Science.gov

Sample records for hadron tile calorimeter

  1. Cesium monitoring system for ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, E.; Blanchot, G.; Bosman, M.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kopikov, S.; Miagkov, A.; Nessi, M.; Shalimov, A.; Shalanda, N.; Soldatov, M.; Solodkov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Zaitsev, A.

    2002-11-01

    A system to calibrate and monitor ATLAS Barrel Hadronic Calorimeter (TileCal) is under construction at CERN Laboratory. A movable radioactive source driven by a liquid flow travels through the calorimeter body deposing a known energy to the calorimeter cells. Extensive R&D studies have been carried out and the main system parameters are evaluated. The prototypes are currently used for quality check and inter-calibration of the TileCal modules. A distributed control system, hardware as well as corresponding on-line and off-line software is developed.

  2. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumediene, Djamel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment. The TileCal provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by means of wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The TileCal readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read by two PMTs. A brief description of the individual calibration systems (Cs radioactive source, laser, charge injection, minimum bias) is provided. Their combination allows to calibrate each part of the data acquisition chain (optical part, photomultiplier, readout electronics) and to monitor its stability to better than 1%. The procedure for setting and preserving the electromagnetic energy scale during Run 1 data taking is discussed. The issues of linearity and stability of the response, as well as the timing adjustment are also shown.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter at LHC in Run 1 and planned upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyanov, O.

    2014-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider, a key detector for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status are explained in the presentation. The energy and the time reconstruction performance of the digitized signals is presented and the noise behaviour and its improvement during the detector consolidation in maintenance periods are shown. A set of calibration systems allow monitoring and equalization of the calorimeter channels responses via signal sources that act at every stage of the signal path, from scintillation light to digitized signal. These partially overlapping systems are described in detail, their individual performance is discussed as well as the comparative results from measurements of the evolution of the calorimeter response with time during the full LHC data-taking period. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals will be directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. For the off-detector electronics a special pre-processor board is being developed, which will take care of the initial trigger processing, while the main data are temporarily stored in the pipeline and de-randomiser memories.

  4. In-situ probe of the response of the Tile Calorimeter to isolated hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennens, D.

    2014-06-01

    The Tile calorimeter is the hadronic central barrel of the calorimeter system of the ATLAS experiment for the LHC at CERN. It is based on a sampling technique where scintillating tiles are embedded in iron absorber plates. The tiles are grouped together in cells which are disposed in three different layers. The cells from the two innermost layers cover a Δη × Δϕ range of 0.1 × 0.1, while the outermost layer covers 0.2 × 0.1. An in-situ method to probe the calorimeter response to single charged hadrons can be established by using the ratio of energy measured in the calorimeter cells over the momentum measured by the inner tracking system. This measurement can be used to place constraints on the systematic uncertainty for the jet and tau energy scales. Results from pp collision data from 2010 and 2011 will be shown and discussed as a function of different layer and barrel section. Finally, comparison to MC simulation will prove the good performance of the detector.

  5. Upgrade of the Laser calibration system for the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter TileCal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerden, Marius Cornelis

    2016-07-01

    We present in this contribution the new system for Laser calibration of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter TileCal. The Laser system is a part of the three stage calibration apparatus designed to compute the calibration factors of the individual cells of TileCal. The Laser system is mainly used to correct for short term drifts of the readout of the individual cells. A sub-percent accuracy in the control of the calibration factors is required. To achieve this goal in the LHC Run2 conditions, a new Laser system was designed. The architecture of the system is described with details on the new optical line used to distribute Laser pulses in each individual detector module and on the new electronics used to drive the Laser, to read out optical monitors and to interface the system with the ATLAS readout, trigger and slow control. The LaserII system has been fully integrated into the framework used for measuring calibration factors and for monitoring data quality. First results on the Laser system performances studied are presented.

  6. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephe

    2013-04-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section (0 < |η| < 1.7) of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons decaying hadronically, and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired during 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance will be presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. These results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter is performing well within the design requirements and is giving essential input to the physics results.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Louise; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design requirements and it has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results. In addition, the data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking are described and the outcome of the detector consolidation in the maintenance period is also presented.

  8. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance with Run 1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá Alberich, L.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the central hadronic calorimeter, TileCal, in the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is studied using cosmic-ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results are presented for the precision of the absolute energy scale and timing, noise characterization, and time-stability of the detector. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  9. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltova, Jana; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.

  10. The ATLAS tile calorimeter performance at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, R.

    2011-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read out system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection and a radioactive source. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons and more importantly LHC collision events. The results presented here assess the absolute energy scale calibration precision, the energy and timing uniformity and the synchronization precision. The ensemble of the results demonstrates a very good understanding of the performance of the Tile Calorimeter that is proved to be well within the design expectations. (authors)

  11. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data acquisition systems. This paper describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Recently improved description of the optical and electronic signal propagation is highlighted and the validation with the real particle data is presented.

  12. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1998-11-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Comparative study of WLS fibres for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A.; David, M.; Henriques, A.; Maio, A.

    1998-02-01

    The Wave Length Shifting (WLS) fibres are one of the most important components of the ATLAS barrel hadronic tile calorimeter (Tilecal). The fibres collect the hght produced in the injection molded scintillating tiles and transport it to the photomultipliers. Parameters like attenuation length and light yield are important, as well as flexibility and radiation hardness. Comparative results of WLS fibres produced by Bicron, Kuraray and Pol.Hi.Tech are presented. The performance of the fibres BCF91A from Bicron and S048 from Pol.Hi.Tech was significatively improved, but the most performant are still the double clad Y11 fibres from Kuraray.

  14. Comparative study of WLS fibres for the ATLAS tile calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A.; David, M.; Henriques, A.; Maio, A.

    1997-02-01

    The Wave Length Shifting (WLS) fibres are one of the most important components of the ATLAS barrel hadronic tile calorimeter (Tilecal). The fibres collect the light produced in the injection molded scintillating tiles and transport it to the photomultipliers. Parameters like attenuation length and light yield are important, as well as flexibility and radiation hardness. Comparative results of WLS fibres produced by Bicron, Kuraray and Pol.Hi.Tech are presented. The performance of the fibres BCF91A from Bicron and S048 from Pol.Hi.Tech was significatively improved, but the most performant are still the double clad Y11 fibres from Kuraray.

  15. The DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1995-08-01

    The Small angle TIle Calorimeter (STIC) provides calorimetric coverage in the very forward region for the DELPHI experiment at the CERN LEP collider. A veto system composed of two scintillator layers allows to trigger on single photon events and provides e{minus}{gamma} separation. The authors present here some results of extensive measurements performed on part of the calorimeter and the veto system in the CERN test beams prior to installation and report on the performance achieved during the 1994 LEP run.

  16. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.; E892 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a copper absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe design choices that led us to this concept, details of the mechanical and optical structure, and test beam results. We discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  17. sPHENIX Hadronic Calorimeter Scintillator Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Reuben; Sphenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A new form of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) was discovered with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). PHENIX is an experiment at RHIC that helped with this discovery, but plans are being made to replace it with a new spectrometer with different capabilities. The sPHENIX detector will consist of a superconducting solenoid magnet, hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry and charged particle tracking. sPHENIX will enable a rich jet physics program that will address fundamental questions about of the nature of the QGP. The new detector will provide full azimuthal coverage and +/- 1.1 in pseudorapidity. The Hadronic Calorimeter is a major subsystem in this detector. It is made of alternating layers of scintillating tiles and steel plates. In the current prototype the tiles are covered with a reflective coating and contain wavelength shifting fibers. As the second round of prototypes are developed for an upcoming beam test, special care is being taken to provide uniform light collection efficiency across the detector. Studies are being conducted to ensure this by careful alignment of the silicon photomultipliers to the fibers and varying coatings on the tiles. The effects of the coating will be presented along with the current status and ongoing plans.

  18. Calibration and data quality systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter during the LHC Run-I operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ženiš, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It consists of thin steel plates and scintillating tiles. Wavelength shifting fibers coupled to the tiles collect the produced light and are read out by photomultiplier tubes. The calibration scheme of the Tile Calorimeter comprises Cs radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. Each stage of the signal production of the calorimeter from scintillation light to digitization is monitored and equalized. Description of the different TileCal calibration systems as well as the results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability is given. The data quality procedures and efficiency of the Tile Calorimeter during the LHC Run-1 data-taking period are presented as well.

  19. Highly granular hadron calorimeter: software compensation and shower decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadeeva, M.; CALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The highly granular analogue hadron calorimeter was developed and constructed by the CALICE collaboration. The active layers of the calorimeter are assembled from scintillator tiles with individual readout by silicon photomultipliers and are interleaved with absorber plates. The response and resolution of the calorimeter equipped with steel absorber was intensively tested in single particle beams. The application of software compensation techniques developed for the scintillator-steel prototype allows for reduction of the stochastic term of the single particle resolution from 58%/ √E/GeV to 45%/ √E/GeV. The detailed study and decomposition of the longitudinal and radial profiles of hadron-induced showers in the energy range from 10 to 80 GeV are presented and compared to GEANT4 simulations.

  20. The CMS central hadron calorimeter: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1998-06-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  1. Prototype tests for a highly granular scintillator-based hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, K.; CALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Within the CALICE collaboration, several concepts for the hadronic calorimeter of a future linear collider detector are studied. After having demonstrated the capabilities of the measurement methods in "physics prototypes", the focus now lies on improving their implementation in"technological prototypes", that are scalable to the full linear collider detector. The Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) concept is a sampling calorimeter of tungsten or steel absorber plates and plastic scintillator tiles read out by silicon photomultipliers as active material. In the AHCAL technological prototype, the front-end chips are integrated into the active layers of the calorimeter and are designed for minimal power consumption. The versatile electronics allows the prototype to be equipped with different types of scintillator tiles and SiPMs. The current status of the AHCAL engineering prototype is shown and recent beam test measurements as well as plans for future hadron beam tests with a larger prototype will be discussed.

  2. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  3. Master plate production for the tile calorimeter extended barrel modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.J.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Price, L.E.; Proudfoot, J.; Wood, K.

    1999-03-10

    Approximately 41,000 master plates (Fig. 1) are required for the Extended Barrel Hadronic Calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Early in the R&D program associated with the detector, it was recognized that the fabrication of these steel laminations was a significant issue, both in terms of the cost to produce these high precision formed plates, as well as the length of time required to produce all plates for the calorimeter. Two approaches were given serious consideration: laser cutting and die stamping. The Argonne group was a strong supporter of the latter approach and in late 1995 initiated an R&D program to demonstrate the feasibility and cost effectiveness of die stamping these plates by constructing a die and stamping approximately 2000 plates for use in construction of three full size prototype modules. This was extremely successful and die stamping was selected by the group for production of these plates. When the prototype die was constructed it was matched to the calorimeter envelope at that time. This subsequently changed. However with some minor adjustments in the design envelope and a small compromise in terms of instrumented volume, it became possible to use this same die for the production of all master plates for the Tile Calorimeter. Following an extensive series of discussions and an evaluation of the performance of the stamping presses available to our collaborators in Europe, it was decided to ship the US die to CERN for use in stamping master plates for the barrel section of the calorimeter. This was done under the supervision of CERN and JINR, Dubna, and carried out at the TATRA truck plant at Koprivinice, Czech Republic. It was a great success. Approximately 41,000 plates were stamped and fully met specification. Moreover, the production time was significantly reduced by avoiding the need of constructing and then qualifying a second die for use in Europe. This also precluded small geometrical differences between the barrel and

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiascaris, Maria; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. This detector is instrumented for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off- detector data-acquisition systems. After an initial setting of the absolute energy scale in test beams with particles of well-defined momentum, the calibrated scale is transferred to the rest of the detector via the response to radioactive sources. The calibrated scale is validated in situ with muons and single hadrons whereas the timing performance is checked with muons and jets. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status during the LHC Run 1 are presented. The energy and the time reconstruction performance of the digitized signals is summarized and the calorimeter response to hadrons is investigated with collision data.

  5. Calibration of the CDF tile-fiber endplug calorimeters using moving radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.; Laasanen, A.; Pompos, A.; Wilson, M.

    1998-11-01

    The use of moving radioactive gamma sources to assess, calibrate and monitor scintillating tile calorimeters is discussed, and the techniques and equipment are described. The capabilities of the technique are illustrated using Cs{sup 137} sources with the CDF Endplug Upgrade EM and Hadron calorimeters at testbeams and at a cosmic ray test stand. Source measurements of all the tiles in testbeam modules which are exact replicas of the calorimeters, predict the relative responses of EM towers to 50 GeV positrons and muons, and of Hadron towers to 50 GeV pions, with RMS accuracies of 1.3{percent}, 1.8{percent} and 2.0{percent}, respectively. Source measurements will be used in lieu of testbeam measurements for the initial calibration of all towers in the final calorimeters. Source measurements of single tiles are reproducible to 0.4{percent} and will be used to monitor gain changes of the photomultiplier tubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Forward hadron calorimeter for measurements of projectile spectators in heavy-ion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, M. B. Guber, F. F. Ivashkin, A. P. Kurepin, A. B. Marin, V. N. Sadovsky, A. S. Petukhov, O. A.

    2012-06-15

    The construction and performance of a modular hadron calorimeter for NA61 experiment at CERN are described. The calorimeter consists of individual lead/scintillator sandwich modules with the sampling satisfying the compensating condition. The light from the individual scintillator tiles is captured and transported with the WLS-fibers embedded in the scintillator grooves. The light readout is done by avalanche micro-pixel photodiodes. The construction ensures a fine transverse granulation of the calorimeter and a longitudinal segmentation of each module in 10 independent sections. The results of beam tests of the calorimeter prototype are presented.

  7. Identification of Low PT Muon with the Atlas Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usai, G.

    2005-02-01

    A method for the identification of muons with the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is presented and its efficiency and mis-tagging fraction are discussed. It is demonstrated that the Tile Calorimeter can identify muons with good efficiency down to 2 GeV/c transverse momentum, where the stand-alone Muon Spectrometer has zero efficiency. This kinematic region is important for study of B meson physics and in the particular for the CP violating decay channels. The effectiveness of this method is tested, in particular, in the case of bbar {b} events at low LHC luminosity (1033cm-1s-2) with full simulation of experimental conditions. The muon identification with the Tile Calorimeter is fast and can be used for muon selection at the trigger level. A method of exploiting the information available in other ATLAS sub-detectors in order to reduce spurious muon-tag and measure the candidate muon momentum is discussed.

  8. The ATLAS tile calorimeter ROD injector and multiplexer board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, A.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; González, V.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Sanchís, E.; Solans, C.; Torres, J.; Valls, J. A.

    2011-02-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is a sampling detector composed by cells made of iron-scintillator tiles. The calorimeter cell signals are digitized in the front-end electronics and transmitted to the Read-Out Drivers (RODs) at the first level trigger rate. The ROD receives triggered data from up to 9856 channels and provides the energy, phase and quality factor of the signals to the second level trigger. The back-end electronics is divided into four partitions containing eight RODs each. Therefore, a total of 32 RODs are used to process and transmit the data of the TileCal detector. In order to emulate the detector signals in the production and commissioning of ROD modules a board called ROD Injector and Multiplexer Board (RIMBO) was designed. In this paper, the RIMBO main functional blocks, PCB design and the different operation modes are described. It is described the crucial role of the board within the TileCal ROD test-bench in order to emulate the front-end electronics during the validation of ROD boards as well as during the evaluation of the ROD signal reconstruction algorithms. Finally, qualification and performance results for the injection operation mode obtained during the Tile Calorimeter ROD production tests are presented.

  9. Upgrade fo the CMS Hadron Outer Calorimeter with SIPMs

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jacob; Freeman, James; Los, Sergey; Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2011-09-14

    The CMS Hadron Outer Calorimeter (HO) is undergoing an upgrade to replace the existing photodetectors (HPDs) with SIPMs. The chosen device is the Hamamatsu 3 x 3mm 50 {mu}m pitch MPPC. The system has been developed to be a 'drop-in' replacement of the HPDs. A complete control system of bias voltage generation, leakage current monitoring, temperature monitoring, and temperature control using solid state Peltier coolers has been developed and tested. 108 channels of the system have been installed into CMS and operated for more than 2 years. The complete system of about 2200 channels is in production and will be installed in the next LHC long shutdown scheduled for 2013. The CMS central calorimeter consists of a detector inside the solenoidal magnet, HB, and a component outside the magnet, the Outer Hadron Calorimeter, HO [1]. The HO is installed inside the magnet flux return yoke and provides for typically 3{lambda} of additional absorber to the calorimetric measurement. The outer calorimeter is composed of one or more layers of scintillator with wavelength shifting fiber readout into photodetectors. Figure 1 (a) shows the schematic layout of the calorimeters in CMS and shows the location of the HO scintillator layers. The front end electronics are placed inside the CMS detector, close to the scintillators. Figure 1(b) shows a photograph of the scintillators. Note the four wavelength shifting fibers per tile. The tile size creates a projective tower with the HB. Currently the photodetector used is the HPD but for performance and operational reasons it is desired to upgrade these with SIPMs. The CMS HCAL group has developed a drop-in replacement for the HPD using SIPMs. SIPMs are very suitable for this application because of several factors: The radiation levels are modest with a lifetime expected fluence of less than 5*10{sup 11} neutrons (E > 100 KeV) per cm{sup 2}. The energy flux into HO is small, the rate of larger energy depositions is low, and the required

  10. Test beam performance of the CDF plug upgrade hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, P.; CDF Plug Upgrade Group

    1998-01-13

    We report on the performance of the CDF End Plug Hadron Calorimeter in a test beam. The sampling calorimeter is constructed using 2 inch iron absorber plates and scintillator planes with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The linearity and energy resolution of the calorimeter response to pions, and the transverse uniformity of the response to muons and pions are presented. The parameter e/h, representing the ratio of the electromagnetic to hadronic response, is extracted from the data.

  11. The Monitoring and Calibration Web Systems for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Data Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivolella, A.; Maidantchik, C.; Ferreira, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is one of the ATLAS sub-detectors. The read-out is performed by about 10,000 PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMTs). The signal of each PMT is digitized by an electronic channel. The Monitoring and Calibration Web System (MCWS) supports the data quality analysis of the electronic channels. This application was developed to assess the detector status and verify its performance. It can provide to the user the list of TileCal known problematic channels, that is stored in the ATLAS condition database (COOL DB). The bad channels list guides the data quality validator in identifying new problematic channels and is used in data reconstruction and the system allows to update the channels list directly in the COOL database. MCWS can generate summary results, such as eta-phi plots and comparative tables of the masked channels percentage. Regularly, during the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) shutdown a maintenance of the detector equipments is performed. When a channel is repaired, its calibration constants stored in the COOL database have to be updated. Additionally MCWS system manages the update of these calibration constants values in the COOL database. The MCWS has been used by the Tile community since 2008, during the commissioning phase, and was upgraded to comply with ATLAS operation specifications. Among its future developments, it is foreseen an integration of MCWS with the TileCal control Web system (DCS) in order to identify high voltage problems automatically.

