of Norway. Reports from a questionnaire filled out by health workers were used as observational data. The main finding was that 64.3% of the clients showed indices of dysfunctional eating behavior. The five most…

Hove, Oddbjorn

2007-01-01

245

Differences in eating behaviors between nonobese, weight stable young and older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habitual dietary intake, dietary cognitive restraint (CR), disinhibition and hunger are eating behaviors that influence energy balance in both young and older adults. Since the prevalence of overweight and obesity in older adults is steadily rising, it is important to identify eating behavior adaptations that allow individuals to maintain a healthy body weight with advancing age. The association of age

Kelsey M. Gilmour Flint; Emily L. Van Walleghen; Elizabeth H. Kealey; Sandra VonKaenel; Daniel H. Bessesen; Brenda M. Davy

2008-01-01

246

Development and modification of child food preferences and eating patterns: behavior genetics strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral genetics (BG) designs can offer useful strategies for studying the development of child food preferences and eating patterns. This review summarizes BG designs that tested familial influences on child eating behavior and implicated both genetic and home environmental factors. A range of BG strategies, including family and pseudo-family designs, classic twins designs, discordant sibling designs, cotwin control designs, and

M S Faith

2005-01-01

247

Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

2012-01-01

248

Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

2012-01-01

249

Dialectical Behavior Therapy: An Effective Treatment for Individuals with Comorbid Borderline Personality and Eating Disorders?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with either or both Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and an eating disorder face a number of intrapsychic and interpersonal difficulties that have been historically treatment resistant. Dialectical Behavior Therapy, which combines elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and Zen practices, has shown some promise as a potential treatment for patients with comorbid personality and eating disorders. Criticisms of DBT include

Traci R. Stein

2008-01-01

250

The Impact of Teachers and Families on Young Children's Eating Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Young children depend on their families and teachers to support their well-being and promote positive development, including eating behaviors. Children's food preferences and willingness to try new foods are influenced by the people around them. The eating behaviors children practice early in life affect their health and nutrition--significant…

Eliassen, Erin K.

2011-01-01

251

Drunkorexia: Understanding the Co-occurrence of Alcohol Consumption and Eating\\/Exercise Weight Management Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Examine the co-occurrence of alcohol consumption, physical activity, and disordered eating behaviors via a drunkorexia perspective. Participants: Nationally representative sample (n = 22,488) of college students completing the Fall 2008 National College Health Assessment. Methods: Hierarchical logistic regression was employed to determine if physical activity and disordered eating behaviors uniquely predicted binge drinking, while controlling for age, race, gender,

Adam E. Barry; Anna K. Piazza-Gardner

2012-01-01

252

The Concurrence of Eating Disorders with Histories of Child Abuse Among Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between eating disorders and reported history of physical or sexual abuse among male and female adolescents. A survey administered to high school students in a rural midwestern slate school system contained questions on eating behaviors, weight, lifestyle habits, parental substance abuse, and history of physical abuse, extrafamilial sex abuse and incest. Results showed that eating

Jeanne Hernandez

1996-01-01

253

Promoting Lifelong Healthy Eating: An Overview. CDC's Guidelines for School Health Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication describes the importance of promoting healthy eating habits among school-age children, discussing the benefits of healthy eating (e.g., prevents child and adolescent health problems and health problems later in life) and noting the consequences of unhealthy eating (e.g., hungry childen are more likely to have behavioral,…

Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), Atlanta, GA. Adolescent and School Health Div.

254

[Food consumption and eating behavior among Brazilian adolescents: National Adolescent School-based Health Survey (PeNSE), 2009].  

PubMed

The objective of this article is to describe the characteristics of food consumption and eating behavior of adolescents and its association with socio-demographic factors. In 2009, a random sample of students in 9th grade of elementary education at public and private schools from 26 Brazilian state capitals and Federal District was studied. It was applied a self-administered questionnaire with socio-demographic attributes, food consumption and eating behavior, among others. Estimates of the constructed indicators were presented for the total population and by sex. The association of each indicator with socio-demographic variables was examined by logistic regression. The results showed that over half of adolescents presented frequent consumption of beans (62.6%), milk (53.6%) and sweets (50.9%), and held at least lunch or dinner with the mother or responsible (62.6%) and watching television or studying (50.9%). In general, girls were more exposed to undesirable eating habits and higher socioeconomic status was associated with a higher prevalence of the indicators studied. The results revealed regular consumption of unhealthy diet markers and consumption of less than the recommended for a healthy diet, pointing the need for strengthening health promotion activities targeting young people. PMID:21049149

Levy, Renata Bertazzi; Castro, Inês Rugani Ribeiro de; Cardoso, Letícia de Oliveira; Tavares, Letícia Ferreira; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Gomes, Fabio da Silva; Costa, André Wallace Nery da

2010-10-01

255

Habit and nonhabit systems for unconscious and conscious behavior: implications for multitasking.  

PubMed

The study of human consciousness has demonstrated that there are both conscious and unconscious systems. Other work, particularly in animals, has shown that there are habit and nonhabit systems and that these involve different brain regions and memory processes. Here we argue that habits can be equated with unconscious behavior and nonhabits with conscious behavior. This equation makes the extensive physiological literature on habit/nonhabit relevant to the less tractable issue of consciousness. On the basis of this line of reasoning, it appears that different parts of the BG and different memory structures mediate conscious and unconscious processes. It is further argued here that the unconscious system is highly capable; it can both process sensory information and produce behavior. The benefit of such a dual system is multitasking: The unconscious system can execute background tasks, leaving the conscious system to perform more difficult tasks. PMID:23163411

Lisman, John; Sternberg, Eliezer J

2012-11-19

256

A Description of Disordered Eating Behaviors in Latino Males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore disordered eating and eating disorders (EDs) in Latino males. Participants: Participants are 722 male college students from a larger prevalence study conducted in the University of Puerto Rico system. Methods: Participants were selected from a list of sections of required courses for first-year students on each campus. Self-report instruments were used to explore ED symptoms (the Eating

Mae Lynn Reyes-Rodríguez; Margarita Sala; Ann Von Holle; Claudia Unikel; Cynthia M. Bulik; Luis Cámara-Fuentes; Alba Suárez-Torres

2011-01-01

257

Gender Differences in Eating Behavior and Body Weight Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gender differences in food intake and selection first appear in adolescence. Men consume more calories than women, and the sexes have different eating styles, which indicate that women have been socialized to eat in a more feminine manner. Women experience more food-related conflict than men do, in that they like fattening foods but perceive that they should not eat them.

Barbara J. Rolls; Ingrid C. Fedoroff; Joanne F. Guthrie

1991-01-01

258

Eating disorders in adolescents: Correlations between symptoms and central control of eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to verify the relationship between eating disorders (binge eating and bulimia nervosa) and body image dissatisfaction with BMI, anorexigenic and orexigenic factors in adolescents. Thirty-two adolescents, (13 obese [BMI=36.65±5.68] and 19 non-obese [BMI=22.18±3.11]), aged between 14 and 19y, were recruited. Symptoms of eating disorders were measured by self-report questionnaires (BSQ, BITE and BES). Hormones,

Mara Cristina Lofrano-Prado; Wagner Luiz do Prado; Aline de Piano; Lian Tock; Danielle Arisa Caranti; Claudia Maria Oller do Nascimento; Lila Missae Oyama; Sergio Tufik; Marco Túlio de Mello; Ana Raimunda Dâmaso

2011-01-01

259

An Examination of General and Specific Motivational Mechanisms for the Relations Between Body Dissatisfaction and Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to test a model of the regulation of eating behaviors that could help to better understand the processes by which body dissatisfaction could be either associated with dysfunctional eating behaviors or with healthy eat- ing behaviors. Based on Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2000, it appears that women's general level

Luc G. Pelletier; Stéphanie C. Dion

2007-01-01

260

Eating green. Consumers' willingness to adopt ecological food consumption behaviors.  

PubMed

Food consumption is associated with various environmental impacts, and consumers' food choices therefore represent important environmental decisions. In a large-scale survey, we examined consumers' beliefs about ecological food consumption and their willingness to adopt such behaviors. Additionally, we investigated in more detail how different motives and food-related attitudes influenced consumers' willingness to reduce meat consumption and to buy seasonal fruits and vegetables. We found consumers believed avoiding excessive packaging had the strongest impact on the environment, whereas they rated purchasing organic food and reducing meat consumption as least environmentally beneficial. Similarly, respondents appeared to be most unwilling to reduce meat consumption and purchase organic food. Taste and environmental motives influenced consumers' willingness to eat seasonal fruits and vegetables, whereas preparedness to reduce meat consumption was influenced by health and ethical motives. Women and respondents who preferred natural foods were more willing to adopt ecological food consumption patterns. PMID:21896294

Tobler, Christina; Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

2011-08-27

261

Collegiate athletic trainers' knowledge and perceptions of disordered eating behaviors in athletes.  

PubMed

To assess athletic trainers' perceptions and knowledge regarding disordered eating behaviors and to estimate their confidence in response to a test of knowledge, a cross-sectional mail survey was distributed to a national random sample of 500 athletic trainers from the National Collegiate Athletic Association and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. 408 collegiate certified athletic trainers responded (rate of 81.6%). A 30-item questionnaire assessed perceptions of disordered eating behaviors within 5 domains. Opinions regarding the prevalence of disordered eating, athletic injury and nutritional status, and their role in recognizing disordered eating were assessed. Most respondents reported perceiving disordered eating to be a significant problem. Also, athletic trainers needed knowledge in all domains of disordered eating. PMID:18361133

Thompson, Amy; Yingling, Faith; Boardley, Debra; Rocks, Joan

2007-12-01

262

The Metabolic Syndrome and Behavioral Correlates in Obese Patients With Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the frequency of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and explored behavioral eating- and weight-related correlates in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Ninety-three treatment-seeking obese BED patients (22 men and 71 women) with and without the MetSyn were compared on demographic features and a number of current and historical eating and weight variables. Sixty percent of the

Megan Roehrig; Robin M. Masheb; Marney A. White; Carlos M. Grilo

2009-01-01

263

Differentiation in eating behaviors between Korean female collegiate athletes and non-athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Majority of eating disorders (ED)\\/disordered eating (DE) research has examined women only in developed western countries. However, ED\\/DE are not restricted to western populations. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to estimate the prevalence of ED and DE among female collegiate athletes and non-athletes in South Korea, and (b) to differentiate eating behaviors among the same population. A

Chankyo Jeong

2010-01-01

264

Eating behaviors of children in the context of their family environment  

PubMed Central

Both a family history of obesity and early childhood obesity have been identified as strong predictors of adult obesity risk. The finding that parental obesity, maternal obesity in particular, increases a child’s risk for developing obesity suggests that either shared genes, or environment, or likely a combination of both may promote overeating and excessive weight gain in children. Parents not only create food environments for children’s early experiences with food and eating, but they also influence their children’s eating by modeling their own eating behaviors, taste preferences, and food choices. Thus, it is important to identify intermediary behavioral eating traits which promote overeating and obesity in children and to determine the extent to which associations between eating traits and excessive weight gain in children may be influenced by genetic factors, environmental factors, or both. Behavioral genetic methods can be used to help partition genetic and environmental sources of variability in behavioral traits. The focus of this paper is to review and discuss findings from both short-term experimental and prospective cohort studies on eating behaviors of children at various stages in their lives. Select child eating traits and parent-child resemblances in eating will be further examined in the context of children’s home environment and their familial predisposition to obesity.

Kral, Tanja V.E.; Rauh, Erin M.

2010-01-01

265

Eating behavior dimensions. Associations with energy intake and body weight. A review.  

PubMed

The purpose of this review is to spark integrative thinking in the area of eating behaviors by critically examining research on exemplary constructs in this area. The eating behaviors food responsiveness, enjoyment of eating, satiety responsiveness, eating in the absence of hunger, reinforcing value of food, eating disinhibition and impulsivity/self-control are reviewed in relation to energy intake, body mass index and weight gain over time. Each of these constructs has been developed independently, and little research has explored the extent to which they overlap or whether they differentially predict food choices, energy intake and weight gain in the naturalistic environment. Most available data show positive cross-sectional associations with body mass index, but fewer studies report associations with energy intake or food choices. Little prospective data are available to link measures of eating behaviors with weight gain. Disinhibition has the largest and most consistent body of empirical data that link it prospectively with weight gain. An overarching conceptual model to integrate the conceptual and empirical research base for the role of eating behavior dimensions in the field of obesity research would highlight potential patterns of interaction between individual differences in eating behaviors, specific aspects of the individual's food environment and individual variation in state levels of hunger and satiety. PMID:22796186

French, Simone A; Epstein, Leonard H; Jeffery, Robert W; Blundell, John E; Wardle, Jane

2012-07-11

266

Eating Behavior Dimensions: Associations With Energy Intake And Body Weight: A Review  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review is to spark integrative thinking in the area of eating behaviors by critically examining research on exemplary constructs in this area. The eating behaviors food responsiveness, enjoyment of eating, satiety responsiveness, eating in the absence of hunger, reinforcing value of food, eating disinhibition and impulsivity/self-control are reviewed in relation to energy intake, body mass index and weight gain over time. Each of these constructs has been developed independently, and little research has explored the extent to which they overlap or whether they differentially predict food choices, energy intake and weight gain in the naturalistic environment. Most available data show positive cross-sectional associations with body mass index, but fewer studies report associations with energy intake or food choices. Little prospective data are available to link measures of eating behaviors with weight gain. Disinhibition has the largest and most consistent body of empirical data that link it prospectively with weight gain. An overarching conceptual model to integrate the conceptual and empirical research base for the role of eating behavior dimensions in the field of obesity research would highlight potential patterns of interaction between individual differences in eating behaviors, specific aspects of the individual’s food environment and individual variation in state levels of hunger and satiety.

French, Simone A.; Epstein, Leonard H; Jeffery, Robert W.; Blundell, John E.; Wardle, Jane

2012-01-01

267

Expectations, mood, and eating behavior in binge eating disorder. Beware of the bright side  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sad people may indulge in fattening snacks because they believe that eating will repair their mood. To test whether (1) changes in expectations and mood had an effect on caloric intake and (2) depressive symptoms moderated caloric intake, 73 women with binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to a condition in which expectations about food and emotion were either confirmed

Alexandra E. Dingemans; Carolien Martijn; Eric F. van Furth; Anita T. M. Jansen

2009-01-01

268

Exploring the co-morbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in a nationally representative community-based sample.  

PubMed

Emerging evidence signifies the co-occurrence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with clinical and sub-threshold disordered eating behaviors. However, many existing studies have assessed this co-occurrence among inpatient or intensive outpatient populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the co-occurrence of ADHD with clinical eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors in a nationally representative sample via a secondary data analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 4,862; 2,243 males; 2,619 females). Results reveal that females have higher rates of co-occurrence of ADHD and diagnosed eating disorders than males (1.05% vs. 0.20%, p < .01). When controlling for age and race, ADHD predicted diagnosed eating disorders in females (incidence rate ratio (IRR): 2.06; 95% CI: 1.09-3.88; p < .05), but did not predict diagnosed eating disorders in males. With regard to disordered eating behaviors, when controlling for age, gender, and race, ADHD significantly predicted disordered eating behaviors (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.21-2.74). When stratifying by type of disordered eating behavior, ADHD predicted binging and/or purging behavior (OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 1.78-4.61), but not restrictive behaviors. Implications of study findings pertain to both secondary/targeted prevention efforts in addition to tertiary prevention via patient-specific treatment plans. PMID:23910787

Bleck, Jennifer; DeBate, Rita D

2013-05-22

269

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions on physical activity and eating habits in persons with severe mental disorders: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background There is a high prevalence of overweight and obesity in persons with severe mental disorders and this has serious implications on the short and long term health outcomes of these patients. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity and eating habits in persons with severe mental disorders. Special attention was given if any of the included studies in the review also examined the cost-effectiveness of these health promotion interventions. Methods A systematic search through the electronic databases Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL and Cohrane Library was conducted, and by hand-searching the reference lists of the retrieved articles from the electronic databases. Studies were included if they examined effectiveness and/or cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity and eating habits in persons with severe mental disorders, with primary outcome changes in Body Mass Index and body weight. Results Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Weight loss and Body Mass Index decrease were observed in intervention groups in 11 studies. The difference in weight change between intervention and control groups was statistically significant in nine studies. Differences in mean Body Mass Index between intervention and control groups were statistically significant in eight studies. Five studies reported improvements in quality of life and general health. In none of the studies cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions was examined. Conclusion Further research on both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity and eating habits in persons with severe mental disorders is required to assist in the development of new health promotion interventions in this population.

2011-01-01

270

Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children’s health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children’s eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch programs on children’s overall (both in- and out-of-school) eating behavior. METHODS A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in which 2039 students in 12 elementary and 10 middle schools reported their eating behavior and the frequencies with which they purchased meals and à la carte items in the school cafeteria. Food service managers from each school provided information on the availability of foods and beverages during school lunch periods. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to identify school- and student-level predictors of children’s eating behavior. RESULTS The availability of nutritious foods during school lunch periods was associated with healthier eating behavior among students. However, this effect was observed only among children who infrequently purchased à la carte food items, and not among those who were frequent purchasers. CONCLUSION Increased availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products as components of school meals may be an effective strategy to promote healthy eating behaviors among children. Improving the nutrition standards for foods offered in competition with federally reimbursable school meals may enhance the positive effects of school meal programs on student eating behavior.

Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

2011-01-01

271

Successful weight loss and maintenance in everyday clinical practice with an individually tailored change of eating habits on the basis of food energy density  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Weight change was analyzed in a cohort of obese patients whose eating habits were changed individually mainly on the basis\\u000a of food energy density (ED) to evaluate the feasibility of this concept for a larger controlled trial.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Five hundred and thirteen outpatients were treated between January 2003 and December 2006. Dietary counseling was based on\\u000a a pretreatment food diary. In

Volker Schusdziarra; Margit Hausmann; Corina Wiedemann; Julie Hess; Cornelia Barth; Stefan Wagenpfeil; Johannes Erdmann

2011-01-01

272

Gender as a Moderator for the Relationship Between BAS-Drive and Disordered Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with highly active behavioral activation (BAS) motivational systems are at increased risk for disordered eating\\u000a behaviors (Bijttebier et al. 2009). The current study examined gender differences in the relationship between motivational tendencies and disordered eating\\u000a behaviors by administering self-report measures to a sample of 352 college undergraduate students from a Midwestern university\\u000a in the United States. The goal-driven facet

Heather K. Wadeson; Kathryn H. Gordon; Keith F. Donohue

273

Perceptions of control, standards of beauty, body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors among Hispanic women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on eating disorders and body dissatisfaction have focused primarily on White non-Hispanic women, and more research is need on minority populations. The purpose of the present study is to provide additional information on psychosocial and intrapsychic correlates of disordered eating behavior and body dissatisfaction, specifically, degree of acculturation to Hispanic culture, acceptance of Western standards of beauty, and perceived

Kaia Beth Calbeck

2002-01-01

274

Counseling College Women Experiencing Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) is, by far, the most common eating disorder that college counseling professionals encounter among their female clients. Empirical evidence and best practice guidelines support use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with women experiencing EDNOS. This article…

Choate, Laura H.

