Science.gov

Sample records for hadronic radiation environment

  1. J/psi and UPSILON radiative and hadronic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1987-07-01

    The search for gluonium at the J/psi and UPSILON is discussed, as well as the search for exotics at the UPSILON. Reactions discussed include radiative and hadronic decays of the J/psi and the search for radiative decays of the UPSILON. Future perspectives are also briefly considered. 45 refs., 27 figs. (LEW)

  2. The Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the space radiation environment on spacecraft systems and instruments are significant design considerations for space missions. Astronaut exposure is a serious concern for manned missions. In order to meet these challenges and have reliable, cost-effective designs, the radiation environment must be understood and accurately modeled. The nature of the environment varies greatly between low earth orbits, higher earth orbits and interplanetary space. There are both short-term and long-term variations with the phase of the solar cycle. In this paper we concentrate mainly on charged particle radiations. Descriptions of the radiation belts and particles of solar and cosmic origin are reviewed. An overview of the traditional models is presented accompanied by their application areas and limitations. This is followed by discussion of some recent model developments.

  3. Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2015-01-01

    When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140

  4. Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-01-01

    When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140

  5. Genesis Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Skipworth, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft launched on 8 August 2001 sampled solar wind environments at L1 from 2001 to 2004. After the Science Capsule door was opened, numerous foils and samples were exposed to the various solar wind environments during periods including slow solar wind from the streamer belts, fast solar wind flows from coronal holes, and coronal mass ejections. The Survey and Examination of Eroded Returned Surfaces (SEERS) program led by NASA's Space Environments and Effects program had initiated access for the space materials community to the remaining Science Capsule hardware after the science samples had been removed for evaluation of materials exposure to the space environment. This presentation will describe the process used to generate a reference radiation Genesis Radiation Environment developed for the SEERS program for use by the materials science community in their analyses of the Genesis hardware.

  6. CCTV for radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Shaufl, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) within radiation environments requires the system designer to have a thorough knowledge of the application environment and the electronic and optical components expected to survive within the environment. Of all the many ambient conditions to which CCTV components are exposed, from an air-conditioned office complex to 1,000 feet under the ocean, none is as demanding as the radiation encountered in the nuclear industrial field. Unhardened CCTV equipment can fail or degrade to the point of being useless when exposed to ionizing radiation doses of as little as 10/sup 3/ rads (Si) or to a neutron fluence of as little as 10/sup 11/ neutrons per square centimeter. (Rads (Si) stands for roentgens absorbed dose in silicon, while a fluence is defined as the time integral of neutron flux.) The applications for CCTV systems may require that each component within the system withstand a total ionizing radiation dose of 10/sup 8/ rads or greater.

  7. The radiation environment on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Science. Rikho Nymmik, Of

    A prerequisite for planning long-term human space missions, including to the Moon and Mars, is to ensure the radiation safety of the crews of spacecraft and laboratories. This problem can be solved by comparing the standardized dose limit with probable doses in the space environment, the latter of which can be calculated on the basis of available flux data for primary radiation (cosmic rays) and secondary radiation (resulting from the surrounding matter). Quantitative models are used to determine these fluxes, and the accuracy and completeness of these models determine the accuracy of the estimation of radiation risk in space missions. In the present report, we forecast the radiation environment on the lunar surface and at depth in the lunar soil. Calculations are made for periods of solar minimum and solar maximum, using models of particle fluxes of cosmic radiation (GCR [1] and SEP [2]) and secondary hadron radiation [3] arising from the bombardment of matter by cosmic rays. The energy spectra of the proton and neutron fluxes are presented both on the lunar surface behind shielding and within a depth of lunar soil. In addition, the likelihood of an occurrence of SEP fluxes is considered for missions of varying duration. These data are also compared with similar data calculated by other known models. 1. International Standard, ISO 15390. Space environment (natural and artificial) -Galactic cosmic ray model. (First edition 2004-06-01), @ ISO 2004. 2. R.A. Nymmik. Probabilistic Model for Fluences and Peak Fluxes of Solar Particles. Radiation Measurements. 30 (1999), 287-296. 3. A. Dementyev, N. Sobolevsky, SHIELD -universal Monte Carlo hadron transport code: scope and applications, Rad. Meas., 30 (1999), 553-557. http://www.inr.ru/shield/

  8. Chandra Radiation Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FluX) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operations times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space Chandra must operate, and on-board particle detectors do not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. This presentation will describe the plasma environment data analysis and modeling basis of the CRMFLX engineering environment model developed to predict the proton flux in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetosphere phenomenological regions of geospace. The recently released CRMFLX Version 2 implementation includes an algorithm that propagates flux from an observation location to other regions of the magnetosphere based on convective ExB and VB-curvature particle drift motions. This technique has the advantage of more completely filling out the database and makes maximum use of limited data obtained during high Kp periods or in areas of the magnetosphere with poor satellite flux measurement coverage.

  9. Lunar radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Wilson, Jody

    One of the goals of the CRaTER investigation is to characterize the radiation environment near the Moon in order to enable exploration. The state-of-the-art understanding developed thus far during the LRO mission is documented in a special issue of the Spaceweather Journal entitled “Space Weather: Building the observational foundation to deduce biological effects of space radiation” (Schwadron et al., 2013a). This recently published CRaTER work probes deeper into the physics of the radiation environment at the Moon. It motivates and provides the scientific basis for new investigations in the next phase of the LRO mission. The effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) range from chemical modification of the regolith, the generation of a radiation albedo that is increasingly illuminating chemical properties of the regolith, causing charging of the regolith and hazards to human explorers and robotic missions. Low-lunar orbit provides a platform for measuring SEP anisotropy over timescales of 2 hours both parallel and perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, and so far we have observed more than 18 SEP events with time-variable anisotropies during the LRO mission. Albedo proton maps of the Moon from CRaTER indicate that the flux of lunar albedo protons is correlated with elemental abundances at the lunar surface. The yield of albedo protons from the maria is 1% higher than the yield from the highlands, and there are localized peaks with even higher contrast (that may be co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer). The Moon’s radiation environment both charges and affects the chemistry in the Moon’s polar regions, particularly in PSRs. This makes these regions a prime target for new CRaTER observations, since CRaTER measures GCRs and SEPs that penetrate the regolith down to 10s of cm. Thus, we review emerging discoveries from LRO/CRaTER’s remarkable exploration of

  10. Radiation Environment Inside Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Patrick O'Neill, NASA Johnson Space Center, will present a detailed description of the radiation environment inside spacecraft. The free space (outside) solar and galactic cosmic ray and trapped Van Allen belt proton spectra are significantly modified as these ions propagate through various thicknesses of spacecraft structure and shielding material. In addition to energy loss, secondary ions are created as the ions interact with the structure materials. Nuclear interaction codes (FLUKA, GEANT4, HZTRAN, MCNPX, CEM03, and PHITS) transport free space spectra through different thicknesses of various materials. These "inside" energy spectra are then converted to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and dose rate - that's what's needed by electronics systems designers. Model predictions are compared to radiation measurements made by instruments such as the Intra-Vehicular Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (IV-CPDS) used inside the Space Station, Orion, and Space Shuttle.

  11. RADIATION ENVIRONMENT OF GROWTH CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiation measurements with different types of meters in several controlled environment facilities have been compiled to demonstrate the problems associated with insuring uniform radiation levels in separate facilities. Data are provided for a quantum meter, three photometers, a ...

  12. Radiation Environments for Lunar Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Blackwell, Willliam C.; Harine, Katherine J.

    2007-01-01

    Developing reliable space systems for lunar exploration and infrastructure for extended duration operations on the lunar surface requires analysis and mitigation of potential system vulnerabilities to radiation effects on materials and systems. This paper reviews the characteristics of space radiation environments relevant to lunar programs including the trans-Earth and trans-lunar injection trajectories through the Earth's radiation belts, solar wind surface dose environments, energetic solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays and discusses the radiation design environments being developed for lunar program requirements to assure that systems operate successfully in the space environment.

  13. Characterizing the Moon's radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-05-01

    The radiation environment near the Moon could be damaging to humans and electronics on future missions. To characterize this potentially hazardous environment, the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission, which orbits at 50 kilometers above the Moon's surface, measures the radiation that would be absorbed by either electronic parts or human tissue behind the shielding of a spacecraft.

  14. Resistive Plate Chamber digitization in a hadronic shower environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Yue, Q.; Yang, Z.; Boumediene, D.; Carloganu, C.; Français, V.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Lee, S. C.; Park, W.; Vallecorsa, S.; Apostolakis, J.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Pingault, A.; Zaganidis, N.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Buridon, V.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Eté, R.; Garillot, G.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Corriveau, F.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Belkadhi, K.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.

    2016-06-01

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadronic calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. This paper presents the SDHCAL prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are observed at higher energies. The reasons for these differences are investigated.

  15. Modeling the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a renaissance of interest in space radiation environment modeling. This has been fueled by the growing need to replace long time standard AP-9 and AE-8 trapped particle models, the interplanetary exploration initiative, the modern satellite instrumentation that has led to unprecedented measurement accuracy, and the pervasive use of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) microelectronics that require more accurate predictive capabilities. The objective of this viewgraph presentation was to provide basic understanding of the components of the space radiation environment and their variations, review traditional radiation effects application models, and present recent developments.

  16. The space radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.E.

    1997-04-30

    There are three primary sources of space radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped belt radiation, and solar particle events (SPE). All are composed of ions, the nuclei of atoms. Their energies range from a few MeV u{sup -1} to over a GeV u{sup -1}. These ions can fragment when they interact with spacecraft materials and produce energetic neutrons and ions of lower atomic mass. Absorbed dose rates inside a typical spacecraft (like the Space Shuttle) in a low inclination (28.5 degrees) orbit range between 0.05 and 2 mGy d{sup -1} depending on the altitude and flight inclination (angle of orbit with the equator). The quality factor of radiation in orbit depends on the relative contributions of trapped belt radiation and GCR, and the dose rate varies both with orbital altitude and inclination. The corresponding equivalent dose rate ranges between 0.1 and 4 mSv d{sup -1}. In high inclination orbits, like that of the Mir Space Station and as is planned for the International Space Station, blood-forming organ (BFO) equivalent dose rates as high as 1.5 mSv d{sup -1}. Thus, on a 1 y mission, a crew member could obtain a total dose of 0.55 Sv. Maximum equivalent dose rates measured in high altitude passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) were 10 mSv h{sup -1}. For an interplanetary space mission (e.g., to Mars) annual doses from GCR alone range between 150 mSv y{sup -1} at solar maximum and 580 mSv y{sup -1} at solar minimum. Large SPE, like the October 1989 series, are more apt to occur in the years around solar maximum. In free space, such an event could contribute another 300 mSv, assuming that a warning system and safe haven can be effectively used with operational procedures to minimize crew exposures. Thus, the total dose for a 3 y mission to Mars could exceed 2 Sv.

  17. The IRAS radiation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    Orbital flux integration for three selected mission altitudes and geographic instantaneous flux-mapping for nominal flight-path altitude were used to determine the external charged particle radiation predicted for the Infrared Astronomy Satellite. A current field model was used for magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions. Innovative analysis features introduced include (1) positional fluxes as a function of time and energy for the most severe pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly; (2) total positional doses as a function of time and shield thickness; (3) comparison mapping fluxes for ratios of positional intensities to orbit integrated averages; and (4) statistical exposure-time history of a trajectory as a function of energy indicating, in percent of total mission duration, the time intervals over which the instantaneous fluxes would exceed the orbit integrated averages. Results are presented in tables and graphs.

  18. 3D measurement of the radiation distribution in a water phantom in a hadron therapy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalka, L.; Granja, C.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Jaekel, O.; Martisikova, M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Hadron therapy is a highly precise radio-therapeutic method with many advantages especially in cases when the tumour is close to sensitive organs where standard treatments cannot be used. For reliable treatment planning it is necessary to have calculation tools for maximization of the dose delivered to the targeted tissue and minimization of the dose outside of it. While the main physical processes in material irradiated by hadron beams are known, in reality the processes involved are complex so that analytical computations are impossible. Thus, the planning tools to incorporate simplified models and numerical approximations and an experimental method for high precision verification of the models within phantoms is desired. The development of sensitive, high resolution and online methods for measurement of the radiation environment inside of the irradiated object is the aim of this work. Such measurements are made possible by the resolving power of the state-of-the-art pixel detector Timepix. This quantum counting imaging device is able to record the characteristic shapes of the particle traces including their energies deposited in the detector. All these data recorded for each event allow to estimate the particle type, its energy and direction of flight. Event-by-event analysis is done using pattern recognition of the characteristic traces. The objective of the experiment is the detection and characterization of secondary radiation generated by the primary therapeutic beams in tissue equivalent material (water). Measurements were performed inside of a water phantom irradiated by a carbon beam at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT).

  19. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment.

    PubMed

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs. PMID:26569259

  20. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    PubMed Central

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs. PMID:26569259

  1. Rare Hadronic and Radiative Penguin B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, Stephane

    2002-02-07

    We report recent results in the study of rare hadronic and radiative penguin decays of B mesons. These results are based on a sample of 23 million BB pairs collected by the BaBar Collaboration at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- B Factory.

  2. Hadron production via e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions with initial state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Druzhinin, V. P.; Eidelman, S. I.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Solodov, E. P.

    2011-10-01

    A novel method of studying e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into hadrons using initial state radiation at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders is described. After a brief history of the method, its theoretical foundations are considered. Numerous experiments in which exclusive cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into hadrons below the center-of-mass energy of 5 GeV have been measured are presented. Some applications of the experimental results to fundamental tests of the standard model are listed.

  3. Radiation Assurance for the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Poivey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The space radiation environment can lead to extremely harsh operating conditions for spacecraft electronic systems. A hardness assurance methodology must be followed to assure that the space radiation environment does not compromise the functionality and performance of space-based systems during the mission lifetime. The methodology includes a definition of the radiation environment, assessment of the radiation sensitivity of parts, worst-case analysis of the impact of radiation effects, and part acceptance decisions which are likely to include mitigation measures.

  4. Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1999-01-01

    Space radiation presents a very serious hazard to crews of interplanetary human missions. The two sources of this radiation are the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The GCR provides a steady source of low dose rate radiation that is primarily responsible for stochastic effects, such as cancer, and can effect the response of the central nervous system. Nuclear interactions of these components with the Martian atmosphere produces substantial flux of neutrons with high Radio Biological Effectiveness. The uncertainty in the knowledge of many fragmentation cross sections and their energy dependence required by radiation transport codes, uncertainties in the ambient radiation environment, and knowledge of the Martian atmosphere, lead to large enough uncertainties in the knowledge of calculated radiation dose in both free space (cruise phase), in Martian orbit, and on Martian surface. Direct measurements of radiation levels, the relative contributions of protons, neutrons, and heavy ions, and Martian atmospheric characteristics is thus a prerequisite for any human mission. An integrated suite of two spectrometers to provide these data will be described. The Orbiter spectrometer will measure the energy spectrum of SEP events from 15 to 500 MeV/n, and when combined with data from other space based instruments, such as the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), would provide accurate GCR spectra also. The Lander spectrometer would measure the absorbed dose rate, dose equivalent dose rate, and the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra and is capable of separating the relative contribution of these quantities from protons, neutrons, and high Z particles. There are two separate flight instruments, one for the Orbiter and one for the Lander, based on a common design of the backplane, the central processing unit (CPU), power supply, and onboard data storage. The Orbiter instrument consists of an energetic particle spectrometer that can measure

  5. Slot Region Radiation Environment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Ingmar; Daglis, Ioannis; Heynderickx, Daniel; Evans, Hugh; Nieminen, Petteri

    2013-04-01

    Herein we present the main characteristics and first results of the Slot Region Radiation Environment Models (SRREMs) project. The statistical models developed in SRREMs aim to address the variability of trapped electron and proton fluxes in the region between the inner and the outer electron radiation belt. The energetic charged particle fluxes in the slot region are highly dynamic and are known to vary by several orders of magnitude on both short and long timescales. During quiet times, the particle fluxes are much lower than those found at the peak of the inner and outer belts and the region is considered benign. During geospace magnetic storms, though, this region can fill with energetic particles as the peak of the outer belt is pushed Earthwards and the fluxes can increase drastically. There has been a renewed interest in the potential operation of commercial satellites in orbits that are at least partially contained within the Slot Region. Hence, there is a need to improve the current radiation belt models, most of which do not model the extreme variability of the slot region and instead provide long-term averages between the better-known low and medium Earth orbits (LEO and MEO). The statistical models developed in the SRREMs project are based on the analysis of a large volume of available data and on the construction of a virtual database of slot region particle fluxes. The analysis that we have followed retains the long-term temporal, spatial and spectral variations in electron and proton fluxes as well as the short-term enhancement events at altitudes and inclinations relevant for satellites in the slot region. A large number of datasets have been used for the construction, evaluation and inter-calibration of the SRREMs virtual dataset. Special emphasis has been given on the use and analysis of ESA Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) data from the units on-board PROBA-1, INTEGRAL, and GIOVE-B due to the sufficient spatial and long temporal

  6. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B.; Yazzie, A.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T.; Leavitt, C.P.

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  7. The space radiation environment for electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Raymond, J.P.

    1988-11-01

    The earth's space radiation environment is described in terms of charged particles as relevant to effects on spacecraft electronics. The nature and magnitude of the trapped and transiting environments are described in terms of spatial distribution and temporal variation. The internal radiation environment of the spacecraft is described in terms of shielding the high-energy particles of the free-field environment. Exposure levels are presented in terms of ionizing radiation dose and particle fluence for comparison to electronic component susceptibility.

  8. Radiation beam therapy evolution: From X-rays to hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2006-10-15

    The history of external radiation beam therapy (radiotherapy)-in particular, proton therapy (PT)-is brietly outlined. Two possible strategies in increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy are considered. The radiotherapy methods and techniques are brietly described. The possibilities of PT in providing effective treatment and the main achievements are demonstrated. The state of the art in the PT development involving the active creation of large clinical PT centers since 1990 is analyzed.

  9. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Frazier, Donald O.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Environmental Modeling is crucial to proper predictive modeling and electronic response to the radiation environment. When compared to on-orbit data, CREME96 has been shown to be inaccurate in predicting the radiation environment. The NEDD bases much of its radiation environment data on CREME96 output. Close coordination and partnership with DoD radiation-hardened efforts will result in leveraged - not duplicated or independently developed - technology capabilities of: a) Radiation-hardened, reconfigurable FPGA-based electronics; and b) High Performance Processors (NOT duplication or independent development).

  10. Hadronic Contributions to R and G-2 from Initial-State-Radiation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Denis, 1; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2012-04-06

    I review the recent efforts to improve the precision of the prediction of the anomalous moment of the muon, in particular of the hadronic contribution of the vacuum polarization, which is the contribution with the largest uncertainty. Focus is given to the recent result for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by the BaBar collaboration, obtained using events with radiation in the initial state.

  11. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-18

    We observed the collective behavior of hadronic particles in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In our work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, the thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2–3 in 0%–1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermalmore » photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.« less

  12. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p +Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-01

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low pT direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p +Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  13. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems. PMID:26943529

  14. Overview of the Martian radiation environment experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K.; Pinsky, L.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation presents a hazard to astronauts, particularly those journeying outside the protective influence of the geomagnetosphere. Crews on future missions to Mars will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of deep space during the transit between Earth and Mars. Once on Mars, they will encounter radiation that is only slightly reduced, compared to free space, by the thin Martian atmosphere. NASA is obliged to minimize, where possible, the radiation exposures received by astronauts. Thus, as a precursor to eventual human exploration, it is necessary to measure the Martian radiation environment in detail. The MARIE experiment, aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, is returning the first data that bear directly on this problem. Here we provide an overview of the experiment, including introductory material on space radiation and radiation dosimetry, a description of the detector, model predictions of the radiation environment at Mars, and preliminary dose-rate data obtained at Mars. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Overview of the Martian radiation environment experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.F.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K.T.; Pinsky, L.S.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2004-12-01

    Space radiation presents a hazard to astronauts, particularly those journeying outside the protective influence of the geomagnetosphere. Crews on future missions to Mars will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of deep space during the transit between Earth and Mars. Once on Mars, they will encounter radiation that is only slightly reduced, compared to free space, by the thin Martian atmosphere. NASA is obliged to minimize, where possible, the radiation exposures received by astronauts. Thus, as a precursor to eventual human exploration, it is necessary to measure the Martian radiation environment in detail. The MARIE experiment, aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, is returning the first data that bear directly on this problem. Here we provide an overview of the experiment, including introductory material on space radiation and radiation dosimetry, a description of the detector, model predictions of the radiation environment at Mars, and preliminary dose-rate data obtained at Mars.