  12. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  13. A scintillating tile/fiber system for the CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aota, S.; Asakawa, T.; Hara, K.; Hayashi, E.; Kim, S.; Kondo, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Miyashita, S.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Seiya, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Toyoda, H.; Uchida, T.; Yasuoka, K.; Mishina, M.; Iwai, J.; Albrow, M.; Freeman, J.; Limon, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    The plug calorimeter of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) [1] will be upgraded, replacing the existing gas calorimeter by a scintillating tile/fiber calorimeter. We have completed R&D for the CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter. We describe the results of the R&D leading to the final design of the tile/fiber system for the calorimeter. Kuraray SCSN38, Kuraray Y11 and PET film (E65) were chosen as materials for scintillating tiles, wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers and a surface reflector on tiles, respectively, in view of obtaining large light yield and uniform response from a tile/fiber system. We decided fiber groove path in a tile, groove cross-sectional shape and groove depth for each tile to get uniform response from a tile/fiber. For the tile/fiber system of the final design, the average light yield was larger than 3.0 photoelectrons per minimum ionizing particle (MIP), the response uniformity in a tile was less than 2.5% and a total cross talk from a tile to the adjacent tiles was less than 2.0%. These results satisfied our requirements.

  14. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Calorimeters with Scintillator and with Gas Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Marco

    2014-06-01

    The time structure of hadronic showers is characterized by a prompt component from relativistic particles and by late components predominantly connected to neutrons in the cascade. The sensitivity to this late component thus depends on the choice of the active medium for hadronic calorimeters. The time structure and the differences originating from different readout technologies in a calorimeter with tungsten absorbers are studied with two dedicated setups using scintillator tiles read out with SiPMs and glass RPCs. In both cases, a radial strip of 15 cells with a size of 3 × 3 cm2 each is read out with fast digitizers with deep buffers, providing detailed information on the time structure of the recorded signals over a long sampling window. We will discuss the technical aspects of these systems, and present results on the time structure measurements, which demonstrate sizeable differences in the response of scintillator and gaseous detectors to the neutron components of the hadronic cascade.

  15. Radiation hardness of 3HF-tile/O2-WLS-fiber calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.W.; Hu, L.D.; Liu, N.Z.

    1993-11-01

    The radiation hardness of a 3HF-tile/O2-WLS-fiber calorimeter with two different tile/fiber patterns has been studied. Two calorimeter modules were irradiated up to 10 Mrad with the BEPC 1.3 GeV electron beam. The radiation damage of these modules is compared with our previous measurements from SCSN81-tile/BCF91A-WLS-fiber modules. The longitudinal damage profiles are fitted as a function of depth.

  16. Towards Optimal Filtering on ARM for ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Front-End Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Mitchell A.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN generates enormous amounts of raw data which presents a serious computing challenge. After planned upgrades in 2022, the data output from the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter will increase by 200 times to over 40 Tb/s. Advanced and characteristically expensive Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are currently used to process this quantity of data. It is proposed that a cost- effective, high data throughput Processing Unit (PU) can be developed by using several ARM System on Chips in a cluster configuration to allow aggregated processing performance and data throughput while maintaining minimal software design difficulty for the end-user. ARM is a cost effective and energy efficient alternative CPU architecture to the long established x86 architecture. This PU could be used for a variety of high-level algorithms on the high data throughput raw data. An Optimal Filtering algorithm has been implemented in C++ and several ARM platforms have been tested. Optimal Filtering is currently used in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end for basic energy reconstruction and is currently implemented on DSPs.

  17. Tile-in-ONE: A web platform which integrates Tile Calorimeter data quality and calibration assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Burghgrave, B.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter collaboration assesses the quality of calibration data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks is then performed by executing several tools and accessing web systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration's requirements and do not necessarily are connected with each other. Thus, to attend the collaboration needs, several programs are usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a designed and implemented platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract them. Within the environment, a dashboard stands for a particular Tile operation aspect and gets together plug-ins, i.e. software components that add specific features to an existing application. A server contains the platform core, which represents the basic environment to deal with the configuration, manage user settings and load plug-ins at runtime. A web middleware assists users to develop their own plug-ins, perform tests and integrate them into the platform as a whole. Backends are employed to allow that any type of application is interpreted and displayed in a uniform way. This paper describes Tile-in-ONE web platform.

  18. Production summary for extended barrel module fabrication at Argonne for the ATLAS tile calorimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Skrzecz, F.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.; Anderson, S.; Caird, A.; Keyser, C.; Kocenko, L.; Matijas, Z.; Nephew, T.; Stanek, R.; Franchini, F.; High Energy Physics

    2007-11-14

    The Tile Calorimeter is one of the main hadronic calorimeters to be used in the ATLAS experiment at CERN [1,2]. It is a steel/scintillator sampling calorimeter which is built by stacking 64 segments in azimuth and 3 separate cylinders to provide a total structure whose length is approximately 12m and whose diameter is a little over 8.4m. It has a total weight of about 2630 metric tons. Important features of this calorimeter are: A minimum gap (1.5mm) between modules in azimuth; Pockets in the structure to hold the scintillator tiles; Recessed channels at the edges of the module into which the readout fibers will sit; and Holes in the structure through which a radioactive source will pass. The mechanical structure for one of the 3 calorimeter sections, the Extended Barrel (EBA) was constructed at Argonne. A schematic of the calorimeter sampling structure and the layout of one of the 64 segments, termed a module, are shown in figure 1. Each module comprises mechanically of a precision machined, structural girder to which 10 submodules are bolted. One of these submodules, the ITC, has a customized shape to accommodate services for other detector elements. Each submodule weighs 850Kg and the assembled mechanical structure of the module weighs approximately 9000Kg (a fully instrumented Extended Barrel modules weighs {approx}9600Kg). A crucial issue for the tile calorimeter assembly is the minimization of the un-instrumented gap between modules when they are stacked on top of each other during final assembly. The design goal was originally 1mm gap which was eventually relaxed to 1.5mm following a careful evaluation of all tolerances in the construction and assembly process as shown in figure 2 [3]. Submodules for this assembly were produced at 4 locations [4] using tooling and procedures which were largely identical [5]. An important issue was the height of each submodule on the stacking fixture on which they were fabricated as this defines the length along the girder

  19. Electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters in the MIPP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T.S.; Gustafson, H.R.; Longo, M.J.; Park, H.K.; Rajaram, D.; Dukes, C.; Lu, L.C.; Materniak, C.; Nelson, K.; Norman, A.; Meyer, H.; /Fermilab /Harvard U. /Indiana U. /Iowa U. /Purdue U.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the MIPP experiment is to study the inclusive production of photons, pions, kaons, and nucleons in {pi}, K, and p interactions on various targets using beams from the Main Injector at Fermilab. The function of the calorimeters is to measure the production of forward-going neutrons and photons. The electromagnetic calorimeter consists of 10 lead plates interspersed with proportional chambers. It was followed by the hadron calorimeter with 64 steel plates interspersed with scintillator. The data presented were collected with a variety of targets and beam momenta from 5 to 120 GeV/c. The energy calibration of both calorimeters with electrons, pions, kaons, and protons is discussed. The resolution for electrons was found to be 0.27/{radical}E, and for hadrons the resolution was 0.554/{radical}E with a constant term of 2.6%. The performance of the calorimeters was tested on a neutron sample.

  20. Electromagnetic and Hadron Calorimeters in the MIPP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    T. S. Nigmanov; H. R. Gustafson; M. J. Longo; H. K. Park; D. Rajaram; and 13 others

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of the MIPP experiment is to study the inclusive production of photons, pions, kaons, and nucleons in π, K, and p interactions on various targets using beams from the Main Injector at Fermilab. The function of the calorimeters is to measure the production of forward-going neutrons and photons. The electromagnetic calorimeter consists of 10 lead plates interspersed with proportional chambers. It was followed by the hadron calorimeter with 64 steel plates interspersed with scintillator. The data presented were collected with a variety of targets and beam momenta from 5 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c. The energy calibration of both calorimeters with electrons, pions, kaons, and protons is discussed. The resolution for electrons was found to be 0.27/sqrt(E), and for hadrons the resolution was 0.554/sqrt(E) with a constant term of 2.6%. The performance of the calorimeters was tested on a neutron sample.

  1. Electromagnetic and Hadron Calorimeters in the MIPP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    T. S. Nigmanov; H. R. Gustafson; M. J. Longo; D. Rajaram

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the MIPP experiment is to study the inclusive production of photons, pions, kaons, and nucleons produced in π, K, and p interactions on various targets using beams from the Main Injector at Fermilab. The purpose of the calorimeters is to measure the production of forward-going photons and neutrons. The electromagnetic calorimeter consists of 10 lead plates interspersed with proportional chambers followed by the hadron calorimeter with 64 steel plates interspersed with scintillator. We collected data with a variety of targets with beam energies from 5 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. The energy calibration of both calorimeters with electrons, pions, kaons and protons is discussed. The performance of the calorimeters was tested on a neutron sample.

  2. Electromagnetic and Hadron Calorimeters in the MIPP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T. S.; Gustafson, H. R.; Longo, M. J.; Rajaram, D.

    2006-10-27

    The purpose of the MIPP experiment is to study the inclusive production of photons, pions, kaons, and nucleons produced in {pi}, K, and p interactions on various targets using beams from the Main Injector at Fermilab. The purpose of the calorimeters is to measure the production of forward-going photons and neutrons. The electromagnetic calorimeter consists of 10 lead plates interspersed with proportional chambers followed by the hadron calorimeter with 64 steel plates interspersed with scintillator. We collected data with a variety of targets with beam energies from 5 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. The energy calibration of both calorimeters with electrons, pions, kaons and protons is discussed. The performance of the calorimeters was tested on a neutron sample.

  3. A Scintillator tile-fiber preshower detector for the CDF Central Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lami

    2004-08-12

    The front face of the CDF central calorimeter is being equipped with a new Preshower detector, based on scintillator tiles read out by WLS fibers. A light yield of about 40 pe/MIP at the tile exit was obtained, exceeding the design requirements.

  4. Forward hadron calorimeter of European hybrid spectrometer monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Boratave, M.; Datsko, N.A.; David, J.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.M.; Kistenoev, E.P.; Vlasov, E.V.

    1985-11-01

    The light-monitoring system of the forward neutral-hadron calorimeter of the European hybrid spectrometer is described. A general block diagram of the system, the functional relationships of the modules, and the ideology of the mathematical support are presented. The calorimeter records neutral particles in momentum range of 10-400 MeV/c. The calorimeter consists of 200 identical counters in modules of four each in a 10 X 20 matrix. The counters are made from plastic scintillators interlayed by steel plates. Light is collected by means of a rod reemitter admitted along the counter axis.

  5. The effect of passive material on the detection of hadrons in calorimeter configurations for the SDC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Trost, H.J.

    1991-08-14

    We have used a flexible geometry model of a calorimeter design for SDC to study the effect of passive material in front of the calorimeter and between the barrel and endcap modules on the apparent response to hadrons. The thicknesses of the passive materials have been chosen to closely resemble the currently projected wall thicknesses of the scintillating tile-fiber and liquid-argon calorimeter designs. The liquid-argon model contains about three times the amount of material in its shells compared to the tile-fiber model. The solenoid coil reduces the relative difference somewhat in the barrel region but constitutes only a minor correction in the transition region from barrel to endcap. Correspondingly, we find a significantly worse response for the liquid-argon case which we demonstrate using beams of single {pi}{sup minus} particles of 10 GeV/c momentum. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Tile-in-ONE An integrated framework for the data quality assessment and database management for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, R.; Solans, C.; Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.

    2014-06-01

    In order to ensure the proper operation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter and assess the quality of data, many tasks are performed by means of several tools which have been developed independently. The features are displayed into standard dashboards, dedicated to each working group, covering different areas, such as Data Quality and Calibration.

  7. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  8. The cathode read-out of the DELPHI hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ajinenko, I.; Chudoba, J.; Czellar, S.

    1995-08-01

    To improve the identification and separation of leptons in the Hadron Calorimeter of DELPHI, one of the four LEP experiments at CERN, the possibility of a direct read-out of the cathodes of the 20,000 limited streamer tubes was studied and successfully tested on a small scale. A larger scale test started in June 1994. This new system which is independent of the present pad read-out provides a ``yes/no`` information. The combination of both read-out systems makes it possible to use the Hadron Calorimeter as a track detector. The result of these test show that the cathode read-out provides a better {pi}/{micro} separation, and improved detection of neutral long lived particles, enhanced discrimination of two showers and a more precise hadron energy measurement. It was decided to equip the whole detector with the new read-out, starting during the 94/95 shutdown.

  9. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, G.; Price, T.; Watson, N. K.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range of 10–80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from GEANT4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  10. Plate stamping of masterplates for the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimetric for ATLAS detector at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.F.; Petereit, E.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.

    1996-05-16

    Various methods have been explored for the fabrication of the large trapezoidal plates used in the construction of the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimeter for ATLAS. The options include die stamping, laser cutting, waterjet cutting, plasma arc cutting, and a combination of machining and laser cutting. Very early in the program, the Argonne group began investigating the possibility of die stamping the master plates. At that time it was felt that two dies would be necessary to achieve the accuracy required. Quotations were received for dies for both the master and spacer plates. Concern was expressed by many members of the collaboration that due to the very precise tolerances required, die stamping, using standard dies, would not be adequate. Fine blanking techniques were felt to be adequate, but were cost prohibitive. Two methods were finally used for the initial cutting of prototype plates, laser cutting and die stamping. Only the die stamping, will be reviewed here.

  11. Study on the compensated lead hadron calorimeter characteristics by means of hadron and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. A.; Apokin, V. D.; Buyanov, O. V.

    The results on measuring the basic characteristics of a compensated lead calorimeter (NEPTUN experiment) in a hadron and electron beam are presented. A prototype consisting of 30 modulus was used in the measurements. The energy resolution follows the dependence approximately = 57%/sq. root of E, the detector uniformity is (+-)5%, the measured e/h ratio is close to unity.

  12. Design and expected performance of a fast scintillator hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    A typical pulse from the 807 calorimeter is shown. This was generated by 4 GeV electrons but the pulses from hadrons and at different energies are not significantly different. The width and shape of this pulse comes from the convolution of a number of sources: (a) The time spread of energy deposition by a shower including time of flight of slow protons and neutrons, (b) scintillator phosphor rise and decay times, (c) shifter rise and decay times, (d) phototube response, (e) time delays in the light collection from different parts of the calorimeter and time dispersion in transmission. The objective of the first phase of this study was to isolate these spearate contributions, estimate how they could be speeded up and find what costs are involved. In the second phase we constructed an extremely crude calorimeter whose pulses should have the same characteristic as in a real device. With this we have observed signals whose mean width was 7 nsec and whose width at 10% of maximum height was 15 nsec. Clipping could reduce these widths to 6 and 12 nsec respectively. We conclude that gate times of less than 20 nsec would be appropriate for such a calorimeter.

  13. Performance of the DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1996-06-01

    The DELPHI STIC detector is a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter with wave length shifting optical fibers used for light collection. The main goal of the calorimeter at LEP100 is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The detector has been in operation since the 1994 LEP run. Presented here is the performance measured during the 1994--1995 LEP runs, with the emphasis on the achieved energy and space resolution, the long-term stability and the efficiency of the detector. The new bunchtrains mode of LEP requires a rather sophisticated trigger and timing scheme which is also presented. To control the trigger efficiency and stability of the calorimeter channels, a LED-based monitoring system has been developed.

  14. Design of a new front-end electronics test-bench for the upgraded ATLAS detector's Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kureba, C. O.; Govender, M.; Hofsajer, I.; Ruan, X.; Sandrock, C.; Spoor, M.

    2015-10-01

    The year 2022 has been scheduled to see an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in order to increase its instantaneous luminosity. The High Luminosity LHC, also referred to as the upgrade Phase-II, means an inevitable complete re-design of the read-out electronics in the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) detector. Here, the new read-out architecture is expected to have the front-end electronics transmit fully digitized information of the detector to the back-end electronics system. Fully digitized signals will allow more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms which will contribute to the required improved triggers at high pile-up. In Phase II, the current Mobile Drawer Integrity ChecKing (MobiDICK) test-bench will be replaced by the next generation test-bench for the TileCal superdrawers, the new Prometeo (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics). Prometeo is a portable, high-throughput electronic system for full certification of the front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal. It is designed to interface to the fast links and perform a series of tests on the data to assess the certification of the electronics. The Prometeo's prototype is being assembled by the University of the Witwatersrand and installed at CERN for further developing, tuning and tests. This article describes the overall design of the new Prometeo, and how it fits into the TileCal electronics upgrade.

  15. The CMS hadron calorimeter detector control system upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, M. O.; Behrens, U.; Campbell, A.; Martens, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. A.; Saxena, P.

    2015-04-01

    The detector control system of the CMS hadron calorimeter provides the 40.0788 MHz LHC clock to the front end electronics and supplies synchronization signals and I2C communication. Pedestals and diagnostic bits are controlled, and temperatures and voltages are read out. SIPM temperatures are actively stabilized by temperature readback and generation of correction voltages to drive the Peltier regulation system. Overall control and interfacing to databases and experimental DAQ software is provided by the software CCM Server. We report on design and development status, and implementation schedule of this system.

  16. Evaluating Small Scintillating Cells for Digital Hadron Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This thesis discusses the use of scintillator cells with digital electronics as a basis for a digital hadron calorimeter. The detection of a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), analysis of crosstalk, and determination of light yield for the array of scintillating cells are described. The cells were found to have a light yield (in terms of single photoelectrons per MIP) of 7 to 13. Crosstalk due to transfer of light between adjacent cells or photomultiplier tube channels can reach 45%. Rejection versus efficiency studies show that single-channel thresholds can be set that reject noise while accepting MIP signals.

  17. PGAS in-memory data processing for the Processing Unit of the Upgraded Electronics of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohene-Kwofie, Daniel; Otoo, Ekow

    2015-10-01

    The ATLAS detector, operated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) records proton-proton collisions at CERN every 50ns resulting in a sustained data flow up to PB/s. The upgraded Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment will sustain about 5PB/s of digital throughput. These massive data rates require extremely fast data capture and processing. Although there has been a steady increase in the processing speed of CPU/GPGPU assembled for high performance computing, the rate of data input and output, even under parallel I/O, has not kept up with the general increase in computing speeds. The problem then is whether one can implement an I/O subsystem infrastructure capable of meeting the computational speeds of the advanced computing systems at the petascale and exascale level. We propose a system architecture that leverages the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) model of computing to maintain an in-memory data-store for the Processing Unit (PU) of the upgraded electronics of the Tile Calorimeter which is proposed to be used as a high throughput general purpose co-processor to the sROD of the upgraded Tile Calorimeter. The physical memory of the PUs are aggregated into a large global logical address space using RDMA- capable interconnects such as PCI- Express to enhance data processing throughput.