2010-01-01

275

Sports Participation and Disordered Eating Behaviors and Beliefs of Middle School Girls.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined the disordered eating behaviors and beliefs of female middle school athletes, investigating the relationship between number and type of sports played and disordered eating. Student surveys indicated that girls participated in a mean of 4.6 sports and reported an average of 2.1 weight dissatisfied beliefs and restrictive or disordered…

Burckes-Miller, Mardie; Burak, Lydia J.

2002-01-01

276

Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

2010-01-01

277

Perceived stress and eating behaviors in a community-based sample of African Americans†  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported that psychological stress is associated with greater food consumption, particularly consumption of high fat foods. We are unaware of any studies that have examined stress-induced eating among African Americans (AAs). The goals of the current study were to examine the relationship between perceived stress and high fat eating behaviors in a sample of AAs, to examine whether this relationship is stronger among overweight and obese participants, and to examine whether haphazard meal planning mediates the relationship between perceived stress and high fat eating behaviors. One hundred fifty-nine adults from a metropolitan area completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the Eating Behaviors Pattern Questionnaire (EBPQ), a demographic questionnaire, and body mass was assessed with BMI. Perceived stress was associated with haphazard planning and emotional eating, but not related to other high fat eating domains in the overall sample. These findings held for overweight and obese participants with the addition of snacking on sweets. High fat eating behaviors were not mediated by haphazard meal planning. These findings are consistent with other studies which demonstrate a link between stress and eating. Long-term interventions for high fat consumption and obesity should include an examination of perceived stress among AAs.

Sims, Regina; Gordon, Shalanda; Garcia, Wanda; Clark, Elijah; Monye, Deloris; Callender, Clive; Campbell, Alfonso

2008-01-01

278

Perceived stress and eating behaviors in a community-based sample of African Americans.  

PubMed

Previous studies have reported that psychological stress is associated with greater food consumption, particularly consumption of high fat foods. We are unaware of any studies that have examined stress-induced eating among African Americans (AAs). The goals of the current study were to examine the relationship between perceived stress and high fat eating behaviors in a sample of AAs, to examine whether this relationship is stronger among overweight and obese participants, and to examine whether haphazard meal planning mediates the relationship between perceived stress and high fat eating behaviors. One hundred fifty-nine adults from a metropolitan area completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the Eating Behaviors Pattern Questionnaire (EBPQ), a demographic questionnaire, and body mass was assessed with BMI. Perceived stress was associated with haphazard planning and emotional eating, but not related to other high fat eating domains in the overall sample. These findings held for overweight and obese participants with the addition of snacking on sweets. High fat eating behaviors were not mediated by haphazard meal planning. These findings are consistent with other studies which demonstrate a link between stress and eating. Long-term interventions for high fat consumption and obesity should include an examination of perceived stress among AAs. PMID:18329591

Sims, Regina; Gordon, Shalanda; Garcia, Wanda; Clark, Elijah; Monye, Deloris; Callender, Clive; Campbell, Alfonso

2007-06-20

279

Sex Role Conflict, Social Desirability, and Eating-Disorder Attitudes and Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of conflict between sex role ideology and sex role orientation with eating-disorder behaviors and attitudes was examined. American participants were 321 female college students who completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory (Bem. 1974), Sex Role Ideology Scale (Kalin & Tilby, 1978), and Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI; Garner, Olmsted, & Polivy, 1983). The results indicated that conflict between ideology

Mark E. Johnson; Christiane Brems; Pamela Fischer

1996-01-01

280

Pretreatment and Process Predictors of Outcome in Interpersonal and Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined pretreatment and process predictors of individual nonresponse to psychological group treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). In a randomized trial, 162 overweight patients with BED were treated with either group cognitive–behavioral therapy or group interpersonal psychotherapy. Treatment nonresponse, which was defined as nonabstinence from binge eating, was assessed at posttreatment and at 1 year following treatment

Anja Hilbert; Brian E. Saelens; Richard I. Stein; Danyte S. Mockus; R. Robinson Welch; Georg E. Matt; Denise E. Wilfley

2007-01-01

281

Personality dimensions and treatment drop-outs among eating disorder patients treated with cognitive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Premature, unilateral interruption of inpatient treatment of eating disorders (ED) is a key factor limiting success. We evaluated the role of personality dimensions (temperament and character) in predicting drop-out in 145 consecutive ED inpatients (133 females) who entered cognitive behavior therapy. Baseline assessment included anthropometry, the Eating Disorder Examination, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Temperament

Riccardo Dalle Grave; Simona Calugi; Francesca Brambilla; Giulio Marchesini

2008-01-01

282

The effect of inpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders on temperament and character  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personality traits seem to have an important role in the development, clinical expression, course, and treatment response in eating disorders (EDs). We investigated the effects of an inpatient cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) on the measures of temperament and character (Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)) in 149 consecutive patients with EDs. Baseline assessment included anthropometry, the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), the Beck

Riccardo Dalle Grave; Simona Calugi; Francesca Brambilla; Giovanni Abbate-Daga; Secondo Fassino; Giulio Marchesini

2007-01-01

283

Desire for Thinness among High School Cheerleaders: Relationship to Disordered Eating and Weight Control Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined cheerleaders' desire for thinness in relationship to disordered eating and weight control behaviors. A Desire for Thinness Scale and selected scales from three eating disorder instruments were administered to 751 high school cheerleaders. Cheerleaders who expressed a strong desire for thinness had significantly higher scores on seven of…

Lundholm, Jean K.; Littrell, John M.

1986-01-01

284

Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

2010-01-01

285

Alcohol Use, Eating Patterns, and Weight Behaviors in a University Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore associations between alcohol, alcohol-related eating, and weight-related health indicators. Methods: Cross-sectional, multivariate regression of weight behaviors, binge drinking, and alcohol-related eating, using self-reported student survey data (n = 3206 undergraduates/graduates). Results: Binge drinking was associated with…

Nelson, Melissa C.; Lust, Katherine; Story, Mary; Ehlinger, Ed

2009-01-01

286

High School Coaches' Knowledge of Disordered Eating Behavior in Female Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to discover more about high school coaches' knowledge of disordered eating behavior in female athletes. In a sample of 98 coaches from Minnesota, it was found that the majority of coaches were not familiar with the Female Athlete Triad, a phenomenon describing three interrelated health problems: disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. However, coaches provided

Allison Woerpel

2007-01-01

287

Infantile deprivation and adult behavior in the rat: retention of increased rate of eating  

Microsoft Academic Search

When adult eating rate in infantile-deprived rats is compared to that of matched controls, a significantly faster eating rate was shown by the experimental groups on the first day of adult deprivation. This difference had disappeared by the 7th trial and no significant differences in hoarding behavior were observed.

Melvin H. Marx

1952-01-01

288

Change in eating disorder attitudes and behavior in college women: Prevalence and predictors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is evidence suggesting that disordered eating is common among female college students, there is little research on whether these behaviors increase during college. This study examined change in eating disorder (ED) symptoms in undergraduate women, and the relationship between change in ED symptoms and change in risk factors. Participants (N=186) completed measures of ED symptoms (i.e., bingeing, purging,

Kelly C. Berg; Patricia Frazier; Laura Sherr

2009-01-01

289

Alcohol Use, Eating Patterns, and Weight Behaviors in a University Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To explore associations between alcohol, alcohol-related eating, and weight-related health indicators. Methods: Cross-sectional, multivariate regression of weight behaviors, binge drinking, and alcohol-related eating, using self-reported student survey data (n = 3206 undergraduates/graduates). Results: Binge drinking was associated…

Nelson, Melissa C.; Lust, Katherine; Story, Mary; Ehlinger, Ed

2009-01-01

290

Is healthy behavior contagious: associations of social norms with physical activity and healthy eating  

PubMed Central

Background Social norms are theoretically hypothesized to influence health-related behaviors such as physical activity and eating behaviors. However, empirical evidence relating social norms to these behaviors, independently of other more commonly-investigated social constructs such as social support, is scarce and findings equivocal, perhaps due to limitations in the ways in which social norms have been conceptualized and assessed. This study investigated associations between clearly-defined social norms and a range of physical activity and eating behaviors amongst women, adjusting for the effects of social support. Methods Self-report survey data about particular physical activity (leisure-time moderate-vigorous activity; volitional walking; cycling for transport) and eating behaviors (fast food, soft drink and fruit and vegetable consumption), and social norms and support for these, were provided by 3,610 women aged 18-46 years living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods in Victoria, Australia. Results Results of regression analyses showed that social norms for physical activity and eating behaviors predicted these respective behaviors relatively consistently; these associations generally remained significant after adjustment for social support. Conclusions Acknowledging the cross-sectional study design, these data confirm theoretical accounts of the importance of social norms for physical activity and eating behaviors, and suggest that this is independent from social support. Intervention strategies aimed at promoting physical activity and healthy eating could incorporate strategies aimed at modifying social norms relating to these behaviors.

2010-01-01

291

Indication of Insensitivity of Planetary Weathering Behavior and Habitable Zone to Surface Land Fraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences planetary weathering behavior. This is important because the silicate-weathering feedback determines the width of the habitable zone in space and time. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate, useful for gaining qualitative understanding, is developed to examine climate evolution for planets of various land-ocean fractions. It is pointed out that, if seafloor weathering does not depend directly on surface temperature, there can be no weathering-climate feedback on a waterworld. This would dramatically narrow the habitable zone of a waterworld. Results from our model indicate that weathering behavior does not depend strongly on land fraction for partially ocean-covered planets. This is powerful because it suggests that previous habitable zone theory is robust to changes in land fraction, as long as there is some land. Finally, a mechanism is proposed for a waterworld to prevent complete water loss during a moist greenhouse through rapid weathering of exposed continents. This process is named a "waterworld self-arrest," and it implies that waterworlds can go through a moist greenhouse stage and end up as planets like Earth with partial ocean coverage. This work stresses the importance of surface and geologic effects, in addition to the usual incident stellar flux, for habitability.

Abbot, Dorian S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Ciesla, Fred J.

2012-09-01

292

Relationship between needs driving eating occasions and eating behavior in midlife women  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the relationship between type of eating occasion based on need state segments experienced by 200 midlife women (46 ± 6 years) and food group, nutrient, and energy intake. Women completed an Eating Occasion Questionnaire for 3 eating occasions over a 3-day period for which they maintained diet records. Cluster analysis segmented 559 eating occasions into six need states. Energy, total fat, and cholesterol consumption per occasion were highest in “routine family meal” occasions of which more than 60% were dinner and eaten at home with their children. The percentage of eating occasions in which fruits/vegetables were eaten was also highest in “routine family meal,” followed by “healthy regimen.” More than half of “indulgent escape” eating occasions occurred away from home and about one-third were experienced as a snack. Saturated fat and sweets intakes were the highest in the “indulgent escapes” occasions. Eating occasions experienced by women according to needs surrounding the occasion should be considered when developing tailored interventions to improve intake.

Sudo, Noriko; Degeneffe, Dennis; Vue, Houa; Ghosh, Koel; Reicks, Marla

2009-01-01

293

Quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars ( Melopsittacus undula fus)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the bases of the studies of acoustic behavior and pattern recognition of budgerigar calls, the quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars is further given in this paper. These results open up a new knowledge for comprehensive analyses of abnormalities of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars prior to earthquakes. Under indoor lighting, the song calls in budgerigars are possessed of the beginning and ending singing time with the natural characteristics, and of the rhythmic habit of daylight singings and night rests. In daily daylight and night calls, single calls, vari-toned calls, mono-syllabic and multi-syllabic protest calls are respectively possessed of the occupation habit corresponding to behavior activities, and have close acrophases and regular following properties corresponding to half-value phases, and the acrophases delay half-value phases by about half an hour on an average. After reversing lighting, the acrophases of budgerigar calls delay those of the normal lighting by about 12 hours on an average, and the following properties corresponding to half-value phases are irregular.

Jiang, Jin-Chang; Chen, Hao; Xu, Mu-Ling; Zhang, Hong

1994-08-01

294

The Effects of Violent Video Game Habits on Adolescent Hostility, Aggressive Behaviors, and School Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Video games have become one of the favorite activities of American children. A growing body of research is linking violent video game play to aggressive cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors. The first goal of this study was to document the video games habits of adolescents and the level of parental monitoring of adolescent video game use. The…

Gentile, Douglas, A.; Lynch, Paul, J.; Linder, Jennifer Ruh; Walsh, David, A.

2004-01-01

295

Growth of Cognitive Skills in Preschoolers: Impact of Sleep Habits and Learning-Related Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: The present study used a longitudinal design to identify how sleep habits and learning-related behaviors impact the development of cognitive skills in preschoolers (ages 3–5). Sixty- seven children with parental report and cognitive skill assessment data were included. Scores on the Differential Ability Scales (C. Elliott, 1990) were obtained at ages 3, 4, and 5. A Sleep Questionnaire

Eunjoo Jung; Victoria J. Molfese; Jennifer Beswick; Jill Jacobi-Vessels; Andrew Molnar

2009-01-01

296

Growth of Cognitive Skills in Preschoolers: Impact of Sleep Habits and Learning-Related Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The present study used a longitudinal design to identify how sleep habits and learning-related behaviors impact the development of cognitive skills in preschoolers (ages 3-5). Sixty- seven children with parental report and cognitive skill assessment data were included. Scores on the Differential Ability Scales (C. Elliott, 1990)…

Jung, Eunjoo; Molfese, Victoria J.; Beswick, Jennifer; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill; Molnar, Andrew

2009-01-01

297

Consumer behaviors towards ready-to-eat foods based on food-related lifestyles in Korea.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine consumers' behaviors toward ready-to-eat foods and to develop ready-to-eat food market segmentation in Korea. The food-related lifestyle and purchase behaviors of ready-to-eat foods were evaluated using 410 ready-to-eat food consumers in the Republic of Korea. Four factors were extracted by exploratory factor analysis (health-orientation, taste-orientation, convenience-orientation, and tradition-orientation) to explain the ready-to eat food consumers' food-related lifestyles. The results of cluster analysis indicated that "tradition seekers" and "convenience seekers" should be regarded as the target segments. Chi-square tests and t-tests of the subdivided groups showed there were significant differences across marital status, education level, family type, eating-out expenditure, place of purchase, and reason for purchase. In conclusion, the tradition seekers consumed more ready-to-eat foods from discount marts or specialty stores and ate them between meals more often than the convenience seekers. In contrast, the convenience seekers purchased more ready-to-eat foods at convenience stores and ate them as meals more often than the tradition seekers. These findings suggest that ready-to-eat food market segmentation based on food-related lifestyles can be applied to develop proper marketing strategies. PMID:20827350

Bae, Hyun-Joo; Chae, Mi-Jin; Ryu, Kisang

2010-08-31

298

Consumer behaviors towards ready-to-eat foods based on food-related lifestyles in Korea  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine consumers' behaviors toward ready-to-eat foods and to develop ready-to-eat food market segmentation in Korea. The food-related lifestyle and purchase behaviors of ready-to-eat foods were evaluated using 410 ready-to-eat food consumers in the Republic of Korea. Four factors were extracted by exploratory factor analysis (health-orientation, taste-orientation, convenience-orientation, and tradition-orientation) to explain the ready-to eat food consumers' food-related lifestyles. The results of cluster analysis indicated that "tradition seekers" and "convenience seekers" should be regarded as the target segments. Chi-square tests and t-tests of the subdivided groups showed there were significant differences across marital status, education level, family type, eating-out expenditure, place of purchase, and reason for purchase. In conclusion, the tradition seekers consumed more ready-to-eat foods from discount marts or specialty stores and ate them between meals more often than the convenience seekers. In contrast, the convenience seekers purchased more ready-to-eat foods at convenience stores and ate them as meals more often than the tradition seekers. These findings suggest that ready-to-eat food market segmentation based on food-related lifestyles can be applied to develop proper marketing strategies.

Bae, Hyun-Joo; Chae, Mi-Jin

2010-01-01

299

Stress-Related Eating and Drinking Behavior and Body Mass Index and Predictors of This Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Earlier studies on stress and obesity have not considered coping in situations involving stress. This study examines the associations between stress-related eating and drinking and obesity and the factors predicting this behavior. Predictive factors include risk factors for adult obesity, longitudinal socioeconomic status, and perceived social support.Methods. A longitudinal, population-based study of 2,359 men and 2,791 women born in

Jaana Laitinen; Ellen Ek; Ulla Sovio

2002-01-01

300

Perceptions of emotional eating behavior. A qualitative study of college students.  

PubMed

Approximately one-third of college students are overweight or obese and the average student gains 5 kg during college. Previous research has identified a relationship between emotional eating and weight gain in young adults, but outside the realm of eating disorders, few studies qualitatively capture why individuals cope with emotions by eating. Exploratory qualitative research was conducted, including 3-day food journals and indepth interviews, with proportionate quota sampling of eight male and eight female undergraduate students to gain an understanding of students' perceptions of their emotional eating behaviors. Participants were purposively selected based on their emotional eating scores on the Weight Related Eating Questionnaire from a larger survey assessing student eating behaviors. Participants' (n=16) mean age was 19.6 ± 1.0 years and all self-reported their race to be white. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) for females and males was 24.1 ± 1.2 kg/m(2) and 24.8 ± 1.7 kg/m(2), respectively. Findings from the qualitative analyses indicated gender differences and similarities. Females identified stress as the primary trigger for emotional eating, frequently followed by guilt. Males were primarily triggered by unpleasant feelings such as boredom or anxiety turning to food as a distraction; however, males were less likely to experience guilt after an emotional eating episode than females. During emotional eating episodes, both genders chose what they defined as unhealthful foods. These findings indicate a multidisciplinary intervention focusing on emotion and stress management in addition to dietary behavior change should be developed to reduce the potential for weight gain associated with emotional eating in the college-aged population. PMID:23046706

Bennett, Jessica; Greene, Geoffrey; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna

2012-10-06

301

Night eating patterns and chronotypes: a correlation with binge eating behaviors.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study examined the association between the morningness/eveningness dimension and eating patterns. The sample consists of 100 subjects who were screened at a nutrition clinic and was composed of 77% women; mean age was 39.5 (±11.7) years; and 66% were overweight. Significant bivariate correlations were found between the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) total score and the Binge Eating Scale (BES) and the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ). The NEQ and BES were also significantly correlated. Body mass index (BMI) was correlated with the NEQ and BES, but it was not a confounding variable as no associations were found between the MEQ and BMI. To control for potential multicollinearity effects among variables, we also used multivariate regression analysis in which the values of the correlation coefficients were adjusted. Only the BES remained statistically associated with the MEQ. In conclusion, these results suggest that the study of chronotype may be an important issue to be considered when characterizing disordered eating. This study serves as an impetus for examining circadian intake patterns in more detail between those with binge eating disorder (BED) and night eating syndrome (NES) to help discern these important nosological questions. PMID:22906954

Harb, Ana; Levandovski, Rosa; Oliveira, Ceres; Caumo, Wolnei; Allison, Kelly Costello; Stunkard, Albert; Hidalgo, Maria Paz

2012-08-18

302

A Description of Disordered Eating Behaviors in Latino Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore disordered eating and eating disorders (EDs) in Latino males. Participants: Participants are 722 male college students from a larger prevalence study conducted in the University of Puerto Rico system. Methods: Participants were selected from a list of sections of required courses for first-year students on each campus.…

Reyes-Rodriguez, Mae Lynn; Sala, Margarita; Von Holle, Ann; Unikel, Claudia; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Camara-Fuentes, Luis; Suarez-Torres, Alba

2011-01-01

303

Dental Complications of Eating Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... Dental Complications of Eating Disorders Dental Complications of Eating Disorders Dietary habits can and do play a role ... associated with dental complications that causes individuals with eating disorders to seek treatment. Signs & Symptoms Loss of tissue ...