  16. Overview of the Martian radiation environment experiment.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Cleghorn, T; Cucinotta, F; Saganti, P; Andersen, V; Lee, K; Pinsky, L; Atwell, W; Turner, R; Badhwar, G

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation presents a hazard to astronauts, particularly those journeying outside the protective influence of the geomagnetosphere. Crews on future missions to Mars will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of deep space during the transit between Earth and Mars. Once on Mars, they will encounter radiation that is only slightly reduced, compared to free space, by the thin Martian atmosphere. NASA is obliged to minimize, where possible, the radiation exposures received by astronauts. Thus, as a precursor to eventual human exploration, it is necessary to measure the Martian radiation environment in detail. The MARIE experiment, aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, is returning the first data that bear directly on this problem. Here we provide an overview of the experiment, including introductory material on space radiation and radiation dosimetry, a description of the detector, model predictions of the radiation environment at Mars, and preliminary dose-rate data obtained at Mars. PMID:15791732

  17. The Near-Earth Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the effects of the Near-Earth space radiation environment on NASA missions. Included in this presentation is a review of The Earth s Trapped Radiation Environment, Solar Particle Events, Galactic Cosmic Rays and Comparison to Accelerator Facilities.

  18. Space, Atmospheric, and Terrestrial Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Dyer, C. S.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    2003-01-01

    The progress on developing models of the radiation environment since the 1960s is reviewed with emphasis on models that can be applied to predicting the performance of microelectronics used in spacecraft and instruments. Space, atmospheric, and ground environments are included. It is shown that models must be adapted continually to account for increased understanding of the dynamics of the radiation environment and the changes in microelectronics technology. The IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference is a vital forum to report model progress to the radiation effects research community.

  19. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches.

  20. Manned Mars mission radiation environment and radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtwey, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Potential radiation hazards to crew members on manned Mars missions are discussed. It deals briefly with radiation sources and environments likely to be encountered during various phases of such missions, providing quantitative estimates of these environments. Also provided are quantitative data and discussions on the implications of such radiation on the human body. Various sorts of protective measures are suggested. Recent re-evaluation of allowable dose limits by the National Council of Radiation Protection is discussed, and potential implications from such activity are assessed.

  1. Chemical freeze-out in Hawking-Unruh radiation and quark-hadron transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Yassin, Hayam; Elyazeed, Eman R. Abo

    2015-10-01

    The proposed analogy between hadron production in high-energy collisions and Hawking-Unruh radiation process in the black holes shall be extended. This mechanism provides a theoretical basis for the freeze-out parameters, the temperature (T ), and the baryon chemical potential (μ ), characterizing the final state of particle production. The results from charged black holes, in which the electric charge is related to μ , are found comparable with the phenomenologically deduced parameters from the ratios of various particle species and the higher-order moments of net-proton multiplicity in thermal statistical models and Polyakov linear-sigma model. Furthermore, the resulting freeze-out condition ⟨E ⟩/⟨N ⟩≃1 GeV for average energy per particle is in good agreement with the hadronization process in the high-energy experiments. For the entropy density (s ), the freeze-out condition s /T3≃7 is found at μ ≲0.3 GeV . Then, due to the dependence of T on μ , the values of s /T3 increase with increasing μ . In accordance with this observation, we found that the entropy density (s ) remains constant with increasing μ . Thus, we conclude that almost no information is going lost through Hawking-Unruh radiation from charged black holes. It is worthwhile to highlight that the freeze-out temperature from charged black holes is determined independent on both freeze-out conditions.

  2. Radiation environment models and the atmospheric cutoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, Andrei; Hardy, Alva C.; Atwell, William

    1987-01-01

    The limitations of radiation environment models are examined by applying the model to the South Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The local magnetic-field-intensity (in gauss) and McIlwain (1961) drift-shell-parameter contours in the SAA are analyzed. It is noted that it is necessary to decouple the atmospheric absorption effects from the trapped radiation models in order to obtain accurate radiation dose predictions. Two methods for obtaining more accurate results are proposed.

  3. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  4. Search for Hadronic Decays of a Light Higgs Boson in the Radiative Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.

    2012-02-16

    The authors search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) produced in radiative decays of an {Upsilon}(2S) or {Upsilon}(3S) meson, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}. The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) center of mass energies, and include (121.3 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and (98.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions {beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) {center_dot} {beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) (n = 2 or 3) that range from 1 x 10{sup -6} for an A{sup 0} mass of 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} to 8 x 10{sup -5} at 7 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Antenna subtraction at NNLO with hadronic initial states : double real radiation for initial-initial configurations with two quark flavours.

    SciTech Connect

    Boughezal, R.; Gehrmann-De Ridder, A.; Ritzmann, M.

    2011-02-01

    The antenna subtraction formalism allows to calculate QCD corrections to jet observables. Within this formalism, the subtraction terms are constructed using antenna functions describing all unresolved radiation between a pair of hard radiator partons. In this paper, we focus on the subtraction terms for double real radiation contributions to jet observables in hadron-hadron collisions evaluated at NNLO. An essential ingredient to these subtraction terms are the four-parton antenna functions with both radiators in the initial state. We outline the construction of the double real subtraction terms, classify all relevant antenna functions and describe their integration over the relevant antenna phase space. For the initial-initial antenna functions with two quark flavours, we derive the phase space master integrals and obtain the integrated antennae.

  6. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Koller, Josef; Tokar, Robert L; Chen, Yue; Henderson, Michael G; Friedel, Reiner H

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  7. Modelling the martian cosmic radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, L. R.; Desorgher, L.; Ward, J. M.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    The martian surface is no longer protected by a global magnetic field or substantial atmosphere and so is essentially unshielded to the flux of cosmic rays. This creates an ionising radiation field on the surface and subsurface that is hazardous to life and the operation of spacecraft instruments. Here we report the modelling approach used to characterise this complex and time-variable radiation environment and discuss the wider applications of the results generated.

  8. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B. ||

    1993-12-31

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  9. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  10. Radiation and Plasma Environments for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Diekmann, Anne M.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Harine, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    Space system design for lunar orbit and extended operations on the lunar surface requires analysis of potential system vulnerabilities to plasma and radiation environments to minimize anomalies and assure that environmental failures do not occur during the mission. Individual environments include the trapped particles in Earth s radiation belts, solar energetic particles and galactic cosmic rays, plasma environments encountered in transit to the moon and on the lunar surface (solar wind, terrestrial magnetosheath and magnetotail, and lunar photoelectrons), and solar ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet photons. These are the plasma and radiation environments which contribute to a variety of effects on space systems including total ionizing dose and dose rate effects in electronics, degradation of materials in the space environment, and charging of spacecraft and lunar dust. This paper provides a survey of the relevant charged particle and photon environments of importance to lunar mission design ranging from the lowest (approx.few 10 s eV) photoelectron energies to the highest (approx.GeV) cosmic ray energies.

  11. Nuclear medicine and the environment: radiation interactions.

    PubMed

    Schmelter, R F

    1986-04-01

    The effect of radiation interactions on the environment may be considered from the perspective of the purely physical phenomena occurring or from the effects the interactions produce in organized biological systems. The physical processes by which radiation interacts with the environment are quite well defined. Although these processes differ depending upon the nature (either electromagnetic or particulate) of the primary radiation, the ultimate result is the production in the medium of high-speed, secondary charged particles. Some of the energy of these particles is absorbed by the medium, while a portion may be lost as bremsstrahlung. The energy that is absorbed produces excitation and ionization, which can be disruptive to biological systems. The effects produced by ionizing radiations at the biochemical, cellular, and organ level are less well defined. Nevertheless, available data indicate that certain generalizations are possible. For example, given the ubiquitous nature of water in tissues, macromolecules, regardless of their structural types, tend to serve as acceptors of the energy and products of water radiolysis. However, a deeper insight into the consequences of irradiation requires an understanding of the interplay of such parameters as the type and energy of the radiation, and the dose and rate of its application. Furthermore, at the cellular level, the type and age of the irradiated cells, the concentration of oxygen in their environment, and their cell-cycle phase are all important factors in determining the consequences of irradiation. PMID:3515567

  12. Radiation Protection Quantities for Near Earth Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, John E.

    2004-01-01

    As humans travel beyond the protection of the Earth's magnetic field and mission durations grow, risk due to radiation exposure will increase and may become the limiting factor for such missions. Here, the dosimetric quantities recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) for the evaluation of health risk due to radiation exposure, effective dose and gray-equivalent to eyes, skin, and blood forming organs (BFO), are calculated for several near Earth environments. These radiation protection quantities are evaluated behind two different shielding materials, aluminum and polyethylene. Since exposure limits for missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) have not yet been defined, results are compared to limits recommended by the NCRP for LEO operations.

  13. MSL-RAD radiation environment measurements.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Hassler, Donald M; Ehresmann, Bent; Köhler, Jan; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David; Burmeister, Sönke; Cucinotta, Francis; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-09-01

    In this study, results are presented from the on-board radiation assessment detector (RAD) of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). RAD is designed to measure the energetic particle radiation environment, which consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) as well as secondary particles created by nuclear interactions of primary particles in the shielding (during cruise) or Martian soil and atmosphere (surface measurements). During the cruise, RAD collected data on space radiation from inside the craft, thus allowing for a reasonable estimation of what a human crew travelling to/from Mars might be exposed to. On the surface of Mars, RAD is shielded by the atmosphere (from above) and the planet itself (from below). RAD measures the first detailed radiation data from the surface of another planet, and they are highly relevant for planning future crewed missions. The results for radiation dose and dose equivalent (a quantity most directly related to human health risk) are presented during the cruise phase, as well as on the Martian surface. Dose and dose equivalent are dominated by the continuous GCR radiation, but several SEP events were also detected and are discussed here. PMID:25969529

  14. Radiation exposure in the moon environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    During a stay on the moon humans are exposed to elevated radiation levels due to the lack of substantial atmospheric and magnetic shielding compared to the Earth's surface. The absence of magnetic and atmospheric shielding allows cosmic rays of all energies to impinge on the lunar surface. Beside the continuous exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which increases the risk of cancer mortality, exposure through particles emitted in sudden nonpredictable solar particle events (SPE) may occur. SPEs show an enormous variability in particle flux and energy spectra and have the potential to expose space crew to life threatening doses. On Earth, the contribution to the annual terrestrial dose of natural ionizing radiation of 2.4 mSv by cosmic radiation is about 1/6, whereas the annual exposure caused by GCR on the lunar surface is roughly 380 mSv (solar minimum) and 110 mSv (solar maximum). The analysis of worst case scenarios has indicated that SPE may lead to an exposure of about 1 Sv. The only efficient measure to reduce radiation exposure is the provision of radiation shelters. Measurements on the lunar surface performed during the Apollo missions cover only a small energy band for thermal neutrons and are not sufficient to estimate the exposure. Very recently some data were added by the Radiation Dose Monitoring (RADOM) instrument operated during the Indian Chandrayaan Mission and the Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRaTER) instrument of the NASA LRO (Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter) mission. These measurements need to be complemented by surface measurements. Models and simulations that exist describe the approximate radiation exposure in space and on the lunar surface. The knowledge on the radiation exposure at the lunar surface is exclusively based on calculations applying radiation transport codes in combination with environmental models. Own calculations are presented using Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the radiation environment on the moon and organ doses on the

  15. Europa Surface Radiation Environment for Lander Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The Jovian magnetospheric particle environment at Europa's surface is critical to assessment of landed astrobiological experiments in three respects: (1) the landing site must be chosen for the best prospects for detectable organic or inorganic signs of Life, e.g. regions of freshly emergent flows from the subsurface; (2) lander systems must reach the surface through the Jovian magnetospheric environment and operate long enough on the surface to return useful data; (3) lander instrumentation must be capable of detecting signs of life in the context of the local environmental radiation and associated chemistry. The Galileo, Voyager, and Pioneer missions have provided a wealth of data on energetic particle intensities throughout the Jovian magnetosphere including from many flybys of Europa. cumulative radiation dosages for spacecraft enroute to Europa can be well characterized, but knowledge of the surface radiation environment is very limited. Energetic electrons should primarily impact the trailing hemisphere with decreasing intensity towards the center of the leading hemisphere and are the most significant radiation component down to meter depths in the surface regolith due to secondary interactions. Observed surface distribution for sulfates is suggestive of electron irradiation but may have alternative interpretations. Having much-larger magnetic gyroradii than electrons, energetic protons and heavier ions irradiate more of the global surface. The particular orientations of electron, proton, and ion gyromotion would project into corresponding directional (e.g., east-west) anisotropies of particle flu into the surface. Particular topographic features at the landing site may therefore offer shielding from part of the incident radiation.

  16. Ionizing Radiation Environments and Exposure Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are simulated to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, near-Earth asteroid, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmospheres of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut's body tissues using NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. Space radiation protection methods, which are derived largely from ground-based methods recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) or International Commission on Radiological Protections (ICRP), are built on the principles of risk justification, limitation, and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). However, because of the large uncertainties in high charge and energy (HZE) particle radiobiology and the small population of space crews, NASA develops distinct methods to implement a space radiation protection program. For the fatal cancer risks, which have been considered the dominant risk for GCR, the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model has been developed from recommendations by NCRP; and undergone external review by the National Research Council (NRC), NCRP, and through peer-review publications. The NSCR model uses GCR environmental models, particle transport codes describing the GCR modification by atomic and nuclear interactions in atmospheric shielding coupled with spacecraft and tissue shielding, and NASA-defined quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates for HZE particles. By implementing the NSCR model, the exposure risks from various heliospheric conditions are assessed for the radiation environments for various-class mission types to understand architectures and strategies of human exploration missions and ultimately to contribute to the optimization of radiation safety and well-being of space crewmembers participating in long-term space missions.

  17. Updating the Jovian Proton Radiation Environment - 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Since publication in 1983 by N. Divine and H. Garrett, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's plasma and radiation models have been the design standard for NASA's missions to Jupiter. These models consist of representations of the cold plasma and electrons, the warm and auroral electrons and protons, and the radiation environment (electron, proton, and heavy ions). To date, however, the high-energy proton model has been limited to an L-shell of 12. With the requirement to compute the effects of the high energy protons and other heavy ions on the proposed Europa mission, the extension of the high energy proton model from approximately 12 L-shell to approximately 50 L-shell has become necessary. In particular, a model of the proton environment over that range is required to estimate radiation effects on the solar arrays for the mission. This study describes both the steps taken to extend the original Divine proton model out to an approximately 50 L-shell and the resulting model developed to accomplish that goal. In addition to hydrogen, the oxygen, sulfur, and helium heavy ion environments have also been added between approximately 6 L-shell and approximately 50 L-shell. Finally, selected examples of the model's predictions are presented to illustrate the uses of the tool.

  18. MSL-RAD Radiation Environment Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Brinza, David; Burmeister, Soenke; Cucinotta, Francis; Ehresmann, Bent; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Guenther; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    We present results from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) obtained during MSL's cruise to Mars and during the first 150 sols after Curiosity's successful landing. RAD is designed to measure the energetic particle environment, which consists of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), and the secondary particles created by nuclear interactions of primary GCRs in shielding. During cruise, RAD was asymmetrically shielded inside the spacecraft. On the surface, RAD is shielded by the atmosphere, and the radiation dose rate is seen to vary slightly as the column depth of the atmosphere varies on a diurnal cycle. RAD's cruise measurements are a unique data set that provide a reasonable simulation of what might be encountered by a human crew headed for Mars or for some other destination in deep space. RAD successfully operated for 220 days of the 253 day journey to Mars. RAD has also operated stably on the surface of Mars, returning the first detailed radiation data from the surface of another planet. The data from the surface are also highly relevant for planning future crewed missions. We will present results for radiation dose and dose equivalent (the quantity most directly related to human health risk) obtained with both cruise and surface data. Dose and dose equivalent are dominated by the continuous GCR radiation, but five significant SEP events were seen during cruise and will be discussed.

  19. Radiation resistence of microorganisms from radiation sterilization processing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabovljev, Svetlana A.; Žunić, Zora S.

    The radiation resistance of microorganisms was examined on the samples of dust collected from the radiation sterilization processing environments including assembly, storage, and sterilization plant areas. The isolation of radiation resistant strains was performed by irradiation with screening doses ranging from 10 to 35 kGy and test pieces containing 10 6 to 10 8 CFU in dried serum-broth, representing 100 to 5000 colonies of primary cultures of microorganisms from 7 different sites. In an examination of 16900 colonies of aerobic microorganisms from 3 hygienically controlled production sites and 4 uncontrolled ones, 30 strains of bacteria were isolated. Of those 15 were classified as genus Bacillus, 9 as Micrococcus and 6 as Sarcina. All of the 15 strains of Gram positive sporeforming aerobic rods exhibited an exponential decrease in the surviving fraction as a function of dose, indicating that the inactivation of spores of aerobic rods is a consequence of a single energy deposition into the target. All strains were found to be moderately resistant to radiation with D-6 values (dose required to reduce survival to 6 log cycles) between 18 and 26 kGy. All of the isolated Gram positive cocci showed inactivation curves having a shoulder, indicating that different processes are involved in the inactivation of these cells, e.g. accumulation of sublethal lesions, or final repair capacity of potential lethal lesions. Moderate radiation resistance was observed in 13 strains with D-6 values between 16 to 30 kGy. Two slow-growing, red pigmented strains tentatively classified as genus Micrococcus isolated from uncontrolled sites (human dwellings) were exceptionally resistant with D-6 more than 45 kGy. For hygienically controlled sites, Gram positive spereforming rods composed two thirds of the resistant microflora, while Gram positive cocci comprised one third. For hygienically uncontrolled sites this ratio was reversed. An assumption is made that one isolated strain has grown

  20. Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model: DREAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Cunningham, G. S.; Friedel, R. W. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; Koller, J.; Morley, S. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Zaharia, S.

    2012-03-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed to provide accurate, global specification of the Earth's radiation belts and to better understand the physical processes that control radiation belt structure and dynamics. DREAM is designed using a modular software approach in order to provide a computational framework that makes it easy to change components such as the global magnetic field model, radiation belt dynamics model, boundary conditions, etc. This paper provides a broad overview of the DREAM model and a summary of some of the principal results to date. We describe the structure of the DREAM model, describe the five major components, and illustrate the various options that are available for each component. We discuss how the data assimilation is performed and the data preprocessing and postprocessing that are required for producing the final DREAM outputs. We describe how we apply global magnetic field models for conversion between flux and phase space density and, in particular, the benefits of using a self-consistent, coupled ring current-magnetic field model. We discuss some of the results from DREAM including testing of boundary condition assumptions and effects of adding a source term to radial diffusion models. We also describe some of the testing and validation of DREAM and prospects for future development.

  1. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  2. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1991-10-01

    This lecture will provide a bridge from the physical energy or LET spectra as might be calculated in an organ to the risk of carcinogenesis, a particular concern for extended missions to the moon or beyond to Mars. Topics covered will include (1) LET spectra expected from galactic cosmic rays, (2) probabilities that individual cell nuclei in the body will be hit by heavy galactic cosmic ray particles, (3) the conventional methods of calculating risks from a mixed environment of high and low LET radiation, (4) an alternate method which provides certain advantages using fluence-related risk coefficients (risk cross sections), and (5) directions for future research and development of these ideas.