  18. Hadron calorimeter performance with a PbWO4 EM compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1996-01-01

    The CMS detector[1] at the LHC has chosen PbWO4 in order to achieve the superior photon energy resolution which is crucial in searching for the 2 photon decay of low mass Higgs bosons. The hadronic compartment is thought to be Cu absorber, since one is immersed in a 4 T magnetic field, read out by scintillator tiles coupled to wavelength shifter (WLS) fibers. The combined performance of this calorimeter is of interest in the study of jets and missing transverse energy (neutrino, SUSY signatures). For this reason, a test was made of the electromagnetic (EM) compartment combined with a reasonable approximation to the baseline HCAL ``barrel`` calorimeter. Data was taken in the H4 CERN beamline. The EM compartment was a 7 {times} 7 square array of PbWO4 crystals, which for the purposes of this study are considered as a single readout in depth (or ``compartment``) [2]. The HCAL module consisted of large scintillator plates with 24 individual longitudinal readout channels. The EM compartment was followed by 10 Cu plates each 3 cm thick, followed by 9 Cu plates each 6 cm thick. This set of absorber plates represented the HCAL compartments inside the coil. The coil itself [1] was approximated as Al and Fe plates, of a total thickness of about 1.4 absorption lengths. The coil mockup was sampled and then followed by 4 plates of 8 cm thick Cu, each with an individual readout which represented a test of the ``Tailcatcher`` concept.

  19. The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter Upgrade During Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, E.

    2014-06-01

    The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter is being upgraded during phase 1. The upgrade includes the replacement of the current PMTs with the 4-anode ones and the readout electronics. Stray muons hitting the PMT windows produce Cherenkov light causing erroneous signals. These signals are detrimental to the triggering and physic results, since such signals mimic very high energy events. The new 4-anode PMTs are selected because of their thin windows to reduce the Cherenkov light production. Additional anodes also provide information to eliminate such signals. These new PMTs have been tested extensively to understand their characteristics and to develop the algorithms to eliminate the unwanted signals. Eventually, the current read out will be replaced with two-channel readout electronics for each PMT. The overall expected improvement on the physics results will also be discussed.

  20. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  1. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  2. The CMS central hadron calorimeter DAQ system upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbeck, A.; Hirschauer, J.

    2015-05-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeters will undergo a complete replacement of their data acquisition system electronics. The replacement is phased, with portions of the replacement starting in 2014 and continuing through LHC Long Shutdown 2 in 2018. The existing VME electronics will be replaced with a μTCA-based system. New on-detector QIE electronics cards will transmit data at 4.8 GHz to the new μHTR cards residing in μTCA crates in the CMS electronics cavern. The μTCA crates are controlled by the AMC13, which accepts system clock and trigger throttling control from the CMS global DAQ system. The AMC13 distributes the clock to the μHTR and reads out data buffers from the μHTR into the CMS data acquisition system. The AMC 13 also provides the clock for in-crate GLIBs which in turn distribute the clock to the on-detector front end electronics. We report on the design, development status, and schedule of the DAQ system upgrades.

  3. Construction of a hadron calorimeter for Jefferson Lab Hall-A Super Bigbite Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamyan, Vahe

    2015-04-01

    A ``shashlik'' hadron calorimeter is being constructed for the new Super Bigbite Spectrometer in Jefferson Lab Hall-A. The calorimeter will be used in nucleon-coincidence form-factor experiments taking advantage of Jefferson Labs' 12 GeV upgrade. An adiabatic light guide has been developed for the calorimeter based on laser cut acrylic sheets. A prototype module has been built to measure time resolution of the calorimeter for cosmic ray muons as well as to validate the Geant4 simulation. Several innovations in the calorimeter design will be discussed, in particular the choice of the scintillator, wave length shifter and the construction process of the light. The results of prototype tests is compared with Geant4 simulation for cosmic ray muons and prediction of HCal time and special resolution for hadrons in the 2-10 GeV/c momentum range will be presented. SBS COLLABORATION.

  4. The CALICE digital hadron calorimeter: calibration and response to pions and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilki, B.; CALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    In order to measure the jet products of the hadronic decays of electroweak bosons in a future lepton collider with 3-4% resolution, a novel approach named Particle Flow Algorithms is proposed. The Particle Flow Algorithms attempt to measure each particle in a hadronic jet individually, using the detector providing the best energy/momentum resolution. The role of the hadronic calorimeters is to measure the neutral component of the hadronic jets. In this context, the CALICE Collaboration developed the Digital Hadron Calorimeter, which uses Resistive Plate Chambers as active media. The 1-bit resolution (digital) readout of 1 × 1 cm2 pads achieves a world record in the number of readout channels already at the prototyping stage. Here we report on the results from the analysis of pion events of momenta between 2 to 60 GeV/c collected in the Fermilab test beam with an emphasis on the intricate calibration procedures.

  5. Hadronic models validation in GEANT4 with CALICE highly granular calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramilli, Marco; CALICE Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular hadronic and electromagnetic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider, and to validate hadronic shower models with unprecedented spatial segmentation. The electromagnetic calorimeter is a sampling structure of tungsten and silicon with 9720 readout channels. The hadron calorimeter uses 7608 small plastic scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. This high granularity opens up the possibility for precise three-dimensional shower reconstructions and for software compensation techniques to improve the energy resolution of the detector. We discuss the latest results on the studies of shower shapes and shower properties and the comparison to the latest developed GEANT4 models for hadronic showers. A satisfactory agreement at better than 5% is found between data and simulations for most of the investigated variables. We show that applying software compensation methods based on reconstructed clusters the energy resolution for hadrons improves by a factor of 15%. The next challenge for CALICE calorimeters will be to validate the 4th dimension of hadronic showers, namely their time evolution.

  6. Design, performance, and calibration of the CMS hadron-outer calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Anderson, E. W.; Antchev, G.; Arcidy, M.; Ayan, S.; Aydin, S.; Aziz, T.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baden, D.; Bakirci, M. N.; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bard, R.; Barnes, V.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bencze, G.; Beri, S.; Berntzon, L.; Bhandari, V.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bodek, A.; Bose, S.; Bose, T.; Budd, H.; Burchesky, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Cerci, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Chung, Y.; Clarida, W.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Damgov, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Debbins, P.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demianov, A.; de Visser, T.; Deshpande, P. V.; Diaz, J.; Dimitrov, L.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Erturk, S.; Esen, S.; Eskut, E.; Fenyvesi, A.; Fisher, W.; Freeman, J.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gaultney, V.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Genchev, V.; Gleyzer, S.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Murat Güler, A.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Halyo, V.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Hunt, A.; Ilyina, N.; Ingram, D.; Isiksal, E.; Jarvis, C.; Jeong, C.; Johnson, K.; Jones, J.; Kaftanov, V.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalmani, S.; Karmgard, D.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Kramer, L.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krokhotin, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Lee, S. W.; Levchuk, L.; Linn, S.; Litvintsev, D.; Lobolo, L.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Lukanin, V.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mans, J.; Marlow, D.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Moeller, A.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Moissenz, P.; Mondal, N.; Mossolov, V.; Nagaraj, P.; Narasimham, V. S.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Onengut, G.; Ozkan, C.; Ozkurt, H.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Ozok, F.; Paktinat, S.; Pal, A.; Patil, M.; Penzo, A.; Petrushanko, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Pikalov, V.; Piperov, S.; Podrasky, V.; Polatoz, A.; Pompos, A.; Popescu, S.; Posch, C.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Qian, W.; Ralich, R. M.; Reddy, L.; Reidy, J.; Rogalev, E.; Roh, Y.; Rohlf, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ruchti, R.; Ryazanov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanzeni, C.; Sarycheva, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Schmidt, I.; Sekmen, S.; Semenov, S.; Senchishin, V.; Sergeyev, S.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Singh, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Sharma, S.; Sherwood, B.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, V.; Sogut, K.; Sonmez, N.; Sorokin, P.; Spezziga, M.; Stefanovich, R.; Stolin, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Sulak, L.; Suzuki, I.; Talov, V.; Teplov, K.; Thomas, R.; Tonwar, S.; Topakli, H.; Tully, C.; Turchanovich, L.; Ulyanov, A.; Vanini, A.; Vankov, I.; Vardanyan, I.; Varela, F.; Vergili, M.; Verma, P.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vidal, R.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Vlassov, E.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Volobouev, I.; Volkov, A.; Volodko, A.; Wang, L.; Werner, J.; Wetstein, M.; Winn, D.; Wigmans, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, S. X.; Yazgan, E.; Yetkin, T.; Zalan, P.; Zarubin, A.; Zeyrek, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL HO) of the CMS detector is designed to measure the energy that is not contained by the barrel (HCAL HB) and electromagnetic (ECAL EB) calorimeters. Due to space limitation the barrel calorimeters do not contain completely the hadronic shower and an outer calorimeter (HO) was designed, constructed and inserted in the muon system of CMS to measure the energy leakage. Testing and calibration of the HO was carried out in a 300 GeV/c test beam that improved the linearity and resolution. HO will provide a net improvement in missing E T measurements at LHC energies. Information from HO will also be used for the muon trigger in CMS.

  7. The modular nuclear absorber of the ATLAS hadron calorimeter (The experience controlled assembly of the surface and in the pit).

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.; Batusov, V.; Budagov, J.; Leitener, R.; Lyablin, M.; Miralles, L.; Nessi, M.; Russakovich, N.; Sissakian, A.; Topilin, N.; Khubua, J.; Henriques, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter of the ATLAS spectrometric complex is a principal part of the whole setup. This paper describes the developed concept and methods for the controlled construction of a steel nuclear calorimeter absorber which provides calorimeter assembly on the surface and in the underground experimental hall meeting the required design tolerances.

  8. A New scintillator tile / fiber preshower detector for the CDF central calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; Artikov, A.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Byrum, K.; Chang, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Goulianos, K.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lami, S.; Lindgren, M.; Lytken, E.; Miller, R.; Nodulman, L.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Roser, R.; /Argonne /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Michigan State U. /INFN, Siena /Rockefeller U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Udine /Tsukuba U.

    2004-11-01

    A detector designed to measure early particle showers has been installed in front of the central CDF calorimeter at the Tevatron. This new preshower detector is based on scintillator tiles coupled to wavelength-shifting fibers read out by multianode photomultipliers and has a total of 3,072 readout channels. The replacement of the old gas detector was required due to an expected increase in instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron collider in the next few years. Calorimeter coverage, jet energy resolution, and electron and photon identification are among the expected improvements. The final detector design, together with the R&D studies that led to the choice of scintillator and fiber, mechanical assembly, and quality control are presented. The detector was installed in the fall 2004 Tevatron shutdown and is expected to start collecting colliding beam data by the end of 2004. First measurements indicate a light yield of 12 photoelectrons/MIP, a more than two-fold increase over the design goals.

  9. Castellated tiles as the beam-facing components for the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzo, S.; Cervaro, V.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pimazzoni, A.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; Zampieri, L.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations and experimental tests carried out to assess the feasibility and suitability of graphite castellated tiles as beam-facing component in the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from Radio frequency plasma). The results indicate that this concept could be a reliable, although less performing, alternative for the present design based on carbon fiber composite tiles, as it provides thermal measurements on the required spatial scale.

  10. Castellated tiles as the beam-facing components for the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, S; Cervaro, V; Dalla Palma, M; Delogu, R; De Muri, M; Fasolo, D; Franchin, L; Pasqualotto, R; Pimazzoni, A; Rizzolo, A; Tollin, M; Zampieri, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations and experimental tests carried out to assess the feasibility and suitability of graphite castellated tiles as beam-facing component in the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from Radio frequency plasma). The results indicate that this concept could be a reliable, although less performing, alternative for the present design based on carbon fiber composite tiles, as it provides thermal measurements on the required spatial scale. PMID:26932097

  11. Performance of the Prototype Readout System for the CMS Endcap Hadron Calorimeter Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverin, Nate; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Pastika, Nathaniel; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will upgrade the photodetectors and readout systems of the endcap hadron calorimeter during the technical stop scheduled for late 2016 and early 2017. A major milestone for this project was a highly successful testbeam run at CERN in August 2015. The testbeam run served as a full integration test of the electronics, allowing a study of the response of the preproduction electronics to the true detector light profile, as well as a test of the light yield of various new plastic scintillator materials. We present implications for the performance of the hadron calorimeter front-end electronics based on testbeam data, and we report on the production status of various components of the system in preparation for the upgrade.

  12. The new front-end electronics for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase 2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the plans, design, and performance results to date for the new front-end electronics being developed for the Phase 2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. The front-end electronics will be replaced to address the increased luminosity at the HL-LHC around 2025, as well as to upgrade to faster, more modern components with higher radiation tolerance. The new electronics will operate dead-timelessly, pushing full data sets from each beam crossing to the data acquisition system that resides off-detector. The new on-detector electronics contains five main parts: the front-end boards that connect directly to the photomultiplier tubes; the Main Boards that digitize the data; the Daughter Boards that collect the data streams and contain the high speed optical communication links for writing data to the data acquisition system; a programmable high voltage control system; and a new low voltage power supply. There are different options for implementing these subcomponents, which will be described. The new system contains new features that in the current version include power system redundancy, data collection redundancy, data transmission redundancy with 2 QSFP optical transceivers and Kintex-7 FPGAs with firmware enhanced scheme for single event upset mitigation. To date, we have built a Demonstrator—a fully functional prototype of the new system. Performance results and plans are presented.

  13. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Sekonya, K.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-10-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy and light yield analysis whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs and light loss can be attributed to a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to possible hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss and light yield loss with increasing dose.

  14. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-06-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs but a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants is observed. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss as dose is increased.

  15. The TileCal Laser Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangiobbe, Vincent; On Behalf Of The Atlas Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector operating at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter whose active material is made of scintillating plastic tiles. Scintillation light is read by photomultipliers. A Laser system is used to monitor their gain stability. During dedicated calibration runs the Laser system sends via long optical fibers, a monitored amount of light simultaneously to all the ≈10000 photomultipliers of TileCal. This note describes two complementary methods to measure the stability of the photomultipliers gain using the Laser calibration runs. The results of validation tests are presented for both methods and theirrespective performances and limitations are discussed.

  16. The use of WLS fibers in a hadronic calorimeter for the HyperCP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Durandet, C.; Dukes, E.C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Nelson, K.S.; Rajaram, D.; Saleh, N.; Tzamouranis, Y.; Crisler, M.

    1998-11-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the operational aspects of an iron-scintillator sampling hadronic calorimeter used in the HyperCP experiment at Fermilab during the 1996-1997 fixed target run. The calorimeter used wavelength shifter fibers for light collection from scintillator sheets. Details of how the 2 m{times}2 mm fibers were polished, sputtered, and used for the readout are discussed. The average reflectivity of the sputtered fibers was 0.85{plus_minus}0.05, and the average attenuation lengths were 3.48{plus_minus}0.34 m. The calorimeter was designed to trigger on the proton (anti-proton) from {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) decays, suppressing triggers from secondary interactions and background muons. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Performance of the prototype readout system for the CMS endcap hadron calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastika, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will upgrade the photon detection and readout systems of its barrel and endcap hadron calorimeters (HCAL) through the second long shutdown of the LHC in 2018. The upgrade includes new silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), SiPM control electronics, signal digitization via the Fermilab QIE11 ASIC, data formatting and serialization via a Microsemi FPGA, and data transmission via CERN Versatile Link technology. The first prototype system for the endcap HCAL has been assembled and characterized on the bench and in a test beam. The design of this new system and prototype performance are described.

  18. Neural network based neutral particles reconstruction with the E687 hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gérard, G.; Gianini, G.; Marchesotti, M.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.; Buchholz, D.; Claes, D.; O'Reilly, B.

    1996-02-01

    We present a neutral particle reconstruction algorithm based on a neural network approach applied to the E687 hadron calorimeter. A measurement of the invariant mass of the Σ± → nπ± is presented to verify the reliability of the reconstruction. The reconstructed invariant mass of the charmed meson D + → K L0π+π+π- is also presented to show the possible application of this technique to charmed particles decaying into a neutral hadron. An example of this would be Λc+ → nK -π+π+.

  19. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  20. Single hadron response measurement and calorimeter jet energy scale uncertainty with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-03-01

    The uncertainty on the calorimeter energy response to jets of particles is derived for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, the calorimeter response to single isolated charged hadrons is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo simulation using proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt{s} = 900 {GeV} and 7 TeV collected during 2009 and 2010. Then, using the decay of K s and Λ particles, the calorimeter response to specific types of particles (positively and negatively charged pions, protons, and anti-protons) is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo predictions. Finally, the jet energy scale uncertainty is determined by propagating the response uncertainty for single charged and neutral particles to jets. The response uncertainty is 2-5 % for central isolated hadrons and 1-3 % for the final calorimeter jet energy scale.

  1. Design, performance, and calibration of CMS hadron-barrel calorimeter wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adams, M.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Anderson, E. W.; Antchev, G.; Ayan, S.; Aydin, S.; Baarmand, M.; Baden, D.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barnes, V.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bencze, G.; Beri, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Burchesky, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Chendvankar, S.; Chung, Y.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Damgov, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Demianov, A.; de Visser, T.; Dimitrov, L.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Eskut, E.; Fisher, W.; Freeman, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Genchev, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Imboden, M.; Isiksal, E.; Jarvis, C.; Johnson, K.; Kaftanov, V.; Kalagin, V.; Karmgard, D.; Kalmani, S.; Katta, S.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kisselevich, I.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Polatoz, A.; Laasanen, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Lukanin, V.; Machado, E.; Mans, J.; Massolov, V.; Mazumdar, K.; Merlo, J. P.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Mondal, N.; Nagaraj, P.; Norbeck, E.; O'Dell, V.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Onengut, G.; Ozdes-Koca, N.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Ozok, F.; Paktinat, S.; Patil, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Pikalov, V.; Piperov, S.; Podrasky, V.; Pompos, A.; Posch, C.; Qian, W.; Ralich, R.; Reddy, L.; Reidy, J.; Ruchti, R.; Rohlf, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ryazanov, A.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanzeni, C.; Sarycheva, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Schmidt, I.; Senchishin, V.; Sergeyev, S.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Singh, J.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Sherwood, B.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, P.; Stefanovich, R.; Stolin, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Suzuki, I.; Talov, V.; Thomas, R.; Tully, C.; Turchanovich, L.; Ulyanov, A.; Vankov, I.; Vardanyan, I.; Verma, P.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vidal, R.; Vlassov, E.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Volkov, A.; Volodko, A.; Winn, D.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, S. X.; Zalan, P.; Zarubin, A.; Zeyrek, M.

