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Sample records for haemophilus ducreyi treponema

  1. Simultaneous PCR detection of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 from genital ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Orle, K A; Gates, C A; Martin, D H; Body, B A; Weiss, J B

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay with colorimetric detection was devised for the simultaneous amplification of DNA targets from Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2. By using target-specific oligonucleotides in a microwell format, 298 genital ulcer swab specimens collected in New Orleans during three intervals from 1992 through 1994 were evaluated. The results of the M-PCR assay were compared with the results of dark-field microscopy and H. ducreyi culture on two different culture media. HSV culture results were available for 99 specimens collected during the third interval. Confirmatory PCR assays targeting different gene sequences for each of the three organisms were used to validate the M-PCR results. Specimens were resolved as positive for the determination of sensitivity if the reference diagnostic test was positive or if the results of both the M-PCR and the confirmatory PCR were positive. The resolved sensitivities of M-PCR for HSV, H. ducreyi, and T. pallidum were 100, 98.4, and 91%, respectively. The resolved sensitivities of HSV culture, H. ducreyi culture, and dark-field microscopy were 71.8, 74.2, and 81%, respectively. These results indicate that the M-PCR assay is more sensitive than standard diagnostic tests for the detection of HSV, H. ducreyi, and T. pallidum from genital ulcers. PMID:8748271

  2. Chancroid and Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, S A

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent of chancroid, one of the genital ulcerative diseases. H. ducreyi is the major cause of genital ulcer disease in Africa and Southeast Asia and is of increasing concern in the United States. Definitive diagnosis of chancroid requires the isolation and identification of H. ducreyi, but isolation of this organism is difficult and the available medium is not optimal for all strains. Fluorescent antibody and serologic tests are of limited value. In general, our knowledge of this organism is rather limited, and indeed, recent studies have questioned the placement of H. ducreyi in the genus Haemophilus. H. ducreyi has relatively few biochemical activities, and epidemiologic studies are limited because there are limited phenotypic markers available for strain typing. Specific virulence factors of H. ducreyi have yet to be identified. Antimicrobial resistance in H. ducreyi is of special concern, as this organism has acquired both gram-negative and gram-positive resistance determinants. In addition, some of these determinants can be mobilized and transferred to other Haemophilus species or to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:2650859

  3. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections

    PubMed Central

    González-Beiras, Camila; Marks, Michael; Chen, Cheng Y.; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi infections is poorly documented because of difficulties in confirming microbiological diagnoses. We evaluated published data on the proportion of genital and nongenital skin ulcers caused by H. ducreyi before and after introduction of syndromic management for genital ulcer disease (GUD). Before 2000, the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi ranged from 0.0% to 69.0% (35 studies in 25 countries). After 2000, the proportion ranged from 0.0% to 15.0% (14 studies in 13 countries). In contrast, H. ducreyi has been recently identified as a causative agent of skin ulcers in children in the tropical regions; proportions ranged from 9.0% to 60.0% (6 studies in 4 countries). We conclude that, although there has been a sustained reduction in the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi, this bacterium is increasingly recognized as a major cause of nongenital cutaneous ulcers. PMID:26694983

  4. Swine model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, M M; San Mateo, L R; Orndorff, P E; Almond, G; Kawula, T H

    1995-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a strict human pathogen that causes sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. We infected domestic swine with H. ducreyi 35000, resulting in the development of cutaneous ulcers histologically resembling human chancroid lesions. Intraepidermal lesions progressed from pustules to ulcers containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes and were accompanied by a dermal inflammatory infiltrate containing T cells and macrophages. H. ducreyi was recovered from lesions up to 17 days after inoculation, and pigs did not develop immunity to reinfection with the challenge strain. Features of the model include inoculation through abrasions in the epidermis, ambient housing temperatures for infected pigs, the ability to deliver multiple different inocula to a single host, and the availability of monoclonal antibodies against porcine immune cells permitting immunohistochemical characterization of the host immune response to H. ducreyi infection. PMID:7622236

  5. DNA probes for the identification of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Parsons, L M; Shayegani, M; Waring, A L; Bopp, L H

    1989-07-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi ATCC 33922, a virulent, well-characterized strain, was used to construct a genomic library in a bacteriophage expression vector. Three DNA fragments were selected for use as probes on the basis of their ability to encode H. ducreyi-specific proteins, as demonstrated by reactivity with rabbit polyclonal antiserum. With DNA-DNA hybridization, the three probes, labeled with 32P, reacted strongly with 16 strains of H. ducreyi obtained from a variety of sources. Thirty-seven other bacterial isolates, representing 33 different species and including organisms likely to be encountered in the urogenital tract, were also tested with the three probes. Twenty-eight of these isolates, including the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, showed no hybridization with the probes. In addition, herpes simplex virus-infected tissue culture cells and Treponema pallidum-infected rabbit testicular fluid were also completely nonreactive. Nine isolates, six belonging to other Haemophilus species and three belonging to Pasteurella species, reacted weakly with the probes when approximately 3.0 x 10(7) to 6.0 x 10(7) CFU was tested. When 10(5) to 10(6) CFU of these organisms was tested, the weak reactions could no longer be seen. Yet this number of H. ducreyi still reacted strongly. In fact, the three probes consistently detected 10(4) CFU of H. ducreyi in pure and mixed cultures and even produced a weak signal when only 10(3) CFU was present. It is clear from our results that use of these probes will greatly facilitate the laboratory diagnosis of this genital pathogen. PMID:2788660

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi infections--time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    McEntegart, M. G.; Hafiz, S.; Kinghorn, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    As the literature on Haemophilus ducreyi and clinical chancroid is reviewed, it becomes obvious that many significant findings have been forgotten over the years. As a result, from the time of Ducrey's original description of the organism in 1890 until about 1977, both clinical and laboratory experts in the United Kingdom believed that H. ducreyi infections were rare, generally acquired abroad, and almost impossible to confirm in the routine laboratory! In consequence it was a common view that it was not worth looking for H. ducreyi until all other possible causes of genital ulceration had been excluded. Moreover, the search for such an infection stopped as soon as any other cause for the patient's lesions had been found. A decision to ignore this 'rule' in Sheffield led to our looking for H. ducreyi in specimens from an unselected series of patients with genital ulceration including a number with herpes genitalis infections. The surprise finding of H. ducreyi in circumstances suggesting that it was a secondary invader made us re-examine the whole question of H. ducreyi infections and chancroid and wonder if the same organism can act as a primary pathogen and as a secondary invader. An account of the media and methods we used and of the characteristics of the organism is presented. In an attempt to find out more about the characteristic coherent colonies of H. ducreyi we studied them with the scanning electron microscope. It is clear that the whole subject of H. ducreyi infections has been neglected in the United Kingdom, but we believe that interest has now been aroused and progress will surely follow. Some areas for further investigation are suggested. Images Plate 1 PMID:7153512

  7. Evaluation of multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 in the diagnosis of genital ulcer disease in the Rakai District, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Suntoke, T R; Hardick, A; Tobian, A A R; Mpoza, B; Laeyendecker, O; Serwadda, D; Opendi, P; Gaydos, C A; Gray, R H; Wawer, M J; Quinn, T C; Reynolds, S J

