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1

The CALICE hadron scintillator tile calorimeter prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE Collaboration develops high granularity calorimeters to achieve excellent energy resolution at ILC. One type is a four million channel scintillator tile Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) read out with novel photodetectors—Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM). A 1 m 3 prototype with 7608 channels was built in order to test the Particle Flow concept and to gain experience with the novel techniques. The prototype and MEPhI/Pulsar SiPMs have demonstrated excellent performance and stability during several months of testing at CERN and FNAL in 2006-2008. Less than 0.08% of SiPMs are broken. The SiPM calibration and monitoring procedures have been developed. Improved SiPMs have been developed by CPTA for the next engineering prototype and their properties are discussed. This prototype will have very slim sensitive planes with electronics inside. It addresses all engineering issues relevant to the real calorimeter at ILC.

Buanes, T.; Danilov, M.; Eigen, G.; Göttlicher, P.; Markin, O.; Reinecke, M.; Tarkovsky, E.; Calice Collaboration

2010-11-01

2

Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment. The TileCal provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by means of wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The TileCal readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read by two PMTs. A brief description of the individual calibration systems (Cs radioactive source, laser, charge injection, minimum bias) is provided. Their combination allows to calibrate each part of the data acquisition chain (optical part, photomultiplier, readout electronics) and to monitor its stability to better than 1%. The procedure for setting and preserving the electromagnetic energy scale during Run 1 data taking is discussed. The issues of linearity and stability of the response, as well as the timing adjustment are also shown.

Boumediene, Djamel; ATLAS collaboration

2015-02-01

3

Scintillator tile hadron calorimeter with novel SiPM readout  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration is presently constructing a test hadron calorimeter (HCAL) with 7620 scintillator tiles readout by novel photo-detectors—Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). This prototype is the first device which uses SiPMs on a large scale. We present the design of the HCAL and report on measured properties of more than 10 000 SiPMs. We discuss the SiPM efficiency, gain, cross-talk, and noise rate dependence on bias voltage and temperature, including the spread in these parameters. We analyze the reasons for SiPM rejection and present the results of the long-term stability studies. The first measurements of the SiPM radiation hardness are presented. We compare properties of SiPM with the properties of similar devices, MRS APD and MPPC. A possibility to make the tiles thinner and to read them out without WLS fibers has been studied.

Danilov, M.; CALICE Collaboration

2007-10-01

4

Design, Construction and Installation of the ATLAS Hadronic Barrel Scintillator-Tile Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The scintillator tile hadronic calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter using steel as the absorber structure and scintillator as the active medium. The scintillator is located in "pockets" in the steel structure and the wavelength-shifting fibers are contained in channels running radially within the absorber to photomultiplier tubes which are located in the outer support girders of the calorimeter structure. In addition, to its role as a detector for high energy particles, the tile calorimeter provides the direct support of the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter in the barrel region, and the liquid argon electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters in the endcap region. Through these, it indirectly supports the inner tracking system and beam pipe. The steel absorber, and in particular the support girders, provide the flux return for the solenoidal field from the central solenoid. Finally, the end surfaces of the barrel calorimeter are used to mount services, power supplies and readout crates for the inner tr...

Abdallah, J; Alexa, C; Alves, R; Amaral, P; Ananiev, A; Anderson, K; Andresen, X; Antonaki, A; Batusov, V; Bednar, P; Bergeaas, E; Biscarat, C; Blanch, O; Blanchot, G; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bosi, F; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu A; Calvet, D; Cardeira, C; Carli, T; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Costello, J; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cerqueira, A S; Clément, C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Da Silva, P; Davidek, M; David, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Del Prete, T; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dotti, A; Downing, R; Drake, G; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Farbin, A; Fassouliotis, D; Feng, E; Fenyuk, A; Ferdi, C; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Flix, J; Francavilla, P; Fullana, E; Garde, V; Gellerstedt, K; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gildemeister, O; Gilewsky, V; Giokaris, N; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; González, V; Gouveia, J; Grenier, P; Gris, P; Guarino, V; Guicheney, C; Sen-Gupta, A; Hakobyan, H; Haney, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Higón, E; Hill, N; Holmgren, S; Hruska, I; Hurwitz, M; Huston, J; Jen-La Plante, I; Jon-And, K; Junk, T; Karyukhin, A; Khubua, J; Klereborn, J; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Krivkova, P; Kulchitsky, Y; Kurochkin, Yu; Kuzhir, P; Lapin, V; Le Compte, T; Lefèvre, R; Leitner, R; Li, J; Liablin, M; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Y; Lourtie, P; Lovas, L; Lupi, A; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Maliukov, S; Manousakis, A; Marques, C; Marroquim, F; Martin, F; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Myagkov, A; Miller, R; Minashvili, I; Miralles, L; Montarou, G; Némécek, S; Nessi, M; Nikitine, I; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Onofre, A; Oreglia, M; Palan, B; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Pereira, A; Pilcher, J E; Pina, J; Pinhão, J; Pod, E; Podlyski, F; Portell, X; Poveda, J; Pribyl, L; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Ramalho, M; Ramstedt, M; Raposeiro, L; Reis, J; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romanov, V; Rosnet, P; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Rumiantsau, V; Russakovich, N; Sada Costa, J; Salto, O; Salvachúa, B; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Says, L P; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J L; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Shalanda, N; Shevtsov, P; Shochet, M; Simaitis, V; Simonyan, M; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, J; Silva, O; Sosebee, M; Spanó, F; Speckmeyer, P; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Starovoitov, P; Suk, M; Sykora, I; Tang, F; Tas, P; Teuscher, R; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Torres, J; Underwood, D; Usai, G; Valero, A; Valkár, S; Valls, J A; Vartapetian, A; Vazeille, F; Vellidis, C; Ventura, F; Vichou, I; Vivarelli, I; Volpi, M; White, A; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zilka, B

2007-01-01

5

Performance of the Large Scale Prototypes of the CALICE Tile Hadron Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The concept of a tile hadron calorimeter (HCAL) for the International Linear Collider (ILC) has been developed. A major aspect is the improvement of the jet energy resolution by measuring details of the shower development and combining them with the data of the tracking chamber (particle flow). The concept utilizes scintillating tiles that are read out by novel Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) and takes into account all design aspects that are demanded by the intended operation

Reinecke, M

2015-01-01

6

The Calice Tile Hadron Calorimeter Prototype with Sipm Readout:. Design, Construction and First Test Beam Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed a test beam hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) with 7608 scintillator tiles, individually read out by novel multi-pixel Geiger mode photodiodes, so called SiPMs, and tested it in electron and hadron beams at CERN. This prototype is the first device which uses SiPMs on a large scale; its purpose is to establish the technology and to record hadron shower data with unprecedented granularity for the validation of simulation models and the development of clustering algorithms.

Wattimena, N.

2008-06-01

7

Performances of the signal reconstruction in the ATLAS Hadronic Tile Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The Tile Barrel Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS. It is a key detector for the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, taus and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillators as active medium. The scintillators are read?out by wavelength shifting fibers coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analogue signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The read?out system is designed to reconstruct the data in real time fulfilling the tight time constraint imposed by the ATLAS first level trigger rate (100 kHz). The signal amplitude for each channel and the phases are measured using Optimal Filtering techniques both at on?line and off?line level. We present the performances of these techniques on the data collected in the proton?proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. We show in particular the measurements of low amplitudes, where the cell signals and the nois...

Meoni, E; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01

8

Commissioning of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter with Single Beam and First Collisions  

E-print Network

TileCal, the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is built of steel and scintillating tiles with a double readout by optical fibers and uses photomultipliers as photodetectors. It provides measurements for hadrons, jets and missing transverse energy. In recent years TileCal has gone through an intensive commissioning phase. During this period several repairs of the front-end electronic components and low voltage power supplies were made, and all detector channels were fully tested using the dedicated calibration systems: cesium, laser and charge injection. Furthermore, cosmic muons and single beam data were used to verify the performance of the detector and check its readiness for the first collisions in 2009. The work to be presented will focus on the main results of the TileCal pre-collision commissioning phase and on the first results obtained with proton-proton collisions. The first proton-proton collisions at 900 GeV and 2360 GeV took place in the ...

Saraiva, J G; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01

9

ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Interface Card  

E-print Network

-1- ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Interface Card K. Anderson, A. Gupta, J. Pilcher, H. Sanders, F. Tang, R. Teuscher, H. Wu The University of Chicago ABSTRACT This paper describes the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. OVERVIEW The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (Tilecal) [1] [Figure 1] front end electronics consists of 4 parts, 3in

10

ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.

Faltova, Jana; ATLAS Collaboration

2015-02-01

11

Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (Phase-II) where the peak luminosity will increase 5 times compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm?2s?1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional increase of the average luminosity with a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity levelling. This upgrade is expected to happen around 2024. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics to the extent that all calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to the counting room while 5 Gbps down-links are used for synchronization, configuration and detector control. For the off-detector electronics a pre-processor (sROD) is being developed, which takes care of the initial trigger processing while temporarily storing the main data flow in pipeline and derandomizer memories. One demonstrator prototype module with the new calorimeter module electronics, but still compatible with the present system, is planned to be inserted in ATLAS this year.

Carrió, F.; Tile Calorimeter System, ATLAS

2015-02-01

12

Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data acquisition systems. This paper describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Recently improved description of the optical and electronic signal propagation is highlighted and the validation with the real particle data is presented.

Karpov, S. N.

2014-09-01

13

Hadronic showers in the CALICE calorimeter prototypes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at the future International Linear Collider. These calorimeters have been tested extensively in particle beams at CERN and at Fermilab. We present preliminary results of an analysis of hadronic events in the combined system under test at CERN in 2006 and 2007, comprising a SiW ECAL, a scintillator tile HCAL and a scintillator strip tail catcher, the latter two with SiPM readout. The properties of hadronic showers in the HCAL, compared to simulations performed with GEANT4, are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of the linearity of the detector response and on the single particle energy resolution achievable with simple weighting algorithms based on the local energy density in the hadronic showers.

Simon, Frank; Calice Collaboration

2010-11-01

14

Readiness of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter for LHC collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tile hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector has undergone extensive testing in the experimental hall since its installation\\u000a in late 2005. The readout, control and calibration systems have been fully operational since 2007 and the detector has successfully\\u000a collected data from the LHC single beams in 2008 and first collisions in 2009. This paper gives an overview of the

G. Aad; B. Abbott; J. Abdallah; A. A. Abdelalim; A. Abdesselam; O. Abdinov; B. Abi; M. Abolins; H. Abramowicz; H. Abreu; B. S. Acharya; D. L. Adams; T. N. Addy; J. Adelman; C. Adorisio; P. Adragna; T. Adye; S. Aefsky; J. A. Aguilar-Saavedra; M. Aharrouche; S. P. Ahlen; F. Ahles; A. Ahmad; M. Ahsan; G. Aielli; T. Akdogan; T. P. A. Åkesson; G. Akimoto; A. V. Akimov; A. Aktas; M. S. Alam; M. A. Alam; S. Albrand; M. Aleksa; I. N. Aleksandrov; C. Alexa; G. Alexander; G. Alexandre; T. Alexopoulos; M. Alhroob; M. Aliev; G. Alimonti; J. Alison; M. Aliyev; P. P. Allport; S. E. Allwood-Spiers; J. Almond; A. Aloisio; R. Alon; A. Alonso; M. G. Alviggi; K. Amako; C. Amelung; A. Amorim; G. Amorós; N. Amram; C. Anastopoulos; T. Andeen; C. F. Anders; K. J. Anderson; A. Andreazza; V. Andrei; X. S. Anduaga; A. Angerami; F. Anghinolfi; N. Anjos; A. Annovi; A. Antonaki; M. Antonelli; S. Antonelli; J. Antos; B. Antunovic; F. Anulli; S. Aoun; G. Arabidze; I. Aracena; Y. Arai; A. T. H. Arce; J. P. Archambault; S. Arfaoui; J.-F. Arguin; T. Argyropoulos; M. Arik; A. J. Armbruster; O. Arnaez; C. Arnault; A. Artamonov; D. Arutinov; M. Asai; S. Asai; R. Asfandiyarov; S. Ask; B. Åsman; D. Asner; L. Asquith; K. Assamagan; A. Astvatsatourov; G. Atoian; B. Auerbach; K. Augsten; M. Aurousseau; N. Austin; G. Avolio; R. Avramidou; C. Ay; G. Azuelos; Y. Azuma; M. A. Baak; A. M. Bach; H. Bachacou; K. Bachas; M. Backes; E. Badescu; P. Bagnaia; Y. Bai; T. Bain; J. T. Baines; O. K. Baker; M. D. Baker; S. Baker; F. Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa; E. Banas; P. Banerjee; S. Banerjee; D. Banfi; A. Bangert; V. Bansal; S. P. Baranov; A. Barashkou; T. Barber; E. L. Barberio; D. Barberis; M. Barbero; D. Y. Bardin; T. Barillari; M. Barisonzi; T. Barklow; N. Barlow; B. M. Barnett; R. M. Barnett; A. Baroncelli; A. J. Barr; F. Barreiro; P. Barrillon; R. Bartoldus; D. Bartsch; R. L. Bates; L. Batkova; J. R. Batley; A. Battaglia; M. Battistin; F. Bauer; H. S. Bawa; M. Bazalova; B. Beare; T. Beau; P. H. Beauchemin; R. Beccherle; P. Bechtle; G. A. Beck; H. P. Beck; M. Beckingham; K. H. Becks; A. J. Beddall; V. A. Bednyakov; C. Bee; M. Begel; S. Behar Harpaz; P. K. Behera; M. Beimforde; C. Belanger-Champagne; P. J. Bell; W. H. Bell; G. Bella; L. Bellagamba; F. Bellina; M. Bellomo; A. Belloni; K. Belotskiy; O. Beltramello; S. Ben Ami; O. Benary; D. Benchekroun; M. Bendel; B. H. Benedict; N. Benekos; Y. Benhammou; D. P. Benjamin; M. Benoit; J. R. Bensinger; K. Benslama; S. Bentvelsen; M. Beretta; D. Berge; E. Bergeaas Kuutmann; N. Berger; F. Berghaus; E. Berglund; J. Beringer; P. Bernat; R. Bernhard; C. Bernius; T. Berry; A. Bertin; M. I. Besana; N. Besson; S. Bethke; R. M. Bianchi; M. Bianco; O. Biebel; J. Biesiada; M. Biglietti; H. Bilokon; M. Bindi; A. Bingul; C. Bini; C. Biscarat; U. Bitenc; K. M. Black; R. E. Blair; J.-B. Blanchard; G. Blanchot; C. Blocker; A. Blondel; W. Blum; U. Blumenschein; G. J. Bobbink; A. Bocci; M. Boehler; J. Boek; N. Boelaert; S. Böser; J. A. Bogaerts; A. Bogouch; C. Bohm; J. Bohm; V. Boisvert; T. Bold; V. Boldea; V. G. Bondarenko; M. Bondioli; M. Boonekamp; S. Bordoni; C. Borer; A. Borisov; G. Borissov; I. Borjanovic; S. Borroni; K. Bos; D. Boscherini; M. Bosman; H. Boterenbrood; J. Bouchami; J. Boudreau; E. V. Bouhova-Thacker; C. Boulahouache; C. Bourdarios; A. Boveia; J. Boyd; I. R. Boyko; I. Bozovic-Jelisavcic; J. Bracinik; A. Braem; P. Branchini; A. Brandt; G. Brandt; O. Brandt; U. Bratzler; B. Brau; J. E. Brau; H. M. Braun; B. Brelier; J. Bremer; R. Brenner; S. Bressler; D. Britton; F. M. Brochu; I. Brock; R. Brock; E. Brodet; C. Bromberg; G. Brooijmans; W. K. Brooks; G. Brown; D. Bruncko; R. Bruneliere; S. Brunet; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; M. Bruschi; F. Bucci; J. Buchanan; P. Buchholz; A. G. Buckley; I. A. Budagov; B. Budick; V. Büscher; L. Bugge; O. Bulekov; M. Bunse; T. Buran; H. Burckhart; S. Burdin; T. Burgess; S. Burke; E. Busato; P. Bussey; C. P. Buszello; F. Butin; B. Butler; J. M. Butler; C. M. Buttar; J. M. Butterworth; T. Byatt; J. Caballero; S. Cabrera Urbán; D. Caforio; O. Cakir; P. Calafiura; G. Calderini; P. Calfayan; R. Calkins; L. P. Caloba; D. Calvet; P. Camarri; D. Cameron; S. Campana; M. Campanelli; V. Canale; F. Canelli; A. Canepa; J. Cantero; L. Capasso; M. D. M. Capeans Garrido; I. Caprini; M. Caprini; M. Capua; R. Caputo; C. Caramarcu; R. Cardarelli; T. Carli; G. Carlino; L. Carminati; B. Caron; S. Caron; G. D. Carrillo Montoya; S. Carron Montero; A. A. Carter; J. R. Carter; J. Carvalho; D. Casadei; M. P. Casado; M. Cascella; A. M. Castaneda Hernandez; E. Castaneda-Miranda; V. Castillo Gimenez; N. F. Castro; G. Cataldi; A. Catinaccio; J. R. Catmore; A. Cattai; G. Cattani; S. Caughron; P. Cavalleri; D. Cavalli; M. Cavalli-Sforza; V. Cavasinni; F. Ceradini; A. S. Cerqueira; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; F. Cerutti; S. A. Cetin; A. Chafaq; D. Chakraborty; K. Chan

2010-01-01

15

Calibration and Monitoring of the Tile Calorimeter during LHC Run-I  

E-print Network

The ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, named the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), is a non-compensating sampling calorimeter comprised of steel and scintillating plastic tiles which are read-out by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The TileCal is regularly monitored and calibrated by several different calibration systems: a Cs radioactive source that illuminates the scintillating tiles directly, a laser light system to directly test the PMT response, and a charge injection system (CIS) for the frontend electronics. These calibrations systems, in conjunction with data collected during protonproton collisions, provide extensive monitoring of the instrument and a means for equalizing the calorimeter response at each stage of signal propagation. Through the individual calibrations provided by these systems, we are able to achieve a precision of approximately 0.5-1.0% in the monitoring of the evolution of the response of the different components of TileCal. Analysis of the combined calibrations is used to measure the gain varianc...

Darmora, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2014-01-01

16

Hadron showers in a digital hadron calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A small prototype of a finely granulated digital hadron calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as active elements was exposed to positive pions of 1-16 GeV energy from the Fermilab test beam. The event selection separates events with mostly non-interacting particles and events with hadronic showers which initiated in the front part of the calorimeter. The data are compared to a

Burak Bilki; John Butler; Georgios Mavromanolakis; E. May; Edwin Norbeck; Jose Repond; David Underwood; Lei Xia; Qingmin Zhang

2009-01-01

17

LED Calibration Systems for CALICE Hadron Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents several versions of the calibration and monitoring system for the scintillator tile hadron calorimeter for the ILC. The first Calibration and Monitoring Board (CMB) is used to calibrate all 7608 SiPMs of a 1 m3 hadron calorimeter prototype. Each CMB has 12 LEDs and each LED illuminates 18 tiles with SiPMs through 18 optical fibers. The pulse is 10 ns wide and delivers a signal equivalent to 70 MIPs to each SiPM. The new AHCAL engineering prototype offers both embedded LED driver (1 LED per 1 tile) and an external calibration board (1 LED per many tiles, up to 72). The embedded LED driver circuit was tuned for shorter pulses and produce nice single photo-electron spectrum and can also saturate the SiPM. A newer version of external calibrating system uses sinusoidal signal generated by a Quasi-Resonant LED driver. The system generates ?3.5 ns optical pulse with high intensity (0.4 nJ) and low EM noise. The QRLED driver with a special notched optical fibre can saturate 12 SiPMs at once with a signal up to 200 MIPs per tile. Next version will be improved to generate longer pulses (?5 ns), therefore a higher light intensity. Our development includes an optical distribution through a notched fibre, which shines equally from 12, 24 or 72 points. The light in the final AHCAL prototype will be routed from single LED by 3 fibers having 24 notches each, illuminating row of 72 tiles at once.

Kvasnicka, Jiri; Polak, Ivo; On Behalf Of Calice Collaboration

18

a Hadronic Calorimeter for the International Linear Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed a testbeam hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) with 7608 scintillator tiles, individually read out by novel multi-pixel Geiger mode photodiodes, so called SiPMs, and tested it in electron and hadron beams at CERN. This prototype purpose is to establish the technology and to record hadron shower data with unprecedented granularity for the validation of simulation models and the development of clustering algorithms.

Wattimena, N.

2010-12-01

19

Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase 2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in the middle of 2014 during the first Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB) alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The Main Board will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the Daughter Board will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the super Read-Out Driver (sROD) will perform processing tasks on them and will be the interface to the trigger levels 0, 1 and 2.

Carrió, Fernando

2013-11-01

20

Electromagnetic response of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration is studying the design of high performance electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for future International Linear Collider detectors. For the hadronic calorimeter, one option is a highly granular sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillator layers as active material. High granularity is obtained by segmenting the scintillator into small tiles individually read out via silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). A prototype has been built, consisting of thirty-eight sensitive layers, segmented into about eight thousand channels. In 2007 the prototype was exposed to positrons and hadrons using the CERN SPS beam, covering a wide range of beam energies and angles of incidence. The challenge of cell equalization and calibration of such a large number of channels is best validated using electromagnetic processes. The response of the prototype steel-scintillator calorimeter, including linearity and uniformity, to electrons is investigated and described.

CALICE Collaboration; Adloff, C.; Blaha, J.; Blaising, J.-J.; Drancourt, C.; Espargilière, A.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N. K.; Goto, T.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Benyamna, M.; Cârloganu, C.; Fehr, F.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J. G. R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Fabbri, R.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Garutti, E.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Marchesini, I.; Meyer, N.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Wattimena, N.; Wendt, O.; Feege, N.; Haller, J.; Richter, S.; Samson, J.; Eckert, P.; Kaplan, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Tadday, A.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Uozumi, S.; Ballin, J. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Yilmaz, H. S.; Zorba, O.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Balagura, V.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Buzhan, P.; Dolgoshein, B.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Smirnov, S.; Frey, A.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Weuste, L.; Bonis, J.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Fleury, J.; Guilhem, G.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Jeans, D.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Reinhard, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Nishiyama, M.; Takeshita, T.; Tozuka, S.; Buanes, T.; Eigen, G.

2011-04-01

21

Noise dependency with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects noise under different circumstances are described.

Araque Espinosa, Juan Pedro; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01

22

Calibration and Monitoring of the Tile Calorimeter during LHC Run-I  

E-print Network

The ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), is a non-compensating sampling calorimeter comprised of steel and scintillating plastic tiles which are read-out by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The TileCal is regularly monitored and calibrated by several different calibration systems: a Cs radioactive source that illuminates the scintillating tiles directly, a laser light system to directly test the PMT response, and a charge injection system (CIS) for the front-end electronics. These calibrations systems, in conjunction with data collected during proton-proton collisions, provide extensive monitoring of the instrument and a means for equalizing the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal propagation. Through the individual calibrations provided by these systems, we are able to achieve a precision of approximately 0.5-1.0% in the monitoring of the evolution of the response of the different components of TileCal. Analysis of the combined calibrations is used to observe the gain varianc...

Darmora, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2014-01-01

23

Tests of a Digital Hadron Calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of developing a hadron calorimeter with extremely fine granularity for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms to the measurement of jet energies at a future lepton collider, we report on extensive tests of a small scale prototype calorimeter. The calorimeter contained up to 10 layers of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with 2560 1×1 cm2 readout pads, interleaved

Burak Bilki; John Butler; Ed May; Georgios Mavromanolakis; Edwin Norbeck; José Repond; David Underwood; Lei Xia; Qingmin Zhang

2011-01-01

24

Development of Digital Hadron Calorimeter Using GEM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linear colliders are future electron-positron collider accelerators in high energy particle physics. The physics goals at the future linear colliders demand high jet energy resolution. Energy flow algorithm allows for dramatic improvement of hadronic jets by utilizing momenta measured in tracking systems. However the success of energy flow algorithm depends significantly on higher granularity of hadronic calorimeters. The higher granularity requires large number of readout channels that could potentially drive the cost of such a calorimeter to a prohibitive level. Digital hardon calorimeter is one of possible solutions. In this talk I will report on a digital hadron calorimeter development effort using Gas Electron Multiplier as the sensitive gap.

Habib, Shahnoor; Kaushik, Venkatish; Li, Jia; Sosebee, Mark; Brandt, Andrew; de, Kaushik; White, Andrew; Yu, Jaehoon

2002-10-01

25

Tests of a Digital Hadron Calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the concept of a Digital Hadron Calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as active elements for use in a detector optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms to the measurement of hadronic jets. We report on tests of a small scale prototype calorimeter using muons, positrons and pions from the Fermilab test beam. The results are compared to

José Repond; John Butler; Ed May; Georgios Mavromanolakis; Edwin Norbeck; David Underwood; Lei Xia; Qingmin Zhang

2009-01-01

26

Hadronic Showers in a Highly Granular Imaging Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration develops highly granular calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for experiments at a future lepton collider. The analogue hadronic calorimeter prototype consists of steel absorber plates interleaved with 38 active plastic scintillator layers which are sub-divided into small tiles. In total 7608 tiles are read out individually via embedded Silicon Photomultipliers. The prototype is one of the ?rst large scale applications of these novel and very promising miniature photodetectors. Since 2006, the calorimeter has been operated in combined test beam setups at DESY, CERN and FNAL. The high-resolution 3D image data with analogue energy information are used to study properties and composition of hadronic showers at a new level of detail. This helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. The spatial shower development and the substructure of the showers, compared to a variety of different Geant 4 shower models including decompositions into individual shower components are presented. Aspects of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers, such as Particle Flow, are discussed.

Kaplan, A.; The Calice Collaboration

27

Master plate production for the tile calorimeter extended barrel modules.  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 41,000 master plates (Fig. 1) are required for the Extended Barrel Hadronic Calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Early in the R&D program associated with the detector, it was recognized that the fabrication of these steel laminations was a significant issue, both in terms of the cost to produce these high precision formed plates, as well as the length of time required to produce all plates for the calorimeter. Two approaches were given serious consideration: laser cutting and die stamping. The Argonne group was a strong supporter of the latter approach and in late 1995 initiated an R&D program to demonstrate the feasibility and cost effectiveness of die stamping these plates by constructing a die and stamping approximately 2000 plates for use in construction of three full size prototype modules. This was extremely successful and die stamping was selected by the group for production of these plates. When the prototype die was constructed it was matched to the calorimeter envelope at that time. This subsequently changed. However with some minor adjustments in the design envelope and a small compromise in terms of instrumented volume, it became possible to use this same die for the production of all master plates for the Tile Calorimeter. Following an extensive series of discussions and an evaluation of the performance of the stamping presses available to our collaborators in Europe, it was decided to ship the US die to CERN for use in stamping master plates for the barrel section of the calorimeter. This was done under the supervision of CERN and JINR, Dubna, and carried out at the TATRA truck plant at Koprivinice, Czech Republic. It was a great success. Approximately 41,000 plates were stamped and fully met specification. Moreover, the production time was significantly reduced by avoiding the need of constructing and then qualifying a second die for use in Europe. This also precluded small geometrical differences between the barrel and extended barrel plates (and therefore submodules) being an issue, with the result that standard submodules are fully exchangeable between the two types of module.

Guarino, V.J.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Price, L.E.; Proudfoot, J.; Wood, K.

1999-03-10

28

Engineering prototype of the CALICE analog hadron calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new prototype of a tile hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) for the International Linear Collider detector is currently developed within the CALICE collaboration. The aim is to improve the energy resolution by measuring details of the shower development and combining them with the data of the tracking chamber (particle flow). The prototype is based on scintillating tiles that are read out by novel Silicon-Photomultiplier (SiPM). This new prototype will take into account all design aspects that are demanded by the intended operation at the ILC It will contain about 2500 detector channels. This is the first calorimeter design which makes full use of the high integration potential of the novel photo-sensor technology. Main focus of this contribution is the mechanical and electrical integration of the front-end electronics into the calorimeter absorber structure, with the aim of maintaining high-density calorimeter. Integration aspects and scalability to an ILC detector are discussed. For the analog calorimeter the proposal of an integrated light-calibration system for calibration and gain monitoring are presented, addressing temperature and bias dependence of the SiPM gain. First results from the measurements with one prototype module at the DESY test beam are presented, which demonstrate the quality of the readout system, and of the light-calibration system.

Garutti, Erika; CALICE Collaboration

2011-04-01

29

Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter in pp collisions at the LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. This detector is instrumented for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off- detector data-acquisition systems. After an initial setting of the absolute energy scale in test beams with particles of well-defined momentum, the calibrated scale is transferred to the rest of the detector via the response to radioactive sources. The calibrated scale is validated in situ with muons and single hadrons whereas the timing performance is checked with muons and jets. The data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking and the evolution of the detector status during the LHC Run 1 are presented. The energy and the time reconstruction performance of the digitized signals is summarized and the calorimeter response to hadrons is investigated with collision data.

Fiascaris, Maria; ATLAS Collaboration

2015-02-01

30

QCALT: A tile calorimeter for KLOE-2 upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upgrade of the Da?ne machine layout requires a modification of the size and position of the inner focusing quadrupoles of KLOE-2, thus asking for the realization of two new calorimeters, named QCALT, covering this area. To improve the reconstruction of KL?2?0 events with photons hitting the quadrupoles, a calorimeter with high efficiency to low energy photons (20-300 MeV), time resolution of less than 1 ns and space resolution of few cm, is needed. To match these requirements we are now constructing a scintillator tile calorimeter where each single tile is readout by mean of SiPM for a total granularity of 1760 channels. We show the design of the different calorimeter components and the present status of the construction.

Balla, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; Martini, M.; Paglia, C.; Pileggi, G.; Ponzio, B.; Saputi, A.; Tagnani, D.

2013-08-01

31

The Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Readout Electronics for Phase II  

E-print Network

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade, called the Phase II Upgrade, in 2022. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter community will do major modifications to the sub-detector to account for the increased luminosity. More specifically, a large proportion of the current front and back-end electronics will be upgraded in order to digitize all signals generated in the Calorimeters. A Demonstrator program has been established, which combines the current and future architectures, as a proof of principle. The insertion of the first demonstrator is planned for the end of 2015.

ATLAS Tile Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01

32

Studies of Scintillator Tiles with SiPM Readout for Imaging Calorimeters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Imaging hadronic calorimeters with scintillator readout use small scintillator tiles individually read out by silicon photomultipliers to achieve the necessary granularity needed for sophisticated reconstruction algorithms at future collider detectors. For a second generation prototype of the CALICE analog HCAL new, 3 mm thick scintillator tiles with an embedded wavelength shifting fiber and new photon sensor from CPTA are being fabricated. The availability of blue-sensitive SiPMs also allows fiberless coupling of the photon sensor to the tile, a technique requiring modified geometries to achieve a high degree of response uniformity. We discuss results from test bench and from test beam measurements of different scintillator tile geometries as well as prospects for fiberless coupling of photon sensors.

Simon, Frank; CALICE Collaboration

2011-04-01

33

Prototype tests for a highly granular scintillator-based hadron calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the CALICE collaboration, several concepts for the hadronic calorimeter of a future linear collider detector are studied. After having demonstrated the capabilities of the measurement methods in "physics prototypes", the focus now lies on improving their implementation in"technological prototypes", that are scalable to the full linear collider detector. The Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) concept is a sampling calorimeter of tungsten or steel absorber plates and plastic scintillator tiles read out by silicon photomultipliers as active material. In the AHCAL technological prototype, the front-end chips are integrated into the active layers of the calorimeter and are designed for minimal power consumption. The versatile electronics allows the prototype to be equipped with different types of scintillator tiles and SiPMs. The current status of the AHCAL engineering prototype is shown and recent beam test measurements as well as plans for future hadron beam tests with a larger prototype will be discussed.

Krüger, K.; CALICE collaboration

2015-02-01

34

The Monitoring and Calibration Web Systems for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Data Quality Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is one of the ATLAS sub-detectors. The read-out is performed by about 10,000 PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMTs). The signal of each PMT is digitized by an electronic channel. The Monitoring and Calibration Web System (MCWS) supports the data quality analysis of the electronic channels. This application was developed to assess the detector status and verify its performance. It can provide to the user the list of TileCal known problematic channels, that is stored in the ATLAS condition database (COOL DB). The bad channels list guides the data quality validator in identifying new problematic channels and is used in data reconstruction and the system allows to update the channels list directly in the COOL database. MCWS can generate summary results, such as eta-phi plots and comparative tables of the masked channels percentage. Regularly, during the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) shutdown a maintenance of the detector equipments is performed. When a channel is repaired, its calibration constants stored in the COOL database have to be updated. Additionally MCWS system manages the update of these calibration constants values in the COOL database. The MCWS has been used by the Tile community since 2008, during the commissioning phase, and was upgraded to comply with ATLAS operation specifications. Among its future developments, it is foreseen an integration of MCWS with the TileCal control Web system (DCS) in order to identify high voltage problems automatically.

Sivolella, A.; Maidantchik, C.; Ferreira, F.

2012-12-01

35

Operational Experience and First Results with a Highly Granular Tungsten Analog Hadron Calorimeter  

E-print Network

Precision physics at future multi-TeV lepton colliders such as CLIC requires excellent jet energy resolution. The detectors need deep calorimeter systems to limit the energy leakage also for very highly energetic particles and jets. At the same time, compact physical dimensions are mandatory to permit the installation of the complete calorimeter system inside high-field solenoidal magnets. This requires very dense absorbers, making tungsten a natural choice for hadron calorimeters at such a future collider. To study the performance of such a calorimeter, a physics prototype with tungsten absorbers and scintillator tiles with SiPM readout as active elements has been constructed and has been tested in particle beams at CERN over a wide energy range from 1 GeV to 300 GeV. We report on the construction and on the operational experience obtained with muon, electron and hadron beams.

Frank Simon; for the CALICE Collaboration

2011-11-22

36

The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in highly granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers  

E-print Network

The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

C. Adloff; J. -J. Blaising; M. Chefdeville; C. Drancourt; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; I. Koletsou; J. Prast; G. Vouters J. Repond; J. Schlereth; L. Xia E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; G. Eigen; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki J. Apostolakis; S. Arfaoui; M. Benoit; D. Dannheim; K. Elsener; G. Folger; C. Grefe; V. Ivantchenko; M. Killenberg; W. Klempt; E. van der Kraaij; L. Linssen; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Münnich; S. Poss; A. Ribon; P. Roloff; A. Sailer; D. Schlatter; E. Sicking; J. Strube; V. Uzhinskiy; C. Carloganu; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; U. Cornett; D. David; A. Ebrahimi; G. Falley; N. Feege; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; C. Neubüser; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; A. Fagot; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; P. D. Dauncey; E. Cortina Gil; S. Mannai; G. Baulieu; P. Calabria; L. Caponetto; C. Combaret; R. Della Negra; R. Ete; G. Grenier; R. Han; J-C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; W. Tromeur; M. Vander Donckt; Y. Zoccarato J. Berenguer Antequera; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; V. Kozlov; Y. Soloviev; D. Besson; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; F. Richard; R. Pöschl; J. Rouene; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; E. Becheva; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; E. Guliyev; Y. Haddad; F. Magniette; M. Ruan; T. H. Tran; H. Videau; S. Callier; F. Dulucq; G. Martin-Chassard; Ch. de la Taille; L. Raux; N. Seguin-Moreau; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; . Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; K. Kotera; H. Ono; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; J. S. Chai; H. S. Song; S. H. Lee; M. Götze; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2014-07-21

37

Validation of GEANT4 Monte Carlo Models with a Highly Granular Scintillator-Steel Hadron Calorimeter  

E-print Network

Calorimeters with a high granularity are a fundamental requirement of the Particle Flow paradigm. This paper focuses on the prototype of a hadron calorimeter with analog readout, consisting of thirty-eight scintillator layers alternating with steel absorber planes. The scintillator plates are finely segmented into tiles individually read out via Silicon Photomultipliers. The presented results are based on data collected with pion beams in the energy range from 8GeV to 100GeV. The fine segmentation of the sensitive layers and the high sampling frequency allow for an excellent reconstruction of the spatial development of hadronic showers. A comparison between data and Monte Carlo simulations is presented, concerning both the longitudinal and lateral development of hadronic showers and the global response of the calorimeter. The performance of several GEANT4 physics lists with respect to these observables is evaluated.

C. Adloff; J. Blaha; J. -J. Blaising; C. Drancourt; A. Espargilière; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; J. Prast; G. Vouters; K. Francis; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; J. Smith; L. Xia; E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; T. Buanes; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; A. Dotti; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; V. Uzhinskiy; M. Benyamna; C. Cârloganu; F. Fehr; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; J. G. R. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; U. Cornett; D. David; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; A. Vargas-Trevino; N. Feege; E. Garutti; I. Marchesinik; M. Ramilli; P. Eckert; T. Harion; A. Kaplan; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; V. Bartsch; M. Wing; F. Salvatore; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Kirikova; V. Kozlov; P. Smirnov; Y. Soloviev; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; A. Karakash; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; D. Jeans; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Reinhard; M. Ruan; H. Videau; B. Bulanek; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; M. Götze; O. Hartbrich; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2014-06-15

38

The time structure of hadronic showers in highly granular calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

Adloff, C.; Blaising, J.-J.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Eté, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J. S.; Song, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

2014-07-01

39

The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in highly granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers  

E-print Network

The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

Adloff, C; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, A.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Carloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Ete, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouene, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J.S.; Song, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

2014-01-01

40

Calibration Studies and the Investigation of Track Segments within Showers with an Imaging Hadronic Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed a highly granular hadronic sampling calorimeter prototype with small scintillator tiles individually read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) to evaluate technologies for the ILC. The imaging capability of the detector allows detailed studies of the substructure of hadronic events, such as the identification of minimum ionizing track segments within the hadronic shower. These track segments are of high quality, so that they can be used for calibration, as an additional tool to Muons and to the built-in LED system used to monitor the SiPMs. These track segments also help to constrain hadronic shower models used in Geant4. Detailed MC studies with a realistic model of an ILC detector were performed to study the calibration requirements of a complete calorimeter system. The calibration strategy was tested on real data by transporting calibration constants from a Fermilab beam test to data recorded at CERN under different conditions.