    2008-05-01

    Extensive measurements have been made with pions, electrons and muons on four production wedges of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) hadron barrel (HB) calorimeter in the H2 beam line at CERN with particle momenta varying from 20 to 300 GeV/ c. The time structure of the events was measured with the full chain of preproduction front-end electronics running at 34 MHz. Moving-wire radioactive source data were also collected for all scintillator layers in the HB. The energy dependent time slewing effect was measured and tuned for optimal performance.

  2. Channel control ASIC for the CMS hadron calorimeter front end readout module

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Yarema et al.

    2002-09-26

    The Channel Control ASIC (CCA) is used along with a custom Charge Integrator and Encoder (QIE) ASIC to digitize signals from the hybrid photo diodes (HPDs) and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the CMS hadron calorimeter. The CCA sits between the QIE and the data acquisition system. All digital signals to and from the QIE pass through the CCA chip. One CCA chip interfaces with two QIE channels. The CCA provides individually delayed clocks to each of the QIE chips in addition to various control signals. The QIE sends digitized PMT or HPD signals and time slice information to the CCA, which sends the data to the data acquisition system through an optical link.

  3. Hadronic calorimeter shower size: Challenges and opportunities for jet substructure in the superboosted regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressler, Shikma; Flacke, Thomas; Kats, Yevgeny; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad

    2016-05-01

    Hadrons have finite interaction size with dense material, a basic feature common to known forms of hadronic calorimeters (HCAL). We argue that substructure variables cannot use HCAL information to access the microscopic nature of jets much narrower than the hadronic shower size, which we call superboosted massive jets. It implies that roughly 15% of their transverse energy profile remains inaccessible due to the presence of long-lived neutral hadrons. This part of the jet substructure is also subject to order-one fluctuations. We demonstrate that the effects of the fluctuations are not reduced when a global correction to jet variables is applied. The above leads to fundamental limitations in the ability to extract intrinsic information from jets in the superboosted regime. The neutral fraction of a jet is correlated with its flavor. This leads to an interesting and possibly useful difference between superboosted W / Z / h / t jets and their corresponding backgrounds. The QCD jets that form the background to the signal superboosted jets might also be qualitatively different in their substructure as their mass might lie at or below the Sudakov mass peak. Finally, we introduce a set of zero-cone longitudinal jet substructure variables and show that while they carry information that might be useful in certain situations, they are not in general sensitive to the jet substructure.

  4. Performance of a remote High Voltage power supply for the Phase II upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazeille, F.

    2016-02-01

    The experience gained in the operation of the present High Voltage system of the Tile calorimeter in the ATLAS detector and the new HL-LHC constraints, in particular the increase of the radiation, lead to the proposal of changing the currently embedded regulation system to be a remote system in the counting room, by adding easily new functionalities. The system described in this note is using the same regulation scheme as the current one and distributes the individual High Voltage settings with 100 m long multi-conductor cables. The tests show that it reaches the same good performance in terms of regulation stability and noise, while allowing a permanent access to the electronics.

  5. Characterization of plastic scintillators using magnetic resonance techniques for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelwan, C.; Jivan, H.; Joubert, D.; Keartland, J.; Liao, S.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we look at radiation damage and its adverse effects on plastic scintillators housed within the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS detector. The study focuses on determining how the interaction of ionizing radiation with plastic scintillators effects their efficacy and desired properties such as high light output and fast decay time. Plastic scintillators form an integral part of the ATLAS trigger system and their optimal functionality is paramount to the success of ATLAS. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides insight into the electronic structure of the plastics and can characterize the damage caused by ionizing radiation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed in order to simulate the EPR signal. Preliminary EPR results investigate four different types of plastic scintillators. These include three polyvinyl-toluene based Eljen technologies: EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260, and one polystyrene based Dubna sample. It has been observed that the Dubna sample, identical on the current scintillator used in the ATLAS detector, undergoes more structural damage when compared to the Eljen samples.

  6. Construction of a technological semi-digital hadronic calorimeter using GRPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laktineh, I.

    2011-04-01

    A high-granularity semi-digital Hadronic calorimeter using GRPC as sensitive medium is one of the two HCAL options considered by the ILD collaboration to be proposed for the detector of the future International Linear Collider project. A prototype of 1m3 has been conceived within the CALICE collaboration in order to validate this option. The prototype intends to be as close as possible to the one proposed in the ILD Letter Of Intent. Few units made of 1m2 GRPC fully equipped with semi-digital readout electronics and new gas distribution design were produced and successfully tested. In 2010 we intend to produce 40 similar units to be inserted in a self-supporting mechanical structure. The prototype will then be exposed to TestBeams at CERN for final validation.

  7. Characterization of 900 four-anode Photomultiplier Tubes for use in 2013 Hadronic Forward calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiras, Emrah

    The first 900 four-anode Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) have been evaluated for use in the 2013 Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter upgrade. HF is a part of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which is one of the two large general-purpose particle detectors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. HF requires 1728 PMTs. These small tubes are the sensitive light detectors that provide the output signals of HF. Before installing PMTs in HF, their quality control demands need to be satisfied. These tests, done at the University of Iowa, are designed in three categories to test seventeen different parameters for each PMT. The three most basic and most important groups of parameters are: dark current, gain (anode and cathode), and timing. There are secondary tests which are performed on a smaller percentage of the PMTs such as surface uniformity, double pulse and single photo-electron resolution. The PMTs that meet the specifications of HF will be sent to CERN where they are expected to be in use for at least a decade.

  8. A comparative study of the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, S.; Erasmus, R.; Jivan, H.; Pelwan, C.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of radiation on the light transmittance of plastic scintillators was studied experimentally. The high optical transmittance property of plastic scintillators makes them essential in the effective functioning of the Tile calorimeter of the ATLAS detector at CERN. This significant role played by the scintillators makes this research imperative in the movement towards the upgrade of the tile calorimeter. The radiation damage of polyvinyl toluene (PVT) based plastic scintillators was studied, namely, EJ-200, EJ-208 and EJ-260, all manufactured and provided to us by ELJEN technology. In addition, in order to compare to scintillator brands actually in use at the ATLAS detector currently, two polystyrene (PS) based scintillators and an additional PVT based scintillator were also scrutinized in this study, namely, Dubna, Protvino and Bicron, respectively. All the samples were irradiated using a 6 MeV proton beam at different doses at iThemba LABS Gauteng. The radiation process was planned and mimicked by doing simulations using a SRIM program. In addition, transmission spectra for the irradiated and unirradiated samples of each grade were obtained, observed and analyzed.

  9. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; de Barbaro, P.; Mishina, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R&D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R&D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} has been designed. Its performance requirements, R&D results and mechanical design are discussed.

  10. Construction and commissioning of a technological prototype of a high-granularity semi-digital hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baulieu, G.; Bedjidian, M.; Belkadhi, K.; Berenguer, J.; Boudry, V.; Calabria, P.; Callier, S.; Calvo Almillo, E.; Cap, S.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Cornat, R.; Cortina Gil, E.; de Callatay, B.; Davin, F.; de la Taille, C.; Dellanegra, R.; Delaunay, D.; Doizon, F.; Dulucq, F.; Eynard, A.; Fouz, M.-C.; Gastaldi, F.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Haddad, Y.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Manai, K.; Mannai, S.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Prast, J.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Ruan, M.; Schirra, F.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Tytgat, M.; Vander Donckt, M.; Vouters, G.; Zaganidis, N.

    2015-10-01

    A large prototype of 1.3 m3 was designed and built as a demonstrator of the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (SDHCAL) concept proposed for the future ILC experiments. The prototype is a sampling hadronic calorimeter of 48 units. Each unit is built of an active layer made of 1 m2 Glass Resistive Plate Chamber (GRPC) detector placed inside a cassette whose walls are made of stainless steel. The cassette contains also the electronics used to read out the GRPC detector. The lateral granularity of the active layer is provided by the electronics pick-up pads of 1 cm2 each. The cassettes are inserted into a self-supporting mechanical structure built also of stainless steel plates which, with the cassettes walls, play the role of the absorber. The prototype was designed to be very compact and important efforts were made to minimize the number of services cables to optimize the efficiency of the Particle Flow Algorithm techniques to be used in the future ILC experiments. The different components of the SDHCAL prototype were studied individually and strict criteria were applied for the final selection of these components. Basic calibration procedures were performed after the prototype assembling. The prototype is the first of a series of new-generation detectors equipped with a power-pulsing mode intended to reduce the power consumption of this highly granular detector. A dedicated acquisition system was developed to deal with the output of more than 440000 electronics channels in both trigger and triggerless modes. After its completion in 2011, the prototype was commissioned using cosmic rays and particles beams at CERN.

  11. Status of the CALICE analog calorimeter technological prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwort, Mark; CALICE Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The CALICE collaboration is currently developing engineering prototypes of electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for a future linear collider detector. This detector is designed to be used in particle-flow based event reconstruction. In particular, the calorimeters are optimized for the individual reconstruction and separation of electromagnetic and hadronic showers. They are conceived as sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers, respectively. Two electromagnetic calorimeters are being developed, one with silicon-based active layers and one based on scintillator strips that are read out by MPPCs, allowing highly granular readout. The analog hadron calorimeter is based on scintillating tiles that are also read out individually by silicon photomultipliers. The multi-channel, auto-triggered front-end chips are integrated into the active layers of the calorimeters and are designed for minimal power consumption (power pulsing). The goal of the construction of these prototypes is to demonstrate the feasibility of building and operating detectors with fully integrated front-end electronics. The concept and engineering status of these prototypes are reported here.

  12. Investigation of innovative silicon detector assembling solutions for hadron calorimeter modules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, G.; Ammannati, N.

    1995-11-01

    The application of large areas of silicon detector mosaics in calorimetry for high energy particles measurement in Physics has grown in the last few years and is still in progress. The high number of mosaic units in the calorimeter implies the following main requirements to be satisfied: a simple low cost for manufacturing and assembling easy mountable/dismountabic units possibility to move or change silicon detectors easily reliability of the electrical contacts between the aluminium layer on the silicon detectors surface and the PCB breaker points In order to satisfy the above requirements several assembling solutions have been investigated and tested recently, as fixed contact by using conducting epoxy-glues, mechanical-dismountable contacts of gold-plated PCB copper to the silicon detectors, and others. The results of the tests show a general degradation of the original electrical characteristics of the contacts after of varying lengths operating times. This fact, due to corrosion phenomena assisted by chemical residuals in the contact interface, causes an irreversible damage of the detectors in the long term. In addition we found a room temperature interdiffusion of gold and copper. A promising solution to these problems can be achieved by careful removal of chemical, increase of golden layer of the PCB electrical copper contacts or aluminising them by pure aluminium vapour deposition in vacuum chamber. The estimated degradation time between the PCB copper and the aluminium film is very low in this case, and the risk of diffusion in the detector aluminium film surface is low along the whole operating life of the calorimeter.

  13. CMS hadron calorimeter front-end upgrade for SLHC phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    We present an upgrade plan for the CMS HCAL detector. The HCAL upgrade is required for the increased luminosity (3 * 10E34) of SLHC Phase I which is targeted for 2014. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to add longitudinal segmentation to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. The increased segmentation is achieved by replacing the hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) with silicon PMTs (SIPMs). We plan to instrument each fiber of the calorimeter with an SIPM (103,000 total). We will then electrically sum outputs from selected SIPMs to form the longitudinal readout segments. In addition to having more longitudinal information, the upgrade plans include a new custom ADC with matched sensitivity and timing information. The increased data volume requires higher speed transmitters and the additional power dissipation for the readout electronics requires better thermal design, since much of the on-detector infrastructure (front-end electronics crates, cooling pipes, optical fiber plant, etc.) will remain the same. We will report on the preliminary designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

  14. (Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  15. Shower development of particles with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Tran, H. L.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Nanni, J.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Chen, S.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Kozakai, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter. The data were recorded at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron in 2011. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type as well as measurements of the energy resolution and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development for selected particles. The results are compared to Geant4 simulations (version 9.6.p02). In the study of the energy resolution we include previously published data with beam momenta from 1 GeV to 10 GeV recorded at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2010.

  16. A Monte Carlo simulation of the response of a hadronic calorimeter to protons of momentum 3.5 to 200 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincer, A. I.; Gabriel, T. A.; Bishop, B. L.; Berley, D.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Goodman, J. A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.

    1985-08-01

    The response of scintillation counters in an ionization calorimeter to incident protons of momenta 3.5 to 200 GeV/ c was simulated using the CALOR computer code system. Results of the simulation are compared with data taken at Brookhaven National Laboratory for 3.5- and 10-GeV/ c protons and at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for 50-, 100- and 278-GeV hadrons. Mechanisms which produce large pulse heights for low-energy incident particles are discussed.

  17. An alternative method for the TileCal signal detection and amplitude estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-01

    The Tile Barrel Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS. It is a key detector for the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, taus and missing transverse energy and it assists the muon measurements due to a low signal-to-noise ratio. The energy deposited in each cell is read out by two electronic channels for redundancy and is estimated by reconstructing the amplitude of the digitized signal pulse sampled every 25 ns. This work presents an alternative approach for TileCal signal detection and amplitude estimation under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions, exploring the applicability of a Matched Filter. The proposed method is compared to the Optimal Filter algorithm, that is currently being used at TileCal for energy reconstruction. The results for a simulated data set showed that for conditions where the signal pedestal could be considered stationary, the proposed method achieves a better SNR performance than the Optimal Filter technique.

  18. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A.; Bailey, D.; Belanger, G.; Cadabeschi, M.; Chen, T.-Y.; Epshteyn, V.; Gorbounov, P.; Joo, K. K.; Khakzad, M.; Khovanskiy, V.; Krieger, P.; Loch, P.; Mayer, J.; Neuheimer, E.; Oakham, F. G.; O'Neill, M.; Orr, R. S.; Qi, M.; Rutherfoord, J.; Savine, A.; Schram, M.; Shatalov, P.; Shaver, L.; Shupe, M.; Stairs, G.; Strickland, V.; Tompkins, D.; Tsukerman, I.; Vincent, K.

    2008-02-01

    Forward calorimeters, located near the incident beams, complete the nearly 4π coverage for high pT particles resulting from proton-proton collisions in the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Both the technology and the deployment of the forward calorimeters in ATLAS are novel. The liquid argon rod/tube electrode structure for the forward calorimeters was invented specifically for applications in high rate environments. The placement of the forward calorimeters adjacent to the other calorimeters relatively close to the interaction point provides several advantages including nearly seamless calorimetry and natural shielding for the muon system. The forward calorimeter performance requirements are driven by events with missing ET and tagging jets.

  19. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  20. Response and Uniformity Studies of Directly Coupled Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Zutshi, Vishnu

    2010-04-02

    A finely-segmented scintillator-based calorimeter which capitalizes on the marriage of proven detection techniques with novel solid-state photo-detector devices such as Multi-pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) is an interesting calorimetric system from the point of view of future detector design. A calorimeter system consisting of millions of channels will require a high degree of integration. The first steps towards this integration have already been facilitated by the small size and magnetic field immunity of the MPPCs. The photo-conversion occurs right at the tile, thus obviating the need for routing of long clear fibers. Similar considerations apply to the presence of wave-length shifting (WLS) fibers inside the tiles which couple it to the photo-detectors. Significant simplification in construction and assembly ensue if the MPPCs can be coupled directly to the scintillator tiles. Equally importantly, the total absence of fibers would offer greater flexibility in the choice of the transverse segmentation while enhancing the electro-mechanical integrability of the design. The NIU high-energy physics group has been studying the fiberless or direct-coupling option for some time now. Encouraging results on response and response uniformity have been obtained using radioactive sources. This MOU seeks to set up a framework to extend these tests using beams at the MTBF. The results will be relevant to high granularity scintillator/crystal electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. The tests involve a set of small directly-coupled tile counters fabricated at NIU which will be placed in the beam to study their response and response uniformity as a function of the incident position of the particles passing through them.

  1. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and

  3. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

    2005-09-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2

  4. Triggering with the LHCb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Regis; LHCb Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC has been conceived to pursue high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in b hadron decays. The online selection is crucial in LHCb and relies on the calorimeters to trigger on high transverse energy electrons, photons, π0 and hadrons. In this purpose a dedicated electronic has been realized. The calorimeter trigger system has been commissioned and is used to trigger on cosmic muons before beams start circulating in the LHC. When the LHC will start, it will also provide a very useful interaction trigger.

  5. Study of the $H^0/A^0 \\to \\tau \\mu$ signal at the hadronic colliders and intercalibration of the D0 calorimeter at Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Delsart, Pierre Antoine

    2003-01-01

    This thesis was realized in collaboration with the ``theory'' group and the ``D0" group of IPNL. Within D0 we have worked on a component of the calibration of the detector's calorimeter : the intercalibration. Using the fact the physics is $\\phi$-symmetric in D0, we created and applied statistical methods for a relative calibration of the $\\phi$-symmetric parts of the calorimeter. Work on particle physics concerned the two Higgs doublet model. In such models leptonic number violation is possible : we have simulated the $H^0/A^0 \\to \\tau \\mu$ signal in order to study the discovery potential and the constraints on the coupling responsible for this decay.

  6. Method and system for improved resolution of a compensated calorimeter detector

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for a depleted uranium calorimeter detector used in high energy physics experiments. In a depleted uranium calorimeter detector, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined and the output response of the calorimeter detector is compensated so that the ratio of the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a lepton to the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a hadron of the same energy as the lepton is approximately equal to 1. In the present invention, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined as a function of time and the hadron content of the response of the calorimeter detector is inferred based upon the time structure of the energy pulse measured by the calorimeter detector. The energy measurement can be corrected based on the inference of the hadron content whereby the resolution of the calorimeter can be improved.

  7. Design Studies of the Calorimeter Systems for the sPHENIX Experiment at RHIC and Future Upgrade Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, C.; Kistenev, E.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The PHENIX Experiment at RHIC is planning a series of major upgrades that will enable a comprehensive measurement of jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions, provide enhanced physics capabilities for studying nucleon-nucleus and polarized proton collisions, and allow a detailed study of electron-nucleus collisions at the Electron Ion Collider at Brookhaven (eRHIC). The first of these upgrades, sPHENIX, will be based on the former BaBar magnet and will include a hadronic calorimeter and new electromagnetic calorimeter that will cover ±1.1 units in pseudorapidity and 2π in azimuth in the central region, resulting in a factor of 6 increase in acceptance over the present PHENIX detector. The electromagnetic calorimeter will be a tungsten scintillating fiber design with a radiation length ~ 7 mm and a Moliere radius ~ 2 cm. It will have a total depth of ~ 18 radiation lengths and an energy resolution ~ 15%/√E. The hadronic calorimeter will consist of steel plates with scintillating tiles in between that are read out with wavelength shifting fibers, It will have a total depth of ~ 5 interaction lengths and an energy resolution 100%/√E. Both calorimeters will use silicon photomultipliers as the readout sensor. Detailed design studies and Monte Carlo simulations for both calorimeters have been carried out and prototype detectors have been constructed and tested in a test beam at Fermilab in February 2014. This contribution describes these design studies for the sPHENIX experiment and its future upgrade plans at RHIC.