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop a real-time PCR assay that reliably and accurately detects the predominant sexually transmitted aetiological agents of genital ulcer disease (GUD) (Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2)) and to assess the use of real-time PCR diagnostic testing in a rural African field site. Methods: Two multiplex real-time PCR reactions were used to detect H ducreyi/and HSV-1/HSV-2 in ulcer swabs from 100 people with symptomatic genital ulcers in rural Rakai, Uganda. Results were compared with syphilis, HSV-1 and HSV-2 serology. Results: Of 100 GUD samples analysed from 43 HIV positive and 57 HIV negative individuals, 71% were positive for one or more sexually transmitted infection (STI) pathogens by real-time PCR (61% for HSV-2, 5% for T pallidum, 3% for HSV-1, 1% for H ducreyi and 1% for dual H ducreyi/HSV-2). The frequency of HSV in genital ulcers was 56% (32/57) in HIV negative individuals and 77% (33/43) in HIV positive individuals (p=0.037). Assay reproducibility was evaluated by repeat PCR testing in the USA with 96% agreement (κ=0.85). Conclusions: STI pathogens were detected in the majority of GUD swab samples from symptomatic patients in Rakai, Uganda, by real-time PCR. HSV-2 was the predominant cause of genital ulcers. Real-time PCR technology can provide sensitive, rapid and reproducible evaluation of GUD aetiology in a resource-limited setting. PMID:19066198

  8. A multicenter prospective trial to asses a new real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex-1/2 and Haemophilus ducreyi in genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Glatz, M; Juricevic, N; Altwegg, M; Bruisten, S; Komericki, P; Lautenschlager, S; Weber, R; Bosshard, P P

    2014-12-01

    Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex virus types 1 or 2 (HSV-1/2) and Haemophilus ducreyi are sexually transmitted pathogens that can cause genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers. Laboratory evaluation of these pathogens in ulcers requires different types of specimens and tests, increasing the risk of improper specimen handling and time lapse until analysis. We sought to develop a new real-time PCR (TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR) to facilitate the detection of T. pallidum, HSV-1/2 and H. ducreyi in ulcers. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR was tested (i) in a retrospective study on 193 specimens of various clinical origin and (ii) in a prospective study on 36 patients with genital, anal or oropharyngeal ulcers (ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT01688258). The results of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR were compared with standard diagnostic methods (T. pallidum: serology, dark field microscopy; HSV-1/2: PCR; H. ducreyi: cultivation). Sensitivity and specificity of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR for T. pallidum were both 100%, for HSV-1 100% and 98%, and for HSV-2 100% and 98%, respectively. T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 were detected in 53% and 22% of patients in the prospective study; H. ducreyi was not detected. In the prospective study, 5/19 (26%) specimens were true positive for T. pallidum in the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR but non-reactive in the VDRL. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR is sensitive and specific for the detection of T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 in routine clinical practice and it appears superior to serology in early T. pallidum infections. PMID:24909546

  9. Chancroid and Haemophilus ducreyi: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Trees, D L; Morse, S A

    1995-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that causes the sexually transmitted infection chancroid. Chancroid is a major genital ulcerative disease in Africa, Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America and is of increasing concern in the United States. Genital ulcerative disease and chancroid in particular have been associated with facilitating the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. The diagnosis of chancroid based on the clinical appearance of the genital lesion or on the isolation of H. ducreyi on selective medium is relatively insensitive. However, recent advances in nonculture diagnostic tests have enhanced our ability to diagnose chancroid. There has been renewed interest in understanding the pathogenesis of H. ducreyi. In vitro and in vivo models have been developed to help identify important virulence determinants. Through the use of biochemical and molecular techniques, macromolecular components that may be important in virulence have been identified. PMID:7553570

  10. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  11. Haemophilus ducreyi Associated with Skin Ulcers among Children, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization’s yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  12. Characterization of a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Willson, P J; Albritton, W L; Slaney, L; Setlow, J K

    1989-01-01

    Plasmid pLS88 from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus ducreyi encoded resistance determinants for sulfonamides and streptomycin related to those of RSF1010 and for kanamycin related to Tn903 but lacked the inverted repeats of the transposon. Its host range included Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Escherichia coli; and it was compatible with pDM2 and RSF1010. Images PMID:2684012

  13. Characterization of ampicillin resistance plasmids from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Handsfield, H H; Peters, D; Holmes, K K; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    Seven strains of Haemophilus ducreyi from diverse geographic origins were analyzed for their plasmid content. All strains were multiply resistant, but only resistance to ampicillin was transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. The H. ducreyi plasmids encoding for ampicillin resistance were 7.4, 5.7, and 3.6 megadaltons and encoded for part or all of TnA, and ampicillin transposon. The relatedness of these plasmids was examined by restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA-DNA homology with isolated DNA fragments from TnA. Images PMID:6282212

  14. Assessing the antibiotic potential of essential oils against Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemophilus ducreyi is the bacterium responsible for the genital ulcer disease chancroid, a cofactor for the transmission of HIV, and it is resistant to many antibiotics. With the goal of exploring possible alternative treatments, we tested essential oils (EOs) for their efficacy as antimicrobial agents against H. ducreyi. Methods We determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), Eugenia caryophyllus (clove) and Thymus satureioides (thyme) oil against 9 strains of H. ducreyi using the agar dilution method. We also determined the minimum lethal concentration for each oil by subculturing from the MIC plates onto fresh agar without essential oil. For both tests, we used a 2-way ANOVA to evaluate whether antibiotic-resistant strains had a different sensitivity to the oils relative to non-resistant strains. Results All 3 oils demonstrated excellent activity against H. ducreyi, with MICs of 0.05 to 0.52 mg/mL and MLCs of 0.1-0.5 mg/mL. Antibiotic-resistant strains of H. ducreyi were equally susceptible to these 3 essential oils relative to non-resistant strains (p = 0.409). Conclusion E. caryophyllus, C. verum and T. satureioides oils are promising alternatives to antibiotic treatment for chancroid. PMID:24885682

  15. Susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to spectinomycin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hafiz, S; Jones, B M; Kinghorn, G R; Duerden, B I

    1986-01-01

    Using an agar dilution technique with standardised inocula prepared by ultrasonication, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of spectinomycin were determined for 66 strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, eight of which were beta lactamase producers. All strains were sensitive to concentrations of spectinomycin, which were well within the therapeutic ranges attained with normal dosage. The MIC50 and MIC90 were 8 mg/l, (range 0.007-16 mg/l). PMID:2942458

  16. Fine tangled pili expressed by Haemophilus ducreyi are a novel class of pili.

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, R J; Ketterer, M; Apicella, M A; Spinola, S M

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi synthesizes fine, tangled pili composed predominantly of a protein whose apparent molecular weight is 24,000 (24K). A hybridoma, 2D8, produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) that bound to a 24K protein in H. ducreyi strains isolated from diverse geographic locations. A lambda gt11 H. ducreyi library was screened with MAb 2D8. A 3.5-kb chromosomal insert from one reactive plaque was amplified and ligated into the pCRII vector. The recombinant plasmid, designated pHD24, expressed a 24K protein in Escherichia coli INV alpha F that bound MAb 2D8. The coding sequence of the 24K gene was localized by exonuclease III digestion. The insert contained a 570-bp open reading frame, designated ftpA (fine, tangled pili). Translation of ftpA predicted a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 21.1K. The predicted N-terminal amino acid sequence of the polypeptide encoded by ftpA was identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified pilin and lacked a cleavable signal sequence. Primer extension analysis of ftpA confirmed the lack of a leader peptide. The predicted amino acid sequence lacked homology to known pilin sequences but shared homology with the sequences of E. coli Dps and Treponema pallidum antigen TpF1 or 4D, proteins which associate to form ordered rings. An isogenic pilin mutant, H. ducreyi 35000ftpA::mTn3(Cm), was constructed by shuttle mutagenesis and did not contain pili when examined by electron microscopy. We conclude that H. ducreyi synthesizes fine, tangled pili that are composed of a unique major subunit, which may be exported by a signal sequence independent mechanism. PMID:8550517