304

Chronic Inhibition, Self-Control and Eating Behavior: Test of a 'Resource Depletion' Model  

PubMed Central

The current research tested the hypothesis that individuals engaged in long-term efforts to limit food intake (e.g., individuals with high eating restraint) would have reduced capacity to regulate eating when self-control resources are limited. In the current research, body mass index (BMI) was used as a proxy for eating restraint based on the assumption that individuals with high BMI would have elevated levels of chronic eating restraint. A preliminary study (Study 1) aimed to provide evidence for the assumed relationship between eating restraint and BMI. Participants (N?=?72) categorized into high or normal-range BMI groups completed the eating restraint scale. Consistent with the hypothesis, results revealed significantly higher scores on the weight fluctuation and concern for dieting subscales of the restraint scale among participants in the high BMI group compared to the normal-range BMI group. The main study (Study 2) aimed to test the hypothesized interactive effect of BMI and diminished self-control resources on eating behavior. Participants (N?=?83) classified as having high or normal-range BMI were randomly allocated to receive a challenging counting task that depleted self-control resources (ego-depletion condition) or a non-depleting control task (no depletion condition). Participants then engaged in a second task in which required tasting and rating tempting cookies and candies. Amount of food consumed during the taste-and-rate task constituted the behavioral dependent measure. Regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect of these variables on amount of food eaten in the taste-and-rate task. Individuals with high BMI had reduced capacity to regulate eating under conditions of self-control resource depletion as predicted. The interactive effects of BMI and self-control resource depletion on eating behavior were independent of trait self-control. Results extend knowledge of the role of self-control in regulating eating behavior and provide support for a limited-resource model of self-control.

Hagger, Martin S.; Panetta, Giulia; Leung, Chung-Ming; Wong, Ging Ging; Wang, John C. K.; Chan, Derwin K. C.; Keatley, David A.; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.

2013-01-01

305

Chronic inhibition, self-control and eating behavior: test of a 'resource depletion' model.  

PubMed

The current research tested the hypothesis that individuals engaged in long-term efforts to limit food intake (e.g., individuals with high eating restraint) would have reduced capacity to regulate eating when self-control resources are limited. In the current research, body mass index (BMI) was used as a proxy for eating restraint based on the assumption that individuals with high BMI would have elevated levels of chronic eating restraint. A preliminary study (Study 1) aimed to provide evidence for the assumed relationship between eating restraint and BMI. Participants (N?=?72) categorized into high or normal-range BMI groups completed the eating restraint scale. Consistent with the hypothesis, results revealed significantly higher scores on the weight fluctuation and concern for dieting subscales of the restraint scale among participants in the high BMI group compared to the normal-range BMI group. The main study (Study 2) aimed to test the hypothesized interactive effect of BMI and diminished self-control resources on eating behavior. Participants (N?=?83) classified as having high or normal-range BMI were randomly allocated to receive a challenging counting task that depleted self-control resources (ego-depletion condition) or a non-depleting control task (no depletion condition). Participants then engaged in a second task in which required tasting and rating tempting cookies and candies. Amount of food consumed during the taste-and-rate task constituted the behavioral dependent measure. Regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect of these variables on amount of food eaten in the taste-and-rate task. Individuals with high BMI had reduced capacity to regulate eating under conditions of self-control resource depletion as predicted. The interactive effects of BMI and self-control resource depletion on eating behavior were independent of trait self-control. Results extend knowledge of the role of self-control in regulating eating behavior and provide support for a limited-resource model of self-control. PMID:24146942

Hagger, Martin S; Panetta, Giulia; Leung, Chung-Ming; Wong, Ging Ging; Wang, John C K; Chan, Derwin K C; Keatley, David A; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

2013-10-17

306

Insensitivity of weathering behavior to planetary land fraction and effect on habitability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is likely that an increasing number of terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered in the habitable zone of their stars. Planetary surface land fraction may, however, influence the functioning of the silicate weathering feedback, which buffers planetary surface climate against changes in stellar luminosity over a star's lifetime. It is therefore worthwhile to consider the effect of land fraction on the planetary carbon cycle and weathering behavior in a general sense. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate is developed that includes both continental silicate weathering and seafloor weathering. This model can be used to gain an intuitive sense of the behavior of terrestrial planets with different land fractions in the habitable zone of main-sequence stars as their star's insolation changes with time. It is found that, as long as seafloor weathering is independent of surface temperature, there can be no weathering feedback on a waterworld. This means that the tenure of a waterworld in the habitable zone (before it undergoes a moist greenhouse) is likely to be much shorter than that of a planet with some land fraction. The silicate weathering feedback, however, is effective even at very low land fractions. A planet with a land fraction of 0.01 should remain in the habitable zone nearly as long as a planet with a land fraction of 0.3. Finally, by comparing the timescale for water loss to space to the weathering timescale, it is found that it is possible for a waterworld to draw down atmospheric CO2 quickly enough as a moist greenhouse is in progress to prevent complete loss of all water. This would imply that waterworlds in the habitable zone of main sequence stars can go through a moist greenhouse stage and end up as planets like Earth with only partial ocean coverage and a habitable climate.

Abbot, D. S.; Archer, D.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Ciesla, F. J.; Bean, J. L.

2012-04-01

307

Feeding and Eating Behaviors in Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mothers of children aged 2–12 years completed an exhaustive questionnaire assessing feeding and eating behaviors for both\\u000a themselves and their children with autism, and typically developing siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (where\\u000a available), or typically developing children with no sibling with a disability. Results indicate that children with autism\\u000a were only marginally more likely to exhibit picky eating behavior

Yolanda Martins; Robyn L. Young; Danielle C. Robson

2008-01-01

308

Eating disorder behaviors of ethnically diverse urban female adolescent athletes and non-athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared Caucasian, Hispanic, and African–American urban adolescent athlete and non-athlete females for relative frequency of behavioral and psychological indices of eating disorders, while controlling for physical size. High school female athletes (n=571) and non-athletes (n=463) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) composed of eight subscales that measure behavioral and psychological indices common in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

DEBORAH J. RHEA

1999-01-01

309

Electromyographic measurement of eating behaviors for buckwheat noodles.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to analyze human eating behaviors in chewing and slurping buckwheat noodles. We used electromyography to measure the activity of the jaw-closing, jaw-opening, and lip-closing muscles while healthy adults ate one mouthful of buckwheat noodles. Slurping the noodles required a longer mastication period but smaller muscle activity per movement than chewing the same samples. Total muscle activity was greater in slurping. Slurping also showed a longer average cycle time but greater variances in the cycle time than rhythmical chewing. The mechanical properties of buckwheat noodles significantly differed between the noodle types (half-raw and dry), but the human mastication variables for the two types of noodles were not significantly changed within a subject. Both types of noodles kept for 10 min at 23 degrees C after being cooked could be consumed with less mastication effort than those immediately served, and this observation corresponded to softening of the noodles during the standing time. PMID:20057146

Kohyama, Kaoru; Hanyu, Takashi; Hayakawa, Fumiyo; Sasaki, Tomoko

2010-01-07

310

Disordered eating behaviors among Italian men: objectifying media and sexual orientation differences.  

PubMed

Objectification theory was tested as a suitable framework for explaining sexual orientation differences in disordered eating behaviors in college-aged Italian men. The theory's applicability to 125 homosexual and 130 heterosexual men was investigated using self-report questionnaires. Gay men scored significantly higher on exposure to sexually objectifying media, body surveillance, body shame, disordered eating behaviors, and depression than heterosexual men. Although path analyses support the theory's applicability to both groups, for gay men the path model demonstrated a better fit to the objectification theory for disordered eating and depression. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:22985233

Dakanalis, Antonios; Di Mattei, Valentina E; Bagliacca, Elena Pagani; Prunas, Antonio; Sarno, Lucio; Riva, Giuseppe; Zanetti, M Assunta

2012-01-01

311

Eating is a protected behavior even in the face of persistent pain in male rats  

PubMed Central

Feeding is critical for survival. Yet, patients with chronic pain often lose their appetite and eat less. We previously showed that ad libitum fed male rats continue to feed rather than withdraw from a brief noxious stimulus. This study examined the effects of a sustained noxious stimulus on feeding by testing ad libitum fed male rats for five eating behaviors –latency to eat, time taken to eat each chip, pauses and scanning during eating, and the number of chocolate chips eaten - during the hour following a sham injection or an injection of a low (0.5%) or moderate (1.5%) dose of formalin into the hind paw. Sham-injected rats showed no pain-related behaviors, rats injected with 0.5% formalin showed very few pain-related behaviors, and rats injected with 1.5% formalin showed favoring, lifting and licking of the injured paw with a characteristic biphasic time course. Besides taking less time to commence eating during the first phase of formalin pain, rats injected with either dose of formalin did not differ from sham-injected rats on any of the other eating measures. Rats injected with 0.5% formalin showed no pain behaviors during eating, whereas those given 1.5% formalin typically ate while not exhibiting any pain behaviors but occasionally ate while favoring the paw, rarely while lifting the paw, and never while licking the paw. These results show that eating is a protected activity even in the presence of persistent pain in male rats.

Foo, H.; Crabtree, Katherine; Thrasher, Ama; Mason, Peggy

2009-01-01

312

Time Trends in Population Prevalence of Eating Disorder Behaviors and Their Relationship to Quality of Life  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine temporal trends in the burden of eating disorder (ED) features, as estimated by the composite of their prevalence and impact upon quality of life (QoL) over a period of 10 years. Methodology Representative samples of 3010 participants in 1998 and 3034 participants in 2008 from the South Australian adult population were assessed for endorsement of ED features (objective binge eating, extreme dieting, and purging were assessed in both years; subjective binge eating and extreme weight/shape concerns were also assessed in 2008) and QoL using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-36). Principal Findings From 1998 to 2008 significant increases in the prevalence of objective binge eating (2.7% to 4.9%, p<0.01) and extreme dieting (1.5% to 3.3%, p<0.01), but not purging, were observed. Lower scores on the SF-36 were significantly associated with endorsement of any of these behaviors in both 1998 and 2008 (all p<0.001). No significant difference was observed in the effect of the endorsement of these ED behaviors on QoL between 1998 and 2008 (all p>0.05). Multiple linear regressions found that in 1998 only objective binge eating significantly predicted scores on the mental health summary scale of the SF-36; however, in 2008 extreme weight/shape concerns, extreme dieting, and subjective binge eating were also significant predictors. Objective binge eating and extreme dieting were significant predictors of scores on the physical health summary scale of the SF-36 in both 1998 and 2008. Conclusions and Significance The prevalence of ED behaviors increased between 1998 and 2008, while their impact on QoL remained stable. This suggests an overall increase in the burden of disordered eating from 1998 to 2008. Given that binge eating and extreme dieting predict impairment in QoL, the necessity of interventions to prevent both under- and over-eating is reinforced.

Mitchison, Deborah; Hay, Phillipa; Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Mond, Jonathan

2012-01-01

313

Health Habits of Nursing versus Non-nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Health Habits Inventory was completed at two time intervals by 71 nursing and 83 other students. Nursing students scored higher in health habits and improved significantly over 2 years, especially in such behaviors as eating breakfast, performing self-exams, reading food labels, wearing seatbelts, and exercising. (SK)

Shriver, Cathy B.; Scott-Stiles, Anne

2000-01-01

314

Using Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Healthy Eating among Danish Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to apply the theory of planned behavior to predict Danish adolescents' behavioral intention for healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: A cluster sample survey of 410 students aged 11 to 16 years studying in Grade 6 to Grade 10 was conducted in Denmark. Findings: Perceived behavioral control followed by…

Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Chan, Kara; Tsang, Lennon

2013-01-01

315

Is healthy behavior contagious: associations of social norms with physical activity and healthy eating  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Social norms are theoretically hypothesized to influence health-related behaviors such as physical activity and eating behaviors. However, empirical evidence relating social norms to these behaviors, independently of other more commonly-investigated social constructs such as social support, is scarce and findings equivocal, perhaps due to limitations in the ways in which social norms have been conceptualized and assessed. This study

Kylie Ball; Robert W Jeffery; Gavin Abbott; Sarah A McNaughton; David Crawford

2010-01-01

316

Using Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Healthy Eating among Danish Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of the study was to apply the theory of planned behavior to predict Danish adolescents' behavioral intention for healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: A cluster sample survey of 410 students aged 11 to 16 years studying in Grade 6 to Grade 10 was conducted in Denmark. Findings: Perceived behavioral control followed by…

Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Chan, Kara; Tsang, Lennon

2013-01-01

317

Underlying dimensions and psychometric properties of the Eating Behaviors and Body Image Test for preadolescent girls.  

PubMed

Developed a rating scale to measure body image satisfaction and eating behaviors and disturbances in preadolescent girls and evaluated the psychometric properties of the instrument. The Eating Behaviors and Body Image Test (EBBIT) for preadolescent girls was administered to 291 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade girls to identify the measure's factor structure. Body Image Silhouettes (BIS; Childress, Brewerton, Hodges, & Jarrell, 1993) were also administered, and height and weight measurements were obtained. Although four factors were predicted (maladaptive thoughts about body size, restrictive eating, bingeing, and compensatory behavior for overeating), corresponding to adult criteria for the diagnoses of anorexia and bulimia, factor analysis of the EBBIT suggested only two factors: Body Image Dissatisfaction/Restrictive Eating and Binge Eating Behaviors. Only two compensatory behaviors (exercising to burn off food eaten and skipping meals after overeating) loaded on the scale, and they loaded on the Body Image Dissatisfaction/Restrictive Eating factor. Internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were adequate to good, and initial validity of the scale was established by using scores on the Body Image Silhouettes, body mass index ratios, age, and race as predictors of EBBIT scores. PMID:9561944

Candy, C M; Fee, V E

1998-03-01

318

Development of eating behavior and its relation to physical growth in normal weight preschool children.  

PubMed

In order to examine whether some characteristics of eating behavior are related to physical growth and weight increment in young children, a longitudinal prospective study was conducted. The eating behaviors of 11 age-matched normal-weight preschool children were observed at lunchtime on 18 consecutive days. The same set of observations was carried out three times when the children were 40, 52 and 59 months old, on average. MANOVA procedures for repeated measures design revealed that the eating behavior of the subjects changed considerably between the first and second observation stages, whereas it did not change significantly between the second and third stages. It was considered that eating behaviour developed mostly between the first and second observation stages and that the subjects were able to eat completely independently by the second observation stage. The increment in the children's weight per month began to show individual variation at the age of 48 months between the first and second observation stages. Coincidentally, the relationship between eating behavior and physique first appeared at the second observation stage and a similar relationship was observed at the third stage. The partial correlation coefficients and the multivariate multiple regression of MANOVA were performed for this analysis. Meal duration was the factor most strongly related to weight and BMI, whereas in contrast, growth history and familial factors influenced the eating behavior at the first observation stage. The present results indicate that eating behavior was one of the factors related to the rapid increase in weight soon after or just at the time of initiation of complete self-feeding in normal-weight children. PMID:2310177

Nakao, H; Aoyama, H; Suzuki, T

1990-02-01

319

Genetic and environmental influences on restrained eating behavior  

PubMed Central

Objective We examined the relative contributions of genetic and environmental influences to restrained eating. Methods Restrained eating was assessed by the Restraint Scale in a survey mailed to all twins enrolled in the University of Washington Twin Registry. We used structural equation modeling to estimate genetic and non-genetic contributions to restrained eating. Results 1,196 monozygotic, 456 same-sex dizygotic twins, and 447 opposite-sex twins were included in analyses. Restraint Scale scores were more closely correlated in monozygotic twins (rmale = 0.55, rfemale = 0.55) than in same-sex dizygotic twins (rmale = 0.31, rfemale = 0.19). Based on structural equation modeling, the estimated heritability for restrained eating, adjusted for BMI and sex, was 43% (95% confidence interval 35–50%). There was little evidence for common environmental effects. Conclusion These results indicate an inherited component to restrained eating. Genes could influence restrained eating directly or through inherited mediators such as personality factors or tendencies to gain weight.