  3. LOFAR's Potential to Characterize Jupiter's Radiation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.

    2008-09-01

    Jupiter is a strong source of radio emissions, as discovered in the early 1950s (Burke and Franklin, 1955). These first detections revealed emissions that were sporadic in character, and confined to frequencies less than 40 MHz. This component of the planet's radio emission is commonly referred to as decametric (DAM) radiation, and is attributed to electron cyclotron maser emission, emitted by keV electrons in Jupiter's auroral regions. All four giant planets and the Earth emit such radiation. To date these emissions have been studied in the timefrequency domain, since it has not been possible to image at these low frequencies. A new Low Frequency Array, LOFAR, is momentarily being build in the Netherlands. It consists of a low (~30-80 MHz) and high (~120-240 MHz) frequency band, with baselines between 100 m up to 100 km. By connecting (VLBI) with the Nancay radio telescope, baselines of 700 km can be achieved. This telescope complements the VLA (Very large Array) and ATA (Allen Telescope Array) in frequency coverage, and using the combined arrays (quasi)- simultaneously, Jupiter's radiation environment can be mapped from about 20 MHz (the low LOFAR band is still sensitive below 30 MHz, but with reduced through-put) up to 20 GHz. Jupiter emits both synchrotron and coherent cyclotron radiation at low frequencies (e.g., de Pater 2004; Zarka, 2004). Synchrotron radiation is emitted by relativistic electrons (MeV) trapped in Jupiter's radiation belts; this component of the emission has been imaged regularly at higher (> 300 MHz) frequencies. Simultaneous high resolution imaging at low frequencies will help identify the origin and mode of transport of the synchrotron radiating electrons, including their source and loss terms. At frequencies below 40 MHz LOFAR could, for the first time ever, image Jupiter's decametric (DAM) emissions. These emissions have been observed since the early 1950's, and are characterized by complex, highly organized structures in the frequency

  4. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  5. Astrophysical radiation environments of habitable worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Samuel

    Numerous astrophysical sources of radiation affect the environment of planets orbiting within the liquid-water habitable zone of main-sequence stars. This dissertation reaches a number of conclusions about the ionizing radiation environment of the habitable zone with respect to X-rays and gamma-rays from stellar flares and background Galactic cosmic rays. Gamma-rays and X-rays incident on terrestrial-like exoplanet atmospheres can be efficiently reprocessed into diffuse UV emission that, depending on the presence of atmospheric UV absorbers, can reach the surface. Extreme solar X-ray flares over the last 4.6 Gyr could have delivered large enough radiation doses to the Martian surface to sterilize any unprotected organisms, depending on the largest energy releases possible. These flares also pose a significant hazard to manned space missions, since a large flare can occur with little or no warning during an extravehicular activity. A flare as large as the largest observed could deliver radiation doses exceeding safety limits to an astronaut protected by only a spacesuit. With respect to particle radiation, the nature of Galactic cosmic-ray modulation by astrospheres means that habitable-zone cosmic-ray fluxes change by much larger magnitudes when passing through low- densities regions of the interstellar medium. In contrast to the popular idea that passages through dense molecular clouds are required to significantly enhance Galactic cosmic-ray fluxes and affect planets' electrical circuits, background mutation rates, and climates, we find that densities of only 0.1-10 cm -3 , the densities of most interstellar clouds, are sufficient to bring fluxes close to the full, interstellar level. Finally, passages through dense molecular clouds are necessary to shrink astrospheres to within the habitable zone, but such events produce even higher interstellar hydrogen and dust accretion rates than have been estimated because of the combination of enhanced charge

  6. Review of radiation hardening techniques for EDFAs in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Tian, CuiPing; Wang, YingYing; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-01

    The damage mechanism and test technology of space radiation environment to space equipment was classified and the radiation protection demand of active fiber for space application was analyzed. The radiation hardening techniques of Ce doping, hydrogen loading and pre-radiation exposure and thermal annealing for Er:Yb co-doped fiber was surveyed.

  7. The Near-Earth Space Radiation for Electronics Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; LaBel, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    The earth's space radiation environment is described in terms of: a) charged particles as relevant to effects on spacecraft electronics, b) the nature and distribution of trapped and transiting radiation, and c) their effect on electronic components.

  8. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-11-20

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  9. HADRON ACCELERATORS: Study on CYCIAE-100 radiation field and residual radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuan-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Jue; Jia, Xian-Lu; Zhou, Zheng-He; Wang, Feng; Wei, Su-Min; Zhong, Jun-Qing; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    The accelerators should be properly designed to make the radiation field produced by beam loss satisfy the dose limits. The radiation field for high intensity H- cyclotron includes prompt radiation and residual radiation field. The induced radioactivity in accelerator components is the dominant source of occupational radiation exposure if the accelerator is well shielded. The source of radiation is the beam loss when cyclotron is operating. In this paper, the radiation field for CYCIAE-100 is calculated using Monte Carlo method and the radioactive contamination near stripping foil is studied. A method to reduce the dose equivalent rate of maintenance staff is also given.

  10. Renormdynamics and Hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2016-01-01

    Independently radiating valence quarks and corresponding negative binomial distribution presents phenomenologically preferable mechanism of hadronization in multiparticle production processes. Main properties of the renormdynamics, corresponding motion equations and their solutions are considered.

  11. Measurements of the radiation environment on the APEX satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.J.; Dyer, C.S.; Watson, C.J.; Peerless, C.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Cosmic Radiation Environment and Dosimetry experiment was built to accompany the CRUX (Cosmic Ray Upset) experiment on the USAF APEX satellite, launched in August 1994. Results of measurements of the space radiation environment are presented here while a companion paper presents CRUX measurements of upsets correlated with proton flux.

  12. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Johnson, Michael; Cressler, John D.

    2008-01-01

    This conference poster explores NASA's Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments project. This project aims to advance the state of the art in high performance, radiation-hardened electronics that enable the long-term, reliable operation of a spacecraft in extreme radiation and temperature of space and the lunar surface.

  13. Hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  14. The charged particle radiation environment for AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be subjected to several sources of charged particle radiation during its 15-year orbital lifetime: geomagnetically-trapped electrons and protons, galactic cosmic ray particles, and solar flare events. These radiation levels are presented for the AXAF orbit for use in the design of the observatory's science instruments.

  15. Technology Developments in Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Howell, Joe T.

    2008-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS, Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches. System level applications for the RHESE technology products are discussed.

  16. RADECS Short Course Session I: The Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael; Bourdarie, Sebastien

    2007-01-01

    The presented slides and accompanying paper focus on radiation in the space environment. Since space exploration has begun it has become evident that the space environment is a highly aggressive medium. Beyond the natural protection provided by the Earth's atmosphere, various types of radiation can be encountered. Their characteristics (energy and nature), origins and distributions in space are extremely variable. This environment degrades electronic systems and on-board equipment in particular and creates radiobiological hazards during manned space flights. Based on several years of space exploration, a detailed analysis of the problems on satellites shows that the part due to the space environment is not negligible. It appears that the malfunctions are due to problems linked to the space environment, electronic problems, design problems, quality problems, other issues, and unexplained reasons. The space environment is largely responsible for about 20% of the anomalies occurring on satellites and a better knowledge of that environment could only increase the average lifetime of space vehicles. This naturally leads to a detailed study of the space environment and of the effects that it induces on space vehicles and astronauts. Sources of radiation in the space environment are discussed here and include the solar activity cycle, galactic cosmic rays, solar particle events, and Earth radiation belts. Future challenges for space radiation environment models are briefly addressed.

  17. Overview of Radiation Environments and Human Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposures to ionizing radiation have been vastly altered by developing technology in the last century. This has been most obvious in the development of radiation generating devices and the utilization of nuclear energy. But even air travel has had its impact on human exposure. Human exposure increases with advancing aircraft technology as a result of the higher operating altitudes reducing the protective cover provided by the Earth s atmosphere from extraterrestrial radiations. This increase in operating altitudes is taken to a limit by human operations in space. Less obvious is the changing character of the radiations at higher altitudes. The associated health risks are less understood with increasing altitude due to the increasing complexity and new field components found in high altitude and space operations.

  18. Overview of radiation environments and human exposures.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J W

    2000-11-01

    Human exposures to ionizing radiation have been vastly altered by developing technology in the last century. This has been most obvious in the development of radiation generating devices and the utilization of nuclear energy. But even air travel has had its impact on human exposure. Human exposure increases with advancing aircraft technology as a result of the higher operating altitudes reducing the protective cover provided by Earth's atmosphere from extraterrestrial radiations. This increase in operating altitudes is taken to a limit by human operations in space. Less obvious is the changing character of the radiations at higher altitudes. The associated health risks are less understood with increasing altitude due to the increasing complexity and new field components found in high-altitude and space operations. PMID:11045522

  19. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-09-14

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions.

  20. ERTS/Nimbus radiation environment information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the ERTS/Nimbus satellite investigation of electron flux levels are presented. Flux calculations were made with the use of two electron environment models, both of which are static and describe the environment during the solar maximum conditions of October 1967. It is concluded that the construction of these models makes it possible to infer a change of the average quiet time electron flux levels as a function of the solar cycle.

  1. Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

    1998-05-01

    The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

  2. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  3. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  4. Pion-to-proton ratio for unaccompanied high-energy cosmic-ray hadrons at mountain altitude using transition-radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A. S.; MacFall, J. R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Viswanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.

    1983-05-01

    A transition-radiation (TR) detector, consisting of 24 modules of styrofoam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers, and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the pion-to-proton ratio among the unaccompanied cosmic-ray hadrons at a mountain altitude of 730 g cm-2. Using the characteristics of the TR detector obtained from calibrations with particle beams at accelerators, the πp ratio has been determined for cosmic-ray hadrons as πp=0.96+/-0.15 for hadron energy = 400-800 GeV, and πp=0.45+/-0.25 for energy > 800 GeV. Monte Carlo simulations of hadron cascades in the atmosphere using the approximate criterion of unaccompaniment suggest that the observed πp ratio as well as the previously reported neutral-to-charge ratio can be understood by assuming a value of about 13 for the charge exchange in nucleon-air-nucleus inelastic interactions at energies above 400 GeV.

  5. Pion-to-proton ratio for unaccompanied high-energy cosmic-ray hadrons at mountain altitude using transition-radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, R.W.; Ito, A.S.; MacFall, J.R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Tonwar, S.C.; Viswanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    A transition-radiation (TR) detector, consisting of 24 modules of styrofoam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers, and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the pion-to-proton ratio among the unaccompanied cosmic-ray hadrons at a mountain altitude of 730 g cm/sup -2/. Using the characteristics of the TR detector obtained from calibrations with particle beams at accelerators, the ..pi../p ratio has been determined for cosmic-ray hadrons as ..pi../p = 0.96 +- 0.15 for hadron energy = 400--800 GeV, and ..pi../p = 0.45 +- 0.25 for energy >800 GeV. Monte Carlo simulations of hadron cascades in the atmosphere using the approximate criterion of unaccompaniment suggest that the observed ..pi../p ratio as well as the previously reported neutral-to-charge ratio can be understood by assuming a value of about (1/3) for the charge exchange in nucleon--air-nucleus inelastic interactions at energies above 400 GeV.

  6. Measurement of Radiation Pressure in an Ambient Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Light has momentum and thus exerts ``radiation pressure'' when it is reflected or absorbed due to the conservation of momentum. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are suitable for measurement and utilization of radiation pressure due to their high sensitivities. However, other light-induced mechanical deformations such as photothermal effects often obscure accurate measurements of radiation pressure in these systems. In this work, we investigate the radiation pressure and photothermal force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever under illumination by a 660 nm laser in an ambient environment. To magnify the mechanical effects, the cantilever is driven optically from dc across its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and phase of its oscillation are acquired by an optical beam deflection method and a lockin amplifier. We show that radiation pressure and photothermal effects can be distinguished through the cantilever's frequency response. Furthermore, in a radiation pressure dominant regime, our measurement of the radiation force agrees quantitatively with the theoretical calculation.

  7. The Role of Radiation Feedback in Starburst Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Matzner, C. D.; Seaquist, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Massive bursts of stellar activity in starburst environments feed prodigious amount of energy and momentum into the surrounding neutral clouds. With sufficiently intense irradiation from starbursts, the structure of an HII region will be dominated by radiation pressure rather than ionized gas pressure, and radiative energy input in photodissociation regions (PDRs) becomes more important. This state is of considerable interest because of its role in the formation of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and the evolution of starburst galaxies. We study the role of radiation feedback in starburst environments via both theoretical and observational approaches. We argue that radiation pressure is the underlying mechanism for the remarkable constancy of ionization parameters in starburst environments. We also point out that clumping in the neutral material and compression by stellar wind pressure can act to reduce ionization parameters. We use the Cloudy code to determine effective ionization parameters for a population of static dusty HII regions compressed by both radiation pressure and stellar winds. We conclude that the inner starburst region of M82 and the Antennae Galaxies HII regions are both dominated by a combination of radiation pressure and shocked winds. We investigate radiative energy feedback in starburst environments by observing the nearest starburst region 30 Doradus in the LMC. We observe 30 Doradus using NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) with H2 1-0 S(1), Brγ, and [FeII] lines. While H2 can be either radiative or shock excited, the near infrared [FeII] emission line traces shock activities, and the hydrogen recombination line Brγ arises from regions ionized by UV radiation. Therefore ratios of the three emission lines form very useful diagnostics to assess the fraction of radiative and shock feedback. We preliminarily suggest that radiative energy input in the 30 Doradus PDRs is non-negligible.

  8. Radiative decay of {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} in a hadronic molecule picture

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yubing; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Kumano, S.

    2010-08-01

    The {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} baryon with quantum numbers J{sup P}=(1/2){sup +} is considered as a molecular state composed of a nucleon and D{sup *} meson. We give predictions for the width of the radiative decay process {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}(2286){sup +}+{gamma} in this interpretation. Based on our results we argue that an experimental determination of the radiative decay width of {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} is important for the understanding of its intrinsic properties.

  9. Evaluations of Risks from the Lunar and Mars Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Protecting astronauts from the space radiation environments requires accurate projections of radiation in future space missions. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) flux for the next solar cycle was estimated as a function of interplanetary deceleration potential, which has been derived from GCR flux and Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last 4 decades. For the chaotic nature of solar particle event (SPE) occurrence, the mean frequency of SPE at any given proton fluence threshold during a defined mission duration was obtained from a Poisson process model using proton fluence measurements of SPEs during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23). Analytic energy spectra of 34 historically large SPEs were constructed over broad energy ranges extending to GeV. Using an integrated space radiation model (which includes the transport codes HZETRN [1] and BRYNTRN [2], and the quantum nuclear interaction model QMSFRG[3]), the propagation and interaction properties of the energetic nucleons through various media were predicted. Risk assessment from GCR and SPE was evaluated at the specific organs inside a typical spacecraft using CAM [4] model. The representative risk level at each event size and their standard deviation were obtained from the analysis of 34 SPEs. Risks from different event sizes and their frequency of occurrences in a specified mission period were evaluated for the concern of acute health effects especially during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). The results will be useful for the development of an integrated strategy of optimizing radiation protection on the lunar and Mars missions. Keywords: Space Radiation Environments; Galactic Cosmic Radiation; Solar Particle Event; Radiation Risk; Risk

  10. Optimized Radiator Geometries for Hot Lunar Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The optimum radiator configuration in hot lunar thermal environments is one in which the radiator is parallel to the ground and has no view to the hot lunar surface. However, typical spacecraft configurations have limited real estate available for top-mounted radiators, resulting in a desire to use the spacecraft's vertically oriented sides. Vertically oriented, flat panel radiators will have a large view factor to the lunar surface, and thus will be subjected to significant incident lunar infrared heat. Consequently, radiator fluid temperatures will need to exceed approximately 325 K (assuming standard spacecraft radiator optical properties) in order to provide positive heat rejection at lunar noon. Such temperatures are too high for crewed spacecraft applications in which a heat pump is to be avoided. A recent study of vertically oriented radiator configurations subjected to lunar noon thermal environments led to the discovery of a novel radiator concept that yielded positive heat rejection at lower fluid temperatures. This radiator configuration, called the Intense Thermal Infrared Reflector (ITIR), has exhibited superior performance to all previously analyzed concepts in terms of heat rejection in the lunar noon thermal environment. A key benefit of ITIR is the absence of louvers or other moving parts and its simple geometry (no parabolic shapes). ITIR consists of a specularly reflective shielding surface and a diffuse radiating surface joined to form a horizontally oriented V-shape (shielding surface on top). The point of intersection of these surfaces is defined by two angles, those which define the tilt of each surface with respect to the local horizontal. The optimum set of these angles is determined on a case-by-case basis. The idea assumes minimal conductive heat transfer between shielding and radiating surfaces, and a practical design would likely stack sets of these surfaces on top of one another to reduce radiator thickness.

  11. Radiation environment at high-mountains stations and onboard spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Spurny, Frantisek; Ploc, Ondrej; Jadrmickova, Iva

    2008-08-07

    Radiation environment has been studied at high-mountain observatories and onboard spacecraft. The most important contribution to this environment at high-mountain observatories represents cosmic radiation component. We have been studied this environment in two high-mountain observatories: one situated on the top of Lomnicky Stit, High Tatras, Slovakia, and another one close to the top of Moussala, Rila, Bulgaria (Basic Environment Observatory--BEO). The studies have been performed using: an energy deposition spectrometer with a Si-diode (MDU) developed at BAS, Sofia, permitting to estimate non-neutron as well as neutron component of the radiation field; other active equipment designated to measure natural radiation background, and thermoluminescent detectors as passive dosimeters. Basic dosimetry characteristics of these fields are presented, analyzed, and discussed; they are also compared with the estimation of cosmic radiation component as published in the Report of UNSCEAR 2000. Measuring instruments mentioned above, together with an LET spectrometer based on chemically etched track detectors have been also used to characterize radiation environment onboard spacecraft, particularly International Space Station. They have been exposed on the surface and/or inside a phantom. Some of results obtained are presented, and discussed.

  12. QED Radiative Corrections to Asymmetries of Elastic ep-scattering in Hadronic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Ilyichev; Andrei Afanasev; Igor Akushevich; Mykola Merenkov

    2001-08-16

    Compact analytical formulae for QED radiative corrections in the processes of elastic e-p scattering are obtained in the case when kinematic variables are reconstructed from the recoil proton momentum measured. Numerical analysis is presented under kinematic conditions of current experiments at JLab.

  13. Designing Equipment for Use in Gamma Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-01-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems.

  14. Photosynthesis via Mineral Fluorescence in Harsh UV Radiation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, L. M.; Nealson, K.

    2005-12-01

    Before the development of a protective ozone layer about two billion years ago, the surface ultraviolet flux on Earth would have restricted ancient life to environments that offered some protection from direct solar radiation, such as the deep ocean or under or within rocks. In environments where the visible solar radiation would have been reduced to levels too low for photosynthesis, visible fluorescence resulting from UV irradiation of minerals may have provided a useable energy source. We are investigating the possibility that photosynthesis can occur without direct sunlight, if certain minerals are present that can absorb UV radiation and fluoresce in the visible. There are several common minerals(e.g. fluorite, calcite) that emit strong visible radiation under both short- and long-wave UV light, as well as some that only emit visible radiation under specific UV wavelengths. We will test a variety of minerals that fluoresce at wavelengths utilized by microbial chlorophylls and accessory pigments, and by simulating endolithic communities living under a few centimeters or millimeters of rock, we will measure the intensity of fluorescence and UV radiation received at various depths. We plan to simulate a variety of environments where the surface UV radiation may have a significant impact on the survival of life. These include the early Earth and present-day Mars(where the atmosphere would offer little to no protection against biologically damaging UV radiation), as well as extrasolar planets(a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone around an M-type star, for example, would be subject to an intense UV flux due to high flare activity). If mineral fluorescence proves to be a viable survival mechanism for photosynthetic organisms in harsh radiation environments, there are many implications for the study of ancient life on Earth as well as the search for life elsewhere.