  8. High-Density, Scintillating, Fluoride Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Ugur; Xie, Qiuchen

    2014-03-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Here, we propose to use high density, scintillating, fluoride glasses as active media in calorimeters. CHG3 is a special example of this glass family, which has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. In this presentation, the results from a computational study on the performances of the two different designs of CHG3 glass calorimeters are reported. First design reads the signal directly from the edge of the glass plate; the second design utilizes wavelength-shifting fibers to carry the signal out of the glass plate. Each simulation model is a sampling calorimeter with 20 alternating layers of glass and iron absorber. By changing the absorber thickness we tested hadronic as well as electromagnetic capabilities of the calorimeter models.

  9. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for Hades Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, A.; Blume, C.; Czyžycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Lapidus, K.; Lisowski, E.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Svoboda, O.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

    2014-06-01

    Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement the dilepton spectrometer HADES currently operating at GSI Darmstadt, Germany. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 A GeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. The calorimeter will also improve the electron-hadron separation and will as well be used for the detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and heavy ion reactions. Calorimeter modules constructed of lead glass Cherenkov counter, photomultiplier, HV divider and optical fiber are described in the detail. Two prototypes of novel front-end electronics based on TRB3 are presented. A dedicated LED based system being developed to monitor the stability of the calorimeter during beamtime is introduced as well.

  10. Fiber-tile optical studies at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.; Morgan, D.J.; Proudfoot, J.

    1991-07-23

    In support of a fiber-tile calorimeter for SDC, we have done studies on a number of topics. The most basic problems were light output and uniformity of response. Using a small electron beam, we have studied fiber placement, tile preparation, wrapping and masking, fiber splicing, fiber routing, phototube response, and some degradation factors. We found two configurations which produced more light output than the others and reasonably uniform response. We have chosen one of these to go into production for the EM test module on the basis of fiber routing for ease of assembly of the calorimeter. We have also applied some of the tools we developed to CDF end plug tile uniformity, shower max testing and development for a couple of detectors, and development of better techniques for radiation damage studies. 18 figs.

  11. Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Callegari, G.; Piemontese, L.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I., Piccolo, M.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Johnson, A.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.

    1986-03-01

    A prototype hadron calorimeter, of similar design to the Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) planned for the SLD experiment, has been built and its performance has been studied in a test beam. The WIC is an iron sampling calorimeter whose active elements are plastic streamer tubes similar to those used for the Mont-Blanc proton decay experiment. The construction and operation of the tubes will be briefly described together with their use in an iron calorimeter - muon tracker. Efficiency, resolution and linearity have been measured in a hadron/muon beam up to 11 GeV. The measured values correspond to the SLD design goals.

  12. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R. ); Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E. )

    1994-08-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1[degree]--7[degree]). The 7 [lambda] deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented.

  13. A radiation tolerant Data link board for the ATLAS Tile Cal upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkerstedt, H.; Bohm, C.; Muschter, S.; Silverstein, S.; Valdes, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the latest, full-functionality revision of the high-speed data link board developed for the Phase-2 upgrade of ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter. The link board design is highly redundant, with digital functionality implemented in two Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGAs, and two Molex QSFP+ electro-optic modules with uplinks run at 10 Gbps. The FPGAs are remotely configured through two radiation-hard CERN GBTx deserialisers (GBTx), which also provide the LHC-synchronous system clock. The redundant design eliminates virtually all single-point error modes, and a combination of triple-mode redundancy (TMR), internal and external scrubbing will provide adequate protection against radiation-induced errors. The small portion of the FPGA design that cannot be protected by TMR will be the dominant source of radiation-induced errors, even if that area is small.

  14. Test beam performance of CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; CDF Upgrade Group

    1998-01-01

    CDF Plug Upgrade(tile-fiber) EM Calorimeter performed resolution of 15%/{radical}E{circle_plus}0.7% with non-linearity less than 1% in a energy range of 5-180 GeV at Fermilab Test Beam. Transverse uniformity of inside-tower-response of the EM Calorimeter was 2.2% with 56 GeV positron, which was reduced to 1.0% with response map correction. We observed 300 photo electron/GeV in the EM Calorimeter. Ratios of EM Calorimeter response to positron beam to that to {sup 137}Cs Source was stable within 1% in the period of 8 months.

  15. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  16. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  17. LHCb calorimeters high voltage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilitsky, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Perret, P.; Schopper, A.; Soldatov, M.; Yakimchuk, V.

    2007-02-01

    The calorimeter system in LHCb aims to identify electrons, photons and hadrons. All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600-00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. The calorimeter high voltage (HV) system is based on a Cockroft Walton (CW) voltage converter and a control board connected to the Experiment Control System (ECS) by serial bus. The base of each photomultiplier tube (PMT) is built with a high voltage converter and constructed on an individual printed circuit board, using compact surface mount components. The base is attached directly to the PMT. There are no HV cables in the system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used on the control board as an interface between the ECS and the 200 control channels. The FPGA includes also additional functionalities allowing automated monitoring and ramp up of the high voltage values. This paper describes the HV system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation and summarizes the system performance. This safe and low power consumption HV electronic system for the photomultiplier tubes can be used for various biomedical apparatus too.

  18. Performance of CDF calorimeter simulation for Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    C. Currat

    2002-09-19

    The upgraded CDF II detector has collected first data during the initial operation of the Tevatron accelerator in Run II. The simulation of the CDF electromagnetic and hadronic central and upgraded plug (forward) calorimeter is based on the Gflash calorimeter parameterization package used within the GEANT based detector simulation of the Run II CDF detector. We present the results of tuning the central and plug calorimeter response to test beam data.

  19. The electromagnetic performance of the RD52 fiber calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; De Pedis, D.; Ferrari, R.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Genova, P.; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Moggi, A.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Scuri, F.; Sill, A.; Venturelli, T.; Wigmans, R.

    2014-01-01

    The RD52 calorimeter is an instrument intended to detect both electromagnetic and hadronic showers, as well as muons, using the dual-readout principle. Scintillation and Cherenkov light provide the two signals which, in combination, allow for superior hadronic performance. In this paper, we report on the electromagnetic performance of this instrument, and compare this performance with that of other calorimeters that were constructed with similar goals in mind.

  20. The TileCal Optical Multiplexer Board 9U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, Alberto; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at LHC/CERN. The system contains roughly 10,000 channels of read-out electronics, whose signals are gathered and digitized in the front-end electronics and then transmitted to the counting room through two redundant optical links. Then, the data is received in the back-end system by the Optical Multiplexer Board (OMB) 9U which performs a CRC check to the redundant data to avoid Single Event Upsets errors. A real-time decision is taken on the event-to-event basis to transmit single data to the Read-Out Drivers (RODs) for processing. Due to the low dose level expected during the first years of operations in ATLAS it was decided not to use a redundant system and currently the front-end electronics is directly connected to the RODs. However, the increasing luminosity of the LHC will force to use the redundant read-out and the OMB system will be installed. Moreover, the OMB can be used as a ROD injector to emulate the front-end electronics for ROD software tests during detector maintenance periods taking advantage of its location in the data acquisition chain. First we will give a detailed description of the main components of the board and the different operation modes. Then, the production and qualification tests will be explained including a detailed description of the test-bench, software and validation protocols.

  1. Isothermal Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure-feedback signal indicates rate of heating. Improved isothermal calorimeter measures rate of heating in object under test. Called "isothermal" because chamber holding object and its environment maintained at or near constant temperature to minimize spurious tranfers of heat introducing errors into measurements. When item under test generates heat, rate of boiling and pressure in inner chamber increase. Servo-valve opens wider to maintain preset differential pressure. Valve-control voltage used as measure of rate of heating.

  2. Radiation damage studies for the SDC electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R.; Imlay, R. L.; Khosravi, E. S.; Lim, Jit-Ning; Lyndon, C.; McMills, G.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W. J.; Courtney, J. C.; Tashakkori, R.; Vegara, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results from a year long study aimed at radiation resistance and optical performance of scintillator tile with green wave shifter fiber readout. A careful investigation of several rad-hard plastic scintillators from Bicron and Kuraray, studies indicate that for a specific rad-hard Bicron scintillator, it is possible to build a tile/fiber EM calorimeter that can operate in the design luminosity of SSC. This calorimeter with excellent optical response would only have a light loss of about 5% after being exposed to 1 Mrad.

  3. Efficient Tiled Loop Generation: D-Tiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegon; Rajopadhye, Sanjay

    Tiling is an important loop optimization for exposing coarse-grained parallelism and enhancing data locality. Tiled loop generation from an arbitrarily shaped polyhedron is a well studied problem. Except for the special case of a rectangular iteration space, the tiled loop generation problem has been long believed to require heavy machinery such as Fourier-Motzkin elimination and projection, and hence to have an exponential complexity. In this paper we propose a simple and efficient tiled loop generation technique similar to that for a rectangular iteration space. In our technique, each loop bound is adjusted only once, syntactically and independently. Therefore, our algorithm runs linearly with the number of loop bounds. Despite its simplicity, we retain several advantages of recent tiled code generation schemes - unified generation for fixed, parameterized and hybrid tiled loops, scalability for multi-level tiled loop generation with the ability to separate full tiles at any levels, and compact code. We also explore various schemes for multi-level tiled loop generation. We formally prove the correctness of our scheme and experimentally validate that the efficiency of our technique is comparable to existing parameterized tiled loop generation approaches. Our experimental results also show that multi-level tiled loop generation schemes have an impact on performance of generated code. The fact that our scheme can be implemented without sophisticated machinery makes it well suited for autotuners and production compilers.

  4. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  5. Interlocking wettable ceramic tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, Jr., Alton T.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Groat, Eric; Mroz, Thomas; Ulicny, Alan; Walker, Mark F.

    2005-03-08

    An electrolytic cell for the reduction of aluminum having a layer of interlocking cathode tiles positioned on a cathode block. Each tile includes a main body and a vertical restraining member to prevent movement of the tiles away from the cathode block during operation of the cell. The anode of the electrolytic cell may be positioned about 1 inch from the interlocking cathode tiles.

  6. Development of a forward calorimeter system for the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, O. D.; Aschenauer, E.; Christie, W.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Fazio, S.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Heppelmann, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Jacobs, W. W.; Igo, G.; Kisilev, A.; Landry, K.; Liu, X.; Mondal, M. M.; Pan, Y. X.; Sergeeva, M.; Shah, N.; Sichtermann, E.; Trentalange, S.; Visser, G.; Wissink, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present results of an R&D program to develop a forward calorimeter system (FCS) for the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The FCS is a very compact, compensated, finely granulated, high resolution calorimeter system being developed for p+p and p+A program at RHIC. The FCS prototype consists of both electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters. The electromagnetic portion of the detector is constructed with W powder and scintillation fibers. The hadronic calorimeter is a traditional Pb/Sc-plate sandwich design. Both calorimeters were readout with Hamamatsu MPPCs. A full- scale prototype of the FCS was tested with a beam at FNAL in March 2014. We present details of the design, construction technique and performance of the FCS prototype during the test run at FNAL.

  7. Uranium scintillator calorimeter at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H; Killian, T; Ludlam, T

    1980-01-01

    The design, Monte Carlo studies and test beam results of a uranium/scintillator calorimeter to be installed in the Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR) at CERN are described. In its final stage the calorimeter will cover the full azimuth over a polar region of 45/sup 0/ < theta < 135/sup 0/. The full calorimeter is built in a modular way from 128 stacks, with each stack internally subdivided into six cells of 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/ cross section. The readout is by wavelength shifting (WLS) plates with a separate readout of the front part of the calorimeter (first ten plates) to allow electromagnetic/hadronic separation. Since the readout plates are on both sides of the cells, position information is obtained from the left/right ratio.

  8. The STAR EM calorimeter design and small prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    The basis for several design features of The STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Shower Maximum Detector is presented. This includes some of the tile-fiber optical design. The authors describe both the barrel and the end cap. Some preliminary analysis of electron acceptance vs pion rejection in test beam data is also discussed.

  9. Spaghetti calorimeter results and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Desalvo, R.

    1992-12-31

    In the guidelines of the SPACAL-LAA project the authors have built and beam-tested a prototype of spaghetti calorimeter with full hadronic shower containment. The results proved that the spaghetti technology (lead and scintillating fibers) can perform very accurate calorimetric measurements at the 15 ns LHC or SSC crossing rate and can compete with advantage over the other calorimetric technologies. In this paper they present the experimental results obtained so far and some future development foreseen in view of a hermetic supercollider detector.

  10. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  11. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors.

  12. Clustering of Hadronic Showers with a Structural Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The internal structure of hadronic showers can be resolved in a high-granularity calorimeter. This structure is described in terms of simple components and an algorithm for reconstruction of hadronic clusters using these components is presented. Results from applying this algorithm to simulated hadronic Z-pole events in the SiD concept are discussed.

  13. Test beam performance of CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.

    1998-11-01

    CDF Plug Upgrade(tile-fiber) EM Calorimeter performed resolution of 15{percent}/{radical} (E) {circle_plus}0.7{percent} with non-linearity less than 1{percent} in a energy range of 5{endash}180 GeV at Fermilab Test Beam. Transverse uniformity of inside-tower-response of the EM Calorimeter was 2.2{percent} with 56 GeV positron, which was reduced to 1.0{percent} with response map correction. We observed 300 photo electron/GeV in the EM Calorimeter. Ratios of EM Calorimeter response to positron beam to that to {sup 137}C{sub s} Source was stable within 1{percent} in the period of 8 months. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. The TileCal Online Energy Estimation for the Next LHC Operation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It covers the central part of the ATLAS detector (|η| < 1.6). The energy deposited by the particles is read out by approximately 5,000 cells, with double readout channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which expects a single signal with a well-defined shape. However, the LHC luminosity is expected to increase leading to pile-up that deforms the signal of interest. Due to limited resources, the current hardware setup, which is based on Digital Signal Processors (DSP), does not allow the implementation of sophisticated energy estimation methods that deal with the pile-up. Therefore, the technique to be employed for online energy estimation in TileCal for next LHC operation period must be based on fast filters such as the Optimal Filter (OF) and the Matched Filter (MF). Both the OF and MF methods envisage the use of the background second order statistics in its design, more precisely the covariance matrix. However, the identity matrix has been used to describe this quantity. Although this approximation can be valid for low luminosity LHC, it leads to biased estimators under pile- up conditions. Since most of the TileCal cell present low occupancy, the pile-up, which is often modeled by a non-Gaussian distribution, can be seen as outlier events. Consequently, the classical covariance matrix estimation does not describe correctly the second order statistics of the background for the majority of the events, as this approach is very sensitive to outliers. As a result, the OF (or MF) coefficients are miscalculated leading to a larger variance and biased energy estimator. This work evaluates the usage of a robust covariance estimator, namely the Minimum

  15. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  16. The Calorimeter Systems for the sPHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, C.; Kistenev, E.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    A major upgrade is being planned for the PHENIX experiment that will have greatly enhanced physics capabilities to measure jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, as well as in polarized proton interactions, and eventually electron ion collisions at an Electron Ion Collider. This upgrade, sPHENIX, will include two new calorimeter systems. One will be a hadronic calorimeter, which will be the first hadronic calorimeter ever used in an experiment at RHIC, and another will be a new compact electromagnetic calorimeter. Both calorimeters will cover a region of +/-1.1 in pseudorapidity and 2π in phi. The hadron calorimeter will be based on scintillator plates interspersed between steel absorber plates and read out with wavelength shifting fibers. The electromagnetic calorimeter will be an accordion design that will utilize scintillating fibers embedded in a matrix consisting of tungsten plates, tungsten powder and epoxy. The readout for both calorimeters will use silicon photomultipliers. The overall design of these two calorimeter systems is described along with the R&D efforts currently being pursued to develop them along with their readout.

  17. Secondary Emission Calorimeter Sensor Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, David R.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-12-01

    In a Secondary Emission electron(SEe) detector module, Secondary Emission electrons (SEe) are generated from an SE surface/cathode, when charged hadronic or electromagnetic particles, particularly shower particles, penetrate an SE sampling module placed between absorber materials (Fe, Cu, Pb, W etc) in calorimeters. The SE cathode is a thin (10-50 nm thick) film (simple metal-oxides, or other higher yield materials) on the surface of a metal plate, which serves as the entrance “window” to a compact vacuum vessel (metal or metal-ceramic); this SE film cathode is analogous to a photocathode, and the SEe are similar to p.e., which are then amplified by dynodes, also is in a PMT. SE sensor modules can make use of electrochemically etched/machined or laser-cut metal mesh dynode sheets, as large as ~30 cm square, to amplify the Secondary Emission Electrons (SEe), much like those that compact metal mesh or mesh dynode PMT's use to amplify p.e.'s. The construction requirements easier than a PMT, since the entire final assembly can be done in air; there are no critical controlled thin film depositions, cesiation or other oxygen-excluded processes or other required vacuum activation, and consequently bake-out can be a refractory temperatures; the module is sealed by normal vacuum techniques (welding or brazing or other high temperature joinings), with a simple final heated vacuum pump-out and tip-off. The modules envisioned are compact, high gain, high speed, exceptionally radiation damage resistant, rugged, and cost effective, and can be fabricated in arbitrary tileable shapes. The SE sensor module anodes can be segmented transversely to sizes appropriate to reconstruct electromagnetic cores with high precision. The GEANT4 and existing calorimeter data estimated calorimeter response performance is between 35-50 Secondary Emission electrons per GeV, in a 1 cm thick Cu absorber calorimeter, with a gain per SEe > 105 per SEe, and an e/pi<1.2. The calorimeter pulse width is

  18. Development of a high data-throughput ADC board for the PROMETEO portable test-bench for the upgraded front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoor, Matthew; Kureba, Oscar; Sandrock, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for a major Phase-II upgrade scheduled for 2022 [1]. The upgrade will require a complete redesign of both on- and off-detector electronics systems in the ATLAS Tile hadron Calorimeter (TileCal) [2]. The PROMETEO (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics) stand-alone test-bench system is currently in development and will be used for the certification and quality checks of the new front- end electronics. The Prometeo is designed to read in digitized samples from 12 channels simultaneously at the bunch crossing frequency while accessing quality of information in realtime. The main board used for the design is a Xilinx VC707 evaluation board with a dual QSFP+ FMC (FPGA Mezzanine Card) module for read-out and control of the front-end electronics. All other functions are provided by a HV board, LED board and a 16 channel ADC daughter board. The paper relates to the development and testing of the ADC board that will be used in the new Prometeo system.