Lu, Shaojun

2010-04-01

41

Construction and commissioning of the CALICE analog hadron calorimeter prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analog hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) prototype of 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths thickness has been constructed by members of the CALICE Collaboration. The AHCAL prototype consists of a 38-layer sandwich structure of steel plates and highly-segmented scintillator tiles that are read out by wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to SiPMs. The signal is amplified and shaped with a custom-designed ASIC. A calibration/monitoring system based on LED light was developed to monitor the SiPM gain and to measure the full SiPM response curve in order to correct for non-linearity. Ultimately, the physics goals are the study of hadron shower shapes and testing the concept of particle flow. The technical goal consists of measuring the performance and reliability of 7608 SiPMs. The AHCAL was commissioned in test beams at DESY and CERN. The entire prototype was completed in 2007 and recorded hadron showers, electron showers and muons at different energies and incident angles in test beams at CERN and Fermilab.

CALICE Collaboration; Adloff, C.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Brandt, A.; Brown, H.; De, K.; Medina, C.; Smith, J.; Li, J.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.; Yu, J.; Buanes, T.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Miller, O.; Watson, N. K.; Wilson, J. A.; Goto, T.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Oreglia, M.; Benyamna, M.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Ha, J.; Blazey, G. C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Lima, G.; Zutshi, V.; Babkin, V. A.; Bazylev, S. N.; Fedotov, Yu I.; Slepnev, V. M.; Tiapkin, I. A.; Volgin, S. V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Fabbri, R.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Garutti, E.; Göttlicher, P.; Jung, T.; Karstensen, S.; Korbel, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lutz, B.; Meyer, N.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Schätzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Wattimena, N.; Wendt, O.; Groll, M.; Heuer, R.-D.; Richter, S.; Samson, J.; Kaplan, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Tadday, A.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. C.; Kawagoe, K.; Tamura, Y.; Ballin, J. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Yilmaz, H.; Zorba, O.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Green, M. G.; Salvatore, F.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Fouz, M. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, R. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Batouritski, M.; Dvornikov, O.; Shulhevich, Yu; Shumeiko, N.; Solin, A.; Starovoitov, P.; Tchekhovski, V.; Terletski, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Morgunov, V.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Andreev, V.; Kirikova, N.; Komar, A.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Terkulov, A.; Buzhan, P.; Dolgoshein, B.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Smirnov, S.; Baranova, N.; Boos, E.; Gladilin, L.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Savin, A.; Voronin, A.; Topkar, A.; Frey, A.; Kiesling, C.; Lu, S.; Prothmann, K.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Weuste, L.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Ruan, M.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Gaycken, G.; Cornat, R.; Jeans, D.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Reinhard, M.; Rougé, A.; Vanel, J.-Ch; Videau, H.; Park, K.-H.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Arestov, Yu; Ammosov, V.; Chuiko, B.; Gapienko, V.; Gilitski, Y.; Koreshev, V.; Semak, A.; Sviridov, Yu; Zaets, V.; Belhorma, B.; Belmir, M.; Baird, A.; Halsall, R. N.; Nam, S. W.; Park, I. H.; Yang, J.; Chai, J.-S.; Kim, J.-T.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, Y.; Kang, J.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kim, I.; Lee, T.; Park, J.; Sung, J.; Itoh, S.; Kotera, K.; Nishiyama, M.; Takeshita, T.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

2010-05-01

42

Production summary for extended barrel module fabrication at Argonne for the ATLAS tile calorimeter.  

SciTech Connect

The Tile Calorimeter is one of the main hadronic calorimeters to be used in the ATLAS experiment at CERN [1,2]. It is a steel/scintillator sampling calorimeter which is built by stacking 64 segments in azimuth and 3 separate cylinders to provide a total structure whose length is approximately 12m and whose diameter is a little over 8.4m. It has a total weight of about 2630 metric tons. Important features of this calorimeter are: A minimum gap (1.5mm) between modules in azimuth; Pockets in the structure to hold the scintillator tiles; Recessed channels at the edges of the module into which the readout fibers will sit; and Holes in the structure through which a radioactive source will pass. The mechanical structure for one of the 3 calorimeter sections, the Extended Barrel (EBA) was constructed at Argonne. A schematic of the calorimeter sampling structure and the layout of one of the 64 segments, termed a module, are shown in figure 1. Each module comprises mechanically of a precision machined, structural girder to which 10 submodules are bolted. One of these submodules, the ITC, has a customized shape to accommodate services for other detector elements. Each submodule weighs 850Kg and the assembled mechanical structure of the module weighs approximately 9000Kg (a fully instrumented Extended Barrel modules weighs {approx}9600Kg). A crucial issue for the tile calorimeter assembly is the minimization of the un-instrumented gap between modules when they are stacked on top of each other during final assembly. The design goal was originally 1mm gap which was eventually relaxed to 1.5mm following a careful evaluation of all tolerances in the construction and assembly process as shown in figure 2 [3]. Submodules for this assembly were produced at 4 locations [4] using tooling and procedures which were largely identical [5]. An important issue was the height of each submodule on the stacking fixture on which they were fabricated as this defines the length along the girder for installation, with a design gap between submodules on the girder of 0.3mm. During production we relaxed this tolerance to +0.3, -1.5mm. The height summary for submodules used at Argonne is shown in Appendix I. About 10 submodules fell outside the positive height envelope (due to the raw plate thickness being out of specification) and we constructed some custom short submodules to allow their use in module assembly. The structural girders were produced commercially following the Quality Control plan agreed to with the Tile Calorimeter collaboration and shipped to Argonne. The crucial tolerances on the girder are the key into which submodules are placed as well as the flatness of the key surface which are used in aligning submodules such that the azimuthal surface lies wholly an envelope of +0.75mm from nominal [6]. Another important characteristic of the girder are clearance holes through which the wavelength shift fibers pass to couple the light to photomultipliers located inside the girder, as described in [2]. Since these fiber bundles must be located to high precision, rather than position the holes in the steel to this precision, tooling was developed by which the precision pieces are glued into the girder [7]. This is shown in figure 3. More details on the pieces used to accomplish this interface to the readout electronics are discussed in [2].

Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Skrzecz, F.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.; Anderson, S.; Caird, A.; Keyser, C.; Kocenko, L.; Matijas, Z.; Nephew, T.; Stanek, R.; Franchini, F.; High Energy Physics

2007-11-14

43

Design of an FPGA-based embedded system for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics test-bench  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The portable test-bench for the certification of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter front-end electronics has been redesigned for the present Long Shutdown (LS1) of LHC, improving its portability and expanding its functionalities. This paper presents a new test-bench based on a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA that implements an embedded system using a PowerPC 440 microprocessor hard core and custom IP cores. A light Linux version runs on the PowerPC microprocessor and handles the IP cores which implement the different functionalities needed to perform the desired tests such as TTCvi emulation, G-Link decoding, ADC control and data reception.

Carrió, F.; Kim, H. Y.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Sandrock, C.; Schettino, V.; Shalyugin, A.; Solans, C.; Souza, J.; Usai, G.; Valero, A.

2014-03-01

44

Tile-in-ONE An integrated framework for the data quality assessment and database management for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to ensure the proper operation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter and assess the quality of data, many tasks are performed by means of several tools which have been developed independently. The features are displayed into standard dashboards, dedicated to each working group, covering different areas, such as Data Quality and Calibration.

Cunha, R.; Solans, C.; Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.

2014-06-01

45

Interactions of hadrons in the CALICE silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter  

E-print Network

The CALICE collaboration develops prototypes for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future linear electron positron collider. The highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype was tested in particle beams. We present the study of the interactions of hadrons in this prototype.

Roman Pöschl; for the CALICE Collaboration

2012-03-07

46

Calibration of a digital hadron calorimeter with muons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The calibration procedure of a finely granulated digital hadron calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as the active elements is described. Results obtained with a stack of nine layers exposed to muons from the Fermilab test beam are presented.

Burak Bilki; John Butler; Tim Cundiff; Gary Drake; William Haberichter; Eric Hazen; Jim Hoff; Scott Holm; Andrew Kreps; Ed May; Georgios Mavromanolakis; Edwin Norbeck; David Northacker; Yasar Onel; José Repond; David Underwood; Shouxiang Wu; Lei Xia

2008-01-01

47

Studies of the response of the prototype CMS hadron calorimeter, including magnetic field effects, to pion, electron, and muon beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the response of a prototype CMS hadron calorimeter module to charged particle beams of pions, muons, and electrons with momenta up to 375 GeV/c . The data were taken at the H2 and H4 beamlines at CERN in 1995 and 1996. The prototype sampling calorimeter used copper absorber plates and scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The effects of a magnetic field of up to 3 T on the response of the calorimeter to muons, electrons, and pions are presented, and the effects of an upstream lead tungstate crystal electromagnetic calorimeter on the linearity and energy resolution of the combined calorimetric system to hadrons are evaluated. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and are used to optimize the choice of total absorber depth, sampling frequency, and longitudinal readout segmentation.

Abramov, V. V.; Acharya, B. S.; Akchurin, N.; Atanasov, I.; Baiatian, G.; Ball, A.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; de Barbaro, P.; Barnes, V.; Bencze, G.; Bodek, A.; Booke, M.; Budd, H.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Dugad, S. R.; Dimitrov, L.; Dyshkant, A.; Elias, J.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fong, D.; Freeman, J.; Genchev, V.; Goncharov, P. I.; Green, D.; Gurtu, A.; Hagopian, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Korneev, Yu.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krishnaswami, G.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Kryshkin, V.; Kunori, S.; Laasanen, A.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Litov, L.; Mondal, N. K.; Moulik, T.; Narasimham, V. S.; Nemashkalo, A.; Onel, Y.; Petrov, P.; Petukhov, Yu.; Piperov, S.; Popov, V.; Reidy, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ruchti, R.; Singh, J. B.; Shen, Q.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Skup, E.; Sorokin, P.; Sudhakar, K.; Summers, D.; Szoncso, F.; Tereshenko, S. I.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S. C.; Turchanovich, L.; Tyukov, V.; Volodko, A.; Yukaev, A.; Zaitchenko, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; CMS-HCAL Collaboration

2001-01-01

48

Electromagnetic and Hadron Calorimeters in the MIPP Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the MIPP experiment is to study the inclusive production of photons, pions, kaons, and nucleons produced in ?, K, and p interactions on various targets using beams from the Main Injector at Fermilab. The purpose of the calorimeters is to measure the production of forward-going photons and neutrons. The electromagnetic calorimeter consists of 10 lead plates interspersed with proportional chambers followed by the hadron calorimeter with 64 steel plates interspersed with scintillator. We collected data with a variety of targets with beam energies from 5 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. The energy calibration of both calorimeters with electrons, pions, kaons and protons is discussed. The performance of the calorimeters was tested on a neutron sample.

T. S. Nigmanov; H. R. Gustafson; M. J. Longo; D. Rajaram (MIPP Collaboration)

2006-10-01

49

Particle showers in a highly granular hadron calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider. The hadron calorimeter uses small scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. The system with 7608 channels has been successfully operated in beam tests at DESY, CERN and Fermilab since 2006, and represents the first large scale tests of these devices in high energy physics experiments. The unprecedented granularity of the detector provides detailed information of the properties of hadronic showers, which helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. Results on longitudinal and lateral shower profiles, compared to a variety of hadronic shower models, first results with a software compensation technique for the energy resolution and an outlook on the next generation detector prototype are presented.

Seidel, Katja; CALICE Collaboration

2011-02-01

50

Particle Showers in a Highly Granular Hadron Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider. The hadron calorimeter uses small scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. The system with 7608 channels has been successfully operated in beam tests at DESY, CERN and Fermilab since 2006, and represents the first large scale tests of these devices in high energy physics experiments. The unprecedented granularity of the detector provides detailed information of the properties of hadronic showers, which helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. We will discuss results on longitudinal and lateral shower profiles compared to a variety of different shower models, and present studies of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers using software compensation techniques.

Simon, Frank; CALICE Collaboration

2011-04-01

51

Concept and Status of the CALICE Analog Hadron Calorimeter Engineering Prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A basic prototype for an analog hadron calorimeter for a future linear collider detector is currently being realized by the CALICE collaboration. The aim is to show the feasibility to build a realistic detector with fully integrated readout electronics. An important aspect of the design is the improvement of the jet energy resolution by measuring details of the shower development with a highly granular device and combining them with the information from the tracking detectors. Therefore, the signals are sampled by small scintillating tiles that are read out by silicon photomultipliers. The ASICs are integrated into the calorimeter layers and are developed for minimal power dissipation. An embedded LED system per channel is used for calibration. The prototype has been tested extensively and the concept as well as results from the DESY test setups are reported here.

Terwort, Mark; On Behalfof The Calice Collaboration

52

Track segments in hadronic showers in a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter  

E-print Network

We investigate the three dimensional substructure of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter. The high granularity of the detector is used to find track segments of minimum ionising particles within hadronic showers, providing sensitivity to the spatial structure and the details of secondary particle production in hadronic cascades. The multiplicity, length and angular distribution of identified track segments are compared to GEANT4 simulations with several different shower models. Track segments also provide the possibility for in-situ calibration of highly granular calorimeters.

CALICE Collaboration; C. Adloff; J. -J. Blaising; M. Chefdeville; C. Drancourt; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; I. Koletsou; J. Prast; G. Vouters; K. Francis; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; J. Smith; L. Xia; E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; D. Dannheim; A. Dotti; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; W. Klempt; E. van der Kraaij; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Ribon; D. Schlatter; V. Uzhinskiy; C. Carloganu; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; J. G. R. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; U. Cornett; D. David; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; N. Feege; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; Y. Sudo; T. Yoshioka; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; V. Bartsch; M. Wing; F. Salvatore; E. Cortina Gil; S. Mannai; G. Baulieu; P. Calabria; L. Caponetto; C. Combaret; R. Della Negra; G. Grenier; R. Han; J-C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; W. Tromeur; M. Vander Donckt; Y. Zoccarato; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Kirikova; V. Kozlov; P. Smirnov; Y. Soloviev; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; A. Karakash; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouene; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; E. Guliyev; Y. Haddad; F. Magniette; G. Musat; M. Ruan; T. H. Tran; H. Videau; B. Bulanek; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; K. Kotera; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; D. Jeans; M. Götze; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2013-07-29

53

Track segments in hadronic showers in a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the three dimensional substructure of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter. The high granularity of the detector is used to find track segments of minimum ionising particles within hadronic showers, providing sensitivity to the spatial structure and the details of secondary particle production in hadronic cascades. The multiplicity, length and angular distribution of identified track segments are compared to GEANT4 simulations with several different shower models. Track segments also provide the possibility for in-situ calibration of highly granular calorimeters.

Adloff, C.; Blaising, J.-J.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N. K.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Ribon, A.; Schlatter, D.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J. G. R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Sudo, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Bartsch, V.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Jeans, D.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

2013-09-01

54

Plate stamping of masterplates for the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimetric for ATLAS detector at CERN  

SciTech Connect

Various methods have been explored for the fabrication of the large trapezoidal plates used in the construction of the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimeter for ATLAS. The options include die stamping, laser cutting, waterjet cutting, plasma arc cutting, and a combination of machining and laser cutting. Very early in the program, the Argonne group began investigating the possibility of die stamping the master plates. At that time it was felt that two dies would be necessary to achieve the accuracy required. Quotations were received for dies for both the master and spacer plates. Concern was expressed by many members of the collaboration that due to the very precise tolerances required, die stamping, using standard dies, would not be adequate. Fine blanking techniques were felt to be adequate, but were cost prohibitive. Two methods were finally used for the initial cutting of prototype plates, laser cutting and die stamping. Only the die stamping, will be reviewed here.

Hill, N.F.; Petereit, E.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.

1996-05-16

55

Measurement of positron showers with a digital hadron calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A small prototype of a finely granulated digital hadron calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as active elements was exposed to positrons of 1-16 GeV energy from the Fermilab test beam. The response function, energy resolution, as well as measurements of the shape of electromagnetic showers are presented. The data are compared to a Monte Carlo simulation of the set-up.

Burak Bilki; John Butler; E. May; G. Mavromanolakis; E. Norbeck; J. Repond; David Underwood; Lei Xia; Qingmin Zhang

2009-01-01

56

Master plate production for the Tile Calorimeter:Extended Barrel Modules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 41,000 master plates (Fig. 1) are required for the Extended Barrel Hadronic Calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Early in the R&D program associated with the detector, it was recognized that the fabrication of these steel laminations was a significant issue, both in terms of the cost to produce these high precision formed plates, as well as

J Proudfoot; V Guarino; K Wood; N Hill; E P Petereit; L Price

1999-01-01

57

Development of a readout link board for the demonstrator of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hybrid readout system is being developed for installation in one module of the ATLAS scintillating Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) during the long LHC shutdown in 2013/2014. The hybrid combines a fully functional demonstrator of the full-digital system planned for installation in 2022 with circuitry to maintain compatibility with the existing system. This is the report on a second generation prototype link and controller board connecting the on- and off-detector electronics. The main logic component within this board is a XILINX Kintex-7 FPGA connected to an 12 ×5 Gbps SNAP12 opto transmitter and a 4 ×10 Gbps QSFP+ connector, for off-detector communication. One of the latter two will be chosen for the final design.

Muschter, S.; Anderson, K.; Bohm, C.; Eriksson, D.; Oreglia, M.; Tang, F.

2013-03-01

58

Hadronic energy resolution of a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter using software compensation techniques  

E-print Network

The energy resolution of a highly granular 1 m3 analogue scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter is studied using charged pions with energies from 10 GeV to 80 GeV at the CERN SPS. The energy resolution for single hadrons is determined to be approximately 58%/sqrt(E/GeV}. This resolution is improved to approximately 45%/sqrt(E/GeV) with software compensation techniques. These techniques take advantage of the event-by-event information about the substructure of hadronic showers which is provided by the imaging capabilities of the calorimeter. The energy reconstruction is improved either with corrections based on the local energy density or by applying a single correction factor to the event energy sum derived from a global measure of the shower energy density. The application of the compensation algorithms to Geant4 simulations yield resolution improvements comparable to those observed for real data.

CALICE Collaboration; C. Adloff; J. Blaha; J. -J. Blaising; C. Drancourt; A. Espargilière; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; J. Prast; G. Vouters; K. Francis; J. Repond; J. Smith; L. Xia; E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; T. Buanes; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; T. Goto; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; M. Benyamna; C. Cârloganu; F. Fehr; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; J. G. R. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; U. Cornett; D. David; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; A. Vargas-Trevino; N. Feege; E. Garutti; I. Marchesini; M. Ramilli; P. Eckert; T. Harion; A. Kaplan; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; A. Tadday; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; M. Wing; F. Salvatore; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; V. Balagura; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Kirikova; V. Kozlov; P. Smirnov; Y. Soloviev; P. Buzhan; B. Dolgoshein; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; A. Karakash; E. Popova; S. Smirnov; C. Kiesling; S. Pfau; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; J. Bonis; B. Bouquet; S. Callier; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; M. Faucci Giannelli; J. Fleury; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; N. Seguin-Moreau; F. Wicek; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; D. Jeans; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Reinhard; M. Ruan; H. Videau; B. Bulanek; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2012-09-27

59

Hadron shower decomposition in a highly granular calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial development of showers induced by positive hadrons with momenta 10-80 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadronic calorimeter is analysed. The parametrisation of both longitudinal and radial shower profiles with the two- component functions are fit to the test beam data and simulations using the physics lists QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT from GEANT4 version 9.6 patch 01. The shower parameters, describing the longitudinal tail and radial halo, are in good agreement between data and simulations and are similar for pions and protons. For the longitudinal development, the most significant difference between data and simulations is in the relative containment of the separated components. For the radial development, the core slope parameter is underestimated by simulations. The physics list FTFP_BERT gives a very good description of proton showers in the studied energy range and gives better predictions of the pion shower development than QGSP_BERT.

Chadeeva, Marina; CALICE Collaboration

2015-02-01

60

A Novel Digital Hadron Calorimeter: Analysis and Calibration with Muons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis is a report on the design, construction and data analysis of the Digital Hadron Calorimeter (DHCAL). The DHCAL was constructed as part of the CALICE collaboration efforts in the SiD detector design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC). The SiD detector design is one of two detector designs for the ILC. The DHCAL is but one of the detector sub-systems that are to make up the entire detector. The CALICE collaboration is involved in the development of calorimeters for the ILC. The DHCAL utilizes Resistive Plate Chamber technology to detect the physics events and is the world's first digital imaging calorimeter. The prototype construction was performed at Argonne National Laboratory and the detector studied locally in a cosmic ray test stand. In addition, the DHCAL was also put into multiple test beam runs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This work will be completed with the analysis of the DHCAL data with muons. The calibration with muons will be discussed, as well as its purpose to the overall viability of this technology in a full scale detector.

Trojand, Daniel

61

A hadronic calorimeter with Glass RPC as sensitive medium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SDHCAL technological prototype is a 1 × 1 × 1.3 m3 high-granularity Semi-Digital Hadronic CALorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chambers as sensitive medium. It is one of the two HCAL options considered by the ILD Collaboration to be proposed for the detector of the future International Linear Collider project. The prototype is made of up to 50 GRPC detectors of 1 m2 size and 3 mm thickness each with an embedded semi-digital electronics readout that is autotriggering and power-pulsed. The GRPC readout is finely segmented into pads of 1 cm2. Measured performances of the GRPC and the full SDHCAL prototype in terms of homogeneity, low noise and energy resolution are presented in this proceeding.

Grenier, G.

2014-09-01

62

The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter Upgrade During Phase I  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter is being upgraded during phase 1. The upgrade includes the replacement of the current PMTs with the 4-anode ones and the readout electronics. Stray muons hitting the PMT windows produce Cherenkov light causing erroneous signals. These signals are detrimental to the triggering and physic results, since such signals mimic very high energy events. The new 4-anode PMTs are selected because of their thin windows to reduce the Cherenkov light production. Additional anodes also provide information to eliminate such signals. These new PMTs have been tested extensively to understand their characteristics and to develop the algorithms to eliminate the unwanted signals. Eventually, the current read out will be replaced with two-channel readout electronics for each PMT. The overall expected improvement on the physics results will also be discussed.

Gülmez, E.

2014-06-01

63

Upgrade for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Readout Electronics at the High Luminosity LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents an overview of the on-detector and off-detector electronics for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. Three options are being studied for the implementation of the new front-end readout: an improved version of the 3-in-1 card, a new version of the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. Moreover, the MainBoard will manage incoming signals from the FEBs and the DaughterBoard will send the digitized data to the off-detector electronics where the sROD will perform processing tasks on them. This work summarizes the status of the project.

Carrió, F.

2013-08-01

64

Studies of hadron-electron separators for the ZEUS barrel calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

Two possible upgrades, a shower maximum detector and a presampler, designed to improve the low energy electron/hadron separation capabilities of the ZEUS barrel calorimeter are described and test-beam results are reported. The presampler can also be used to correct for energy loss of particles traversing the dead material in front of the calorimeter.

Ambats, I.; Bortz, D.; Connolly, A. [and others

1995-05-25

65

A New scintillator tile / fiber preshower detector for the CDF central calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

A detector designed to measure early particle showers has been installed in front of the central CDF calorimeter at the Tevatron. This new preshower detector is based on scintillator tiles coupled to wavelength-shifting fibers read out by multianode photomultipliers and has a total of 3,072 readout channels. The replacement of the old gas detector was required due to an expected increase in instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron collider in the next few years. Calorimeter coverage, jet energy resolution, and electron and photon identification are among the expected improvements. The final detector design, together with the R&D studies that led to the choice of scintillator and fiber, mechanical assembly, and quality control are presented. The detector was installed in the fall 2004 Tevatron shutdown and is expected to start collecting colliding beam data by the end of 2004. First measurements indicate a light yield of 12 photoelectrons/MIP, a more than two-fold increase over the design goals.

Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.; Artikov, A.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Byrum, K.; Chang, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Goulianos, K.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, M.; Kuhlmann,; Lami, S.; Lindgren, M.; Lytken, E.; Miller, R.; Nodulman, L.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Roser, R.; /Argonne /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Michigan

2004-11-01

66

Pion and proton showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter  

E-print Network

Showers produced by positive hadrons in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter were studied. The experimental data were collected at CERN and FNAL for single particles with initial momenta from 10 to 80 GeV/c. The calorimeter response and resolution and spatial characteristics of shower development for proton- and pion-induced showers for test beam data and simulations using Geant4 version 9.6 are compared.

The CALICE Collaboration; B. Bilki; J. Repond; L. Xia; G. Eigen; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; J. G. R. Lima; R. Salcido; V. Zutshi; F. Salvatore; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; T. Suehara; T. Tomita; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; J. Apostolakis; D. Dannheim; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; W. Klempt; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Ribon; D. Schlatter; E. Sicking; V. Uzhinskiy; J. Giraud; D. Grondin; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; E. Brianne; U. Cornett; D. David; A. Ebrahimi; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; C. Neubüser; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; H. L. Tran; P. Buhmann; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; Y. Munwes; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; B. van Doren; G. W. Wilson; M. Wing; C. Combaret; L. Caponetto; R. Eté; G. Grenier; R. Han; J. C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; J. Berenguer Antequera; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Marin; J. Puerta-Pelayo; A. Verdugo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; R. Chistov; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Drutskoy; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; D. Mironov; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; D. Besson; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; E. Popova; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; N. van der Kolk; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; G. Martin-Chassard; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; F. Richard; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; Ch. de la Taille; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; C. Clerc; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; A. Matthieu; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Ruan; H. Videau; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; D. Jeans; S. Weber

2015-03-15

67

A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider  

SciTech Connect

Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

2010-01-01

68

A new portable test bench for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics certification  

E-print Network

This paper describes the upgraded portable test bench for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The previous version of the portable test bench was extensively used for certification and qualification of the front-end electronics during the commissioning phase as well as during the short maintenance periods of 2010 and 2011. The new version described here is designed to be an easily upgradable version of the 10-year-old system, able to evaluate the new technologies planned for the ATLAS upgrade as well as provide new functionalities to the present system. It will be used in the consolidation of electronics campaign during the long shutdown of the LHC in 2013-14 and during future maintenance periods. The system, based on a global re-design with state-of-the-art devices, is based on a back-end electronics crate instrumented with commercial and custom modules and a front-end GUI that is executed on an external portable computer and communicates with the controller in the crate through an Ethernet...

Alves, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Hee Yeun, K; Minashvili, I; Moreno, P; Qin, G; Reed, R; Schettino, V; Shalyugin, A; Solans, C; Sousa, J; Usai, G; Valero, A

2013-01-01

69

A new portable test bench for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics certification  

E-print Network

This paper describes the upgraded portable test bench for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The previous version of the portable test bench was extensively used for certification and qualification of the front-end electronics during the commissioning phase as well as during the short maintenance periods of 2010 and 2011. The new version described here is designed to be an easily upgradable version of the 10-year-old system, able to evaluate the new technologies planned for the ATLAS upgrade as well as provide new functionalities to the present system. It will be used in the consolidation of electronics campaign during the long shutdown of the LHC in 2013-14 and during future maintenance periods. The system, based on a global re-design with state-of-the-art devices, is based on a back-end electronics crate instrumented with commercial and custom modules and a front-end GUI that is executed on an external portable computer and communicate

Alves, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Hee Yeun, K; Minashvili, I; Moreno, P; Qin, G; Reed, R; Schettino, V; Shalyugin, A; Solans, C; Sousa, J; Usai, G; Valero, A

2013-01-01

70

Energy Flow Alrogithm Development for a Digital Hadron Calorimeter Using GEM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linear colliders are future accelerators for high energy particle physcis. The linear colliders use the collisions of electrons and positrons for research. Since the physics goals at these colliders demand high jet energy resolution, an energy flow (EF) algorithm provides a good solution for dramatic improvement of hadronic jets by utilizing momenta measured in tracking systems. Finer granularity of calorimeter cells is crucial for the success of EF algorithm. Consequently the necessary level of granularity requires large number of readout channels that could make such a calorimeter very expensive. Digital hardon calorimeter is a possible solution for this issue. This talk will cover EF algorithm development effort for a digital hadron calorimeter using GEM as the sensitive gap.

Kaushik, Venkatesh; Habib, Shahnoor; Li, Jia; Sosebee, Mark; Brandt, Andrew; de, Kaushik; White, Andrew; Yu, Jaehoon

2002-10-01

71

Hadronic models validation in GEANT4 with CALICE highly granular calorimeters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular hadronic and electromagnetic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider, and to validate hadronic shower models with unprecedented spatial segmentation. The electromagnetic calorimeter is a sampling structure of tungsten and silicon with 9720 readout channels. The hadron calorimeter uses 7608 small plastic scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. This high granularity opens up the possibility for precise three-dimensional shower reconstructions and for software compensation techniques to improve the energy resolution of the detector. We discuss the latest results on the studies of shower shapes and shower properties and the comparison to the latest developed GEANT4 models for hadronic showers. A satisfactory agreement at better than 5% is found between data and simulations for most of the investigated variables. We show that applying software compensation methods based on reconstructed clusters the energy resolution for hadrons improves by a factor of 15%. The next challenge for CALICE calorimeters will be to validate the 4th dimension of hadronic showers, namely their time evolution.

Ramilli, Marco; CALICE Collaboration

2012-12-01

72

The CALICE digital hadron calorimeter: calibration and response to pions and positrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to measure the jet products of the hadronic decays of electroweak bosons in a future lepton collider with 3-4% resolution, a novel approach named Particle Flow Algorithms is proposed. The Particle Flow Algorithms attempt to measure each particle in a hadronic jet individually, using the detector providing the best energy/momentum resolution. The role of the hadronic calorimeters is to measure the neutral component of the hadronic jets. In this context, the CALICE Collaboration developed the Digital Hadron Calorimeter, which uses Resistive Plate Chambers as active media. The 1-bit resolution (digital) readout of 1 × 1 cm2 pads achieves a world record in the number of readout channels already at the prototyping stage. Here we report on the results from the analysis of pion events of momenta between 2 to 60 GeV/c collected in the Fermilab test beam with an emphasis on the intricate calibration procedures.

Bilki, B.; CALICE Collaboration

2015-02-01

73

Impact of dead zones on the response of a hadron calorimeter with projective and non-projective geometry  

E-print Network

The aim of this study is to find an optimal mechanical design of the hadronic calorimeter for SiD detector which takes into account engineering as well as physics requirements. The study focuses on the crack effects between two modules for various barrel mechanical design on calorimeter response. The impact of different size of the supporting stringers and dead areas in an active calorimeter layer along the module boundary has been studied for single pions and muons. The emphasis has been put on the comparison of the projective and non-projective barrel geometry for SiD hadronic calorimeter.

J. Blaha; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis

2011-02-07

74

Beam Test Results with a Highly Granular Analog Hadron Calorimeter Prototype (AHCAL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To evaluate technologies for ILC calorimetry, the CALICE collaboration has constructed a prototype of a highly granular analog hadron sampling calorimeter with small scintillator cells, individually read out by silicon photomultipliers. This detector has been tested extensively in particle beams at DESY, CERN and Fermilab. The imaging capabilities of this detector provide three dimensional information of hadronic showers with unprecedented resolution and will thus help to constrain hadronic shower models in simulation codes. The high granularity also opens up the possibility for improved energy resolution achieved with energy weighting algorithms. Longitudinal and transverse shower profiles of hadronic events was compared to simulations with a variety of different models. The energy resolution and the linearity of the detector response as well as the unique possibility to decompose the hadronic shower into its electromagnetic, and hadronic components were studied.

Morozov, Sergey

2010-04-01

75

Study of Solid State Photon Detectors Read Out of Scintillator Tiles  

E-print Network

We present preliminary results on efficiency and light collection uniformity read out performances of different assemblies of scintillator tiles, coupled with solid state photon detectors of different make. Our test beam data suggest that the use of 2 mm scintillator tiles without wavelength shifting fibers may be possible in an ILC hadron calorimeter.

A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; E. Kuznetsova; P. Patteri; M. Piccolo

2009-01-14

76

THE ATLAS TILE CALORIMETER DIGITIZER S. Berglund, C. Bohm, S-O. Holmgren, K. Jon-And, J. Klereborn, B. Selldn, S. Silverstein  

E-print Network

are located in a TileCal "super drawer". The boards are connected in a chain ending in a Fibre-channel S-link Calorimeter. Light from the scintillators is transferred via wavelength shifting fibers to photomultipliers (PMT) in the base of the module. The PMTs and all other electronics are mounted on a sliding "drawer

77

Performance of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter with Cosmic Ray Muons and LHC Beam Data  

E-print Network

The CMS Hadron Calorimeter in the barrel, endcap and forward regions is fully commissioned. Cosmic ray data were taken with and without magnetic field at the surface hall and after installation in the experimental hall, hundred meters underground. Various measurements were also performed during the few days of beam in the LHC in September 2008. Calibration parameters were extracted, and the energy response of the HCAL determined from test beam data has been checked.

Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G

2010-01-01

78

Analysis of shower shapes of pions and protons from the tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter  

E-print Network

In this report, analysis results of test-beam data taken with the CALICE tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter prototype are presented. Proton and pion-induced showers originating from a particle beam of an momentum range of 25-150 GeV are examined. As a first part of the study, a comparison between data and two GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations with regard to variables describing hadronic shower fluctuations is performed. In the second part of this report, the separation potential of the W-AHCAL for protons and pions is discussed.

Burger, Angela Maria

2014-01-01

79

Single hadron response measurement and calorimeter jet energy scale uncertainty with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

E-print Network

The uncertainty on the calorimeter energy response to jets of particles is derived for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, the calorimeter response to single isolated charged hadrons is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo simulation using proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 7 TeV collected during 2009 and 2010. Then, using the decay of K_s and Lambda particles, the calorimeter response to specific types of particles (positively and negatively charged pions, protons, and anti-protons) is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo predictions. Finally, the jet energy scale uncertainty is determined by propagating the response uncertainty for single charged and neutral particles to jets. The response uncertainty is 2-5% for central isolated hadrons and 1-3% for the final calorimeter jet energy scale.

ATLAS Collaboration

2012-03-06

80

[Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

Not Available

1992-08-04

81

Shower characteristics of particles with momenta up to 100 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of showers initiated by 1-100 GeV positrons, pions, kaons, and protons in the highly granular CALICE analogue scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter. The data were taken at the CERN PS and SPS. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development. The results are compared to several Geant4 simulation models.

Sicking, Eva; CALICE; CLICdp collaborations

2015-02-01

82

Shower characteristics of particles with momenta up to 100 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter  

E-print Network

We present a study of showers initiated by 1–100 GeV positrons, pions, kaons, and protons in the highly granular CALICE analogue scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter. The data were taken at the CERN PS and SPS. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development. The results are compared to several Geant4 simulation models.

Sicking, E

2014-01-01

83

Channel control ASIC for the CMS hadron calorimeter front end readout module  

SciTech Connect

The Channel Control ASIC (CCA) is used along with a custom Charge Integrator and Encoder (QIE) ASIC to digitize signals from the hybrid photo diodes (HPDs) and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the CMS hadron calorimeter. The CCA sits between the QIE and the data acquisition system. All digital signals to and from the QIE pass through the CCA chip. One CCA chip interfaces with two QIE channels. The CCA provides individually delayed clocks to each of the QIE chips in addition to various control signals. The QIE sends digitized PMT or HPD signals and time slice information to the CCA, which sends the data to the data acquisition system through an optical link.

Ray Yarema et al.

2002-09-26

84

Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter  

E-print Network

A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 600,000 selected negatively changed pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the GEANT4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. Although a reasonable overall description of the data is observed, there are significant quantitative discrepancies in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

The CALICE Collaboration; B. Bilki; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; L. Xia; Z. Deng; Y. Li; Y. Wang; Q. Yue; Z. Yang; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; T. Price; N. K. Watson; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; C. Cârloganu; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; J. G. R. Lima; P. Salcido; V. Zutshi; V. Boisvert; B. Green; A. Misiejuk; F. Salvatore; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; T. Suehara; T. Tomita; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; J. Apostolakis; G. Folger; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; A. Ribon; V. Uzhinskiy; S. Cauwenbergh; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; K. Krüger; B. Lutz; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; N. Feege; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; S. Lu; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; A. Kaplan; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; E. J. Kim; B. van Doren; G. W. Wilson; M. Wing; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; R. Chistov; M. Danilov; A. Drutskoy; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; D. Besson; E. Popova; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; M. Faucci-Giannelli; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; B. Kégl; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; E. Becheva; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; F. Magniette; A. Matthieu; P. Mora de Freitas; H. Videau; J-E. Augustin; J. David; P. Ghislain; D. Lacour; L. Lavergne; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; D. Jeans; M. Götze

2014-11-26

85

Semi-Digital hadronic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new concept of high granularity hadronic calorimeter based on a semi-digital readout for future ILC experiments is presented. The aim of this concept is to provide the HCAL with a tracking capacity in addition to a good energy measurement resolution. The sensitive medium of this HCAL is made of very thin gas detectors. The readout is based on detector-embedded electronic boards equipped with low consumption daisy-chained 64-channel chips. The nice results obtained with a slice test made of small detectors show that the concept is successful and can be used to build a 1m3 semi-digital HCAL prototype.

Laktineh, Imad

2009-04-01

86

Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter  

E-print Network

A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 600,000 selected negatively changed pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the GEANT4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. Although a reasonable overall description of the data is observed, there are significant quantitative discrepancies in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

The CALICE Collaboration

2014-01-01

87

Directly Coupled Tiles for a High Granularity Scintillator-SiPM Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future detectors in high energy particle physics, such as those being proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC), will require highly segmented hadron calorimetry. One goal in the design of such devices is to improve the jet energy resolution in order to separate Z and W decays into jets. One of the technologies being explored is using small scintillator cells in conjunction with silicon photo multipliers (SiPM) as photon sensors. This talk will present the status of the research being performed on this by the Northern Illinois University High-Energy Physics group in collaboration with Fermilab and the CALICE Collaboration. It will include results on the geometry used to directly couple the cells to the photo detectors, and the design and operation of the circuit board and associated electronics used to read out an array of scintillators.