Schur, Ellen; Noonan, Carolyn; Polivy, Janet; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

2009-01-01

320

Disordered Eating in College Students: Links with Childhood Abuse and Maternal Eating Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The prevalence of sexual conflicts in many patients with eating disorders has been well documented. A parallel has been found between psychological problems experienced by victims of childhood sexual abuse and patients with anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia. Past studies have used inpatient clinical samples; however, this study extended this area…

Feilke, Kim; Chambliss, Catherine

321

The effects of “thin ideal” media on women's body image concerns and eating-related intentions: The beneficial role of an autonomous regulation of eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the protective role of an autonomous regulation of eating behaviors (AREB) on the relationship between trait body dissatisfaction and women's body image concerns and eating-related intentions in response to “thin ideal” media. Undergraduate women (n=138) were randomly assigned to view a “thin ideal” video or a neutral video. As hypothesized, trait body dissatisfaction predicted more negative

Lisa Mask; Céline M. Blanchard

2011-01-01

322

Thinking Fat and Feeling Blue: Eating Behaviors, Ruminative Coping, and Depressive Symptoms in College Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Restrained and binge eating are related to depressive symptomatology in women; we examined the role of ruminative coping in\\u000a this association. Sample participants (N?=?329) were female college students in the Midwestern U.S. who completed a health behaviors survey. Multiple regression models\\u000a examining the pathway between eating (restrained and bingeing, respectively) and depressive symptoms were tested; ruminative\\u000a coping was examined as

Zaje A. T. Harrell; Benita Jackson

2008-01-01

323

Comparing two measures of eating restraint in bulimic women treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine changes in dietary restraint patterns revealed by the Eating Disorders Examination Restraint subscale (EDE-R) and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Cognitive Restraint scale (TFEQ-CR) in a large sample of women with bulimia nervosa (BN) who completed 18 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Method: Data from 134 subjects were obtained from a larger study and analyzed using repeated-measures analysis

Debra L. Safer; W. Stewart Agras; Michael R. Lowe; Susan Bryson

2004-01-01

324

Nutrient Intakes and Eating Behavior see of Vegetarian and Nonvegetarian Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To compare nutrient intakes between vegetarians and nonvegetarians with similar health practices, and to assess relationships with eating behavior scores from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire.Design Survey.Setting Metropolitan area in western Canada.Subjects Subjects (n=45) were participants in a study comparing subclinical menstrual disturbances between vegetarians and nonvegetarians. To be included, women had to be 20 to 40 years old, be

K. CHRISTINA JANELLE; SUSAN I. BARR

1995-01-01

325

Cognitive—Behavioral Self-Help for Binge Eating Disorder A Controlled Effectiveness Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 methods of administering a cognitive—behavioral self-help program for binge eating disorder. The study was designed to reproduce many of the conditions that apply in settings in which self-help interventions are most relevant. Seventy-two women with binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions for 12

Jacqueline C. Carter

2000-01-01

326

Cognitive–Behavioral Self-Help for Binge Eating Disorder: A Controlled Effectiveness Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 methods of administering a cognitive–behavioral self-help program for binge eating disorder. The study was designed to reproduce many of the conditions that apply in settings in which self-help interventions are most relevant. Seventy-two women with binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions for 12

Jacqueline C. Carter; Christopher G. Fairburn

1998-01-01

327

Methyl palmoxirate increases eating behavior and brain Fos-like immunoreactivity in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administration of methyl palmoxirate (MP), an inhibitor of fatty acid oxidation, stimulates eating behavior in rats. Fos immunohistochemistry was used to determine neural pathways that may play a role in the eating response to MP. The number of cells showing Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-li) was quantified by computerized image analysis. MP treatment, at a dose that increased food intake (10 mg\\/kg,

Charles C Horn; Mark I Friedman

1998-01-01

328

Bulimia and binge eating in college women: A comparison of personality and behavioral characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessed 9 behavioral and personality characteristics––restraint, binge eating, high self-expectations, demand for approval, body attitude, assertion, dating, self-esteem, and depression––that have been implicated in studying the onset of bulimia. Ss were 30 women who fulfilled an operationalized definition of the DSM-III criteria for bulimia (bulimics), 22 women who reported binge eating 8 or more times per month but did not

Melanie A. Katzman; Sharlene A. Wolchik

1984-01-01

329

Eating behavior, depression, and self-esteem in high school students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In a representative sample of 4700 Slovene high school students, we examined their eating behavior and its correlations with some psychosocial and psychological characteristics with the aim of identifying the main risk factors for disordered eating.Method: Using a questionnaire which also included Zung’s Self-rating Depression Scale and Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale, we compared girls (n = 2507) and boys (n

Martina Tomori; Maja Rus-Makovec

2000-01-01

330

Eating Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

331

Investigating the Influence of Threat Appraisals and Social Support on Healthy Eating Behavior and Drive for Thinness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between perceived obesity threats, social support, and college students' eating attitudes and behaviors. Results showed that perceived vulnerability to obesity negatively predicted healthy eating behavior. In addition, the perceived severity of obesity-related health problems positively predicted women's drive for thinness. Social support played a significant role in explaining health behaviors. Specifically, appraisal by others indirectly

Christopher J. McKinley

2009-01-01

332

Reported behavior of eating anything at anytime and risk of colorectal cancer in women.  

PubMed

Although numerous studies have assessed the effect of foods and nutrients on colorectal carcinogenesis, few studies have investigated human eating behavior in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. In our study, we assessed whether the reported behavior of eating anything at anytime influenced colorectal cancer risk and related plasma biomarkers. We prospectively followed up 55,540 women in the Nurses' Health Study who were aged 48-73 years, had no history of cancer, ulcerative colitis or diabetes and responded to the item "I eat anything I want, anytime I want" in the 1994 questionnaire. We also analyzed blood samples for 1,994 women, which were collected in 1989-1990. During 12 years of follow-up, 552 colorectal cancer cases were documented. After adjusting for age, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, red and processed meat and other known risk factors for colorectal cancer, women who reported eating anything at anytime experienced an increased risk of colorectal cancer (relative risk = 1.28, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.56) compared to those who did not report this behavior. In addition, reporting eating anything at anytime was associated with higher fasting plasma levels of insulin (p = 0.04) and C-peptide (p = 0.05). In conclusion, reports of eating anything at anytime are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in this large prospective cohort study, independent of other potential risk factors for colorectal cancer. PMID:21520042

Bao, Ying; Nimptsch, Katharina; Chan, Andrew T; Ng, Kimmie; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S

2011-07-21

333

Anxiety and abnormal eating behaviors associated with cyclical readiness testing in a naval hospital active duty population.  

PubMed

Studies of abnormal eating behaviors in active duty military personal have found rates similar to or higher than the general population. We have reviewed these studies and extended the research to examine abnormal eating behaviors in a heterogeneous population at a major military medical center. We found high rates of body dissatisfaction, abnormal eating behaviors, and worry about passing the semiannual personal fitness assessment in both men and women. Abnormal eating behaviors were associated with worrying about the personal fitness assessment, and these measures were associated with body mass index and gender. Our data extend previous research indicating that cyclic or external pressure to maintain body weight within specified standards can produce unsafe eating and dieting behaviors. We recommend changes to the current system to incorporate treatment programs aimed at recognizing and treating eating disorders with a goal of producing more fit and healthy service members. PMID:16173205

Carlton, Janis R; Manos, Gail H; Van Slyke, John A

2005-08-01

334

Stress, Depression, Social Support, and Eating Habits Reduce Dietary Quality in the 1st Trimester in Low-Income Women: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Maternal diet quality influences birth outcomes. Yet little research exists that assesses women’s diet quality during the 1st trimester of pregnancy, a crucial time of placental and fetal development. This cross-sectional study describes diet quality and its relationship with stress, depression, social support, and eating habits in the 1st trimester that may identify low-income women needing intensive dietary intervention. Seventy-one low-income women completed validated instruments measuring stress, depression, social support, and eating habits, had their height and weight measured, received training on portion-size estimation, and completed three 24-hour dietary recalls (1 weekend day and 2 nonconsecutive weekdays) from July, 2009 to February, 2010. Comparative and correlational analyses were performed. Women with diet quality scores below the median (n = 35) had more depression (9.6 ± 5.1 vs. 6.7 ± 5.1) and stress (22.1 ± 5.4 vs. 19.3 ± 4.8) and less control over meal preparation (5.0 ± 1.5 vs. 4.2 ± 1.5) and support from others (52.0 ± 12.0 vs. 57.4 ± 7.2) than did women with high diet quality scores (n = 36). Diet quality was negatively related to depression (r = ?.41), stress (r = ?.35), skipping meals (r = ?.41), and control over meal preparation (r = ?33), and positively related to support from others (r = .38). Low-income women experiencing life stressors represent an at-risk group for low diet quality and may need intensive dietary intervention before and during pregnancy. Efforts targeting this group to test hypotheses aimed at improving diet quality should be undertaken.

Stang, Jamie; Bryant, Miranda; Kim, SungHun

2012-01-01

335

Stress, depression, social support, and eating habits reduce diet quality in the first trimester in low-income women: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Maternal diet quality influences birth outcomes. Yet, little research exists that assesses women's diet quality during the first trimester of pregnancy, a crucial time of placental and fetal development. This cross-sectional study, describing diet quality and its relationship with stress, depression, social support, and eating habits in the first trimester, may identify low-income women needing intensive dietary intervention. Seventy-one low-income women completed validated instruments measuring stress, depression, social support, and eating habits; had their height and weight measured; received training on portion-size estimation; and completed three 24-hour dietary recalls (1 weekend day and 2 nonconsecutive weekdays) from July 2009 to February 2010. Comparative and correlational analyses were done. Women with diet quality scores below the median (n=35) had more depression (9.6±5.1 vs 6.7±5.1) and stress (22.1±5.4 vs 19.3±4.8) and less control over meal preparation (5.0±1.5 vs 4.2±1.5) and support from others (52.0±12.0 vs 57.4±7.2) than did women with high diet quality scores (n=36). Diet quality was negatively related to depression (r=-0.41), stress (r=-0.35), skipping meals (r=-0.41), and control over meal preparation (r=-0.33), and positively related to support from others (r=0.38). Low-income women experiencing life stressors represent an at-risk group for low diet quality and may need intensive dietary intervention before and during pregnancy. More research designed to improve diet quality in low-income pregnant women is needed. PMID:23017572

Fowles, Eileen R; Stang, Jamie; Bryant, Miranda; Kim, Sunghun

2012-10-01

336

Comparison of daily eating habits and emotional states of overweight persons successful or unsuccessful in maintaining a weight loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of 20 overweight persons (predominantly women) who had successfully maintained a weight loss over a 1-yr period were compared with 28 Ss who had failed to maintain a weight loss and 20 normal weight controls. Results indicate that all groups tended to eat balanced meals, but the regainers ate high-caloric snacks in a greater variety of situations unrelated

Gloria R. Leon; Karen Chamberlain

1973-01-01

337

Guide to Your Child's Nutrition: Making Peace at the Table and Building Healthy Eating Habits for Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that the real challenge for parents is not being aware of what to feed their children, but rather getting children to actually eat those foods, this guide provides advice for parents of infants through adolescents regarding children's dietary needs while recognizing the role of children's emotions, tastes, and preferences. Following the…

Dietz, William H., Ed.; Stern, Loraine, Ed.

338

Eating habits of obese patients in the Netherlands: A comparison between various subgroups and the general Dutch population  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is still uncertain whether subgroups of obese subjects demonstrate different eating patterns. The aim of this report is to compare data on dietary intake obtained by different methods (dietary history and dietary diary) in several groups of obese patients in which the effects of weight-reducing agents were investigated. In our first and our second study, the latter part of

M. L. Drent; H. P. F. Koppeschaar

1995-01-01

339

Factors Influencing the Food Choices and Eating Habits of Restaurant Chefs in Northern New Jersey: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to understand the factors influencing the food habits of restaurant chefs in northern New Jersey. Data was collected from participants (N = 12) using dietary recalls, and semi-structured interviews based on the socio-ecological model. Dietary recall analysis revealed multiple nutritional intake hazards including skipping meals, and substitution of foods rich in fats and sugar for fruits

Meena Mahadevan; Charles Feldman

2011-01-01

340

Self-Injurious Behavior and Eating Disorders: The Extent and Nature of the Association  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have reviewed the literature on the association between self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and eating disorders from the psychological-behavioral perspective. Our aims were to investigate the extent and possible reasons for the association. A literature search was conducted using the following electronic databases (1989-2005): Medline, PsychInfo…

Svirko, Elena; Hawton, Keith

2007-01-01

341

Self-Injurious Behavior and Eating Disorders: The Extent and Nature of the Association  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We have reviewed the literature on the association between self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and eating disorders from the psychological-behavioral perspective. Our aims were to investigate the extent and possible reasons for the association. A literature search was conducted using the following electronic databases (1989-2005): Medline, PsychInfo…

Svirko, Elena; Hawton, Keith

2007-01-01

342

Anorexic Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Male and Female College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines gender differences in eating attitudes and behaviors in undergraduate college students (N=471). Anorexic symptomatology was found for 20% of the females and 10% of the males. In general, students without symptomatic attitudes and behaviors had a more positive self-concept and reported less psychological distress than did those with…

Nelson, Wendy L.; Hughes, Honore M.; Katz, Barry; Searight, H. Russell

1999-01-01

343

Self-Reported Weight Perceptions, Dieting Behavior, and Breakfast Eating among High School Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explored the relationships among weight perceptions, dieting behavior, and breakfast eating in 4597 public high school adolescents using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were constructed separately for race and gender groups via SUDAAN (Survey Data…

Zullig, Keith; Ubbes, Valerie A.; Pyle, Jennifer; Valois, Robert F.

2006-01-01

344

A Systematic Review of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for the Treatment of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for eating disorders (EDs). We conducted a systematic literature review to locate refereed journal articles testing DBT for the treatment of EDs. We identified 13 studies empirically evaluating treatment efficacy across various settings. Findings, based on mostly uncontrolled trials, indicate that DBT treatments appear effective in addressing ED behaviors

Sarah M. Bankoff; Madeleine G. Karpel; Hope E. Forbes; David W. Pantalone

2012-01-01

345

Acculturation's Influence on Antifat Attitudes, Body Image and Eating Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antifat attitudes (AFA) refer to the belief that overweight and obese individuals are responsible for their weight. Using 264 Latina and European American females, a regression showed that AFA positively correlated with body dissatisfaction and eating concerns. An ANOVA revealed that European American females reported significantly greater AFA than Latinas. Furthermore, European American females and high acculturated Latinas reported significantly

Alison C. Pepper; Sonia Y. Ruiz

2007-01-01

346

Sleep duration and eating behaviors of college students.  

PubMed

31 short-sleeping college students tended to eat more small meals or snacks than 37 long sleepers, all of whom were satisfied with their sleep. This disrupted pattern of larger meals was predicted from work of Elomaa and Johansson with rats who were partially REM-sleep deprived. PMID:3960667

Hicks, R A; McTighe, S; Juarez, M

1986-02-01

347

Parental influence on eating behavior: Conception to adolescence  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The first years of life mark a time of rapid development and dietary change, as children transition from an exclusive milk diet to a modified adult diet. During these early years, children's learning about food and eating plays a central role in shaping subsequent food choices, diet quality, and wei...

348

Daily patterns of anxiety in anorexia nervosa: Associations with eating disorder behaviors in the natural environment.  

PubMed

The role of anxiety has been emphasized in etiological/maintenance models of anorexia nervosa. This study identified daily patterns of anxiety in anorexia nervosa and examined the likelihood of the occurrence of eating disorder behaviors in each trajectory, the daily temporal distribution of eating disorder behaviors in each trajectory, and the extent to which the tendency to exhibit particular anxiety trajectories was associated with baseline diagnostic and trait-level personality variables. Women with full or subthreshold anorexia nervosa (N = 118) completed a 2-week ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol during which they reported on a variety of behavioral and affective variables, including anxiety and eating disorder behaviors. Using latent growth mixture modeling to classify EMA days (N = 1,526) based on anxiety ratings, we identified 7 distinct daily anxiety trajectories. Overall differences between trajectories were found for rates of binge eating, self-induced vomiting, body checking, skipping meals, and dietary restriction. Furthermore, distinct daily temporal distributions of eating disorder behaviors were found across the trajectories, with peaks in the probability of behaviors frequently coinciding with high levels of anxiety. Finally, traits of personality pathology (affective lability, self-harm, social avoidance, and oppositionality) and the presence of a co-occurring mood disorder were found to be associated with the tendency to experience particular daily anxiety trajectories (e.g., stable high anxiety). Findings support the presence of within-person variability in daily anxiety patterns in anorexia nervosa and also provide evidence for an association between these anxiety patterns and eating disorder behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23647124

Lavender, Jason M; De Young, Kyle P; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

2013-05-06

349

Food-related beliefs, eating behavior, and classroom food practices of middle school teachers.  

PubMed

This study examined classroom food practices and eating behavior of middle school teachers from 16 schools in a metropolitan area, located in the upper Midwest. In winter 1999-2000, teachers in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade were surveyed (response rate = 70%; n = 490/701). Questions addressed teachers' classroom food practices, eating behavior while at school, personal health, and attitudes about the school food environment. Use of food as an incentive/reward for students was a common classroom practice in middle schools, and most foods did not support development of health eating patterns by young adolescents. Candy was the most frequently used food item, reported by 73% of teachers, followed by cookies/doughnuts (37%), sweetened drinks (35%), and pizza (28%). Many middle school teachers did not role model healthy eating behavior at school. Prevalent use of vending was a particular concern, with beverage and snack vending use reported by 62% and 35% of teachers, respectively. Most vending items purchased were sweetened drinks (57%) and high-fat or high-sugar snacks (85%). Low perceived personal health, high-fat scores, and low support for the school food environment were some of the significant correlates of teachers' eating behavior. School and health professionals should continue to advocate for schoolwide policies and programs that support students and teachers if the goal of an integrated healthy school food environment is to be realized. PMID:12389375

Kubik, Martha Y; Lytle, Leslie A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Perry, Cheryl L

2002-10-01

350

Eating behavior and childhood overweight among population-based elementary schoolchildren in Japan.  

PubMed

This study investigated the relationship between eating behavior and childhood overweight among population-based elementary schoolchildren in Japan. Data was collected from fourth graders (9 or 10 years of age) from Ina Town, Saitama Prefecture, Japan from 1999 to 2009. Information about subjects' sex, age, and lifestyle, including eating behaviors (eating until full and chewing thoroughly), was obtained using a self-administered questionnaire, and height and weight were measured directly. Overweight was determined according to the definition established by the International Obesity Task Force. Data from 4027 subjects (2079 boys and 1948 girls) were analyzed. Chewing thoroughly was associated with a significantly decreased odds ratio (OR) for being overweight, whereas eating until full significantly increased the OR for being overweight (OR: 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-1.94) among boys. However, eating until full was not associated with a significantly increased OR for being overweight among the group that reported chewing thoroughly, whereas it was associated with a significantly increased OR for being overweight (2.02, 1.38-2.94) among boys who did not chew thoroughly. In conclusion, eating until full or not chewing thoroughly was associated with being overweight among elementary schoolchildren. Results of this study suggest that chewing thoroughly may be an avenue to explore childhood overweight prevention efforts. PMID:22690201

Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Shimada, Naoki; Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Hashimoto, Masayasu; Hoshino, Hiromi; Tajima, Naoko; Kokaze, Akatsuki

2012-04-16

351

Age differences in genetic and environmental influences on eating attitudes and behaviors in preadolescent and adolescent female twins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 680 11- and 602 17-year-old female twins was used to examine (a) age differences in genetic and environmental influences on disordered eating attitudes and behaviors and (b) associations between body mass index (BMI) and eating attitudes and behaviors. Univariate, biometrical model-fitting analyses indicated that 1 I-year-old twins exhibited less genetic and greater shared environmental influence on eating

Kelly L. Klump; Matt McGue; William G. Iacono

2000-01-01

352

The Relationship between Gender, Type of Sport, Body Dissatisfaction, Self Esteem and Disordered Eating Behaviors in Division I Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined whether gender, type of sport (lean v. non-lean), body dissatisfaction and self esteem were associated with disordered eating behaviors in Division I college athletes. More female than male athletes displayed disordered eating behaviors; approximately one-quarter of the population was at risk for a clinically diagnosable eating disorder. The results also revealed that females in non-lean sports

BreeAnn Milligan; Mary Pritchard

2006-01-01

353

Eating habits and lifestyles: a multivariate analysis of the data from an Italian population-based survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to describe dietary habits and lifestyles in relation to the self-perceived health of the Italian population. The data derived from the Multi-purpose Family Survey, “Aspects of Daily Life” (MFS), a yearly population-based survey conducted by the Italian National Census Bureau (ISTAT). Our study analyzed the 1997 and 1998 MFSs data, a national representative sample

Susanna Conti; Maria Masocco; Paola Meli; Giada Minelli; Renata Solimini; Virgilia Toccaceli; Monica Vichi

2004-01-01

354

Expectations, mood, and eating behavior in binge eating disorder. Beware of the bright side.  