  15. Organ-confined prostate carcinoma radiation brachytherapy compared with external either photon- or hadron-beam radiation therapy. Just a short up-to-date.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2011-07-01

    Both low dose rate (LDR) permanent either 1251 or 103Pd seed implant and high dose rate (HDR) 1921r temporary implant are an excellent way to release high dose of ionizing radiations to cancerous lesions while significantly sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, the radiation brachytherapy, among the established treatment options of organ-confined prostate carcinoma--interstitial radiofrequency, high intensity focused ultrasound, cryotherapy--has gained large acceptance in the last decades. The LDR permanent interstitial radioactive seed implantation is often used as monotherapy for low risk prostate carcinoma whereas the HDR temporary implant may useful to treat intermediate-to-high risk prostate tumors as a radiation boost to combined external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). On the other hand, with recent refinement of EBRT techniques--either three-dimensional conformal- or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, cyber-knife radiosurgery with even 4D-high resolution image-guided tracking--high doses of X-rays may be precisely delivered to prostate malignant lesions without increasing toxicity for surrounding normal structures. Also hadron therapy is an increasingly successful technique that allows the release of effective energy of protons (H+), neutrons or carbon ions (6(12)C) to the limited extent of the cancerous target site, thus destroying malignant lesion with millimetric precision--just as bloodless surgery--while less damaging the neighbouring healthy tissues. Looking to the near future, even more effective oncotherapy modality appears to be the use of antiprotons because of their highly confined energy deposition at well defined body dept around the annihilation point in contact with protons of the ordinary matter, so targeting only a very limited body volume. PMID:21780545

  16. Prediction of LDEF ionizing radiation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John W.; Parnell, T. A.; Derrickson, James H.; Armstrong, T. W.; Benton, E. V.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft flew in a 28.5 deg inclination circular orbit with an altitude in the range from 172 to 258.5 nautical miles. For this orbital altitude and inclination two components contribute most of the penetrating charge particle radiation encountered - the galactic cosmic rays and the geomagnetically trapped Van Allen protons. Where shielding is less than 1.0 g/sq cm geomagnetically trapped electrons make a significant contribution. The 'Vette' models together with the associated magnetic filed models were used to obtain the trapped electron and proton fluences. The mission proton doses were obtained from the fluence using the Burrell proton dose program. For the electron and bremsstrahlung dose we used the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electron dose program. The predicted doses were in general agreement with those measured with on-board thermoluminescent detector (TLD) dosimeters. The NRL package of programs, Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME), was used to calculate the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped protons for comparison with LDEF measurements.

  17. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Response of structural materials to radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1997-12-01

    An evaluation of proton and neutron damage to aluminum, stainless steel, nickel alloys, and various aluminum alloys has been performed. The proton studies were conducted at energies of 200 MeV, 800 MeV, and 23.5 GeV. The proton studies consisted of evaluation and characterization of proton-irradiated window/target materials from accelerators and comparison to nonirradiated archival materials. The materials evaluated for the proton irradiations included 99.9999 wt% aluminum, 1100 aluminum, 5052 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and inconel 718. The neutron damage research centered on 6061 T-6 aluminum which was obtained from a control-rod follower from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). This material had received thermal neutron fluence up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}. The possible effects of thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios are discussed. The increases in tensile strength in the proton-irradiated materials is shown to be the result of atomic displacements. These displacements cause interstitials and vacancies which aggregate into defect clusters which result in radiation hardening of the materials. Production of gas (helium) in the grain boundaries of proton irradiated 99.9999 wt% aluminum is also discussed. The major factor contributing to the mechanical-property changes in the neutron-irradiated 6061 T-6 aluminum is the production of transmutation products formed by interactions of the aluminum with thermal neutrons. The metallurgical and mechanical-property evaluations for the research consisted of electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), tensile testing, and microhardness testing.

  19. Radiation environment measurements on shuttle missions using the CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Sims, A. J.; Truscott, P. R.; Farren, J.; Underwood, C.

    1992-12-01

    The Cosmic Radiation Environment and Activation Monitor (CREAM) was successfully deployed in the middeck area on Shuttle missions STS-48 and STS-44 during September and November 1991 with the aim of monitoring those aspects of the primary and secondary radiation environment responsible for single event upsets in microelectronics and background noise in sensors. Results are compared with the outputs of standard radiation environment models. For the accurate location of trapped protons the choice of geomagnetic field model is shown to be critical, while results at high latitudes show the low-altitude manifestation of the new trapped proton belt observed to follow the March 1991 solar flare event. From deployment at a number of locations there is clear evidence for a significant build-up with shielding of secondary charged particles and neutrons.

  20. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  1. Radiation Environment Variations at Mars - Model Calculations and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar; Cucinotta, Francis

    Variations in the space radiation environment due to changes in the GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) from the past (#23) solar cycle to the current one (#24) has been intriguing in many ways, with an unprecedented long duration of the recent solar minimum condition and a very low peak activity of the current solar maximum. Model calculated radiation data and assessment of variations in the particle flux - protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions of the GCR environment is essential for understanding radiation risk and for any future intended long-duration human exploration missions. During the past solar cycle, we have had most active and higher solar maximum (2001-2003) condition. In the beginning of the current solar cycle (#24), we experienced a very long duration of solar minimum (2009-2011) condition with a lower peak activity (2013-2014). At Mars, radiation measurements in orbit were obtained (onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft) during the past (#23) solar maximum condition. Radiation measurements on the surface of Mars are being currently measured (onboard the Mars Science Laboratory, 2012 - Curiosity) during the current (#24) solar peak activity (August 2012 - present). We present our model calculated radiation environment at Mars during solar maxima for solar cycles #23 and #24. We compare our earlier model calculations (Cucinotta et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S35-S39, 2002; Saganti et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S119-S124, 2002; and Saganti et al., Space Science Reviews, 110, 143-156, 2004) with the most recent radiation measurements on the surface of Mars (2012 - present).

  2. Specialty fiber optic applications for harsh and high radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risch, Brian G.

    2015-05-01

    Since the first commercial introduction in the 1980s, optical fiber technology has undergone an almost exponential growth. Currently over 2 billion fiber kilometers are deployed globally with 2014 global optical fiber production exceeding 300 million fiber kilometers. 1 Along with the staggering growth in optical fiber production and deployment, an increase in optical fiber technologies and applications has also followed. Although the main use of optical fibers by far has been for traditional data transmission and communications, numerous new applications are introduced each year. Initially the practical application of optical fibers was limited by cost and sensitivity of the optical fibers to stress, radiation, and other environmental factors. Tremendous advances have taken place in optical fiber design and materials allowing optical fibers to be deployed in increasingly harsh environments with exposure to increased mechanical and environmental stresses while maintaining high reliability. With the increased reliability, lower cost, and greatly expanded range of optical fiber types now available, new optical fiber deployments in harsh and high radiation environments is seeing a tremendous increase for data, communications, and sensing applications. An overview of key optical fiber applications in data, communications, and sensing for harsh environments in industrial, energy exploration, energy generation, energy transmission, and high radiation applications will be presented. Specific recent advances in new radiation resistant optical fiber types, other specialty optical fibers, optical fiber coatings, and optical fiber cable materials will be discussed to illustrate long term reliability for deployment of optical fibers in harsh and high radiation environments.

  3. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  4. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yu, K Y; Liu, Y; Shao, S; Wang, H; Kirk, M A; Wang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  5. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  6. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  7. Radiation Environment Modeling for Spacecraft Design: New Model Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Xapsos, Mike; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Ladbury, Ray

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on various new space radiation environment models for spacecraft design is described. The topics include: 1) The Space Radiatio Environment; 2) Effects of Space Environments on Systems; 3) Space Radiatio Environment Model Use During Space Mission Development and Operations; 4) Space Radiation Hazards for Humans; 5) "Standard" Space Radiation Environment Models; 6) Concerns about Standard Models; 7) Inadequacies of Current Models; 8) Development of New Models; 9) New Model Developments: Proton Belt Models; 10) Coverage of New Proton Models; 11) Comparison of TPM-1, PSB97, AP-8; 12) New Model Developments: Electron Belt Models; 13) Coverage of New Electron Models; 14) Comparison of "Worst Case" POLE, CRESELE, and FLUMIC Models with the AE-8 Model; 15) New Model Developments: Galactic Cosmic Ray Model; 16) Comparison of NASA, MSU, CIT Models with ACE Instrument Data; 17) New Model Developmemts: Solar Proton Model; 18) Comparison of ESP, JPL91, KIng/Stassinopoulos, and PSYCHIC Models; 19) New Model Developments: Solar Heavy Ion Model; 20) Comparison of CREME96 to CREDO Measurements During 2000 and 2002; 21) PSYCHIC Heavy ion Model; 22) Model Standardization; 23) Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models; and 24) Summary.

  8. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  9. Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-04-15

    Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

  10. ISS Radiation Shielding and Acoustic Simulation Using an Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joshua E.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Environment Simulator (ISSES) is a virtual reality application that uses high-performance computing, graphics, and audio rendering to simulate the radiation and acoustic environments of the International Space Station (ISS). This CAVE application allows the user to maneuver to different locations inside or outside of the ISS and interactively compute and display the radiation dose at a point. The directional dose data is displayed as a color-mapped sphere that indicates the relative levels of radiation from all directions about the center of the sphere. The noise environment is rendered in real time over headphones or speakers and includes non-spatial background noise, such as air-handling equipment, and spatial sounds associated with specific equipment racks, such as compressors or fans. Changes can be made to equipment rack locations that produce changes in both the radiation shielding and system noise. The ISSES application allows for interactive investigation and collaborative trade studies between radiation shielding and noise for crew safety and comfort.

  11. Scientists working to correct misinformation on radiation in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P.; Whicker, W.

    1996-12-31

    Competing claims and conflicting data from the Chernobyl disaster, and other such accidents, have called into question the reliability and consistency of many studies on the behavior of radioactivity in the environment. What is needed, according to an ecologist and a statistician, are guidelines against which the design of radiation studies can be gauged.

  12. Thermal Radiation from Nuclear Detonations in Urban Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Moss, W C; Whitlock, B

    2007-06-04

    There are three principal causes of ''prompt'' casualties from a nuclear detonation: nuclear (gamma-ray and neutron) radiation, thermal radiation, and blast. Common estimates of the range of these prompt effects indicate that thermal radiation has the largest lethal range [1]. Non-lethal skin burns, flash blindness, and retinal burns occur out to much greater range. Estimates of casualties from thermal radiation assume air bursts over flat terrain. In urban environments with multiple buildings and terrain features, the extent of thermal radiation may be significantly reduced by shadowing. We have developed a capability for calculating the distribution of thermal energy deposition in urban environments using detailed 3D computer models of actual cities. The size, height, and radiated power from the fireball as a function of time are combined with ray tracing to calculate the energy deposition on all surfaces. For surface bursts less than 100 kt in locations with large buildings or terrain features, the calculations confirm the expected reduction in thermal damage.

  13. Interplanetary Radiation and Internal Charging Environment Models for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; NeegaardParker, Linda

    2005-01-01

    A Solar Sail Radiation Environment (SSRE) model has been developed for defining charged particle environments over an energy range from 0.01 keV to 1 MeV for hydrogen ions, helium ions, and electrons. The SSRE model provides the free field charged particle environment required for characterizing energy deposition per unit mass, charge deposition, and dose rate dependent conductivity processes required to evaluate radiation dose and internal (bulk) charging processes in the solar sail membrane in interplanetary space. Solar wind and energetic particle measurements from instruments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft in a solar, near-polar orbit provide the particle data over a range of heliospheric latitudes used to derive the environment that can be used for radiation and charging environments for both high inclination 0.5 AU Solar Polar Imager mission and the 1.0 AU L1 solar missions. This paper describes the techniques used to model comprehensive electron, proton, and helium spectra over the range of particle energies of significance to energy and charge deposition in thin (less than 25 micrometers) solar sail materials.

  14. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  15. Effects of radiation environment on reusable nuclear shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Parametric tradeoff analyses of a wide spectrum of alternate tank configurations to minimize both primary and secondary, direct and scattered radiation sources emanating from the NERVA are reported. The analytical approach utilizing point kernel techniques is described and detailed data are presented on the magnitude of neutron/gamma doses for different locations. Single-tank configurations utilizing smaller cone angles and end cap radii were found to minimize integral radiation levels, hence, stage shielding-weight penalties for shuttle missions. Hybrid configurations employing an upper tank with a reduced cone angle and end cap radius result in low integral payload doses primarily due to the increased separation distance caused by the elongation of the larger capacity upper tank. A preliminary radiation damage assessment is discussed of possible reusable nuclear shuttle materials, components, and subsystems, and the possible effects of the radiation environment on various phases of RNS mission operations.

  16. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  17. Development of n-on-p Silicon Sensors for Very High Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Y.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P. et al.

    2010-05-06

    We have developed a novel and highly radiation-tolerant n-in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments such as in the Super Large Hadron Collider. The sensors are designed for a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 15} neq/cm{sup 2} and are fabricated from p-type, FZ, 6 in. (150 mm) wafers onto which we lay out a single 9.75 cm x 9.75 cm large-area sensor and several 1 cm x 1 cm miniature sensors with various n-strip isolation structures. By evaluating the sensors both pre- and post-irradiation by protons and neutrons, we find that the full depletion voltage evolves to approximately 800 V and that the n-strip isolation depends on the p{sup +} concentration. In addition, we characterize the interstrip resistance, interstrip capacitance and the punch-through-protection (PTP) voltage. The first fabrication batch allowed us to identify the weak spots in the PTP and the stereo strip layouts. By understanding the source of the weakness, the mask was modified accordingly. After modification, the follow-up fabrication batches and the latest fabrication of about 30 main sensors and associated miniature sensors have shown good performance, with no sign of microdischarge up to 1000 V.

  18. Radiation environment at aviation altitudes and in space.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Ploc, O; Puchalska, M; Ambrožová, I; Kubančák, J; Kyselová, D; Shurshakov, V

    2015-06-01

    On the Earth, protection from cosmic radiation is provided by the magnetosphere and the atmosphere, but the radiation exposure increases with increasing altitude. Aircrew and especially space crew members are therefore exposed to an increased level of ionising radiation. Dosimetry onboard aircraft and spacecraft is however complicated by the presence of neutrons and high linear energy transfer particles. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters, routinely used for ground-based personnel, do not reliably cover the range of particle types and energies found in cosmic radiation. Further, the radiation field onboard aircraft and spacecraft is not constant; its intensity and composition change mainly with altitude, geomagnetic position and solar activity (marginally also with the aircraft/spacecraft type, number of people aboard, amount of fuel etc.). The European Union Council directive 96/29/Euroatom of 1996 specifies that aircrews that could receive dose of >1 mSv y(-1) must be evaluated. The dose evaluation is routinely performed by computer programs, e.g. CARI-6, EPCARD, SIEVERT, PCAire, JISCARD and AVIDOS. Such calculations should however be carefully verified and validated. Measurements of the radiation field in aircraft are thus of a great importance. A promising option is the long-term deployment of active detectors, e.g. silicon spectrometer Liulin, TEPC Hawk and pixel detector Timepix. Outside the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere, the environment is much harsher than at aviation altitudes. In addition to the exposure to high energetic ionising cosmic radiation, there are microgravity, lack of atmosphere, psychological and psychosocial components etc. The milieu is therefore very unfriendly for any living organism. In case of solar flares, exposures of spacecraft crews may even be lethal. In this paper, long-term measurements of the radiation environment onboard Czech aircraft performed with the Liulin since 2001, as well as measurements and

  19. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  20. Radiation from Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the first demonstration of quantitative flame-radiation measurement in microgravity environments, with the objective of studying the influences and characteristics of radiative transfer on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames with possible application to spacecraft fire detection. Laminar diffusion flames of propane, burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure, are studied in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA Lewis Research Center. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view angle, thermopile-detector radiometer, and comparisons are made with normal-gravity flames. The results show that the radiation level is significantly higher in microgravity compared to normal-gravity environments due to larger flame size, enhanced soot formation, and entrapment of combustion products in the vicinity of the flame. These effects are the consequences of the removal of buoyancy which makes diffusion the dominant mechanism of transport. The results show that longer test times may be needed to reach steady state in microgravity environments.

  1. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse: Low-metallicity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo

    2014-05-10

    Among many physical processes involved in star formation, radiation transfer is one of the key processes because it dominantly controls the thermodynamics. Because metallicities control opacities, they are one of the important environmental parameters that affect star formation processes. In this work, I investigate protostellar collapse in solar-metallicity and low-metallicity (Z = 0.1 Z {sub ☉}) environments using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Because radiation cooling in high-density gas is more effective in low-metallicity environments, first cores are colder and have lower entropies. As a result, first cores are smaller, less massive, and have shorter lifetimes in low-metallicity clouds. Therefore, first cores would be less likely to be found in low-metallicity star forming clouds. This also implies that first cores tend to be more gravitationally unstable and susceptible to fragmentation. The evolution and structure of protostellar cores formed after the second collapse weakly depend on metallicities in the spherical and magnetized models, despite the large difference in the metallicities. Because this is due to the change of the heat capacity by dissociation and ionization of hydrogen, it is a general consequence of the second collapse as long as the effects of radiation cooling are not very large during the second collapse. On the other hand, the effects of different metallicities are more significant in the rotating models without magnetic fields, because they evolve slower than other models and therefore are more affected by radiation cooling.

  2. The Dynamics of the Atmospheric Radiation Environment at Aviation Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, Epaminondas G.

    2004-01-01

    Single Event Effects vulnerability of on-board computers that regulate the: navigational, flight control, communication, and life support systems has become an issue in advanced modern aircraft, especially those that may be equipped with new technology devices in terabit memory banks (low voltage, nanometer feature size, gigabit integration). To address this concern, radiation spectrometers need to fly continually on a multitude of carriers over long periods of time so as to accumulate sufficient information that will broaden our understanding of the very dynamic and complex nature of the atmospheric radiation environment regarding: composition, spectral distribution, intensity, temporal variation, and spatial variation.

  3. Fluorine gettering by activated charcoal in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, L.K.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-10-01

    Activated charcoal has been shown to be an effective gettering agent for the fluorine gas that is liberated in a radiation environment. Even though activated charcoal is a commonly used getter, little is known about the radiation stability of the fluorine-charcoal product. This work has shown that not only is the product stable in high gamma radiation fields, but also that radiation enhances the capacity of the charcoal for the fluorine. The most useful application of this work is with the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt because the radioactive components (fission products and actinides) cause radiolytic damage to the solid LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (64.5, 30.3, 5.0, 0.13 mol %, respectively) resulting in the liberation of fluorine gas. This work has also demonstrated that the maximum damage to the fuel salt by approx.3 /times/ 10/sup 7/ R/h gamma radiation is approximately 2%, at which point the rate of recombination of fluorine with active metal sites within the salt lattice equals the rate of fluorine generation. The enhanced reactivity of the activated charcoal and radiation stability of the product ensures that the gettered fluorine will stay sequestered in the charcoal.

  4. Results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment MARIE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K.; Pinsky, L.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the three science instruments aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment, MARIE. MARIE consists of a stack of silicon detectors, augmented by a Cerenkov detector. MARIE is designed to measure a portion of the particle spectrum of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), as well as the high fluxes of low-energy protons (energies less than about 100 MeV) that are intermittently produced by active regions on the sun in Solar Particle Events (SPE). MARIE is providing the first detailed information about the radiation environment near Mars.measurements. MARIE has been operating successfully for nearly a year. Solar particle events of considerable interest have been observed, and data have been obtained that will yield GCR spectra from a novel observation point in the solar system.

  5. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  6. Radiation environment for rendezvous and docking with nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. R.; Warman, E. A.; Lindsey, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation environment data for the NERVA engine are provided which may be utilized in estimating radiation exposures associated with various space maneuvers. Spatial distributions of neutron and gamma tissue kerma rates produced during full thrust operation of the engine are presented. Final rendezvous with an orbiting space station would be achieved subsequent to full thrust operation during a period of 10 or more hours duration in which impulse is delivered by the propellant used for removal of decay heat. Consequently, post operation radiation levels are of prime importance in estimating space station exposures. Maps of gamma kerma rates around the engine are provided for decay times of 4 and 24 hours after a representative firing. Typical decay curves illustrating the dependence of post operation kerma rates on decay time and operating history are included. Examples of the kerma distributions around the engine which result from integration over specific exposure periods are shown.

  7. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE).