Salcido, Patrick

2009-11-01

88

Construction of a technological semi-digital hadronic calorimeter using GRPC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high-granularity semi-digital Hadronic calorimeter using GRPC as sensitive medium is one of the two HCAL options considered by the ILD collaboration to be proposed for the detector of the future International Linear Collider project. A prototype of 1m3 has been conceived within the CALICE collaboration in order to validate this option. The prototype intends to be as close as possible to the one proposed in the ILD Letter Of Intent. Few units made of 1m2 GRPC fully equipped with semi-digital readout electronics and new gas distribution design were produced and successfully tested. In 2010 we intend to produce 40 similar units to be inserted in a self-supporting mechanical structure. The prototype will then be exposed to TestBeams at CERN for final validation.

Laktineh, I.

2011-04-01

89

Development of a semi-digital hadronic calorimeter using GRPCs for future linear collider experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new concept of high granularity hadronic calorimeter using thin Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) as sensitive medium with embedded semi-digital readout electronics to be used in the future linear collider experiments is under development within the CALICE collaboration. Based on this concept, a small prototype was built and tested with success at CERN PS test beam in 2008. To validate completely this new concept a prototype of 1 m 3 is being conceived. Several GRPCs as large as 1 m 2 were built with a new design reducing the dead zones and improving the gas distribution system. The GRPCs were tested with an electronics board of the same size. The board containing 144 64-channel ASICs was conceived and built for this purpose.

Kieffer, Robert; Calice Collaboration

2011-02-01

90

Production and Test of the ATLAS Hadronic Calorimeter Digitizer S. Berglund, C. Bohm, K. Jon-And, J. Klereborn, M. Ramstedt and B. Selldn  

E-print Network

, on each digitizer board. Data from the TileDMUs are read out via a G-link based interface board (Fig.1 to an array of PMTs via wave length shifting fibers. The PMTs and all the front-end electronics are contained in so called drawers at the base of the calorimeter modules. There are 32 or 45 PMTs in a drawer

91

Steel specification for the ATLAS calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a collaborative experimental High Energy Physics experiment at the LHC Facility, CERN Laboratory, Geneva Switzerland, a group of US institutions has accepted the responsibility for constructing a large portion of the calorimeter for this experiment. This device is referred to as the Tile Calorimeter. The Tile Calorimeter has three major elements, a large center section (Barrel), and

V Guarino

1998-01-01

92

Status of the CALICE analog calorimeter technological prototypes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration is currently developing engineering prototypes of electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for a future linear collider detector. This detector is designed to be used in particle-flow based event reconstruction. In particular, the calorimeters are optimized for the individual reconstruction and separation of electromagnetic and hadronic showers. They are conceived as sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers, respectively. Two electromagnetic calorimeters are being developed, one with silicon-based active layers and one based on scintillator strips that are read out by MPPCs, allowing highly granular readout. The analog hadron calorimeter is based on scintillating tiles that are also read out individually by silicon photomultipliers. The multi-channel, auto-triggered front-end chips are integrated into the active layers of the calorimeters and are designed for minimal power consumption (power pulsing). The goal of the construction of these prototypes is to demonstrate the feasibility of building and operating detectors with fully integrated front-end electronics. The concept and engineering status of these prototypes are reported here.

Terwort, Mark; CALICE Collaboration

2012-12-01

93

Characterization of GEM Digital Hadron Calorimeter with 13bit KPiX Readout System Using Particle Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing a digital hadron calorimeter (DHCAL) for future linear colliders using double-layer Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector in the sensitive gap. The group has built prototype double GEM detectors in several sizes and have exposed four 30cm x 30cm prototype GEM detectors to particle beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. One of these detectors utilized a 13bit KPiX chip and its accompanying read out system developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This talk will present the results of the beam test data analysis to understand the characteristics and performance of the prototype detectors. More specifically, it will present the measured gain, response, and efficiency of the detectors as well as the dependence of these quantities on the ambient pressure, position at which the particle passes through the detector and the applied high voltage.

Khaled, Safat; Pray, Danrae; Park, Seongtae; Yu, Jaehoon; Jones, Andrew; Tran, Nam; Bloom, Benjamin; White, Andrew; Hahn, Changhie

2012-03-01

94

Characterization of GEM Digital Hadron Calorimeter with 13 bit KPiX Readout System Using Particle Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing a digital hadron calorimeter (DHCAL) for future linear colliders using double-layer Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector in the sensitive gap. The group has built prototype double GEM detectors in several sizes and have exposed four 30cm x 30cm prototype GEM detectors to particle beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. One of these detectors utilized a 13 bit KPiX chip and its accompanying read out system developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This talk will present the results of the beam test data analysis to understand the characteristics and performance of the prototype detectors. More specifically, it will present the measured gain, response, and efficiency of the detectors as well as the dependence of these quantities on the ambient pressure, position at which the particle passes through the detector and the applied high voltage.

Khaled, Safat

2012-03-01

95

The Optical and Electronic Readout of the HCAL Tile calorimeter By V. Korbel, Version 27.2.2001, V. Korbel, , LC-DET-2001-52, 2001.  

E-print Network

with stainless steel or brass absorber and scintillator tile detector plates. Together with the inner ECAL HCAL barrel module is an assembly of 38 sandwich layers, the HCAL endcaps have 45 sandwich layers form cell layers, from 3 tiles/cell in front to 7 tiles/cell in back. The barrel HCAL has

96

In-situ calibration of forward hadron calorimeters of CMS at LHC  

E-print Network

Physical possibility for bending the LHC protons (or ions) a huge angle of 1-20 degrees in the energy range of 0.45 to 7 TeV by means of a bent channeling crystal of Silicon or Germanium is demonstrated. Such an application can be useful for calibration of CMS (or ATLAS) calorimeters in situ by the LHC beam of precisely known energy. We show by simulations that such an application would be feasible at the LHC, and report the experience of IHEP Protvino in bending 70 GeV protons by 9 degrees (150 mrad) during 10 years in 1994-2004 experiments.

V. M. Biryukov

2005-04-12

97

Search for pair-produced long-lived neutral particles decaying to jets in the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter in pp collisions at ?{ s} = 8 TeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is used to search for the decay of a scalar boson to a pair of long-lived particles, neutral under the Standard Model gauge group, in 20.3 fb-1 of data collected in proton-proton collisions at ?{ s} = 8 TeV. This search is sensitive to long-lived particles that decay to Standard Model particles producing jets at the outer edge of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter or inside the hadronic calorimeter. No significant excess of events is observed. Limits are reported on the product of the scalar boson production cross section times branching ratio into long-lived neutral particles as a function of the proper lifetime of the particles. Limits are reported for boson masses from 100 GeV to 900 GeV, and a long-lived neutral particle mass from 10 GeV to 150 GeV.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.

2015-04-01

98

Search for pair-produced long-lived neutral particles decaying in the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV  

E-print Network

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is used to search for the decay of a scalar boson to a pair of long-lived particles, neutral under the Standard Model gauge group, in 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV. This search is sensitive to long-lived particles that decay to Standard Model particles producing jets at the outer edge of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter or inside the hadronic calorimeter. No significant excess of events is observed. Limits are reported on the product of the scalar boson production cross section times branching ratio into long-lived neutral particles as a function of the proper lifetime of the particles. Limits are reported for boson masses from 100 GeV to 900 GeV, and a long-lived neutral particle mass from 10 GeV to 150 GeV.

ATLAS Collaboration

2015-03-07

99

Search for pair-produced long-lived neutral particles decaying in the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV  

E-print Network

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is used to search for the decay of a scalar boson to a pair of long-lived particles, neutral under the Standard Model gauge group, in 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV. This search is sensitive to long-lived particles that decay to Standard Model particles producing jets at the outer edge of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter or inside the hadronic calorimeter. No significant excess of events is observed. Limits are reported on the product of the scalar boson production cross section times branching ratio into long-lived neutral particles as a function of the proper lifetime of the particles. Limits are reported for boson masses from 100 GeV to 900 GeV, and a long-lived neutral particle mass from 10 GeV to 150 GeV.

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin

2015-01-01

100

Production and commissioning of a large prototype Digital Hadron Calorimeter for future colliding beam experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new detector technology is being developed for future colliding beam experiments that is based on the use of fine-grained calorimetry, to optimize the use of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) in measuring hadronic jets. Instead of traditional tower geometry and energy summation from many sampling layers, the new approach measures energy deposition in 1 cm2 cells on each sampling layer

A. Baumbaugh; B. Bilki; J. Butler; T. Cundiff; L. Dal Monte; P. De Lurgio; G. Drake; K. Francis; W. Haberichter; E. Hazen; J. Hoff; S. Holm; A. Kreps; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; J. Smith; D. Trojand; S. Wu; L. Xia; Q. Zhang

2011-01-01

101

CALICE scintillator HCAL - Electromagnetic and hadronic shower analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE test beam calorimeters operated at the CERN SPS facility have collected a large sample of hadronic and electromagnetic showers with unprecedented granularity. The calorimeters and beam line instrumentation are modeled in the MOKKA framework and full simulation of the test beam experiment is performed using GEANT4. Digitization is applied to each calorimeter to account for detector effects and noise. The scintillator-based hadronic calorimeter (AHCAL) is the center of the studies reported in this paper. The most important validation of the detector modeling and calibration chain is the test of the calorimeter response linearity and resolution for a large range on incident beam energies. Electromagnetic showers are the most demanding test since the energy deposited per single tile in an electromagnetic shower is larger than in a hadronic shower for the same beam energy. Results of the calorimeter response to muons and positrons are discussed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC). The analysis of single pion showers, recorded with the AHCAL offer the unique possibility to test hadronic shower models using a number of different observables. Total energy and longitudinal profiles have been studied at first and compared with two available shower models in GEANT4. Results of the effect of the shower leakage on the reconstructed energy and energy resolution are presented. Furthermore, studies of shower separation are performed using event mixing techniques. Shower separation is critical for the performance of modern particle flow algorithms, which here for the first time can be tested on experimental data.

Garutti, Erika; CALICE Collaboration

2009-04-01

102

The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Calorimeters with Scintillator and with Gas Readout  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hadronic showers are characterized by a rich particle structure in the spatial as well as in the time domain. The prompt component comes from relativistic fragments that deposit energy at the ns scale, while late components are associated predominantly with neutrons in the cascade. To measure the impact of these late components, two experiments, based on gaseous and plastic active layers with steel and tungsten absorbers, were set up. The different choice for the material of the active layers produces distinct responses to neutrons, and consequently to late energy depositions. After discussing the technical aspects of these systems, we present a comparison of the signals, read out with fast digitizers with deep buffers, and provide detailed information of the time structure of hadronic showers over a long sampling window.

Szalay, Marco; CALICE collaboration

2015-02-01

103

CMS hadron calorimeter front-end upgrade for SLHC phase I  

SciTech Connect

We present an upgrade plan for the CMS HCAL detector. The HCAL upgrade is required for the increased luminosity (3 * 10E34) of SLHC Phase I which is targeted for 2014. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to add longitudinal segmentation to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. The increased segmentation is achieved by replacing the hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) with silicon PMTs (SIPMs). We plan to instrument each fiber of the calorimeter with an SIPM (103,000 total). We will then electrically sum outputs from selected SIPMs to form the longitudinal readout segments. In addition to having more longitudinal information, the upgrade plans include a new custom ADC with matched sensitivity and timing information. The increased data volume requires higher speed transmitters and the additional power dissipation for the readout electronics requires better thermal design, since much of the on-detector infrastructure (front-end electronics crates, cooling pipes, optical fiber plant, etc.) will remain the same. We will report on the preliminary designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

2009-09-01

104

(Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

Not Available

1992-08-04

105

Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator  

E-print Network

The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new read-out system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

Henrik Åkerstedt; Steffen Muschter; Gary Drake; Kelby Anderson; Christian Bohm; Mark Oreglia; Fukun Tang

2014-06-23

106

Design Studies of the Calorimeter Systems for the sPHENIX Experiment at RHIC and Future Upgrade Plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PHENIX Experiment at RHIC is planning a series of major upgrades that will enable a comprehensive measurement of jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions, provide enhanced physics capabilities for studying nucleon-nucleus and polarized proton collisions, and allow a detailed study of electron-nucleus collisions at the Electron Ion Collider at Brookhaven (eRHIC). The first of these upgrades, sPHENIX, will be based on the former BaBar magnet and will include a hadronic calorimeter and new electromagnetic calorimeter that will cover ±1.1 units in pseudorapidity and 2? in azimuth in the central region, resulting in a factor of 6 increase in acceptance over the present PHENIX detector. The electromagnetic calorimeter will be a tungsten scintillating fiber design with a radiation length ~ 7 mm and a Moliere radius ~ 2 cm. It will have a total depth of ~ 18 radiation lengths and an energy resolution ~ 15%/?E. The hadronic calorimeter will consist of steel plates with scintillating tiles in between that are read out with wavelength shifting fibers, It will have a total depth of ~ 5 interaction lengths and an energy resolution 100%/?E. Both calorimeters will use silicon photomultipliers as the readout sensor. Detailed design studies and Monte Carlo simulations for both calorimeters have been carried out and prototype detectors have been constructed and tested in a test beam at Fermilab in February 2014. This contribution describes these design studies for the sPHENIX experiment and its future upgrade plans at RHIC.

Woody, C.; Kistenev, E.; PHENIX Collaboration

2015-02-01

107

SLD liquid argon calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The liquid argon calorimeter (LAC) of the SLD detector is a parallel plate -- liquid argon sampling calorimeter, used to measure particle energies in Z[sup 0] decays at the Stanford Linear Collider. The LAC module design is based on a unique projective tower structure, in which lead plates and segmented lead tiles serve both as absorbers and electrodes. The LAC front end electronics incorporates several novel features, including extensive multiplexing and optical fiber readout, which take advantage of the low SLC beam crossing frequency. The operational performance of the LAC during the recently completed SLD physics run (which recorded over 10,000 Z[sup 0] events) is discussed.

Vella, E.

1992-10-01

108

SLD liquid argon calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The liquid argon calorimeter (LAC) of the SLD detector is a parallel plate -- liquid argon sampling calorimeter, used to measure particle energies in Z{sup 0} decays at the Stanford Linear Collider. The LAC module design is based on a unique projective tower structure, in which lead plates and segmented lead tiles serve both as absorbers and electrodes. The LAC front end electronics incorporates several novel features, including extensive multiplexing and optical fiber readout, which take advantage of the low SLC beam crossing frequency. The operational performance of the LAC during the recently completed SLD physics run (which recorded over 10,000 Z{sup 0} events) is discussed.

Vella, E.; SLD Collaboration

1992-10-01

109

Hyperbolic Tilings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This image is a hyperbolic tiling made from alternating two shapes: heptagons and triangles. This image is a hyperbolic tiling made from alternating two shapes: heptagons and triangles. This image is a hyperbolic tiling made from alternating two shapes: heptagons and triangles. This image is a hyperbolic tiling made from alternating two shapes: heptagons and triangles. This image is a hyperbolic tiling made from alternating two shapes: heptagons and triangles.

110

A position sensitive highly radiation hard and fast hadron calorimeter for a lead ion experiment at CERN SPS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the performance of the Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) built for the NA50 experiment at the CERN SPS. This detector measures the Cherenkov light produced in silica optical fibres embedded in tantalum and offers the double advantage of being highly radiation resistant (up to several Grad) and very fast (signal width of the order of 10 ns). It has an active volume of 5 × 5 × 65 cm 3 with a fibre to tantalum volume ratio of {1}/{17}; the fibres are positioned at an angle of 0° with respect to the beam direction and have a diameter of 365 ?m. The measured energy resolution ( {?}/{E}) is 30% for protons at 205 GeV and 5% for lead ions at 160 GeV/nucleon. The detector exhibits also very good localising properties since it can detect the impact point of the lead beam on its front face with a precision better than 0.4 mm rms.

Chiavassa, E.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Gallio, M.; Guaita, P.; Musso, A.; Piccotti, A.; Scomparin, E.; Vercellin, E.

1995-12-01

111

Rectangular Tiling  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Tilling starts with an iteration space and partitions the iteration space into uniform tiles of a given size and shape. The\\u000a tiles can be any shapes such as triangles, squares, rectangles, parallelograms, hexagons or their higher-dimensional equivalents.\\u000a In practice, however, squares, rectangles and parallelograms are common. As a result, two types of tiling techniques are distinguished\\u000a in the literature: rectangular

Jingling Xue

112

Floor Tiles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Java applet allows users to explore tessellations made from quadrilaterals. The user deforms a square into another quadrilateral, which then tiles the plane. The user can choose two colors for the tessellation. An information window provides data about the shape to be tiled, including: area, perimeter, coordinates for vertices, and side lengths.

2005-01-01

113

Tiling phosphorene.  

PubMed

We present a scheme to categorize the structure of different layered phosphorene allotropes by mapping their nonplanar atomic structure onto a two-color 2D triangular tiling pattern. In the buckled structure of a phosphorene monolayer, we assign atoms in "top" positions to dark tiles and atoms in "bottom" positions to light tiles. Optimum sp3 bonding is maintained throughout the structure when each triangular tile is surrounded by the same number N of like-colored tiles, with 0?N?2. Our ab initio density functional calculations indicate that both the relative stability and electronic properties depend primarily on the structural index N. The proposed mapping approach may also be applied to phosphorene structures with nonhexagonal rings and 2D quasicrystals with no translational symmetry, which we predict to be nearly as stable as the hexagonal network. PMID:25418761

Guan, Jie; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David

2014-12-23

114

ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test  

SciTech Connect

This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2 individually read out towers. The fibers from an individual tower are grouped together to form readout tower bundles. These are each optically coupled to an avalanche photodiode (APO) via a short light guide to provide some spatial optical mixing and to match the fiber bundle to the APO. The module assembly is indicated in Figure l. The supermodules weigh about 9.6 tons and are the basic units handled during installation. Each supermodule is roughly I45cm wide at the front surface by 350cm long with an active depth of 24.5cm (at {eta} = 0) plus an additional 6.6 cm of depth in structural plates. The physical characteristics of the ALICE EMCal are summarized in Table 1. The EMCal test beam measurements at FNAL will utilize a stacked 4 x 4 array of prototype EMCal modules (8 x 8 towers). All towers will be instrumented with the same model APO and preamplifier as will be used in the ALICE experiment and all channels will be readout with existing prototype front end electronics intended for use in ALICE. The goals of the test beam measurements are: To investigate the energy resolution, linearity, uniformity, and position resolution, using electron beams; To study the energy dependence of the response to electrons and hadrons to determine the particle identification capabilities of the EMCal by shower shape; And to investigate the timing characteristics of the energy signal for crude time-of-flight measurement ({approx} 1ns) for use for anti-neutron rejection. Measurements will be made for comparison with different signal shaping times in the front end electronics.

Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

2005-09-01

115

SPIROC: design and performances of a dedicated very front-end electronics for an ILC Analog Hadronic CALorimeter (AHCAL) prototype with SiPM read-out  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the future e+ e- International Linear Collider (ILC) the ASIC SPIROC (Silicon Photomultiplier Integrated Read-Out Chip) was designed to read out the Analog Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) equipped with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM). It is an evolution of the FLC_SiPM chip designed by the OMEGA group in 2005. SPIROC2 [1] was realized in AMS SiGe 0.35 ?m technology [2] and developed to match the requirements of large dynamic range, low noise, low consumption, high precision and large number of read-out channels. This ASIC is a very front-end read-out chip that integrates 36 self triggered channels with variable gain to achieve charge and time measurements. The charge measurement must be performed from 1 up to 2000 photo-electrons (p.e.) corresponding to 160 fC up to 320 pC for SiPM gain 106. The time measurement is performed with a coarse 12-bit counter related to the bunch crossing clock (up to 5 MHz) and a fine time ramp based on this clock (down to 200 ns) to achieve a resolution of 1 ns. An analog memory array with a depth of 16 for each channel is used to store the time information and the charge measurement. The analog memory content (time and charge) is digitized thanks to an internal 12-bit Wilkinson ADC. The data is then stored in a 4kbytes RAM. A complex digital part is necessary to manage all these features and to transfer the data to the DAQ. SPIROC2 is the second generation of the SPIROC ASIC family designed in 2008 by the OMEGA group. A very similar version (SPIROC2c) was submitted in February 2012 to improve the noise performance and also to integrate a new TDC (Time to Digital Converter) structure. This paper describes SPIROC2 and SPIROC2c ASICs and illustrates the main characteristics thank to a series of measurements.

Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Callier, S.; Fleury, J.; Dulucq, F.; De la Taille, C.; Chassard, G. Martin; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.

2013-01-01

116

SPIROC (SiPM Integrated Read-Out Chip): dedicated very front-end electronics for an ILC prototype hadronic calorimeter with SiPM read-out  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SPIROC chip is a dedicated very front-end electronics for an ILC (International Linear Collider) prototype of hadronic calorimeter using Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) or Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC) readout. This ASIC is due to equip a 10,000-channel demonstrator in 2010. SPIROC is an evolution of FLC-SiPM used for the ILC Analogue HCAL physics prototype. The first prototype of SPIROC was submitted in June 2007. It embeds cutting edge features that fulfil ILC final detector requirements. It has been realized in 0.35 ?m SiGe technology. It has been developed to match the requirements of large dynamic range, low noise, low consumption, high precision and large number of readout channels needed. SPIROC is an auto-triggered, dual gain, 36-channel ASIC which allows to measure on each channel the charge from one photoelectron to 2,000 photoelectron and the time with a 100 ps accurate Time-to-digital Converter (TDC). An analogue memory array with a depth of 16 for each channel is used to store the time information and the charge measurement. A 12-bit Wilkinson Analogue-to-digital Converter (ADC) has been embedded to digitize the analogue memory content (time and charge on 2 gains). The data are then stored in a 4 Kbytes RAM. A very complex digital part has been integrated to manage all these features and to transfer the data to the DAQ which is described in Dulucq et al. After an exhaustive description, the extensive measurement results of this new front-end chip are presented.

Bouchel, M.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Jaeger, J.-J.; de La Taille, C.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.

2011-01-01

117

Tiled microprocessors  

E-print Network

Current-day microprocessors have reached the point of diminishing returns due to inherent scalability limitations. This thesis examines the tiled microprocessor, a class of microprocessor which is physically scalable but ...

Taylor, Michael Bedford, 1975-

2007-01-01

118

Fiber-tile optical studies at Argonne  

SciTech Connect

In support of a fiber-tile calorimeter for SDC, we have done studies on a number of topics. The most basic problems were light output and uniformity of response. Using a small electron beam, we have studied fiber placement, tile preparation, wrapping and masking, fiber splicing, fiber routing, phototube response, and some degradation factors. We found two configurations which produced more light output than the others and reasonably uniform response. We have chosen one of these to go into production for the EM test module on the basis of fiber routing for ease of assembly of the calorimeter. We have also applied some of the tools we developed to CDF end plug tile uniformity, shower max testing and development for a couple of detectors, and development of better techniques for radiation damage studies. 18 figs.

Underwood, D.G.; Morgan, D.J.; Proudfoot, J.

1991-07-23

119

Commissioning of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter provides electromagnetic and forward hadronic calorimetry for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Since the installation of the calorimeter in 2006, the electronic calibration and readout systems have been exercised with regular calibration and cosmic runs, and with three days of LHC single beam runs. These datasets have enabled detailed studies of calibration procedures, pulse

A. Gibson

2010-01-01

120

Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator  

E-print Network

The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new read-out system will be installed in one slice of ...

Akerstedt, H; The ATLAS collaboration; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, C; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

2014-01-01

121

Method and system for improved resolution of a compensated calorimeter detector  

DOEpatents

An improved method and system for a depleted uranium calorimeter detector used in high energy physics experiments. In a depleted uranium calorimeter detector, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined and the output response of the calorimeter detector is compensated so that the ratio of the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a lepton to the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a hadron of the same energy as the lepton is approximately equal to 1. In the present invention, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined as a function of time and the hadron content of the response of the calorimeter detector is inferred based upon the time structure of the energy pulse measured by the calorimeter detector. The energy measurement can be corrected based on the inference of the hadron content whereby the resolution of the calorimeter can be improved.

Dawson, John W. (Willowbrook, IL)

1991-01-01

122

TILES AND CERAMIC CONTAINERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

TILES (Aa 1-14) Several dozen fragments of pan tiles (keramides) and cover tiles (kalypteres) were found in U6. Only one cover tile was found virtually complete, and it was also possible to reconstruct one unstamped pan tile. The main characteristic of this group of material is that by far most of the fragments of unstamped tiles and all those of

Vladimir I. Kac; Sergei Yu. Monachov; Vladimir F. Stolba; Alexander N. Šeglov

123

Status of Zero Degree Calorimeter for CMS Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) is integral part of the CMS experiment, especially, for heavy ion studies. The design of the ZDC includes two independent calorimeter sections: an electromagnetic section and a hadronic section. Sampling calorimeters using tungsten and quartz fibers have been chosen for the energy measurements. An overview of the ZDC is presented along with a current status of calorimeter's preparation for Day 1 of LHC.

Grachov, O. A.; Murray, M. J.; Ayan, A. S.; Debbins, P.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; D'Enterria, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); CERN PH/EP, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

2006-10-27

124

Status of Zero Degree Calorimeter for CMS Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) is integral part of the CMS experiment, especially, for heavy ion studies. The design of the ZDC includes two independent calorimeter sections: an electromagnetic section and a hadronic section. Sampling calorimeters using tungsten and quartz fibers have been chosen for the energy measurements. An overview of the ZDC is presented along with a current status of calorimeter's preparation for Day 1 of LHC.

Grachov, O. A.; Murray, M. J.; Ayan, A. S.; Debbins, P.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; d'Enterria, D.

2006-10-01

125

A Full Slice Test Version of a Tentative Upgraded Readout System for TileCal  

E-print Network

The upgrade plans on the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) include the full readout of all data to the counting room. In order to study functional requirements of the future upgraded TileCal readout system we have assembled a minimal TDAQ slice. The aim is to implement a tentative readout chain for TileCal, starting with a newly developed 3-in-1 FE-board from University of Chicago and ending with the storage of triggered data on a PC. Later we will use PMT pulses, amplified and shaped by the 3-in-1 board, as a data source. However, for simplicity we start by using well defined calibration pulses also generated by the 3-in-1 board. The pulses are sampled by a 12 bit ADC, which is connected to an ML605 evaluation board from XILINX. These boards emulate the new on-detector electronics. The ML605 communicates via two 5Gb/s optical links with a Virtex-6 FPGA development board from HighTech Global which emulates the off-detector electronics. The off-detector board is situated in a PC and uses PCIe for readout an...

Muschter, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, C; Eriksson, D; Kavianipour, H; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

2011-01-01

126

Steel specification for the Atlas calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

As part of a collaborative experimental High Energy Physics experiment at the LHC Facility, CERN Laboratory, Geneva Switzerland, a group of US institutions has accepted the responsibility for constructing a large portion of the calorimeter for this experiment. This device is referred to as the Tile Calorimeter. The Tile Calorimeter has three major elements, a large center section (Barrel), and two end sections (Extended Barrel). The US group will be responsible for the construction of one of these extended barrel sections. All of the components that are required to construct this device will be fabricated in the US over a period of three years commencing in 1998. Another similar element and the barrel element will be constructed in both eastern and western Europe by parallel groups. The extended barrel is a cylindrical device approximately 8.5 meters (28 ft.) OD x 4.5 meters (14 ft.) ID, made up of 64 wedges. Each of these wedges (see Attachment 1) is constructed by bolting submodules to a strongback girder. Each submodule is constructed of a series of sheets that are welded and glued together. This document summarizes the characteristics and specifications of these steel sheets. The Tile Calorimeter is the return path for the magnet flux of the ATLAS internal superconducting 2T solenoid, therefore its steel magnetic properties are important.

Guarino, V.

1998-02-10

127

Tile-in-ONE.cern.ch  

E-print Network

The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter assesses the quality of data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks are then performed by running several tools and systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration’s requirements and do not necessarily builds an effective connection among them. Thus, a program is usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a unique platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract th...

Sivolella Gomes, Andressa; The ATLAS collaboration; Ferreira, Fernando; Solans, Carlos; Solodkov, Alexander

2015-01-01

128

Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles(1 deg -7 deg). The 7 lambda deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented

Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D. R.; Carey, R.; Dye, S.

1994-08-01

129

Plane Tilings Richard P. Stanley  

E-print Network

Plane Tilings Richard P. Stanley M.I.T. Plane Tilings ­ p. #12;region: tiles: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Plane Tilings ­ p. #12;tiling: 1 7 5 6 2 34 Plane Tilings ­ p. #12;Is there a tiling? How many? About how many that a tiling doesn't exist? What is a "typical" tiling? Plane Tilings ­ p. #12;Relations among different

130

Effect of the muon component of cosmic rays on the results of hadron experiments with the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) of the Tien Shan station  

Microsoft Academic Search

A full-scale simulation of the response of the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) at the Tien Shan station to the passage of\\u000a single protons and muons was performed on the basis of the GEANT4 package in order to estimate the contribution of the muon\\u000a cosmic-ray component to the generation of unusual events (such as Anti-Centauros), which were recorded by this facility,

A. G. Bogdanov; R. P. Kokoulin; A. A. Petrukhin; A. V. Shalabaeva; V. I. Yakovlev

2008-01-01

131

Effect of the muon component of cosmic rays on the results of hadron experiments with the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) of the Tien Shan station  

Microsoft Academic Search

A full-scale simulation of the response of the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) at the Tien Shan station to the passage of single protons and muons was performed on the basis of the GEANT4 package in order to estimate the contribution of the muon cosmic-ray component to the generation of unusual events (such as Anti-Centauros), which were recorded by this facility,

A. G. Bogdanov; R. P. Kokoulin; A. A. Petrukhin; A. V. Shalabaeva; V. I. Yakovlev

2008-01-01

132

Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES  

E-print Network

We propose to build the Electromagnetic calorimeter for the HADES di-lepton spectrometer. It will enable to measure the data on neutral meson production from nucleus-nucleus collisions, which are essential for interpretation of dilepton data, but are unknown in the energy range of planned experiments (2-10 GeV per nucleon). The calorimeter will improve the electron-hadron separation, and will be used for detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and HI reactions. Detailed description of the detector layout, the support structure, the electronic readout and its performance studied via Monte Carlo simulations and series of dedicated test experiments is presented. The device will cover the total area of about 8 m^2 at polar angles between 12 and 45 degrees with almost full azimuthal coverage. The photon and electron energy resolution achieved in test experiments amounts to 5-6%/sqrt(E[GeV]) which is sufficient for the eta meson reconstruction with S/B ratio of 0.4% in Ni+Ni collisions at 8 AGeV. A purity of the identified leptons after the hadron rejection, resulting from simulations based on the test measurements, is better than 80% at momenta above 500 MeV/c, where time-of-flight cannot be used.

W. Czyzycki; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; M. Golubeva; F. Guber; A. Ivashkin; M. Kajetanowicz; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; A. Kugler; K. Lapidus; E. Lisowski; J. Pietraszko; A. Reshetin; P. Salabura; Y. Sobolev; J. Stanislav; P. Tlusty; T. Torrieri; M. Traxler

2011-11-28

133

Interlocking wettable ceramic tiles  

DOEpatents

An electrolytic cell for the reduction of aluminum having a layer of interlocking cathode tiles positioned on a cathode block. Each tile includes a main body and a vertical restraining member to prevent movement of the tiles away from the cathode block during operation of the cell. The anode of the electrolytic cell may be positioned about 1 inch from the interlocking cathode tiles.

Tabereaux, Jr., Alton T.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Groat, Eric; Mroz, Thomas; Ulicny, Alan; Walker, Mark F.

2005-03-08

134

Effect of the muon component of cosmic rays on the results of hadron experiments with the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) of the Tien Shan station  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale simulation of the response of the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) at the Tien Shan station to the passage of single protons and muons was performed on the basis of the GEANT4 package in order to estimate the contribution of the muon cosmic-ray component to the generation of unusual events (such as Anti-Centauros), which were recorded by this facility, and to the imitation of the long-flying component, which changes the shape of the average cascade curve. A comparison of the results of this simulation with experimental data reveals that the appearance of Anti-Centauros may be reasonably explained by the contribution of multiple interactions of single muons, but that muon events are insufficient for explaining the change in the shape of the cascade curve (in particular, the emergence of a second maximum)

Bogdanov, A. G., E-mail: AGBogdanov@mephi.ru; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shalabaeva, A. V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2008-01-15

135

Effect of the muon component of cosmic rays on the results of hadron experiments with the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) of the Tien Shan station  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale simulation of the response of the big ionization calorimeter (BIC) at the Tien Shan station to the passage of single protons and muons was performed on the basis of the GEANT4 package in order to estimate the contribution of the muon cosmic-ray component to the generation of unusual events (such as Anti-Centauros), which were recorded by this facility, and to the imitation of the long-flying component, which changes the shape of the average cascade curve. A comparison of the results of this simulation with experimental data reveals that the appearance of Anti-Centauros may be reasonably explained by the contribution of multiple interactions of single muons, but that muon events are insufficient for explaining the change in the shape of the cascade curve (in particular, the emergence of a second maximum).

Bogdanov, A. G., E-mail: AGBogdanov@mephi.ru; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shalabaeva, A. V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2008-01-15

136

Electronic chain for the readout of a fast liquid argon prototype calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. A research and development program is being conducted in view of realizing an electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The authors report on tests on fast electronics, coupled to an electromagnetic prototype calorimeter built with an accordion structure. Three different types of preamplifiers have been used. In two (Si and GaAs hybrids),

B. Aubert; A. Bazan; B. Beaugiraud; J. Colas; M. Lebeau; T. Leflour; J. C. MeMarec; M. Maire; P. Petitpas; J. Thion; J. P. Vialle; I. Wingerter-Seez; H. A. Gordon; V. Radeka; D. Rahm; D. Stephani; J. L. Chevalley; C. W. Fabjan; A. Franz; P. Farthouat; O. Gildemeister; P. Jenni; M. Lefebvre; M. Nessi; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; M. Pepe; W. Richter; G. R. Stevenson; W. J. Willis; J. M. Baze; L. Gosset; P. Lavocat; B. Mnasoulie; J. P. Meyer; J. F. Renardy; J. Teiger; H. Zaccone; G. Battistoni; D. Camin; D. Cavalli; G. Costa; A. Ferrari; F. Gianotti; L. Mandelli; M. Mazzanti; L. Perini; P. Sala; E. Auge; R. L. Chase; J. C. Chollet; C. de la Taille; L. Fayard; D. Fournier; G. Guilhem; A. Hrisoho; L. Iconomidou-Fayard; P. Jean; B. Merkel; J. M. Noppe; G. Parrour; P. Petroff; J. P. Repellin; A. Schaffer; N. Seguin; J. J. Veillet; C. Fuglesang

1991-01-01

137

Repairing ceramic insulating tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fused-silica tiles containing large voids or gauges are repaired without adhesives by plug insertion method. Tiles are useful in conduits for high-temperature gases, in furnaces, and in other applications involving heat insulation.

Dunn, B. R.; Laymance, E. L.

1980-01-01

138

Electronics of LHCb calorimeter monitoring system  

E-print Network

All calorimeter sub-detectors in LHCb, the Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD), the Preshower detector (PS), the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) and the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) are equipped with the Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as devices for light to electrical signal conversion [1]. The PMT gain behaviour is not stable in a time, due to changes in the load current and due to ageing. The calorimeter light emitting diode (LED) monitoring system has been developed to monitor the PMT gain over time during data taking. Furthermore the system will play an important role during the detector commissioning and during LHC machine stops, in order to perform tests of the PMTs, cables and FE boards and measurements of relative time alignment. The aim of the paper is to describe the LED monitoring system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation based on radiation tolerant components and to summarize the system performance.

Konoplyannikov, A

2008-01-01

139

Uranium scintillator calorimeter at the CERN ISR  

SciTech Connect

The design, Monte Carlo studies and test beam results of a uranium/scintillator calorimeter to be installed in the Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR) at CERN are described. In its final stage the calorimeter will cover the full azimuth over a polar region of 45/sup 0/ < theta < 135/sup 0/. The full calorimeter is built in a modular way from 128 stacks, with each stack internally subdivided into six cells of 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/ cross section. The readout is by wavelength shifting (WLS) plates with a separate readout of the front part of the calorimeter (first ten plates) to allow electromagnetic/hadronic separation. Since the readout plates are on both sides of the cells, position information is obtained from the left/right ratio.

Gordon, H; Killian, T; Ludlam, T

1980-01-01

140

Development of a forward calorimeter system for the STAR experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of an R&D program to develop a forward calorimeter system (FCS) for the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The FCS is a very compact, compensated, finely granulated, high resolution calorimeter system being developed for p+p and p+A program at RHIC. The FCS prototype consists of both electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters. The electromagnetic portion of the detector is constructed with W powder and scintillation fibers. The hadronic calorimeter is a traditional Pb/Sc-plate sandwich design. Both calorimeters were readout with Hamamatsu MPPCs. A full- scale prototype of the FCS was tested with a beam at FNAL in March 2014. We present details of the design, construction technique and performance of the FCS prototype during the test run at FNAL.

Tsai, O. D.; Aschenauer, E.; Christie, W.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Fazio, S.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Heppelmann, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Jacobs, W. W.; Igo, G.; Kisilev, A.; Landry, K.; Liu, X.; Mondal, M. M.; Pan, Y. X.; Sergeeva, M.; Shah, N.; Sichtermann, E.; Trentalange, S.; Visser, G.; Wissink, S.

2015-02-01

141

Handmade Tile Mosaics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

Keeler, Rusty

2007-01-01

142

Report of the Working Group on the physics of hadronic showers  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses hadronic shower codes for studies of compensation in uranium calorimeters. In particular, the paper emphasizes the use of Monte Carlo calculations to correct for electromagnetic response in SLD calorimeters. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

Brau, J.E.; Stacey, B.; Abraham, D.; Derrick, M.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fukui, Y.; Gabriel, T.A.; Givernaud, A.; Kowalski, H.; Nodulman, L.