  19. Penrose tilings as model sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutov, A. V.; Maleev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The Baake construction, based on generating a set of vertices of Penrose tilings as a model set, is refined. An algorithm and a corresponding computer program for constructing an uncountable set of locally indistinguishable Penrose tilings are developed proceeding from this refined construction. Based on an analysis of the parameters of tiling vertices, 62 versions of rhomb combinations at the tiling center are determined. The combinatorial structure of Penrose tiling worms is established. A concept of flip transformations of tilings is introduced that makes it possible to construct Penrose tilings that cannot be implemented in the Baake construction.

  20. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we present the performance of the Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment. The ZN is a quartz-fiber spaghetti calorimeter, which will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Its principle of operation is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in silica optical fibers, embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The detector was tested at CERN SPS using positive hadron and positron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter, the energy resolution, the localizing capability, the signal uniformity and the transverse profile of the detectable hadronic shower are presented.

  1. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Y. Balatz et al.

    2004-07-19

    A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from few GeV up to 500 GeV in the collisions of the 650 GeV {Sigma}{sup -} hyperons and {pi}{sup -} mesons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and {pi}{sup 0} mesons reconstructed in 650 GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated.

  2. Hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  3. An Imaging Calorimeter for Access-Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Adams, James H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure tile spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to approximately 10(exp 15) eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

  4. Voronoi spiral tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi; Hizume, Akio

    2015-04-01

    The parameter set of Voronoi spiral tilings gives a dual of van Iterson's bifurcation diagram for phyllotactic spirals. We study the Voronoi tilings for the Bernoulli spiral site sets, as the simplest spirals in the centric representation with similarity symmetry. Their parameter set is composed of a family of real algebraic curves in the complex plane, with the Farey sequence structure. This naturally extends to the parameter set for multiple tilings, i.e., the tilings of the covering spaces of the punctured plane. We show the denseness of the parameters z = reiθ for quadrilateral Voronoi spiral multiple tilings. The techniques of dynamical systems are applied to the group of similarity symmetry. The parastichy numbers and the distortion of the Voronoi regions depend on the rational approximations of θ/2π. We consider the limit set of the shapes of the quadrilateral tiles by taking the limit as r → 1, with θ fixed. If θ/2π is a quadratic irrational number, then the limit set is a finite set of rectangles. In particular, if θ/2π is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the limit is the square.

  5. Summary talk on fiber tower calorimeter for the scintillation calorimeter subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.P.; Walker, J.K.; Johnson, C.; Wahl, H.; Gabriel, T.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a new calorimeter design based on small scintillator tiles, lead absorber and wavelength shifting fiber readout. We have addressed all the major issues in SSC calorimetry and have developed a design with many advantageous features. It has been well demonstrated that the best resolution is obtained for a 'compensated' calorimeter. It is also well known how such compensation may be achieved by a suitable choice of active and passive materials and their relative thickness. One such choice is that of lead and scintillator for which the best thickness ratio is 4:1. This selection has been used in the development of the so-called spaghetti calorimeter (SPACAL) discussed at this workshop. The relative merits of this and many other designs have been the subject of much discussion at SSC workshops from which a number of critical issues have emerged for each design. In the present paper, we have addressed the issues raised in the SPACAL design and proposed an alternative, improved design. The SPACAL represents a significant step forward in calorimeter design, but there are always areas which can be improved in any design when it is subjected to detailed study. Specifically we have considered the areas of energy resolution, channeling, projective towers/calibration, longitudinal segmentation, and radiation sensitivity. We will now discuss each of these areas in turn. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  6. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  7. The AMS-02 lead-scintillating fibres Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Basara, L.; Bigongiari, G.; Bosi, F.; Brun, P.; Cadoux, F.; Cervelli, F.; Chambert, V.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Coignet, G.; Cougoulat, G.; Di Falco, S.; Dubois, J. M.; Elles, S.; Falchini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N.; Galeotti, S.; Gallucci, G.; Gherarducci, F.; Girard, L.; Giuseppe, F.; Goy, C.; Hermel, R.; Incagli, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Journet, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Lepareur, V.; Li, Z. H.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Maestro, P.; Magazzù, C.; Maire, M.; Orsini, A.; Paniccia, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Peltier, F.; Piendibene, M.; Pilo, F.; Pochon, J.; Rambure, T.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Spinella, F.; Tang, X. W.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Tazzioli, A.; Vannini, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Zhuang, H. L.

    2013-06-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a fine grained lead-scintillating fibres sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides a high (≥106) electron/hadron discrimination with the other AMS-02 detectors [1] and good energy resolution. The calorimeter also provides a standalone photon trigger capability to AMS-02. The mechanical assembly was realized to ensure minimum weight, still supporting the intrinsically heavy calorimeter during launch. ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from GeV up to TeV. A full-scale flight-like model was tested using electrons and proton beams with energies ranging from 6 to 250 GeV.

  8. Study of response nonuniformity for the LHCb calorimeter module and the prototype of the CBM calorimeter module

    SciTech Connect

    Korolko, I. E.; Prokudin, M. S.

    2009-02-15

    A spatial nonuniformity of the response to high-energy muons is studied in the modules of the LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter and the prototype of the calorimeter module with lead plates and scintillator tiles 0.5 mm thick. The nonuniformity of the response of the inner LHCb modules to 50-GeV electrons is also measured. Software is developed for a thorough simulation of light collection in scintillator plates of a shashlik calorimeter. A model is elaborated to describe light transmission from the initial scintillation to the wavelength-shifting fiber with a subsequent reradiation and propagation of light over the fiber to the photodetector. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with data.

  9. Effect of dead material in a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1995-10-01

    The existence of dead material in any practical calorimeter system is simply a fact of life. The task for the designer, then, is to understand the impact on the Physics in question, and strive to minimize it. The aim of this note is to use the ``Hanging File`` test data, which has fined grained individual readout of about 100 depth segments, to explore impact of dead material on the mean and r.m.s. of the hadronic distribution. The amount and location of the dead material is varied. It important to remember that the Hanging File data was calibrated, EM to HCAL compartment, so as to minimize the electron to pion energy dependence. In practical terms e/pie was made = 1.0 at an incident energy of about 100 GeV. Note that the PB(EM) + FE(HCAL) calorimeter was not a compensating device.

  10. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:23669532

  11. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:24029911

  12. The PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kistenev, E.; White, S.; Belikov, S.; Kochetkov, V.

    1993-12-31

    The main features of the Phenix EM calorimeter are presented. This a Pb/scintillator calorimeter with ``shish-kebab`` fiber readout, designed for low energy electron and photon measurements. Prototype calorimeters have been built with longitudinal segmentation, {approximately} 100 psec time of flight resolution and 8% energy resolution at 1GeV/c. The laser based monitoring system which has been incorporated into large scale prototypes is described. The dependence of light yield on fiber choice and scintillator surface preparation has been studied.

  13. Calorimeter Control Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-11-03

    The Calorimeter Control Software provides PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Control for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters and five Calorimeter Waterbaths. The software accepts a Voltage input, compares it to a user defined setpoint, calculates a new voltage output designed to bring the input closer to the setpoint using a PID control algorithm, then sets the analog voltage output to the calculated value. The software is designed to interface with HP 3852A Data Acquisition Unitmore » via an HP-1B PC board. All field inputs are wired into Digital Input cards and field outputs are wired from Analog Output cards.« less

  14. Calorimeter Control Program

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Jean R.; Levi, Gerald

    1998-11-03

    The Calorimeter Control Software provides PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Control for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters and five Calorimeter Waterbaths. The software accepts a Voltage input, compares it to a user defined setpoint, calculates a new voltage output designed to bring the input closer to the setpoint using a PID control algorithm, then sets the analog voltage output to the calculated value. The software is designed to interface with HP 3852A Data Acquisition Unit via an HP-1B PC board. All field inputs are wired into Digital Input cards and field outputs are wired from Analog Output cards.

  15. CCP. Calorimeter Control Program

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, J.; Levi, G.

    1998-10-01

    The Calorimeter Control Software provides PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Control for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters and five Calorimeter Waterbaths. The software accepts a Voltage input, compares it to a user defined setpoint, calculates a new voltage output designed to bring the input closer to the setpoint using a PID control algorithm, then sets the analog voltage output to the calculated value. The software is designed to interface with HP 3852A Data Acquisition Unit via an HP-1B PC board. All field inputs are wired into Digital Input cards and field outputs are wired from Analog Output cards.

  16. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  17. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  18. The data acquisition system for a fixed target experiment at NICA complex at JINR and its connection to the ATLAS TileCal readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiwa, K. G.; Slepnev, I.; Bazylev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Today's large-scale science projects have always encountered challenges in processing large data flow from the experiments, the ATLAS detector records proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN every 50 ns which results in a total data flow of 10 Pb/s. These data must be reduced to the science data product for further analysis, thus a very fast decisions need to be executed, to modify this large amounts of data at high rates. The capabilities required to support this scale of data movement is development and improvement of high-throughput electronics. The upgraded LHC will provide collisions at rates that will be at least 10 times higher than those of today due to it's luminosity by 2022. This will require a complete redesign of the read-out electronics and Processing Units (PU) in the Tile-calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment. A general purpose, high-throughput PU has been developed for the TileCal at CERN, by using several ARM-processors in cluster configuration. The PU is capable of handling large data throughput and apply advanced operations at high rates. This system has been proposed for the fixed target experiment at NICA complex to handle the first level processes and event building. The aim of this work is to have a look at the architecture of the data acquisition system (DAQ) of the fixed target experiment at the NICA complex at JINR, by compiling the data-flow requirements of all the subcomponents. Furthermore, the VME DAQ modules characteristics to control, triggering and data acquisition will be described in order to define the DAQ with maximum readout efficiency, no dead time and data selection and compression.

  19. CMS electromagnetic calorimeter readout

    SciTech Connect

    Denes, P.; Wixted, R.

    1997-12-31

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter will consist of 109,008 crystals of Lead Tungstate (PbWO{sub 4}) arranged in a barrel (92880 crystals) and 2 endcaps (8064 crystals each). The crystals will be 25 radiation lengths long and cut in tapered shapes to make a hermetic calorimeter. The scintillation light from the crystals is captured by a photodetector, amplified and digitized. The properties of PbWO4, which is a new crystal still very much under development.

  20. Evaluation of candidate photomultiplier tubes for the upgrade of the CDF end plug calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Koska, W.; Delchamps, S.W.; Freeman, J.; Kinney, W.; Lewis, D.; Limon, P.; Strait, J.; Fiori, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Shen, Q.

    1994-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab is upgrading its end plug calorimeter from a gas detector system to one using scintillating tiles and wavelength shifting fibers. This tile-fiber calorimeter will be read out through 1,824 photomultiplier tubes. The performance requirements of the calorimeter require that the PMTs have good response to light in the 500 nm region, provide adequate amplification for signals from minimum ionizing particles yet provide linear response for peak anode currents up to 25 mA at a gain of 50,000, and fit into the restricted space at the rear of the plugs. This paper will describe the evaluation process used to determine the adequacy of the commercially available PMTs which appeared to meet these performance requirements.

  1. The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2016-07-01

    The first-level calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) had operated successfully through the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Towards forthcoming LHC runs, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the beam energy and the luminosity. This paper reviews the ATLAS L1Calo trigger upgrade project that introduces new architectures for the liquid-argon calorimeter trigger readout and the L1Calo trigger processing system.

  2. Molecular random tilings as glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrahan, Juan P.; Stannard, Andrew; Blunt, Matthew O.; Beton, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that p-terphenyl-3,5,3′,5′-tetracarboxylic acid adsorbed on graphite self-assembles into a two-dimensional rhombus random tiling. This tiling is close to ideal, displaying long-range correlations punctuated by sparse localized tiling defects. In this article we explore the analogy between dynamic arrest in this type of random tilings and that of structural glasses. We show that the structural relaxation of these systems is via the propagation–reaction of tiling defects, giving rise to dynamic heterogeneity. We study the scaling properties of the dynamics and discuss connections with kinetically constrained models of glasses. PMID:19720990

  3. Quasiperiodic tilings generated by matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Nagaraja S.; Suryanarayan, E. R.

    1994-02-01

    Using the inflation method, Watanabe, Ito and Soma [3], Clark and Suryanarayan [4] and Balagurusamy, Ramesh and Gopal [5] have obtained nonperiodic tilings of the plane with n-fold rotational symmetry, n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, using two unit prototiles. Fortunately, there is an easier way to generate a more general class of nonperiodic tilings which contains the above-mentioned tilings as special cases. We do this by specifying two matrices of order two which define the two classes of tilings; thus, our approach uses the basic techniques from linear algebra in the study of quasiperiodic tilings and the method can be generalized to obtain tilings that have more than two prototiles. The tilings generated are fractals and their dimensions and the rate of growth are determined.

  4. Design, construction and commissioning of the Digital Hadron Calorimeter—DHCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Bambaugh, A.; Bilki, B.; Butler, J.; Corriveau, F.; Cundiff, T.; Drake, G.; Francis, K.; Furst, B.; Guarino, V.; Haberichter, B.; Hazen, E.; Hoff, J.; Holm, S.; Kreps, A.; DeLurgio, P.; Matijas, Z.; Dal Monte, L.; Mucia, N.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Pollack, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Skrzecz, F.; Smith, J. R.; Trojand, D.; Underwood, D.; Velasco, M.; Walendziak, J.; Wood, K.; Wu, S.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, A.

    2016-07-01

    A novel hadron calorimeter is being developed for future lepton colliding beam detectors. The calorimeter is optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the measurement of hadronic jets and features a very finely segmented readout with 1 × 1 cm2 cells. The active media of the calorimeter are Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with a digital, i.e. one-bit, readout. To first order the energy of incident particles in this calorimeter is reconstructed as being proportional to the number of pads with a signal over a given threshold. A large-scale prototype calorimeter with approximately 500,000 readout channels has been built and underwent extensive testing in the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This paper reports on the design, construction, and commissioning of this prototype calorimeter.

  5. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  6. Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Calorimeters that utilize the temperature sensitivity of magnetism have been under development for over 20 years. They have targeted a variety of different applications that require very high resolution spectroscopy. I will describe the properties of this sensor technology that distinguish it from other low temperature detectors and emphasize the types of application to which they appear best suited. I will review what has been learned so far about the best materials, geometries, and read-out amplifiers and our understanding of the measured performance and theoretical limits. I will introduce some of the applications where magnetic calorimeters are being used and also where they are in development for future experiments. So far, most magnetic calorimeter research has concentrated on the use of paramagnets to provide temperature sensitivity; recent studies have also focused on magnetically coupled calorimeters that utilize the diamagnetic response of superconductors. I will present some of the highlights of this research, and contrast the properties of the two magnetically coupled calorimeter types.

  7. Floating data acquisition system for microwave calorimeter measurements on MTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sewall, N.R.; Meassick, S. )

    1989-09-13

    A microwave calorimeter has been designed for making 140-GHz absorption measurements on the MTX. Measurement of the intensity and spatial distribution of the FEL-generated microwave beam on the inner wall will indicate the absorption characteristics of the plasma when heated with a 140 GHz FEL pulse. The calorimeter works by monitoring changes of temperature in silicon carbide tiles located on the inner wall of the tokamak. Thermistors are used to measure the temperature of each tile. The tiles are located inside the tokamak about 1 cm outside of the limiter radius at machine potential. The success of this measurement depends on our ability to float the data acquisition system near machine potential and isolate it from the rest of the vault ground system. Our data acquisition system has 48 channels of thermistor signal conditioning, a multiplexer and digitizer section, a serial data formatter, and a fiber-optic transmitter to send the data out. Additionally, we bring timing signals to the interface through optical fibers to tell it when to begin measurement, while maintaining isolation. The receiver is an HP 200 series computer with a serial data interface; the computer provides storage and local display for the shot temperature profile. Additionally, the computer provides temporary storage of the data until it can be passed to a shared resource management system for archiving. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  9. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gadrat, S.

    2010-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only LHC experiment at CERN fully dedicated to the study of the quark and gluon plasma. Driven by the RHIC results on jet quenching, the ALICE collaboration has proposed to extend the capabilities of the ALICE detector for the study of high momentum photons and jets by adding a large acceptance calorimeter. This EMCal (ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter) is designed to provide an unbiased fast high-p{sub T} trigger and to measure the neutral energy of jets and photons up to 200 GeV. Four over ten supermodules of the calorimeter have been installed and commissioned at CERN in 2009 which represents 40% of the full acceptance.

  10. A compact light readout system for longitudinally segmented shashlik calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Brizzolari, C.; Cecchini, S.; Cindolo, F.; Jollet, C.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Meregaglia, A.; Paoloni, A.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Prest, M.; Sirri, G.; Terranova, F.; Vallazza, E.; Votano, L.

    2016-09-01

    The longitudinal segmentation of shashlik calorimeters is challenged by dead zones and non-uniformities introduced by the light collection and readout system. This limitation can be overcome by direct fiber-photosensor coupling, avoiding routing and bundling of the wavelength shifter fibers and embedding ultra-compact photosensors (SiPMs) in the bulk of the calorimeter. We present the first experimental test of this readout scheme performed at the CERN PS-T9 beamline in 2015 with negative particles in the 1-5 GeV energy range. In this paper, we demonstrate that the scheme does not compromise the energy resolution and linearity compared with standard light collection and readout systems. In addition, we study the performance of the calorimeter for partially contained charged hadrons to assess the e / π separation capability and the response of the photosensors to direct ionization.

  11. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  12. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating. PMID:26854839

  13. NEUTRON-ENHANCED CALORIMETRY FOR HADRONS (NECH): FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Stroud, Lee Sawyer

    2012-08-31

    We present the results of a project to apply scintillator technology recently developed at Louisiana Tech University to hadronic calorimetry. In particular, we developed a prototype calorimeter module incorporating scintillator embedded with metal oxide nanoparticles as the active layers. These metal oxide nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide, have high cross-sections for interactions with slow neutrons. As a part fo this research project, we have developed a novel method for producing plastic scintillators with metal oxide nanoparticles evenly distributed through the plastic without aggregation.We will test the performance of the calorimeter module in test beam and with a neutron source, in order to measure the response to the neutron component of hadronic showers. We will supplement our detector prototyping activities with detailed studies of the effect of neutron component on the resolution of hadronic energy measurements, particular in the next generation of particle flow calorimeters.

  14. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

  15. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  16. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  17. On timing properties of LYSO-based calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Duarte, J.; Pena, C.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Trevor, J.; Xie, S.

    2015-04-23

    We present test beam studies and results on the timing performance and characterization of the time resolution of Lutetium–Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO)-based calorimeters. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for a particular design. Additionally, we discuss precision timing calorimetry as a tool for the mitigation of physics object performance degradation effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen at the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Central Calorimeter configuration: A study report to the SDC Technical Board

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Wicklund, A.B.