    PubMed

    Atwell, W; Saganti, P; Cucinotta, F A; Zeitlin, C J

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. PMID:15791735

  9. The geomagnetically trapped radiation environment: A radiological point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    The regions of naturally occurring, geomagnetically trapped radiation are briefly reviewed in terms of physical parameters such as; particle types, fluxes, spectrums, and spatial distributions. The major emphasis is placed upon a description of this environment in terms of the radiobiologically relevant parameters of absorbed dose and dose-rate and a discussion of the radiological implications in terms of the possible impact on space vehicle design and mission planning.

  10. Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

  11. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts. PMID:25999124

  12. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5°, 57° and 90°) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5° orbital inclination.

  13. Predicted radiation environment of the Saturn baseline diode

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J.A.; Lee, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport was used to predict the radiation environment of the Saturn accelerator for the baseline diode design. The x-ray output has been calculated, as well as energy deposition in CaF/sub 2/ thermoluminescent dosimetry and silicon. It is found that the design criteria for the radiation environment will be met and that approximately 10 kJ of x rays will be available for simulation experiments, if the diode provides a nominal beam of 2.0-MeV electrons for 20 ns with a peak current of 12.5 MA. The penalty in dose and x-ray output for operating below the nominal energy in order to obtain a softer spectrum is quantified. The penalty for using excessive electron equilibration in the standard packaging of the thermoluminescent dosimeters is shown to be negligible. An intrinsic lack of electron equilibration for silicon elements of components and subsystems is verified for Saturn environments, demonstrating the ambiguity of design criteria based on silicon deposition. Validation of an efficient next-event-estimator method for predicting energy deposition in equilibrated detectors/dosimetry is confirmed. Finally, direct-electron depositions in excess of 1 kJ/g are shown to be easily achievable. 34 refs., 30 figs.

  14. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  15. Space environment simulation at radiation test of nonmetallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, B. A.; Klinshpont, E. R.; Tupikov, V. I.

    1999-05-01

    Russia [1] (B.A. Briskman, V.I. Toupikov, E.N. Lesnovsky, Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Materials in Space Environment, Toulouse, France, 16-20 June 1997, ESA, SP-399, p. 537) has proposed new international standard for the testing of materials to simulated space radiation. The proposal was submitted to ISO (The International Organization for Standards) Technical Committee 20 (Aircraft and Space Vehicles), Subcommittee 14 (Space Systems and Operations) and was approved as Working Draft 15856 at the Los-Angeles meeting (1997). The second version of the draft was approved at the Beijing meeting (1998). The standard extends to space ionizing radiation: protons, electrons, solar ultraviolet, soft X-radiation, bremsstrahlung, that effect the polymeric materials of space engineering. The special feature of interaction of the space ionizing radiation with materials is the localization of the main part of absorbed energy in thin near-surface layers. Numerous problems appear in simulating the ionizing radiation impact, which require a solution for correct conduction of the on-ground tests.

  16. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  17. A new Mars radiation environment model with visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, G.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Singleterry, R. C.; Wilson, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    A new model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (OCR) has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for Mars conditions are transported through the Martian atmosphere, with temporal properties modeled with variable timescales, down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The Martian atmosphere has been modeled by using the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model--version 2001 (Mars-GRAM 2001). The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g., CO2 ice, H2O ice) along with its time variation throughout the Martian year. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A new Mars radiation environment model with visualization.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, G; Clowdsley, M S; Singleterry, R C; Wilson, J W

    2004-01-01

    A new model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (OCR) has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for Mars conditions are transported through the Martian atmosphere, with temporal properties modeled with variable timescales, down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The Martian atmosphere has been modeled by using the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model--version 2001 (Mars-GRAM 2001). The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g., CO2 ice, H2O ice) along with its time variation throughout the Martian year. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. PMID:15880920

  19. Internal Charging Design Environments for the Earths Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts are a widely recognized threat to spacecraft because they penetrate lightly shielded vehicle hulls and deep into insulating materials where they accumulate to sufficient levels to produce electrostatic discharges. Strategies for evaluating the magnitude of the relativistic electron flux environment and its potential for producing ESD events are varied. Simple "rule of thumb" estimates such as the widely used 10(exp 10) e-/sq cm fluence within 10 hour threshold for the onset of pulsing in dielectric materials provide a quick estimate of when to expect charging issues. More sophisticated strategies based on models of the trapped electron flux within the Earth s magnetic field provide time dependent estimates of electron flux along spacecraft orbits and orbit integrate electron flux. Finally, measurements of electron flux can be used to demonstrate mean and extreme relativistic electron environments. This presentation will evaluate strategies used to specify energetic electron flux and fluence environments along spacecraft trajectories in the Earth s radiation belts.

  20. Visualization of Radiation Environment on Mars: Assessment with MARIE Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Flanders, J.; Riman, F.; Hu, X.; Pinsky, L.; Lee, K.; Anderson, V.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2003-01-01

    For a given GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) environment at Mars, particle flux of protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions, are also needed on the surface of Mars for future human exploration missions. For the past twelve months, the MARJE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 200J Mars Odyssey has been providing the radiation measurements from the Martian orbit. These measurements are well correlated with the HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations during these specific GCR environment conditions are now extended and transported through the CO2 atmosphere onto the Martian surface. These calculated pa11icle flux distributions are presented as a function of the Martian topography making use of the MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data from the MGS (Mars Global Surveyor). Also, particle flux calculations are presented with visualization in the human body from skin depth to the internal organs including the blood-forming organs.

  1. Radiation testing for the Jovian environment: in the laboratory and on CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, B.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.

    2015-10-01

    The harsh Jovian radiation environment is one of the main drivers for the design of instruments to be flown to Jupiter. Radiation testing of the instruments in the relevant environment is crucial, but challenging. We introduce RATEX-J, a radiation test setup dedicated for the JUICE mission that focuses on active radiation mitigation approaches and employs ground based and spaceborne testing platforms.

  2. Composite seals for liquid hydrogen and nuclear radiation environments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Auken, R. L.; Chase, V. A.

    1971-01-01

    Description of plastic composite seals for service in a liquid-hydrogen and nuclear-radiation environment. The radiation-resistant aromatic heterocyclic class of polymers, including polyimide, polybenzimidazole, and polyquinoxaline, were evaluated for this application. The seal developed is based on a design involving a resin-starved laminate consisting of alternating layers of woven glass fabric and polymer film. This design imparts a mechanical spring characteristic to the seal, resulting in essentially complete elastic recovery when unloaded, and eliminates cold flow. Encapsulating techniques employing the polyquinoxaline polymer were developed which rendered the seal impervious to liquid hydrogen. The seals were tested before and after gamma irradiation up to 10 to the 10th ergs/g. Load/deflection and leakage tests were performed over a temperature range from -423 through +500 F.

  3. Worst-case space radiation environments for geocentric missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Worst-case possible annual radiation fluences of energetic charged particles in the terrestrial space environment, and the resultant depth-dose distributions in aluminum, were calculated in order to establish absolute upper limits to the radiation exposure of spacecraft in geocentric orbits. The results are a concise set of data intended to aid in the determination of the feasibility of a particular mission. The data may further serve as guidelines in the evaluation of standard spacecraft components. Calculations were performed for each significant particle species populating or visiting the magnetosphere, on the basis of volume occupied by or accessible to the respective species. Thus, magnetospheric space was divided into five distinct regions using the magnetic shell parameter L, which gives the approximate geocentric distance (in earth radii) of a field line's equatorial intersect.

  4. Beam Collimation at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, N. V.

    2003-12-01

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  5. Mars Surface Ionizing Radiation Environment: Need for Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, R. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Suggs, R.

    1999-01-01

    Protection against the hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation remains an unresolved issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise [1]. The major uncertainty is the lack of data on biological response to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures but even a full understanding of the physical interaction of GCR with shielding and body tissues is not yet available and has a potentially large impact on mission costs. "The general opinion is that the initial flights should be short-stay missions performed as fast as possible (so-called 'Sprint' missions) to minimize crew exposure to the zero-g and space radiation environment, to ease requirements on system reliability, and to enhance the probability of mission success." The short-stay missions tend to have long transit times and may not be the best option due to the relatively long exposure to zero-g and ionizing radiation. On the other hand the short-transit missions tend to have long stays on the surface requiring an adequate knowledge of the surface radiation environment to estimate risks and to design shield configurations. Our knowledge of the surface environment is theoretically based and suffers from an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions of GCR with the Martian atmosphere, Martian surface, and intervening shield materials. An important component of Mars surface robotic exploration is the opportunity to test our understanding of the Mars surface environment. The Mars surface environment is generated by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPEs) with the Mars atmosphere and Mars surface materials. In these interactions, multiple charged ions are reduced in size and secondary particles are generated, including neutrons. Upon impact with the Martian surface, the character of the interactions changes as a result of the differing nuclear constituents of the surface materials. Among the surface environment are many neutrons diffusing from

  6. The Martian Radiation Environment Experiment -- Results and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T. F.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

    2004-05-01

    Ionizing radiation in space presents a potentially serious health hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions. Missions that take humans outside the geomagnetosphere (which provides significant shielding for crews in low-Earth orbit) are of particular concern. A mission to Mars would expose a crew to a substantial radiation dose from high-energy heavy ions in the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR). Though not expected to cause acute effects, such exposures might endanger the long-term health of crewmembers, leading to increased risk of late effects such as cancer and cataract. Since the biological effects of these ions are not well understood, NASA cannot yet specify career limits for deep-space missions. While ground-based research in radiobiology continues, it is necessary to characterize the radiation field on the Martian surface. This is determined by the radiation incident on the top of the Martian atmosphere, the transmission properties of the atmosphere, and the production of secondary particles (neutrons in particular) in the upper part of the surface. The Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, has returned the first detailed measurements of the radiation field incident on the atmosphere. MARIE consists of a stack of silicon charged-particle detectors, designed to measure the nearly-constant flux of energetic Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and intermittent Solar Particle Events (SPE). The detector is optimized for the detection of solar protons and helium in the energy range from 30 to 75 MeV/nucleon, though higher energies and heavier ions are also detected. Despite considerable uncertainties in data normalization, the measured dose agrees with model calculations, to an accuracy well within the (conservatively) estimated errors. As of this writing (Feb. 2004), MARIE is off, having sustained damage during the large Solar Particle Event of Oct. 29, 2003. Attempts to recover the instrument will resume in the

  7. Solar Cycle Variation and Application to the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Shinn, Judy L.; Tai, Hsiang; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Badavi, Francis F.; Atwell, William

    1999-01-01

    The interplanetary plasma and fields are affected by the degree of disturbance that is related to the number and types of sunspots in the solar surface. Sunspot observations were improved with the introduction of the telescope in the seventeenth century, allowing observations which cover many centuries. A single quantity (sunspot number) was defined by Wolf in 1848 that is now known to be well correlated with many space observable quantities and is used herein to represent variations caused in the space radiation environment. The resultant environmental models are intended for future aircraft and space-travel-related exposure estimates.

  8. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments.

  9. The ST environment: Expected charged particle radiation levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the ST satellite at the three different mission altitudes, was determined in two ways: (1) by orbital flux-integration and (2) by geographical instantaneous flux-mapping. The latest standard models of the environment were used in this effort. Magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions were obtained from a current field model. Spatial and temporal variations or conditions affecting the static environment models were considered and accounted for, wherever possible. Limited shielding and dose evaluations were performed for a simple geometry. Results, given in tabular and graphical form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are included.

  10. A Radiation Dosimeter Concept for the Lunar Surface Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Watts, John; Kuznetsov, Eugeny N.; Parnell, Thomas A.; Pendleton, Geoff N.

    2007-01-01

    A novel silicon detector configuration for radiation dose measurements in an environment where solar energetic particles are of most concern is described. The dosimeter would also measure the dose from galactic cosmic rays. In the lunar environment a large range in particle flux and ionization density must be measured and converted to dose equivalent. This could be accomplished with a thick (e.g. 2mm) silicon detector segmented into cubic volume elements "voxels" followed by a second, thin monolithic silicon detector. The electronics needed to implement this detector concept include analog signal processors (ASIC) and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) for data accumulation and conversion to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra and to dose-equivalent (Sievert). Currently available commercial ASIC's and FPGA's are suitable for implementing the analog and digital systems.

  11. Development and testing of coatings for orbital space radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Samuel F; Martinez, Carol L; Hausgen, Paul; Wilt, David

    2014-02-01

    Specific coating processes and materials were investigated in the quest to develop multilayer coatings with greater tolerance to space radiation exposure. Ultraviolet reflection (UVR) and wide-band antireflection (AR) multilayer coatings were deposited on solar cell covers and test substrates and subsequently exposed to simulated space environments and also flown on the Materials International Space Station Experiment-7 (MISSE-7) to determine their space environment stability. Functional solar cells integrated with these coatings underwent simulated UV and MISSE-7 low earth orbit flight exposure. The effects of UV, proton, and atomic oxygen exposure on coatings and on assembled solar cells as related to the implemented deposition processes and material compositions were small. The UVR/AR coatings protected flexible polymer substrate materials that are intended for future flexible multijunction cell arrays to be deployed from rolls. Progress was made toward developing stable and protective coatings for extended space-mission applications. Test results are presented. PMID:24514237

  12. A clean radiation environment for opacity measurements of radiatively heated material

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yan; Zhang Jinyan; Yang Jiamin; Pei Wenbing; Ding Yongkun; Lai Donxian; Men Guangwei; Luo Zheng

    2007-05-15

    A clean x-ray radiation environment is essential for detailed measurements of the opacity of high-temperature radiatively heated material. A lot of laser energy is usually needed to heat a large hohlraum to produce such a clean x-ray radiation environment. A type of target is proposed that uses low-density, low-Z foam to provide a passage to radiation while isolating the sample from the disturbance from laser produced, high-temperature, high-Z plasma and heating by reflected laser light. With a smaller hohlraum, less laser energy is needed to produce high-temperature x-ray radiation for sample heating. Experiments have been done to check the proposal. The recorded clean Al self-emission spectra proved there was no gold plasma in the view-way to disturb the measurement. This type of hohlraum can provide a high-quality work-table for opacity measurement even in a relatively small laser facility.

  13. The Martian Radiation Environment from Orbit and on the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Howe, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    A good knowledge of the Martian radiation environment and its interactions with Mars is needed for many reasons. It is needed to help unfold the results of the Mars-2001 orbiter's gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) to determine elemental abundances on the Martian surface. It is needed to interpret the measurements of the Martian Radiation Environment Experiments (MARIE) on both the Mars 2001 orbiter and lander. It is needed to calculate production rates of cosmogenic nuclides that will be measured in samples returned from Mars. It is needed to determine the doses that astronauts would receive in Martian orbit and especially on the surface of Mars. We discuss the two types of energetic particles in the vicinity of Mars and the nature of their interactions. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) occur very rarely but can have high fluxes that are dangerous in space. However, their energies are low enough that few solar energetic particles reach the surface of Mars. Their interactions can be fairly easily modeled because SEPs create few secondary particles. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) have high energies and are the dominant source of energetic particles on the Martian surface, mainly secondary neutrons. Modeling their interactions is complicated because of the range of nuclei in the GCR and their high energies. Work at Los Alamos on GCR interactions will be presented.

  14. Comparison of Martian Radiation Environment with International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This graphic shows the radiation dose equivalent as measured by Odyssey's Martian radiation environment experiment at Mars and by instruments aboard the International Space Station, for the 11-month period from April 2002 through February 2003. The accumulated total in Mars orbit is about two and a half times larger than that aboard the Space Station. Averaged over this time period, about 10 percent of the dose equivalent at Mars is due to solar particles, although a 30 percent contribution from solar particles was seen in July 2002, when the sun was particularly active.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The radiation experiment was provided by the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Tex. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. High-current density coils for high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the problems of providing normal (that is, nonsuperconducting) magnet coils for present and short-term-future requirements where significant radiation doses are involved. Projects such as 100-mA deuteron accelerators and bundle diverter coils for TOKAMAKS are typical of applications where conventional organic insulation limited to 10/sup 10/ rads makes epoxy-based systems unacceptable. Moreover, even in present-day accelerators, radiation levels can be high enough to give rise to problems with oxidation of copper conductors if water is used in direct contact with the copper. The radiolytic oxygen, being formed in situ, cannot be controlled by external deoxygenators. An acceptable insulation for such environments has been described previously, and is being employed where radiation is expected to be a problem. Being a compacted magnesium oxide powder, the insulation has advantages. Analysis of constraints on maximum current densities achievable in such a coil construction, using computer codes, leads to coil configurations that operate at higher current densities than are usually found in directly cooled coils. An example of the thermal analysis of one coil configuration is given. The problems are addressed here.

  16. Performance of BGO in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbink, G.J.; Engler, A.; Kraemer, R.W.; Nash, J.; Sutton, R.B.; Gearhart, R.A.; Linde, F.L.; Sens, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    Bismuth Germanate (Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/), an inert, high Z, and non-hygroscopic material, with a short radiation length L/sub RAD/ = 1.1 cm, has been proposed as the scintillator in a 4..pi.. electromagnetic calorimeter at LEP. Recently long BGO crystals have become available and studies of the effect of radiation have been made by several groups. We report here on the decrease of the light output of long BGO crystals due to irradiation by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays and 25 MeV electrons with doses from 50 to 5000 rad and on the performance of a 4 x 4 matrix of BGO crystals located at small angles (5 to 9 mrad, a high radiation environment) at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring PEP at SLAC. All crystals used are 2 x 2 x 23 or 2 x 2 x 24 cm/sup 3/, have all six faces polished, and are wrapped in white teflon tape. 9 references, 11 figures.

  17. Space Suit Radiator Performance in Lunar and Mars Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabity, James; Mason, Georgia; Copeland, Robert; Libberton, Kerry; Stephan, Ryan; Trevino, Luis; Paul, Heather

    2005-01-01

    During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut's metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 1.58 kg (3.48 lbm), an additional 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water are loaded into the unit, most of which is sublimated and lost to thus become the single largest expendable during an eight hour EVA. We can significantly reduce the amount of expendable water consumed in the sublimator by using a radiator to reject heat from the Astronaut during an EVA. Last year we reported on the design and initial operational assessment tests of our novel radiator designated the Radiator And Freeze Tolerant heat eXchanger (RAFT-X). Herein, we report on tests conducted in the NASA Johnson Space Center Chamber E Thermal Vacuum Test Facility. Up to 260 W (900 Btu/h) of heat were rejected in Lunar and Mars environments with temperatures as cold as -170 C (- 275 F). Further, the RAFT-X endured several freeze / thaw cycles and in fact, the heat exchanger was completely frozen three times without any apparent damage to the unit.

  18. Late effects from hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  19. Space Suit Radiator Performance in Lunar and Mars Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Trevino, Luis; Nabity, James; Mason, Georgia; Copeland, Robert; Libberton, Kerry; Stephan, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut's metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 3.48 lbs, an additional eight pounds of water are loaded into the unit of which about six to eight are sublimated and lost; this is the single largest expendable during an eight-hour EVA. Using a radiator to reject heat from the Astronaut during an EVA, we can significantly reduce the amount of expendable water consumed by the sublimator. Last year we reported on the design and initial operational assessment tests of our novel radiator designated the Radiator And Freeze Tolerant heat eXchanger (RAFT-X). Herein, we report on tests conducted in the NASA Johnson Space Center Chamber E Thermal Vacuum Test Facility. Up to 800 Btu/h of heat were rejected in lunar and Mars environments with temperatures as cold as 150 F. Tilting the radiator did not cause an observable loss in performance. The RAFT-X endured freeze/thaw cycles and in fact, the heat exchanger was completely frozen three times without any apparent damage to the unit. We were also able to operate the heat exchanger in a partially frozen configuration to throttle the heat rejection rate from 530 Btu/h at low water flow rate down to 300 Btu/h. Finally, the deliberate loss of a single loop heat pipe only degraded the heat rejection performance by about 2 to 5%.