1987-01-01

143

Physics with the ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter  

E-print Network

I will present physics measurements which are achievable in the ALICE experiment at the LHC through the inclusion of a new electromagnetic calorimeter. I will focus on jet measurements in proton proton and heavy ion collisions. Detailed simulations have been performed on jet reconstruction, jet triggering, heavy flavor jet reconstruction through electron identification, gamma-jet reconstruction and the measurements of identified hadrons and resonances in jets. I will show the physics capabilities which are made possible through the combination of calorimeter information with the other detector components in ALICE.

Rene Bellwied; for the ALICE Collaboration

2009-07-17

144

CMS Forward Calorimeters Phase II Upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Phase II Upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeters (electromagnetic and hadronic) originates from the fact that these calorimeters will not be sufficiently performant with the expected HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) conditions. The major challenge is to preserve/improve the high performance of the current forward detectors with new devices that can withstand the unprecedented radiation levels and disentangle the very large event pileup. Here, we present an overview of the various upgrade options being considered by CMS, explaining the detector concepts and current/future beam test activities.

Bilki, B.; CMS Collaboration

2015-02-01

145

Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

1983-01-01

146

Performance of the combined zero degree calorimeter for CMS  

E-print Network

The combined zero degree calorimeter (ZDC) is a combination of sampling quartz/tungsten electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. Two identical combined calorimeters are located in the LHC tunnel at CERN at the straight section ~140 m on each side of the CMS interaction vertex and between the two beam pipes. They will detect very forward photons and neutrons. ZDC information can be used for a variety of physics measurements as well as improving the collision centrality determination in heavy-ion collisions. Results are presented for ZDC performance studies with the CERN SPS H2 test beam.

O A Grachov; M Murray; J Snyder; J Wood; V Zhukova; A S Ayan; P Debbins; D F Ingram; E Norbeck; Y Onel; E Garcia; G Stephans; for the CMS Collaboration

2008-07-04

147

Performance of the combined zero degree calorimeter for CMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combined zero degree calorimeter (ZDC) is a combination of sampling quartz/tungsten electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. Two identical combined calorimeters are located in the LHC tunnel at CERN at the straight section ~140 m on each side of the CMS interaction vertex and between the two beam pipes. They will detect very forward |?| >= 8.5 photons and neutrons. ZDC information can be used for a variety of physics measurements as well as improving the collision centrality determination in heavy-ion collisions. Results are presented for ZDC performance studies with the CERN SPS H2 test beam.

Grachov, O. A.; Murray, M.; Snyder, J.; Wood, J.; Zhukova, V.; Ayan, A. S.; Debbins, P.; Ingram, D. F.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Garcia, E.; Stephans, G.; CMS Collaboration

2009-04-01

148

Performance of the CMS Zero Degree Calorimeter's Electromagnetic Section  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crossing angle of the LHC beams at CMS assures the isolation of consecutive collisions and effects the luminosity of the beams. We have measured the crossing angle using the Zero Degree Calorimeter. This was achieved by finding the energy weighted mean position of electromagnetic clusters of energy. For this measurement the electromagnetic section of the ZDC was used. The hadronic section of the ZDC was employed to reject hadronic showers and thereby improve the measurement. In addition, we developed methods for removing events where secondary particles hit the photo-multiplier tubes directly. We will describe the techniques used in these measurements, and the performance of the Zero Degree Calorimeter.

Kenny, Raymond

2011-04-01

149

"Densified" tiles form stronger bonds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Application of colloidal silica more than doubles bond strength of ceramic tile/substrate attachments. "Densification" process strengthens surface where tile attaches to felt strain-isolator pad, redistributing stresses and preventing failures at that point. First, isopropyl alcohol is applied to bottom tile surface. Second, aqueous mixture of cementing colloidal silica and reinforcing ball-milled silica particles is painted on tile. Finally, after drying, tile is rewaterproofed by exposure to vapors or methyltrimethoxysilane and acetic acid.

Dotts, R. L.; Holt, J. W.

1981-01-01

150

Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R&D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

Repond, José

2013-12-01

151

An Imaging Calorimeter for Access-Concept Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure tile spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to approximately 10(exp 15) eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

Parnell, T. A.; Adams, James H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

152

The KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The KLOE detector was designed primarily for the study of CP violation in neutral kaon decays at DA?NE, the Frascati ?-factory. The detector consists of a tracker and an electromagnetic calorimeter. A lead-scintillating-fiber sampling calorimeter satisfies best the requirements of the experiment, providing adequate energy resolution and superior timing accuracy. We describe in the following the construction of the calorimeter,

M. Adinolfi; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; F. Anulli; G. Barbiellini; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; G. Cabibbo; R. Caloi; P. Campana; M. Casarsa; G. Cataldi; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; P. Ciambrone; E De Lucia; P De Simone; G De Zorzi; S Dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S Di Falco; A. Doria; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; A. Ferrari; M. L Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; A. Franceschi; P. Franzini; M. L Gao; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; A. Giannasi; S. Giovannella; E. Graziani; H. G Han; S. W Han; X. Huang; M. Incagli; L. Ingrosso; L. Keeble; W. Kim; C. Kuo; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; T. Lomtadze; C. S Mao; M. Martemianov; W. Mei; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; S. Moccia; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; L. Pacciani; M. Palomba; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; D. Picca; G. Pirozzi; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D Schamberger; B. Sciascia; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; P. Silano; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; A. Ventura; S. Wölfle; Y. Wu; Y. G Xie; P. F Zema; C. D Zhang; J. Q Zhang; P. P. Zhao

2002-01-01

153

Summary talk on fiber tower calorimeter for the scintillation calorimeter subgroups  

SciTech Connect

We present here a new calorimeter design based on small scintillator tiles, lead absorber and wavelength shifting fiber readout. We have addressed all the major issues in SSC calorimetry and have developed a design with many advantageous features. It has been well demonstrated that the best resolution is obtained for a 'compensated' calorimeter. It is also well known how such compensation may be achieved by a suitable choice of active and passive materials and their relative thickness. One such choice is that of lead and scintillator for which the best thickness ratio is 4:1. This selection has been used in the development of the so-called spaghetti calorimeter (SPACAL) discussed at this workshop. The relative merits of this and many other designs have been the subject of much discussion at SSC workshops from which a number of critical issues have emerged for each design. In the present paper, we have addressed the issues raised in the SPACAL design and proposed an alternative, improved design. The SPACAL represents a significant step forward in calorimeter design, but there are always areas which can be improved in any design when it is subjected to detailed study. Specifically we have considered the areas of energy resolution, channeling, projective towers/calibration, longitudinal segmentation, and radiation sensitivity. We will now discuss each of these areas in turn. 5 refs., 9 figs.

White, A.P.; Walker, J.K.; Johnson, C.; Wahl, H.; Gabriel, T.

1989-01-01

154

Voronoi spiral tilings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The parameter set of Voronoi spiral tilings gives a dual of van Iterson's bifurcation diagram for phyllotactic spirals. We study the Voronoi tilings for the Bernoulli spiral site sets, as the simplest spirals in the centric representation with similarity symmetry. Their parameter set is composed of a family of real algebraic curves in the complex plane, with the Farey sequence structure. This naturally extends to the parameter set for multiple tilings, i.e., the tilings of the covering spaces of the punctured plane. We show the denseness of the parameters z = rei? for quadrilateral Voronoi spiral multiple tilings. The techniques of dynamical systems are applied to the group of similarity symmetry. The parastichy numbers and the distortion of the Voronoi regions depend on the rational approximations of ?/2?. We consider the limit set of the shapes of the quadrilateral tiles by taking the limit as r ? 1, with ? fixed. If ?/2? is a quadratic irrational number, then the limit set is a finite set of rectangles. In particular, if ?/2? is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the limit is the square.

Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi; Hizume, Akio

2015-04-01

155

Tiled Multicore Processors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the last few decades Moore’s Law has continually provided exponential growth in the number of transistors on a single chip. This chapter describes a class of architectures, called tiled multicore architectures, that are designed to exploit massive quantities of on-chip resources in an efficient, scalable manner. Tiled multicore architectures combine each processor core with a switch to create a modular element called a tile. Tiles are replicated on a chip as needed to create multicores with any number of tiles. The Raw processor, a pioneering example of a tiled multicore processor, is examined in detail to explain the philosophy, design, and strengths of such architectures. Raw addresses the challenge of building a general-purpose architecture that performs well on a larger class of stream and embedded computing applications than existing microprocessors, while still running existing ILP-based sequential programs with reasonable performance. Central to achieving this goal is Raw’s ability to exploit all forms of parallelism, including ILP, DLP, TLP, and Stream parallelism. Raw approaches this challenge by implementing plenty of on-chip resources - including logic, wires, and pins - in a tiled arrangement, and exposing them through a new ISA, so that the software can take advantage of these resources for parallel applications. Compared to a traditional superscalar processor, Raw performs within a factor of 2x for sequential applications with a very low degree of ILP, about 2x-9x better for higher levels of ILP, and 10x-100x better when highly parallel applications are coded in a stream language or optimized by hand.

Taylor, Michael B.; Lee, Walter; Miller, Jason E.; Wentzlaff, David; Bratt, Ian; Greenwald, Ben; Hoffmann, Henry; Johnson, Paul R.; Kim, Jason S.; Psota, James; Saraf, Arvind; Shnidman, Nathan; Strumpen, Volker; Frank, Matthew I.; Amarasinghe, Saman; Agarwal, Anant

156

Zero Degree Calorimeter for CMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2007 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva will start to collide protons and lead ions together at extremely high energies. The purpose of the proton-proton running is to study the origin of mass. The purpose of the ion running is to recreate the first few moments of the universe. The Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, is one of the experiments at LHC. I am currently working with the Nuclear Physics Team at the University of Kansas on part of CMS, called the Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC). I use a simulation toolkit, Geant4, which uses the object-oriented nature of C++ code to allow users to build simulations of particle collisions. Neutrons hit the ZDC and collide with tungsten plates to produce a shower of particles. The ZDC uses tungsten plates to change the neutrons into charged particles, and optical fibers to gather Cerenkov photons that are created. The current goal is to convert as much energy that comes into the ZDC as possible into light energy, and determine the most effective design for the calorimeter. I will present estimates of the ZDC performance for both proton-proton and heavy ion running.

Lehnherr, Megan

2004-10-01

157

R&D proposal the prism plastic calorimeter:PPC  

E-print Network

This proposal supports two goals: First Goal_Demonstrate that current, widely used plastic technologies allow to design Prism Plastic Calorimeter (PPC) towers with a new "liquid crystal" type plastic called Vectra. It will be shown that this technique meets the requirements for a LHC calorimeter with warm liquids: safety, hermeticity, hadronic compensation, resolution and time response. Second Goal_ Describe how one can design a warm liquid calorimeter integrated into a LHC detector,and list the advantages of the PPC: low price, minimum of mechanical structures, minimum amount of dead space, easiness of mechanical assembly, accessibility to the electronics, possibility to recirculate the liquid. The absorber and the electronics being outside the liquid and easily accessible, one has maximum flexibility to define them. The R&D program we define here aims at showing the feasibility of these new ideas by building nine towers of twenty gaps and exposing them to electron and hadron beams.

Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Marchand, P; Nédélec, P; Salin, P; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

1990-01-01

158

The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment  

SciTech Connect

A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from few GeV up to 500 GeV in the collisions of the 650 GeV {Sigma}{sup -} hyperons and {pi}{sup -} mesons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and {pi}{sup 0} mesons reconstructed in 650 GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated.

M. Y. Balatz et al.

2004-07-19

159

PWO-II scintillation crystals for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PANDA detector will be one of the major experimental installations at the future acceleration facility FAIR at GSI (Darmstadt) for hadron physics studies using a cooled antiproton beam. A new type of the lead tungstate crystals (PWO-II) was developed as the scintillation material for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the target spectrometer of PANDA, which has to provide photon detection

A. Borisevich; A. Derevschikov; W. Doring; V. Dormenev; A. Fedorov; Yu. Goncharenko; V. Kachanov; M. Korzhik; Yu. Melnik; A. Meschanin; O. Missevitch; V. Mochalov; R. Novotny; A. Ryazantsev; P. Semenov; A. Uzunian; A. Vasiliev; A. Yakutin

2008-01-01

160

Seamless tiled display system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

2006-01-01

161

Bridging Gaps Between Refractory Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Excessively large gaps between tiles on Space Shuttle eliminated without time-consuming and costly procedure of removing and replacing tiles. Ceramic tile silver is bonded in gap. Bonded silver prevents airframe under gap from getting too hot during reentry and presents aerodynamically smooth exterior surface.

Haney, J. W. J.

1982-01-01

162

The Shuttle tile story  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural problems associated with the reusable thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are assessed. The ceramic insulation was placed on the aluminum in the form of about 30,000 tiles over approximately 70% of the Orbiter's exterior. The tiles were bonded to felt pads, and then the tile-pad structure was attached to the aluminum skin. As Orbiter design progressed, it was discovered that the TPS would have to withstand loads greater than initially predicted. The group tensile strength was less than that of the individual components. This was the primary factor contributing to the delay of the first flight. Values are given for Orbiter isotherms during a normal flight as well as the corresponding TPS distribution. The complete TPS assemblage is shown schematically, noting the sequence of assembling the tile components into a testing specimen. It is noted that tensile loads are applied to the strain-isolation path at discrete regions along transverse fiber bundles, causing a 50% reduction in system tensile strength. Procedures for strengthening the interface between the insulation and strain-isolation path are discussed and flight-simulation tests are outlined.

Cooper, P. A.; Holloway, P. F.

1981-01-01

163

Floating data acquisition system for microwave calorimeter measurements on MTX  

SciTech Connect

A microwave calorimeter has been designed for making 140-GHz absorption measurements on the MTX. Measurement of the intensity and spatial distribution of the FEL-generated microwave beam on the inner wall will indicate the absorption characteristics of the plasma when heated with a 140 GHz FEL pulse. The calorimeter works by monitoring changes of temperature in silicon carbide tiles located on the inner wall of the tokamak. Thermistors are used to measure the temperature of each tile. The tiles are located inside the tokamak about 1 cm outside of the limiter radius at machine potential. The success of this measurement depends on our ability to float the data acquisition system near machine potential and isolate it from the rest of the vault ground system. Our data acquisition system has 48 channels of thermistor signal conditioning, a multiplexer and digitizer section, a serial data formatter, and a fiber-optic transmitter to send the data out. Additionally, we bring timing signals to the interface through optical fibers to tell it when to begin measurement, while maintaining isolation. The receiver is an HP 200 series computer with a serial data interface; the computer provides storage and local display for the shot temperature profile. Additionally, the computer provides temporary storage of the data until it can be passed to a shared resource management system for archiving. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Sewall, N.R.; Meassick, S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-13

164

Floating data acquisition system for microwave calorimeter measurements on MTX  

SciTech Connect

A microwave calorimeter has been designed for making 140-GHz absorption measurements on the MTX. Measurement of the intensity and spatial distribution of the FEL-generated microwave beam on the inner wall will indicate the absorption characteristics of the plasma when heated with a 140 GHz FEL pulse. The calorimeter works by monitoring changes of temperature in silicon carbide tiles located on the inner wall of the tokamak. Thermistors are used to measure the temperature of each tile. The tiles are located inside the tokamak about 1 cm outside of the limiter radius at machine potential. The success of this measurement depends on our ability to float the data acquisition system near machine potential and isolate it from the rest of the vault ground system. Our data acquisition system has 48 channels of thermistor signal conditioning, a multiplexer and digitizer section, a serial data formatter, and a fiber-optic transmitter to send the data out. Additionally, we bring timing signals to the interface through optical fibers to tell it when to begin measurement, while maintaining isolation. The receiver is an HP 200 Series computer with a serial data interface; the computer provides storage and local display for the shot temperature profile. Additionally, the computer provides temporary storage of the data until it can be passed to a shared resource management system for archiving. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Sewall, N.R.

1989-09-13

165

Proposal for the completion of outstanding work on the mechanical absorber structure of SDC barrel electromagnetic calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory and Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania have worked jointly on a scintillating tile\\/fiber calorimeter with the SDC collaboration since it`s inception in 1989. During the design and prototyping phase of the last three years, we have particularly worked on the development of an innovative cast lead approach to the

V. Guarino; N. Hill; T. Kicmal; J. Nasiatka; E. Petereit; L. Price; J. Proudfoot; R. Stanek; D. Scherbarth

1993-01-01

166

Ceramic tile expansion engine housing  

DOEpatents

An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

Myers, B.

1995-04-11

167

Ceramic tile expansion engine housing  

DOEpatents

An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550)

1995-01-01

168

Commissioning of the new calorimeters of the KLOE-2 experiment  

E-print Network

Three new sub-detectors have been installed on May 2013 in the KLOE apparatus of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of INFN. Photon detection is improved by means of a small crystal calorimeter, named CCALT, in the very forward direction and of a tungsten-scintillating tile sampling device, named QCALT, instrumenting the low-beta quadrupoles of the accelerator. During the first DA$\\phi$NE operations, some preliminary runs, both with and without collisions, have been acquired allowing the commissioning of new subdetectors. In this paper, we report a brief description of QCALT and CCALT and a summary of the commissioning phase.

Happacher, F

2015-01-01

169

Commissioning of the new calorimeters of the KLOE-2 experiment  

E-print Network

Three new sub-detectors have been installed on May 2013 in the KLOE apparatus of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of INFN. Photon detection is improved by means of a small crystal calorimeter, named CCALT, in the very forward direction and of a tungsten-scintillating tile sampling device, named QCALT, instrumenting the low-beta quadrupoles of the accelerator. During the first DA$\\phi$NE operations, some preliminary runs, both with and without collisions, have been acquired allowing the commissioning of new subdetectors. In this paper, we report a brief description of QCALT and CCALT and a summary of the commissioning phase.

F. Happacher; M. Martini; for the KLOE-2 collaboration

2015-01-22

170

Design and Test of a Forward Neutron Calorimeter for the ZEUS Experiment  

E-print Network

A lead scintillator sandwich sampling calorimeter has been installed in the HERA tunnel 105.6 m from the central ZEUS detector in the proton beam direction. It is designed to measure the energy and scattering angle of neutrons produced in charge exchange ep collisions. Before installation the calorimeter was tested and calibrated in the H6 beam at CERN where 120 GeV electrons, muons, pions and protons were made incident on the calorimeter. In addition, the spectrum of fast neutrons from charge exchange proton-lucite collisions was measured. The design and construction of the calorimeter is described, and the results of the CERN test reported. Special attention is paid to the measurement of shower position, shower width, and the separation of electromagnetic showers from hadronic showers. The overall energy scale as determined from the energy spectrum of charge exchange neutrons is compared to that obtained from direct beam hadrons.

The ZEUS FNC Group; S. Bhadra; I. Bohnet; M. Cardy; U. Dosselli; C. -P. Fagerstroem; W. Frisken; K. Furutani; D. Hanna; U. Holm; K. F. Johnson; M. Khakzad; G. Levman; J. N. Lim; B. Loehr; J. F. Martin; C. Muhl; T. Neumann; M. Rohde; W. B. Schmidke; D. G. Stairs; H. Tiecke; C. Voci

1997-01-27

171

Tiled Microprocessors Michael Bedford Taylor  

E-print Network

Tiled Microprocessors by Michael Bedford Taylor A.B., Computer Science Dartmouth College, 1996 S;Tiled Microprocessors by Michael Bedford Taylor Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science ABSTRACT Current-day microprocessors have reached

Wang, Deli

172

Detecting Filler Spaces Under Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eddy-current probe nondestructively and indirectly indicates whether screed present under ceramic tile on aluminum substrate. Transducer coil excites eddy currents in aluminum substrate material. Response appears on oscilloscope or meter. Changes in response indicate spatially abrupt changes in substrate. Intended for use on insulating tiles on Space Shuttle, potential terrestrial applications in nondestructive testing.

Mende, Paul; Shinkevich, David; Scheuer, John

1991-01-01

173

An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

2008-01-01

174

Performance of the LHCb calorimeters during the period 2010-2012  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The calorimeter system of LHCb is subdivided into four sub-detectors which provide its longitudinal segmentation: a Scintillator Pad Detector, followed by a Preshower and, then, an electromagnetic, an hadronic calorimeter. After a description of these detectors, procedures developed to calibrate their response are discussed together with the degradation of response observed due to the harsh conditions (high radiation and current levels). First results on the calorimeter performance over the two most productive years of physics data taking, 2011 and 2012 are given.

Perret, Pascal; Vilasís-Cardona, Xavier; LHCb Collaboration

2015-02-01

175

Study of the interactions of pions in the CALICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A prototype silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for an ILC detector was tested in 2007 at the CERN SPS test beam. Data were collected with electron and hadron beams in the energy range 8 to 80 GeV. The analysis described here focuses on the interactions of pions in the calorimeter. One of the main objectives of the CALICE program is to validate the Monte Carlo tools available for the design of a full-sized detector. The interactions of pions in the Si-W calorimeter are therefore confronted with the predictions of various physical models implemented in the GEANT4 simulation framework.

Adloff, C.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N. K.; Wilson, J. A.; Goto, T.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Benyamna, M.; Cârloganu, C.; Fehr, F.; Gay, P.; Blazey, G. C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Lima, J. G.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Krastev, K.; Morin, L.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Fabbri, R.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Garutti, E.; Göttlicher, P.; Jung, T.; Karstensen, S.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lutz, B.; Meyer, N.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Wattimena, N.; Wendt, O.; Feege, N.; Groll, M.; Haller, J.; Heuer, R.-D.; Morozov, S.; Richter, S.; Samson, J.; Kaplan, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Tadday, A.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. C.; Kawagoe, K.; Tamura, Y.; Dauncey, P. D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Yilmaz, H.; Zorba, O.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Green, M. G.; Salvatore, F.; Bedjidian, M.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Fouz, M.-C.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, R. J.; Kelly, M.; Thompson, R. J.; Danilov, M.; Tarkovsky, E.; Baranova, N.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Voronin, A.; Frey, A.; Lu, S.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Weuste, L.; Bonis, J.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Fleury, J.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Gaycken, G.; Jeans, D.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Reinhard, M.; Rougé, A.; Ruan, M.; Vanel, J.-Ch; Videau, H.; Park, K.-H.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Belmir, M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, I. H.; Yang, J.; Chai, J.-S.; Kim, J.-T.; Kim, G.-B.; Kang, J.; Kwon, Y.-J.; CALICE Collaboration

2010-05-01

176

Study of the interactions of pions in the CALICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter prototype  

E-print Network

A prototype silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for an ILC detector was tested in 2007 at the CERN SPS test beam. Data were collected with electron and hadron beams in the energy range 8 to 80 GeV. The analysis described here focuses on the interactions of pions in the calorimeter. One of the main objectives of the CALICE program is to validate the Monte Carlo tools available for the design of a full-sized detector. The interactions of pions in the Si-W calorimeter are therefore confronted with the predictions of various physical models implemented in the GEANT4 simulation framework.

C. Adloff; Y. Karyotakis; J. Repond; J. Yu; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; J. A. Wilson; T. Goto; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; A. Ribon; V. Uzhinskiy; M. Benyamna; C. Cârloganu; F. Fehr; P. Gay; G. C. Blazey; D. Chakraborty; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; D. Hedin; J. G. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; K. Krastev; L. Morin; N. D'Ascenzo; U. Cornett; D. David; R. Fabbri; G. Falley; K. Gadow; E. Garutti; P. Göttlicher; T. Jung; S. Karstensen; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; B. Lutz; N. Meyer; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; A. Vargas-Trevino; N. Wattimena; O. Wendt; N. Feege; M. Groll; J. Haller; R. -D. Heuer; S. Morozov; S. Richter; J. Samson; A. Kaplan; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; A. Tadday; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; E. J. Kim; G. Kim; D-W. Kim; K. Lee; S. C. Lee; K. Kawagoe; Y. Tamura; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; H. Yilmaz; O. Zorba; V. Bartsch; M. Postranecky; M. Warren; M. Wing; M. G. Green; F. Salvatore; M. Bedjidian; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; M. -C. Fouz; D. S. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; M. Kelly; R. J. Thompson; M. Danilov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Baranova; D. Karmanov; M. Korolev; M. Merkin; A. Voronin; A. Frey; S. Lu; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; L. Weuste; J. Bonis; B. Bouquet; S. Callier; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; M. Faucci Giannelli; J. Fleury; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Poeschl; L. Raux; N. Seguin-Moreau; F. Wicek; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; G. Gaycken; D. Jeans; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Reinhard; A. Rougé; M. Ruan; J-Ch. Vanel; H. Videau; K-H. Park; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; M. Belmir; S. W. Nam; I. H. Park; J. Yang; Jong-Seo Chai; Jong-Tae Kim; Geun-Bum Kim; J. Kang; Y. -J. Kwon

2010-04-28

177

CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement  

SciTech Connect

This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

2003-12-01

178

Prospects for and tests of hadron calorimetry with silicon  

SciTech Connect

Hadron calorimetry with silicon may provide crucial capabilities in experiments at the high luminosity, high energy colliders of the future, particularly due to silicon's fast intrinsic speed and absolute calibration. The important underlying processes of our understanding of hadron calorimeters are reviewed to set the framework for the presentation of recent calculations of the expected performance of silicon detector based hadron calorimeters. Such devices employing uranium are expected to achieve the compensation condition (that is, the ratio of the most probable electron signal to hadron signal (e/h) is approx.1.0) based on the understanding that has been derived from the uranium-liquid argon and uranium-plastic scintillator systems. In fact, even lead-silicon calorimeters are found to achieve the attractive value for the e/h ratio of 1.16 at 10 GeV. An experimental test of these predictions is underway at CERN by the SICAPO Collaboration. 64 refs., 19 figs.

Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics] [Univ. of Oregon, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gabriel, Tony A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rancoita, P. G. [INFN, Milan (Italy)] [INFN, Milan (Italy)

1989-03-01

179

Performance of a liquid argon Accordion calorimeter with fast readout  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prototype lead-liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeter with parallel plates and Accordion geometry has been equipped with high speed readout electronics and tested with electron and muon beams at the CERN SPS. For a response peaking time of about 35 ns, fast enough for operation at the future hadron colliders, the energy resolution for electrons is 9.6%\\/&surd;E[GeV] with a local constant term

Bernard Aubert; A. Bazan; B. Beaugiraud; Jacques Colas; T. Leflour; M. Maire; J. P. Vialle; I. Wingerter-Seez; Y. P. Zolnierowski; H. A. Gordon; V. Radeka; David Charles Rahm; D. Stephani; J. L. Chevalley; Christian Wolfgang Fabjan; D. Fournier; A. Franz; O. Gildemeister; Peter Jenni; Marzio Nessi; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; M. Pepe; W. Richter; J. Soderqvist; J. M. Baze; L G Gosset; P. Lavocat; J. P. Lottin; B. Mansoulie; J. P. Meyer; J. F. Renardy; J. Teiger; Henri Zaccone; G. Battistoni; D. V. Camin; D. Cavalli; G. Costa; A. Cravero; A. Ferrari; F. Gianotti; L. Mandelli; M. Mazzanti; L. Perini; G. Pessina; P R Sala; M. Sciamanna; E. Augé; Robert L Chase; J. C. Chollet; C. de La Taille; Louis Fayard; P. Jean; L. Iconomidou-Fayard; B. Merkel; J. M. Noppe; G. Parrour; P. Pétroff; J. P. Repellin; A C Schaffer; N Seguin-Moreau; G. Unal; C. Fuglesang; M. Lefebvre; S. Towers

1992-01-01

180

Triangle Tiling I: the tile is similar to ABC or has a right angle  

E-print Network

Triangle Tiling I: the tile is similar to ABC or has a right angle Michael Beeson June 6, 2012 Abstract An N-tiling of triangle ABC by triangle T is a way of writing ABC as a union of N triangles congruent to T, overlapping only at their boundaries. The triangle T is the "tile". The tile may or may

Beeson, Michael

181

Radionuclide calorimeter system  

DOEpatents

A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a Wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated. 7 figures.

Donohoue, T.P.; Oertel, C.P.; Tyree, W.H.; Valdez, J.L.

1991-11-26

182

Radionuclide calorimeter system  

DOEpatents

A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated.

Donohoue, Thomas P. (Denver, CO); Oertel, Christopher P. (Arvada, CO); Tyree, William H. (Boulder, CO); Valdez, Joe L. (Denver, CO)

1991-11-26

183

DSWA calorimeter bomb experiments  

SciTech Connect

Two experiments were performed in which 25 grams of TNT were detonated inside an expended detonation calorimeter bomb. The bomb had a contained volume of approximately 5.28 liters. In the first experiment, the bomb was charged with 3 atmospheres of nitrogen. In the second, it was charged with 2.58 atmospheres (23.1 psi gage) of oxygen. In each experiment pressure was monitored over a period of approximately 1200 microseconds after the pulse to the CDU. Monitoring was performed via two 10,000 psi 102AO3 PCB high frequency pressure transducers mounted symmetrically in the lid of the calorimeter bomb. Conditioners used were PCB 482As. The signals from the transducers were recorded in digital format on a multi channel Tektronix scope. The sampling frequency was 10 Mhz (10 samples per microsecond). After a period of cooling following detonation, gas samples were taken and were subsequently submitted for analysis using gas mass spectrometry. Due to a late request for post shot measurement, it was only possible to make a rough estimate of the weight of debris (carbon) remaining in the calorimeter bomb following the second experiment.

Cunningham, B

1998-10-01

184

Search for Supersymmetry in Hadronic Final States using MT2 in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV and Evolution Studies of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Endcap Signals  

E-print Network

Over the past decades, the standard model of particle physics has been proven to accurately describe the vast majority of the experimental observations within particle physics. The discovery of a boson at a mass of about 125 GeV seems to provide the last missing piece of the standard model, the Higgs boson. Despite this success, there are some phenomena, for which the description of the standard model is insufficient. In order to surmount these shortcomings, new-physics models have been advanced. One popular model is supersymmetry, which solves several of the deficiencies of the standard model. Supersymmetry extends the description of the standard model by adding a symmetry between fermions and bosons: the elementary particle spectrum is at least doubled. In this dissertation, a search for supersymmetry in fully hadronic final states is presented. The search analyzes proton-proton collision data, collected at $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\,\\text{TeV}$ with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Coll...

Weber, Hannsjorg Artur

2015-01-01

185

Removable fastener for insulating tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fastening device that consists of internally threaded silica insert, silica plug, and molded rubber retainer, seals holes in ceramic tiles securely over wide temperature excursions without cracking from thermal stresses. Device proves useful in high-temperature industrial applications.

Brown, J. N.; Cade, D. H.; Logston, H. A.

1979-01-01

186

Shell tile thermal protection system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A reusable, externally applied thermal protection system for use on aerospace vehicles subject to high thermal and mechanical stresses utilizes a shell tile structure which effectively separates its primary functions as an insulator and load absorber. The tile consists of structurally strong upper and lower metallic shells manufactured from materials meeting the thermal and structural requirements incident to tile placement on the spacecraft. A lightweight, high temperature package of insulation is utilized in the upper shell while a lightweight, low temperature insulation is utilized in the lower shell. Assembly of the tile which is facilitated by a self-locking mechanism, may occur subsequent to installation of the lower shell on the spacecraft structural skin.

Macconochie, I. O.; Lawson, A. G.; Kelly, H. N. (inventors)

1984-01-01

187

RPCs as a medium for digital hadron calorimetry for the linear collider  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project is to develop a digital hadron calorimeter (DHCAL) using resistive plate chambers (RPCs) as active medium. RPCs are ideally suited for such a calorimeter: they are simple in design, cheap to build, reliable and robust, and the readout can be segmented into small pads of say 1 cm2, as required for a DHCAL at the

G. Drake; J. Repond; D. Underwood; A. B. Wicklund; S. Kuhlmann; S. Magill; L. Xia; J. Butler; M. Oreglia

2004-01-01

188

Hadron-hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

1983-06-21

189

Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

1989-07-14

190

The CLAS Forward Electromagnetic Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The CLAS Forward Electromagnetic Calorimeter M. Amarian d , G. Asryan d , K. Beard b , W. Brooks ) of each sector is equipped with a lead-scintillator electromagnetic sampling calorimeter (EC), 16 radiation lengths thick, using a novel triangular geometry with stereo readout. With its good energy

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

191

Electromagnetic calorimeter for Belle II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electromagnetic calorimeter of the BELLE II detector for experiments at Super B-factory SuperKEKB is briefly described. The project of the calorimeter upgrade to meet severe background conditions expected at the upgraded KEK B factory is presented.

Belle-ECL; Aulchenko, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Garmash, Yu; Goh, Y. M.; Kim, S. H.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Lee, I. S.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Nakamura, I.; Shebalin, V.; Shwartz, B.; Unno, Y.; Usov, Yu; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobjev, V.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

2015-02-01

192

An automatic adiabatic bomb calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper details the conversion of an existing isothermal bomb calorimeter to an adiabatic calorimeter with automatic control. Thermistors in the inner and outer vessels are included in two arms of an a.c. Wheatstone bridge: any rise in temperature of the inner vessel above that of the outer vessel results in phase reversal of the output voltage from the bridge,

W F Raymond; R J Canaway; C E Harris

1957-01-01

193

The PAMELA electromagnetic calorimeter: performances  

SciTech Connect

A sampling silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter has been designed and built for the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment. The calorimeter has been designed to identify antiprotons from an electron background and positrons in a background of protons with a high efficiency and rejection power. In this work we present the identification capabilities of the calorimeter obtained using both Monte Carlo and test beam data. We show that the calorimeter provides a proton rejection factor of at least 105 while keeping a high efficiency in selecting electrons and positrons. Hence, the calorimeter will fulfill the identification power needed to reach the primary scientific objectives of PAMELA, that are the measurement of the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light isotopes in the cosmic radiation.

Mocchiutti, E.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Lundquist, J.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N. [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Albi, M. [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Astronomia dell'Universita di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Lund, J.; Pearce, M. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Physics, Albanova University Centre, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2006-10-27

194

Absorbed dose water calorimeter.  

PubMed

Advantage was taken of the low thermal diffusivity of water and the imperviousness of polyethylene film to water to construct a calorimeter for directly measuring absorbed dose in that medium. An ultrasmall bead thermistor was sandwiched between two thin films stretched on polystyrene rings and immersed in an unregulated water bath. Ten cobalt-60 irradiation runs were made with a precision of 0.5% mean error of the mean at a dose rate of 66 mGy/s. Further development is directed toward a standard instrument that can be used in a medical therapy beam. PMID:7382919

Domen, S R

1980-01-01

195

NEUTRON-ENHANCED CALORIMETRY FOR HADRONS (NECH): FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a project to apply scintillator technology recently developed at Louisiana Tech University to hadronic calorimetry. In particular, we developed a prototype calorimeter module incorporating scintillator embedded with metal oxide nanoparticles as the active layers. These metal oxide nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide, have high cross-sections for interactions with slow neutrons. As a part fo this research project, we have developed a novel method for producing plastic scintillators with metal oxide nanoparticles evenly distributed through the plastic without aggregation.We will test the performance of the calorimeter module in test beam and with a neutron source, in order to measure the response to the neutron component of hadronic showers. We will supplement our detector prototyping activities with detailed studies of the effect of neutron component on the resolution of hadronic energy measurements, particular in the next generation of particle flow calorimeters.

Andrew Stroud, Lee Sawyer

2012-08-31

196

The ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter in pp physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC collider. The experiment main aim is to study the transition of hadronic matter to the deconfined plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP) predicted by Lattice QCD calculations. Proton-proton and proton-nucleus data will be used as reference. The ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter system is made of two sets of forward hadronic calorimeters placed on both sides relative to the interaction point. Each set consists of a neutron and a proton calorimeter. The ZDC has been designed to trigger on the collision centrality in heavy-ion interactions. In proton-proton collisions they measure the energy flow of the leading neutrons and protons. Thanks to the forward rapidity region covered, they can be used to select different event topologies: minimum bias, non diffractive and diffractive events. Results from the 2009 run at ?{s}=900 GeV as well as from 2010 data taking at ?{s}=7 TeV are presented, putting the emphasis on the detector performance.

Oppedisano, C.; Alice Collaboration

2011-06-01

197

The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter 1  

E-print Network

The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter 1 Pascal Pralavorio (for the ATLAS Liquid Argon operation on the LHC in 2005. The collab- oration has chosen a Liquid Argon electromagnetic calorimeter calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter where absorbers are made of lead and liquid argon is the ionising medium

Boyer, Edmond

198

Shell-Tile Thermal-Protection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Durable shell-tile thermal-protection system consists of interlocking upper and lower hard caps, incorporating appropriate stiffeners and enclosing lightweight fibrous insulation. New shell tile more durable than reusable surface insulation (RSI) currently used on Space Shuttle orbiter.

Macconochie, I. O.; Lowson, A. G.; Kelly, H. N.

1983-01-01

199

Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

1985-01-01

200

Atlas of Quasicrystalline Tilings Clifford A. Reiter  

E-print Network

Atlas of Quasicrystalline Tilings Clifford A. Reiter (preprint) Department of Mathematics-dimensions. The atlas gives many new intriguing quasicrystalline tilings in a systematic way. AMS classification scheme a mathematical curiosity. Our goal is to provide an atlas of tilings resulting from canonical projection

Reiter, Clifford A.