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  18. Susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to ampicillin and sulbactam in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B M; Hafiz, S; Duerden, B I

    1986-01-01

    The MICs of ampicillin, ampicillin plus sulbactam in equal proportions, and a range of ampicillin concentrations with a constant 0.5 micrograms/ml concentration of sulbactam were determined for 66 strains of Haemophilus ducreyi by an agar dilution technique with standardized inocula prepared by ultrasonication. Fifty-five strains were susceptible to ampicillin alone (MIC range, 0.06 to 1 microgram/ml). The MICs for the 11 resistant strains were (micrograms per milliliter): range, 8 to greater than 16; MIC for 50% of the strains tested (MIC50), greater than 16; MIC90, greater than 16; 8 of them produced beta-lactamase. In the presence of an equal concentration of sulbactam, the MICs for ampicillin-resistant strains were lowered to (micrograms per milliliter): range, 0.125 to 2; MIC50, 0.25; MIC90, 1. In the presence of a fixed 0.5-micrograms/ml concentration of sulbactam, the MICs for the resistant strains were (micrograms per milliliter): range, 0.125 to 2; MIC50, 0.125; MIC90, 0.25. Sulbactam-ampicillin appears to be suitable for the treatment of H. ducreyi infections, especially those caused by ampicillin-resistant strains. PMID:3015016

  19. Use of pyocin to select a Haemophilus ducreyi variant defective in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Karalus, R; Apicella, M; Melaugh, W; Lesse, A J; Gibson, B W

    1994-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, a cause of genital ulcer disease in developing countries, appears to facilitate the heterosexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus in Africa. Despite an increase in studies of this gram-negative human pathogen, little is known about the pathogenesis of chancroid. Our studies have shown that the lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of H. ducreyi may play an important role in ulcer formation. Monoclonal antibody and mass spectrometric analyses identified a terminal trisaccharide present on H. ducreyi LOS that is immunochemically similar to human paragloboside. This epitope is present on the LOS of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and it may be the site of attachment for pyocin lysis. We have used pyocin, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to select LOS variants with sequential saccharide deletions from N. gonorrhoeae. On the basis of the similarities between N. gonorrhoeae and H. ducreyi LOS, we employed the same technique to determine if H. ducreyi strains were susceptible to pyocin lysis. In this study, we report the generation of a pyocin N-resistant H. ducreyi strain which synthesizes a truncated version of the parental LOS. Further studies have shown that this H. ducreyi variant has lost the terminal LOS epitope defined by monoclonal antibody 3F11. This report demonstrates that H. ducreyi is sensitive to pyocins and that this technique can be used to generate H. ducreyi LOS variants. Such variants could be used in comparative studies to relate LOS structure to biologic function in the pathogenesis of chancroid. Images PMID:8188362

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of 11 Haemophilus ducreyi Isolates from Children with Cutaneous Lesions in Vanuatu and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Samantha S.; Abrams, A. Jeanine; Ballard, Ronald C.; Simpson, Shirley V.; Taleo, Fasihah; Lahra, Monica M.; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori; Trees, David L.; Asiedu, Kingsley; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid and has recently been shown to be a significant cause of cutaneous lesions in tropical or subtropical regions where yaws is endemic. Here, we report the draft genome assemblies for 11 cutaneous strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, isolated from children in Vanuatu and Ghana. PMID:27389258

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of 11 Haemophilus ducreyi Isolates from Children with Cutaneous Lesions in Vanuatu and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Allan; Katz, Samantha S; Abrams, A Jeanine; Ballard, Ronald C; Simpson, Shirley V; Taleo, Fasihah; Lahra, Monica M; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori; Trees, David L; Asiedu, Kingsley; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid and has recently been shown to be a significant cause of cutaneous lesions in tropical or subtropical regions where yaws is endemic. Here, we report the draft genome assemblies for 11 cutaneous strains of Haemophilus ducreyi, isolated from children in Vanuatu and Ghana. PMID:27389258

  2. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Jordan R; Roberts, Sally A; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts. PMID:25774793

  3. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Non-Sexually Transmitted Strains of Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Jordan R.; Roberts, Sally A.; Humphreys, Tricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts. PMID:25774793

  4. Outer membrane protein DsrA is the major fibronectin-binding determinant of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; White, C Dinitra; Nepluev, Igor; Throm, Robert E; Spinola, Stanley M; Elkins, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The ability to bind extracellular matrix proteins is a critical virulence determinant for skin pathogens. Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of the genital ulcer disease chancroid, binds extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin (FN). We investigated H. ducreyi FN binding and report several important findings about this interaction. First, FN binding by H. ducreyi was greatly increased in bacteria grown on heme and almost completely inhibited by hemoglobin. Second, wild-type strain 35000HP bound significantly more FN than did a dsrA mutant in two different FN binding assays. Third, the expression of dsrA in the dsrA mutant restored FN binding and conferred the ability to bind FN to a non-FN-binding Haemophilus influenzae strain. Fourth, an anti-DsrA monoclonal antibody partially blocked FN binding by H. ducreyi. The hemoglobin receptor, the collagen-binding protein, the H. ducreyi lectin, the fine-tangle pili, and the outer membrane protein OmpA2 were not involved in H. ducreyi FN binding, since single mutants bound FN as well as the parent strain did. However, the major outer membrane protein may have a minor role in FN binding by H. ducreyi, since a double dsrA momp mutant bound less FN than did the single dsrA mutant. Finally, despite major sequence differences, DsrA proteins from both class I and class II H. ducreyi strains mediated FN and vitronectin binding. We concluded that DsrA is the major factor involved in FN binding by both classes of H. ducreyi strains. PMID:18212073

  5. Role of the Haemophilus ducreyi Ton System in Internalization of Heme from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Christopher; Totten, Pat A.; Olsen, Bonnie; Thomas, Christopher E.

    1998-01-01

    By cloning into Escherichia coli and construction of isogenic mutants of Haemophilus ducreyi, we showed that the hemoglobin receptor (HgbA) is TonB dependent. An E. coli hemA tonB mutant expressing H. ducreyi hgbA grew on low levels of hemoglobin as a source of heme only when an intact H. ducreyi Ton system plasmid was present. In contrast, growth on heme by the E. coli hemA tonB mutant expressing hgbA was observed only at high concentrations of heme, was TonB independent, and demonstrated that H. ducreyi HgbA was not sufficient to function as a typical TonB-dependent heme receptor in E. coli. Allelic replacement of the wild-type H. ducreyi exbB, exbD, and tonB loci with the exbB, exbD, and tonB deletion resulted in an H. ducreyi isogenic mutant unable to utilize hemoglobin but able to utilize hemin at the same levels as the parent strain to fulfill its heme requirement. This finding confirms the TonB dependence of HgbA-mediated hemoglobin utilization and suggests that uptake of hemin in H. ducreyi is TonB independent. Additionally, the H. ducreyi Ton system mutant synthesized increased amounts of HgbA and other heme-regulated outer membrane proteins, consistent with derepression of these proteins due to lower intracellular heme and/or iron concentrations in the mutant. Sequencing of the Ton system genes revealed that the arrangement of the genes was exbB exbD tonB. The proximity and structure of these genes suggested that they are transcribed as an operon. This arrangement, as well as the DNA and deduced amino acid sequences of these H. ducreyi genes, was most similar to those from other pasteurellae. PMID:9423852