PubMed

Sad people may indulge in fattening snacks because they believe that eating will repair their mood. To test whether (1) changes in expectations and mood had an effect on caloric intake and (2) depressive symptoms moderated caloric intake, 73 women with binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to a condition in which expectations about food and emotion were either confirmed or disconfirmed. Subsequently they were shown either an upsetting or an amusing movie clip followed by a taste task. Contrary to our expectations, there were no differences in the four conditions: participants in all four conditions ate comparable amounts of calories. Manipulation of expectations or mood had no effect on caloric intake. However, higher baseline expectations that food is pleasurable and useful as a reward resulted in a higher caloric intake after positive mood induction. Non-depressed individuals ate less after a negative mood induction than did depressed individuals. Interestingly, they also ate less than the group of individuals, depressed and not, whose mood was positively induced. Non-depressed individuals seem to use healthier coping strategies: negative affect signals that the environment poses a problem. Positive affect on the other hand signals that the environment is benign, and thus makes people less vigilant about food intake. PMID:19520125

Dingemans, Alexandra E; Martijn, Carolien; van Furth, Eric F; Jansen, Anita T M

2009-06-09

355

Beliefs Underlying the Decision to Eat Breakfast: The Role of Theory-based Behavioral Analysis in the Development of Policy, Communication and Educational Interventions for Healthy Eating  

PubMed Central

Policy, communication, and education efforts to influence any social or health outcome are more effective if based on an understanding of the underlying behaviors and their determinants. This conceptual paper outlines how behavioral theory can help design interventions for one healthy eating behavior, eating breakfast. More specifically, the paper illustrates how a prominent health behavior theory, the Reasoned Action Approach, can be used to guide formative research to identify factors underlying people’s decisions. Select findings are presented from three studies of beliefs underlying eating breakfast: online surveys with 1185 undergraduates from a large university in Indiana; in-depth interviews with 61 adults from four Indiana worksites; and 63 in-depth interviews with students from three middle schools in rural Indiana. Analyses of data from the undergraduates demonstrated the role of self-efficacy. Analyses of data from the working adults revealed the importance of normative beliefs about what employers believed. Analyses comparing consequences perceived by adults with those perceived by middle school students found that both groups believed that eating breakfast would provide energy but only middle school students believed that eating breakfast would improve alertness. For each finding, the theory is presented, the finding is described, implications for interventions are suggested, and the need for additional research is outlined. In sum, theory-based behavioral research can help develop interventions at intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental levels that are warranted to encourage healthy eating.

Middlestadt, Susan E.; Stevenson, Laurel D.; Hung, Chia-Ling; Roditis, Maria Leia; Fly, Alyce D.; Sheats, Jylana L.

2013-01-01

356

Number of Different Purging Behaviors Used Among Women With Eating Disorders: Psychological, Behavioral, Self-Efficacy and Quality of Life Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to examine differences between a number of different purging behaviors used and outcome measures among eating disorder patients. Among 211 females who received inpatient or partial hospitalization eating disorder treatment, analyses of covariance and cross-tabulations identified associations among a number of different purging behaviors (vomiting, laxative use, diuretic use) used and psychological, behavioral, self-efficacy

Diann M. Ackard; Catherine L. Cronemeyer; Lisa M. Franzen; Sara A. Richter; Jane Norstrom

2011-01-01

357

Consumer style and health: The role of impulsive buying in unhealthy eating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health psychologists have given surprisingly little attention to consumer behavior. This study focuses on the relationship between an impulsive consumer style and unhealthy eating. In a survey, moderate to strong correlations were found between low self-esteem, dispositional negative affect, impulse buying tendency, snacking habit, and eating disturbance propensity. Structural equation modeling was used to test a model of relations between

Bas Verplanken; Astrid G. Herabadi; Judith A. Perry; David H. Silvera

2005-01-01

358

Associations between body mass index, weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms among non-clinical Chinese adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous research with adolescents has shown associations of body weight, weight control concerns and behaviors with eating disorder symptoms, but it is unclear whether these associations are direct or whether a mediating effect exists. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity, weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms and to examine the

Yiou Fan; Yanping Li; Ailing Liu; Xiaoqi Hu; Guansheng Ma; Guifa Xu

2010-01-01

359

“I'm Not in the Habit of Recycling”The Role of Habitual Behavior in the Disposal of Household Waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of habit was investigated using two potential measures of habitual recycling behavior: past recycling behavior and perceived lack of habit as a reason for previous failure to recycle. Data were collected from 252 participants in Scotland, United Kingdom. Situational constraints, demographic characteristics, and variables associated with the theory of planned behavior were controlled for. Both past behavior and

Christina Knussen; Fred Yule

2008-01-01

360

Disordered eating behaviors among Turkish adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

The aim of this comparative study was to determine the prevalence of disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) and its affecting factors among adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Subjects were 45 diabetic adolescents and 55 nondiabetic healthy control subjects. The main outcome measures used were the Eating Attitudes Test and the Body Image Scale (BIS). Findings suggest that DEBs are almost four times as common in diabetic adolescents as in their nondiabetic peers (p < .001). Strict diet restriction and insulin misuse (p < .01) were related to DEBs. Disordered eating behaviors make a significant contribution to menstrual problems (p < .001) and poor metabolic control (p < .001). There was a nonsignificant negative correlation between DEBs and the BIS score. Health care professionals should be aware of the potential effect of subclinical and clinical DEBs including insulin misuse and strict diet in weight-conscious people with Type 1 diabetes who have poor metabolic control and menstrual problems. PMID:16182098

Pinar, Rukiye

2005-10-01

361

Outcome From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder: Comparing Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Binge Eating to an Active Comparison Group Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder (DBT-BED) aims to reduce binge eating by improving adaptive emotion-regulation skills. Preliminary findings have been promising but have only compared DBT-BED to a wait-list. To control for the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED, the present study compared DBT-BED to an active comparison group therapy (ACGT). Men and women (n=101) meeting DSM-IV BED research

Debra L. Safer; Booil Jo

2010-01-01

362

Research report Understanding gardening and dietary habits among youth garden program participants using the Theory of Planned Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sedentary lifestyles, along with diets low in fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates, and high in fat and total energy are increasing among youth. These unhealthy behaviors contribute to an increase in childhood overweight, which is associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Healthful dietary behaviors, such as eating a balanced and varied diet may be addressed in garden-based

Lauren Lautenschlager; Chery Smith

363

Disordered eating behaviors are associated with poorer diet quality in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

Disordered eating behaviors may pose a risk for poor long-term health outcomes in patients with type 1 diabetes. This cross-sectional study examined associations of disordered eating behaviors with diet quality, diet-related attitudes, and diabetes management in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (N=151, 48% female). Participants, recruited July 2008 through February 2009, completed 3-day diet records and survey measures, including the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey (DEPS) and measures of eating-related attitudes. Biomedical data were obtained from medical records. Participants scoring more than 1 standard deviation above the mean DEPS were classified as at risk for disordered eating. The Healthy Eating Index-2005 was calculated to assess diet quality. Analysis of covariance was used to test for differences between risk groups in diet quality, eating attitudes, and diabetes management, controlling for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) percentile. Youth at risk for disordered eating were more likely to be overweight/obese than those at low risk (59.1% vs 31.8%, P=0.01). The at-risk group had poorer diet quality (P=0.003) as well as higher intake of total fat (P=0.01) and saturated fat (P=0.007) compared with the low-risk group. The at-risk group reported lower self-efficacy (P=0.005), greater barriers (P<0.001), and more negative outcome expectations (P<0.001) for healthful eating, as well as worse dietary satisfaction (P=0.004). The at-risk group had lower diabetes adherence (P<0.01), less-frequent blood glucose monitoring (P<0.002), and higher hemoglobin A1c (P<0.001). The constellation of excess weight, poorer dietary intake, and poorer diabetes management associated with youth at risk for disordered eating suggests potential risk of future poor health outcomes. Attention should be given to healthful weight management, especially among overweight youth with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23102180

Tse, Julia; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Mehta, Sanjeev N; Laffel, Lori M B

2012-11-01

364

Effects of dietary restraint, obesity, and gender on holiday eating behavior and weight gain.  

PubMed

This investigation evaluated the impact of dietary restraint, relative weight, and gender on holiday eating behavior and weight gain. 65 Ss (31 men and 34 women) completed detailed food records for the 2 days before, the 4 days during, and the 2 days after the Thanksgiving weekend. Results indicated increased eating during the Thanksgiving holiday, with men eating more than women and the obese eating less than the nonobese. There was also a significant Total Restraint X Weight X Time interaction, with unrestrained normal-weight subjects behaving similarly to high-restrained overweight subjects over time. There was also a highly reliable Total Restraint X Sex X Time interaction. The most striking finding from this interaction was that high-restrained women displayed decreases in their dietary intake over time. Correlational analyses revealed that restraint scores were negatively associated with dietary intake over the 8-day period but were positively associated with weight gain. The implications for dieting, eating behavior, and energy balance are discussed. PMID:2592685

Klesges, R C; Klem, M L; Bene, C R

1989-11-01

365

[The influence of mourning on feeding habits and its implications for nutritional behavior].  

PubMed

The lack of preparation for dealing with death and the absence of the loved one may lead to organic and psychological reactions that, due to the adaptive capacity of the individual to the period of mourning, may result in interference in feeding habits and consequently on the person's nutritional status. This article addresses the effects of recent mourning on feeding behavior, followed by the analysis of the dietary interview from various standpoints. This includes the postmortem nutrition and feeding habits of the bereaved and the implications of this process on hunger, on thirst and on family cooking, with a focus on nutritional behavior and on the decisions that surround it. This is a review of the literature on the theme of death and mourning, which seeks to contextualize this theme around reflections based on this experience. It emphasizes the interaction of nutrition with the science of thanatology, which is an area still not properly examined and lacking study. The identification of this influence and its implications enables better planning of food strategies, contributing greatly to actions for coping and support during mourning. PMID:23989584

Campos, Maria Teresa Fialho de Sousa

2013-09-01

366

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Weight Management and Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Eating disorders and obesity in children and adolescents involve harmful behavior and attitude patterns that infiltrate daily functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is well-suited to treat these conditions, given the emphasis on breaking negative behavior cycles. This article reviews the current empirically-supported treatments and the considerations for youth with weight control issues. New therapeutic modalities (i.e., Enhanced CBT and the socio-ecological model) are discussed. Rationale is provided for extending therapy beyond the individual treatment milieu to include the family, peer network, and community domains to promote behavior change, minimize relapse, and support healthy long-term behavior maintenance.

Wilfley, Denise E.; Kolko, Rachel P.; Kass, Andrea E.

2011-01-01

367

Don’t take another bite: How sociocultural norms for appearance affect women's eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four studies tested the impact of exposure to thin images on women's eating behavior. In Study 1, women who were exposed to commercials containing thin models ate less in a taste test than women exposed to neutral commercials. The next two studies revealed that the impact of the thin images could be reduced by challenging the sociocultural norms for appearance.

Erin J. Strahan; Steven J. Spencer; Mark P. Zanna

2007-01-01

368

Feeding and Eating Behaviors in Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Mothers of children aged 2-12 years completed an exhaustive questionnaire assessing feeding and eating behaviors for both themselves and their children with autism, and typically developing siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (where available), or typically developing children with no sibling with a disability. Results indicate…

Martins, Yolanda; Young, Robyn L.; Robson, Danielle C.

2008-01-01

369

Retrospective Reports of Child Feeding Practices, Current Eating Behaviors, and BMI in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research concerning child feeding practices has focused on children and adolescents, and little is known about how feeding practices used in childhood relate to eating behaviors and weight status in early adulthood. We assessed college students' and their parents' retrospective reports of child feeding practices used when the students were in middle childhood. We also assessed the college students' current

Amy T. Galloway; Claire V. Farrow; Denise M. Martz

2010-01-01

370

Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Validity of Brief Behavioral and Attitudinal Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Early identification can greatly impact the trajectory of eating disorders, and school-based screening is 1 avenue for identifying those at risk. To be feasible in a school setting, a screening program must use a brief, valid screening tool. The aim of this study was to assess how well brief attitudinal and behavioral survey items…

Haines, Jess; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Franko, Debra L.; McDonald, Julia; Mond, Jonathan M.; Austin, S. Bryn

2011-01-01

371

Parental Loss and Eating-Related Cognitions and Behaviors in College-Age Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To examine the eating-related cognitions and behaviors of college-age women who had experienced parental death, parental divorce, or neither loss condition, we recruited 48 women from science and social science departments at a state university in the Southeast. All participants completed the Mizes Anorectic Cognitions Scale (MAC) and the Bulimia…

Beam, Minna R.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Mathews, Laura

2004-01-01

372

Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Validity of Brief Behavioral and Attitudinal Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Early identification can greatly impact the trajectory of eating disorders, and school-based screening is 1 avenue for identifying those at risk. To be feasible in a school setting, a screening program must use a brief, valid screening tool. The aim of this study was to assess how well brief attitudinal and behavioral survey items…

Haines, Jess; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Franko, Debra L.; McDonald, Julia; Mond, Jonathan M.; Austin, S. Bryn

2011-01-01

373

12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

2012-01-01

374

Media-portrayed idealized images, self-objectification, and eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of media-portrayed idealized images on young women's eating behavior. The study compared the effects for high and low self-objectifiers. 72 female university students participated in this experiment. Six magazine advertisements featuring idealized female models were used as the experimental stimuli, and the same six advertisements with the idealized body digitally removed became the control stimuli.

Fiona J. Monro; Gail. F. Huon

2006-01-01

375

Media-portrayed idealized images, self-objectification, and eating behavior.  

PubMed

This study examined the effects of media-portrayed idealized images on young women's eating behavior. The study compared the effects for high and low self-objectifiers. 72 female university students participated in this experiment. Six magazine advertisements featuring idealized female models were used as the experimental stimuli, and the same six advertisements with the idealized body digitally removed became the control stimuli. Eating behavior was examined using a classic taste test that involved both sweet and savory food. Participants' restraint status was assessed. We found that total food intake after exposure was the same in the body present and absent conditions. There were also no differences between high and low self-objectifiers' total food intake. However, for the total amount of food consumed and for sweet food there were significant group by condition interaction effects. High self-objectifiers ate more food in the body present than the body absent condition. In contrast, low self-objectifiers ate more food in the body absent than in the body present condition. Restraint status was not found to moderate the relationship between exposure to idealized images the amount of food consumed. Our results indicate that exposure to media-portrayed idealized images can lead to changes in eating behavior and highlight the complexity of the association between idealized image exposure and eating behavior. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the prevention of dieting-related disorders. PMID:17056415

Monro, Fiona J; Huon, Gail F

2006-01-20

376

Observed Family Interactions among Subtypes of Eating Disorders Using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared observations of family interactions among anorexic, bulimic-anorexic, bulimic, and normal families (N=74 families) consisting of father, mother, and teenage daughter. Benjamin's structural analysis of social behavior methodology differentiated clinical from normal families. Found unique patterns among subtypes of eating disorders which…

Humphrey, Laura Lynn

1989-01-01

377

The effects of taste and caloric perceptions on the eating behavior of restrained and unrestrained subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explored the phenomenon of counterregulatory eating in chronic dieters by manipulating taste and caloric-information cues of a preload and taste of subsequent ad libfood. The results replicated the “restraint breaking” phenomenon reported by Herman and Mack (1975) and supported the hypothesis that this behavioral pattern is cognitively mediated. In addition, sensitivity to taste was found in restrained

Erik Z. Woody; Philip R. Costanzo; Heidi Liefer; Judith Conger

1981-01-01

378

Preoperative eating behavior, postoperative dietary adherence, and weight loss after gastric bypass surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTo investigate the relationship between preoperative eating behavior, postoperative dietary adherence and weight loss after gastric bypass surgery in a major, urban medical center with a comprehensive bariatric surgery program. Despite the significant weight loss and dramatic improvements in co-morbidities associated with bariatric surgery, a significant minority of patients appear to experience suboptimal weight loss. The reasons for this are

David B. Sarwer; Thomas A. Wadden; Reneé H. Moore; Alexander W. Baker; Lauren M. Gibbons; Steven E. Raper; Noel N. Williams

2008-01-01

379

Prevalence of Bulimic Behaviors and Trends in Eating Attitudes among Turkish Late Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The eating attitudes and the prevalence of bulimic behaviors in a group of 300 late adolescents were investigated using the key questions from the Bulimia Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE), and additional questions. Only four subjects (1.3%) scored above the cut-off point on the BITE, and prevalence rates of males and females were the same.…

Kiziltan, Gul; Karabudak, Efsun; Unver, Sibel; Sezgin, Emine; Unal, Ayse

2006-01-01

380

Yom Kippur, Air France, dormitory food, and the eating behavior of obese and normal persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents 3 field studies, designed to test the generalizability of experimental findings on the eating behavior of obese and normal Ss. These studies examine the relationship of weight deviation to fasting on Yom Kippur, toleration of institutional food, and adjustment to time-zone changes. Conforming to laboratory-generated expectations, obese Jewish Ss were more likely to fast on Yom Kippur, obese students

Ronald Goldman; Melvyn Jaffa; Stanley Schachter

1968-01-01

381

The impact of emotion upon eating behavior: The role of subliminal visual processing of threat cues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Previous research has demonstrated that subliminal threat cues can influence eating behavior. The present study examined whether this effect is due to general emotional activation (by comparing positive and negative emotional cues), whether it is a product of specific negative emotional activation, and whether it can be achieved by acti- vating appetite-related schemata. Method: One hundred women avoided food

Caroline Meyer; Glenn Waller

1999-01-01

382

Behavioral Economic Concepts To Encourage Healthy Eating in School Cafeterias: Experiments and Lessons From College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changing small factors that influence consumer choice may lead to healthier eating within controlled settings, such as school cafeterias. This report describes a behavioral experiment in a college cafeteria to assess the effects of various payment options and menu selection methods on food choices. The results indicate that payment options, such as cash or debit cards, can significantly affect food

David R. Just; Brian Wansink; Lisa Mancino; Joanne F. Guthrie

2008-01-01

383

Drunkorexia: Understanding the Co-Occurrence of Alcohol Consumption and Eating/Exercise Weight Management Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Examine the co-occurrence of alcohol consumption, physical activity, and disordered eating behaviors via a drunkorexia perspective. Participants: Nationally representative sample (n = 22,488) of college students completing the Fall 2008 National College Health Assessment. Methods: Hierarchical logistic regression was employed to…

Barry, Adam E.; Piazza-Gardner, Anna K.