  20. Space Suit Radiator Performance in Lunar and Mars Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabity, James; Mason, Georgia; Copeland, Robert; Libberton, Kerry; Trevino, Luis; Stephan, Ryan; Paul, Heather

    2007-01-01

    During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut's metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 3.48 lbs, an additional eight pounds of water are loaded into the unit of which about six to eight are sublimated and lost; this is the single largest expendable during an eight-hour EVA. Using a radiator to reject heat from the Astronaut during an EVA, we can significantly reduce the amount of expendable water consumed by the sublimator. Last year we reported on the design and initial operational assessment tests of our novel radiator designated the Radiator And Freeze Tolerant heat eXchanger (RAFT-X). Herein, we report on tests conducted in the NASA Johnson Space Center Chamber E Thermal Vacuum Test Facility. Up to 800 Btu/h of heat were rejected in lunar and Mars environments with temperatures as cold as -150 F. Tilting the radiator did not cause an observable loss in performance. The RAFT-X endured freeze / thaw cycles and in fact, the heat exchanger was completely frozen three times without any apparent damage to the unit. We were also able to operate the heat exchanger in a partially frozen configuration to throttle the heat rejection rate from 530 Btu/h at low water flow rate down to 300 Btu/h. Finally, the deliberate loss of a single loop heat pipe only degraded the heat rejection performance by about 2 to 5%.

  1. Radiation effects in generic populations inhabiting a limiting environment.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, T G; Kryshev, A I

    2012-05-01

    A generic population model is formulated for radiation risk assessment of natural biota. The model demonstrates that effects of radiation on the population survival do not follow directly the effects on individual organisms. Dose rates resulting in population extinction can be analytically calculated. Besides individual radiosensitivity, two key parameters were found to determine the survival potential of a population under chronic radiation stress: the ratio “biomass losses/biomass synthesis,” and the lump amount of limiting resource in the environment. A benchmark scenario “Population response to chronic irradiation” developed within the IAEA Programme EMRAS II was calculated for generic populations of mice, hare/rabbit, wolf/wild dog, and deer/goat chronically exposed to different levels of ionizing radiation. In the conditions of the benchmark scenario, model populations survived normally (>90% of the control value) at dose rates below the following levels: 3 mGy day(-1) for wolf/wild dog; 10 mGy day(-1) for deer/goat; 14 mGy day(-1) for hare/rabbit; and 20 mGy day(-1) for mice. The model predictions showed a relatively high survival potential of short-lived and productive species such as mice. At the same time, populations of long-lived animals with slow and radiosensitive reproduction such as wolf/wild dog were candidates to extinction at chronic exposures above 5 mGy day(-1). Recovery of short-lived and productive species took a much shorter time compared with long-lived and slow reproductive species. PMID:22302184

  2. Atmospheric, Ionospheric, and Energetic Radiation Environments of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kollmann, P.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.; Sturner, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary magnetospheric and high-energy cosmic ray interactions with Saturn's rings were first explored in-situ during the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. The following Voyager flybys produced a wealth of new information on ring structure and mass, and on spatial structure of the radiation belts beyond the main rings. Next came the Cassini Orbiter flyover of the rings during Saturn Orbital Insertion in 2004 with the first in-situ measurements of the ring atmosphere and plasma ionosphere. Cassini has since fully explored the radiation belt and magnetospheric plasma region beyond the main rings, discovering how Enceladus acts as a source of water group neutrals and water ions for the ion plasma. But do the main rings also substantially contribute by UV photolysis to water group plasma (H+, O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+, O2+) and neutrals inwards from Enceladus? More massive rings, than earlier inferred from Pioneer 11 and Voyager observations, would further contribute by bulk ring ice radiolysis from interactions of galactic cosmic ray particles. Products of these interactions include neutron-decay proton and electron injection into the radiation belts beyond the main rings. How does radiolysis from moon and ring sweeping of the radiation belt particles compare with direct gas and plasma sources from the main rings and Enceladus? Can the magnetospheric ion and electron populations reasonably be accounted for by the sum of the ring-neutron-decay and outer magnetospheric inputs? Pioneer 11 made the deepest radial penetration into the C-ring, next followed by Cassini SOI. What might Cassini's higher-inclination proximal orbits reveal about the atmospheric, ionospheric, and energetic radiation environments in the D-ring and the proximal gap region? Recent modeling predicts a lower-intensity innermost radiation belt extending from the gap to the inner D-ring. Other remaining questions include the lifetimes of narrow and diffuse dust rings with respect to plasma and energetic particle

  3. Evaluating a radiation monitor for mixed-field environments based on SRAM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiligiannis, G.; Dilillo, L.; Bosio, A.; Girard, P.; Pravossoudovitch, S.; Todri, A.; Virazel, A.; Mekki, J.; Brugger, M.; Wrobel, F.; Saigne, F.

    2014-05-01

    Instruments operating in particle accelerators and colliders are exposed to radiations that are composed of particles of different types and energies. Several of these instruments often embed devices that are not hardened against radiation effects. Thus, there is a strong need for monitoring the levels of radiation inside the mixed-field radiation areas, throughout different positions. Different metrics exist for measuring the radiation damage induced to electronic devices, such as the Total Ionizing Dose (TID), the Displacement Damage (DD) and of course the fluence of particles for estimating the error rates of the electronic devices among other applications. In this paper, we propose an SRAM based monitor, that is used to define the fluence of High Energy Hadrons (HEH) by detecting Single Event Upsets in the memory array. We evaluated the device by testing it inside the H4IRRAD area of CERN, a test area that reproduces the radiation conditions inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel and its shielded areas. By using stability estimation methods and presenting experimental data, we prove that this device is proper to be used for such a purpose.

  4. Inheritance of induction radiation sensitivity of space flight environments and γ-radiation on rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Wang, J.; Wei, L.; Li, Z.; Sun, Y.

    There are many factors affecting living things during space flight, such as microgravity, cosmic radiation, etc. A large number of plant mutants have been obtained after space flight on satellite in China in the last decade and some commercial crop varieties were released. However, little consideration has so far been given to the genetic mechanisms underlying sensitivity of plant seeds to space flight environments. To reveal the genetic mechanisms associated with induction radiation sensitivity (IRS), a set of 226 recombination inbred lines (RILs) derived from Lemont (japonica)/ Teqing (indica) F13, were analyzed using 164 well-distributed DNA markers and assayed for the traits related to IRS including rate of survival seedling (RSS), seedling height (SH), seed setting rate (SSR) and total physiological damage (TPD) in replicated trials after space flight on Chinese Shenzhou IV Spacecraft andγ -radiation treatment (35000 rad) on the ground in 2002. Seedling growth of Lemont was accelerated after space flight with the SH of 116.2% of ground control while growth suppression was happened for Teqing with the SH of 85.7% of ground control. γ -radiation treatment resulted in significant decrease in all tested traits for the two parents, indicating space flight and γ -radiation treatment had different biological effects on the two parents. Significant differences were detected among the RILs for their responses to space flight environments and γ -radiation, reflected as the difference in the four tested traits. Space flight resulted in stimulation on growth for 57.1% lines whileγ -radiation had suppression on growth for most lines. Seventeen putative main-effect QTLs was identified for the four traits related to IRS under space flight and γ -radiation, which totally explained significant portions of the total trait variation (4.4% for RSS, 27.2% for SH, 4% for SSR and 15.8% for TPD for space flight; 10.4% for RSS, 15.1% for SH, 8.2% for SSR and 6.1% for TPD for

  5. Degradation of thermal shield materials in the space radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoji, S.; Kimura, H.; Koitabashi, M.; Imamura, T.; Kasai, R.; Matsushita, M.

    1983-12-01

    Changes in temperature distribution data of Experimental Technology Satellite 4 after its 3 months mission term are discussed. Analysis of the data suggested that the thermal shields loose their function in the space radiation environment. The effect of energetic particles on the shield materials was investigated. Electron beams of 500 keV and proton beams of 900 keV were irradiated on silver-Teflon and aluminized Kapton films. The fluences were changed between 10 to the 14th and 10 to the 16th power sqcm. Temperature varied between -100 and 100C. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, tensile strength and elongation rate were measured. Thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were performed. Electron fluxes have remarkable effects on the mechanical properties, proton fluxes on the thermophysical properties of silver-Teflon film. Kapton films do not change much.

  6. Martian Radiation Environment: Model Calculations and Recent Measurements with "MARIE"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; zeitlin, C. J.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the recently expanded HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations are compared with the first eighteen months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculated predictions. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with the available particle flux distribution. Model calculated particle flux includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current MARIE mapping period are reviewed and presented.

  7. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland`s Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995.

  8. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W. C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Smith, Shawn; Swift, Wesley R.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FluX) is an environmental risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operations times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space Chandra must operate, and the on-board Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) does not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. In addition to the concerns arising from the radiation belts, substorm injections of plasma from the magnetotail may increase the protons flux by orders of magnitude in this energy range. The Earth's magnetosphere is a dynamic entity, with the size and location of the magnetopause driven by the highly variable solar wind parameters (number density, velocity, and magnetic field components). Operational times for the telescope must be made weeks in advance, decisions which are complicated by the variability of the environment. CRMFLX is an engineering model developed to address these problems and provides proton flux and fluence statistics for the terrestrial outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind for use in scheduling ACIS operations. CRMFLX implements a number of standard models to predict the bow shock, magnetopause, and plasma sheet boundaries based on the sampling of historical solar wind data sets. Measurements from the GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft are used to create the proton flux database. This paper describes the recently released CRMFLX v2 implementation that includes an algorithm that propagates flux from an observation location to other regions of the magnetosphere based on convective ExB and VB-curvature particle drift motions in electric and magnetic fields. This technique has the advantage of more completely filling out the database and makes maximum

  9. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  10. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  11. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; et al

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  12. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  13. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  14. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    RHESE covers a broad range of technology areas and products. - Radiation Hardened Electronics - High Performance Processing - Reconfigurable Computing - Radiation Environmental Effects Modeling - Low Temperature Radiation Hardened Electronics. RHESE has aligned with currently defined customer needs. RHESE is leveraging/advancing SOA space electronics, not duplicating. - Awareness of radiation-related activities through out government and industry allow advancement rather than duplication of capabilities.

  15. Hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.

    1985-10-01

    Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs. (LEW)

  16. The environment of the γ-ray emitting SNR G338.3-0.0: a hadronic interpretation for HESS J1640-465

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supan, L.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Castelletti, G.

    2016-05-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0 spatially correlates with HESS J1640-465, which is considered the most luminous γ-ray source associated with a SNR in our Galaxy. The X-ray pulsar PSR J1640-4631 has been recently discovered within the SNR shell, which could favor a leptonic origin for the detected very-high-energy (VHE) emission. In spite of this, the origin of the VHE radiation from HESS J1640-465 has not been unambiguously clarified so far. Indeed, a hadronic explanation cannot be ruled out by current observations. On the basis of atomic (HI) and molecular (12CO) archival data, we determine, for the first time, the total ambient density of protons in the region of the G338.3-0.0/HESS J1640-465 system, a critical parameter for understanding the emission mechanisms at very high energies. The value obtained is in the 100-130 cm-3 range. Besides this, we developed a new hadronic model to describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the HESS J1640-465 source, which includes the latest total γ-ray cross-section for proton-proton collisions available in the literature. By using the assessed ambient proton density, we found that the total energy in accelerated protons required to fit the data is 5.4+4.7-2.3 ×1049 erg and 1.6+1.4-0.7 ×1050 erg for a source distance of 8.5 and 13 kpc, respectively. The case where the source distance is 8.5 kpc agrees with the typical scenario in which the energy released is on the order of 1051 erg and ~10% of that energy is transferred to the accelerated protons, whereas the case corresponding to a source distance of 13 kpc requires either a higher value of the energy released in the explosion or a larger energy fraction to accelerate protons.

  17. Surface radiation environment of Saturn's icy moon Mimas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Kollmann, P.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Krupp, N.

    2012-09-01

    The majority of the large icy satellites that orbit Jupiter and Saturn are embedded within the magnetospheres of their respective parent bodies. The inner regions of these magnetospheric environments are characterized by populations of trapped charged particles, from thermal plasma to high energy energetic ions and electrons. Moons orbiting within these magnetospheres are therefore often subject to continuous bombardment by multiple particle species over a wide range of energies. It is known that such bombardment may induce chemical alterations within icy surfaces through the process of radiolysis, an effect which has the potential to significantly change surface and near-surface composition over typical geological timescales. In order to make quantifiable predictions on the surface composition of these moons, it is therefore critical to have a detailed measure of deposited dose into the surface from the relevant magnetospheric particle species. Saturn's innermost large moon Mimas orbits within one of the harshest radiation environments of the Saturnian magnetosphere and remote sensing observations of the moon have revealed a surface that displays strong signs of magnetospheric weathering. It is therefore of great interest to further quantify the interaction of magnetospheric particles with the Mimantean surface, particularly with regards to determining which bombarding species dominate at different moon surface locations and surface depths and to compare this with remote sensing observations. We will present dose-depth profiles for the nearsurface which have been computed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code and representative energetic electron and proton spectra derived from measurements made by the MIMI-LEMMS particle instrument on the Cassini spacecraft.

  18. Radiation environment monitoring for manned missions to Mars.

    PubMed

    Benghin, V V; Petrov, V M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a radiation monitoring system for manned Mars missions is described, based on the most recent requirements on crew radiation safety. A comparison is shown between the radiation monitoring systems for Earth-orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft, with similarities and differences pointed out and discussed. An operational and technological sketch of the chosen problem solving approach is also given. PMID:12577916

  19. The Natural Radiation Environment, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Jacob

    The somatic and genetic effects of naturally occurring radiation are described in this illustrated booklet. Internal sources of radiation from food, water, and air and external sources including radioisotopes in rock, brick, water, and air and cosmic radiation are tabulated. Detection methods are described, and their use in biological and physical…

  20. Basics of particle therapy: introduction to hadrons.

    PubMed

    Welsh, James S

    2008-10-01

    With the arrival of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy, radiation dose distributions in radiation oncology have improved dramatically over the past couple of decades. As part of a natural progression there recently has been a resurgence of interest in hadron therapy, specifically charged particle therapy, because of the even better dose distributions potentially achievable. In principle, using charged particle beams, radiation dose distributions can be achieved that surpass those possible with even the most sophisticated photon radiation delivery techniques. Certain charged particle beams might possess some biologic advantages in terms of tumor kill potential as well as this dosimetric advantage. The particles under consideration for such clinical applications all belong to the category of particles known as hadrons. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various hadron species previously used, currently used or being considered for future use in radiation oncology. PMID:18838888

  1. Radiation environment study of near space in China area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Dongdong; Chen, Xingfeng; Li, Zhengqiang; Mei, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Aerospace activity becomes research hotspot for worldwide aviation big countries. Solar radiation study is the prerequisite for aerospace activity to carry out, but lack of observation in near space layer becomes the barrier. Based on reanalysis data, input key parameters are determined and simulation experiments are tried separately to simulate downward solar radiation and ultraviolet radiation transfer process of near space in China area. Results show that atmospheric influence on the solar radiation and ultraviolet radiation transfer process has regional characteristic. As key factors such as ozone are affected by atmospheric action both on its density, horizontal and vertical distribution, meteorological data of stratosphere needs to been considered and near space in China area is divided by its activity feature. Simulated results show that solar and ultraviolet radiation is time, latitude and ozone density-variant and has complicated variation characteristics.

  2. The Radiation environment and damage in the CDF tracking volume

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tesarek et al.

    2003-12-16

    The authors present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures, the radiation field can be separated into components from beam losses and collisions and can be checked for consistency between the measurements. They compare the radiation measurements with an increase in the leakage currents of the CDF silicon detectors and find reasonable agreement.

  3. The ionizing radiation environment of LDEF prerecovery predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John W., Jr.; Derrickson, James H.; Parnell, T. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was exposed to several sources of ionizing radiation while in orbit. The principal ones were trapped belt protons and electrons, galactic cosmic rays, and albedo particles (protons and neutrons) from the atmosphere. Large solar flares in 1989 may have caused a small contribution. Prior to the recovery of the spacecraft, a number of calculations and estimates were made to predict the radiation exposure of the spacecraft and experiments. These were made to assess whether measurable radiation effects might exist, and to plan the analysis of the large number of radiation measurements available on the LDEF. Calculations and estimates of total dose, particle fluences, linear energy transfer spectra, and induced radioactivity were made. The principal sources of radiation is described, and the preflight predictions are summarized.

  4. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  5. Radiation in controlled environments: influence of lamp type and filter material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.; Bugbee, B.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation in controlled environments was characterized using fluorescent and various high-intensity-discharge (HID) lamps, including metal halide, low-pressure sodium, and high-pressure sodium as the radiation source. The effects of water, glass, or Plexiglas filters on radiation were determined. Photosynthetic photon flux (PPF, 400 to 700 nm), spectra (400 to 1000 nm), shortwave radiation (285-2800 nm), and total radiation (300 to 100,000 nm) were measured, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) and longwave radiation (2800 to 100,000 nm) were calculated. Measurement of PPF alone was not an adequate characterization of the radiation environment. Total radiant flux varied among lamp types at equal PPF. HID lamps provided a lower percentage of longwave radiation than fluorescent lamps, but, when HID lamps provided PPF levels greater than that possible with fluorescent lamps, the amount of longwave radiation was high. Water was the most effective longwave radiation filter. Glass and Plexiglas similarly filtered longwave more than shortwave radiation, but transmission of nonphotosynthetic shortwave radiation was less with Plexiglas than glass. The filter materials tested would not be expected to influence photomorphogenesis because radiation in the action spectrum of phytochrome was not altered, but this may not be the only pigment involved.

  6. Uncertainties in radiation effect predictions for the natural radiation environments of space.

    PubMed

    McNulty, P J; Stassinopoulos, E G

    1994-10-01

    Future manned missions beyond low earth orbit require accurate predictions of the risk to astronauts and to critical systems from exposure to ionizing radiation. For low-level exposures, the hazards are dominated by rare single-event phenomena where individual cosmic-ray particles or spallation reactions result in potentially catastrophic changes in critical components. Examples might be a biological lesion leading to cancer in an astronaut or a memory upset leading to an undesired rocket firing. The risks of such events appears to depend on the amount of energy deposited within critical sensitive volumes of biological cells and microelectronic components. The critical environmental information needed to estimate the risks posed by the natural space environments, including solar flares, is the number of times more than a threshold amount of energy for an event will be deposited in the critical microvolumes. These predictions are complicated by uncertainties in the natural environments, particularly the composition of flares, and by the effects of shielding. Microdosimetric data for large numbers of orbits are needed to improve the environmental models and to test the transport codes used to predict event rates. PMID:11540040

  7. Uncertainties in radiation effect predictions for the natural radiation environments of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1994-01-01

    Future manned missions beyond low earth orbit require accurate predictions of the risk to astronauts and to critical systems from exposure to ionizing radiation. For low-level exposures, the hazards are dominated by rare single-event phenomena where individual cosmic-ray particles or spallation reactions result in potentially catastrophic changes in critical components. Examples might be a biological lesion leading to cancer in an astronaut or a memory upset leading to an undesired rocket firing. The risks of such events appears to depend on the amount of energy deposited within critical sensitive volumes of biological cells and microelectronic components. The critical environmental information needed to estimate the risks posed by the natural space environments, including solar flares, is the number of times more than a threshold amount of energy for an event will be deposited in the critical microvolumes. These predictions are complicated by uncertainties in the natural environments, particularly the composition of flares, and by the effects of shielding. Microdosimetric data for large numbers of orbits are needed to improve the environmental models and to test the transport codes used to predict event rates.

  8. [Radiation Environment Study of Near Space in China Area].