  6. Defining Potential Vaccine Targets of Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin DsrA

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, William G.; Choudhary, Neelima R.; Stewart, Shelley M.; Alam, S. Munir; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Elkins, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. Strains of H. ducreyi are grouped in two classes (I and II) based on genotypic and phenotypic differences, including those found in DsrA, an outer membrane protein belonging to the family of multifunctional trimeric autotransporter adhesins. DsrA is a key serum resistance factor of H. ducreyi that prevents binding of natural IgM at the bacterial surface and functions as an adhesin to fibronectin, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and human keratinocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed to recombinant DsrA (DsrAI) from prototypical class I strain 35000HP to define targets for vaccine and/or therapeutics. Two anti-DsrAI MAbs bound monomers and multimers of DsrA from genital and non-genital/cutaneous H. ducreyi strains in a Western blot and reacted to the surface of the genital strains; however, these MAbs did not recognize denatured or native DsrA from class II strains. In a modified extracellular matrix protein binding assay using viable H. ducreyi, one of the MAbs partially inhibited binding of fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin to class I H. ducreyi strain 35000HP, suggesting a role for anti-DsrA antibodies in preventing binding of H. ducreyi to extracellular matrix proteins. Standard ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using a peptide library representing full-length, mature DsrAI revealed the smallest nominal epitope bound by one of the MAbs to be MEQNTHNINKLS. Taken together, our findings suggest that this epitope is a potential target for an H. ducreyi vaccine. PMID:25897604

  7. Virtual screening of phytochemicals to novel targets in Haemophilus ducreyi towards the treatment of Chancroid

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Pranav; Chaudhary, Ritu; Singh, Ajeet

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, drugs are discovered by testing chemically synthesized compounds against a battery of in vivo biological screens. Information technology and Omic science enabled us for high throughput screening of compound libraries against biological targets and hits are then tested for efficacy in cells or animals. Chancroid, caused by Haemophilus ducreyi is a public health problem and has been recognized as a cofactor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission. It facilitates HIV transmission by providing an accessible portal entry, promoting viral shedding, and recruiting macrophages as well as CD4 cells to the skin. So, there is a requirement to develop an efficient drug to combat Chancroid that can also diminish HIV infection. In-silico screening of potential inhibitors against the target may facilitate in detection of the novel lead compounds for developing an effective chemo preventive strategy against Haemophilus ducreyi. The present study has investigated the effects of approximately 1100 natural compounds that inhibit three vital enzymes viz. Phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase, Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and Fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase of Haemophilus ducreyi in reference to a commercial drug Rifabutin. Results reveal that the lead compound uses less energy to bind to target. The lead compound parillin has also been predicted as less immunogenic in comparison to Rifabutin. Further, better molecular dynamics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and ADME-T properties establish it as an efficient chancroid preventer. PMID:25258485

  8. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K.; Roberts, Sally A.; Robson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea. PMID:26847887

  9. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K; Roberts, Sally A; Robson, Jenny; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea. PMID:26847887

  10. Identification of tandem genes involved in lipooligosaccharide expression by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M K; Klesney-Tait, J; Lumbley, S; Walters, K A; Joffe, A M; Radolf, J D; Hansen, E J

    1997-01-01

    A transposon insertion mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000 possessing a truncated lipooligosaccharide (LOS) failed to bind the LOS-specific monoclonal antibody 3E6 (M. K. Stevens, L. D. Cope, J. D. Radolf, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 63:2976-2982, 1995). This transposon was found to have inserted into the first of two tandem genes and also caused a deletion of chromosomal DNA upstream of this gene. These two genes, designated lbgA and lbgB, encoded predicted proteins with molecular masses of 25,788 and 40,236 Da which showed homology with proteins which function in lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic in other gram-negative bacteria. The tandem arrangement of the lbgA and lbgB genes was found to be conserved among H. ducreyi strains. Isogenic LOS mutants, constructed by the insertion of a cat cartridge into either the lbgA or the lbgB gene, expressed an LOS phenotype indistinguishable from that of the original transposon-derived LOS mutant. The wild-type LOS phenotype could be restored by complementation with the appropriate wild-type allele. These two LOS mutants proved to be as virulent as the wild-type parent strain in an animal model. A double mutant with a deletion of the lbgA and lbgB genes yielded equivocal results when its virulence was tested in an animal model. PMID:9009327

  11. Production of monoclonal antibodies specific for Haemophilus ducreyi: a screening method to discriminate specific and cross-reacting antibodies.

    PubMed

    Odumeru, J A; Alfa, M J; Martin, C F; Ronald, A R; Jay, F T

    1989-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiological agent of chancroid. The organism shares extensive immunological cross-reactivity with other Haemophilus species. This presents substantial difficulties for the production of specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A competition ELISA was devised for hybridoma screening which allowed the detection of H. ducreyi-specific antibody-producing hybridoma cultures during the initial screening process. With this screening method, seven MAbs specific for H. ducreyi were obtained in a single cell fusion exercise. The specificities of the 7 MAbs were demonstrated by direct ELISA and dot immunobinding assays against several strains each of H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Five of the MAbs reacted against all ten strains of H. ducreyi. These MAbs may permit the development of rapid and efficient immunodiagnostics for chancroid. The principle of the competition ELISA for hybridoma screening should be widely applicable to the development of specific MAbs to other organisms in which immunological cross-reactivity is an impediment to hybridoma screening by conventional methods. PMID:2787274

  12. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Michael P.; Post, Deborah M. B.; Rinker, Sherri D.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Fortney, Kate R.; Zwickl, Beth W.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Baye, Fitsum M.; Katz, Barry P.; Spinola, Stanley M.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs), including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap) transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA), confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB) in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. PMID:25902140

  13. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L; Munson, Robert S; Liu, Yunlong; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans. PMID:26930707

  14. DksA and (p)ppGpp Have Unique and Overlapping Contributions to Haemophilus ducreyi Pathogenesis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Concerta L.; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R.; Ellinger, Sheila; Johnson, Paula; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Janowicz, Diane M.; Katz, Barry P.; Munson, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is important for bacterial survival in nutrient limiting conditions. For maximal effect, (p)ppGpp interacts with the cofactor DksA, which stabilizes (p)ppGpp's interaction with RNA polymerase. We previously demonstrated that (p)ppGpp was required for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans. Here, we constructed an H. ducreyi dksA mutant and showed it was also partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. To understand the roles of (p)ppGpp and DksA in gene regulation in H. ducreyi, we defined genes potentially altered by (p)ppGpp and DksA deficiency using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). In bacteria collected at stationary phase, lack of (p)ppGpp and DksA altered expression of 28% and 17% of H. ducreyi open reading frames, respectively, including genes involved in transcription, translation, and metabolism. There was significant overlap in genes differentially expressed in the (p)ppGpp mutant relative to the dksA mutant. Loss of (p)ppGpp or DksA resulted in the dysregulation of several known virulence determinants. Deletion of dksA downregulated lspB and rendered the organism less resistant to phagocytosis and increased its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Both mutants had reduced ability to attach to human foreskin fibroblasts; the defect correlated with reduced expression of the Flp adhesin proteins in the (p)ppGpp mutant but not in the dksA mutant, suggesting that DksA regulates the expression of an unknown cofactor(s) required for Flp-mediated adherence. We conclude that both (p)ppGpp and DksA serve as major regulators of H. ducreyi gene expression in stationary phase and have both overlapping and unique contributions to pathogenesis. PMID:26056381