2012-01-01

384

Perceived Body Image and Eating Behavior in Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Their Healthy Peers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment aimed at achieving an ideal nutritional status is an integral part of the management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Emphasis is continually placed upon dietary intake and weight. The effects of this on eating behavior and self-perceptions are unclear. This work compared male and female CF adults with a healthy male and female control population with regard to

J. Abbott; S. Conway; C. Etherington; J. Fitzjohn; L. Gee; A. Morton; H. Musson; A. K. Webb

2000-01-01

385

Psychiatric and Medical Symptoms in Binge Eating in the Absence of Compensatory Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore the extent to which binge eating in the absence of compensatory behaviors (BE) is associated with psychiatric and medical symptoms in men and women and to control for the independent effects of BMI.Research Methods and Procedures: A series of regression models was applied to questionnaire data on 8045 twins, 18 to 31 years old, from a population-based

Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud; Cynthia M. Bulik; Patrick F. Sullivan; Kristian Tambs; Jennifer R. Harris

2004-01-01

386

Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children's health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children's eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch…

Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

2011-01-01

387

Drunkorexia: Understanding the Co-Occurrence of Alcohol Consumption and Eating/Exercise Weight Management Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Examine the co-occurrence of alcohol consumption, physical activity, and disordered eating behaviors via a drunkorexia perspective. Participants: Nationally representative sample (n = 22,488) of college students completing the Fall 2008 National College Health Assessment. Methods: Hierarchical logistic regression was employed to…

Barry, Adam E.; Piazza-Gardner, Anna K.

2012-01-01

388

The Eating Behavior Patterns Questionnaire predicts dietary fat intake in African American women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To develop a behavioral assessment of eating that would be predictive of fat intake in African American women. Design Questionnaires were developed using a three-stage design, involving item generation, item refinement, and questionnaire validation. Subjects Focus groups sessions were conducted with 40 African American women, initial questionnaire development employed 80 African American women, and questionnaire validation involved 310 African

David G Schlundt; Margaret K Hargreaves; Maciej S Buchowski

2003-01-01

389

Gender Differences in Eating Behavior and Social Self Concept among Malaysian University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

University students may encounter personal, family, social, and financial stresses while trying to cope with their academic challenges. Such constraints could affect their eating behavior and health status which, in turn may have negative effects on their studies. In light of little information in Malaysia on this subject, this study was undertaken on a sample of 180 students pursuing different

Khor Geok Lin; Lynne Cobiac; Grace Skrzypiec

390

Relationship between Eating Behavior, Breakfast Consumption, and Obesity among Finnish and Greek Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To investigate the relationship between eating-related behaviors, particularly breakfast consumption, and weight status in Finnish and Greek adolescents. Methods: A total of 6,468 16-year-old Finnish adolescents and 2,842 17- and 18-year-old Greek adolescents, based on the latest follow-up of 2 population-based cohorts, were studied.…

Veltsista, Alexandra; Laitinen, Jaana; Sovio, Ulla; Roma, Eleftheria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Ritta; Bakoula, Chryssa

2010-01-01

391

Irregular Breakfast Eating and Associated Health Behaviors: A Pilot Study among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to examine prevalence of eating breakfast and associated health compromising behaviors. This study utilized a cross-sectional survey methodology. A purposive cluster sampling technique was utilized to collect data from a representative sample of college students in a Midwestern university in the U.S. A total of 1,257…

Thiagarajah, Krisha; Torabi, Mohammad R.

2009-01-01

392

Relationship between Eating Behavior, Breakfast Consumption, and Obesity among Finnish and Greek Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate the relationship between eating-related behaviors, particularly breakfast consumption, and weight status in Finnish and Greek adolescents. Methods: A total of 6,468 16-year-old Finnish adolescents and 2,842 17- and 18-year-old Greek adolescents, based on the latest follow-up of 2 population-based cohorts, were studied.…

Veltsista, Alexandra; Laitinen, Jaana; Sovio, Ulla; Roma, Eleftheria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Ritta; Bakoula, Chryssa

2010-01-01

393

An Experiment Analysis of the Impact of Advertising and Food Packaging on Women's Eating Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity is considered a national epidemic and is associated with increased eating behavior and decreased physical activity. Research has demonstrated biological underpinnings, but the dramatic increase in prevalence rates in recent decades (Flegal et al., 2002) suggests that environmental influences also contribute (Hill et al., 2008). This led researchers to speculate about the impact of our purported “Toxic Environment,” in

Amy S Collings

2008-01-01

394

Hypothalamic serotonin in control of eating behavior, meal size, and body weight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in the control of eating behavior and body weight. Stimulants of this monoamine reduce food intake and weight gain and increase energy expenditure, both in animals and in humans. This article reviews evidence that supports a role for hypothalamic serotonergic receptor mechanisms in the mediation of these effects. A variety of studies in rodents indicate

Sarah F Leibowitz; Jesline T Alexander

1998-01-01

395

Mindfulness-Action Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Concurrent Binge Eating Disorder and Substance Use Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) often evidence comorbid Substance Use Disorders (SUD), resulting in poor outcome. This study is the first to examine treatment outcome for this concurrent disordered population. In this pilot study, 38 individuals diagnosed with BED and SUD participated in a 16-week group Mindfulness-Action Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MACBT). Participants significantly improved on measures of objective

Christine M. Courbasson; Yasunori Nishikawa; Leah B. Shapira

2010-01-01

396

Food advertising and television exposure: influence on eating behavior and nutritional status of children and adolescents.  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the influence of food advertising and television exposure on eating behaviour and nutritional status of children and adolescents. It was a cross sectional study developed among 116 students from a private school in Brazil. Socio-demographic and health conditions were evaluated. Anthropometric data, food consumption, physical activity, television viewing habits and behaviour in relation to food advertising were also investigated. Among the results, a 1:2 relationship was identified between the number of televisions and residents per household. Excessive weight was present in 25.8% of subjects and 66.4% of children watched television while eating. Children were exposed to television for a median of 3.0 hours daily (95% CI: 2.9 to 3.6). There was a direct association between attraction to foods advertised and purchasing the product (p < 0.001) and a positive relationship between the number of televisions per household and body weight (r = 0.246, p = 0.015) and the amount of liquid consumed during meals (r = 0.277, p = 0.013). Findings also highlighted the association between watching television while eating and the reduced probability of fruit consumption (p = 0.032), contrasted with a greater likelihood of daily artificial juice intake (p = 0.039). In conclusion, watching television is associated with lower probability of daily consumption of fruits and the number of television at household is positively related to BMI in children and adolescents. PMID:23477208

Costa, Suzane Mota Marques; Horta, Paula Martins; dos Santos, Luana Caroline

2012-03-01

397

What Cognitive Behavioral Techniques Do Therapists Report Using when Delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Eating Disorders?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Clinicians commonly "drift" away from using proven therapeutic techniques. This study examined the degree to which such drift occurs among cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) clinicians working with a specific clinical population--adults with eating disorders. Method: The study used a correlational design. The participants were 80…

Waller, Glenn; Stringer, Hannah; Meyer, Caroline

2012-01-01

398

What Cognitive Behavioral Techniques Do Therapists Report Using when Delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Eating Disorders?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Clinicians commonly "drift" away from using proven therapeutic techniques. This study examined the degree to which such drift occurs among cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) clinicians working with a specific clinical population--adults with eating disorders. Method: The study used a correlational design. The participants were 80…

Waller, Glenn; Stringer, Hannah; Meyer, Caroline

2012-01-01

399

Development of eating behaviors among children and adolescents.  

PubMed

The prevalence of obesity among children is high and is increasing. We know that obesity runs in families, with children of obese parents at greater risk of developing obesity than children of thin parents. Research on genetic factors in obesity has provided us with estimates of the proportion of the variance in a population accounted for by genetic factors. However, this research does not provide information regarding individual development. To design effective preventive interventions, research is needed to delineate how genetics and environmental factors interact in the etiology of childhood obesity. Addressing this question is especially challenging because parents provide both genes and environment for children. An enormous amount of learning about food and eating occurs during the transition from the exclusive milk diet of infancy to the omnivore's diet consumed by early childhood. This early learning is constrained by children's genetic predispositions, which include the unlearned preference for sweet tastes, salty tastes, and the rejection of sour and bitter tastes. Children also are predisposed to reject new foods and to learn associations between foods' flavors and the postingestive consequences of eating. Evidence suggests that children can respond to the energy density of the diet and that although intake at individual meals is erratic, 24-hour energy intake is relatively well regulated. There are individual differences in the regulation of energy intake as early as the preschool period. These individual differences in self-regulation are associated with differences in child-feeding practices and with children's adiposity. This suggests that child-feeding practices have the potential to affect children's energy balance via altering patterns of intake. Initial evidence indicates that imposition of stringent parental controls can potentiate preferences for high-fat, energy-dense foods, limit children's acceptance of a variety of foods, and disrupt children's regulation of energy intake by altering children's responsiveness to internal cues of hunger and satiety. This can occur when well-intended but concerned parents assume that children need help in determining what, when, and how much to eat and when parents impose child-feeding practices that provide children with few opportunities for self-control. Implications of these findings for preventive interventions are discussed. PMID:12224660

Birch, L L; Fisher, J O

1998-03-01

400

Effects of ozone and nitrogen dioxide on drinking and eating behaviors in mice  

SciTech Connect

Male ICR mice were exposed continuously to ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for 7 days to examine the effects on drinking and eating behaviors. Ozone at 0.1 ppm did not affect drinking and eating activities, whereas drinking activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner to 47.7, 12.8, and 3.0% of the control value with 2-day exposures to 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively, and eating activity decreased to 35.2 and 8.7% of the control value at 0.4 and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively. Body weight also decreased markedly by 2.0, 4.6, and 7.5 g at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm O3, respectively. These decrements reached a maximum on the second day of exposure. However, alterations in drinking and eating activities and body weight were transient, leading to recovery during the continuous O3 exposures. The recovery processes were dependent on the concentrations of O3. Nitrogen dioxide at 4 ppm did not affect drinking and eating activities, whereas drinking activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner to 56.8, 8.3, and 18.7% of the control value with 2-day exposures to 6, 8, and 12 ppm NO2, respectively, and eating activity decreased markedly to 21.8 and 16.4% at 8 and 12 ppm NO2, respectively. Body weight also decreased by 2.5, 5.5, and 6.1 g at 6, 8, and 12 ppm NO2, respectively. These decrements reached a maximum on the second day of exposure. As in the O3 exposures, the decrements in drinking and eating activities and body weight were transient and recovered during the continuous exposures to NO2 depending on the concentrations of NO2. Drinking and eating activities and body weights of mice that had been previously exposed to 12 ppm NO2 for 7 days did not show changes when the mice were exposed to 0.4 ppm O3 9 days after NO2 exposure. The present study demonstrates that photochemical oxidants suppress drinking and eating behaviors in mice and that they recover thereafter under the continuous exposure conditions.

Umezu, T.; Suzuki, A.K.; Miura, T.; Koizumi, A. (National Institute for Environmental Studies, Ibaraki (Japan))

1993-04-01

401

Puberty and the Genetic Diathesis of Disordered Eating Attitudes and Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Twin studies from the Minnesota Twin Family Study (MTFS) suggest negligible genetic effects on eating pathology before puberty, but increased genetic effects during puberty. However, an independent study found no pubertal differences in genetic and environmental effects (Rowe et al., 2002). Discrepant results may be due to methodological differences. The MTFS studies divided twins at mid-puberty, while Rowe et al. (2002) divided twins based on menarche alone. We aimed to reconcile discrepant findings by examining differences in etiologic effects for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors (i.e., levels of weight preoccupation, body dissatisfaction, binge eating, compensatory behaviors) using both classification methods in a new sample of 656 female twins. Using the MTFS method, we observed nominal genetic effects in pre-pubertal twins, but significant genetic effects in pubertal and young adult twins. Conversely, genetic effects were moderate and equal in all groups using the Rowe et al. (2002) method. Findings highlight the potentially important role of puberty in the genetic diathesis of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors and the need to use early indicators of pubertal status in studies of developmental effects.

Culbert, Kristen M.; Burt, S. Alexandra; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.; Klump, Kelly L.

2009-01-01

402

A randomized controlled comparison of guided self-help cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral weight loss for binge eating disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a randomized controlled study to test the relative efficacy of guided self-help (gsh) cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBTgsh) and behavioral weight loss treatment (BWLgsh) treatments for binge eating disorder (BED). To provide an additional partial control for non-specific influences of attention, a third control (CON) treatment condition was included. We tested the treatments using a guided self-help approach given the

Carlos M. Grilo; Robin M. Masheb

2005-01-01

403

Family dinner and disordered eating behaviors in a large cohort of adolescents.  

PubMed

We aimed to examine longitudinal associations between family dinner and disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. We studied 7535 females and 5913 males, 9 to 14 years of age in 1996. We performed multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of previous year family dinner with 1-year incidence of each of 3 outcomes: purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Compared to those who ate family dinner "never or some days," female adolescents who ate family dinner at least most days were less likely to initiate purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Estimates of association among males were similar in direction and magnitude, although lower frequency of the outcomes resulted in less precise estimates and fewer statistically significant results. PMID:20390605

Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Field, Alison E; Austin, S Bryn

404

The relation between parental influence, body image, and eating behaviors in a nonclinical female sample.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current study is to create a comprehensive composite measure of parental influence based on previously developed measures to clarify the underlying dimensions of parental influence and to determine the degree to which parental influence relates to body image and dysfunctional weight concerns. Previously published literature was reviewed for measures of parental influence, and items from 22 measures were condensed and combined into a single questionnaire, which was completed by 367 female undergraduate psychology students. Two dimensions emerged from a principle components analysis: Direct Influence, which includes weight and eating related comments, and Modeling, which includes parental modeling of dieting and related behavior. Direct Influence and Modeling were significantly related to eating disturbance, such as drive for thinness and bulimic symptomatology. Overall, the results integrate the previous literature and clarify the underlying dimensions of parental influence. Further, this study provides directions for future research related to the development and maintenance of body image and eating disturbance. PMID:22104125

Abraczinskas, Michelle; Fisak, Brian; Barnes, Rachel D

2011-11-21

405

Gamblers' habits: empirical evidence on the behavior of regulars, newcomers and dropouts.  

PubMed

Electronic gambling offers the opportunity to analyze huge and unbiased data sets of automatically recorded actual gambling behavior. This study refers to data on 2,127,887 poker playing identities from the Online Poker Database of the University of Hamburg (OPD-UHH) to analyze three subgroups of gamblers: regulars, newcomers, and dropouts. Their gambling habits over 6 months are analyzed in total, as well as over time. Regulars show a much higher involvement than non-regulars and increase their playing volume slightly over the observation period. Newcomers have a lower involvement than non-newcomers and most of them decrease their playing volume over time. Still, there is a small group of newcomers which increases their playing volume sharply and is, hence, very interesting for the industry as well as for the early prevention of pathological gambling. Dropouts have a higher gambling involvement than newcomers but play less than players who have not stopped stop gambling. Most dropouts also show a decreasing playing volume before dropping out. An analysis of the correlations between different variables of gambling habits shows that most of them reinforce each other, for example: gamblers with a higher total playing time tend to play at more tables simultaneously. Only playing frequency is a moderating variable of gambling involvement. PMID:22562549

Fiedler, Ingo

2013-06-01

406

Longitudinal and Secular Trends in Parental Encouragement for Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Dieting Throughout the Adolescent Years  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeParental encouragement for healthy eating and physical activity has been found to be associated with the long-term healthy habits of adolescents, whereas parental encouragement to diet has been associated with disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. However, little is known about how parental encouragement changes as adolescents grow older (longitudinal trends), or how parental encouragement has changed over time (secular trends).

Katherine W. Bauer; Melissa N. Laska; Jayne A. Fulkerson; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer

2011-01-01

407

A Cognitive-Behavioral Mindfulness Group Therapy Intervention for the Treatment of Binge Eating in Bariatric Surgery Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Binge eating is a negative indicator of post-surgical weight loss and health outcome in bariatric surgery patients (Hsu, Bentancourt, Sullivan, 1996). Cognitive-behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based practices have been shown to successfully treat binge eating (Agras, Telch, Arnow, Eldredge, & Marnell, 1997; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). This…

Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Irwin, Sharon R.

2008-01-01

408

Prevalence of Disordered Eating and Pathogenic Weight Control Behaviors among NCAA Division I Female Collegiate Gymnasts and Swimmers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eating disorders and related weight control behaviors, such as excessive exercising and restrictive eating, represent serious health problems for girls and women in the United States and other industrialized nations. Female athletes, in particular, have been identified as a subgroup to study because of the unique weight, performance, and body…

Anderson, Carlin; Petrie, Trent A.

2012-01-01

409

Prevalence of Disordered Eating Behaviors and Bulimia Nervosa in a Sample of Mexican American Female College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Disordered eating behaviors and bulimia nervosa were examined in a sample of female Mexican Americans. Results showed that 1.45% to 4.3% could be classified with bulimia. Just over 11% indicated regular binge eating. Dieting and exercising were the primary techniques used for weight control. Implications for intervention are briefly discussed.…

Lester, Regan; Petrie, Trent A.

1998-01-01

410

Prevalence of Disordered Eating and Pathogenic Weight Control Behaviors among NCAA Division I Female Collegiate Gymnasts and Swimmers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eating disorders and related weight control behaviors, such as excessive exercising and restrictive eating, represent serious health problems for girls and women in the United States and other industrialized nations. Female athletes, in particular, have been identified as a subgroup to study because of the unique weight, performance, and body…

Anderson, Carlin; Petrie, Trent A.

2012-01-01

411

Sociocultural Differences in Eating Disordered Behaviors and Body Image Perception: A Comparison between Puerto Rican and American College Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether differences attributable to sociocultural factors existed in the eating-disorder behaviors and body image perception of Puerto Rican and U.S. college women. Participants (n=440) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and provided demographic information. Results indicated significant differences between the…

Encarnacion-Garcia, Haydee

412

Food Preferences Predict Eating Behavior of Very Young Mohawk Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To collect baseline data on energy and nutrient intake and nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of very young Mohawk children to assist the community in planning an appropriate, targeted nutrition and exercise intervention.Design Energy and nutrient intake data were collected from 24-hour recalls conducted in the children's homes. Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and behavior were assessed using a 38-item questionnaire

JEAN HARVEY-BERINO; VIRGINIA HOOD; JANINE ROURKE; TERRIE TERRANCE; ANNE DORWALDT; ROGER SECKER-WALKER

1997-01-01

413

Prevalence of Disordered-Eating Behaviors in Undergraduate Female Collegiate Athletes and Nonathletes  

PubMed Central

Context: As the number of female college students participating in athletics has grown dramatically in the last few decades, sports medicine health care providers have become more aware of the unique health concerns of athletic women. These concerns include disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis: the female athlete triad. Disordered eating appears to be central in the triad, and the literature has conflicting data regarding the influence of athletic participation on disordered-eating behaviors. Objective: To compare disordered-eating symptoms between collegiate athletes (in lean and non-lean sports) and nonathletes. Design: A volunteer, cross-sectional cohort study of female students during the 2002–2003 academic year. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution. Patients or Other Participants: Undergraduate females, including 84 collegiate athletes and 62 nonathletes. Main Outcome Measure(s): Symptoms associated with disordered eating were assessed using the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, a self-report measure of 91 items, and self-reported weight and menstrual function. Results: The athletes had significantly lower scores in body dissatisfaction (P = .01) and ineffectiveness (P = .002). No difference in mean body weight was noted between the 2 groups, but the nonathlete group had a significantly lower desired body weight (P = .004). Lean-sport athletes had a higher score on body dissatisfaction (P = .008) and lower actual (P = .024) and desired body weight (P = .002) than non–lean-sport athletes. A total of 7.1% of the collegiate athletes and 12.9% of the nonathletes were classified as having a high risk for disordered eating. Within the athlete sample, the high-risk group included 2.9% of the non–lean-sport athletes and 25% of the lean-sport athletes. Conclusions: In our study, female athletes did not exhibit more disordered-eating symptoms than women who did not participate in collegiate sports. However, our data suggest that lean-sport athletes are at greater risk for disordered eating than athletes in non-lean sports.