    1991-04-11

    The single most important determinant of the overall Central Calorimeter (CC) shape is the criterion for depth of hadron shower containment. This criterion and its rapidity dependence is discussed in a companion document to this report titled ``Depth Requirements in SSC Calorimeters`` by a D. Green et al., SDC-91-00016. The conclusion reached there is that the calorimeter should be 10 {lambda} thick at {eta} = 0 and increase smoothly to 12 {lambda} at {eta} = 3. We adopt this criterion in this report and discuss the mechanical properties and design details of a CC that meets this condition.

  19. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  20. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  1. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  2. The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Paramatti, Riccardo

    2005-10-12

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC will consist of about 76000 Lead Tungstate crystals. Its main purpose is the very precise energy measurement of electrons and photons produced at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy. A review of its performances and its construction status is given. Then the calibration strategy is described in details.

  3. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  4. Tiles for Reo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Farhad; Bruni, Roberto; Clarke, Dave; Lanese, Ivan; Montanari, Ugo

    Reo is an exogenous coordination model for software components. The informal semantics of Reo has been matched by several proposals of formalization, exploiting co-algebraic techniques, constraint-automata, and coloring tables. We aim to show that the Tile Model offers a flexible and adequate semantic setting for Reo, such that: (i) it is able to capture context-aware behavior; (ii) it is equipped with a natural notion of behavioral equivalence which is compositional; (iii) it offers a uniform setting for representing not only the ordinary execution of Reo systems but also dynamic reconfiguration strategies.

  5. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  6. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    DOEpatents

    Donohoue, Thomas P.; Oertel, Christopher P.; Tyree, William H.; Valdez, Joe L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated.

  7. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    DOEpatents

    Donohoue, T.P.; Oertel, C.P.; Tyree, W.H.; Valdez, J.L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a Wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated. 7 figures.

  8. Single Hadron Response Measurement in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Pavel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Single hadron response measurement in minimum bias proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 7 TeV are presented. Together with test-beam results, these measurement form the basis to evaluate the calorimeter energy response uncertainty of jets at high transverse momenta. The single hadrons response is measured in the momentum range of 0.5 to about 20 GeV in-situ, by comparing the calorimeter response of all energy deposits in a cone around an isolated track with the more precisely measured track momenta. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo simulation is on the level of a few percent. Using kaon and Λ particles, the calorimeter response of identified pions, proton and anti-proton is studied. The MC simulation describes the energy response of pions and protons well, but differences are observed for anti-protons. It is discussed how the jet calorimeter response uncertainty and its correlation between transverse momentum bins is determined from these measurements.

  9. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  10. Modeling Complex Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software suite that models complex calorimeters in the time and frequency domain. These models can reproduce all measurements that we currently do in a lab setting, like IV curves, impedance measurements, noise measurements, and pulse generation. Since all these measurements are modeled from one set of parameters, we can fully describe a detector and characterize its behavior. This leads to a model than can be used effectively for engineering and design of detectors for particular applications.

  11. DSWA calorimeter bomb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, B

    1998-10-01

    Two experiments were performed in which 25 grams of TNT were detonated inside an expended detonation calorimeter bomb. The bomb had a contained volume of approximately 5.28 liters. In the first experiment, the bomb was charged with 3 atmospheres of nitrogen. In the second, it was charged with 2.58 atmospheres (23.1 psi gage) of oxygen. In each experiment pressure was monitored over a period of approximately 1200 microseconds after the pulse to the CDU. Monitoring was performed via two 10,000 psi 102AO3 PCB high frequency pressure transducers mounted symmetrically in the lid of the calorimeter bomb. Conditioners used were PCB 482As. The signals from the transducers were recorded in digital format on a multi channel Tektronix scope. The sampling frequency was 10 Mhz (10 samples per microsecond). After a period of cooling following detonation, gas samples were taken and were subsequently submitted for analysis using gas mass spectrometry. Due to a late request for post shot measurement, it was only possible to make a rough estimate of the weight of debris (carbon) remaining in the calorimeter bomb following the second experiment.

  12. The new UA1 calorimeter trigger processor

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, S.A.; Campbell, D.; Cawthraw, M.; Coughlan, J.; Flynn, P.; Galagadera, S.; Grayer, G.; Halsall, R.; Shah, T.P.; Stephens, R.

    1989-02-01

    The UA1 First Level Trigger Processor (TP) is a fast digital machine with a highly parallel pipelined architecture of fast TTL combinational and programmable logic controlled by programmable microsequencers. The TP uses 100,000 IC's housed in 18 crates each containing 21 fastbus sized modules. It is hardwired with a very high level of interconnection. The energy deposited in the upgraded calorimeter is digitised into 1700 bytes of input data every beam crossing. The Processor selects in 1.5 microseconds events for further processing. The new electron trigger has improved hadron jet rejection, achieved by requiring low energy deposition around the electro-magnetic cluster. A missing transverse energy trigger and a total energy trigger have also been implemented.

  13. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  14. Repairing high-temperature glazed tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixture fills chips and cracks in glazed tile surface. Filler is made by mixing hydrolyzed TEOS, silicon tetraboride powder, and pulverized tile material. Repaired tiles survived testing by intense acoustic emissions, arc jets, and intense heat radiation. Repair is reliable and rapid, performed in 1-1 1/2 hours with tile in any or orientation.

  15. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2 to 350 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; Anagnostou, G.; Andelin, D.; Anderson, E. W.; Anfreville, M.; Anicin, I.; Antchev, G.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Auffray, E.; Argiro, S.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Ayan, S.; Arcidy, M.; Aydin, S.; Aziz, T.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baccaro, S.; Baden, D.; Baffioni, S.; Bakirci, M. N.; Balazs, M.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barge, D.; Barnes, V.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Baty, C.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bandurin, D.; Beauceron, S.; Bell, K. W.; Bencze, G.; Benetta, R.; Bercher, M.; Beri, S.; Bernet, C.; Berntzon, L.; Berthon, U.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Biino, C.; Blaha, J.; Bloch, P.; Blyth, S.; Bodek, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bose, S.; Bose, T.; Bourotte, J.; Brett, A. M.; Brown, R. M.; Britton, D.; Budd, H.; Buehler, M.; Burchesky, K.; Busson, P.; Camanzi, B.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Carrera, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Cerci, S.; Cerutti, M.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Charlot, C.; Chen, E. A.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, Z.; Chendvankar, S.; Chipaux, R.; Choudhary, B. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chung, Y.; Clarida, W.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Combaret, C.; Conetti, S.; Cossutti, F.; Cox, B.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Cussans, D. G.; Dafinei, I.; Damgov, J.; da Silva di Calafiori, D. R.; Daskalakis, G.; Davatz, G.; David, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Debbins, P.; Deiters, K.; Dejardin, M.; Djordjevic, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Della Negra, R.; Della Ricca, G.; Del Re, D.; Demianov, A.; de Min, A.; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; de Visser, T.; Descamps, J.; Deshpande, P. V.; Diaz, J.; Diemoz, M.; di Marco, E.; Dimitrov, L.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dobrzynski, L.; Drndarevic, S.; Duboscq, J. E.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Dutta, D.; Dzelalija, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elias, J.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Erturk, S.; Esen, S.; Eskut, E.; Evangelou, I.; Evans, D. L.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Fay, J.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ferri, F.; Fisher, W.; Flower, P. S.; Franci, D.; Franzoni, G.; Freeman, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gargiulo, C.; Gascon, S.; Gataullin, M.; Gaultney, V.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Geerebaert, Y.; Genchev, V.; Gentit, F. X.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Ghezzi, A.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.; Gilly, J.; Givernaud, A.; Gleyzer, S.; Gninenko, S.; Go, A.; Gobbo, B.; Godinovic, N.; Golubev, N.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Gong, D.; Govoni, P.; Grant, N.; Gras, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Guillaud, J. P.; Gurtu, A.; Murat Güler, A.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Haguenauer, M.; Halyo, V.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hansen, M.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heath, H. F.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Heltsley, B.; Hill, J. A.; Hintz, W.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Honma, A.; Hou, G. W. S.; Hsiung, Y.; Hunt, A.; Husejko, M.; Ille, B.; Ilyina, N.; Imlay, R.; Ingram, D.; Ingram, Q.; Isiksal, E.; Jarry, P.; Jarvis, C.; Jeong, C.; Jessop, C.; Johnson, K.; Jones, J.; Jovanovic, D.; Kaadze, K.; Kachanov, V.; Kaftanov, V.; Kailas, S.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalmani, S.; Karmgard, D.; Kataria, S. K.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Kennedy, B. W.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kloukinas, K.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kokkas, P.; Kolberg, T.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Kramer, L.; Krasnikov, N.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Krpic, D.; Kryshkin, V.; Kubota, Y.; Kubrik, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kunori, S.; Kuo, C. M.; Kurt, P.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Lebeau, M.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lee, S.-W.; Leshev, G.; Lethuillier, M.; Levchuk, L.; Lin, S. W.; Lin, W.; Linn, S.; Lintern, A. L.; Litvine, V.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Lobolo, L.; Locci, E.; Lodge, A. B.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Luckey, P. D.; Lukanin, V.; Lustermann, W.; Lynch, C.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malberti, M.; Malclès, J.; Maletic, D.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mans, J.; Manthos, N.; Maravin, Y.; Marchica, C.; Marinelli, N.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Marlow, D.; Markowitz, P.; Marone, M.; Martinez, G.; Mathez, H.; Matveev, V.; Mavrommatis, C.; Maurelli, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Meridiani, P.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Mikhailin, V.; Milenovic, P.; Miller, M.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Moeller, A.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moissenz, P.

    2009-04-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/ c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/ c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7±1.6% and the constant term is 7.4±0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  16. The limited streamer tubes system for the SLD warm iron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuti, A.C.; Camanzi, B.; Piemontese, L.; Zucchelli, P. |; Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Simone, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Cartwright, S.L.; Fuess, S.; Gonzalez, S.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Lath, A.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L.S.; Rosenson, L.; Schneekloth, U.; Taylor, F.E.; Verdier, R.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Castro, A.; Galvagni, S.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Wyss, J. |; Battiston, R.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G.M.; Checcucci, B; Mancinelli, G.; Mantovani, G.; Pauluzzi, M.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L. |; Carpinelli, M.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Dell`Orso, R.; Pieroni, E.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G. |; Byers, B.L.; Escalera, J.; Kharakh, D.; Messner, R.L.; Zdarko, R.W.; Johnson, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is a general purpose device for studying e{sup +}{epsilon}{sup {minus}} interaction at the Z{sup 0}. The SLD calorimeter system consists of two parts: a lead Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) with both electromagnetic (22 radiation lengths) and hadronic sections (2.8 absorption lengths) housed inside the coil, and the Warm Ion limited streamer tubes Calorimeter (WIC) outside the coil which uses as radiator the iron of the flux return for the magnetic field. The WIC completes the measurement of the hadronic shower energy ({approximately}85% on average is contained in the LAC) and it provides identification and tracking for muons over 99% of the solid angle. In this note we report on the construction, test and commissioning of such a large system.

  17. Gluon bremstrahlung effects in large P/sub perpendicular/ hadron-hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.C.; Kelly, R.L.

    1982-02-01

    We consider effects of parton (primarily gluon) bremstrahlung in the initial and final states of high transverse momentum hadron-hadron scattering. Monte Carlo calculations based on conventional QCD parton branching and scattering processes are presented. The calculations are carried only to the parton level in the final state. We apply the model to the Drell-Yan process and to high transverse momentum hadron-hadron scattering triggered with a large aperture calorimeter. We show that the latter triggers are biased in that they select events with unusually large bremstrahlung effects. We suggest that this trigger bias explains the large cross section and non-coplanar events observed in the NA5 experiment at the SPS.

  18. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  19. ATLAS LAr calorimeters readout electronics upgrade R&D for sLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hucheng; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2011-04-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters consist of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end-caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. A total of 182,468 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the Level-1 trigger. A luminosity upgrade of the LHC will occur in the years ~2020. The current readout electronics will need to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The front-end readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through high speed radiation resistant optical links, the data will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms. This article is an overview of the R&D activities and architectural studies the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Group is developing.

  20. Lozenge Tilings and Hurwitz Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    We give a new proof of the fact that, near a turning point of the frozen boundary, the vertical tiles in a uniformly random lozenge tiling of a large sawtooth domain are distributed like the eigenvalues of a GUE random matrix. Our argument uses none of the standard tools of integrable probability. In their place, it uses a combinatorial interpretation of the Harish-Chandra/Itzykson-Zuber integral as a generating function for desymmetrized Hurwitz numbers.

  1. Design, performance, and calibration of CMS forward calorimeter wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adams, M.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Anderson, E. W.; Antchev, G.; Arcidy, M.; Ayan, S.; Aydin, S.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baden, D.; Bakirci, M. N.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barnes, V.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bencze, G.; Beri, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Burchesky, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Cerci, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Chung, Y.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Damgov, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demianov, A.; de Visser, T.; Dimitrov, L.; Dindar, K.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Eskut, E.; Fenyvesi, A.; Fisher, W.; Freeman, J.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Genchev, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Ilyina, N.; Isiksal, E.; Jarvis, C.; Johnson, K.; Kaftanov, V.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Karmgard, D.; Kalmani, S.; Katta, S.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Koylu, S.; Kramer, L.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kurt, P.; Kuzucu-Polatoz, A.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Linn, S.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Lukanin, V.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Mans, J.; Markowitz, P.; Massolov, V.; Martinez, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Moissenz, P.; Mondal, N.; Nagaraj, P.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Onengut, G.; Ozdes-Koca, N.; Ozkan, C.; Ozkurt, H.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Paktinat, S.; Pal, A.; Patil, M.; Penzo, A.; Petrushanko, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Pikalov, V.; Piperov, S.; Podrasky, V.; Pompos, A.; Posch, C.; Qiang, W.; Reddy, L.; Reidy, J.; Ruchti, R.; Rogalev, E.; Rohlf, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ryazanov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanzeni, C.; Sarycheva, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Schmidt, I.; Sekmen, S.; Semenov, S.; Senchishin, V.; Sergeyev, S.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Singh, J.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Sharma, S.; Sherwood, B.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, V.; Sogut, K.; Sorokin, P.; Spezziga, M.; Stefanovich, R.; Stolin, V.; Sulak, L.; Suzuki, I.; Talov, V.; Teplov, K.; Thomas, R.; Topakli, H.; Tully, C.; Turchanovich, L.; Ulyanov, A.; Vankov, I.; Vardanyan, I.; Varela, F.; Vergili, M.; Verma, P.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vidal, R.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Vlassov, E.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Volkov, A.; Volodko, A.; Wang, L.; Wetstein, M.; Winn, D.; Wigmans, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, S. X.; Yazgan, E.; Yershov, A.; Yetkin, T.; Zalan, P.; Zarubin, A.; Zeyrek, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the test beam results and calibration methods using high energy electrons, pions and muons with the CMS forward calorimeter (HF). The HF calorimeter covers a large pseudorapidity region (3≤|η|≤5), and is essential for a large number of physics channels with missing transverse energy. It is also expected to play a prominent role in the measurement of forward tagging jets in weak boson fusion channels in Higgs production. The HF calorimeter is based on steel absorber with embedded fused-silica-core optical fibers where Cherenkov radiation forms the basis of signal generation. Thus, the detector is essentially sensitive only to the electromagnetic shower core and is highly non-compensating (e/h≈5). This feature is also manifest in narrow and relatively short showers compared to similar calorimeters based on ionization. The choice of fused-silica optical fibers as active material is dictated by its exceptional radiation hardness. The electromagnetic energy resolution is dominated by photoelectron statistics and can be expressed in the customary form as a/sqrt{E}oplus{b}. The stochastic term a is 198% and the constant term b is 9%. The hadronic energy resolution is largely determined by the fluctuations in the neutral pion production in showers, and when it is expressed as in the electromagnetic case, a = 280% and b = 11%.

  2. Evolution of the dual-readout calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzo, Aldo

    2007-12-01

    Measuring the energy of hadronic jets with high precision is essential at present and future colliders, in particular at ILC. The 4th concept design is built upon calorimetry criteria that result in the DREAM prototype, read-out via two different types of longitudinal fibers, scintillator and quartz respectively, and therefore capable of determining for each shower the corresponding electromagnetic fraction, thus eliminating the strong effect of fluctuations in this fraction on the overall energy resolution. In this respect, 4th is orthogonal to the other three concepts, which rely on particle flow analysis (PFA). The DREAM test-beam results hold promises for excellent performances, coupled with relatively simple construction and moderate costs, making such a solution an interesting alternative to the PFA paradigm. The next foreseen steps are to extend the dual-readout principle to homogeneous calorimeters (with the potential of achieving even better performances) and to tackle another source of fluctuation in hadronic showers, originating from binding energy losses in nuclear break-up (measuring neutrons of few MeV energy).

  3. Tungsten Scintillating Fibers Electromagnetic Calorimeters for sPHENIX upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyang; Loggins, Vera; Phipps, Michael; Sickles, Anne

    2015-10-01

    sPHENIX, a planned new detector at RHIC, features electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry that covers | η| < 1.1 and φ = 2 π. The large acceptance calorimeter design is optimized for the study of jets in heavy ion collisions. The design includes a tungsten fiber EmCal that is made out of a tower array of plastic scintillating fiber embedded inside a mixture of tungsten powder and epoxy. For this calorimeter, silicon photomultipliers will be attached at the end of the module to convert scintillated optical photons into electrical signals. The sPHENIX group at Illinois is currently making samples of these modules to study the production process and achievable density. In addition, we have set up a silicon photomultiplier read out test system which will be used to evaluate the module performance. sPHENIX collaboration and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  4. Installation and operation of recording calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Kersey, A.F.

    1984-04-01

    The Cutler-Hammer recording calorimeter is illustrated in this paper. This calorimeter measures the total calorific value of combustible gas, and continuously samples, indicates, and records BTU per cubic foot. The paper emphasizes the importance of calorimeter accuracy. It is suggested that the calorimeter manufacturer be consulted for advice and assistance in developing a sound service program for trouble shooting and for service.

  5. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments

  6. Electron Calorimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Boron loaded scintillators are suitable for measuring secondary neutrons produced by high-energy particles: protons & electrons Neutron flux can be used to discriminate hadron and electro-magnetic particles Combined effectiveness of all e/p discriminators techniques employedTBD Only moderate improvement in detection efficiency for B-10 concentrations >few% in thick moderators Bottom scintillator might serve as cascade penetration counter (TBC)

  7. The CDF miniplug calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Lami, Stefano

    2002-06-28

    Two MiniPlug calorimeters, designed to measure the energy and lateral position of particles in the (forward) pseudorapidity region of 3.6 < |{nu}| < 5.2 of the CDF detector, have been recently installed as part of the Run II CDF upgrade at the Tevatron {bar p}p collider. They consist of lead/liquid scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers arranged in a pixel-type towerless geometry suitable for ''calorimetric tracking''. The design concept, the prototype performance and the final design of the MiniPlugs are here described. A recent cosmic ray test resulted in a light yield of approximately 100 pe/MIP, which exceeds our design requirements.