  15. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA Appear To Play Distinct yet Complementary Roles in Regulation of Envelope-Related Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi. PMID:25201944

  16. Characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC Mutants in In Vitro and In Vivo Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Latimer, Jo L.; Ward, Christine K.; Deng, Kaiping; Blick, Robert; Lumbley, Sheryl R.; Ison, Catherine A.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi expresses a soluble cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) that is encoded by the cdtABC gene cluster and can be detected in culture supernatant fluid by its ability to kill HeLa cells. The cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC genes of H. ducreyi were cloned independently into plasmid vectors, and their encoded proteins expressed singly or in various combinations in an Escherichia coli background. All three gene products had to be expressed in order for E. coli-derived culture supernatant fluids to demonstrate cytotoxicity for HeLa cells. Isogenic H. ducreyi cdtA and cdtB mutants were constructed and used in combination with the wild-type parent strain and a previously described H. ducreyi cdtC mutant (M. K. Stevens, J. L. Latimer, S. R. Lumbley, C. K. Ward, L. D. Cope, T. Lagergard, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 67:3900–3908, 1999) to determine the relative contributions of the CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC proteins to CDT activity. Expression of CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC appeared necessary for H. ducreyi-derived culture supernatant fluid to exhibit cytotoxicity for HeLa cells. Whole-cell sonicates and periplasmic extracts from the cdtB and cdtC mutants had no effect on HeLa cells, whereas these same fractions from a cdtA mutant had a very modest cytotoxic effect on these same human cells. CdtA appeared to be primarily associated with the H. ducreyi cell envelope, whereas both CdtB and CdtC were present primarily in the soluble fraction from sonicated cells. Both the cdtA mutant and the cdtB mutant were found to be fully virulent in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for experimental chancroid. PMID:11500438

  17. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi Increases Sensitivity to Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Activates the CpxRA Regulon ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Sherri D.; Trombley, Michael P.; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial. PMID:21444663

  18. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA with alum, CpG or imiquimod generates a persistent humoral immune response that recognizes the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Samo, Melissa; Choudhary, Neelima R; Riebe, Kristina J; Shterev, Ivo; Staats, Herman F; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2016-02-24

    The Ducreyi serum resistance A (DsrA) protein of Haemophilus ducreyi belongs to a large family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins termed trimeric autotransporter adhesins responsible for resistance to the bactericidal activity of human complement (serum resistance), agglutination and adhesion. The ability of DsrA to confer serum resistance and bind extracellular matrix proteins lies in its N-terminal passenger domain. We have previously reported that immunization with a recombinant form of the passenger domain of DsrA, rNT-DsrA, in complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant, protects against a homologous challenge in swine. We present herein the results of an immunogenicity study in mice aimed at investigating the persistence, type of immune response, and the effect of immunization route and adjuvants on surrogates of protection. Our results indicate that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with alum elicited antisera with comparable bacterial surface reactivity to that obtained with complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. At that dose, high titers and bacterial surface reactivity persisted for 211 days after the first immunization. Administration of rNT-DsrA with CpG or imiquimod as adjuvants elicited a humoral response with similar quantity and quality of antibodies (Abs) as seen with Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, intramuscular administration of rNT-DsrA elicited high-titer Abs with significantly higher reactivity to the bacterial surface than those obtained with subcutaneous immunization. All rNT-DsrA/adjuvant combinations tested, save CpG, elicited a Th2-type response. Taken together, these findings show that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with the adjuvants alum, CpG or imiquimod elicits high-quality Abs with reactivity to the bacterial surface that could protect against an H. ducreyi infection. PMID:26812077

  19. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one that most people are familiar with is Haemophilus influenzae type b, or Hib. There’s a vaccine that can prevent disease caused by Hib, but not the other types of Haemophilus influenzae . Types of Infection Haemophilus influenzae Can Cause Infections ...

  20. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like many parents, you may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  1. Haemophilus influenza organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prior to the widespread use of the H. influenza vaccine). The large red-colored objects are cells in the spinal fluid. A vaccine to prevent infection by Haemophilus influenza (type B) is available as one of the ...

  2. Morphology of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Ovcinnikov, N M; Delektorskij, V V

    1966-01-01

    In recent years many investigations have been carried out on the morphology of Treponema pallidum by means of the electron microscope, and the use of ultra-thin sections has shown up a number of structural details. However, there is still need for much more evidence before the internal structure of treponemes can be elucidated fully and the functions of the structures interpreted. To provide such evidence, the authors have examined under the electron microscope negative-stained treponemes and ultra-thin sections, using both cultivated strains and treponemes obtained direct from syphilids in people suffering from fresh secondary syphilis. It has been shown that treponemes have a complex structure. T. pallidum has a two-layered outer wall, a cytoplasmic membrane proper, cytoplasm and a bunch of fibrils following a different path in different places on the treponeme. The sites of insertion of the fibrils (the basal granules) were investigated; structures similar to mesosomes and nucleoids were found. Cysts and granular forms are described. PMID:5332527

  3. HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZA DISEASES SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Haemophilus Influenzae System at NIP compiles information on all U.S. Haemophilus influenzae invasive disease cases reported to CDC via NETSS since 1991 (managed by EPO and NIP), or via active surveillance in several locales since 1989 (managed by NCIP). Information collected...

  4. Treponema berlinense sp. nov. and Treponema porcinum sp. nov., novel spirochaetes isolated from porcine faeces.

    PubMed

    Nordhoff, Marcel; Taras, David; Macha, Moritz; Tedin, Karsten; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Wieler, Lothar H

    2005-07-01

    Limit-dilution procedures were used to isolate seven, helically coiled bacterial strains from faeces of swine that constituted two unidentified taxa. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed highest similarity values with species of the genus Treponema indicating that the isolates are members of this genus. Strain 7CPL208(T), as well as five further isolates, and 14V28(T) displayed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Treponema pectinovorum ATCC 33768(T) (92.3%) and Treponema parvum OMZ 833(T) (89.9%), respectively. Polar lipid profiles distinguished 7CPL208(T) and 14V28(T) from each other as well as from related species. Based on their phenotypic and genotypic distinctiveness, strains 7CPL208(T) and 14V28(T) are suggested to represent two novel species of the genus Treponema, for which the names Treponema berlinense sp. nov. and Treponema porcinum sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain for Treponema berlinense is 7CPL208(T) (=ATCC BAA-909(T)=CIP 108244(T)=JCM 12341(T)) and for Treponema porcinum 14V28(T) (=ATCC BAA-908(T)=CIP 108245(T)=JCM 12342(T)). PMID:16014500

  5. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  6. Surface Mucopolysaccharides of Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The viscous mucoid fluid that accumulates within syphilitic lesions may be due to breakdown of host tissue during infection, or may be synthesized by Treponema pallidum. Experiments were performed to investigate the acidic mucopolysaccharides that occur at the surface of T. pallidum (Nichols strain). These mucopolysaccharides were demonstrated by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin and by agglutination with wheat germ agglutinin and soybean agglutinin. The polycations ruthenium red and toluidine blue influenced treponemal survival. Concentrations of both compounds at 200 μg/ml inhibited survival, whereas concentrations at 0.1μg/ml enhanced survival. The mucopolysaccharide concentration within the mucoid fluid that accumulates during intratesticular infection was determined by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin; it ranged from 10,000 μg/ml to less than 8 μg/ml. The addition of this mucoid fluid to treponemal suspensions resulted in differing effects on T. pallidum survival. Some preparations were inhibitory, and others were stimulatory. Commercial preparations of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate at 400, 200, 100, and 50 μg/ml were detrimental to treponemal survival. The organisms exhibited pronounced clumping in the presence of the higher concentrations of hyaluronic acid. These clumps of treponemes were comprised of mucopolysaccharides as shown by acidified bovine serum albumin and toluidine blue reactions and by hyaluronidase degradation. Results are discussed in terms of the derivation and potential role of acidic mucopolysaccharides at the surface of T. pallidum. Images PMID:156696