201

CLUSTER INTERACTIONS FOR QUASIPERIODIC TILINGS FRANZ GAHLER  

E-print Network

CLUSTER INTERACTIONS FOR QUASIPERIODIC TILINGS FRANZ G¨AHLER Centre de Physique Th´eorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau, France A cluster for the octagonal square-rhombus tiling is presented, which has the prop- erty that among all tilings completely covered by the cluster the perfectly quasiperi

Gähler, Franz

202

Tiling Puzzle Solver University of Virginia  

E-print Network

1 Tiling Puzzle Solver University of Virginia Gabriel Robins "But what am I to do?" said Alice tilings, and we will prove a few of these theorems in class. Consider the following simple tiling puzzle containing the above instance may be found at: www.cs.virginia.edu/~robins/puzzles/trivial #12;2 A less

Robins, Gabriel

203

TILINGS AND DISCRETE DIRICHLET PROBLEMS RICHARD KENYON  

E-print Network

networks (re­ versible Markov chains) and tilings of rectangles by squares [8]. By placing a po­ tential could be realized geometrically as a tiling of a rectangle by squares. He used the networks to get a geometric realization of (M;f) as a tiling of a rectangle with trapezoids, each trapezoid having two

Kenyon, Richard

204

Waste Toolkit A-Z Carpet tiles  

E-print Network

on Desso carpet tile recycling here: www.wrap.org.uk/sites/files/wrap/Desso%20WRAP%20case%20study%20FINAL_0 is the criteria for carpet tile collection? · Uplifted full carpet tiles · Material must be palletised and shrink wrapped · Maximum stacking height is 1.30 metres · Material must be made available for collection from

Melham, Tom

205

Tiling spaces are inverse limits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let ? be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group ?) and closed in the natural topology. Then ? is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group ?. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin, and Sadun, of Bellissard, Benedetti, and Gambaudo, and of Gähler. In particular, the construction in this paper is a natural generalization of Gähler's.

Sadun, Lorenzo

2003-11-01

206

The CDF miniplug calorimeters  

SciTech Connect

Two MiniPlug calorimeters, designed to measure the energy and lateral position of particles in the (forward) pseudorapidity region of 3.6 < |{nu}| < 5.2 of the CDF detector, have been recently installed as part of the Run II CDF upgrade at the Tevatron {bar p}p collider. They consist of lead/liquid scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers arranged in a pixel-type towerless geometry suitable for ''calorimetric tracking''. The design concept, the prototype performance and the final design of the MiniPlugs are here described. A recent cosmic ray test resulted in a light yield of approximately 100 pe/MIP, which exceeds our design requirements.

Stefano Lami

2002-06-28

207

Development of a readout link board for the TileCal phase 2 demonstrator  

E-print Network

The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter phase 2 upgrade demonstrator aims at installing a hybrid on-detector electronic system replacing 1-4 adjacent TileCal drawers in ATLAS starting end of phase 0, combining a fully functional phase 2 system with circuitry making it compatible with the present system. We are reporting a second generation prototype link and controller board connecting the drawer to off-detector electronics in USA-15. The new boards main logic component is a XILINX Kintex7 FPGA connected to an 12x5 Gb/s AVAGO opto transmitter and a 4x10 Gb/s QSFP+ connector. One of the latter will be chosen for the final design.

Muschter, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, C; Eriksson, D; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

2012-01-01

208

Development of a Readout Link Board for theTileCal Phase 2 Demonstrator  

E-print Network

The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter phase 2 upgrade demonstrator aims at installing a hybrid on-detector electronic system replacing 1-4 adjacent TileCal drawers in ATLAS starting end of phase 0, combining a fully functional phase 2 system with circuitry making it compatible with the present system. We are reporting a second generation prototype link and controller board connecting the drawer to off-detector electronics in USA-15. The new boards main logic component is a XILINX Kintex7 FPGA connected to an 12x5 Gb/s AVAGO opto transmitter and a 4x10 Gb/s QSFP+ connector. One of the latter will be chosen for the final design

Muschter, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, C; Eriksson, D; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

2012-01-01

209

Electron Calorimeter Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron loaded scintillators are suitable for measuring secondary neutrons produced by high-energy particles: protons & electrons Neutron flux can be used to discriminate hadron and electro-magnetic particles Combined effectiveness of all e/p discriminators techniques employedTBD Only moderate improvement in detection efficiency for B-10 concentrations >few% in thick moderators Bottom scintillator might serve as cascade penetration counter (TBC)

Adams, James H.

2008-01-01

210

Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA ‘sub-tile’ strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H.

2014-02-01

211

The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter: upgrade plans for the HL-LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm?2s?1. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. The luminosity for the proposed High Luminosity LHC phase (HL-LHC) will increase up to 5×1034 cm?2s?1 with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb?1. This is well beyond the values for which the detectors were designed. The electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters will be able to tolerate the increased particle flux, but the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal) will be affected. Two possible solutions for keeping the current performance are being discussed. The readout electronics will also need to withstand larger radiation environment. In the hadronic endcap calorimeter (HEC) cold GaAs preamplifiers are located inside the endcap cryostats. The properties of these devices have been investigated in recent proton and neutron irradiation tests to determine whether they must be replaced. In addition, the entire front-end readout system is not expected to survive the integrated luminosity at the HL-LHC and will be replaced. The description of the new readout system is presented.

Novgorodova, Olga; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

2015-02-01

212

On the electronics for Experiment E687's trigger on hadron momenta  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the electronic modules designed to process the E687 hadron calorimeter's 552 readout channels and generate a trigger signal based upon the total momentum and the total transverse momentum of the detected hadrons.

Ramusino, A.C.; Hansen, S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Buchholz, D. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

1990-07-01

213

Characterization of 1800 Hamamatsu R7600-M4 PMTs for CMS HF Calorimeter upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hadronic Forward calorimeters of the CMS experiment are Cherenkov calorimeters that use quartz fibers and 1728 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for readout. The CMS detector upgrade project requires the current Hamamatsu R7525 PMTs to be replaced with 4-anode, high quantum efficiency R7600-M4 PMTs. The new PMTs will improve the detector resolution, as well as the capability of removing fake events due to signal created in the glass window of the PMT. Here, we report the dark current, anode gain, transit time, transit time spread, pulse width, rise time, and linearity measurements performed on 1800 Hamamatsu R7600-200-M4 PMTs.

Akgun, U.; Funk, G.; Corso, J.; Jia, Z.; Southwick, D.; Adams, L.; Kingyon, J.; Tiras, E.; Munhollon, T.; Troendle, E.; Bruecken, P.; Khristenko, V.; Onel, Y.

2014-06-01

214

Calorimeter Process Variable Archiving  

SciTech Connect

These steps were taken to maintain weekly archives: (1) Friday morning you stop the archiver and wait for it to finish writing data (the lock file will be removed from the directory); (2) move the current archive information to a PC via FTP; (3) remove all previous archive information in the previous directory; (4) move the current archive into the previous directory; (5) start a new archive; (6) burn a CDROM of the archive; and (7) copy the current archive to a specific directory. There are 2 ways to check if the Calorimeter Archiver is running, either through the WEB based front end or directly from a command line. Once the archiver is running it can be monitored from a WEB page. This only works with a browser launched from the online machine running the archiver. Each time the browser is reloaded there should be an update reported in the last write check field. You might have to wait a few minutes to see the update. Calorimetry currently takes readings every (300 sec.) 5 minutes. The second method to verify the archiver is running is to issue a command from a Linux cluster machine.

Huffman, David; /Fermilab

2002-01-14

215

Geometrical Tile Design for Complex Neighborhoods  

PubMed Central

Recent research has showed that tile systems are one of the most suitable theoretical frameworks for the spatial study and modeling of self-assembly processes, such as the formation of DNA and protein oligomeric structures. A Wang tile is a unit square, with glues on its edges, attaching to other tiles and forming larger and larger structures. Although quite intuitive, the idea of glues placed on the edges of a tile is not always natural for simulating the interactions occurring in some real systems. For example, when considering protein self-assembly, the shape of a protein is the main determinant of its functions and its interactions with other proteins. Our goal is to use geometric tiles, i.e., square tiles with geometrical protrusions on their edges, for simulating tiled paths (zippers) with complex neighborhoods, by ribbons of geometric tiles with simple, local neighborhoods. This paper is a step toward solving the general case of an arbitrary neighborhood, by proposing geometric tile designs that solve the case of a “tall” von Neumann neighborhood, the case of the f-shaped neighborhood, and the case of a 3?×?5 “filled” rectangular neighborhood. The techniques can be combined and generalized to solve the problem in the case of any neighborhood, centered at the tile of reference, and included in a 3 × (2k?+?1) rectangle. PMID:19956398

Czeizler, Eugen; Kari, Lila

2009-01-01

216

Hierarchical self assembly of patterns from the Robinson tilings: DNA tile design in an enhanced Tile Assembly Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a hierarchical self assembly algorithm that produces the quasiperiodic patterns found in the Robinson tilings\\u000a and suggest a practical implementation of this algorithm using DNA origami tiles. We modify the abstract Tile Assembly Model\\u000a (aTAM), to include active signaling and glue activation in response to signals to coordinate the hierarchical assembly of\\u000a Robinson patterns of arbitrary size from

Jennifer E. Padilla; Wenyan Liu; Nadrian C. Seeman

217

Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

218

The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4? coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ? 2%/?E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

2015-02-01

219

Fast Glazing of Alumina/Silica Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technique for applying ceramic coating to fibrous silica/alumina insulation tiles prevents cracks and substantially reduces firing time. To reduce thermal stresses in tile being coated, high-temperature, shorttime firing schedule implemented. Such schedule allows coating to mature while substrate remains at relatively low temperature, reducing stress differential between coating and substrate. Technique used to repair tiles with damaged coatings and possibly used in heat-treating objects made of materials having different thermal-expansion coefficients.

Creedon, J. F.; Gzowski, E. R.; Wheeler, W. H.

1986-01-01

220

Global Swath and Gridded Data Tiling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This software generates cylindrically projected tiles of swath-based or gridded satellite data for the purpose of dynamically generating high-resolution global images covering various time periods, scaling ranges, and colors called "tiles." It reconstructs a global image given a set of tiles covering a particular time range, scaling values, and a color table. The program is configurable in terms of tile size, spatial resolution, format of input data, location of input data (local or distributed), number of processes run in parallel, and data conditioning.

Thompson, Charles K.

2012-01-01

221

Hadronic Atoms  

E-print Network

We review the theory of hadronic atoms in QCD+QED. The non-relativistic effective Lagrangian approach, used to describe this type of bound states, is illustrated with the case of pi+pi- atoms. In addition, we discuss the evaluation of isospin-breaking corrections to hadronic atom observables by invoking chiral perturbation theory.

J. Gasser; V. E. Lyubovitskij; A. Rusetsky

2009-04-09

222

The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2-GeV/c to 350-GeV/c  

SciTech Connect

The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7 {+-} 1.6% and the constant term is 7.4 {+-} 0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

Abdullin, S.; /Moscow, ITEP; Abramov, V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Acharya, B.; /Tata Inst.; Adam, N.; /Princeton U.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adzic, P.; /Belgrade U.; Akchurin, N.; /Texas Tech.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; /Iowa U.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Virginia U. /Iowa State U.

2009-01-01

223

Monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter  

E-print Network

The liquid argon calorimeter is a key component of the ATLAS detector installed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The primary purpose of this calorimeter is the measurement of electrons and photons. It also provides a crucial input for measuring jets and missing transverse momentum. An advanced data monitoring procedure was designed to quickly identify issues that would affect detector performance and ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. This article presents the validation procedure developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data taking periods, in which more than 98% of the proton proton luminosity recorded by ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV had calorimeter data quality suitable for physics analysis.

ATLAS Collaboration

2014-07-24

224

The zero-degree calorimeter for the relativistic heavy-ion experiment WA80 at CERN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calibration and performance results are presented for a sampling calorimeter designed for use as a beam calorimeter at zero degrees in the relativistic heavy-ion experiment WA80 at CERN. This uranium-scintillator zero-degree calorimeter (ZDC) was found to have a linear response to heavy ions over the range 60-6400 GeV and an in-beam hadronic resolution ranging from {?}/{E} = {0.013 + 0.33}/{?E} at low intensities to {?}/{E} = {0.02 + 0.67}/{?E} at higher intensities. The {e}/{h} ratio of the electromagnetic section was measured to be 1.12 at 135 GeV. The ZDC operated reliably with incident beams of 3.2 TeV oxygen and 6.4 TeV sulfur at intensities of over 10 6 nuclei per spill. It provided a trigger both for minimum bias events and for violent central collisions.

Young, G. R.; Awes, T. C.; Baktash, C.; Cumby, R. P.; Ferguson, R. L.; Gabriel, T. A.; Gustafsson, H. A.; Gutbrod, H. H.; Johnson, J. W.; Lee, I. Y.; Obenshain, F. E.; Plasil, F.; Sorensen, S. P.

1989-07-01

225

Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons  

SciTech Connect

The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multipurpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 47{pi} muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February--May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run. We have compared the shapes of the experimentally-obtained pulse height spectra to the Landau prediction for the ionization loss in a continuous thin absorber in the four electromagnetic and four hadronic layers of the calorimeter, and find good agreement after experimental effects are folded in. We have also determined an absolute energy calibration using two independent methods: one which measures the response of the electronics to a known amount of charge injected at the preamplifiers, and one which uses a carry-over of the calibration from a beam test of central calorimeter modules. Both absolute energy conversion factors agree with one another, within their errors. The calibration determined from the test beam carryover, relevant for use with collider physics data, has an error of 2.3%. We believe that, with further study, a final error of {approx}1% will be achieved. The theory-to-experiment comparison of the peaks (or most probable values) of the muon spectra was used to determine the layer-to-layer consistency of the muon signal. We find that the mean response in the 3 fine hadronic layers is (12 {plus_minus} 2%) higher than that in the 4 electromagnetic layers. These same comparisons have been used to verify the absolute energy conversion factors. The conversion factors work well for the electromagnetic sections.

Kotcher, J.

1992-10-01

226

Results of beam tests of a prototype calorimeter for a Linear Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a detector with superior jet energy resolution of 30%/?E or better near the Z-pole region (91GeV). The Calorimeter for the Linear Collider Collaboration (CALICE) is developing and testing prototype detectors with this goal in mind. One major limitation on detector resolution is the size of the hadron calorimeter contained within a magnetic coil. To compensate for "thin" calorimeters that cannot contain the highest energy particle showers, the Tail Catcher/Muon Tracker (TCMT) has been designed to include calorimetric functions and higher granularity than existing muon tracking systems. The prototype design also provided an opportunity to simulate the impact of a magnetic coil on energy resolution and to study the use of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) in particle detectors. This analysis shows that a TCMT six interaction lengths deep contains leakage and improves energy resolution when added to the CALICE electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. The effect of the TCMT both with and without a coil is more significant as energy increases. The addition of all sixteen layers of the TCMT to a 3.5 interaction length thick calorimeter improves pion resolution by 9.3% at 20 GeV and 10.8% at 80 GeV. For a 5.5 interaction length thick calorimeter system, typical of those under consideration for ILC detectors, the addition of TCMT layers after a coil of 1.8 interaction lengths improves energy resolution of 20 GeV pions by 1% and for 80 GeV pions by 2%.

Francis, Kurt

227

Exotic hadrons at hadron colliders  

E-print Network

In this proceeding, an overview of the recent progress of the exotic hadrons studies at hadron colliders is presented, including the experimental measurement results from CMS, LHCb, CDF and D0. The talk covers the physics properties study of X(3872); the search for Y(4140) state etc; the recent result of Z(4430); and also the extended study to bottomonium sector.

Ye Chen

2014-09-01

228

The Zero Degree Calorimeter for CMS.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) is a device currently in the construction stages for use in nuclear research at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is expected to operate by 2007. The ZDC will be used for both particle physics and nuclear physics research is scheduled at LHC. The ZDC itself will consist of plates at 45 degree angles relative to the beam and will be made of tungsten. Between these plates, there are plates of fiber optics that collect light. The events from colliding beams within the ZDC release Cherenkov light which the fibers then pick up. These many fibers will be fed into a photomultiplier tube with a time resolution of about 25 nanoseconds, the period at which events are expected. One of the problems discussed shall be the tendency of the quartz-based optical fibers to darken over time, so calibration is also necessary. The calibration mechanism will involve injecting a known amount of light into the ZDC itself so that a comparison can be made with the amount of light that is received by the photomultiplier tube. The challenge is creating an injection system resilient enough to withstand a highly radiative environment that will be also compatible with the resolution of the photomultiplier tube.

Wood, Jeff

2006-04-01

229

On abnormal absorption of hadron component of EAS cores in lead and possible explanations  

E-print Network

We confirm the result obtained many years ago at Tien-Shan mountain station with the large 36-m2 lead calorimeter that in extensive air showers (EAS) with energies of few PeV the attenuation of core energy deposit in lead becomes slower than it could be predicted by modern codes. It is shown that this effect is connected with the appearance of the excess of abnormal cores with a large ionisation released in lower layers of the calorimeter and these abnormal EAS cores are most probably produced by high-energy muon groups. A few hypotheses of the excess of muon reach EAS cores are considered. To study the absorption of EAS hadrons and muons in a lead ionization calorimeter, the EAS development in the atmosphere was simulated in the framework of the CORSIKA+QGSJET code whereupon the passage of hadrons and muons through a lead calorimeter has been modeled with using the FLUKA transport code.

L. G. Sveshnikova; A. P. Chubenko; R. A. Mukhamedshin; N. S. Popova; N. M. Nikolskaya; V. I. Yakovlev

2007-01-09

230

The Calice Scintillator HCAL Testbeam Prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A highly-granular, 38-layer, analog scintillator-tile hadron calorimeter prototype is under construction by members of the Calice collaboration in order to study hadronic shower shapes and to test the calorimetric aspects of particle-flow.

Eigen, Gerald

2006-10-01

231

Tile-boundary artifact reduction using odd tile size and the low-pass first convention.  

PubMed

It is well known that tile-boundary artifacts occur in wavelet-based lossy image coding. However, until now, their cause has not been understood well. In this paper, we show that boundary artifacts are an inescapable consequence of the usual methods used to choose tile size and the type of symmetric extension employed in a wavelet-based image decomposition system. This paper presents a novel method for reducing these tile-boundary artifacts. The method employs odd tile sizes (2N + 1 samples) rather than the conventional even tile sizes (2N samples). It is shown that, for the same bit rate, an image compressed using an odd tile length low-pass first (OTLPF) convention has significantly less boundary artifacts than an image compressed using even tile sizes. The OTLPF convention can also be incorporated into the JPEG 2000 image compression algorithm using extensions defined in Part 2 of this standard. PMID:16121452

Wei, Jianxin; Pickering, Mark R; Frater, Michael R; Arnold, John F; Boman, John A; Zeng, Wenjun

2005-08-01

232

Curvelet transform with adaptive tiling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The curvelet transform is a recently introduced non-adaptive multi-scale transform that have gained popularity in the image processing field. In this paper, we study the effect of customized tiling of frequency content in the curvelet transform. Specifically, we investigate the effect of the size of the coarsest level and its relationship to denoising performance. Based on the observed behavior, we introduce an algorithm to automatically choose the optimal number of decompositions. Its performance shows a clear advantage, in denoising applications, when compared to default curvelet decomposition. We also examine how denoising is affected by varying the number of divisions per scale.

Al-Marzouqi, Hasan; AlRegib, Ghassan

2012-03-01

233

Geometric and algebraic properties of polyomino tilings  

E-print Network

In this thesis we study tilings of regions on the square grid by polyominoes. A polyomino is any connected shape formed from a union of grid cells, and a tiling of a region is a collection of polyominoes lying in the region ...

Korn, Michael Robert, 1978-

2004-01-01

234

Barcoded Magnetic Tiles for Programmable Assemblies  

E-print Network

Barcoded Magnetic Tiles for Programmable Assemblies Urmi Majumder and John H. Reif Abstract patterns. The main contribution of our paper is a novel barcode scheme for magnetic tile pads, and the design and optimization of our barcode scheme for magnetic pads is the paper's major concern and focus

Reif, John H.

235

Shaving Ceramic Tiles To Final Dimensions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combination of template and routing tool cuts ceramic tiles to final dimensions. Template guides router along precisely defined planes to accurately and uniformly shave chamfers on edge of tiles. Legs of template temporarily bonded to workpiece by double-backed adhesive tape. Adaptable to in-situ final machining of other nominally flat, narrow surfaces.

Shaw, Ernest

1992-01-01

236

Wind-Resistant Filler for Tile Gaps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Filler developed for gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle finds application in industries that use tiles for thermal or environmental protection. Filler consists of tight-fitting ceramic tubes and fibrous alumina. Combination resists high wind loads while providing requisite heat protection. Quartz-thread stitching holds envelope together.

Bellavia, J.; Quigley, I. A.; Callahan, T. S.

1982-01-01

237

The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

2003-01-01

238

Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, "students discover and explore a special kind of tiling of the plane. Rep-tiles are geometric figures such that n copies can fit together to form a larger, similar figure. Students experiment with various shapes and values of n. Spatial sense is encouraged by the need to visualize and perform transformations with the shapes involved." (from NCTM's Illuminations)

Illuminations National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

2009-07-20

239

TILING A SQUARE WITH SIMILAR RECTANGLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1903 M. Dehn proved that a rectangle can be tiled (or partitioned) into finitely many squares if and only if the ratio of its base and height is rational. In this article we show that a square can be tiled with finitely many similar rectangles of eccentricity r if and only if r isa n algebraic number and each

C. Freiling; D. Rinne

1994-01-01

240

Tiling Space by Platonic Solids, I  

Microsoft Academic Search

.    There exist precisely 914, 58, and 46 equivariant types of tile-transitive tilings of three-dimensional euclidean space by\\u000a topological cubes, octahedra, and tetrahedra, that fall into 11, 3, and 9 topological families, respectively. Representatives\\u000a are described for all topological families. A general method for obtaining results of this kind is introduced.

Olaf Delgado Friedrichs; Daniel H. Huson

1999-01-01

241

Fibonacci words, hyperbolic tilings and grossone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we study the contribution of the theory of grossone to the study of infinite Fibonacci words, combining this tool with the help of a particular tiling of the hyperbolic plane: the tiling { 7, 3 } , called the heptagrid. With the help of the numeral system based on grossone, we obtain a richer family of infinite Fibonacci words compared with the traditional approach.

Margenstern, Maurice

2015-04-01

242

The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

Mkrtchyan, Hamlet [Yerevan Physics Institute, JLAB; Carlini, Roger D. [JLAB; Tadevosyan, Vardan H. [Yerevan Physics Institute; Arrington, John Robert [ANL; Asaturyan, Arshak Razmik [Yerevan Physics Institute; Christy, Michael Eric [Hampton U.; Dutta, Dipangkar [Mississippi State U.; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Fenker, Howard C. [JLAB; Gaskell, David J. [JLAB; Horn, Tanja [Catholic University of America, JLAB; Jones, Mark K. [JLAB; Keppel, Cynthia [JLAB, Hampton U.; Mack, David J. [JLAB; Malace, Simona P. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory and Duke University; Mkrtchyan, Arthur [Yerevan Physics Institute; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana [James Madison U.; Seely, Charles Jason [MIT; Tvaskis, Vladas [University of Manitoba; Wood, Stephen A. [JLAB; Zhamkochyan, Simon [Yerevan Physics Institute

2013-08-01

243

The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab  

E-print Network

The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

H. Mkrtchyan; R. Carlini; V. Tadevosyan; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; D. Gaskell; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; C. E. Keppel; D. J. Mack; S. P. Malace; A. Mkrtchyan; M. I. Niculescu; J. Seely; V. Tvaskis; S. A. Wood; S. Zhamkochyan

2012-04-28

244

Commissioning and calibration of the Zero Degree Calorimeters for the ALICE experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC will study the properties of matter at the extreme temperature and energy density conditions produced in heavy ion collisions. The impact parameter of the collision will be estimated by means of the Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC), that measure the energy carried away by the non-interacting (spectator) nucleons. All the spectator nucleons have the same energy, therefore the calorimeter response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. Two identical sets of hadronic calorimeters are located at opposite sides with respect to the interaction point, 116 m away from it, where the two LHC beams circulate in two different pipes. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) calorimeter, placed between the two beam pipes and a proton (ZP) calorimeter, positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The ZDC are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in the quartz fibers, acting as the active material embedded in a dense absorber matrix. In summer 2007 the ZN and ZP calorimeters have been placed on a movable platform and then installed in the LHC tunnel. The results of the commissioning studies are shown. The monitoring systems adopted to control the stability of the PMT responses, i.e. light injection with a laser diode and cosmic rays, are described in detail. The foreseen calibration with e.m. dissociation events in Pb-Pb collisions will also be discussed. Finally the first measurements carried out during the commissioning in the LHC tunnel will be presented.

Gemme, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Luparello, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

2009-12-01

245

Hadronic Interactions  

E-print Network

Understanding hadronic interactions is crucial for investigating the properties of unstable hadrons, since measuring physical quantities for unstable hadrons including the resonance mass and decay width requires simultaneous calculations of final scattering states. Recent studies of hadronic scatterings and decays are reviewed from this point of view. The nuceon-nucleon and multi-nucleon interactions are very important to understand the formation of nucleus from the first principle of QCD. These interactions have been studied mainly by two methods, due originally to L\\"uscher and to HALQCD. The results obtained from the two methods are compared in three channels, $I=2$ two-pion, H-dibaryon, and two-nucleon channels. So far the results from the two methods for the two-nucleon channels are different even at the level of the presence or absence of bound states. We then discuss possible uncertainties in each method. Recent results on the binding energy for helium nuclei are also reviewed.

Takeshi Yamazaki

2015-03-30

246

Use of Particle Flow Algorithms in a Dual Readout Crystal Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to grow clear, dense scintillating crystals presents an opportunity for development of a total absorption calorimeter that could contain multi-GeV hadrons in a detector volume similar to that of present-day calorimeters. With appropriate crystals and optimized readout elements, both scintillation and Cerenkov photons can be produced and detected separately. This dual readout approach allows one to selectively correct particle energies, resulting in significant gains in energy resolution ?20%/?E or even better for hadrons. An R&D program is underway to 1) develop appropriate clear, dense crystals, 2) test innovative readout methods for both scintillation and Cerenkov light, and 3) provide test beam capability for crystal and readout sensor testing and simulation verification. As part of this effort, simulation studies have been done assuming a dual readout crystal calorimeter implementation for a future e+e- linear collider detector. By using the dual readout correction, corrections for magnetic field effects on low momentum charged hadrons, and particle flow techniques, substantial improvements in dijet mass resolution are obtained.

Magill, Stephen

2012-12-01

247

The Art of Tiling with Rectangles 1 Checkerboards and Dominoes  

E-print Network

Norman Do The Art of Tiling with Rectangles 1 Checkerboards and Dominoes Tiling pervades the art. In this article, we will consider some of the more surprising results from the art of tiling with rectangles. One- moving two squares from opposite corners. How many ways are there to tile the remaining board

Do, Norman

248

Augmenting Loop Tiling with Data Alignment for Improved Cache Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loop blocking (tiling) is a well-known compiler optimization that helps improve cache performance by dividing the loop iteration space into smaller blocks (tiles); reuse of array elements within each tile is maximized by ensuring that the working set for the tile fits into the data cache. Padding is a data alignment technique that involves the insertion of dummy elements into

Preeti Ranjan Panda; Hiroshi Nakamura; Nikil D. Dutt; Alexandru Nicolau

1999-01-01

249

Measurements of the Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in a Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL  

E-print Network

For calorimeter applications requiring precise time stamping, the time structure of hadronic showers in the detector is a crucial issue. This applies in particular to detector concepts for CLIC, where a hadronic calorimeter with tungsten absorbers is being considered to achieve a high level of shower containment while satisfying strict space constraints. The high hadronic background from gamma gamma to hadrons processes at 3 TeV in combination with the 2 GHz bunch crossing frequency at CLIC requires good time stamping in the detectors. To provide first measurements of the time structure in a highly granular scintillator-tungsten calorimeter, T3B, a dedicated timing experiment, was installed behind the last layer of the CALICE WHCAL prototype, a 30 layer tungsten scintillator calorimeter. T3B consists of 15 small scintillator cells with embedded silicon photomultipliers, read out with fast digitizers over a time window of 2.4 us, and provides detailed measurements of the time structure of the signal. The offline data reconstruction performs an automatic gain calibration using noise events recorded between physics triggers and allows the determination of the arrival time of each photon at the photon sensor. The T3B setup, its calibration and data reconstruction, as well as first results of the time structure of the calorimeter response for 10 GeV pions recorded at the CERN PS confronted with Geant4 simulations using different physics lists are discussed.

Frank Simon; for the CALICE Collaboration

2011-09-15

250

Measurements of the Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in a Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For calorimeter applications requiring precise time stamping, the time structure of hadronic showers in the detector is a crucial issue. This applies in particular to detector concepts for CLIC, where a hadronic calorimeter with tungsten absorbers is being considered to achieve a high level of shower containment while satisfying strict space constraints. The high hadronic background from ??? hadrons processes at 3 TeV in combination with the 2 GHz bunch crossing frequency at CLIC requires good time stamping in the detectors. To provide first measurements of the time structure in a highly granular scintillator-tungsten calorimeter, T3B, a dedicated timing experiment, was installed behind the last layer of the CALICE WHCAL prototype, a 30 layer tungsten scintillator calorimeter. T3B consists of 15 small scintillator cells with embedded silicon photomultipliers, read out with fast digitizers over a time window of 2.4 ?s, and provides detailed measurements of the time structure of the signal. The offine data reconstruction performs an automatic gain calibration using noise events recorded between physics triggers and allows the determination of the arrival time of each photon at the photon sensor. The T3B setup, its calibration and data reconstruction, as well as first results of the time structure of the calorimeter response for 10 GeV pions recorded at the CERN PS confronted with Geant4 simulations using different physics lists are discussed.

Simon, Frank; The Calice Collaboration

251

Solar-energy treatment of ceramic tiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 400 kW Advanced Components Test Facility was used to provide a concentrated source of solar energy for firing ceramic wall tile. A domed top cylindrical cavity with a white refractory fiber lining provided diffuse reflection of the concentrated solar beam directly onto the upper surface of the unfired wall tile. The tile were placed directly on the cavity floor in a circular pattern, centered at 450 intervals so that eight tile could be fired at one time. The tile and cavity walls were instrumented with thermocouples, and pyrometric cones were used to determine temperature distribution within the cavity. The glazed and unglazed solar fired titles were tested for flatness, modulus of rupture, water absorption, porosity, bulk density, apparent specific gravity, percent linear thermal expansion and crystalline phases present in the fired bodies. The major problems encountered are: cracking by thermal shock, and uneven shrinkage and glaze maturity across individual tile. The cavity failed to provide even heating at all eight tile positions.

Harris, J. N.; Clayton, M. E.

1981-12-01

252

High-Strength, Low-Shrinkage Ceramic Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Addition of refractory fibers and whiskers to insulating tiles composed primarily of fibrous silica, such as those used on the skin of Space Shuttle orbiter, greatly improves properties. New composition suitable for lightweight, thermally-stable mirror blanks and as furnace and kiln insulation. Improved tiles made with current tile-fabrication processes. For given density, tiles containing silicon carbide and boron additives stronger in flexure than tiles made from silica alone. In addition, tiles with additives nearly immune to heat distortion, whereas pure-silica tiles shrink and become severely distorted.

Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

1986-01-01

253

Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement dilepton spectrometer HADES. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 AGeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. We will report results of the last beam test with quasi-monoenergetic photons carried out in MAMI facility at Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz.

Rodríguez-Ramos, P.; Chlad, L.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlavá?, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Korcyl, G.; Kugler, A.; Lapidus, K.; Linev, S.; Lisowski, E.; Neiser, A.; Ott, O.; Otte, O.; Pethukov, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Svoboda, O.; Thomas, A.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

2014-11-01

254

Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at normal atmospheric pressure is not much greater than that of the fibrous ceramic alone in a vacuum.

White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

2004-01-01

255

Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

256

Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles  

DOEpatents

U-shaped tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners have two rods which engage L-shaped slots. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the wall. Resilient contact strips under the parallel sides of the U-shaped tile assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall. 6 figs.

Gallix, R.

1987-12-09

257

Mechanical Design of the DAMPE BGO Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the CASs new Innovation 2020 program. As the main component of DAMPE, the new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO Crystals coupled with photomultiplier tube.The reliability and safety of the BGO Calorimeter structure play a very important role in the operation of whole detector. During the rocket launch, the calorimeter structure should be stable against vibration and environmental factors to ensure detector works in good conditions. In this article, we make the BGO calorimeter structure design, and then prove that it will work in the environments of rocket launch and flight.

Hu, Yiming; Wu, Jian; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

258

Notch sensitivity of space shuttle tile materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the notch sensitivity of the thermal protection tile for the space shuttle. Two types of RSI tile were studied: LI-900 and LI-2200. Three point bend specimens were cut from discarded tiles in the in-plane (ip) and through-the-thickness (ttt) directions. They were tested with or without a sharp notch. The LI-900 (ip and ttt) specimens were not very notch sensitive, but the LI-2200 (ip and ttt) specimens were. The LI-2200 material showed about a 35 percent reduction in strength due to the presence of the notch. This reduction in strength should be considered in the design of mechanically fastened tile concepts.

Newman, J. C., Jr.

1980-01-01

259

Applied physics: The virtues of tiling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cracked metal film on an elastic substrate has been shown to provide ultrahigh sensitivity in detecting mechanical vibrations. The result draws inspiration from principles of tiling that apply to many biological systems. See Letter p.222

Fratzl, Peter

2014-12-01

260

A family of ternary decagonal tilings  

E-print Network

A new family of decagonal quasiperiodic tilings are constructed by the use of generalized point substitution processes, which is a new substitution formalism developed by the author [N. Fujita, Acta Cryst. A 65, 342 (2009)]. These tilings are composed of three prototiles: an acute rhombus, a regular pentagon and a barrel shaped hexagon. In the perpendicular space, these tilings have windows with fractal boundaries, and the windows are analytically derived as the fixed sets of the conjugate maps associated with the relevant substitution rules. It is shown that the family contains an infinite number of local isomorphism classes which can be grouped into several symmetry classes (e.g., $C_{10}$, $D_5$, etc.). The member tilings are transformed into one another through collective simpleton flips, which are associated with the reorganization in the window boundaries.

Nobuhisa Fujita

2009-11-27

261

The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton (pp) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |?| < 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5 < |?| < 4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5 K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and timing boards. In the first three years of LHC operation, approximately 27 fb?1 of pp collision data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV. Throughout this period, the calorimeter consistently operated with performances very close to specifications, with high data-taking efficiency. This is in large part due to a sophisticated data monitoring procedure designed to quickly identify issues that would degrade the detector performance, to ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. After a description of the detector design, main characteristics and operation principles, this paper details the data quality assessment procedures developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, when more than 98% of the luminosity recorded by ATLAS had high quality LAr calorimeter data suitable for physics analysis.

Simard, Olivier; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

2015-02-01

262

Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadron calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadron calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at centre of mass energies of 7-8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter has been operating almost optimally, with performance very close to specifications. The talk will cover all aspects of these first years of operation, including the calibration efforts and the data quality assessment procedure. The excellent performance achieved will also be briefly reviewed, especially in the context of the recently announced discovery of the Higgs boson.

Lampl, W.

2014-06-01

263

Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

1989-01-01

264

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10

265

On approximating rectangle tiling and packing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our study of tiling and packing with rectangles in twodimensionalregions is strongly motivated by applicationsin database mining, histogram-based estimation of querysizes, data partitioning, and motion estimation in videocompression by block matching, among others.An example of the problems that we tackle is thefollowing: given an n \\\\Theta n array A of positive numbers,find a tiling using at most p rectangles (that

Sanjeev Khanna; S. Muthukrishnant; Mike Paterson

1998-01-01

266

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1999-01-01

267

Performance of the AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter in Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AMS-02(Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) is an high energy particle detector developed to operate on the International Space Station. AMS-02 was installed on ISS on May 2011 and is expected to operate for 10-20 years collecting about 160-320 billions of events. The main goals of the experiment are the detection of primordial antimatter and dark matter by studying spectra and flux of different cosmic ray components (protons, electrons, nuclei, positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays, etc) in the high energy range (1-2000 GeV). Identification of electrons, positrons and photons is provided by the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL), a fine grained lead-scintillating fibers sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides an excellent reconstruction of electromagnetic shower energy and a highly efficient rejection of the hadronic background. Thanks to the 3D shower reconstruction capability, ECAL allows a stand-alone determination of the incoming particle direction, with unprecedented angular resolution. As a result, ECAL is able to identify high energy photons coming from galactic or extragalactic sources.

Gallucci, G.; AMS-02 ECAL group

2015-02-01

268

Results of 2007 test beam of AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AMS-02 experiment will be delivered by the Space Shuttle Discovery to the ISS in summer 2010. The main goals of the experiment are search for antimatter and dark matter, high precision measurement of charged cosmic ray spectra and fluxes and study of gamma rays, in the GeV to TeV energy range. In AMS-02 the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is required to measure e+,e- and gamma energy and to discriminate electromagnetic showers from hadronic cascades. ECAL is based on a lead/scintillating fiber sandwich, providing a 3D imaging reconstruction of the showers. The electronics equipping the detector has low power consumption, low noise, large dynamic range readout and full double redundancy. The calorimeter successfully got through several space qualification tests concerning the mechanical and thermal stability, the electromagnetic compatibility and radiation hardness. The ECAL Flight Model was calibrated during Summer 2007 in a test beam at CERN, using 6-250 GeV electron and proton beams: angular and energy resolutions, obtained from these data, are reported.

Falco, Stefano Di

2010-01-01

269

Results from an iron-proportional tube calorimeter prototype.  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the energy resolution of a prototype gas tracking calorimeter in a test beam at Fermilab as part of the detector development program for the MINOS long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The calorimeter consisted of 25 layers of 1.5 inch thick steel plates interleaved with planes of aluminum proportional tubes. The tube cells are square, with 0.9 cm edges and open tops. Cathode strips were used for read out transverse to the wire cells. The tubes operated with a nonflammable gas mixture of 88% CO{sub 2}, 9.5% isobutane and 2.5% argon which gave an operating range of >500 V (limited by the electronics). We read out the wire signals on the tubes and in some configurations the cathode stripe as well. We studied positrons, pions and muons over a momentum range of 2.5-30 GeV/c and achieved energy resolutions of about 40%/{radical}E for EM and 71%/{radical}E for hadronic showers.

Schoessow, P.