Reinking, Mark F; Alexander, Laura E

2005-01-01

414

Attitudes and Health Behavior in Diverse Populations: Drunk Driving, Alcohol Use, Binge Eating, Marijuana Use, and Cigarette Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five different health behaviors (cigarette use, alcohol use, binge eating, illicit drug use, and drunk driving) were studied prospectively in 5 different groups of subjects. Associations between attitudes toward these behaviors and the behaviors themselves were investigated over at least 2 waves of measurement. Findings revealed that attitudes predicted behavior nonspuriously in 2 instances: alcohol use and marijuana use. Attitudes

Alan W. Stacy; Peter M. Bentler; Brian R. Flay

1994-01-01

415

The Association between Short Sleep Duration and Weight Gain Is Dependent on Disinhibited Eating Behavior in Adults  

PubMed Central

Study Objective: To investigate whether the relationship between short sleep duration and subsequent body weight gain is influenced by disinhibited eating behavior. Design: Six-year longitudinal study. Setting: Community setting. Participants: Two hundred seventy-six adults aged 21 to 64 years from the Quebec Family Study. Measurements and Results: Body composition measurements, self-reported sleep duration, and disinhibition eating behavior trait (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire) were determined at both baseline and after 6 years. For each sleep-duration group (short- [ ? 6 h] average, [7-8 h], and long- [ ? 9 h] duration sleepers), differences in weight gain and waist circumference were tested by comparing the lowest (score ? 3) versus the highest (score ? 6) disinhibition eating behavior tertiles using analysis of covariance, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Individuals having both short sleep duration and high disinhibition eating behavior were more likely to gain weight and increase their abdominal circumference over time (P < 0.05); however, short-duration sleepers having a low disinhibition eating behavior trait were not more likely to increase their adiposity indicators than were average-duration sleepers. Over the 6-year follow-up period, the incidence of overweight/obesity for short-duration sleepers with a high disinhibition eating behavior trait was 2.5 times more frequent than for short-duration sleepers with a low disinhibition eating behavior trait. Energy intake was significantly higher in short-duration sleepers with a high disinhibition eating behavior trait (P < 0.05 versus all other groups). Conclusions: We observed that having a high disinhibition eating behavior trait significantly increased the risk of overeating and gaining weight in adults characterized by short sleep duration. This observation is novel and might explain the interindividual differences in weight gain associated with short sleep duration. Keywords: Adiposity, appetite, body weight, eating traits, sleep deprivation Citation: Chaput JP; Desprées JP; Bouchard C; Tremblay A. The association between short sleep duration and weight gain is dependent on disinhibited eating behavior in adults. SLEEP 2011;34(10):1291-1297.

Despres, Jean-Pierre; Bouchard, Claude; Tremblay, Angelo

2011-01-01

416

A Multisite Investigation of Binge Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The phenomenology of childhood and adolescent loss of control (LOC) eating is unknown. The authors interviewed 445 youths to assess aspects of aberrant eating. LOC was associated with eating forbidden food before the episode; eating when not hungry; eating alone; and experiencing secrecy, negative emotions, and a sense of "numbing" while eating

Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Goossens, Lien; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Ringham, Rebecca; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Braet, Caroline; Marcus, Marsha D.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Olsen, Cara; Yanovski, Jack A.

2007-01-01

417

A Multisite Investigation of Binge Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The phenomenology of childhood and adolescent loss of control (LOC) eating is unknown. The authors interviewed 445 youths to assess aspects of aberrant eating. LOC was associated with eating forbidden food before the episode; eating when not hungry; eating alone; and experiencing secrecy, negative emotions, and a sense of "numbing" while eating

Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Goossens, Lien; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Ringham, Rebecca; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Braet, Caroline; Marcus, Marsha D.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Olsen, Cara; Yanovski, Jack A.

2007-01-01

418

[Dance training and eating disorders].  

PubMed

Medical history, eating habits, weight, current symptomatology and EDI (Eating Disorders Inventory)-scores of 41 bulimic female patients with and without past training in dancing, who came for treatment to an outpatient clinic, were compared. It was found that both groups of patients were not different for age, age at beginning of bulimia, actual as well as minimal and maximal BMI (Body mass index), length and severity of symptomatology, frequency of bulimic behaviors, and scores on the subscales of the EDI, but it should be noted that these similarities might be in relationship with some methodological shortcomings. Considering the prevalence of bulimia nervosa in women and the high frequency of ballet and sports training in teenagers, some hypotheses about the possible influence of strenuous physical exercise in childhood on the symptomatology and some psychological traits in adults with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge-eating disorder are presented. Further studies, including standardized scales and larger samples, are necessary. PMID:7526458

Archinard, M; Scherer, U; Reverdin, N; Rouget, P; Allaz, A F

1994-01-01

419

The Evolution of "Enhanced" Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders: Learning From Treatment Nonresponse  

PubMed Central

In recent years there has been widespread acceptance that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa. The cognitive behavioral treatment of bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) was first described in 1981. Over the past decades the theory and treatment have evolved in response to a variety of challenges. The treatment has been adapted to make it suitable for all forms of eating disorder—thereby making it “transdiagnostic” in its scope— and treatment procedures have been refined to improve outcome. The new version of the treatment, termed enhanced CBT (CBT-E) also addresses psychopathological processes “external” to the eating disorder, which, in certain subgroups of patients, interact with the disorder itself. In this paper we discuss how the development of this broader theory and treatment arose from focusing on those patients who did not respond well to earlier versions of the treatment.

Cooper, Zafra; Fairburn, Christopher G.

2013-01-01

420

Don't take another bite: how sociocultural norms for appearance affect women's eating behavior.  

PubMed

Four studies tested the impact of exposure to thin images on women's eating behavior. In Study 1, women who were exposed to commercials containing thin models ate less in a taste test than women exposed to neutral commercials. The next two studies revealed that the impact of the thin images could be reduced by challenging the sociocultural norms for appearance. In Study 2, including images of relatively heavier women who have been successful in life (an indirect challenge to the norm) attenuated the impact of the thin images on women's eating behavior. Study 3 demonstrated that convincing women that their peers do not endorse the sociocultural norms also reduced the impact of the thin images. In Study 4, we found that exposure to thin images led to activation of an association between heaviness and rejection and that the more this association was activated, the less participants ate. PMID:18089279

Strahan, Erin J; Spencer, Steven J; Zanna, Mark P

2007-09-20

421

Weight-teasing among adolescents: correlations with weight status and disordered eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of perceived weight-teasing and associations with unhealthy weight-control behaviors and binge eating in a population-based sample of youth. Particular focus was placed on overweight youth, who may be most vulnerable to weight-teasing.METHODS: The study population included 4746 adolescents from St Paul\\/Minneapolis public schools who completed surveys and anthropometric measurements as part of

D Neumark-Sztainer; N Falkner; M Story; C Perry; PJ Hannan; S Mulert

2002-01-01

422

Binge Eating and Weight Loss in a Self-Help Behavior Modification Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the occurrence of binge eating and its impact on weight loss outcomes among obese participants in the Trevose Behavior Modification Program, a lay-administered, lay-directed self-help weight loss program offering continuing care.Research Methods and Procedures: Participants completed questionnaires, and weight loss data were recorded prospectively.Results: Although objective bulimic episodes were reported by 41% of the sample, objective bulimic

Sherrie Selwyn Delinsky; Janet D. Latner; G. Terence Wilson

2006-01-01

423

Diabetes Medical Nutrition Therapy: Quality of Life and Behavioral Eating Competence Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: To examine quality of life and eating behavior outcomes from diabetes medical nutrition therapy (MNT).Clinical and medical outcomes for basic care (BC) and practice guideline care (PGC) for diabetes MNT provided by dietitians have been reported. Both groups experienced improvements in HbAlc at 3 and 6 months after study entry.Quality of life (QOL) for trial subjects (n=*86) was

M. J. Franz; A. Monk; B. Barry; P. Upham; R Mazze

1996-01-01

424

Defined weight expectations in overweight women: anthropometrical, psychological and eating behavioral correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To examine associations between defined weight expectations and anthropometric profile and to identify psychological and eating behavioral factors that characterize women having more realistic weight expectations.Methods:A nonrandom sample of 154 overweight\\/obese women completed the ‘Goals and Relative Weight Questionnaire’, which assessed four weight expectations: (1) dream weight (whatever wanted to weight); (2) happy weight (would be happy to achieve); (3)

V Provencher; C Bégin; M-P Gagnon-Girouard; H C Gagnon; A Tremblay; S Boivin; S Lemieux

2007-01-01

425

Personality traits in overweight and obese women: Associations with BMI and eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed at assessing the extent to which personality traits are related to BMI and eating behaviors in overweight and obese women (N=154; mean body mass index (BMI) of 30.5±3.0 kg\\/m2). The NEO Five-Factor Inventory was used to capture the five dimensions of personality (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness). Anthropometric measurements (weight, height and BMI) were performed

Véronique Provencher; Catherine Bégin; Marie-Pierre Gagnon-Girouard; Angelo Tremblay; Sonia Boivin; Simone Lemieux

2008-01-01

426

Eating Behavior and the Experience of Hunger Following Gastric Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Numerous different factors may contribute to the varying degrees of success observed following gastric bypass\\u000a surgery. It is likely that alterations in the subjective experiences of hunger and satiety, as well as behavioral factors,\\u000a are important. Our aim was to investigate the association of several factors, including qualitative aspects of hunger and\\u000a satiety, eating patterns, and the emotional valence

Catherine R. Delin; James Mc K. Watts; Judith L. Saebel; Paul G. Anderson

1997-01-01

427

Appetite sensations and eating behaviors to complete fasting in obese and non-obese individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the response of appetite sensations and eating behaviors to fasting in obese and non-obese individuals.Design: Prospective study on inpatients enrolled in weight loss program including fasting at the obesity clinic, an oriental medical center in Seoul, Korea.Subjects and measurements: For seven obese (body mass index BMI?30) and 11 non-obese (BMI<30) patients, the modified visual analog scale (VAS)

S-Y Oh; BS Kim; R Choue

2002-01-01

428

Date violence and date rape among adolescents: associations with disordered eating behaviors and psychological health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The goal of the study was to assess the prevalence of date violence and rape in adolescents, to examine associations between date violence and rape and disordered eating behaviors and psychopathology, and to determine if these associations remain significant after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and other physical and sexual abuse by an adult.Method: A Minnesota school-based sample of 81,247

Diann M Ackard; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer

2002-01-01

429

Prevalence and risk and protective factors related to disordered eating behaviors among adolescents: relationship to gender and ethnicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To examine the current prevalence of disordered eating behaviors in a large sample of adolescents, by gender and ethnicity, and to identify gender and ethnic-specific risk and protective factors.Methods: The study population included 81,247 9th- and 12th-graders who completed the 1998 Minnesota Student Survey, a self-report, school-based survey which included questions about disordered eating behaviors and a variety of

Jillian Croll; Dianne Neumark-Sztainer; Mary Story; Marjorie Ireland

2002-01-01

430

Women’s regulation styles for eating behaviors and outcomes: The mediating role of approach and avoidance food planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article was to examine the role played by different orientations in planning for eating behaviors as mediators\\u000a of the relationship between regulation styles and eating behaviors. In Study 1, a new scale was developed to assess approach\\u000a food planning and avoidance food planning. Results from confirmatory analyses (N = 241) supported the two-factor structure of the scale. In

Nancy Otis; Luc G. Pelletier

2008-01-01

431

Nutrition Policies at ChildCare Centers and Impact on Role Modeling of Healthy Eating Behaviors of Caregivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies suggest that caregivers influence children's dietary behaviors through role modeling in child-care environments. However, few studies have examined role modeling by caregivers and child-care center policies. This cross-sectional study evaluated the associations between child-care center policies about staff eating practices and caregivers' eating behaviors during mealtime interactions with children. Data were collected in 2008-2009 at 50 North Carolina child-care

Temitope O. Erinosho; Derek P. Hales; Christina P. McWilliams; Josie Emunah; Dianne Stanton Ward

432

Common Genetic Variation near MC4R Has a Sex-Specific Impact on Human Brain Structure and Eating Behavior.  

PubMed

Obesity is associated with genetic and environmental factors but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified obesity- and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants located within or near genes that modulate brain activity and development. Among the top hits is rs17782313 near MC4R, encoding for the melanocortin-4-receptor, which is expressed in brain regions that regulate eating. Here, we hypothesized rs17782313-associated changes in human brain regions that regulate eating behavior. Therefore, we examined effects of common variants at rs17782313 near MC4R on brain structure and eating behavior. Only in female homozygous carriers of the risk allele we found significant increases of gray matter volume (GMV) in the right amygdala, a region known to influence eating behavior, and the right hippocampus, a structure crucial for memory formation and learning. Further, we found bilateral increases in medial orbitofrontal cortex, a multimodal brain structure encoding the subjective value of reinforcers, and bilateral prefrontal cortex, a higher order regulation area. There was no association between rs17782313 and brain structure in men. Moreover, among female subjects only, we observed a significant increase of 'disinhibition', and, more specifically, on 'emotional eating' scores of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire in carriers of the variant rs17782313's risk allele. These findings suggest that rs17782313's effect on eating behavior is mediated by central mechanisms and that these effects are sex-specific. PMID:24066140

Horstmann, Annette; Kovacs, Peter; Kabisch, Stefan; Boettcher, Yvonne; Schloegl, Haiko; Tönjes, Anke; Stumvoll, Michael; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno

2013-09-16

433

Common Genetic Variation near MC4R Has a Sex-Specific Impact on Human Brain Structure and Eating Behavior  

PubMed Central

Obesity is associated with genetic and environmental factors but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified obesity- and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants located within or near genes that modulate brain activity and development. Among the top hits is rs17782313 near MC4R, encoding for the melanocortin-4-receptor, which is expressed in brain regions that regulate eating. Here, we hypothesized rs17782313-associated changes in human brain regions that regulate eating behavior. Therefore, we examined effects of common variants at rs17782313 near MC4R on brain structure and eating behavior. Only in female homozygous carriers of the risk allele we found significant increases of gray matter volume (GMV) in the right amygdala, a region known to influence eating behavior, and the right hippocampus, a structure crucial for memory formation and learning. Further, we found bilateral increases in medial orbitofrontal cortex, a multimodal brain structure encoding the subjective value of reinforcers, and bilateral prefrontal cortex, a higher order regulation area. There was no association between rs17782313 and brain structure in men. Moreover, among female subjects only, we observed a significant increase of ‘disinhibition’, and, more specifically, on ‘emotional eating’ scores of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire in carriers of the variant rs17782313’s risk allele. These findings suggest that rs17782313’s effect on eating behavior is mediated by central mechanisms and that these effects are sex-specific.

Horstmann, Annette; Kovacs, Peter; Kabisch, Stefan; Boettcher, Yvonne; Schloegl, Haiko; Tonjes, Anke; Stumvoll, Michael

2013-01-01

434

Military experience strongly influences post-service eating behavior and BMI status in American veterans.  

PubMed

In-depth interviews were conducted with veterans (n=64) with an average age of 57 years to investigate eating behavior and food insecurity during military service and examine if it affects post-war eating behavior, and if this contributes to the high incidence of obesity found in veterans. About half of the subjects served during the Vietnam War, while smaller numbers served in WWII, the Korean War, Desert Storm, or other conflicts. The mean BMI was 30.5+/-6.7 kg/m(2). Only 12.5% of participants were classified as normal weight, while 37.5% were overweight, 46.9% were obese, and 3.1% were classified as excessively obese. Five major themes were identified including, (a) military service impacts soldier's food environment, (b) food insecurity influences eating behavior and food choices, (c) military impacts weight status during and post-service, (d) military service has health consequences, and (e) post-service re-adjustment solutions are needed to ease re-entry into civilian life. PMID:19013204

Smith, Chery; Klosterbuer, Abby; Levine, Allen S

2008-11-01

435

Which adaptive maternal eating behaviors predict child feeding practices? An examination with mothers of 2- to 5-year-old children  

PubMed Central

Researchers have started to explore the detrimental impact of maladaptive maternal eating behaviors on child feeding practices. However, identifying which adaptive maternal eating behaviors contribute to lower use of negative and higher use of positive child feeding practices remains unexamined. The present study explored this link with 180 mothers of 2- to 5-year-old children. Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for recruitment venue and maternal demographic characteristics, i.e., age, education, ethnicity, and body mass index) examined mothers’ intuitive eating and eating competence as predictors of four feeding practices (restriction, monitoring, pressure to eat, and dividing feeding responsibilities with their child). Mothers who gave themselves unconditional permission to eat were less likely to restrict their child’s food intake. Mothers who ate for physical (rather than emotional) reasons and had eating-related contextual skills (e.g., mindfulness when eating, planning regular and nutritious eating opportunities for themselves) were more likely to monitor their child’s food intake. Mothers who had eating-related contextual skills were more likely to divide feeding responsibilities with their child. No maternal eating behavior predicted pressure to eat. Interventions to help mothers develop their eating-related contextual skills and eat intuitively, in particular, may translate into a more positive feeding environment for their young children.

Tylka, Tracy L.; Eneli, Ihuoma U.; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M.; Lumeng, Julie C.

2013-01-01

436

Cross-sectional study of self-reported physical activity, eating habits and use of complementary medicine in breast cancer survivors  

PubMed Central

Background Besides conventional adjuvant therapies, many breast cancer survivors engage in various activities like exercise, diet and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in order to improve their prognosis. Little is known about specific interests and willingness to participate in institutional programs (e.g. exercise classes). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in patients with early breast cancer assessing current physical activity (PA, e.g. 30 minutes brisk walking), attention to eating habits (“diet”), use of CAM, and interest in learning more about these fields. Patients indicating interest in PA counselling received a voucher for a free instruction by a certified physiotherapist. Data were analysed for factors predictive for engagement in the three fields using a stepwise multivariate logistic approach. Results Of 342 consecutive patients, 232 (69%) reported to be physically active more than once per week, 299 (87%) paying special attention to nutrition (in most cases fruits, “balanced diet”, low fat), and 159 (46%) use of CAM (vitamins, special teas, homeopathy, herbal medicine, mistletoe). Factors predictive for PA were use of CAM, higher age, and fewer worries about the future. Swiss nationality at birth, physical activity and higher education were predictive for diet; whereas physical activity, higher education and lower age were predictive for use of CAM. No associations between any of the above variables and breast cancer characteristics were found. Around half of the patients reported interest in receiving more information and willingness to attend special counselling. Of 166 vouchers, only 7 (4%) were eventually utilized. Conclusions A high proportion of breast cancer survivors report PA, following a specific diet and use of CAM. There were no disease related factors associated with such pursuits, but an association between patient related factors and these fields was observed suggesting general health awareness in some patients. Around half of the patients were interested in more information and indicated willingness to participate in institutional programs. Impact on disease specific and general health including health economic aspects warrants further research.