  7. Haemophilus haemolyticus Isolates Causing Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Briere, Elizabeth C.; Katz, Lee S.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Clark, Thomas A.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    We report seven cases of Haemophilus haemolyticus invasive disease detected in the United States, which were previously misidentified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. All cases had different symptoms and presentations. Our study suggests that a testing scheme that includes reliable PCR assays and standard microbiological methods should be used in order to improve H. haemolyticus identification. PMID:22573587

  8. Opsonization of Treponema pallidum is mediated by immunoglobulin G antibodies induced only by pathogenic treponemes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, J M; Baker-Zander, S A; Lukehart, S A

    1993-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to Leptospira interrogans, Borrelia hermsii, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter, reactive to shared spirochetal antigens, failed to enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum by macrophages, while immunoglobulin G to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue and Treponema paraluiscuniculi promoted phagocytosis. Opsonic antibodies are directed to pathogen-restricted, not shared spirochetal, antigens. PMID:8423106

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tristram, Stephen; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major community-acquired pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Meningitis and bacteremia due to type b strains occur in areas where the protein-conjugated type b vaccine is not in use, whereas nontypeable strains are major causes of otitis media, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and pneumonia. Antibiotic resistance in this organism is more diverse and widespread than is commonly appreciated. Intrinsic efflux resistance mechanisms limit the activity of the macrolides, azalides, and ketolides. β-Lactamase production is highly prevalent worldwide and is associated with resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin. Strains with alterations in penicillin binding proteins, particularly PBP3 (β-lactamase negative ampicillin resistant and β-lactamase positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistant), are increasing in prevalence, particularly in Japan, with increasing resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and many cephalosporins, limiting the efficacy of expanded-spectrum cephalosporins against meningitis and of many oral cephalosporins against other diseases. Most strains remain susceptible to the carbapenems, which are not affected by penicillin binding protein changes, and the quinolones. The activity of many oral agents is limited by pharmacokinetics achieved with administration by this route, and the susceptibility of isolates based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters is reviewed. PMID:17428889

  10. Culture and PCR Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Binks, M. J.; Grimwood, K.; Chang, A. B.; Leach, A. J.; Smith-Vaughan, H.

    2012-01-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen. PMID:22553240

  11. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ...

  12. Treponema diversity in root canals with endodontic failure

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega, Leticia M. M.; Delboni, Maraisa G.; Martinho, Frederico C.; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C. R.; Gomes, Brenda P. F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to investigate the prevalence of eight oral Treponemas (Treponema denticola, T. amylovorum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. pectinovorum, T. socranskii, T. vicentii and T. lecithinolyticum) in teeth with endodontic treatment failure and periapical lesion. Methods: Samples were taken from 40 root canals presenting endodontic failure and periapical lesion. DNA extraction was performed and Nested-PCR technique was used for the detection of Treponema species using specific primers. Results: Treponemas was detected in 56.5% of the samples analyzed (22/39). Individual root canals yielded a maximum of 6 target Treponema species. T. denticola (30.8%) and T. maltophilum (30.8%) were the most frequently detected species followed by T. medium (20.5%), T. socranskii (20.5%), T. pectinovorum (17.9%) and T. vicentii (17.9%). Positive association was verified between T. denticola and T. maltophilum such as T. medium (P<.05). T. lecithinolyticum was positively associated with intraradicular post (P<.05). Conclusion: The present study revealed that a wide variety of Treponema species plays a role in persistent/secondary infection turning the root canal microbiota even more complex than previously described by endodontic literature. PMID:23408792

  13. Cellular fatty acid composition of Haemophilus equigenitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, C; Miyagawa, E; Mitani, K; Nakazawa, M; Isayama, Y

    1982-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of eight Haemophilus equigenitalis strains was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. All strains showed a grossly similar pattern characterized by large amounts of 18:1 and 16:0. The amounts of 16:1, 18:2, 18:0, 3-OH 14:0, 3-OH 16:0, and 3-OH 18:1 were relatively small. PMID:7096556

  14. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  15. Molecular tools for differentiation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa; Richmond, Peter C.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus are closely related bacteria that reside in the upper respiratory tract. NTHi is associated with respiratory tract infections that frequently result in antibiotic prescription whilst H. haemolyticus is rarely associated with disease. NTHi and H. haemolyticus can be indistinguishable by traditional culture methods and molecular differentiation has proven difficult. This current review chronologically summarizes the molecular approaches that have been developed for differentiation of NTHi from H. haemolyticus, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each target and/or technique. We also provide suggestions for the development of new tools that would be suitable for clinical and research laboratories. PMID:25520712

  16. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Gronow, Sabine; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeytun, Ahmet; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Evaluation of New Biomarker Genes for Differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Raydel D.; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S.; Vuong, Jeni T.; Bell, Melissa E.; Juni, Billie A.; Lowther, Sara A.; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  18. Evaluation of new biomarker genes for differentiating Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Theodore, M Jordan; Anderson, Raydel D; Wang, Xin; Katz, Lee S; Vuong, Jeni T; Bell, Melissa E; Juni, Billie A; Lowther, Sara A; Lynfield, Ruth; MacNeil, Jessica R; Mayer, Leonard W

    2012-04-01

    PCR detecting the protein D (hpd) and fuculose kinase (fucK) genes showed high sensitivity and specificity for identifying Haemophilus influenzae and differentiating it from H. haemolyticus. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated two distinct groups for H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus. PMID:22301020

  19. Identifying Haemophilus haemolyticus and Haemophilus influenzae by SYBR Green real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Latham, Roger; Zhang, Bowen; Tristram, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    SYBR Green real time PCR assays for protein D (hpd), fuculose kinase (fucK) and [Cu, Zn]-superoxide dismutase (sodC) were designed for use in an algorithm for the identification of Haemophilus influenzae and H. haemolyticus. When tested on 127 H. influenzae and 60 H. haemolyticus all isolates were identified correctly. PMID:25753676

  20. A PCR–High-Resolution Melt Assay for Rapid Differentiation of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a PCR–high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials. PMID:24478508

  1. Haemophilus parainfluenzae urethritis among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Wu, Mei-Yu; Lin, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a common inhabitant of the human upper respiratory tract of the normal oral microflora. We report three men who had been having unprotected sex with men (MSM) and subsequently acquired H. parainfluenzae urethritis, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Two men were treated with ceftriaxone and doxycycline, and the third man was treated with clarithromycin. All three patients responded to treatment. This case series highlights the potential role of H. parainfluenzae as a sexually transmitted genitourinary pathogen. PMID:23357607

  2. Tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Sun, Eileen S; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2004-11-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi, the etiologic agent of rabbit venereal syphilis, is morphologically indistinguishable from Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the human syphilis treponeme, and induces similar immune responses and histopathologic changes in the infected host. Because of their high degree of relatedness, comparative studies are likely to identify genetic determinants that contribute to pathogenesis or virulence in human syphilis. The tpr (Treponema pallidum repeat) genes are believed to code for potential virulence factors. In this study, we identified 10 tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain and determined their sequence architecture. Half of this group of paralogous genes were predicted to be nonfunctional due to the presence of frameshifts and premature stop codons. Furthermore, the immune response against the T. paraluiscuniculi Tpr homologs in long-term-infected rabbits was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lymphocyte proliferation assay, showing that TprK is the only target of the antibody and T-cell responses during experimental infection and emphasizing the importance of this putative virulence factor in venereal treponematosis. PMID:15501788

  3. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on...