    PubMed

    Mei, Xiao-dong; Sun, Ji-lin; Li, Zheng-qiang; Chen, Xing-feng; Xing, Jin; Xu, Hua; Qie, Li-li; Lü, Yang; Li, Yang; Liu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Aerospace activity in near space (20-50 km) has become a research hotspot for aviation big countries worldwide. Solar radiation study, as the prerequisite to carry out aerospace activity, is facing the barrier of lacking of observation in near space layer. Ozone is the most important factor that affects radiation value in this layer. Based on ECMWF reanalysis data, this input key parameter and its horizontal, vertical and temporal characteristics are analyzedwith results showing obvious regional features in temporal-spatial distribution and varieties. With meteorological data and surface parameters, near space over China is divided into 5 parts. Key factors' value is confirmed over each division. With SBDART radiation transfer model, solar radiation and ultraviolet radiation simulation in near space are conducted separately. Results show that it is influenced by latitude, total ozone and its vertical distribution, radiation varies under complex rules. The average year and monthly solar radiation strengthens changes with latitude reduction, while annual range changes reversely. Air absorbing is related to latitude and land-sea contrast and shows different values and seasonal variations. The ultraviolet radiation over South China Sea reaches its maximum value and minimum annual range, as well as minimum monthly range with value strengthening in summer and weakening in winter. In other areas radiation increases in summer while weakens in winter, monthly range shows double peaks with higher value in spring and autumn, lower in summer and winter. Air absorption in ultraviolet radiation is influenced by multiple factors, vertical varieties over areas besides South China Sea enhance in summer time. The vertical changes of monthly ranges affected by air absorption show consistence in higher and lower layer in June and July, while in other months ranges are bigger in higher layer. PMID:27400492

  9. The Space Radiation Environment and Its Implication for Designing Reliable Electronic Systems: A NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    The contents include the following: The space radiation environment. The effects on electronics. The environment in action NASA approaches to commercial electronics: flight projects; and proactive research. Living with a star space environment testbed status. Final thoughts: atomic interactions; direct ionization; interaction with nucleus.

  10. Recent Studies of Space Radiation Environment in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiishi, Hideki

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has measured the space radiation environment and its effects on spacecraft and astronaut since 1987. We had developed and operated charged-particle monitors, neutron monitors, magnetometers, dosimeters, single-event monitors, electric-potential monitors, and atomic-oxygen monitors onboard eight spacecrafts, and at present, have operated some of them onboard three GEO satellites and three LEO satellites. The obtained space radiation environment data has been gathered into the Space Environment and Effects System database (SEES, http://sees.tksc.jaxa.jp/), and utilized for short-term forecasts for safety operation of spacecraft and manned space mission, for understandings and evaluations of spacecraft anomalies and astronaut dose, and for long-term static and dynamic space radiation environment modelings for reliable design of future plannings. In this presentation, recent studies of space radiation environment in JAXA will be reported.

  11. Computation of radiative fields in opposed-flow flame spread in a microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaraza, Jeanie Ray P.

    The purpose of this thesis is to perform radiation computations in opposed-flow flame spread in a microgravity environment. In this work, the flame spread simulations consider a thermally thin, PMMA fuel in a quiescent, microgravity environment or facing low opposed-flow velocities at ambient conditions of 1 atm and 50-50 volumetric mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The flame spread model, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, is used for numerical simulations in combination with a radiation model. The CFD code is written in FORTRAN language, and a Matlab code is developed for plotting results. The temperature and species fields from CFD computations are used as inputs into the radiation model. Radiative quantities are calculated by using a global balance method along with the total transmittance non-homogeneous model. Radiation effect on thermocouple temperature measurement is investigated. Although this topic is well known, performing radiation correction calculations usually considers surface radiation only and not gas radiation. The inclusion of gas radiation is utilized in predicting the gas temperature that a thermocouple would measure. A narrow bed radiation model is used to determine the average incident radiative flux at a specified location from which a thermocouple temperature measurement is predicted. This study focuses on the quiescent microgravity environment only. The effect of parameters such as thermocouple surface emissivity and bead diameter are also studied. For the main part of this thesis, the effect of gas radiation on the mechanism of flame spread over a thermally thin, solid fuel in microgravity is investigated computationally. Generated radiative fields including thermal and species fields are utilized to investigate the nature of the influence of gas radiation on flame structure as well as its role in the mechanism of opposed-flow flame spread. The opposed-flow configuration considers low flow velocities including a quiescent

  12. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glass. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Harada, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The degradation of glass used on space structures due to electromagnetic and particulate radiation in a space environment was evaluated. The space environment was defined and a simulated space exposure apparatus was constructed. Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance, while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. Specimen selection and preparation, exposure conditions, and the effect of simulated exposure are discussed. A selective bibliography of the effect of radiation on glass is included.

  13. New Hadron Monitor By Using A Gas-Filled RF Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Fasce, Giorgio; Flanagan, Gene; Johnson, Rolland; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-05-01

    It is trend to build an intense neutrino beam facility for the fundamental physics research, e.g. LBNF at Fermilab, T2K at KEK, and CNGS at CERN. They have investigated a hadron monitor to diagnose the primary/secondary beam quality. The existing hadron monitor based on an ionization chamber is not robust in the high-radiation environment vicinity of MW-class secondary particle production targets. We propose a gas-filled RF resonator to use as the hadron monitor since it is simple and hence radiation robust in this environment. When charged particles pass through the resonator they produce ionized plasma via the Coulomb interaction with the inert gas. The beam-induced plasma changes the permittivity of inert gas. As a result, a resonant frequency in the resonator shifts with the amount of ionized electrons. The radiation sensitivity is adjustable by the inert gas pressure and the RF amplitude. The hadron profile will be reconstructed with a tomography technique in the hodoscope which consists of X, Y, and theta layers by using a strip-shaped gas resonator. The sensitivity and possible system design will be shown in this presentation.

  14. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H W; Chen, Yue; Koller, Josef; Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  15. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  16. Design and "As Flown" Radiation Environments for Materials in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; McWilliams, Brett; Altstatt, Richard; Koontz, Steven

    2006-01-01

    A conservative design approach was adopted by the International Space Station Program for specifying total ionizing radiation dose requirements for use in selecting and qualifying materials for construction of the International Space Station. The total ionizing dose design environment included in SSP 30512 Space Station Ionizing Radiation Design Environment is based on trapped proton and electron fluence derived from the solar maximum versions of the AE-8 and AP-8 models, respectively, specified for a circular orbit at 500 km altitude and 51.7 degree inclination. Since launch, the range of altitudes utilized for Space Station operations vary from a minimum of approximately 330 km to a maximum of approximately 405 km with a mean operational altitude less than 400 km. The design environment, therefore, overestimates the radiation environment because the particle flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly is the primary contributor to radiation dose in low Earth orbit and flux within the Anomaly is altitude dependent. In addition, a 2X multiplier is often applied to the design environment to cover effects from the contributions of galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particle events, geomagnetic storms, and uncertainties in the trapped radiation models which are not explicitly included in the design environment. Application of this environment may give radiation dose overestimates on the order of 1OX to 30X for materials exposed to the space environment, suggesting that materials originally qualified for ten year exposures on orbit may be used for longer periods without replacement. In this paper we evaluate the "as flown" radiation environments derived from historical records of the ISS flight trajectory since launch and compare the results with the SSP 30512 design environment to document the magnitude of the radiation dose overestimate provided by the design environment. "As flown" environments are obtained from application of the AE-8/AP-8 trapped particle models along

  17. Characterization of the SPR II generated radiation environments next to and within a guidance system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.

    1994-02-01

    The neutron fluences and spectra and the gamma ray doses inside and in the vicinity of a guidance system exposed to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor II (SPR II) in four configurations have been determined. This project required customization of the environment and the application of new techniques to determine the spectra within the system. The required radiation environment was achieved, and the experimental results clearly demonstrated that the radiation environment inside the system was very different from that seen outside. This example demonstrates very clearly that experimenters must consider the effect the test apparatus may have on the environment inside the system.

  18. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported.

  20. Spacecraft Environments Interactive: Space Radiation and Its Effects on Electronic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. W., Jr.; Hardage, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    The natural space environment is characterized by complex and subtle phenomena hostile to spacecraft. Effects of these phenomena impact spacecraft design, development, and operation. Space systems become increasingly susceptible to the space environment as use of composite materials and smaller, faster electronics increases. This trend makes an understanding of space radiation and its effects on electronic systems essential to accomplish overall mission objectives, especially in the current climate of smaller/better/cheaper faster. This primer outlines the radiation environments encountered in space, discusses regions and types of radiation, applies the information to effects that these environments have on electronic systems, addresses design guidelines and system reliability, and stresses the importance of early involvement of radiation specialists in mission planning, system design, and design review (part-by-part verification).

  1. Radiation environment and shielding for early manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Stephen B.; Mccann, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of shielding a crew during early manned Mars missions is discussed. Requirements for shielding are presented in the context of current astronaut exposure limits, natural ionizing radiation sources, and shielding inherent in a particular Mars vehicle configuration. An estimated range for shielding weight is presented based on the worst solar flare dose, mission duration, and inherent vehicle shielding.

  2. Using a Commercial Ethernet PHY Device in a Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Jeremy; Arani, Michael; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This work involved placing a commercial Ethernet PHY on its own power boundary, with limited current supply, and providing detection methods to determine when the device is not operating and when it needs either a reset or power-cycle. The device must be radiation-tested and free of destructive latchup errors. The commercial Ethernet PHY's own power boundary must be supplied by a current-limited power regulator that must have an enable (for power cycling), and its maximum power output must not exceed the PHY's input requirements, thus preventing damage to the device. A regulator with configurable output limits and short-circuit protection (such as the RHFL4913, rad hard positive voltage regulator family) is ideal. This will prevent a catastrophic failure due to radiation (such as a short between the commercial device's power and ground) from taking down the board's main power. Logic provided on the board will detect errors in the PHY. An FPGA (field-programmable gate array) with embedded Ethernet MAC (Media Access Control) will work well. The error detection includes monitoring the PHY's interrupt line, and the status of the Ethernet's switched power. When the PHY is determined to be non-functional, the logic device resets the PHY, which will often clear radiation induced errors. If this doesn't work, the logic device power-cycles the FPGA by toggling the regulator's enable input. This should clear almost all radiation induced errors provided the device is not latched up.

  3. Radiation environment and hazards for a geosynchronous space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. J.; Fishman, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the potential radiation hazards to the crew and equipment of a geosynchronous space station. Tissue dose rates for electron, bremsstrahlung, galactic cosmic rays, and solar proton events are included for parking longitudes of 110 and 290 degrees at orbit inclinations of 0, 30, and 45 degrees.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice after seed ground simulated radiation and spaceflight explains the radiation effects of space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Jinming; Liang, Shujian; Lei, Huang; Shenyi, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing

    In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed space-flights with ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and found that the protein expression profiles were changed after seed space environment exposures. Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved. Rice seed is in the process of dormant of plant development, showing high resistance against stresses, so the highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to seeds. To further investigate the radiation effects of space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and compared between the proteomes of seed irra-diated plants and seed spaceflight (20th recoverable satellite) plants from the same rice variety. Space ionization shows low-dose but high energy particle effects, for searching the particle effects, ground radiations with the same low-dose (2mGy) but different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3KeV/µm-C, 30KeV/µm-C, 31KeV/µm-Ne, 62.2KeV/µm-C, 500Kev/µm-Fe) were performed; using 2-D DIGE coupled with clustering and principle component analysis (PCA) for data process and comparison, we found that the holistic protein expression patterns of plants irradiated by LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles were most similar to spaceflight. In addition, although space environment presents a low-dose radiation (0.177 mGy/day on the satellite), the equivalent simulated radiation dose effects should still be evaluated: radiations of LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles with different cumulative doses (2mGy, 20mGy, 200mGy, 2000mGy) were further carried out and resulted that the 2mGy radiation still shared most similar proteomic profiles with spaceflight, confirming the low-dose effects of space radiation. Therefore, in the protein expression level

  5. Exploration Technology Developments Program's Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Darty, Ronald C.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary Objective: 1) A computational tool to accurately predict electronics performance in the presence of space radiation in support of spacecraft design: a) Total dose; b) Single Event Effects; and c) Mean Time Between Failure. (Developed as successor to CR ME96.) Secondary Objectives: 2) To provide a detailed description of the natural radiation environment in support of radiation health and instrument design: a) In deep space; b) Inside the magnetosphere; and c) Behind shielding.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation environment of pollen and its effect on pollen germination. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The damage to pollen caused by natural ultraviolet radiation was investigated. Experimental and literature research into the UV radiation environment is reported. Viability and germination of wind and insect pollinated species were determined. Physiological, developmental, and protective factors influencing UV sensitivity of binucleate, advanced binucleate, and trinucleate pollen grains are compared.

  7. The ultraviolet radiation environment of pollen and its effect on pollen germination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The damage to pollen caused by natural ultraviolet radiation was investigated. Experimental and literature research into the UV radiation environment is reported. Viability and germination of wind and insect pollinated species were determined. Physiological, developmental, and protective factors influencing UV sensitivity of binucleate, advanced binucleate, and trinucleate pollen grains are compared.

  8. The PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J. M.

    2009-03-10

    Dielectron measurements by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC are limited by the combinatorial background from electrons and positrons which are not produced in the same pair. The Hadron Blind Detector will allow a substantial reduction of this background by correctly identifying dielectrons from photon conversions and pion Dalitz decays which dominate the signal in the low mass region of the spectrum. Triple GEM stacks, with a CsI photocathode deposited on the uppermost GEM, detect Cherenkov light produced by electrons in a CF{sub 4} radiator. The transparency of CF{sub 4}, high quantum efficiency of CsI in the UV, and absence of a window between the gas radiator and the GEMs allow a large photoelectron yield, while minimizing the hadron signal. Results from the HBD in RHIC's Run-7 and preparations for upcoming runs are discussed.

  9. Hybrid microelectronics in severe temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. W.; Draper, B. L.; Elliott, J. K.

    1981-03-01

    A JFET/thick film hybrid microcircuit technology tolerant to high temperatures and radiation were developed. These hybrids functioned for 1000 hours at 300 C and were tested to radiation levels of 1.4 x 10 to the 9th power rad gamma and 5 x 10 to the 15h power neutrons/cu cm. High temperature operation during irradiation should allow functionally to greater than 10 to the 10th power rad gamma and 10 to the 16th power n/cu cm. Related technologies ar being incorporated in geophysical downhole instrumentation, jet engine monitors, nuclear reactor safety systems, and certain space probes. A survey of test results and a prediction of further obtainable tolerance are presented.

  10. Radiation and EMI effects in the NIF environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stathis, P.

    1994-07-01

    In order to determine the magnitude of the noise problem in the target chamber area of the National Ignition Facility, a literature search was conducted to determine the sensitivities of various components that would be exposed to the radiation and electro magnetic interference fields in the target chamber area. Additionally, Test Program experience and data were also used in determining some of these sensitivities. Using the predicted fluences, it was found that there will be significant effects on fibers cables, and electronic components inside the target chamber; radiation hardening will be required. In the area between the target chamber walls and the target room walls, there will also be some hardening required. Some estimates of electro magnetic interference were made that indicate shielding will need to be incorporated in the design.

  11. Operation of silicon microstrip detectors in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustinsky, J.S.; Alde, D.M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Jeppesen, R.G.; Lane, D.W.; Leitch, M.J.; Lillberg, J.W.; Lopez, T.A.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Peng, J.C. ); Brooks, B.M.; Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E. ); Lederman, L.M.; Schub, M.H. ); Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Gounder, K.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Mishra, C.S. (Fermi National

    1990-01-01

    A Silicon Microstrip Spectrometer was recently installed and operated in an 800 GeV proton beamline at Fermilab as a major new component of experiment E789. The detectors received an estimated radiation exposure of up to 7.8 {times} 10{sup 12} minimum ionizing particles per cm{sup 2} over a period of two months. We report on the changes in detector performance that we have observed following preliminary data analysis. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  13. Iodine-131 tositumomab (Bexxar) in a radiation oncology environment

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, Roger M. . E-mail: macklir@ccf.org

    2006-10-01

    Iodine-131 (I-131) tositumomab (Bexxar; GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC) is one of two recently approved radiolabeled antibodies directed against the CD20 surface antigen found on normal B cells and in more than 95% of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The compound itself is formulated as an IgG2a immunoglobulin radiolabeled with the mixed beta/gamma emitter I-131. Multicenter clinical trials have repeatedly shown impressive clinical responses (20-40% complete response rates and 60-80% overall response rates) in the patient groups for whom this treatment is indicated. Treatment-related toxicity is generally extremely mild and typically involves only reversible hematopoietic suppression and (in some cases) a risk of treatment-induced hypothyroidism. Owing to Radiation safety concerns necessitated by the clinical use of this targeted radiopharmaceutical, it is important for radiation oncology departments wishing to participate in the care of these patients to establish methodologies and standard operating procedures for safe and efficient departmental use. This summary reviews the pertinent background information related to the current clinical experience with I-131 tositumomab and highlights some of the major opportunities for the participation of radiation oncology in the patient evaluation and treatment process. I-131 tositumomab provides an excellent example of the way in which the increasingly important new field of 'targeted therapy' intersects with the practice of clinical radiotherapy. The author contends that it will be worth the time and effort involved in establishing a firm basis for the development of a comprehensive program for systemic targeted radiopharmaceutical therapies (STaRT) within Radiation medicine domain.

  14. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  15. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  16. Effects of the specular Orbiter forward radiators on a typical Spacelab payload thermal environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L. D.; Humphries, W. R.; Littles, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Orbiter radiators, having a specular reflection, must be considered when determining the design environment for payloads which can view the forward deployed radiators. Unlike most surfaces on the Orbiter, which reflect energy diffusely, the radiators are covered with a highly specular silverized Teflon material, with high emissivity, and have a concave contour, producing a local concentration of reflected energy towards the region of angle incidence. The combined effects of radiator specularity and geometry were analyzed using the Thermal Radiation Analysis System (TRASYS II), a specialized ray trace program, and a generalized Monte-Carlo-based thermal radiation program. Data given for a 0 deg payload inclination angle at orbital noon at 3.454 m indicate that the maximum total flux and average flux can increase 173% and 63%, respectively, when compared to diffuse radiators.

  17. Estimation of The Radiation Environment Based On The NASA Ap-8 and Ae-8 Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the earth's trapped radiation environment, as described by the NASA models AP-8 and AE-8. We include a description of the sources and structure of the trapped radiation belts, and their dependence on external factors. After describing how to use the models to predict the environment, we present data from various space missions, and compare those data to the models. This shows the limits and strengths of the models. Finally, we describe alternative models of the trapped radiation belts, and discuss why they have not been widely adopted yet.

  18. The measured radiation environment within Spacelabs 1 and 2 and comparison with predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    A set of passive and active radiation detectors was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation (VFI) in an attempt to measure the radiation environment in the Spacelab (SL) module and on the pallet. SL 1 carried 4 passive and 2 active detector packages which were used to evaluate the radiation environment within the spacecraft and SL 2 carried 2 passive VFI units on the pallet. Dose equivalents of 330 + or - 70 mrem and 537 + or - 37 mrem were measured in the SL 1 module and SL 2 pallet, respectively.

  19. [The radiation environment in the Russian Federation according to the results of radiohygienic certification].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring nuclear and radiation safety in the use of atomic energy is one of the most important constituents of the Russian Federation's security, which is laid down in the "Foundations of Public Policy in the nuclear and radiation safety of the Russian Federation till 2010 and Further Prospects". The radiation safety in an area is determined by not only the number of radiation objects in it, the grade of their potential radiation hazard, their maintenance, the nature of use, but also by the measures ensuring radiation safety and preventing possible radiation accidents, and the readiness for liquidation of their consequences, and the effective supervision of whether the requirements are carried out. To assure constant and effective control over radiation safety, a uniform system for the information provision of radiation safety has been developed and introduced in the Russian Federation since 1998, which includes radiohygienic certification and the uniform state system for monitoring and considering the radiation doses exposed by the residents of Russia. The 2007 radiohygienic certification covered more than 16000 organizations dealing with the sources of ionizing irradiations. A total of 202.7 million medical diagnostic radiological procedures were performed in Russia in 2007. It should be noted that the dose of medical irradiation is reduced. In general, the radiation environment in the Russian Federation is satisfactory, but in a number of its regions there are reasonably serious problems associated with the population's radiation safety. PMID:19645102

  20. Inclusion of Radiation Environment Variability in Total Dose Hardness Assurance Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Stauffer, C.; Phan, A.; McClure, S. S.; Ladbury, R. L.; Pellish, J. A.; Campola, M. J.; LaBel, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to parts categorization for total dose hardness assurance methods. It is shown that it can have a significant impact. A modified approach is developed that uses current environment models more consistently and replaces the design margin concept with one of failure probability.