1998-02-03

270

Timing resolution of Shisk-Kebab'' lead scintillator sandwich calorimeters  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed lead scintillator sandwich calorimeters with 1/4 [chi][sub o] sampling frequency and total thickness [approximately]16[chi][sub o]. The 4 mm thick scintillator plates are read out by wavelength shifter fibers 1 mm in diameter which pass through holes penetrating the plates on a .95 cm [times] .95 cm grid (Shish-Kebab geometry). We tested these modules in the A2 test beam at Brookhaven using low energy electrons and hadrons. Results are here presented on electron energy and time-of-flight resolution obtained with various combinations of scintillators and wavelength shifters. We also describe results on e/[pi] separation obtained with a new technique for the longitudinal segmentation.

Kistenev, E.; White, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Pischalnikov, Y.; Protopopov, Y.; Rykalin, V. (Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation))

1992-01-01

271

Timing resolution of ``Shisk-Kebab`` lead scintillator sandwich calorimeters  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed lead scintillator sandwich calorimeters with 1/4 {chi}{sub o} sampling frequency and total thickness {approximately}16{chi}{sub o}. The 4 mm thick scintillator plates are read out by wavelength shifter fibers 1 mm in diameter which pass through holes penetrating the plates on a .95 cm {times} .95 cm grid (Shish-Kebab geometry). We tested these modules in the A2 test beam at Brookhaven using low energy electrons and hadrons. Results are here presented on electron energy and time-of-flight resolution obtained with various combinations of scintillators and wavelength shifters. We also describe results on e/{pi} separation obtained with a new technique for the longitudinal segmentation.

Kistenev, E.; White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Pischalnikov, Y.; Protopopov, Y.; Rykalin, V. [Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation)

1992-12-31

272

Zero Degree Calorimeter for CMS at the LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) for the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is located between the incoming and outgoing beam lines at a distance of 140 m on each side of the interaction point. It measures primarily neutral particles that go in the direction of the original proton or heavy ion beam. With p-p reactions these are mostly neutrons produced by a charge exchange of the original proton. With heavy ion reactions the ZDC measures mostly spectator neutrons. The number of neutrons provides a measure of the amount of overlap of the interacting heavy ions. Over the last year the ZDC has collected data from p-p reactions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36, and 7.0 TeV and Pb-Pb reactions at center of mass energies per nucleon pair of 2.75 TeV.

Norbeck, Edwin

2011-04-01

273

A water calorimeter for neutron dosimetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A water calorimeter has been used for the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in a d(15)+Be neutron beam. The absorbed dose measured with the calorimeter was compared with that measured with an Exradin ionisation chamber, constructed of A-150 plastic. The doses measured by the ionisation chamber were calculated according to the European (ECNEU) protocol. Absorbed dose to tissue

G. Galloway; J. R. Greening; J. R. Williams

1986-01-01

274

LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter calibration and performance  

E-print Network

LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter calibration and performance Savrina Daria ITEP, Moscow SINP MSU system Main requierements: Energy resolution E/E = 10%/E+1%; Fast responce ~25ns; Stable operation under Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) Geometrical acceptance of 300 mrad × 250 mrad Shashlik sampling technology

275

5.8 X-ray Calorimeters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

Porter, F. Scott

2008-01-01

276

Lessons from Monte Carlo simulations of the performance of a dual-readout fiber calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The RD52 calorimeter uses the dual-readout principle to detect both electromagnetic and hadronic showers, as well as muons. Scintillation and Cherenkov light provide the two signals which, in combination, allow for superior hadronic performance. In this paper, we report on detailed, GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations of the performance of this instrument. The results of these simulations are compared in great detail to measurements that have been carried out and published by the DREAM Collaboration. This comparison makes it possible to understand subtle details of the shower development in this unusual particle detector. It also allows for predictions of the improvement in the performance that may be expected for larger detectors of this type. These studies also revealed some inadequacies in the GEANT4 simulation packages, especially for hadronic showers, but also for the Cherenkov signals from electromagnetic showers.

Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; De Pedis, D.; Ferrari, R.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Genova, P.; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Scuri, F.; Sill, A.; Venturelli, T.; Wigmans, R.

2014-10-01

277

Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid Argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at a unprecedented center of mass energies between 7 TeV and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating with performances very close to the specification ones. After 2019, the instantaneous luminosity will reach 2-3 × 1034 cm-2s-1, well above the luminosity for which the calorimeter was designed. In order to preserve its triggering capabilities, the detector will be upgraded with a new fully digital trigger system with a refined granularity. In 2023, the instantaneous luminosity will ultimately reach 5-7 × 1034 cm-2s-1, requiring a complete replacement of the readout electronics. Moreover, with an increased particle flux, several phenomena (liquid argon boiling, space charge effects...) will affect the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal). A replacement with a new FCal with smaller LAr gaps or a new calorimeter module are considered. The performance of these new calorimeters is being studied in highest intensity particle beams. This contribution covers all aspects of the first three years of operation. The excellent performance achieved is especially detailed in the context of the discovery of the Higgs boson announced in July 2012. The future plans to preserve this performance until the end of the LHC program are also presented.

Strizenec, P.

2014-09-01

278

Development of GEM-Based Digital Hadron Calorimetry Using the SLAC KPiX Chip  

SciTech Connect

The development of Digital Hadron Calorimetry for the SiD detector Concept for the International Linear Collider is described. The jet energy requirements of the ILC physics program are discussed. The concept of GEM-based digital hadron calorimetry is presented, followed by a description of, and results from, prototype detectors. Plans are described for the construction of 1m{sup 2} GEM-DHCAL planes to be tested as part of a future calorimeter stack.

White, A.; /Texas U., Arlington /Washington U., Seattle /Unlisted /SLAC

2012-04-12

279

29 CFR 570.64 - Occupations involved in the manufacture of brick, tile, and kindred products (Order 13).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...glazed structural tile, roofing tile, stove lining, chimney pipes and tops, wall coping, and drain tile. The term shall not include the...non-structural-bearing clay products: Ceramic floor and wall tile, mosaic tile, glazed and...

2010-07-01

280

29 CFR 570.64 - Occupations involved in the manufacture of brick, tile, and kindred products (Order 13).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and tops, wall coping, and drain tile. The term shall not include the following non-structural-bearing clay products: Ceramic floor and wall tile, mosaic tile, glazed and enameled tile, faience, and similar tile, nor shall the term include...

2011-07-01

281

Texture and color features for tile classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we present the results of a preliminary computer vision system to classify the production of a ceramic tile industry. We focus on the classification of a specific type of tiles whose production can be affected by external factors, such as humidity, temperature, origin of clays and pigments. Variations on these uncontrolled factors provoke small differences in the color and the texture of the tiles that force to classify all the production. A constant and non- subjective classification would allow avoiding devolution from customers and unnecessary stock fragmentation. The aim of this work is to simulate the human behavior on this classification task by extracting a set of features from tile images. These features are induced by definitions from experts. To compute them we need to mix color and texture information and to define global and local measures. In this work, we do not seek a general texture-color representation, we only deal with textures formed by non-oriented colored-blobs randomly distributed. New samples are classified using Discriminant Analysis functions derived from known class tile samples. The last part of the paper is devoted to explain the correction of acquired images in order to avoid time and geometry illumination changes.

Baldrich, Ramon; Vanrell, Maria; Villanueva, Juan J.

1999-09-01

282

Tiled WMS/KML Server V2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This software is a higher-performance implementation of tiled WMS, with integral support for KML and time-varying data. This software is compliant with the Open Geospatial WMS standard, and supports KML natively as a WMS return type, including support for the time attribute. Regionated KML wrappers are generated that match the existing tiled WMS dataset. Ping and JPG formats are supported, and the software is implemented as an Apache 2.0 module that supports a threading execution model that is capable of supporting very high request rates. The module intercepts and responds to WMS requests that match certain patterns and returns the existing tiles. If a KML format that matches an existing pyramid and tile dataset is requested, regionated KML is generated and returned to the requesting application. In addition, KML requests that do not match the existing tile datasets generate a KML response that includes the corresponding JPG WMS request, effectively adding KML support to a backing WMS server.

Plesea, Lucian

2012-01-01

283

FLUKA studies of hadron-irradiated scintillating crystals for calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will be performed in a harsh radiation environment with high hadron fluences. The upgraded CMS electromagnetic calorimeter design and suitable scintillating materials are a focus of current research. In this paper, first results using the Monte Carlo simulation program FLUKA are compared to measurements performed with proton-irradiated LYSO, YSO and cerium fluoride crystals. Based on these results, an extrapolation to the behavior of an electromagnetic sampling calorimeter, using one of the inorganic scintillators above as an active medium, is performed for the upgraded CMS experiment at the HL-LHC. Characteristic parameters such as the induced ambient dose, fluence spectra for different particle types and the residual nuclei are studied, and the suitability of these materials for a future calorimeter is surveyed. Particular attention is given to the creation of isotopes in an LYSO-tungsten calorimeter that might contribute a prohibitive background to the measured signal.

Quittnat, Milena; CMS collaboration

2015-02-01

284

AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS DURING BUFFING OF RESILIENT FLOOR TILE  

EPA Science Inventory

Although asbestos-containing resilient floor tiles are considered nonfriable, the frictional forces exerted on the tile during routine maintenance operations can generate asbestos-containing structures. tudy was conducted to determine the level of airborne asbestos concentrations...

285

Measurement of exclusive branching fractions of hadronic one-prong tau decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the branching fractions for the hadronic ? decays, ? ? ?Kn?° ? (0? n ?3), with the L3 detector at LEP. Multiphoton final states are analyzed using the fine-grained, high-resolution electromagnetic calorimeter. The decay channels are identified using a neural network method. The results are: BR(? ? ?K?) = (11.82 ± 0.26 ± 0.43) %, BR(? ?

M. M. Accarri; A. Adam; O. Adriani; M. Aguilar-Benitez; S. Ahlen; J. Alcaraz; A. Aloisio; G. Alverson; M. G. Alviggi; G. Ambrosi; Q. An; H. Anderhub; A. L. Anderson; V. P. Andreev; T. Angelescu; L. Antonov; D. Antreasyan; G. Alkhazov; P. Arce; A. Arefiev; T. Azemoon; T. Aziz; P. V. K. S. Baba; P. Bagnaia; J. A. Bakken; L. Baksay; R. C. Ball; S. Banerjee; K. Banicz; R. Barillère; L. Barone; A. Baschirotto; M. Basile; R. Battiston; A. Bay; F. Becattini; U. Becker; F. Behner; Gy. L. Bencze; J. Berdugo; P. Berges; B. Bertucci; B. L. Betev; M. Biasini; A. Biland; G. M. Bilei; R. Bizzarri; J. J. Blaising; G. J. Bobbink; R. Bock; A. Böhm; B. Borgia; A. Boucham; D. Bourilkov; M. Bourquin; D. Boutigny; B. Bouwens; E. Brambilla; J. G. Branson; V. Brigljevic; I. C. Brock; M. Brooks; A. Bujak; J. D. Burger; W. J. Burger; C. Burgos; J. Busenitz; A. Buytenhuijs; A. Bykov; X. D. Cai; M. Capell; G. Cara Romeo; M. Caria; G. Carlino; A. M. Cartacci; J. Casaus; R. Castello; N. Cavallo; M. Cerrada; M. Cesaroni; M. Chamizo; Y. H. Chang; U. K. Chaturvedi; M. Chemarin; A. Chen; C. Chen; G. Chen; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; M. Chen; G. Chiefari; C. Y. Chien; M. T. Choi; S. Chung; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; C. Civinini; I. Clare; R. Clare; T. E. Coan; H. O. Cohn; G. Coignet; N. Colino; S. Costantini; F. Cotorobai; B. de la Cruz; X. T. Cui; X. Y. Cui; T. S. Dai; R. D'Alessandro; R. de Asmundis; A. Degré; K. Deiters; E. Dénes; P. Denes; F. Denotaristefani; D. Dibitonto; M. Diemoz; H. R. Dimitrov; C. Dionisi; M. Dittmar; L. Djambazov; I. Dorne; M. T. Dova; E. Drago; D. Duchesneau; F. Duhem; P. Duinker; I. Duran; S. Dutta; S. Easo; H. El Mamouni; A. Engler; F. J. Eppling; F. C. Erné; P. Extermann; R. Fabbretti; M. Fabre; S. Falciano; A. Favara; J. Fay; M. Felcini; T. Ferguson; D. Fernandez; G. Fernandez; F. Ferroni; H. Fesefeldt; E. Fiandrini; J. H. Field; F. Filthaut; P. H. Fisher; G. Forconi; L. Fredj; K. Freudenreich; M. Gailloud; Yu. Galaktionov; E. Gallo; S. N. Ganguli; P. Garcia-Abia; S. Gentile; J. Gerald; N. Gheordanescu; S. Giagu; S. Goldfarb; J. Goldstein; Z. F. Gong; E. Gonzalez; A. Gougas; D. Goujon; G. Gratta; M. W. Gruenewald; C. Gu; M. Guanziroli; V. K. Gupta; A. Gurtu; H. R. Gustafson; L. J. Gutay; A. Hasan; D. Hauschildt; J. T. He; T. Hebbeker; M. Hebert; A. Hervé; K. Hilgers; H. Hofer; H. Hoorani; S. R. Hou; G. Hu; B. Ille; M. M. Ilyas; V. Innocente; H. Janssen; B. N. Jin; L. W. Jones; P. de Jong; I. Josa-Mutuberria; A. Kasser; R. A. Khan; Yu. Kamyshkov; P. Kapinos; J. S. Kapustinsky; Y. Karyotakis; M. Kaur; S. Khokhar; M. N. Kienzle-Focacci; D. Kim; J. K. Kim; S. C. Kim; Y. G. Kim; W. W. Kinnison; A. Kirkby; D. Kirkby; J. Kirkby; S. Kirsch; W. Kittel; A. Klimentov; A. C. König; E. Koffeman; O. Kornadt; V. Koutsenko; A. Koulbardis; R. W. Kraemer; T. Kramer; V. R. Krastev; W. Krenz; H. Kuijten; K. S. Kumar; A. Kunin; P. Ladron de Guevara; G. Landi; D. Lanske; S. Lanzano; P. Laurikainen; A. Lebedev; P. Lebrun; P. Lecomte; P. Lecoq; P. Le Coultre; D. M. Lee; J. S. Lee; K. Y. Lee; I. Leedom; C. Leggett; J. M. Le Goff; R. Leiste; M. Lenti; E. Leonardi; P. Levtchenko; C. Li; E. Lieb; W. T. Lin; F. L. Linde; B. Lindemann; L. Lista; Y. Liu; W. Lohmann; E. Longo; W. Lu; Y. S. Lu; J. M. Lubbers; K. Lübelsmeyer; C. Luci; D. Luckey; L. Ludovici; L. Luminari; W. Lustermann; W. G. Ma; M. MacDermott; M. Maity; L. Malgeri; R. Malik; A. Malinin; C. Maña; S. Mangla; M. Maolinbay; P. Marchesini; A. Marin; J. P. Martin; F. Marzano; G. G. G. Massaro; K. Mazumdar; P. McBride; T. McMahon; D. McNally; S. Mele; M. Merk; L. Merola; M. Meschini; W. J. Metzger; Y. Mi; A. Mihul; G. B. Mills; Y. Mir; G. Mirabelli; J. Mnich; M. Möller; V. Monaco; B. Monteleoni; R. Morand; S. Morganti; N. E. Moulai; R. Mount; S. Müller; E. Nagy; M. Napolitano; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; H. Newman; M. A. Niaz; A. Nippe; H. Nowak; G. Organtini; R. Ostonen; D. Pandoulas; S. Paoletti; P. Paolucci; G. Pascale; G. Passaleva; S. Patricelli; T. Paul; M. Pauluzzi; C. Paus; F. Pauss; Y. J. Pei; S. Pensotti; D. Perret-Gallix; A. Pevsner; D. Piccolo; M. Pieri; J. C. Pinto; P. A. Piroué; E. Pistolesi; F. Plasil; V. Plyaskin; M. Pohl; V. Pojidaev; H. Postema; N. Produit; J. M. Qian; K. N. Qureshi; R. Raghavan; G. Rahal-Callot; P. G. Rancoita; M. Rattaggi; G. Raven; P. Razis; K. Read; M. Redaelli; D. Ren; Z. Ren; M. Rescigno; S. Reucroft; A. Ricker; S. Riemann; B. C. Riemers; K. Riles; O. Rind; H. A. Rizvi; S. Ro; A. Robohm; F. J. Rodriguez; B. P. Roe; M. Röhner; S. Röhner; L. Romero; S. Rosier-Lees; R. Rosmalen; Ph. Rosselet; W. van Rossum; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; J. A. Rubio; H. Rykaczewski; J. Salicio; E. Sanchez; G. S. Sanders; A. Santocchia; M. E. Sarakinos; S. Sarkar; G. Sartorelli; M. Sassowsky; G. Sauvage; H. Schäfer; V. Schegelsky; D. Schmitz; P. Schmitz; M. Schneegans; N. Scholz; H. Schopper; D. J. Schotanus; S. Shotkin; H. J. Schreiber; J. Shukla

1995-01-01

286

R&D for a SiW Electromagnetic Calorimeter for a Future Linear Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents an overview on the status and perspectives of a highly granular silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW Ecal) conceived for the operation at a future linear electron-positron collider. Prototypes for this kind of calorimeters are developed within the R&D program of the international collaboration CALICE. This article reports on results on the "pure" calorimetric performance of a first physics prototype with an energy resolution of about and an angular resolution of about 100mrad. Beyond that, emphasis is put on the merits of the high granularity which is indispensable for the achievement of the envisaged physics goals of a linear collider. This high granularity permits the application of image processing algorithms for particle separation as well as it reveals a more detailed view into hadronic cascades than was possible hitherto.

Pöschl, Roman; CALICE Collaboration

2011-04-01

287

Nematic colloidal tilings as photonic materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colloidal platelets are explored as elementary building blocks for the shape-controlled assembly of crystalline and quasicrystalline tilings. Using three-dimensional (3D) numerical modelling based on the minimization of Landau-de Gennes free energy for modelling of colloids combined with Finite Difference Time Domain calculations for optics, we demonstrate the self-assembly and optical (transmission) properties of triangular, square and pentagonal sub-micrometer sized platelets in a thin layer of nematic liquid crystal. Interactions between platelets are explored, providing an insight into the assembly process. Two-dimensional tilings of various-shaped colloidal platelets are demonstrated, and their use as diffraction layers is explored by using FDTD simulations. Designing symmetry-breaking surface anchoring profiles on pentagonal platelets opens also a possibility to achieve interactions that could lead to tilings with non-crystalline symmetry.

Ravnik, M.; Dontabhaktuni, J.; Cancula, M.; Zumer, S.

2014-02-01

288

Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles  

DOEpatents

U-shaped limiter tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners secured to a wall have two rods which engage L-shaped slots in the runners. The short receiving legs of the L-shaped slots are perpendicular to the wall and open away from the wall, while long retaining legs are parallel to and adjacent the wall. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the runners. Resilient contact strips between the parallel arms of the U-shaped tiles and the wall assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall.

Tsuo, Simon (Lakewood, CO), Langford, Alison A. (Boulder, CO)

1989-01-01

289

Modular robotic tiles: experiments for children with autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a modular robotic tile and a system composed of a number of these modular robotic tiles. The system composed\\u000a of the modular robotic tiles engages the user in physical activities, e.g., physiotherapy, sports, fitness, and entertainment.\\u000a The modular robotic tiles motivate the user to perform physical activities by providing immediate feedback based upon their\\u000a physical interaction with the

Henrik Hautop Lund; Martin Dam Pedersen; Richard Beck

2009-01-01

290

The Soudan 2 honeycomb calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

Soudan 2 is an 1100-ton honeycomb tracking calorimeter which is being constructed to search for nucleon decay. The detector consists of finely segmented iron instrumented with long drift tubes, and records three spatial coordinates and dE/dx for every gas crossing. Excellent event reconstruction capability, particle identification and muon sign and direction determination give superior rejection of the neutrino background to nucleon decay in many modes. The first 620 tons of Soudan 2 are now in steady operation, with completion planned for 1992. Detector performance has been studied using cosmic ray tracks and a charged test beam calibration. Results on detector performance and detector response are described in this paper. 2 refs. , 11 figs.

Garcia-Garcia, C.

1990-12-01

291

Hadron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs. (LEW)

Cooper, S.

1985-10-01

292

Hadron Spectroscopy  

E-print Network

Recent results on the hadron spectroscopy from lattice QCD are reviewed with emphasis on the meson sector and in particular on quarkonium-like $XYZ$ states. I report on the first rigorous treatment of the near-threshold states $X(3872)$ and $D_s^0(2317)$, and the lattice searches for $Z_c^+(3900)$, $X(4140)$ and double-charm tetraquark states. Meson resonances in light, strange and charm sector are reviewed, where the resonances masses as well as the strong decay widths are reported. The first lattice QCD simulation of two coupled-channels is discussed.

Sasa Prelovsek

2014-11-03

293

Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

Macaulay, Sara Grove

2001-01-01

294

Improving Emittance of High-Temperature Insulating Tile  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple addition to ceramic insulating tiles provides backup properties that minimize transfer of heat through tiles when their surfaces become damaged. Addition of 3 percent by weight of 320- or 600-grit silicon carbide powder to ceramic during production results in impregnated tile material that resists overheating. Silicon carbide increases emittance and decreases transmittance of ceramic.

Gzowski, E. R.

1985-01-01

295

Ceramic Tiles from High-Carbon Fly Ash  

Microsoft Academic Search

Only about 20% of Illinois fly ash is utilized, mostly by the concrete industry. Us? of fly ash as a major ingredient in manufacturing ceramic tiles can increase the ash utilization, as well as reduce the cost of raw materials in the tile industry and provide a competitive edge to U.S. tile manufacturers against foreign competition. The project included laboratory

Alex Mishulovich; James L. Evanko

2003-01-01

296

A FIBONACCI TILING OF THE PLANE Charles W. Huegy  

E-print Network

. Running head: FIBONACCI TILING AMS codes: 11B39 Keywords: Fibonacci number, tiling, recurrence Completed by engineering considerations and exhibits Fibonacci growth as it expands from the origin. Fibonacci numbers alsoA FIBONACCI TILING OF THE PLANE Charles W. Huegy Polygonics, 2 Mann St., Irvine, CA 92612

West, Douglas B.

297

Production and characterization of glazed tiles containing incinerated sewage sludge.  

PubMed

In this article, glaze with different colorants was applied to tile specimens manufactured by incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and clay. Improvements using different amounts of colorants, and glaze components and concentrations on tile bodies were investigated. Four different proportions of clay (by weight ratio) were replaced by ISSA. Tiles of size 12 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm were made and left in an electric furnace to make biscuit tiles at 800 degrees C. Afterwards, four colorants, Fe2O3 (red), V2O5 (yellow), CoCO3 (blue), and MnO2 (purple), and four different glaze concentrations were applied on biscuit tile specimens. These specimens were later sintered into glazed tiles at 1050 degrees C. The study shows that replacement of clay by sludge ash had adverse effects on properties of tiles. Water absorption increased and bending strength reduced with increased amounts of ash. However, both water absorption and bending strength improved for glazed ash tiles. Abrasion of grazed tiles reduced noticeably from 0.001 to 0.002 g. This implies glaze can enhance abrasion resistance of tiles. Effects like lightfastness and acid-alkali resistance improved as different glazes were applied on tiles. In general, red glazed tiles showed the most stable performance, followed by blue, yellow, and purple. PMID:17433656

Lin, D F; Chang, W C; Yuan, C; Luo, H L

2008-01-01

298

21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

299

90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-21. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

300

Nondeterministic polynomial time factoring in the tile assembly model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formalized study of self-assembly has led to the definition of the tile assembly model, Previously I presented ways to compute arithmetic functions, such as addition and multiplication, in the tile assembly model: a highly distributed parallel model of computation that may be implemented using molecules or a large computer network such as the Internet. Here, I present tile assembly model

Yuriy Brun

2008-01-01

301

Installation of Ceramic Tile: Residential Thin-Set Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide contains materials for use in teaching a course on residential thin-set methods of tile installation. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: the tile industry; basic math; tools; measurement; safety in tile setting; installation materials and guidelines for their use; floors; counter tops and backsplashes;…

Short, Sam

302

EPINET: euclidean patterns in non-euclidean tilings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a method for generating 3D euclidean periodic networks from 2D hyperbolic tilings. We utilize triply-periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) as a mathematical scaffold to guide this process. These surfaces have an intrinsic hyperbolic geometry as well as an underlying set of discrete hyperbolic symmetries, allowing decoration with tilings of matching symmetry. Hyperbolic tilings of a given symmetry can be

Vanessa Robins; Stuart Ramsden; Stephen Hyde

2006-01-01

303

Testing of clay tile infilled frames  

SciTech Connect

Several large-scale static tests of clay tile infilled frames were recently conducted. For in-plane racking tests, the effects of cyclic loading, varying frame stiffness, varying infill size, infill offset from frame centerline, and single and double wythe infill construction were investigated. Out-of-plane tests examined infilled frame response to inertial loadings and inter-story drift loadings. Multiple loadings were performed to determine in-plane strength and stiffness degradation from both out-of-plane loadings. To determine constitutive properties of the infills, prism compression, mortar compression and various unit tile tests were performed.

Flanagan, R.D. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)); Bennett, R.M.; Burdette, E.G.; Goodpasture, D.W. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1992-08-21

304

2.OA Red and Blue Tiles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Lin wants to put some red and blue tiles on a wall for decoration. She is thinking about several different patterns of tiles she could create. She want...

305

Servo calorimeter measures material heating rate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Servo calorimeter accurately measures the heating rate of a material exposed to nuclear radiation independently of the specific heat thermal conductivity of the material. The electrical power used is a direct measure of the nuclear heating rate.

Gilmour, G.; Wilson, J. H.

1965-01-01

306

CMD-3 Liquid Xenon Calorimeter's signals processing  

E-print Network

CMD-3 Liquid Xenon Calorimeter's signals processing for timing measurements. Leonid Epshtein Budker connected to constitute 264 «towers»; signal of each tower is processed by electronic channel. Liquid Xenon

307

Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

1998-12-31

308

CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

Lessard, Victor R.

2006-01-01

309

Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age  

SciTech Connect

Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

Niski, K; Cohen, J D

2007-08-15

310

High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

1983-01-01

311

Radioactivity level in Chinese building ceramic tile.  

PubMed

The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K have been determined by gamma ray spectrometry. The concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K range from 158.3 to 1087.6, 91.7 to 1218.4, and 473.8 to 1031.3 Bq kg(-1) for glaze, and from 63.5 to 131.4, 55.4 to 106.5, and 386.7 to 866.8 Bq kg(-1) for ceramic tile, respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and with the typical world values. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), external hazard index (H(ex)) and internal hazard index (H(in)) associated with the radionuclides were calculated. The Ra(eq) values of all ceramic tiles are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1). The values of H(ex) and H(in) calculated according to the Chinese criterion for ceramic tiles are less than unity. The Ra(eq) value for the glaze of glazed tile collected from some areas are >370 Bq kg(-1). PMID:15292525

Xinwei, L

2004-01-01

312

The Halting Probability via Wang Tiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using work of Hao Wang, we exhibit a tiling characterization of the bits of the halting probability . Algorithmic information theory (2) shows that pure mathematics is innitely complex and contains irreducible complexity. The canonical example of such irreducible complexity is the innite sequence of bits in the base-two expan- sion of the halting probability . The halting probability is

Gregory J. Chaitin

2008-01-01

313

TILE at Iowa: Adoption and Adaptation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter introduces a University of Iowa effort to enhance and support active learning pedagogies in technology-enhanced (TILE) classrooms and three elements that proved essential to the campus-wide adoption of those pedagogies. It then describes the impact of those professional development efforts on the curricula and cultures of three…

Florman, Jean C.

2014-01-01

314

L-Tromino Tiling of Multilated Chessboards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An "n" x "n" chessboard is called deficient if one square is missing from any spot on the board. Can all deficient boards with a number of cells divisible by 3 be tiled by bent (or L-shaped) trominoes? The answer is yes, with exception of the order-5 board. This paper deals with the general problem plus numerous related puzzles and proofs…

Gardner, Martin

2009-01-01

315

Behavior of structural clay tile infilled frames  

SciTech Connect

Steel frames infilled with structural clay tile have been used in commercial and industrial buildings for most of this century. Often these buildings are located in moderate to high seismic zones and are likely to experience earthquake forces. Little prior research has been conducted to investigate the behavior of clay tile infills under lateral loading. Twenty-one large-scale clay tile infilled frames were tested to determine their behavior and correlate the results with other available experimental data. The infills greatly increased the in-plane stiffness and strength of the otherwise flexible framing. Two in-plane failure mechanisms were observed, diagonal cracking and comer crushing. Under uniform out-of-plane load, the infills cracked along the mortar joints and developed membrane forces. Tremendous out-of-plane capacity was observed as the panels arched vertically and then horizontally, remaining stable after ultimate capacity was reached. Under sequential and combined bidirectional loadings, the panels remained stable with little interaction of the in-plane and out-of-plane behavior, particularly in the frame member forces. Analytical comparisons of measured versus predicted stiffness, ultimate capacity, and frame member forces were performed. A numerical model based on a piecewise linear equivalent strut was developed. Recommendations for evaluation of clay tile infills subjected to seismic loads were proposed.

Flanagan, R.D.

1994-12-18

316

Computer-controlled optical scanning tile microscope.  

PubMed

A new type of computer-controlled optical scanning, high-magnification imaging system with a large field of view is described that overcomes the commonly believed incompatibility of achieving both high magnification and a large field of view. The new system incorporates galvanometer scanners, a CCD camera, and a high-brightness LED source for the fast acquisition of a large number of a high-resolution segmented tile images with a magnification of 800x for each tile. The captured segmented tile images are combined to create an effective enlarged view of a target totaling 1.6 mm x 1.2 mm in area. The speed and sensitivity of the system make it suitable for high-resolution imaging and monitoring of a small segmented area of 320 microm x 240 microm with 4 microm resolution. Each tile segment of the target can be zoomed up without loss of the high resolution. This new microscope imaging system gives both high magnification and a large field of view. This microscope can be utilized in medicine, biology, semiconductor inspection, device analysis, and quality control. PMID:16523776

Wang, C; Shumyatsky, P; Zeng, F; Zevallos, M; Alfano, R R

2006-02-20

317

Mechanical and thermal design of the CEBAF Hall a beam calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

A calorimeter is being fabricated to provide 0.5% - 1.0% absolute measurement of the beam current in the Hall A end station of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB). Modern powder metallurgy processes have produced high density, high thermal conductivity tungsten-copper composite materials that minimize electromagnetic and hadronic energy loss while maintaining a rapid thermal response time. Heat leaks are minimized by mounting the mass in vacuum on glass ceramic mounts. A conduction cooling scheme utilizes an advanced carbon fiber compliant thermal interface material. Transient finite difference and finite element models were developed to estimate heat leaks and thermal response times.

M. Bevins; A. Day; P. Degtiarenko; L.A. Dillon-Townes; A. Freyberger; R. Gilman; A. Saha; S. Slachtouski

2005-05-16

318

Calorimeters for Precision Timing Measurements in High Energy Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current and future high energy physics particle colliders are capable to provide instantaneous luminosities of 1034 cm-2s-1 and above. The high center of mass energy, the large number of simultaneous collision of beam particles in the experiments and the very high repetition rates of the collision events pose huge challenges. They result in extremely high particle fluxes, causing very high occupancies in the particle physics detectors operating at these machines. To reconstruct the physics events, the detectors have to make as much information as possible available on the final state particles. We discuss how timing information with a precision of around 10 ps and below can aid the reconstruction of the physics events under such challenging conditions. High energy photons play a crucial role in this context. About one third of the particle flux originating from high energy hadron collisions is detected as photons, stemming from the decays of neutral mesons. In addition, many key physics signatures under study are identified by high energy photons in the final state. They pose a particular challenge in that they can only be detected once they convert in the detector material. The particular challenge in measuring the time of arrival of a high energy photon lies in the stochastic component of the distance to the initial conversion and the size of the electromagnetic shower. They extend spatially over distances which propagation times of the initial photon and the subsequent electromagnetic shower which are large compared to the desired precision. We present studies and measurements from test beams and a cosmic muon test stand for calorimeter based timing measurements to explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons of 10 GeV and above. We put particular focus on techniques to measure the timing with a precision of about 10 ps in association with the energy of the photon. For calorimeters utilizing scintillating materials and light guiding components, the propagation speed of the scintillation light in the calorimeter is important. We present studies and measurements of the propagation speed on a range of detector geometries. Finally, possible applications of precision timing in future high energy physics experiments are discussed.

Bornheim, Adolf; Apresyan, Artur; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Xie, Si

2015-02-01

319

Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Builders School, Ceramic Tile Setting 3-9.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course, for individualized or group instruction on ceramic tile setting, was developed from military sources for use in vocational education. The course provides students with skills in mortar preparation, surface preparation, tile layout planning, tile setting, tile cutting, and the grouting of tile joints. Both theory and shop assignments…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

320

The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter: overview, lessons learned during Run 1 and future projections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC is a hermetic, fine grained, homogeneous calorimeter, containing 75,848 lead tungstate scintillating crystals. We highlight the key role of the ECAL in the discovery and elucidation of the Standard Model Higgs boson during LHC Run I. We discuss, with reference to specific examples from LHC Run I, the challenges of operating a crystal calorimeter at a hadron collider. Particular successes, chiefly in terms of achieving and maintaining the required detector energy resolution in the harsh radiation environment of the LHC, are described. The prospects for LHC Run II (starting in 2015) are discussed, building upon the experience gained from Run I. The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to be operational from about 2025 to 2035 and will provide instantaneous and integrated luminosities of around 5 × 1034/cm2/s and 3000/fb respectively. We outline the challenges that ECAL will face and motivate the evolution of the detector that is thought to be necessary to maintain its performance throughout LHC and High-Luminosity LHC operation.

Biino, Cristina

2015-02-01

321

Tiling by rectangles and alternating current  

E-print Network

This paper is on tilings of polygons by rectangles. A celebrated physical interpretation of such tilings due to R.L. Brooks, C.A.B. Smith, A.H. Stone and W.T. Tutte uses direct-current circuits. The new approach of the paper is an application of alternating-current circuits. The following results are obtained: - a necessary condition for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles of given shapes; - a criterion for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles similar to it but not all homothetic to it; - a criterion for a generic polygon to be tilable by squares. These results generalize the ones of C. Freiling, R. Kenyon, M. Laczkovich, D. Rinne and G. Szekeres.

M. Prasolov; M. Skopenkov

2010-02-06

322

Tiling by rectangles and alternating current  

E-print Network

This paper is on tilings of polygons by rectangles. A celebrated physical interpretation of such tilings due to R.L. Brooks, C.A.B. Smith, A.H. Stone and W.T. Tutte uses direct-current circuits. The new approach of the paper is an application of alternating-current circuits. The following results are obtained: - a necessary condition for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles of given shapes; - a criterion for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles similar to it but not all homothetic to it; - a criterion for a generic polygon to be tilable by squares. These results generalize the ones of C. Freiling, R. Kenyon, M. Laczkovich, D. Rinne and G. Szekeres.

Prasolov, M

2010-01-01

323

Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

2002-10-01

324

Temperature Effects in the ATIC BGO Calorimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment contains a segmented calorimeter composed of 320 individual BGO crystals (18 radiation lengths deep) to determine the particle energy. Like all inorganic scintillation crystals the light output of BGO depends not only on the energy deposited by particles but also on the temperature of the crystal. ATIC had successful flights in 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 from McMurdo, Antarctica. The temperature of balloon instruments varies during their flights at altitude due to sun angle variations and differences in albedo from the ground and is monitored and recorded. In order to determine the temperature sensitivity of the ATIC calorimeter it was temperature cycled in the thermal vacuum chamber at the CSBF in Palestine, TX. The temperature dependence is derived from the pulse height response to cosmic ray muons at various temperatures.

Isbert, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K.; Chang, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fazely, A.; Ganel, O.; Gunasigha, R.

2006-01-01

325

Temperature Effects in the ATIC BGO Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter ATIC Balloon Experiment contains a segmented calorimeter composed of 320 individual BGO crystals 18 radiation lengths deep to determine the particle energy Like all inorganic scintillation crystals the light output of BGO depends not only on the energy deposited by particles but also on the temperature of the crystal ATIC had successful flights in 2000 2001 and 2002 2003 from McMurdo Antarctica The temperature of balloon instruments varies during their flights at altitude due to sun angle variations and differences in albedo from the ground and is monitored and recorded In order to determine the temperature sensitivity of the ATIC calorimeter the instrument was temperature cycled in the thermal vacuum chamber at the CSBF in Palestine TX The temperature dependence derived from the pulse height response to cosmic ray muons at various temperatures is discussed and compared to values in the literature

Isbert, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Atic Team

326

Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

Robie, R.A.

1965-01-01

327

Interference Lattice-based Loop Nest Tilings for Stencil Computations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A common method for improving performance of stencil operations on structured multi-dimensional discretization grids is loop tiling. Tile shapes and sizes are usually determined heuristically, based on the size of the primary data cache. We provide a lower bound on the numbers of cache misses that must be incurred by any tiling, and a close achievable bound using a particular tiling based on the grid interference lattice. The latter tiling is used to derive highly efficient loop orderings. The total number of cache misses of a code is the sum of (necessary) cold misses and misses caused by elements being dropped from the cache between successive loads (replacement misses). Maximizing temporal locality is equivalent to minimizing replacement misses. Temporal locality of loop nests implementing stencil operations is optimized by tilings that avoid data conflicts. We divide the loop nest iteration space into conflict-free tiles, derived from the cache miss equation. The tiling involves the definition of the grid interference lattice an equivalence class of grid points whose images in main memory map to the same location in the cache-and the construction of a special basis for the lattice. Conflicts only occur on the boundaries of the tiles, unless the tiles are too thin. We show that the surface area of the tiles is bounded for grids of any dimensionality, and for caches of any associativity, provided the eccentricity of the fundamental parallelepiped (the tile spanned by the basis) of the lattice is bounded. Eccentricity is determined by two factors, aspect ratio and skewness. The aspect ratio of the parallelepiped can be bounded by appropriate array padding. The skewness can be bounded by the choice of a proper basis. Combining these two strategies ensures that pathologically thin tiles are avoided. They do not, however, minimize replacement misses per se. The reason is that tile visitation order influences the number of data conflicts on the tile boundaries. If two adjacent tiles are visited successively, there will be no replacement misses on the shared boundary. The iteration space may be covered with pencils larger than the size of the cache while avoiding data conflicts if the pencils are traversed by a scanning-face method. Replacement misses are incurred only on the boundaries of the pencils, and the number of misses is minimized by maximizing the volume of the scanning face, not the volume of the tile. We present an algorithm for constructing the most efficient scanning face for a given grid and stencil operator. In two dimensions it is based on a continued fraction algorithm. In three dimensions it follows Voronoi's successive minima algorithm. We show experimental results of using the scanning face, and compare with canonical loop orderings.

VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael

2000-01-01

328

8.G Tile Patterns II: hexagons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: A common tiling pattern with hexagons is pictured below: A regular hexagon is a hexagon with $6$ congruent sides and $6$ congruent interior angles. Fin...

329

Tiling Space By Platonic Solids I  

Microsoft Academic Search

There exist precisely 914, 58 and 46 equivariant types of tile-transitivetilings of 3-dimensional euclidean space by topological cubes, octahedraand tetrahedra, that fall into 11, 3, and 9 topological families,respectively. Representatives are described for all topological families.A general method for obtaining results of this kind is introduced.AMS subject classifications: 51M20, 52B10, 52C22, 57Q91.1 IntroductionOf the five regular platonic solids, only the

Olaf Delgado Friedrichs; Daniel H. Huson

1997-01-01

330

FITS Tile Compression in the NOAO DMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NOAO Data Management system (DMS) captures data from eleven NOAO and partner telescopes and transports these data from three mountaintops to replicate them between three data centers both North and South of the equator. Image files are annotated, remediated, ingested, and persisted through interfaces of the NOAO Science Archive. Wide-field optical and infrared images flow out of the archive, through the NOAO High Performance Pipeline creating several new data products that flow back into the archive. Raw, pipeline-reduced, and survey data products, both proprietary and post-proprietary, are made available through the NOAO Portal using VO standards and services. Each of these several steps requires access to both image data and metadata in the form of image header keywords. Measures of storage efficiency and throughput characterize performance, cost, schedule, and risk in a matrix across all telescopes and all subsystems. Anything that impedes access to data or metadata diminishes throughput, thus slowing schedules, increasing costs, revealing risks, and adversely affecting performance. The familiar gzip compression algorithm is often used to increase data storage efficiency. However, gzip actually reduces throughput due to initial and recurring overhead of compression and later uncompression. For example, if metadata for an image require remediation, the whole image must be compressed, uncompressed, and compressed again. By contrast, the FITS tile convention using the Rice algorithm achieves about 40% better compression than gzip in just one-third the time. Image headers remain readable such that images often need never be uncompressed at all; metadata can be simply edited in place. Further, a library such as CFITSIO can support tile compression as a native image format. The pixel tiling feature means that for applications such as a cutout service, only the tiles overlapping the desired image section need be uncompressed.

Stobie, E.; Seaman, R.; Barg, I.

2009-09-01

331

Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

1993-10-15

332

Foam-on-Tile Damage Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

2012-01-01

333

Comparison between calorimeter and HLNC errors  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes an error analysis that compares systematic and random errors of total plutonium mass estimated for high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNC) and calorimeter measurements. This task was part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study on the comparison of the two instruments to determine if HLNC measurement errors met IAEA standards and if the calorimeter gave significantly'' better precision. Our analysis was based on propagation of error models that contained all known sources of errors including uncertainties associated with plutonium isotopic measurements. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Goldman, A.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); De Ridder, P.; Laszlo, G. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01

334

Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter  

E-print Network

The in-situ commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter is taking place since three years. During this period, it has been fully tested by means of frequent calibration runs, and the analysis of the large cosmic muon data samples and of the few beam splash events that occurred on September 10th, 2008. This has allowed to obtain a stable set of calibration constants for the first collisions, and to measure the in-situ calorimeter performances that were found to be at the expected level.

S. Laplace

2010-05-17

335

Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics  

ScienceCinema

Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

Ren-Yuan Zhu

2010-01-08

336

Some comments on pinwheel tilings and their diffraction  

E-print Network

The pinwheel tiling is the paradigm for a substitution tiling with circular symmetry, in the sense that the corresponding autocorrelation is circularly symmetric. As a consequence, its diffraction measure is also circularly symmetric, so the pinwheel diffraction consists of sharp rings and, possibly, a continuous component with circular symmetry. We consider some combinatorial properties of the tiles and their orientations, and a numerical approach to the diffraction of weighted pinwheel point sets.

Uwe Grimm; Xinghua Deng

2011-02-08

337

TextTiling: A Quantitative Approach to Discourse Segmentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents TextTiling, a method for partition- ing full-length text documents into coherent multi- paragraph units. The layout of text tiles is meant to reflect the pattern of subtopics contained in an expos- itory text. The approach uses lexical analyses based on tf.idf, an information retrieval measurement, to de- termine the extent of the tiles, incorporating thesaural information via

Marti A. Hearst

1993-01-01

338

Some notes on graph automata, tiling systems and partition logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduce heuristically the newly definition (W. Thomas) for graph automata — using “tiles” to simulate the extension (over\\u000a dag’s) of the classical notions of transition moves; propose a sufficient condition for when graph automata can be reduced\\u000a to (simpler) tiling systems, which is a generalization of a Thomas’ result; and finally study the logic sepcification of tiling\\u000a systems, (particularly, over

Enshao Shen

1998-01-01

339

Array element auto-tiling based on capacitive displacement sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Array element tiling is one of the key technologies for the coherent beam combination in a high-power laser facility. In this paper, we proposed a method of the array element auto-tiling based on capacitive displacement sensor. The method was verified on a double-pass tiled-grating compressor in XG-III laser facility. The research showed that the method is an effective way to control the misalignment errors automatically, with high precision and long-term stability.

Mu, Jie; Jing, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Zhilin; Zhu, Qihua; Su, Jingqin; Cheng, Ningbo; Zhou, Song; Zhang, Junwei; Zhou, Kainan; Zeng, Xiaoming

2015-02-01

340

55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

341

Design and electronics commissioning of the physics prototype of a Si-W electromagnetic calorimeter for the International Linear Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CALICE collaboration is studying the design of high performance electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for future International Linear Collider detectors. For the electromagnetic calorimeter, the current baseline choice is a high granularity sampling calorimeter with tungsten as absorber and silicon detectors as sensitive material. A ``physics prototype'' has been constructed, consisting of thirty sensitive layers. Each layer has an active area of 18 × 18 cm2 and a pad size of 1 × 1 cm2. The absorber thickness totals 24 radiation lengths. It has been exposed in 2006 and 2007 to electron and hadron beams at the DESY and CERN beam test facilities, using a wide range of beam energies and incidence angles. In this paper, the prototype and the data acquisition chain are described and a summary of the data taken in the 2006 beam tests is presented. The methods used to subtract the pedestals and calibrate the detector are detailed. The signal-over-noise ratio has been measured at 7.63±0.01. Some electronics features have been observed; these lead to coherent noise and crosstalk between pads, and also crosstalk between sensitive and passive areas. The performance achieved in terms of uniformity and stability is presented.

CALICE Collaboration; Repond, J.; Yu, J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Mikami, Y.; Miller, O.; Watson, N. K.; Wilson, J. A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Yan, W.; Badaud, F.; Boumediene, D.; Cârloganu, C.; Cornat, R.; Gay, P.; Gris, Ph; Manen, S.; Morisseau, F.; Royer, L.; Blazey, G. C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Lima, G.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Korbel, V.; Sefkow, F.; Groll, M.; Kim, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Tamura, Y.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Noronha, C.; Yilmaz, H.; Zorba, O.; Bartsch, V.; Butterworth, J. M.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Green, M. G.; Salvatore, F.; Wu, T.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Kelly, M.; Snow, S.; Thompson, R. J.; Danilov, M.; Kochetkov, V.; Baranova, N.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Voronin, A.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Ruan, M.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Zhang, Z.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Clerc, C.; Gaycken, G.; Jauffret, C.; Karar, A.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Reinhard, M.; Rougé, A.; Sanchez, A. L.; Vanel, J.-Ch; Videau, H.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Arestov, Yu; Baird, A.; Halsall, R. N.; Nam, S. W.; Park, I. H.; Yang, J.

2008-08-01

342

NASA TileWorld manual (system version 2.2)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The commands are documented of the NASA TileWorld simulator, as well as providing information about how to run it and extend it. The simulator, implemented in Common Lisp with Common Windows, encodes a particular range in a spectrum of domains, for controllable research experiments. TileWorld consists of a two dimensional grid of cells, a set of polygonal tiles, and a single agent which can grasp and move tiles. In addition to agent executable actions, there is an external event over which the agent has not control; this event correspond to a 'gust of wind'.

Philips, Andrew B.; Bresina, John L.

1991-01-01

343

Arctic octahedron in three-dimensional rhombus tilings and related integer s* partitions  

E-print Network

Arctic octahedron in three-dimensional rhombus tilings and related integer s* *olid 18, 2002) Three-dimensional integer partitions provide a convenient represent* *ation phenomenon" in three-dimensional ran* *dom tilings. Key-words: Random tilings; Integer partitions

Widom, Michael

344

Scintillation Detectors for Radiation-Hard Electromagnetic Calorimeters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the application in the compact and radiation hard electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter in the PANDA detection system at the new GSI facility, we have started to advance scintillation crystals and the light detection technique. PANDA is the universal internal-target detection system for charmonium spectroscopy and the search for glue-balls and hybrid states in antiproton annihilations. In particular, the large dynamic range from several GeV down to a detection threshold of some MeV for EM radiation and the expected high background rate of neutrons and ions will impose severe requirements on crystals and light sensors. In the magnetic environment of tracking devices the use of Avalanche Photodiodes (APD's) is preferred. In order to achieve suitable resolution for low energy hadrons and photons, the light output of crystals will have to be improved by special production techniques, activation and doping. These procedures might have implications for the radiation hardness. We report on measurements of signal response and radiation damage in crystals of PbWO4 and BGO both from the BTCP (Russia) and SICCAS (China) production sites. Beams of protons, electrons and photons have been applied while detectors with either phototube or APD readout were operated in the range from room temperature to -20°C. Results on light yield and energy resolution are presented. We report on the reduction of light transmission after proton irradiation and results from electron-spin resonance studies on irradiated crystals to analyse the cause of radiation damage.

Löhner, H.

2005-02-01

345

Challenges in Hadron Physics  

E-print Network

The status of hadron physics at the end of the HADRON07 Conference is reviewed. The latest results presented at the conference, as well as those important developments in the field which were not represented, are included.

Kamal K. Seth

2007-12-05

346

Perspectives in hadron spectroscopy  

E-print Network

A brief survey is presented of selected recent results in hadron spectroscopy and related theoretical studies. This includes the pentaquarks and hadrons containing one or two charmed quarks or antiquarks.

J. M. Richard

2005-11-21

347

An isothermal calorimeter with sample temperature control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an isothermal calorimeter using an improved method for controlling the sample temperature. As in conventional instruments the heat generated by the sample flows through a thermal resistance into a water jacket and the resultant temperature difference, which is proportional to the rate of heat generation of the sample, is measured. But whereas normally the sample temperature is

L L van Zyl

1964-01-01

348

Grout Analysis for EC and CC Calorimeters  

SciTech Connect

The EC and CC calorimeters roll on Two parallel hardened steel ways which reside on the top of the D0 platform's center beam. The ways will be grouted to the center beam once their correct elevation has been established. The purpose of this report is to evaluate and compare three different epoxy grouts and their properties for this application.

Engstrom, L.L.; /Fermilab

1987-01-06

349

QCD in hadron-hadron collisions  

SciTech Connect

Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

Albrow, M.

1997-03-01

350

High energy hadron-hadron collisions  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

Chou, T.T.

1991-12-01

351

Inclusive Electron Production from Heavy Quarks with the Tasso Lead-Liquid Argon Calorimeters in Electron Positron Annihilation at PETRA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The production of electrons from the decay of bottom and charm hadrons has been studied in e('+)e('-) annihilation at 34.6 GeV center of mass energy using lead -liquid argon calorimeters. It is observed that the b quark fragmentation function is peaked at large values of the scaling variable z with. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). For c quarks. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). is observed. A forward-backward charge asymmetry of A = -0.25 (+OR-) 0.22 was measured in b production. As the calorimeters and the methods of pattern recognition are well suited to (pi)('0) identification, the inclusive (pi)('0) cross section has also been measured.

Wicklund, Eric John

352

Nuclear-nuclear collision centrality determination by the spectators calorimeter for the MPD setup at the NICA facility  

SciTech Connect

The work conditions of the hadron calorimeter for spectators registration (Zero Degree Calorimeter, ZDC) were studied for the heavy nuclei collisions with the several GeV invariant energy. The ZDC simulations were performed for the MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) collider, which are under developement at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). Taking into account the spectator nuclear fragments leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the ZDC response on the impact parameter. The reason for this dependence studied with several event generators is the primary beam hole in the ZDC center. It is shown, that the ZDC signal should be combined with a data from other MPD-NICA detector subsystems to determine centrality.

Golubeva, M. B.; Guber, F. F.; Ivashkin, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Isupov, A. Yu. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Kurepin, A. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Litvinenko, A. G., E-mail: litvin@moonhe.jinr.ru; Litvinenko, E. I.; Migulina, I. I.; Peresedov, V. F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15

353

Nuclear-nuclear collision centrality determination by the spectators calorimeter for the MPD setup at the NICA facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work conditions of the hadron calorimeter for spectators registration (Zero Degree Calorimeter, ZDC) were studied for the heavy nuclei collisions with the several GeV invariant energy. The ZDC simulations were performed for the MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) collider, which are under developement at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). Taking into account the spectator nuclear fragments leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the ZDC response on the impact parameter. The reason for this dependence studied with several event generators is the primary beam hole in the ZDC center. It is shown, that the ZDC signal should be combined with a data from other MPD@NICA detector subsystems to determine centrality.

Golubeva, M. B.; Guber, F. F.; Ivashkin, A. P.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Kurepin, A. B.; Litvinenko, A. G.; Litvinenko, E. I.; Migulina, I. I.; Peresedov, V. F.

2013-01-01

354

Complex tiling patterns in liquid crystals  

PubMed Central

In this account recent progress in enhancing the complexity of liquid crystal self-assembly is highlighted. The discussed superstructures are formed mainly by polyphilic T-shaped and X-shaped molecules composed of a rod-like core, tethered with glycerol units at both ends and flexible non-polar chain(s) in lateral position, but also related inverted molecular structures are considered. A series of honeycomb phases composed of polygonal cylinders ranging from triangular to hexagonal, followed by giant cylinder honeycombs is observed for ternary T-shaped polyphiles on increasing the size of the lateral chain(s). Increasing the chain size further leads to new modes of lamellar organization followed by three-dimensional and two-dimensional structures incorporating branched and non-branched axial rod-bundles. Grafting incompatible chains to opposite sides of the rod-like core leads to quaternary X-shaped polyphiles. These form liquid crystalline honeycombs where different cells are filled with different material. Projected on an Euclidian plane, all honeycomb phases can be described either by uniformly coloured Archimedean and Laves tiling patterns (T-shaped polyphiles) or as multi-colour tiling patterns (X-shaped polyphiles). It is shown that geometric frustration, combined with the tendency to segregate incompatible chains into different compartments and the need to find a periodic tiling pattern, leads to a significant increase in the complexity of soft self-assembly. Mixing of different chains greatly enhances the number of possible ‘colours’ and in this way, periodic structures comprising up to seven distinct compartments can be generated. Relations to biological self-assembly are discussed shortly. PMID:24098852

Tschierske, C.; Nürnberger, C.; Ebert, H.; Glettner, B.; Prehm, M.; Liu, F.; Zeng, X.-B.; Ungar, G.

2012-01-01

355

Vortex states in Archimedean tiling pinning arrays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We numerically study vortex ordering and pinning in Archimedean tiling substrates composed of square and triangular plaquettes. The two different plaquettes become occupied at different vortex densities, producing commensurate peaks in the magnetization at non-integer matching fields. We find that as the field increases, in some cases the fraction of occupied pins can decrease due to the competition between fillings of the different plaquette types. We also identify a number of different types of vortex orderings as a function of the field at integer and non-integer commensurate fillings.

Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

2014-07-01

356

Tiling, Block Data Layout, and Memory Hierarchy Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, several experimental studies have been conducted on block data layout in conjunction with tiling as a data transformation technique to improve cache performance. In this paper, we analyze cache and translation look-aside buffer (TLB) performance of such alternate layouts (including block data layout and Morton layout) when used in conjunction with tiling. We derive a tight lower bound on

Bo Hong; Viktor K. Prasanna

2003-01-01

357

Color grading of randomly textured ceramic tiles using color histograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present a method designed to solve the problem of automatic color shade grading for industrial inspection of randomly textured multicolored ceramic tiles. Their grading method is based on the comparison of color histograms and they present results of correctly grading several series of ceramic tiles, the differences of which were at the threshold of human perception

Constantinos Boukouvalas; Josef Kittler; Radek Marik; Maria Petrou

1999-01-01

358

Full-rank Tilings of F 2 Do Not Exist  

E-print Network

Full-rank Tilings of F 8 2 Do Not Exist #3; Ari Trachtenberg y Alexander Vardy z February 3, 2003 Abstract We show that there are no full-rank tilings of F 8 2 , using a carefully designed exhaustive search. This solves an open problem posed in [5] and implies that a full-rank perfect binary code

Goldberg, Bennett

359

Tiling 3D Euclidean Space with Acute Tetrahedra Ungor \\Lambda  

E-print Network

Tiling 3D Euclidean Space with Acute Tetrahedra Alper ¨ Ung¨or \\Lambda Abstract. We show that it is possible to tile the three dimensional space using only acute dihedral angle tetrahedra. Several dimensions but not necessarily in three dimensions. 1 Introduction Definition 1 A tetrahedra is acute if all

Üngör, Alper

360

METHOD FOR EVALUATING MOLD GROWTH ON CEILING TILE  

EPA Science Inventory

A method to extract mold spores from porous ceiling tiles was developed using a masticator blender. Ceiling tiles were inoculated and analyzed using four species of mold. Statistical analysis comparing results obtained by masticator extraction and the swab method was performed. T...

361

The tilings of Kari and E. Arthur Robinson, Jr.  

E-print Network

. · In a valid tiling, colors of adjacent edges must match. · Essentialy a 2-dimensional SFT, · (any 2-d SFT can Fibonacci SFT. #12;Finite state machine #12;Hao Wang, 1961 · Studied problem of existence of a valid tiling of the plane. · Equivalently: every nonempty 2-dimensional SFT has a periodic orbit. · (Wang did not use

Robinson Jr., E. Arthur (Robbie)

362

Tiling With Trominoes Silvia Heubach Department of Mathematics  

E-print Network

the tilings of a particular size rectangle. Similar questions regarding Ls and squares are explored in [1 with the questions of which figures can be covered with trominoes, or for which rectangles all but one or two squares tilings of ! 2" n and ! 3" n rectangles using trominoes of which there are two basic shapes, namely a ! 1

Heubach, Silvia

363

Quasi-static impact damage in confined ceramic tiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of confinement on the failure mechanisms in dense alumina tiles during the penetration of a projectile was investigated and the role played by lateral mechanical confinement in inhibiting some failure modes was examined.Alumina tiles were placed in a confinement frame which simply and accurately allows high biaxial compressive pre-stresses. The confinement frame is a modular system which enables

Dov Sherman; Tamir Ben-Shushan

1998-01-01

364

Computerized Machine for Cutting Space Shuttle Thermal Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A report presents the concept of a machine aboard the space shuttle that would cut oversized thermal-tile blanks to precise sizes and shapes needed to replace tiles that were damaged or lost during ascent to orbit. The machine would include a computer-controlled jigsaw enclosed in a clear acrylic shell that would prevent escape of cutting debris. A vacuum motor would collect the debris into a reservoir and would hold a tile blank securely in place. A database stored in the computer would contain the unique shape and dimensions of every tile. Once a broken or missing tile was identified, its identification number would be entered into the computer, wherein the cutting pattern associated with that number would be retrieved from the database. A tile blank would be locked into a crib in the machine, the shell would be closed (proximity sensors would prevent activation of the machine while the shell was open), and a "cut" command would be sent from the computer. A blade would be moved around the crib like a plotter, cutting the tile to the required size and shape. Once the tile was cut, an astronaut would take a space walk for installation.

Ramirez, Luis E.; Reuter, Lisa A.

2009-01-01

365

Tiled top-down combinatorial pyramids for large images representation  

E-print Network

Tiled top-down combinatorial pyramids for large images representation Romain Goffe1, Luc Brun2. Firstly, the amount of data usually prevents such images from being processed globally and therefore resolutions. This paper introduces the tiled top-down pyramidal framework which addresses these two main

Boyer, Edmond

366

Glazed tiles manufactured from incinerated sewage sludge ash and clay.  

PubMed

Sewage sludge incineration is applied extensively in highly populated cities as a final sludge treatment. In this study, incinerated ash was utilized as an additive to clay to manufacture glaze tiles. Four different amounts of ash (0, 15, 30, and 45%) were added, and five glaze concentrations (0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 g/cm2) were applied on the surface of biscuit tiles to study the effects of ash additive and glaze concentration on properties of fired samples. Sewage sludge was dehydrated and incinerated into ash at 800 degrees C. Subsequently, tile specimens were manufactured and fired at 800 degrees C to make biscuit tiles. Fritted glazes and iron oxide were used as the fundamental glaze and colorant, respectively. Finally, glaze was applied on the surface of biscuit tiles and then fired at 1050 degrees C to sinter them into glazed tile specimens. Tests were performed to analyze properties, including water absorption, firing shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, abrasion resistance, bending resistance, acid-alkali resistance, and aging resistance on specimens of glaze tile. To further understand more about the microstructural behavior of glazed tile specimens, analysis of energy dispersive spectrometer, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray were carried out in this study. PMID:15796106

Lin, Deng-Fong; Luo, Huan-Lin; Sheen, Yeong-Nain

2005-02-01

367

Effects of thermal blooming on systems comprised of tiled subapertures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser weapon systems comprise of tiled subapertures are rapidly emerging in the directed energy community. The Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy (AFIT\\/CDE), under sponsorship of the HEL Joint Technology Office has developed performance models of such laser weapon system configurations consisting of tiled arrays of both slab and fiber subapertures. These performance models are based on

Charles L. Leakeas; Richard J. Bartell; Matthew J. Krizo; Steven T. Fiorino; Salvatore J. Cusumano; Matthew R. Whiteley

2010-01-01

368

Low-Density, Aerogel-Filled Thermal-Insulation Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerogel fillings have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop low-density thermal-insulation tiles that, relative to prior such tiles, have greater dimensional stability (especially less shrinkage), equal or lower thermal conductivity, and greater strength and durability. In preparation for laboratory tests of dimensional and thermal stability, prototypes of aerogel-filled versions of recently developed low-density tiles have been fabricated by impregnating such tiles to various depths with aerogel formations ranging in density from 1.5 to 5.6 lb/ft3 (about 53 to 200 kg/cu m). Results available at the time of reporting the information for this article showed that the thermal-insulation properties of the partially or fully aerogel- impregnated tiles were equivalent or superior to those of the corresponding non-impregnated tiles and that the partially impregnated tiles exhibited minimal (<1.5 percent) shrinkage after multiple exposures at a temperature of 2,300 F (1,260 C). Latest developments have shown that tiles containing aerogels at the higher end of the density range are stable after multiple exposures at the said temperature.

Santos, Maryann; Heng, Vann; Barney, Andrea; Oka, Kris; Droege, Michael

2005-01-01

369

Covering Shapes with Tiles: Primary Students' Visualisation and Drawing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students' early area· concepts were llwestigated by an analysis of responses to a worksheet of items that involved visualising the tiling of given figures. Students in Years 2 and 4 in four schools attempted the items on three occasions and some of the students completed ten classroom spatial activities. Half the students had difficulty visualising the tiling of shapes, but

Kay Owens

1998-01-01

370

Large Classroom Experience with an Interactive Tiled Display Mural  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents work on an advanced multimedia lecture hall exploiting large tiled displays and student laptops, the software supporting their combined use, and the initial validation of this environment in enhancing learning and student-instructor interaction. Large resolution tiled displays allow multiple students with laptops or tablet PC's to present their work and collaborate with the instructor and other students

Jeremy Richards; Patrick E. Mantey

2006-01-01

371

ENUMERATION OF TILINGS OF DIAMONDS AND HEXAGONS WITH DEFECTS  

E-print Network

ENUMERATION OF TILINGS OF DIAMONDS AND HEXAGONS WITH DEFECTS HARALD A. HELFGOTT AND IRA M. GESSEL Abstract. We show how to count tilings of Aztec diamonds and hexagons with defects using determinants diamond of order n is the union of all unit squares with integral vertices contained within the region |x

Gessel, Ira M.

372

MIT Lincoln Laboratory Parallel Vector Tile-Optimized Library  

E-print Network

is sponsored by the Department of the Air Force under Air Force contract FA8721- 05-C-0002. Opinions1 PVTOL-1 6/23/07 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Parallel Vector Tile-Optimized Library (PVTOL with large IO and processing requirements Approach: Develop Parallel Vector Tile Optimizing Library (PVTOL

Kepner, Jeremy

373

High energy hadron-hadron collisions  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

Chou, T.T.

1990-11-01

374

X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

Kilbourne, Caroline A.

2009-01-01

375

Removal of nutrient and pesticides from tile drainage discharge using an end-of-tile cartridge approach  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Nutrient transport from subsurface tile drainage is pretty well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-products that have a s...

376

Calorimeter, Coffee Cup (ChemPages Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Calorimeter, Coffee Cup: this is a resource in the collection "ChemPages Laboratory Resources". A coffee cup calorimeter is a useful, simple device that can be used to measure the temperature change that accompanies a reaction. A Styrofoam cup is used because it is a good insulator. The cup will absorb (or supply) negligible amounts of heat during most General Chemistry experiments. Thus, any change in temperature is assumed to be due only to the reaction, and the heat transferred in the reaction may be calculated. The ChemPages Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

377

Shashlik calorimeter Beam-test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results from an extensive study of nonprojective Shashlik calorimeter prototypes are reported. Nine (47 × 47 mm 2) towers were exposed to a high energy electron beam at CERN SPS and read out by silicon photodiodes followed by low noise preamplifiers. The main results are the measurements of the energy and shower position resolution and the angular resolution of the electron shower direction. The shower direction measurement is encouraging being in agreement at the tower center with a resolution of ??(mrad) = 70/? E (10 mrad for 50 GeV electrons). The uniformity of the calorimeter response is found to be better than ± 1%. The mean light yield measured in Shashlik towers equipped with Kuraray Y7 WLS fibres and aluminized at the front end of the tower is of the order of 13 photons/MeV.

Badier, J.; Busson, Ph.; Charlot, C.; Dobrzynski, L.; Tanaka, R.; Bordalo, P.; Ramos, S.; Bityukov, S.; Obraztsov, V.; Ostankov, A.; Zaitchenko, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guschin, E.; Issakov, V.; Mussienko, Y.; Semenjuk, I.

1994-08-01

378

LYSO crystal calorimeter readout with silicon photomultipliers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger-Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (~106). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9~18X0 LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4×4 mm2 SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter was tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100-500 MeV energy range.

Berra, A.; Bonvicini, V.; Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Guffanti, D.; Lietti, D.; Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E.; Prest, M.; Rossi, A.; Vallazza, E.

2014-11-01

379

Rising Total Hadron-Hadron Cross Sections  

E-print Network

A historical summary is made on the measurements concerning the rising total hadron-hadron cross sections at high energies. The first part of this paper concerns the total cross section measurements performed at the Brookhaven, Serpukhov and Fermilab fixed target accelerators; then the measurements at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), and at the CERN and at the Tevatron Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders; finally the cosmic ray measurements at even higher energies. A short discussion on Conclusions and Perspectives follows.

Giorgio Giacomelli

2007-12-06

380

Direct hadron production in hadronic collisions Francois Arleoa,  

E-print Network

Direct hadron production in hadronic collisions Franc¸ois Arleoa, , Stanley J. Brodskyb,c , Dae investigate the scaling properties of large-p hadron, jet and prompt photon production in hadronic collisions by comparing systematically world data to NLO QCD predictions. In the hadron sector a significant discrepancy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

381

Thermochemistry : BombCalorimeter (4 Variations)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Stearic acid (CH 3 (CH 2 ) 16 CO 2 H) is a fatty acid, the part of fat that stores most of the energy. 1.00 g of stearic acid was burned in a bomb calorimeter. The bomb had a heat capacity of 652 J/ o C and a 500. g water reservoir. If the temperature rose from 25.0 to 39.3 o C, how much heat was released when the stearic acid was burned?

382

Monte Carlo simulation of HERD calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. It is designed as a next generation space facility focused on indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. The calorimeter plays an essential role in the main scientific objectives of HERD. A 3-D cubic calorimeter filled with high granularity crystals as active material is a very promising choice for the calorimeter. HERD is mainly composed of a 3-D calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by silicon trackers (TK) from all five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of 9261 cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. Here the simulation results of the performance of CALO with GEANT4 and FLUKA are presented: 1) the total absorption CALO and its absorption depth for precise energy measurements (energy resolution: 1% for electrons and gammarays beyond 100 GeV, 20% for protons from 100 GeV to 1 PeV); 2) its granularity for particle identification (electron/proton separation power better than 10-5); 3) the homogenous geometry for detecting particles arriving from every unblocked direction for large effective geometrical factor (<3 m2sr for electron and diffuse gammarays, >2 m2sr for cosmic ray nuclei); 4) expected observational results such as gamma-ray line spectrum from dark matter annihilation and spectrum measurement of various cosmic ray chemical components.

Xu, M.; Chen, G. M.; Dong, Y. W.; Lu, J. G.; Quan, Z.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z. G.; Wu, B. B.; Zhang, S. N.

2014-07-01

383

Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (inventors)

1974-01-01

384

Performance and Monitering of Zero Degree Calorimeter at CMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CMS Zero Degree Calorimeter is designed to measure photons and neutrons for pp and PbPb collisions at TeV energies. The detector can be used for physics and for measuring the brightness and luminosity of the beams. This poster will show the performance of the calorimeter in test beams and describe the monitoring systems we have developed to ensure that the calorimeter is working correctly.

Lesage, Heidi

2008-10-01

385

Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell'Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-08

386

Figure 1. The LambdaTable. Lambda Table: High Resolution Tiled Display Table  

E-print Network

display technology. We discuss the advantages of tiled Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) systems over projector based displays, and present the LambdaTable, our implementation of a tiled LCD table. We also discussVision. #12;2. Tiled LCD Displays EVL has researched tiled displays using high- end as well as commodity

Johnson, Andrew

387

TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT FOR A NOSECONE CALORIMETER (NCC) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT.  

SciTech Connect

A remarkable result has emerged from the first several years of data taking at RHIC--the high temperature and density phase of QCD matter created in heavy ion collisions at RHIC is best described as a near perfect fluid--the strongly interacting Quark-Gluon-Plasma (sQGP). This state is characterized by a small viscosity to entropy ratio, and a high density of color charges which induces huge energy losses of partons transversing the medium. The task for the future is to understand the characteristics of the sQGP, and perhaps more importantly--to gain some insight into how and why such a medium is created. The PHENIX detector has been one of the primary experimental tools at RHIC; in particular the electromagnetic calorimeter has been a critical component of many of the measurements leading to this discovery. The coverage of the present PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter is rather limited, covering half the azimuth and -0.35< {eta} <0.35 Further progress requires larger coverage of electromagnetic calorimetry, both to increase the rate for low cross section phenomena, and to cover a broader range of pseudorapidity to study the rapidity dependence of the medium. A pair of Nosecone Calorimeters (NCC) has been designed covering both positive and negative rapidity regions 1< |{eta}| <3 of the PHENIX detector. The NCC will make it possible to perform tomographic studies of the jet energy dependence of energy loss and medium response, by using direct photons as trigger particles over a large rapidity range. The technique of correlating trigger hadrons with low momentum hadrons has been powerfully exploited at RHIC to study the evolution of back to back jets [1, 2] and hence the response of the medium. The NCC will make it possible to do such studies using direct photons as the trigger particles. The direct photon in such ''photon-jet'' events tags the transverse momentum of outgoing parton which then fragments into lower energy particles. Together with the Forward Silicon Vertex detector (FVTX), the NCC will make PHENIX a large acceptance spectrometer, capable of detecting photons, electrons, muons, and hadrons. Our prime motivation is to provide precision measurements of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}s and dielectrons in A+A, p(d)+A, and polarized p+p collisions. The upgrade will provide access to physics observables that are not currently accessible to PHENIX or that are now available only indirectly with very limited accuracy.

PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; BOOSE, S.; CHIU, M.; JOHNSON, B.M.; KISTENEV, E.P.; LYNCH, D.; NOUICER, R.; PAK, R.; PISANI, R.; STOLL, S.P.; SUKHANOV, A.; WOODY, C.L.; LI, Z.; RADEKA, V.; RESCIA, S.; (PHENIX EXPERIMENT COLLABORATORS)

2007-08-01

388

Coal fly ash utilization: low temperature sintering of wall tiles.  

PubMed

We present here a study of the sintering of fly ash and its mixture with low alkali pyrophyllite in the presence of sodium hexa meta phosphate (SHMP), a complex activator of sintering, for the purpose of wall tile manufacturing. The sintering of fly ash with SHMP in the temperature range 925-1050 degrees C produces tiles with low impact strength; however, the incremental addition of low alkali pyrophyllite improves impact strength. The impact strength of composites with >or=40% (w/w) pyrophyllite in the fly ash-pyrophyllite mix satisfies the acceptable limit (19.6 J/m) set by the Indian Standards Institute for wall tiles. Increasing the pyrophyllite content results in an increase in the apparent density of tiles, while shrinkage and water absorption decrease. The strength of fly ash tiles is attributed to the formation of a silicophosphate phase; in pyrophyllite rich tiles, it is attributed to the formation of a tridymite-structured T-AlPO(4) phase. Scanning electron micrographs show that the reinforcing rod shaped T-AlPO(4) crystals become more prominent as the pyrophyllite content increases in the sintered tiles. PMID:17950591

Chandra, Navin; Sharma, Priya; Pashkov, G L; Voskresenskaya, E N; Amritphale, S S; Baghel, Narendra S

2008-01-01

389

Spectral response data for development of cool coloured tile coverings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most ancient or traditional buildings in Italy show steep-slope roofs covered by red clay tiles. As the rooms immediately below the roof are often inhabited in historical or densely urbanized centres, the combination of low solar reflectance of tile coverings and low thermal inertia of either wooden roof structures or sub-tile insulation panels makes summer overheating a major problem. The problem can be mitigated by using tiles coated with cool colours, that is colours with the same spectral response of clay tiles in the visible, but highly reflecting in the near infrared range, which includes more than half of solar radiation. Cool colours can yield the same visible aspect of common building surfaces, but higher solar reflectance. Studies aimed at developing cool colour tile coverings for traditional Italian buildings have been started. A few coating solutions with the typical red terracotta colour have been produced and tested in the laboratory, using easily available materials. The spectral response and the solar reflectance have been measured and compared with that of standard tiles.

Libbra, Antonio; Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Corticelli, Mauro A.

2011-03-01

390

Basic Structure in Hadrons  

E-print Network

We have calculated the Structure function a constituent quark in the NLO and from it we have derived the structure functions of hadrons. We found that perturbative generation of hadron structure falls short of conforming with data by a few percent. This is due to the presence of soft gluon and its radiation in the hadron. This contribution is modeled into our calculations. It is also responsible for the breaking of flavor symmetry in the nucleon sea.

Firooz Arash; Ali N. Khorramian

2001-05-24

391

Hadron Physics at FAIR  

SciTech Connect

The new FAIR facility in Darmstadt has a broad program in the field of hadron and nuclear physics utilizing ion beams with unprecedented intensity and accuracy. The hadron physics program centers around the the high-energy storage ring HESR for antiprotons and the PANDA experiment that is integrated in it. The physics program includes among others topics like hadron spectroscopy in the charmonium mass region and below, hyperon physics, electromagnetic processes and charm in nuclei.

Wiedner, Ulrich [Institut f. Experimentalphysik I, Ruhr-University Bochum D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2011-10-24

392

Hypervelocity impact testing of Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented from a series of 22 hypervelocity impact tests carried out on the thermal protection system (TPS) for the Shuttle Orbiter. Both coated and uncoated low-density (0.14 g/cu cm) LI-900 and high-density (0.35 g/cu cm) LI-2200 tiles were tested. The results are used to develop the penetration and damage correlations which can be used in meteoroid and debris hazard analyses for spacecraft with a ceramic tile TPS. It is shown that tile coatings act as a 'bumper' to fragment the impacting projectile, with thicker coating providing increased protection.

Christiansen, Eric L.; Ortega, Javier

1990-01-01

393

57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING, HENRY MERCER USED THE KILN FOR HIS EARLIEST GLAZE TESTS. THE PRESS WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH METAL CASED MOLDS. SINCE ONLY THE EARLIEST TILE DESIGNS ARE IN METAL CASES. THIS TECHNIQUE WAS PROBABLY DISCONTINUED. THIS PRESS WAS, THEREFORE, PROBABLY NOT USED EXTENSIVELY AT THIS SITE. THE UPPER PART OF GLAZE KILN No. 2 IS AT THE LEFT REAR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

394

Precise olfactory responses tile the sniff cycle.  