2013-01-01

437

Eating competence of Hispanic parents is associated with attitudes and behaviors that may mediate fruit and vegetable-related behaviors of 4th grade youth.  

PubMed

Parent self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and behaviors toward cooking and fruits and vegetables mediate children's eating. Eating competence, an intra-individual approach to food-related attitudes and behaviors, is associated with healthful outcomes but has not been studied as a moderator of parent food-related behaviors that mediate healthful eating in 4th grade children. Parents (n = 339; 78% Hispanic, 89% female) of 4th graders who participated in an impact study of the Cooking with Kids curriculum in Santa Fe, NM schools eligible for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education completed the following surveys: Satter eating competence inventory for low-income (ecSI/LI) (16 items, Likert scale, possible score 0-48); modeling behaviors related to food preparation and fruits/vegetables (11 items, Likert scale, possible score 0-33); self-efficacy/outcome expectancies (SE/OE) (12 items, Likert scale, possible score 12-60); and availability of fruits/vegetables (20 items, possible score 0-20). Higher scores indicate more desired behaviors. The mean ecSI/LI score was 33.6 ± 8.5; 59% were eating competent, i.e., ecSI/LI ? 32. Eating-competent parents demonstrated more modeling (16.3 ± 5.0 vs. 14.0 ± 4.3; P < 0.001), greater SE/OE (53.7 ± 10.1 vs. 51.2 ± 8.5; P = 0.03), and greater in-home fruit/vegetable availability (12.7 ± 3.0 vs. 11.9 ± 3.2; P = 0.02). Two clusters of modeling behavior were defined: achievers and strivers. Modeling achievers (34.9 ± 6.9) were more eating competent (P < 0.001) than strivers (30.3 ± 8.9). Eating competence moderated parent food-related behaviors. Measuring eating competence may contribute to understanding parent behavior as a mediator in school-based nutrition interventions. PMID:22933747

Lohse, Barbara; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

2012-08-29

438

Cocaine addiction: from habits to stereotypical-repetitive behaviors and punding.  

PubMed

"Punding" is a stereotypical motor behavior characterized by an intense fascination with repetitive handling and examining of objects. Since its first description in amphetamine and cocaine addicts, data on punding has only derived from studies performed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Punding is classifiable as the most severe form of Repetitive Reward-Seeking Behaviours (RRSB) syndromes. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and phenomelogy of RRSB acutely induced by cocaine in order to determine the prevalence, severity and distinctive features discriminating "punders" from "non-punders". A consecutive sample of 50 cocaine addicts received a clinical psychiatric interview. RRSB diagnosis and severity were assessed using a modified version of a previous published questionnaire designed to identify punding in patients with PD. In the present series, 38% of the cocaine addicts met the proposed diagnostic criteria for a RRSB and 8% were considered punders. Subjects with vs. without RRSB did not differ in terms of sex ratio, age, education, occupation, predisposing habits, duration of cocaine use, hours of sleep, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and concomitant use of other drugs. These results and the observation that in the majority of cases RRSB started soon after first drug intake, strongly suggest that an underlying unknown predisposition led to the development of these behaviors. In conclusion, RRSB and punding is much more common than has been described previously and the resultant social disability is often overlooked. PMID:18378407

Fasano, Alfonso; Barra, Andrea; Nicosia, Paola; Rinaldi, Federica; Bria, Pietro; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Tonioni, Federico

2008-04-18

439

A systematic review of dialectical behavior therapy for the treatment of eating disorders.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for eating disorders (EDs). We conducted a systematic literature review to locate refereed journal articles testing DBT for the treatment of EDs. We identified 13 studies empirically evaluating treatment efficacy across various settings. Findings, based on mostly uncontrolled trials, indicate that DBT treatments appear effective in addressing ED behaviors and other forms of psychopathology in ED samples. The expectation that improvements in emotion regulation capabilities drive reductions in ED pathology was not fully supported. Further research is necessary to confirm the efficacy of modified DBT treatments for EDs. PMID:22519897

Bankoff, Sarah M; Karpel, Madeleine G; Forbes, Hope E; Pantalone, David W

2012-01-01

440

A Multisite Investigation of Binge Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phenomenology of childhood and adolescent loss of control (LOC) eating is unknown. The authors interviewed 445 youths to assess aspects of aberrant eating. LOC was associated with eating forbidden food before the episode; eating when not hungry; eating alone; and experiencing secrecy, negative emotions, and a sense of \\

Marian Tanofsky-Kraff; Lien Goossens; Kamryn T. Eddy; Rebecca Ringham; Andrea Goldschmidt; Susan Z. Yanovski; Caroline Braet; Marsha D. Marcus; Denise E. Wilfley; Cara Olsen; Jack A. Yanovski

2007-01-01

441

The significance of repetitive hair-pulling behaviors in eating disorders.  

PubMed

We studied the relation between intrusive and repetitive hair pulling, the defining feature of trichotillomania, and compulsive and impulsive features in 1,453 individuals with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. We conducted a series of regression models examining the relative influence of compulsive features associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, compulsive features associated with eating disorders, trait features related to harm avoidance, perfectionism, and novelty seeking, and self harm. A final model with a reduced sample (n = 928) examined the additional contribution of impulsive attributes. One of 20 individuals endorsed hair pulling. Evidence of a positive association with endorsement of compulsive behavior of the obsessive-compulsive spectrum emerged. Hair pulling may be more consonant with ritualistic compulsions than impulsive urges in those with eating disorders. PMID:21365638

Zucker, Nancy; Von Holle, Ann; Thornton, Laura M; Strober, Michael; Plotnicov, Kathy; Klump, Kelly L; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M; Halmi, Katherine A; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S; Keel, Pamela; LaVia, Maria; Mitchell, James E; Rotondo, Alessandro; Woodside, D Blake; Berrettini, Wade H; Kaye, Walter H; Bulik, Cynthia M

2011-01-03

442

The Significance of Repetitive Hair-Pulling Behaviors in Eating Disorders  

PubMed Central

We studied the relation between intrusive and repetitive hair-pulling, the defining feature of trichotillomania, and compulsive and impulsive features in 1453 individuals with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. We conducted a series of regression models examining the relative influence of compulsive features associated with obsessive compulsive disorder; compulsive features associated with eating disorders; trait features related to harm avoidance, perfectionism and novelty seeking; and self harm. A final model with a reduced sample (n=928) examined the additional contribution of impulsive attributes. One out of 20 individuals endorsed hair-pulling. Evidence of a positive association with endorsement of compulsive behavior of the obsessive compulsive spectrum emerged. Hair-pulling may be more consonant with ritualistic compulsions than impulsive urges in those with eating disorders.

Zucker, Nancy; Von Holle, Ann; Thornton, Laura M.; Strober, Michael; Plotnicov, Kathy; Klump, Kelly L.; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S.; Keel, Pamela; LaVia, Maria; Mitchell, James E.; Rotondo, Alessandro; Woodside, D. Blake; Berrettini, Wade H.; Kaye, Walter H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

2013-01-01

443

Eating Behaviors and Social Capital are Associated with Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Rural Adults.  

PubMed

Few studies have focused on determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in rural areas. This study examined the relationship between demographics, socioeconomic status, social capital, eating behaviors, and fruit and vegetable intake for a large rural sample. Data from 1220 rural adults participating in the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment Survey were used. Multivariable regression results demonstrated eating a regular breakfast (p-value ? 0.001) was positively and drinking sugar-sweetened beverages (p-value = 0.010) was negatively associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Being female, older, and having higher levels of education and social capital were associated with consuming more fruit and vegetables. This analysis provides evidence that contextual aspects are important for understanding fruit and vegetable intake in rural areas. PMID:21116465

Johnson, Cassandra M; Sharkey, Joseph R; Dean, Wesley R

2010-07-01

444

Yoga and Pilates: Associations with body image and disordered eating behaviors in a population-based sample of young adults  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine associations between participating in mind-body activities (yoga/Pilates) and body dissatisfaction and disordered eating (unhealthy and extreme weight control practices and binge eating) in a population-based sample of young adults. Method The sample included 1030 young men and 1257 young women (mean age: 25.3 years, SD=1.7) who participated in Project EAT-III (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults). Results Among women, disordered eating was prevalent in yoga/Pilates participants and non-participants, with no differences between the groups. Men participating in yoga/Pilates were more likely to use extreme weight control behaviors (18.6% vs. 6.8%, p=.006) and binge eating (11.6% vs. 4.2%, p=.023), and marginally more likely to use unhealthy weight control behaviors (49.1% vs. 34.5%; p=.053), than non-participants after adjusting for sociodemographics, weight status, and overall physical activity. Discussion Findings suggest the importance of helping yoga/Pilates instructors recognize that their students may be at risk for disordered eating.

Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Wall, Melanie; Loth, Katie A.

2010-01-01

445

Negotiating food choice: parents' perception of children's eating behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is based on a qualitative study exploring parents' attitudes and perceptions of their role in their children's eating habits in schools in Angus, Scotland. Parents believed they had different degrees of influence on their children's eating habits. This article will examine these different perceptions of parental responsibility for children's eating habits to explore how parents viewed their influence

E. Mei-Li Roberts

446

2,5-Anhydro- d-mannitol induces Fos-like immunoreactivity in hindbrain and forebrain: relationship to eating behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Injection of the fructose analogue, 2,5-anhydro-d-mannitol (2,5-AM), stimulates eating behavior in rats. Previous studies have shown that administration of 2,5-AM in doses that elicit eating induces Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-li) primarily in hindbrain structures, including the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), area postrema (AP), and lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN). To more closely assess the relationship between neural activation and the

Charles C Horn; Mark I Friedman

1998-01-01

447

If you are good you can have a cookie: How memories of childhood food rules link to adult eating behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether memories of parental rules about food during childhood are linked to adult eating behaviors. Method: An adult community sample (N=122) (56% female, 44% male) with a mean age of 44.6 years completed self-report measures of weight and dieting history, current eating patterns, and recollection of different types of rules about

Rebecca M. Puhl; Marlene B. Schwartz

2003-01-01

448

Adolescents' Perceptions of Healthy Eating and Communication about Healthy Eating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating, their perceptions of various socializing agents shaping their eating habits, and their opinions about various regulatory measures which might be imposed to encourage healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: Four focus group interview sessions…

Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

2009-01-01

449

Adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating and communication about healthy eating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating, their perceptions of various socializing agents shaping their eating habits, and their opinions about various regulatory measures which might be imposed to encourage healthy eating. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Four focus group interview sessions were conducted with 22 eighth and ninth grade adolescents (aged 13 to

Kara Chan; Gerard Prendergast; Alice Grønhøj; Tino Bech-Larsen

2009-01-01

450

Adolescents' Perceptions of Healthy Eating and Communication about Healthy Eating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating, their perceptions of various socializing agents shaping their eating habits, and their opinions about various regulatory measures which might be imposed to encourage healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: Four focus group interview sessions…

Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

2009-01-01

451

Change in eating disorder attitudes and behavior in college women: prevalence and predictors.  

PubMed

Although there is evidence suggesting that disordered eating is common among female college students, there is little research on whether these behaviors increase during college. This study examined change in eating disorder (ED) symptoms in undergraduate women, and the relationship between change in ED symptoms and change in risk factors. Participants (N=186) completed measures of ED symptoms (i.e., bingeing, purging, and bulimic attitudes) and risk factors (i.e., academic stress, body dissatisfaction, depression, self-esteem, and social insecurity) at two time points, two months apart. ED symptoms were common, with 49% and 40% of the sample endorsing disordered eating an average of at least once per week at Time 1 and Time 2, respectively. Mean scores decreased on all ED symptoms and risk factors except bingeing. However, individual change scores indicated that ED symptoms and risk factors did not change reliably for most women. When change occurred, decreases in symptoms were more common than increases. The most consistent predictors of decreases in ED symptoms were increases in body satisfaction and self-esteem. PMID:19665094

Berg, Kelly C; Frazier, Patricia; Sherr, Laura

2009-03-29

452

Changing Behavior by Memory Aids: A Social Psychological Model of Prospective Memory and Habit Development Tested With Dynamic Field Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a social psychological model of prospective memory and habit development. The model is based on relevant research literature, and its dynamics were investigated by computer simulations. Time-series data from a behavior-change campaign in Cuba were used for calibration and validation of the model. The model scored well in several system-analytical tests, including the replication of the data

Robert Tobias

2009-01-01

453

Use of a Tool to Determine Perceived Barriers to Children's Healthy Eating and Physical Activity and Relationships to Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

This pilot investigation assesses whether barriers to children’s healthy eating and physical activity reported by parents on a newly developed brief pediatric obesity screening and counseling tool are related to healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. The sample included parents of 115 Medicaid-enrolled children in a general pediatric clinic. Of 10 barriers, 7 were statistically associated with parent-reported behaviors with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 0.6 to 9.4. Relationships remained significant when child characteristics were controlled in the analysis. Although additional testing is needed, the tool provides clinicians with an approach to identify barriers and behaviors for targeted counseling.

Jacobson Vann, Julie C.; Finkle, Joanne; Ammerman, Alice; Wegner, Steven; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Benjamin, John T.; Perrin, Eliana M.

2012-01-01

454

Menstrual function and eating behavior in female recreational weight lifters and competitive body builders.  

PubMed

A group of 103 female weight lifters (WL) and 92 control (C) women answered a survey concerning eating behavior and attitudes (including the Eating Disorder Inventory) and menstrual function. The incidence of menstrual dysfunction, defined as oligomenorrhea plus amenorrhea, was significantly higher for the WL (30%) than for the C (13%) not on contraceptive pills. Only 2% of the women had amenorrhea. The incidence of dysfunction was highest for the subset of 12 WL who had competed in at least one body building competition (COMP); 86% of the COMP not on birth control pills had menstrual dysfunction (P less than 0.05). More WL than C reported missing at least one menstrual period during the last year (P = 0.06). WL scored significantly higher than C on the Drive for Thinness subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Fifteen percent of the WL and 9% of the C achieved the criteria on this subscale for being weight preoccupied (P greater than 0.05). Significantly more WL than C responded that they were terrified of becoming fat (WL 56%, C 38%), were obsessed with food (WL 47%, C 30%), used laxatives for weight control (WL 14%, C 1%), and claimed that they had been anorexic in the past (WL 17%, C 5%). Examination of the answers of COMP revealed several items that were significantly different from the remainder of the WL. For example, 42% used to be anorexic, 67% were terrified of becoming fat, and 50% experienced uncontrollable urges to eat.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1997810

Walberg, J L; Johnston, C S

1991-01-01

455

Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder (BED) all involve observable eating, and often purging, behaviors.\\u000a However, to develop a complete conceptual picture of each disorder, additional sociocultural, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional\\u000a processes must be considered. To complicate matters, altered physiological functioning may result from as well as cause emotional\\u000a and cognitive dysfunction. Thus, whereas interviewers will want to

Risa J. Stein; Ryan D. Field; John P. Foreyt

456

Brain-Behavior Relations During Motor Processing in Chronic Tic and Habit Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study examined electrophysiological indices of pre- paration(readinesspotential,RP)andexecution(movement-associated potential,MAP)duringautomatedandcontrolledreactiontime(RT)in 13 chronic tic disorder, 17 habit disorder, and 14 control participants. Background: Both tic and habit disorders are hypothesized to in- volve states of heightened activation, which could impede initiation and the control of complex motor actions. Method: The electrophysiological signal was recorded from 4 elec- trodes (Fz, C3, C4,

Marc E. Lavoie; Manon Robert; Emmanuel Stip

2005-01-01

457

Weight Perception, Substance Use, and Disordered Eating Behaviors: Comparing Normal Weight and Overweight High-School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Disordered eating behaviors and substance use are two risk factors for the development of serious psychopathology and health concerns in adulthood. Despite the negative outcomes associated with these risky behaviors, few studies have examined potential associations between these risk factors as they occur during adolescence. The importance of…

Eichen, Dawn M.; Conner, Bradley T.; Daly, Brian P.; Fauber, Robert L.

2012-01-01

458

Weight Perception, Substance Use, and Disordered Eating Behaviors: Comparing Normal Weight and Overweight High-School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Disordered eating behaviors and substance use are two risk factors for the development of serious psychopathology and health concerns in adulthood. Despite the negative outcomes associated with these risky behaviors, few studies have examined potential associations between these risk factors as they occur during adolescence. The importance of…

Eichen, Dawn M.; Conner, Bradley T.; Daly, Brian P.; Fauber, Robert L.

2012-01-01

459

Predicting Intentions to Eat a Healthful Diet by College Baseball Players: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To assess factors important to college baseball players regarding intention to eat a healthful diet within the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design: A survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior was administered during the 2006 summer league season from 5 of the Northern Division teams of the Coastal Plain League. Participants: Male…

Pawlak, Roman; Malinauskas, Brenda; Rivera, David

2009-01-01

460

Association of perceived racial discrimination with eating behaviors and obesity among participants of the SisterTalk study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the association of perceived racial discrimination with emotional eating behaviors, weight status, and stress levels among obese African-American women, who volunteered to enter a weight control study (SisterTalk) in the New England region of the United States. The sample of women was taken from the baseline data of participants in SisterTalk, a randomized, controlled trial of a cable TV-delivered weight control program. Using the Krieger instrument, telephone and in-person surveys were used to assess perceived discrimination, emotional eating behaviors, and stress. Height and weight were measured to calculate BMI in order to assess weight status. ANOVA models were constructed to assess the association of discrimination with demographics. Correlations were calculated for discrimination, stress, emotional eating, and weight variables. ANOVA models were also constructed to assess discrimination with emotional eating, after adjusting for appropriate demographic variables. Perceived discrimination was associated with education and stress levels but was not associated with weight status (BMI). The frequency of eating when depressed or sad, and eating to manage stress, were both significantly higher among women who reported higher perceived discrimination and higher stress levels. Discrimination may contribute to stress that leads to eating for reasons other than hunger among African-American women, although the causal direction of associations cannot be determined with cross sectional data. Associations of discrimination with weight status were not found, although it is likely that emotional eating behaviors related to perceived discrimination are unhealthy. Future research should examine these relationships more closely in longitudinal studies. PMID:23061168

Johnson, Portia; Risica, Patricia Markham; Gans, Kim M; Kirtania, Usree; Kumanyika, Shiriki K

2012-07-01