  8. The host-interacting proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin; conservation among treponemes and restriction of proteolytic capacity to Treponema pallidum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted bacterial infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Treponema pallidum is significantly more invasive than other treponemal species, being able to cross both the blood...

  9. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum Clinical Strains from Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Florindo, C.; Reigado, V.; Gomes, J. P.; Azevedo, J.; Santo, I.; Borrego, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A molecular system was used to subtype Portuguese Treponema pallidum clinical strains isolated from both skin lesions and blood. The study with this system constitutes the first typing study in a European country. Three T. pallidum subtypes were found: subtypes 14a (50%), 14d (45.2%), and 14f (4.8%). Further studies are needed to better characterize the isolates involved in syphilis outbreaks. PMID:18753355

  10. In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum would facilitate many different aspects of syphilis research. This review summarizes developments in this field that have been published since 1975. Findings are discussed in terms of treponemes and the oxygen question, treponemal metabolism involving proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids, and treponemal interaction with tissue culture cells. Suggested future approaches and potential problem areas pertinent to successful cultivation are discussed. PMID:6172213

  11. Haemophilus parasuis: infection, immunity and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Nubia; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an early colonizer of the porcine upper respiratory tract and is the etiological agent of Glasser's disease. The factors responsible for H. parasuis colonization and systemic infection are not yet well understood, while prevention and control of Glasser's disease continues to be challenging. Recent studies on innate immunity to H. parasuis have demonstrated that porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) are able to differentially up-regulate several genes related to inflammation and phagocytosis, and several pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced by porcine cells upon exposure to H. parasuis. The susceptibility of H. parasuis strains to phagocytosis by PAMs and the bactericidal effect of complement are influenced by the virulent phenotype of the strains. While non-virulent strains are susceptible to phagocytosis and complement, virulent strains are resistant to both. However, in the presence of specific antibodies against H. parasuis, virulent strains become susceptible to phagocytosis. More information is still needed, though, in order to better understand the host immune responses to H. parasuis. Antimicrobials are commonly used in the swine industry to help treat and control Glasser's disease. Some of the common antimicrobials have been shown to reduce colonization by H. parasuis, which may have implications for disease dynamics, development of effective immune responses and immunomodulation. Here, we provide the current state of research on innate and adaptive immune responses to H. parasuis and discuss the potential effect of enrofloxacin on the development of a protective immune response against H. parasuis infection. PMID:26511717

  12. Population Structure in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) frequently colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are an important cause of otitis media in children. Past studies have identified typeable H. influenzae as being clonal, but the population structure of NTHi has not been extensively characterized. The research presented here investigated the diversity and population structure in a well-characterized collection of NTHi isolated from the middle ears of children with otitis media or the pharynges of healthy children in three disparate geographic regions. Multilocus sequence typing identified 109 unique sequence types among 170 commensal and otitis media-associated NTHi isolates from Finland, Israel, and the US. The largest clonal complex contained only five sequence types, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. The eBURST v3, ClonalFrame 1.1, and structure 2.3.3 programs were used to further characterize diversity and population structure from the sequence typing data. Little clustering was apparent by either disease state (otitis media or commensalism) or geography in the ClonalFrame phylogeny. Population structure was clearly evident, with support for eight populations when all 170 isolates were analyzed. Interestingly, one population contained only commensal isolates, while two others consisted solely of otitis media isolates, suggesting associations between population structure and disease. PMID:23266487

  13. Specific immunofluorescence staining of Treponema pallidum in smears and tissues.

    PubMed

    Ito, F; Hunter, E F; George, R W; Swisher, B L; Larsen, S A

    1991-03-01

    To date, tissue sections prepared from Formalin-fixed tissues have not been successfully stained with Treponema pallidum subspecies-specific antibody in a direct fluorescent-antibody assay. While current methods stain T. pallidum, they do not distinguish T. pallidum from other spirochetes such as Borrelia burgdorferi (E. F. Hunter, P. W. Greer, B. L. Swisher, A. R. Simons, C. E. Farshy, J. A. Crawford, and K. R. Sulzer, Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 108:878-880, 1984). Because trypsin pretreatment of tissue sections has enhanced other immunofluorescent-antibody (IFA) applications, we compared the use of the trypsin digestion method with the current 1% ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) method as a means to obtain specific staining of T. pallidum in tissues by both direct and indirect IFA techniques. Pretreated T. pallidum-infected tissues sections from rabbits, hamsters, and humans were quantitatively examined with the direct fluorescent-antibody-T. pallidum test conjugate absorbed with Treponema phagedenis, the Reiter treponeme. For indirect staining, a serum specimen from a patients with syphilis absorbed by affinity chromatography with T. phagedenis was used as the primary reagent, and a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled rabbit anti-human globulin was used as the secondary reagent. Serum specificity was established first by examining antigen smears of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, B. burgdorferi, T. phagedenis, and Treponema denticola MRB and then by examining tissues infected with these pathogens plus those infected with four Leptospira serovars. When we stained tissue using the direct IFA method that is currently a standard method for the examination of chancre smears, we found it to be unsuitable for use with tissue. Trypsin digestion did not offer an improvement over the NH4OH pretreatment method in the specific identification of T. pallidum by direct IFA. However, specific identification of T. pallidum in tissue sections was obtained by the

  14. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  15. Detection of Treponema pallidum in early syphilis by DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, K; Noordhoek, G T; Abbruscato, F; Wicher, V

    1992-01-01

    By using experimentally infected rabbits as a model for early syphilis, the applicability of in vitro DNA amplification was explored for detection of Treponema pallidum. It was determined that whole blood in heparin or EDTA (but not serum), lesion exudate, and punch biopsy as well as swabs of lesions are useful specimens for examination by the polymerase chain reaction. Swabs do not require special diluents, and the specimens, whether kept at room temperature or frozen, are well suited for use in the polymerase chain reaction. Images PMID:1537923

  16. Use of CB hamsters in the study of Treponema pertenue.

    PubMed

    Schell, R F; Le Frock, J L; Babu, J P; Chan, J K

    1979-10-01

    The CB/Ss LAK strain of inbred hamster was used as a model for studies of infection with Treponema pertenue and of acquired resistance to it. When infected, this strain developed cutaneous lesions which lasted for six to seven months, even in the presence of peak titres of antitreponemal antibody. The rate of appearance and resolution of these lesions varied with the size of the inoculum. The infected hamsters' inguinal lymph nodes increased significantly in weight and teemed with treponemes for several weeks. Animals infected for eight or 10 weeks obtained quick resolution of their lesions by treatment with penicillin and were thereafter resistant to reinfection. PMID:509189

  17. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum strain DAL-1

    PubMed Central

    Zobaníková, Marie; Mikolka, Pavol; Čejková, Darina; Pospíšilová, Petra; Chen, Lei; Strouhal, Michal; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum strain DAL-1 is a human uncultivable pathogen causing the sexually transmitted disease syphilis. Strain DAL-1 was isolated from the amniotic fluid of a pregnant woman in the secondary stage of syphilis. Here we describe the 1,139,971 bp long genome of T. pallidum strain DAL-1 which was sequenced using two independent sequencing methods (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina). In rabbits, strain DAL-1 replicated better than the T. pallidum strain Nichols. The comparison of the complete DAL-1 genome sequence with the Nichols sequence revealed a list of genetic differences that are potentially responsible for the increased rabbit virulence of the DAL-1 strain. PMID:23449808

  18. [Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum -- the causative agent of neurosyphilis].