PubMed

In terrestrial vertebrates, sniffing controls odorant access to receptors, and therefore sets the timescale of olfactory stimuli. We found that odorants evoked precisely sniff-locked activity in mitral/tufted cells in the olfactory bulb of awake mouse. The trial-to-trial response jitter averaged 12 ms, a precision comparable to other sensory systems. Individual cells expressed odor-specific temporal patterns of activity and, across the population, onset times tiled the duration of the sniff cycle. Responses were more tightly time-locked to the sniff phase than to the time after inhalation onset. The spikes of single neurons carried sufficient information to discriminate odors. In addition, precise locking to sniff phase may facilitate ensemble coding by making synchrony relationships across neurons robust to variation in sniff rate. The temporal specificity of mitral/tufted cell output provides a potentially rich source of information for downstream olfactory areas. PMID:21765422

Shusterman, Roman; Smear, Matthew C; Koulakov, Alexei A; Rinberg, Dmitry

2011-08-01

395

Floor tile and mastic removal project report  

SciTech Connect

A test program was developed and coordinated with State and Federal Regulators and carried out at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This program was carefully designed to create the worst conditions in order to evaluate whether asbestos fibers are released when asbestos containing floor tile and mastic are removed. There were over 1,000 samples taken and analyzed during the execution of the program. The conclusions reached were based upon analysis of the critical samples using the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) technology. Additionally, the TEM procedures were used to evaluate personnel samples to determine whether those fibers found were asbestos or other materials. Most of the (TEM) samples were analyzed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Not Available

1992-11-01

396

The LHCf detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LHCf is an experiment dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted in the very forward region of LHC collisions. The physics goal is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models that are used in the study of Extremely High-Energy Cosmic-Rays. This is possible since the laboratory equivalent collision energy of LHC is 1017 eV. Two LHCf detectors, consisting of imaging calorimeters made of tungsten plates, plastic scintillator and position sensitive sensors, are installed at zero degree collision angle ±140 m from an interaction point (IP). Although the lateral dimensions of these calorimeters are very compact, ranging from 20 mm × 20 mm to 40 mm × 40 mm, the energy resolution is expected to be better than 6% and the position resolution better than 0.2 mm for ?-rays with energy from 100 GeV to 7 TeV. This has been confirmed by test beam results at the CERN SPS. These calorimeters can measure particles emitted in the pseudo rapidity range ? > 8.4. Detectors, data acquisition and electronics are optimized to operate during the early phase of the LHC commissioning with luminosity below 1030 cm-2 s-1. LHCf is expected to obtain data to compare with the major hadron interaction models within a week or so of operation at luminosity ~ 1029 cm-2 s-1. After ~ 10 days of operation at luminosity ~ 1029 cm-2 s-1, the light output of the plastic scintillators is expected to degrade by ~ 10% due to radiation damage. This degradation will be monitored and corrected for using calibration pulses from a laser.

LHCf Collaboration; Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Faus, D. A.; Fukui, K.; Grandi, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Macina, D.; Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Menjo, H.; Mizuishi, M.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A. L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Taki, K.; Tamura, T.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Velasco, J.; Viciani, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshida, K.

2008-08-01

397

45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION HALL LOOKING EAST ACROSS ARRIVAL LOBBY FLOOR - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

398

44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

44. Everett Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN, FROM LOGGIA LOOKING EAST ACROSS RECEPTION HALL - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

399

The Art of Space Filling in Penrose Tilings and Fractals  

E-print Network

Incorporating designs into the tiles that form tessellations presents an interesting challenge for artists. Creating a viable MC Escher like image that works esthetically as well as functionally requires resolving incongruencies at a tile's edge while constrained by its shape. Escher was the most well known practitioner in this style of mathematical visualization, but there are significant mathematical shapes to which he never applied his artistry. These shapes can incorporate designs that form images as appealing as those produced by Escher, and our paper explores this for traditional tessellations, Penrose Tilings, fractals, and fractal/tessellation combinations. To illustrate the versatility of tiling art, images were created with multiple figures and negative space leading to patterns distinct from the work of others.

Le, San

2011-01-01

400

Modular tacTiles for Sonic Interactions with Smart Environments  

E-print Network

Modular tacTiles for Sonic Interactions with Smart Environments Jan Anlauff, Thomas Hermann, Tobias as an `artificial skin' to extend the perceptual capabilities of furniture or other artifacts in environments

Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

401

24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE STEEL WALL ARMOR EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26, Alton, Madison County, IL

402

Measurement of Tritium Surface Distribution on TFTR Bumper Limiter Tiles  

SciTech Connect

The tritium surface distribution on graphite tiles used in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) bumper limiter and exposed to TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) discharges from 1993 to 1997 was measured by the Tritium Imaging Plate Technique (TIPT). The TFTR bumper limiter shows both re-/co-deposition and erosion. The tritium images for all tiles measured are strongly correlated with erosion and deposition patterns, and long-term tritium retention was found in the re-/co-depositions and flakes. The CFC tiles located at erosion dominated areas clearly showed their woven structure in their tritium images owing to different erosion yields between fibers and matrix. Significantly high tritium retention was observed on all sides of the erosion tiles, indicating carbon transport via repetition of local erosion/deposition cycles.

K. Sugiyama; T. Tanabe; C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile

2004-06-28

403

South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

South front, west part, showing wrought iron gates and tiling at the former main entrance. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

404

DNA-Computing: Solving The Complementary Bounded Tiling Problem  

E-print Network

sticky-ends to facilitate the assembly of multi-tile lattices, thereby producing candidate solutions. Their endless support and honest criticism transformed the manner in which I approach science, instilling within

Campbell, A. Malcolm

405

25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

406

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21

407

Beam test of the SDC barrel EM calorimeter test module  

SciTech Connect

The SDC barrel electromagnetic calorimeter test module was exposed to beams of high energy pions and electrons in the MP9 test beam at Fermilab in the fall of 1991. Data were collected on resolution, light yield, signal timing and hermiticity. These data demonstrated that the design met the specifications for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the Solenoidal Detector collaboration (SDC).

Balka, L.; Guarino, V.; Hill, N. [and others

1994-05-01

408

Performances of the NA48 Liquid Krypton calorimeter  

E-print Network

The NA48 experiments aims at a precise measurement of direct CP violation in the neutral Kaon system. This puts stringent requirements on the electromagnetic calorimeter used to detect photons of average energy 25 GeV. The choice of NA48 is a quasi homogeneous Liquid Krypton calorimeter with fast readout. The operation of this device and the performances achieved are described.

Guillaume Unal

2000-12-05

409

AGILE Mini-Calorimeter gamma-gay burst catalog  

E-print Network

The Mini-Calorimeter of the AGILE satellite can observe the high-energy part of gamma-ray bursts with good timing capability. We present the data of the 85 hard gamma-gay bursts observed by the Mini-Calorimeter since the launch (April 2007) until October 2009. We report the timing data for 84 and spectral data for 21 burst.

Galli, M; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Bulgarelli, A; Cattaneo, P W; Colafrancesco, S; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Giannotti, F; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pittori, C; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vercellone, S; Verrecchia, F

2013-01-01

410

THE PERFORMANCE OF THE ZEUS CALORIMETER \\Lambda JAMES A. CRITTENDEN  

E-print Network

, the operating characteristics, the calibration techniques, and the performance of the calorimeter during its of the mechanical design, readout and calibration techniques, and selected test beam results, we concentrate scintillation hodoscope (SRTD) and a planar drift chamber (RTD) in front of the rear calorimeter (RCAL

411

No inherent glassiness in a Penrose tiling quasicrystal  

SciTech Connect

Consideration of the structure of the Penrose pattern has led to speculation that a system with a Penrose tiling ground state might be subject to inherent glassy behavior. Monte Carol simulations show, using a simple model of the energetics, that there is no inherent glassiness in the Penrose tiling. Thermodynamic quantities measured are completely reversible, displaying no observable hysterisis, and the system may be easily cooled from a highly disordered configuration into its lowest energy state. 11 refs., 7 figs.

Strandburg, K.J.; Dressel, P.R.

1988-11-01

412

Parametrized tiling: Accurate approximations and analysis of global dependences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aspects of parametrized tiling as applied to algorithms whose computational domain can be represented as a convex polyhedron are studied. A method for constructing approximations to a set of tiles is developed, and necessary and sufficient conditions for their accuracy are stated. Formulas for determining intertile vectors are derived. A formal representation of iteration sets generating such vectors is obtained in the form of polyhedra with explicitly expressed boundaries.

Bakhanovich, S. V.; Sobolevskii, P. I.

2014-11-01

413

Tiling an m-by-n Area with Squares  

E-print Network

sliced into two or more smaller rectangles without cutting squares. basic block not a basic block - IdeaTiling an m-by-n Area with Squares of Size up to k-by-k (m £ 5) Dr. Silvia Heubach Dept Atlantic University, Boca Raton March 8 - 12, 1999 #12;Tiling an m-by-n Area with Squares of size up to k

Heubach, Silvia

414

Tile Size Selection Using Cache Organization and Data Layout  

Microsoft Academic Search

When dense matrix computations are too large to fit in cache, previous research proposes tiling to reduce or elim- inate capacity misses. This paper presents a new algorithm for choosing problem-size dependent tile sizes based on the cache size and cache line size for a direct-mapped cache. The algorithm eliminates both capacity and self-interference misses and reduces cross-interference misses. We

Stephanie Coleman; Kathryn S. McKinley

1995-01-01

415

Hadronization via Recombination  

E-print Network

The recombination model as a model for hadronization from a quark-gluon plasma has been recently revived since it has advantages in explaining several important features of the final state produced in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC, such as the constituent quark number scaling of the elliptic coefficient versus the transverse energy of identified hadrons, the bending shape of the $p_T$ spectrum of hadrons near 5 GeV/c, and the measured large value of baryon to meson ratio(of the order of unity) in the same $p_T$ range. We have developed a dynamic simulation model of heavy-ion collisions in which a quark-gluon plasma, starting from a certain initial condition, evolves hydrodynamically until it reaches the phase boundary, and then hadronizes by valence quark recombination. Rescattering after hadronization is described by UrQMD. We discuss some details of the model and report first, preliminary results.

Kang Seog Lee; Steffen Bass; Berndt Mueller; Chiho Nonaka

2008-12-27

416

Glue drops inside hadrons  

E-print Network

We present experimental evidences for the existence of a semi-hard scale in light hadrons. This includes the suppression of gluon radiation that is seen in high mass hadron diffraction; the weak energy dependence of hadronic total cross sections; the small value of the Pomeron trajectory slope measured in photoproduction of J/Psi; the weakness of gluon shadowing in nuclei; shortage of gluons in the proton revealed by an unusual behavior of the proton structure function in the soft limit, and the enhanced intrinsic transverse momentum of quarks and gluons, which considerably exceeds the inverse hadronic size. All these observations suggest that gluons in hadrons are located within spots of a small size relative to the confinement radius.

B. Z. Kopeliovich; B. Povh; Ivan Schmidt

2006-07-31

417

Closed Gap Slug Calorimeter for Plasma Stream Characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Slug calorimeters are used in sheer and stagnation mode to characterize heat flux levels for high enthalpy streams. The traditional design features a gap between slug and holder, which can be of concern in these convective heat flux environments. The challenge is to develop a calorimeter that closes the gap to gas flow, but largely maintains thermal insulation of the slug. The work presented herein introduces two new slug calorimeter designs featuring a closed gap. This is done using either aerogel as a filler or press fitting the slug with a disk. The designs were verified and compared to the baseline calorimeter design under radiative heat flux. Building on this, the calorimeters were exposed to convective heat flux in the arc-jet facilities. Results from the new designs and conclusions on the impact of the gap in convective heat flux will be shown.

Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gorbunov, Sergey; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Jones, Steven M.

2012-01-01

418

Differential scanning calorimeter data acquisiton system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kinetics of polymerization reactions are studied in our laboratory using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) data at various temperature scanning rates and analyzed by a computer code based on a theory developed and expanded in this laboratory. This created the need for an efficient data acquisition system with a variable and accurate programmable data collection rate. This report discusses one such successful data acquisition system using a Bascom Turner recorder (BTR). It is a combination chart recorder, calculator, floppy disk storage device, and interface allowing data to be transferred to a printer, CRT, or computer. Step-by-step procedures are presented.

Houtz, M. D.

1984-05-01

419

Thermochemistry : CoffeeCupCalorimeter (2 Variations)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A block of copper is heated to {x} °C and then is dropped into a coffee cup calorimeter containing {y} g of water at 25.0 °C. The final temperature of the system is 45.1 °C. What is the mass of the copper block to the nearest gram? (Assume all heat is transferred to the water). Write your answer in the box, and do NOT include units. Specific heat capacity of copper = 0.383 J/(g*°C) Specific heat capacity of water = 4.18 J/(g*°C)

420

Orbiter thermal pressure drop characteristics for shuttle orbiter thermal protection system components: High density tile, low density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pad  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure drop tests were conducted on available samples of low and high density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pads. The results are presented in terms of pressure drop, material thickness and volume flow rate. Although the test apparatus was only capable of a small part of the range of conditions to be encountered in a Shuttle Orbiter flight, the data serve to determine the type of flow characteristics to be expected for each material type tested; the measured quantities also should serve as input for initial venting and flow through analysis.

Lawing, P. L.; Nystrom, D. M.

1980-01-01

421

Foam on Tile Impact Modeling for the STS-107 Investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia during reentry a NASA/Contractor investigation team was formed to examine the probable damage inflicted on Orbiter Thermal Protection System elements by impact of External Tank insulating foam projectiles. The authors formed a working subgroup within the larger team to apply the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code SPHC to the damage estimation problem. Numerical models of the Orbiter's tiles and of the Tank's foam were constructed and used as inputs into the code. Material properties needed to properly model the tiles and foam were obtained from other working subgroups who performed tests on these items for this purpose. Two- and three-dimensional models of the tiles were constructed, including the glass outer layer, the main body of LI-900 insulation, the densified lower layer of LI-900, the Nomex felt mounting layer, and the Aluminum 2024 vehicle skin. A model for the BX-250 foam including porous compression, elastic rebound, and surface erosion was developed. Code results for the tile damage and foam behavior were extensively validated through comparison with Southwest Research Institute foam-on-tile impact experiments carried out in 1999. These tests involved small projectiles striking individual tiles and small tile arrays. Following code and model validation we simulated impacts of larger foam projectiles on the examples of tile systems used on the Orbiter. Results for impacts on the main landing gear door are presented in this paper, including effects of impacts at several angles, and of rapidly rotating projectiles. General results suggest that foam impacts on tiles at about 500 mph could cause appreciable damage if the impact angle is greater than about 20 degrees. Some variations of the foam properties, such as increased brittleness or increased density could increase damage in some cases. Rotation up to 17 rps failed to increase the damage for the two cases considered. This does not rule out other cases in which the rotational energy might lead to an increase in tile damage, but suggests that in most cases rotation will not be an important factor.

Stellingwerf, R. F.; Robinson, J. H.; Richardson, S.; Evans, S. W.; Stallworth, R.; Hovater, M.

2004-01-01

422

Phase change material in floor tiles for thermal energy storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditional passive solar systems have relied on sensible heat storage for energy savings. Recent research has investigated taking advantage of latent heat storage for additional energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change material into building materials used in traditional passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. This research introduces a new flooring material that incorporates a phase change material ready for commercial manufacture. An agglomerate floor tile containing 20% by mass of encapsulated octadecane has been manufactured. Flexural and compressive strength of 7.4 MPa and 24.5 MPa respectively, were measured for the tile. Peak melting transition temperature was determined to be 27.2°C with a latent heat of 33.9 J/g of tile. Structural and thermal performance of the tile surpassed that of a typical ceramic tile. Each tile was composed of quartz, resin and phase change material. Statistical modeling was performed to analyze the response of flexural and compressive strength on varying amounts of quartz, resin and phase change material. Resulting polynomials described the effect of adding phase change material into the tile. With as little as 10% by mass of phase change material, the strength was reduced to less than 50% of tile without phase change material. It was determined that the maximum phase change material content to attain structural integrity greater than ceramic tile was 20% by mass. The statistical analysis used for this research was based on mixture experiments. A procedure was developed to simplify the selection of data points used in the fit of the polynomials to describe the response of flexural and compressive strengths. Analysis of energy savings using this floor tile containing 20% by mass of phase change material was performed as an addendum to this research. A known static simulation method, SLR (solar load ratio), was adapted to include latent heat storage. In addition a dynamic simulation was also performed using BLAST. The program had to be modified to simulate latent heat storage. Annual heating consumptions from both methods were estimated to be reduced by approximately 5%.

Lee, Amy Sarah

423

Performance of the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The EBIT calorimeter spectrometer (ECS) is a new high-resolution, broadband x-ray spectrometer that has recently been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Trap Facility (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The ECS is an entirely new production class spectrometer that replaces the XRS/EBIT spectrometer that has been operating at EBIT since 2000. The ECS utilizes a 32-pixel x-ray calorimeter array from the XRS instrument on the Suzaku x-ray observatory. Eighteen of the pixels are optimized for the 0.1-10 keV band and yield 4.5 eV full width at half maximum energy resolution and 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV. In addition, the ECS includes 14 detector pixels that are optimized for the high-energy band with a bandpass from 0.5 to over 100 keV with 34 eV resolution and 32% quantum efficiency at 60 keV. The ECS detector array is operated at 50 mK using a five stage cryogenic system that is entirely automated. The instrument takes data continuously for over 65 h with a 2.5 h recycle time. The ECS is a nondispersive, broadband, highly efficient spectrometer that is one of the prime instruments at the EBIT facility. The instrument is used for studies of absolute cross sections, charge exchange recombination, and x-ray emission from nonequilibrium plasmas, among other measurements in our laboratory astrophysics program.

Porter, Frederick Scott; Gygax, John; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; King, Jonathan M. [Code 662, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Thorn, Daniel B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kahn, Steven M. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2008-10-15

424

COTS Analog Prototype for LHCb's Calorimeter Upgrade  

E-print Network

The objective of this thesis is to present a proposal for the analogue signal processing chain needed for the LHCb calorimeter upgrade improving the design used originally. The design contains several novelties: the system was designed with low noise in mind from the beginning, it is made to have good immunity to interferences stressing the fact that the board will be shared with large digital circuits, differential operational amplifiers are used in a non-standard way as a mean to obtain opposite polarity signals for the signal treatment and a way to increase the available signal in the front end electronics is proposed. The thesis starts with a brief introduction to the detector and its environment. This is followed by an explanation of the use of shapers in high energy physics detectors and the constraints that the shaper must address in the LHCb calorimeter. This leads to a chapter where the circuit design is explained starting from the analysis of the original circuit and its flaws. Once the original cir...

Abellan Beteta, Carlos; Herms i Berenguer, Atilà

425

Weibull model of Multiplicity Distribution in hadron-hadron collisions  

E-print Network

We introduce the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes involving fragmentation processes. This gives a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multi-particle production in hadron hadron collisions involving QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization.

Sadhana Dash; Basanta K. Nandi

2014-09-19

426

Hadron Spectroscopy -- Theory  

E-print Network

A brief review of theoretical progress in hadron spectroscopy and nonperturbative QCD is presented. Attention is focussed on recent lattice gauge theory, the Dyson-Schwinger formalism, effective field theory, unquenching constituent models, and some beyond the Standard Model physics.

E. S. Swanson

2009-10-30

427

Fractal dimension analysis in a highly granular calorimeter  

E-print Network

The concept of “particle flow” has been developed to optimise the jet energy resolution by distinguishing the different jet components. A highly granular calorimeter designed for the particle flow algorithm provides an unprecedented level of detail for the reconstruction of calorimeter showers and enables new approaches to shower analysis. In this paper the measurement and use of the fractal dimension of showers is described. The fractal dimension is a characteristic number that measures the global compactness of the shower. It is highly dependent on the primary particle type and energy. Its application in identifying particles and estimating their energy is described in the context of a calorimeter designed for the International Linear Collider.

Ruan, M; Brient, J.C; Jeans, D; Videau, H

2015-01-01

428

Characterization of ceramic roof tile wastes as pozzolanic admixture.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to study the recycling of tile wastes in the manufacture of blended cements. Cracked or broken ceramic bodies are not accepted as commercial products and, therefore, the unsold waste of the ceramic industry becomes an environment problem. The use of powdered roof tile in cement production, as pozzolanic addition, is reported. The wastes were classified as nonglazed, natural and black glazed tiles. The mineralogy of the powders was controlled by SEM-EDX microscopy, XRD analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Particle size was checked by laser granulometry. Once the materials were fully characterized, pozzolanic lime consumption tests and Fratini tests were carried out. Different formulations of cement-tile blends were prepared by incorporation of up to 30% weight ratios of recycled waste. The compressive strength of the resulting specimens was measured. The evolution of hydration of the cement-tile blends was analyzed by XRD and FTIR techniques. Vibrational spectroscopy presented accurate evidence of pozzolanic activity. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of these waste materials to produce pozzolanic cement. PMID:19124234

Lavat, Araceli E; Trezza, Monica A; Poggi, Mónica

2009-05-01

429

Analysis of Thick Sandwich Shells with Embedded Ceramic Tiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) is an advanced technology demonstrator of an all-composite ground combat vehicle. The CAV upper hull is made of a tough light-weight S2-glass/epoxy laminate with embedded ceramic tiles that serve as armor. The tiles are bonded to a rubber mat with a carefully selected, highly viscoelastic adhesive. The integration of armor and structure offers an efficient combination of ballistic protection and structural performance. The analysis of this anisotropic construction, with its inherent discontinuous and periodic nature, however, poses several challenges. The present paper describes a shell-based 'element-layering' technique that properly accounts for these effects and for the concentrated transverse shear flexibility in the rubber mat. One of the most important advantages of the element-layering technique over advanced higher-order elements is that it is based on conventional elements. This advantage allows the models to be portable to other structural analysis codes, a prerequisite in a program that involves the computational facilities of several manufacturers and government laboratories. The element-layering technique was implemented into an auto-layering program that automatically transforms a conventional shell model into a multi-layered model. The effects of tile layer homogenization, tile placement patterns, and tile gap size on the analysis results are described.

Davila, Carlos G.; Smith, C.; Lumban-Tobing, F.

1996-01-01

430

Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

1997-05-07

431

Simulation studies of hadron energy resolution as a function of iron plate thickness at INO-ICAL  

E-print Network

We report on a detailed simulation study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5--8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2--15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a thickness-independent contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this work. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.

Lakshmi S. Mohan; Anushree Ghosh; Moon Moon Devi; Daljeet Kaur; Sandhya Choubey; Amol Dighe; D. Indumathi; M. V. N. Murthy; Md. Naimuddin

2015-03-11

432

Simulation studies of hadron energy resolution as a function of iron plate thickness at INO-ICAL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on a detailed simulation study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5–8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2–15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a thickness-independent contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this work. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.

Lakshmi, S. M.; Ghosh, A.; Devi, M. M.; Kaur, D.; Choubey, S.; Dighe, A.; Indumathi, D.; Murthy, M. V. N.; Naimuddin, Md

2014-09-01

433

Hollow clay tile wall program summary report  

SciTech Connect

Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

1995-07-30

434

Arctic octahedron in three-dimensional rhombus tilings and related integer s* partitions  

E-print Network

Arctic octahedron in three-dimensional rhombus tilings and related integer s* *olid 21, 2002) Three-dimensional integer partitions provide a convenient represent* *ation-words: Random tilings; Integer partitions; Configurational entropy* *; Boundary effects; Tran- sition

Widom, Michael

435

An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

1982-01-01

436

Tony Rollins fashions a new tile for the Space Shuttle orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, holds down a curtain while making a test sample of tile on a block 5-axis computerized numerical control milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttle orbiter's external surface is shielded from heat by a network of more than 24,000 tiles formed from a silica fiber compound. They are known as High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tiles and Low-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (LRSI) tiles. Most HRSI tiles are 6 inches square, but may be as large as 12 inches in some areas, and 1 to 5 inches thick. LRSI tiles are generally 8 inches square, ranging from 0.2- to 1-inch thick. More advanced materials such as Flexible Insulation Blankets have replaced tiles on some upper surfaces of the orbiter.

1998-01-01

437

A particle counting EM calorimeter using MAPS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The availability of full size MAPS sensors makes it possible to construct a calorimeter with pixelsize of a few tens of micrometers. This would be small enough to count individual shower particles and would allow a shower shape analysis on an unprecedented, small scale. Interesting features would be tracking capability for particle flow algorithms and a superior discrimination of single photons from neutral and charged pions at high momenta. A small Molière radius together with high transverse resolution would allow to separate close showers, induced by photons from neutral pion decay. A full scale (4 RM, 28 X0) prototype was constructed to demonstrate this. It features 30 micron pixelsize and a longitudinal sampling at 1 radiation length. We will show results from beam tests of this prototype at electron energies of 2 to 200 GeV.

Nooren, G.; Rocco, E.

2015-02-01

438

Beta spectrometry with metallic magnetic calorimeters.  

PubMed

Metallic magnetic calorimeters are a specific type of cryogenic detectors that have been shown to enable precise measurement of the shape of low energy beta spectra. The aim of their use at LNHB is the determination of the shape factors of beta spectra. The beta source is enclosed in the detector absorber, allowing for very high detection efficiency. It has turned out that the type of source is of crucial importance for the correctness of the measured spectrum. Spectra of (63)Ni measured with several sources prepared by drying a NiCl2 solution differ from one another and from theory, whereas spectra measured with electroplated sources are reproducible and agree with theory. With these latter measurements we could confirm the atomic exchange effect down to very low energy (200 eV). PMID:24368065

Loidl, M; Rodrigues, M; Le-Bret, C; Mougeot, X

2014-05-01

439

Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

2001-01-01

440

Mobilization and loss of elements from roofing tiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deposition, leaching and chemical transformation are processes that affect roofing tile and roof runoff water. Leaching experiments, with artificial rainwater in the laboratory, showed the presence of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3 -, SO4 2-, with a ratio of Ca2+ and SO4 2- suggesting gypsum dissolution. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) of the exposed roof tile showed depletion such as Mg, Al, Si, P, Ti and K at the surface of the tile and an enrichment of Fe and Mn which hinted at a process akin to laterite formation. However, calcium appeared to be enriched at the surface as gypsum (confirmed by X-ray diffraction) and to a lesser extent calcite, which is characteristic of deposits on building surfaces in cities.

Sulaiman, Fazrul Razman; Brimblecombe, Peter; Grossi, Carlota M.

2009-08-01

441

Fly ash of mineral coal as ceramic tiles raw material.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of mineral coal fly ash as a raw material in the production of ceramic tiles. The samples of fly ash came from Capivari de Baixo, a city situated in the Brazilian Federal State of Santa Catarina. The fly ash and the raw materials were characterized regarding their physical chemical properties, and, based on these results; batches containing fly ash and typical raw materials for ceramic tiles were prepared. The fly ash content in the batches varied between 20 and 80 wt%. Specimens were molded using a uniaxial hydraulic press and were fired. All batches containing ash up to 60 wt% present adequate properties to be classified as several kinds of products in the ISO 13006 standard () regarding its different absorption groups (pressed). The results obtained indicate that fly ash, when mixed with traditional raw materials, has the necessary requirements to be used as a raw material for production of ceramic tiles. PMID:16540298

Zimmer, A; Bergmann, C P

2007-01-01

442

Efficacy of photon cleaning of JET divertor tiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photon cleaning by means of a flash-lamp was used for in-situ detritiation of the inner wall tiles of the JET divertor in May 2004. Additional trials were also performed ex-situ in October 2004 on divertor base tiles. Early work confirmed that for pulse energies between 150 J and 300 J some deposited material was removed. To increase the amount of material removed during photon cleaning, further experiments with higher pulse energies (500 J) were performed and are reported here. Analysis of cross sections confirmed a removal rate of 0.04 ?m/pulse, removing ˜80 ?m from 200 ?m thick deposits over a treatment area of 15 × 10-4 m2. During the photon cleaning tests at least 12% of the tritium inventory for the tile was removed. It was also shown that deuterium was desorbed from a depth ˜7 ?m beyond the depth of material removed.

Jet-Efda Contributors; Widdowson, A.; Coad, J. P.; Bekris, N.; Counsell, G.; Forrest, M. J.; Gibson, K. J.; Hole, D.; Likonen, J.; Parsons, W.; Renvall, T.; Rubel, M.; JET-EFDA Contributors1

2007-06-01

443

Flow and heat transfer in space vehicle tile gaps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow patterns and the characteristics of the convective heat transfer in intersecting tile gaps on space vehicles were experimentally investigated using a water channel flow facility for simulating flow conditions in the tile gaps on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle. It was found that penetration of external flow into the perpendicular gap was limited in most cases to roughly two gap widths, while greater entrainment occurred in the parallel gap. Heat transfer in the bulk of the perpendicular gap occurred by natural convection. The Reynolds number and the relative tile-height differences had the strongest influence on heat transfer and affected both the magnitude and the symmetry of the temperature and the flow fields.

Garimella, S. V.; Shollenberger, K. A.; Eibeck, P. A.; White, S.

1992-01-01

444

New class tiling design for dot-diffused halftoning.  

PubMed

In this paper, a new class tiling designed dot diffusion along with the optimized class matrix and diffused matrix are proposed. The result of this method presents a nearly periodic-free halftone when compared to the former schemes. Formerly, the class matrix of the dot diffusion is duplicated and orthogonally tiled to fulfill the entire image for further thresholding and quantized-error diffusion, which accompanies subsequent periodic artifacts. In our observation, this artifact can be solved by manipulating the class tiling with comprising rotation, transpose, and alternatively shifting of the class matrices. As documented in the experimental results, the proposed dot diffusion has been compared with the former halftoning methods with parallelism in terms of image quality, processing efficiency, periodicity, and memory consumption; the proposed dot diffusion exhibits as a very competitive candidate in the printing/display market. PMID:23192555

Liu, Yun-Fu; Guo, Jing-Ming

2013-03-01

445

Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same  

DOEpatents

A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

1999-11-16

446

Interlaced particle systems and tilings of the Aztec diamond  

E-print Network

Motivated by the problem of domino tilings of the Aztec diamond, a weighted particle system is defined on $N$ lines, with line $j$ containing $j$ particles. The particles are restricted to lattice points from 0 to $N$, and particles on successive lines are subject to an interlacing constraint. It is shown that marginal distributions for this particle system can be computed exactly. This in turn is used to give unified derivations of a number of fundamental properties of the tiling problem, for example the evaluation of the number of distinct configurations and the relation to the GUE minor process. An interlaced particle system associated with the domino tiling of a certain half Aztec diamond is similarly defined and analyzed.

Benjamin J. Fleming; Peter J. Forrester

2010-04-03

447

Error suppression mechanisms for DNA tile self-assembly and their simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Algorithmic self-assembly using DNA-based molecular tiles has been demonstrated to implement molecular computation. When several\\u000a different types of DNA tile self-assemble, they can form large two-dimensional algorithmic patterns. Prior analysis predicted\\u000a that the error rates of tile assembly can be reduced by optimizing physical parameters such as tile concentrations and temperature.\\u000a However, in exchange, the growth speed is also very

Kenichi Fujibayashi; David Yu Zhang; Erik Winfree; Satoshi Murata

2009-01-01

448

Algorithm for elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange based on DNA tile self-assembly  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA tile self-assembly is a promising paradigm for nanotechnology. Recently, many researches show that computation by DNA tile self-assembly maybe scalable. In this paper, we propose the algorithm for elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange based on DNA tile self-assembly. First we give the DNA tile self-assembly model to compute the scalar multiplication, then we can successfully implement the Diffie-Hellman key

Zhen Cheng; Yufang Huang; Jin Xu

2008-01-01

449

Realtime calibration of the A4 electromagnetic lead fluoride calorimeter  

E-print Network

Sufficient energy resolution is the key issue for the calorimetry in particle and nuclear physics. The calorimeter of the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI is a segmented calorimeter where the energy of an event is determined by summing the signals of neighbouring channels. In this case the precise matching of the individual modules is crucial to obtain a good energy resolution. We have developped a calibration procedure for our total absorbing electromagnetic calorimeter which consists of 1022 lead fluoride (PbF_2) crystals. This procedure reconstructs the the single-module contributions to the events by solving a linear system of equations, involving the inversion of a 1022 x 1022-matrix. The system has shown its functionality at beam energies between 300 and 1500 MeV and represents a new and fast method to keep the calorimeter permanently in a well-calibrated state.

S. Baunack; D. Balaguer Ríos; L. Capozza; J. Diefenbach; R. Frascaria; B. Gläser; D. v. Harrach; Y. Imai; R. Kothe; R. Kunne; J. H. Lee; F. E. Maas; M. C. Mora Espí; M. Morlet; S. Ong; E. Schilling; J. van de Wiele; C. Weinrich

2011-02-28

450

The zero degree calorimeters for the ALICE experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC, providing a direct measure of the centrality of the collisions. ZDC are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. The main characteristics of the ZP and ZN detectors are described in this article. The calorimeters were tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. Test beam results such as the calorimeter response, the energy resolution, the signal uniformity and the localizing capability are presented.

Puddu, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Locci, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

2007-10-01

451

The BaBar cesium iodide electromagnetic calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Cesium Iodide Electromagnetic Calorimeter is currently in the technical design stage. The calorimeter consists of approximately 10,000 individual thallium-doped cesium iodide crystals arranged in a near-hermetic barrel and endcap structure. Taking previous cesium iodide calorimeters as a benchmark, we hope to build a system with roughly two times better energy resolution. This will be achieved by a combination of high quality crystal growing, precision mechanical processing of crystals and support structure, highly efficient light collection and low noise readout electronics. The calorimeter described here represents the current state of the design and we are undertaking an active period of optimization before this design is finalized. We discuss here the physics motivation, the current design and options for optimization.

Wuest, C.R.

1994-12-01

452

PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

Douglas C. Hittle

2002-10-01

453

Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

1995-01-01

454

Current Status and Performance of the BESIII Electromagnetic Calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BESIII experiment is located at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) in China. Its electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) consists of 6240 CsI(TI) crystals, each read out by two Photodiodes (PD) at the end of the crystal. Changes in the response of the calorimeter due to radiation damage in the crystals or changes in the photo detector output are monitored with a light pulser system.

Feldbauer, Florian; BESIII Collaboration

2015-02-01

455

The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment  

SciTech Connect

A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

2007-04-16

456

Position resolution and particle identification with the ATLAS EM calorimeter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the years between 2000 and 2002 several pre-series and series modules of the ATLAS EM barrel and end-cap calorimeter were exposed to electron, photon and pion beams. The performance of the calorimeter with respect to its finely segmented first sampling has been studied. The polar angle resolution has been found to be in the range 50–60 (mrad)\\/E(GeV). The ?0

J. Colas; L. Di Ciaccio; M. El Kacimi; O. Gaumer; M. Gouanère; D. Goujdami; R. Lafaye; C. Le Maner; L. Neukermans; P. Perrodo; L. Poggioli; D. Prieur; H. Przysiezniak; G. Sauvage; I. Wingerter-Seez; R. Zitoun; F. Lanni; H. Ma; S. Rajagopalan; S. Rescia; H. Takai; A. Belymam; D. Benchekroun; M. Hakimi; A. Hoummada; E. Barberio; Y. S. Gao; L. Lu; R. Stroynowski; M. Aleksa; J. Beck Hansen; T. Carli; P. Fassnacht; F. Gianotti; L. Hervas; W. Lampl; B. Belhorma; J. Collot; M. L. Gallin-Martel; J. Y. Hostachy; F. Ledroit-Guillon; P. Martin; F. Ohlsson-Malek; S. Saboumazrag; S. Viret; M. Leltchouk; J. A. Parsons; M. Seman; F. Barreiro; J. Del Peso; L. Labarga; C. Oliver; S. Rodier; P. Barrillon; C. Benchouk; F. Djama; P. Y. Duval; F. Henry-Couannier; F. Hubaut; E. Monnier; P. Pralavorio; D. Sauvage; C. Serfon; S. Tisserant; J. Toth; D. Banfi; L. Carminati; D. Cavalli; G. Costa; M. Delmastro; M. Fanti; L. Mandelli; M. Mazzanti; G. F. Tartarelli; K. Kotov; A. Maslennikov; G. Pospelov; Yu. Tikhonov; C. Bourdarios; C. de La Taille; L. Fayard; D. Fournier; L. Iconomidou-Fayard; M. Kado; M. Lechowski; G. Parrour; P. Puzo; D. Rousseau; R. Sacco; N. Seguin-Moreau; L. Serin; G. Unal; D. Zerwas; B. Dekhissi; J. Derkaoui; A. El Kharrim; F. Maaroufi; A. Camard; D. Lacour; B. Laforge; I. Nikolic-Audit; Ph. Schwemling; H. Ghazlane; R. Cherkaoui El Moursli; A. Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine; M. Boonekamp; B. Mansoulié; P. Meyer; J. Schwindling; B. Lund-Jensen; Y. Tayalati

2005-01-01

457

The design, construction, and calibration of a heat exchanger calorimeter  

E-print Network

THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND CALIBRATION OF A HEAT EXCHANGER CALORIMETER A Thesis by JEFFERY PAUL LOVELADY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND CALIBRATION OF A HEAT EXCHANGER CALORIMETER A Thesis by JEFFERY PAUL LOVELADY Approved as to style and content by: N. K. Anand (Chairman...

Lovelady, Jeffery Paul

1988-01-01

458

Current status and performance of the BESIII electromagnetic calorimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design and construction of the BESIII electromagnetic calorimeter is introduced briefly. Radiation dose of CsI(Tl) crystals is monitored and history graph of integral dose of crystals is showed. LED-fiber system is used for monitoring the EMC light output, and large decrease of light output of several crystals is discussed. BESIII electromagnetic calorimeter works very well and its performance reach the design value.

Fang, Jian; Wang, Zhigang

2012-12-01

459

Signal feedthroughs for the ATLAS barrel and endcap calorimeters  

SciTech Connect

The function, design, construction, testing, and installation of the signal feedthroughs for the barrel and endcap ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters are described. The feedthroughs provide a high density and radiation hard method to extract over 200 000 signals from the cryogenic environment of the calorimeters using an application of a design based on flexible kapton circuit board transmission lines. A model to describe the frequency dependent behavior of the transmission lines is also presented.

Axen, D.; Hackenburg, R.; Hoffmann, A.; Kane, S.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Muller, T.; Pate, D.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rehak, M.; Rescia, S.; Sexton, K.; Sondericker, J.; Birney, P.; Dowling, A.W.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Hodges, T.; Holness, F.; Honkanen, N. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 3P6 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [and others