  1. Potential of a New Lunar Surface Radiator Concept for Hot Lunar Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Dustin A.; Vogel, Matthew R.; Trevino, Luis A.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    The optimum radiator configuration in hot lunar thermal environments is one in which the radiator is parallel to the ground and has no view to the hot lunar surface. However, typical spacecraft configurations have limited real estate available for top-mounted radiators, resulting in a desire to use the spacecraft s vertically oriented sides. Vertically oriented, flat panel radiators will have a large view factor to the lunar surface, and thus will be subjected to significant incident lunar infrared heat. Consequently, radiator fluid temperatures will need to exceed approx.325 K (assuming standard spacecraft radiator optical properties) in order to provide positive heat rejection at lunar noon. Such temperatures are too high for crewed spacecraft applications in which a heat pump is to be avoided. A recent study of vertically oriented radiator configurations subjected to lunar noon thermal environments led to the discovery of a novel radiator concept that yielded positive heat rejection at lower fluid temperatures. This radiator configuration, called the Upright Lunar Terrain Radiator Assembly (ULTRA), has exhibited superior performance to all previously analyzed concepts in terms of heat rejection in the lunar noon thermal environment. A key benefit of the ULTRA is the absence of louvers or other moving parts and its simple geometry. Analysis of the ULTRA for a lunar extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support system (PLSS) is shown to provide moderate heat rejection, on average, at all solar incident angles assuming an average radiator temperature of 294 K, whereas prior concepts exhibited insignificant heat rejection or heat absorption at higher incident angles. The performance of the ULTRA for a lunar lander is also discussed and compared to the performance of a vertically oriented, flat panel radiator at various lunar latitudes.

  2. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In space, astronauts are constantly bombarded with energetic particles. The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the NASA Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. Among the identified radiation risks are cancer, acute and late CNS damage, chronic and degenerative tissue decease, and acute radiation syndrome. The term "safely" means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences can be defined. The NASA Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting the identified radiation risks. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus, the fourth element develops computer algorithms to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining

  3. Predictions of energetic particle radiation in the close Martian environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan M. P.; Dryer, M.; Fry, C. D.; Sun, W.; Lario, D.; Deehr, C. S.; Sanahuja, B.; Afonin, V. A.; Verigin, M. I.; Kotova, G. A.

    2005-03-01

    Intense, prolonged solar flare activity during March 1989 was used to provide a retrospective scenario for predictions of associated interplanetary shocks and accompanying particle radiation at planet Mars. Shocks from five major flares were simulated to hit both the Earth and Mars during the interval 9-23 March 1989. The simulated scenario was provided by the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 (HAFv.2) solar wind model. Since part of the generally required inputs for the model (specifically metric radio Type II coronal shock speeds) were not available, the shock speeds were iteratively determined via a "calibration" that uses limited IMP 8 particle and sudden storm commencement (SSC) data as proxies for shock arrival at the Earth. The shocks from four major solar flares were, thereby, found to arrive at Mars at times that are appropriate to explain solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events recorded in situ by the particle radiation detector experiments Solar Low Energy Detector (SLED) and Low Energy Telescope (LET) aboard Phobos-2. Supporting measurements were provided by the magnetometer (MAGMA) and plasma spectrometer (TAUS) experiments. A gap in the spacecraft records occurred at the simulated time of arrival of the fifth flare-associated shock. There were some uncertainties attending the selection of certain of the events deemed to be "parent" flares. Such uncertainty can be expected in view of the incomplete set of energetic particle, plasma, and magnetic field measurements made at relevant times at both the Earth and Mars (the latter planet was then located at a distance of 1.6 AU, at about 78° east of the Sun-Earth line). Use of the HAFv.2 solar wind model affords a 4-day lead time between predicted and measured space weather events at Mars, with an error of approximately ±12 hours. Solar radiation events of the magnitude studied occur often enough to warrant consideration in the design of both manned and unmanned expeditions to

  4. Capacitor-based isolation amplifiers for harsh radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Francisco J.; Zong, Yi; de Agapito, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) capacitor-based isolation amplifiers were irradiated at the Portuguese Research Reactor (PRR) in order to determine its tolerance to the displacement damage and total ionising dose (TID). The set of experimental data shows that some of these devices are suitable for zones inside future nuclear facilities where the expected total radiation damage would be below 2.2×1013 1-MeV neutron/cm2 and 230 Gy (Si). However, some drawbacks must be taken into account by the electronic designers such as the increase of the output offset voltage and the slight modification of the transmission gain.

  5. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  6. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment. PMID:24324275

  7. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  8. Expectations for hohlraum environment driven by spatially compressed flying radiation case at intermediate currents

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Rogers, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The radiation environment produced by the magnetic implosion of a hot, low density plasma and its stagnation on an axial cushion (a Flying Radiation Case) is modeled using a two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic code and drive parameters for the PFZA-Z machine pulsed power machine. The authors consider the effects of instability growth in the plasma during the implosion, its reassembly on the cushion, and plasma interactions with shaped electrodes. The radiation environment within the pinch and in an axial side hohlraum are modeled. They also consider effects of the pinch on the side hohlraum. The computational approach has been successful in modeling the implosion and radiation output of Z-pinches on the Pegasus facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and on the Saturn and PFZA-Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. Material Response of One-Dimensional, Steady-State Transpiration Cooling in Radiative and Convective Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a transpiration-cooled porous heat-shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. Essential features of this approach are "two-flux method" for radiative transfer process and "two-temperature" assumption for solid and gas temperatures. Incident radiative-convective heatings are specified as boundary conditions. Sample results are shown using porous silica with CO2 transpiration and some parameters quantitatively show the effect on this transpiration cooling system. Summarized maps for mass injection rate, porosity and blowing correction factor for radiation are obtained in order to realize such a cooling system.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, S.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M.; Kurochkin, I.; Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S.

    2016-07-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarized, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  11. Radiation Environment on Mir Orbital Station During Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space radiation poses a significant risk for the stay and rotation cycle of astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS is in the same orbit as the Mir orbital station and as such, data acquired onboard the Mir station is of direct applicability to the ISS astronaut. During the seven NASA-Mir missions, data were acquired with a variety of both passive and active detectors, including measurements of astronaut doses. This paper describes these measurements and comparisons with measurements carried out by other groups. It is shown that trapped protons absorbed can be very well described by quadratic equation in In(p), where p is the atmospheric density. Similarly, the galactic cosmic ray absorbed dose is nearly exponentially related to the deceleration potential. The average radiation quality factor with the ICRP-60 definition is about 2.44. Using the measured quality factor, absorbed crew doses, and estimates of neutron dose equivalent, leads to crew stay times as short as 9 months during a deep solar minimum. The data are compared with in vivo dose estimates using chromosome aberrations (simple translocations and total exchange) on same astronauts.

  12. Precise realization of the thermal radiation environment for an optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloy, Kyle; Sherman, Jeff; Phillips, Nathaniel; Hinkley, Nathan; Oates, Chris; Ludlow, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The Stark shift due to thermal radiation contributes one of the largest known perturbations to the clock transition frequency of optical lattice clocks. Consequently, the uncertainty stemming from this shift has played a dominant role in the total uncertainty of these standards. Following recent works focused on atomic response factors (e.g., the differential polarizability), uncertainty in this perturbation is now limited by imprecise knowledge of the environment itself. Here we present progress towards precise realization of the thermal radiation environment in a Yb optical lattice clock by trapping the atoms in a highly uniform radiation shield at a well-known temperature. We characterize the non-ideal aspects of this approach, including less than unit emissivity, contamination of the blackbody environment from the ambient environment, and thermal non-uniformities.

  13. Using Space Weather Variability in Evaluating the Radiation Environment Design Specifications for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Bruce, Margaret B.; Howard, James W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program, initiated to fulfill the Vision for Space Exploration, will create a new generation of vehicles for servicing low Earth orbit, the Moon, and beyond. Space radiation specifications for space system hardware are necessarily conservative to assure system robustness for a wide range of space environments. Spectral models of solar particle events and trapped radiation belt environments are used to develop the design requirements for estimating total ionizing radiation dose, displacement damage, and single event effects for Constellation hardware. We first describe the rationale using the spectra chosen to establish the total dose and single event design environmental specifications for Constellation systems. We then compare variability of the space environment to the spectral design models to evaluate their applicability as conservative design environments and potential vulnerabilities to extreme space weather events

  14. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  15. Impact of the Near-Earth Space Environment on Human Radiation Exposure at Commercial Airline Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Kunches, J.; Kress, B. T.; Murray, J. J.; Wilson, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    There is a growing concern for the health and safety of commercial aircrew and passengers due to their exposure to ionizing radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET), particularly at high latitudes. The International Commission of Radiobiological Protection (ICRP), the EPA, and the FAA consider the crews of commercial aircraft as radiation workers. The FAA reports that pregnant crew members may run a risk as high as 1.3 per thousand births of severe illness to their children as a result of background radiation exposure. During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, radiation exposure can exceed annual limits, and the number of serious health effects is expected to be quite high if precautions are not taken. Health concerns for frequent-flyer passengers are similar to the health concerns of the crew. There is a need for a capability to monitor background radiations levels at commercial airline altitudes and to provide analytical input for airline operations decisions for altering flight paths and altitudes for the mitigation and reduction of radiation exposure levels during a SEP event. Efforts are currently underway to develop a global, nowcast (real-time) capability for calculating ionizing radiation exposure at commercial airline altitudes. The state-of-the-art in physics-based transport of high energy galactic cosmic ray and solar cosmic ray particles will be presented. Paramount to reliable real-time transport calculations is an accurate and timely specification of the boundary conditions, such as the incident differential energy flux and geomagnetic cutoff rigidity, using a combination of satellite observations and empirical space radiation environment models. However, empirical models of the near-Earth radiation environment can only advance with continued observations and development of physics-based models of the heliosphere and the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In this paper we also discuss the state-of-the-art in space

  16. Hardening electronic devices against very high total dose radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, B.; Shedd, W.; Roosild, S.; Dolan, R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of hardening silicon semiconductor devices to the high neutron and gamma radiation levels and greater than 10 to the eighth power rads required for the NERVA nuclear engine development are discussed. A comparison is made of the high dose neutron and gamma hardening potential of bipolar, metal insulator semiconductors and junction field effect transistors. Experimental data is presented on device degradation for the high neutron and gamma doses. Previous data and comparisons indicate that the JFET is much more immune to the combined neutron displacement and gamma ionizing effects than other transistor types. Experimental evidence is also presented which indicates that p channel MOS devices may be able to meet the requirements.

  17. Low-radiation environment affects the development of protection mechanisms in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Fratini, E; Carbone, C; Capece, D; Esposito, G; Simone, G; Tabocchini, M A; Tomasi, M; Belli, M; Satta, L

    2015-05-01

    Very little is known about the influence of environmental radiation on living matter. In principle, important information can be acquired by analysing possible differences between parallel biological systems, one in a reference-radiation environment (RRE) and the other in a low-radiation environment (LRE). We took advantage of the unique opportunity represented by the cell culture facilities at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, where environment dose rate reduction factors in the underground (LRE), with respect to the external laboratory (RRE), are as follows: 10(3) for neutrons, 10(7) for directly ionizing cosmic rays and 10 for total γ-rays. Chinese hamster V79 cells were cultured for 10 months in both RRE and LRE. At the end of this period, all the cultures were kept in RRE for another 6 months. Changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPX) and spontaneous mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus were investigated. The results obtained suggest that environmental radiation might act as a trigger of defence mechanisms in V79 cells, specifically those in reference conditions, showing a higher degree of defence against endogenous damage as compared to cells grown in a very low-radiation environment. Our findings corroborate the hypothesis that environmental radiation contributes to the development of defence mechanisms in today living organisms/systems. PMID:25636513

  18. Space Environment Effects: Low-Altitude Trapped Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, S. L.; Pfitzer, K. A.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate models of the Earth's trapped energetic proton environment are required for both piloted and robotic space missions. For piloted missions, the concern is mainly total dose to the astronauts, particularly in long-duration missions and during extravehicular activity (EVA). As astronomical and remote-sensing detectors become more sensitive, the proton flux can induce unwanted backgrounds in these instruments. Due to this unwanted background, the following description details the development of a new model for the low-trapped proton environment. The model is based on nearly 20 years of data from the TIRO/NOAA weather satellites. The model, which has been designated NOAAPRO (for NOAA protons), predicts the integral omnidirectional proton flux in three energy ranges: >16, >36, and >80 MeV. It contains a true solar cycle variation and accounts for the secular variation in the Earth's magnetic field. It also extends to lower values of the magnetic L parameter than does AP8. Thus, the model addresses the major shortcomings of AP8.

  19. Performance Characterization of Digital Optical Data Transfer Systems for Use in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effects in photonic and microelectronic components can impact the performance of high-speed digital optical data link in a variety of ways. This segment of the short course focuses on radiation effects in digital optical data links operating in the MHz to GHz regime. (Some of the information is applicable to frequencies above and below this regime) The three basic component level effects that should be considered are Total Ionizing Dose (TID), Displacement Damage Dose (DDD) and Single Event Effects (SEE). In some cases the system performance degradation can be quantified from component level tests, while in others a more holistic characterization approach must be taken. In Section 2.0 of this segment of the Short Course we will give a brief overview of the space radiation environment follow by a summary of the basic space radiation effects important for microelectronics and photonics listed above. The last part of this section will give an example of a typical mission radiation environment requirements. Section 3.0 gives an overview of intra-satellite digital optical data link systems. It contains a discussion of the digital optical data link and it's components. Also, we discuss some of the important system performance metrics that are impacted by radiation effects degradation of optical and optoelectronic component performance. Section 4.0 discusses radiation effects in optical and optoelectronic components. While each component effect will be discussed, the focus of this section is on degradation of passive optical components and SEE in photodiodes (other mechanisms are covered in segment II of this short course entitled "Photonic Devices with Complex and Multiple Failure Modes"). Section 5.0 will focus on optical data link system response to the space radiation environment. System level SEE ground testing will be discussed. Then we give a discussion of system level assessment of data link performance when operating in the space radiation environment.

  20. Radiative effects of aerosols on the environment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    Anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of aerosol precursors and aerosols over China are among the highest in major countries of the world. Due to large emissions of soot and dust, aerosol absorption is high. Based on the observed direct and diffuse irradiance, a single scattering albedo of about 0.8 is derived for two large agri/eco/industrial areas. Aerosol direct effect can exert various environmental impacts in China. Photochemical activities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are significantly reduced because of reductions in photolysis rates and in emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons. Crop yields under optimal conditions can be reduced due to the reduction in surface solar irradiance. The most significant aerosol radiative perturbation is in changing the air-surface interaction and diurnal evolution of ABL. Reductions in various surface heat fluxes due to aerosols depend on soil moisture. Over a relatively dry surface, the evaporation has a small change, leading to the largest decrease of surface skin temperature at noon. Over a relatively wet surface, a substantial reduction in evaporation results in the largest surface cooling in the early morning. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) can be reduced by an amount comparable to the observed decrease of DTR. The longwave absorption of aerosols can lead to an increase of the daily minimum temperature and contributes to about 20% of the decrease in the DTR. The near-surface air temperature has the largest cooling in the early morning because the ABL is shallow and the temperature is sensitive to the radiative perturbation. As a result of the reduced sensible heat flux, the surface layer becomes more stable. Moreover, the aerosol heating enhances the stabilization of surface layer and in turn further reduces the sensible heat flux. As a result the ABL height can be reduced substantially. This will have many important ramifications, including trapping/accumulation of air pollutants, and perturbing the water

  1. Potential vascular damage from radiation in the space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griem, M. L.; Robotewskyj, A.; Nagel, R. H.

    1994-10-01

    Cultured endothelial cells of blood vessels have a Do of 2 Gy for X-rays. A dose of 0.5 Gy of X-rays has an acute effect on vessel diameter. The vessels may show other acute effects such as change in permeability including a change in the blood brain barrier. Changes occurring from late effects of chronic exposure in vascular architecture include telangiectasia and decrease in vascular density. Changes in the perivascular connective tissue particularly collagen may play a role in these changes. After charged particle exposure of 15 and 30 Gy, radiation changes in the blood brain barrier and vascular changes are noted in the nervous system. These long term changes are recorded by PET, MRI, and CT imaging. Chronic exposure to alpha particles causes vascular damage in compact bone resulting in bone infarcts. Using tandem scanning confocal microscopy in-situ imaging of the capillaries and collagen of the papillary dermis provides a non-invasive method of serial recording of changes in irradiated microvasculature.

  2. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara; Burnley, Pamela; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Haber, Daniel; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  3. A Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. The term safely means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences (for example, excess lifetime fatal cancer risk) can be defined. The Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the understanding of health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus the fourth element develops computer codes to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  4. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A

    2008-12-31

    The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

  5. Development of n+-in-p large-area silicon microstrip sensors for very high radiation environments - ATLAS12 design and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Y.; Edwards, S. O.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Wilson, J. A.; Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D.; Carter, J. R.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Robinson, D.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Tackmann, K.; Betancourt, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Wiik-Fucks, L.; Clark, A.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez Sevilla, S.; Ashby, J.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Doherty, F.; Eklund, L.; McMullen, T.; McEwan, F.; O`Shea, V.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Takashima, R.; Chilingarov, A.; Fox, H.; Affolder, A. A.; Allport, P. P.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Wonsak, S.; Wormald, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Palni, P.; Seidel, S.; Taylor, A.; Toms, K.; Wang, R.; Hessey, N. P.; Valencic, N.; Arai, Y.; Hanagaki, K.; Dolezal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Bohm, J.; Mikestikova, M.; Bevan, A.; Beck, G.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grillo, A. A.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Schumacher, D.; Seiden, A.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.; Paganis, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Motohashi, K.; Todome, K.; Yamaguchi, D.; Hara, K.; Hagihara, M.; Garcia, C.; Jimenez, J.; Lacasta, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Soldevila, U.

    2014-11-01

    We have been developing a novel radiation-tolerant n+-in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments, aiming for application in the high luminosity large hadron collider. The sensors are fabricated in 6 in., p-type, float-zone wafers, where large-area strip sensor designs are laid out together with a number of miniature sensors. Radiation tolerance has been studied with ATLAS07 sensors and with independent structures. The ATLAS07 design was developed into new ATLAS12 designs. The ATLAS12A large-area sensor is made towards an axial strip sensor and the ATLAS12M towards a stereo strip sensor. New features to the ATLAS12 sensors are two dicing lines: standard edge space of 910 μm and slim edge space of 450 μm, a gated punch-through protection structure, and connection of orphan strips in a triangular corner of stereo strips. We report the design of the ATLAS12 layouts and initial measurements of the leakage current after dicing and the resistivity of the wafers.

  6. Geant4 Predictions of Energy Spectra in Typical Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabra, M. S.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of energy spectra inside spacecraft is important for protecting astronauts as well as sensitive electronics from the harmful effects of space radiation. Such knowledge allows one to confidently map the radiation environment inside the vehicle. The purpose of this talk is to present preliminary calculations for energy spectra inside a spherical shell shielding and behind a slab in typical space radiation environment using the 3D Monte-Carlo transport code Geant4. We have simulated proton and iron isotropic sources and beams impinging on Aluminum and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) targets at energies of 0.2, 0.6, 1, and 10 GeV/u. If time permits, other radiation sources and beams (_, C, O) and targets (C, Si, Ge, water) will be presented. The results are compared to ground-based measurements where available.

  7. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation.

  8. Geant4 predictions of energy spectra in typical space radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, M. S.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of energy spectra inside spacecraft is important for protecting astronauts as well as sensitive electronics from the harmful effects of space radiation. Such knowledge allows one to confidently map the radiation environment inside the vehicle. The purpose of this talk is to present preliminary calculations for energy spectra inside a spherical shell shielding and behind a slab in typical space radiation environment using the 3D Monte-Carlo transport code Geant4. We have simulated proton and iron isotropic sources and beams impinging on Aluminum and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) targets at energies of 0.2, 0.6, 1, and 10 GeV/u. If time permits, other radiation sources and beams (α, C, O) and targets (C, Si, Ge, water) will be presented. The results are compared to ground-based measurements where available.

  9. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  10. THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Tian, Feng; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-02-15

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV transiting