  8. Image Composition Engine for Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2011-08-22

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. It is designed to be used in parallel applications requiring rendering. The primary purpose of IceT is to be integrated into parallel visualization applications such as ParaView to provide parallel rendering capabilities. The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. IceT uses a "sort-Iasf' approach to rendering. Each process in a parallel application independently renders a local piece of geometry. The resulting images are given to IceT, and IceT combines the images together to form a single cohesive image. Ice T is also capable of driving tiled displays, largeformat displays comprising an array of smaller displays. To this end IceT can collect the smaller tile images and organize them such that the entire tiled display can be driven. Ice T takes advantage of spatial coherence in geometry by identifying empty regions of the display and reducing the overall required work.

  9. Image Composition Engine for Tiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-22

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. It is designed to be used in parallel applications requiring rendering. The primary purpose of IceT is to be integrated into parallel visualization applications such as ParaView to provide parallel rendering capabilities. The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. IceT uses a "sort-Iasf' approach to rendering. Each process in a parallel application independently rendersmore » a local piece of geometry. The resulting images are given to IceT, and IceT combines the images together to form a single cohesive image. Ice T is also capable of driving tiled displays, largeformat displays comprising an array of smaller displays. To this end IceT can collect the smaller tile images and organize them such that the entire tiled display can be driven. Ice T takes advantage of spatial coherence in geometry by identifying empty regions of the display and reducing the overall required work.« less

  10. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbouZeid, Hass; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particle flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 88 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 9 fb-1 (as of June, 2012) of data have been collected at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating almost optimally, with performances very close to the specifications.

  11. Resistive Plate Chamber digitization in a hadronic shower environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Yue, Q.; Yang, Z.; Boumediene, D.; Carloganu, C.; Français, V.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, S. C.; Park, W.; Vallecorsa, S.; Apostolakis, J.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Pingault, A.; Zaganidis, N.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Buridon, V.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Eté, R.; Garillot, G.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Corriveau, F.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Belkadhi, K.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.

    2016-06-01

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadronic calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. This paper presents the SDHCAL prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are observed at higher energies. The reasons for these differences are investigated.

  12. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  13. Muon g-2 Calorimeter Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, Chris; /Fermilab

    2010-05-03

    The proposed design is a tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter with 35 segments, each read out by a separate PMT. Tungsten, which is significantly denser than lead, produces compact showers. This is necessary, in order to improve shower separation in analysis and to fully contain the showers within a calorimeter that satisfies the strict space constraints of the experiment. A single calorimeter segment (4 x 6 x 15 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed in order establish the feasibility of the new design and study its properties. Initial tests of the detector segment at the Paul Scherrer Institute were conducted with a low energy < 400 MeV/c electron beam. A higher-energy test with electrons up to a few GeV/c was performed at the Test Beam Facility under the experimental number T-967. All data from that test have been analyzed and published, and the tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter still appears to be a viable candidate. For this test beam run, a larger calorimeter (15 x 15 x 11 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed and an emphasis will be placed on understanding shower leakage and the ability to separate pileup events with a more granular readout. The experimenters will measure the energy resolution, linearity, and shower size of the calorimeter segment. This will provide important information for finalizing decisions on the angle of the fibers relative to the incoming electrons and the optimal granularity of the readout.

  14. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R.; Frame, Barbara J.

    2012-01-02

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  15. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-12-14

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  16. Results of the R&D program on a magnetized SCIFI calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Mitri, Ivan

    2002-02-01

    A comprehensive R&D program has been developed on a magnetized scintillating fiber imaging calorimeter to be used for hadronic and electromagnetic energy measurements on neutrino events in a LBL ν beam. In this paper we report on the optimization of the optical readout, in particular on gain, linearity, time resolution and cathode uniformity measurements on several PMT types with standard, fine mesh or channel multiplier structure. The PMT response in the presence of the magnetized calorimeter fringe fields has also been studied.

  17. Geant4 validation with CMS calorimeters test-beam data

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    CMS experiment is using Geant4 for Monte-Carlo simulation of the detector setup. Validation of physics processes describing hadronic showers is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c.

  18. Local hadron calibration with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Paola; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2011-04-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in ATLAS as one of the two major calibration schemes for the reconstruction of jets and missing transverse energy. The method starts from noise suppressed clusters and corrects them for non-compensation effects and for losses due to noise threshold and dead material. Jets are reconstructed using the calibrated clusters and are then corrected for out of cone effects. The performance of the corrections applied to the calorimeter clusters is tested with detailed GEANT4 information. Results obtained with this procedure are discussed both for single pion simulations and for di-jet simulations. The calibration scheme is validated on data, by comparing the calibrated cluster energy in data with Mote Carlo simulations. Preliminary results obtained with GeV collision data are presented. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo is within 5% for the final cluster scale.

  19. Hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.

    1985-10-01

    Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs. (LEW)

  20. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

    2006-10-01

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  1. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-10-27

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  2. Novel method for detecting the hadronic component of extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Volchenko, V. I.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Shchegolev, O. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2015-05-15

    A novel method for studying the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS) is proposed. The method is based on recording thermal neutrons accompanying EAS with en-detectors that are sensitive to two EAS components: an electromagnetic (e) component and a hadron component in the form of neutrons (n). In contrast to hadron calorimeters used in some arrays, the proposed method makes it possible to record the hadronic component over the whole area of the array. The efficiency of a prototype array that consists of 32 en-detectors was tested for a long time, and some parameters of the neutron EAS component were determined.

  3. Novel method for detecting the hadronic component of extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Volchenko, V. I.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Shchegolev, O. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for studying the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS) is proposed. The method is based on recording thermal neutrons accompanying EAS with en-detectors that are sensitive to two EAS components: an electromagnetic (e) component and a hadron component in the form of neutrons (n). In contrast to hadron calorimeters used in some arrays, the proposed method makes it possible to record the hadronic component over the whole area of the array. The efficiency of a prototype array that consists of 32 en-detectors was tested for a long time, and some parameters of the neutron EAS component were determined.

  4. Algebraic properties of basic isohedral marked tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Gabriele H.

    2006-05-01

    In 1977 Grünbaum and Shephard described all possible 93 types of isohedral marked tilings of the plane; 46 of them are called basic, since their induced tile group is trivial. The aim of this paper is to give an algebraic description of all basic tilings. A purely algebraic characterization of the adjacency symmetries of tiles of the 46 basic tilings is presented. Moreover, 46 related abstract definitions of two-dimensional crystallographic groups supplement and extend those of the well-known book Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups by Coxeter and Moser.

  5. The design and performance of the electromagnetic calorimeters in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Tadevosyan, Hamlet Mkrtchyan, Arshak Asaturyan, Arthur Mkrtchyan, Simon Zhamkochyan

    2012-12-01

    resolution and yields similar to the HMS calorimeter. Good electron/hadron separation can be achieved by using energy deposition in the Preshower along with total energy deposition in the calorimeter. In this case the PID capability is similar to or better than that attainable with HMS calorimeter, with a pion suppression factor of a few hundreds predicted for 99% electron detection efficiency.

  6. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2-GeV/c to 350-GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Virginia U. /Iowa State U.

    2009-01-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7 {+-} 1.6% and the constant term is 7.4 {+-} 0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  7. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  8. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard E.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter.

  9. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter. PMID:26724069

  10. Fractal tiles associated with shift radix systems.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Valérie; Siegel, Anne; Steiner, Wolfgang; Surer, Paul; Thuswaldner, Jörg M

    2011-01-15

    Shift radix systems form a collection of dynamical systems depending on a parameter r which varies in the d-dimensional real vector space. They generalize well-known numeration systems such as beta-expansions, expansions with respect to rational bases, and canonical number systems. Beta-numeration and canonical number systems are known to be intimately related to fractal shapes, such as the classical Rauzy fractal and the twin dragon. These fractals turned out to be important for studying properties of expansions in several settings. In the present paper we associate a collection of fractal tiles with shift radix systems. We show that for certain classes of parameters r these tiles coincide with affine copies of the well-known tiles associated with beta-expansions and canonical number systems. On the other hand, these tiles provide natural families of tiles for beta-expansions with (non-unit) Pisot numbers as well as canonical number systems with (non-monic) expanding polynomials. We also prove basic properties for tiles associated with shift radix systems. Indeed, we prove that under some algebraic conditions on the parameter r of the shift radix system, these tiles provide multiple tilings and even tilings of the d-dimensional real vector space. These tilings turn out to have a more complicated structure than the tilings arising from the known number systems mentioned above. Such a tiling may consist of tiles having infinitely many different shapes. Moreover, the tiles need not be self-affine (or graph directed self-affine). PMID:24068835

  11. Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcher, J.

    1992-10-01

    The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multipurpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 47{pi} muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February--May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run. We have compared the shapes of the experimentally-obtained pulse height spectra to the Landau prediction for the ionization loss in a continuous thin absorber in the four electromagnetic and four hadronic layers of the calorimeter, and find good agreement after experimental effects are folded in. We have also determined an absolute energy calibration using two independent methods: one which measures the response of the electronics to a known amount of charge injected at the preamplifiers, and one which uses a carry-over of the calibration from a beam test of central calorimeter modules. Both absolute energy conversion factors agree with one another, within their errors. The calibration determined from the test beam carryover, relevant for use with collider physics data, has an error of 2.3%. We believe that, with further study, a final error of {approx}1% will be achieved. The theory-to-experiment comparison of the peaks (or most probable values) of the muon spectra was used to determine the layer-to-layer consistency of the muon signal. We find that the mean response in the 3 fine hadronic layers is (12 {plus_minus} 2%) higher than that in the 4 electromagnetic layers. These same comparisons have been used to verify the absolute energy conversion factors. The conversion factors work well for the electromagnetic sections.

  12. Beautiful math, part 2: aesthetic patterns based on fractal tilings.

    PubMed

    Peichang Ouyang; Fathauer, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    A fractal tiling (f-tiling) is a tiling whose boundary is fractal. This article presents two families of rare, infinitely many f-tilings. Each f-tiling is constructed by reducing tiles by a fixed scaling factor, using a single prototile, which is a segment of a regular polygon. The authors designed invariant mappings to automatically produce appealing seamless, colored patterns from such tilings. PMID:24808170

  13. The Development of a 3D Imaging Calorimeter of DAMPE for Cosmic Ray Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wei, Yifeng; Huang, Guangshun

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) experiment began its on-orbit operations on December 17, 2015. The BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BGO ECAL) of the DAMPE is a total absorption calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the shower shape. It provides a good energy resolution (<1%@200GeV) and high electron/hadron discrimination (>10^5). The calorimeter also provides a trigger capability to DAMPE. The BGO ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. An Engineering qualified model was built and tested using high energy electron and proton beams with energy ranging from 1 GeV to 250GeV. Some pre results will be introduced in this talk.

  14. Exploiting Parallelism in the TileCal Trigger System with GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Marc

    2015-10-01

    After the 2022 upgrades, the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) detector at ATLAS will be generating raw data at a rate of approximately 41 TB/s. The TileCal triggering system contains a degree of parallelism in its processing algorithms and thus presents an opportunity to explore the use of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU). Currently, research into the viability of an sROD ARM-based co-processing unit (PU) is being conducted at Wits University with especial regard to increasing the I/O throughput of the detector. Integration of GPGPU into this PU could enhance its performance by relieving the ARMs of particularly parallel computations. In addition to the PU, use of GPGPU in the front-end trigger is being investigated on the basis of the used algorithms having a similarity to image processing algorithms - where GPU can be used optimally. The use of GPUs in assistance to or in place of FPGAs can be justified by GPUs’ relative ease of programming; C/C++ like languages as opposed to assembly-like Hardware Description Languages (HDLs). This project will consider how GPUs can best be utilised as a subsystem of TileCal in terms of power and computing efficiency; and therefore cost.

  15. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  16. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  17. D-Zero Calorimeter Multiplan

    SciTech Connect

    Wintercorn, S.J.; /Fermilab

    1987-06-15

    This short report explains the parameters, and their basis, of the D-Zero calorimeter multiplan spread sheet Macintosh Multiplan worksheets have been found to be a valuable asset to the D-Zero design effort. The spread sheet contains parameters (constants) and results that come from the parameters. The full effect of changes in D-Zero calorimeter parameters can be calculated quite easily with Multiplan. When a change in a parameter is made, any results that pertain to that parameter automatically change also. This report will explain how some of the unobvious results were obtained.

  18. Geometrical tile design for complex neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Czeizler, Eugen; Kari, Lila

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has showed that tile systems are one of the most suitable theoretical frameworks for the spatial study and modeling of self-assembly processes, such as the formation of DNA and protein oligomeric structures. A Wang tile is a unit square, with glues on its edges, attaching to other tiles and forming larger and larger structures. Although quite intuitive, the idea of glues placed on the edges of a tile is not always natural for simulating the interactions occurring in some real systems. For example, when considering protein self-assembly, the shape of a protein is the main determinant of its functions and its interactions with other proteins. Our goal is to use geometric tiles, i.e., square tiles with geometrical protrusions on their edges, for simulating tiled paths (zippers) with complex neighborhoods, by ribbons of geometric tiles with simple, local neighborhoods. This paper is a step toward solving the general case of an arbitrary neighborhood, by proposing geometric tile designs that solve the case of a "tall" von Neumann neighborhood, the case of the f-shaped neighborhood, and the case of a 3 x 5 "filled" rectangular neighborhood. The techniques can be combined and generalized to solve the problem in the case of any neighborhood, centered at the tile of reference, and included in a 3 x (2k + 1) rectangle. PMID:19956398

  19. Geometrical Tile Design for Complex Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Czeizler, Eugen; Kari, Lila

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has showed that tile systems are one of the most suitable theoretical frameworks for the spatial study and modeling of self-assembly processes, such as the formation of DNA and protein oligomeric structures. A Wang tile is a unit square, with glues on its edges, attaching to other tiles and forming larger and larger structures. Although quite intuitive, the idea of glues placed on the edges of a tile is not always natural for simulating the interactions occurring in some real systems. For example, when considering protein self-assembly, the shape of a protein is the main determinant of its functions and its interactions with other proteins. Our goal is to use geometric tiles, i.e., square tiles with geometrical protrusions on their edges, for simulating tiled paths (zippers) with complex neighborhoods, by ribbons of geometric tiles with simple, local neighborhoods. This paper is a step toward solving the general case of an arbitrary neighborhood, by proposing geometric tile designs that solve the case of a “tall” von Neumann neighborhood, the case of the f-shaped neighborhood, and the case of a 3 × 5 “filled” rectangular neighborhood. The techniques can be combined and generalized to solve the problem in the case of any neighborhood, centered at the tile of reference, and included in a 3 × (2k + 1) rectangle. PMID:19956398

  20. Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

  1. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2014-02-01

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA ‘sub-tile’ strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

  2. The e/[pi] and [pi][sup 0]/[pi] ratios measured, and monochromatic [gamma] and [pi][sup 0] beams explored in the D0 test calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    The e/[pi] response ratio of the DO end calorimeter has been measured by comparing data from 10 to 150 GeV/c electron and pion beams. The intrinsic'' e/[pi] of the fine-hadronic module has also been studied with the pions alone, by selecting [pi][sup 0]-like showers contained within individual layers of the calorimeter. The measurements are compared to GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. A technique to generate monochromatic test beams of photons and neutral pions was successfully investigated. Preliminary results from central calorimeter modules exposed to these beams are discussed, and are compared to calculated expectations.

  3. The e/{pi} and {pi}{sup 0}/{pi} ratios measured, and monochromatic {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} beams explored in the D0 test calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; D0 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The e/{pi} response ratio of the DO end calorimeter has been measured by comparing data from 10 to 150 GeV/c electron and pion beams. The ``intrinsic`` e/{pi} of the fine-hadronic module has also been studied with the pions alone, by selecting {pi}{sup 0}-like showers contained within individual layers of the calorimeter. The measurements are compared to GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. A technique to generate monochromatic test beams of photons and neutral pions was successfully investigated. Preliminary results from central calorimeter modules exposed to these beams are discussed, and are compared to calculated expectations.

  4. Development of GEM-Based Digital Hadron Calorimetry Using the SLAC KPiX Chip

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.; /Texas U., Arlington /Washington U., Seattle /Unlisted /SLAC

    2012-04-12

    The development of Digital Hadron Calorimetry for the SiD detector Concept for the International Linear Collider is described. The jet energy requirements of the ILC physics program are discussed. The concept of GEM-based digital hadron calorimetry is presented, followed by a description of, and results from, prototype detectors. Plans are described for the construction of 1m{sup 2} GEM-DHCAL planes to be tested as part of a future calorimeter stack.

  5. COE1 Calorimeter Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter Angelo

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the operations of the COE1 calorimeter which is used to measure the thermal power generated by the radioactive decay of plutonium-bearing materials for the purposes of assaying the amount of plutonium within the material.

  6. Calorimeter Optimization for Jet Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, G.

    2004-10-11

    During LCWS 1999 at Sitges, Spain, we presented a set of discriminators for reconstructing jets in high energy lepton colliders. We have extended that study by adding new event types, by adding new discriminators, and by using a neural net rather than cuts to identify jets. We apply these techniques to detector simulations to begin a study of calorimeter optimization.

  7. Optimizing Tile Concentrations to Minimize Errors and Time for DNA Tile Self-assembly Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ho-Lin; Kao, Ming-Yang

    DNA tile self-assembly has emerged as a rich and promising primitive for nano-technology. This paper studies the problems of minimizing assembly time and error rate by changing the tile concentrations because changing the tile concentrations is easy to implement in actual lab experiments. We prove that setting the concentration of tile T i proportional to the square root of N i where N i is the number of times T i appears outside the seed structure in the final assembled shape minimizes the rate of growth errors for rectilinear tile systems. We also show that the same concentrations minimize the expected assembly time for a feasible class of tile systems. Moreover, for general tile systems, given tile concentrations, we can approximate the expected assembly time with high accuracy and probability by running only a polynomial number of simulations in the size of the target shape.

  8. Fast Glazing of Alumina/Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.; Gzowski, E. R.; Wheeler, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for applying ceramic coating to fibrous silica/alumina insulation tiles prevents cracks and substantially reduces firing time. To reduce thermal stresses in tile being coated, high-temperature, shorttime firing schedule implemented. Such schedule allows coating to mature while substrate remains at relatively low temperature, reducing stress differential between coating and substrate. Technique used to repair tiles with damaged coatings and possibly used in heat-treating objects made of materials having different thermal-expansion coefficients.

  9. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, V. E.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ˜6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  10. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, V. E. Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.