    PubMed

    Salavec, Miloslav; Boštíková, Vanda; Vaňásková, Zuzana; Smetana, Jan; Sleha, Radek; Coufalová, Monika; Plíšek, Stanislav; Špliňo, Miroslav; Štěpánová, Vlasta; Boštík, Pavel

    2013-09-01

    Neurosyphilis is defined as infection of central nervous system by Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. Neurosyphilis can develop at any stage after initial infec-tion and is reflected in laboratory results. The pathogenesis of neurosyphilis is similar to that of classical form of syphilis. Individuals with persistent abnormalities in the cerebrospinal fluid are at risk of the development of clinical manifestations. Proper understanding of particular forms of neurosyphilis for differential diagnosis is important to determine potential risk of the development of progressive disease in neurology. PMID:24116696

  19. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C M; Norris, S J; Weinstock, G M; White, O; Sutton, G G; Dodson, R; Gwinn, M; Hickey, E K; Clayton, R; Ketchum, K A; Sodergren, E; Hardham, J M; McLeod, M P; Salzberg, S; Peterson, J; Khalak, H; Richardson, D; Howell, J K; Chidambaram, M; Utterback, T; McDonald, L; Artiach, P; Bowman, C; Cotton, M D; Fujii, C; Garland, S; Hatch, B; Horst, K; Roberts, K; Sandusky, M; Weidman, J; Smith, H O; Venter, J C

    1998-07-17

    The complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum was determined and shown to be 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted coding sequences (open reading frames). Systems for DNA replication, transcription, translation, and repair are intact, but catabolic and biosynthetic activities are minimized. The number of identifiable transporters is small, and no phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase carbohydrate transporters were found. Potential virulence factors include a family of 12 potential membrane proteins and several putative hemolysins. Comparison of the T. pallidum genome sequence with that of another pathogenic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, identified unique and common genes and substantiates the considerable diversity observed among pathogenic spirochetes. PMID:9665876

  20. Simple sequence repeats in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Power, Peter M; Sweetman, W A; Gallacher, N J; Woodhall, M R; Kumar, G A; Moxon, E R; Hood, D W

    2009-03-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSRs) of DNA are subject to high rates of mutation and are important mediators of adaptation in Haemophilus influenzae. Previous studies of the Rd KW20 genome identified the primacy of tetranucleotide SSRs in mediating phase variation (the rapid reversible switching of gene expression) of surface exposed structures such as lipopolysaccharide. The recent sequencing of the genomes of multiple strains of H. influenzae allowed the comparison of the SSRs (repeat units of one to nine nucleotides in length) in detail across four complete H. influenzae genomes and then comparison with a further 12 genomes when they became available. The SSR loci were broadly classified into three groups: (1) those that did not vary; (2) those for which some variation between strains was observed but this could not be linked to variation of gene expression; and (3) those that both varied and were located in regions consistent with mediating phase variable gene expression. Comparative analysis of 988 SSR associated loci confirmed that tetranucleotide repeats were the major mediators of phase variation and extended the repertoire of known tetranucleotide SSR loci by identifying ten previously uncharacterised tetranucleotide SSR loci with the potential to mediate phase variation which were unequally distributed across the H. influenzae pan-genome. Further, analysis of non-tetranucleotide SSR in the 16 strains revealed a number of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, pentanucleotide, heptanucleotide, and octanucleotide SSRs which were consistent with these tracts mediating phase variation. This study substantiates previous findings as to the important role that tetranucleotide SSRs play in H. influenzae biology. Two Brazilian isolates showed the most variation in their complement of SSRs suggesting the possibility of geographic and phenotypic influences on SSR distribution. PMID:19095084

  1. Construction of DNA recognition sites active in Haemophilus transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Danner, D B; Smith, H O; Narang, S A

    1982-01-01

    Competent Haemophilus cells recognize and preferentially take up Haemophilus DNA during genetic transformation. This preferential uptake is correlated with the presence on incoming DNA of an 11-base-pair (bp) sequence, 5'-A-A-G-T-G-C-G-G-T-C-A-3'. To prove that this sequence is the recognition site that identifies Haemophilus DNA to the competent cell, we have now constructed a series of plasmids, each of which contains the 11-bp sequence. Using two different assay systems we have tested the ability of fragments from these plasmids to compete with cloned Haemophilus DNA fragments that naturally contain the 11-bp sequence. We find that the addition of the 11-bp sequence to a DNA fragment is necessary and sufficient for preferential uptake of that fragment. However, plasmid DNAs containing this sequence may vary as much as 48-fold in uptake activity, and this variation correlates with the A+T-richness of the DNA flanking the 11-mer. Images PMID:6285382

  2. Investigating the porcine immune reponse to Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässers disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic invasion of the bacteria to serosal surfaces, resulting in inflammation and induction of pleuritis, peritonitis, and arthritis. In addition, certain strains of H. parasuis cause pneumonia wh...

  3. Isolation and characterization of outer membrane vesicles from Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a small, pleomorphic Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine. Numerous strains of this organism are capable of causing systemic disease, resulting in high morbidity and mortality in the host. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of vir...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  9. Osteitis in the dens of axis caused by Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Syphilis has been referred to as “the great imitator” due to its ability to imitate other diseases. Untreated syphilis becomes a systemic infection that can involve almost every organ systems. Treponema pallidum has a high affinity for bone tissue, but osteitis has mainly been described in late stages of the disease. Vertebral involvement is rare, and this is to our knowledge the first case describing syphilitic spondylitis in early acquired syphilis. Case presentation We here describe destructive osteitis in the vertebral column as the initial manifestation of early acquired syphilis in a 24-year-old caucasian homosexual male with HIV infection. The diagnosis was reached by universal bacterial PCR and DNA sequencing of the DNA product. It was confirmed by PCR specific for Treponema pallidum, immunohistochemistry and detection of increasing antibody titer. Conclusions As syphilis has re-emerged in Western countries and remains a worldwide common disease it is important to have in mind as a causative agent of skeletal symptoms, especially among HIV-infected individuals or men who have sex with men (MSM). PMID:23885957

  10. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  11. Relationship of Treponema denticola periplasmic flagella to irregular cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, J D; Li, H; Kuramitsu, H; Norris, S J; Goldstein, S F; Buttle, K F; Charon, N W

    1997-01-01

    Treponema denticola is an anaerobic, motile, oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. We found that the periplasmic flagella (PFs), which are located between the outer membrane sheath and cell cylinder, influence its morphology in a unique manner. In addition, the protein composition of the PFs was found to be quite complex and similar to those of other spirochetes. Dark-field microscopy revealed that most wild-type cells had an irregular twisted morphology, with both planar and helical regions, and a minority of cells had a regular right-handed helical shape. High-voltage electron microscopy indicated that the PFs, especially in those regions of the cell which were planar, wrapped around the cell body axis in a right-handed sense. In those regions of the cell which were helical or irregular, the PFs tended to lie along the cell axis. The PFs caused the cell to form the irregular shape, as two nonmotile, PF-deficient mutants (JR1 and HL51) were no longer irregular but were right-handed helices. JR1 was isolated as a spontaneously occurring nonmotile mutant, and HL51 was isolated as a site-directed mutant in the flagellar hook gene flgE. Consistent with these results is the finding that wild-type cells with their outer membrane sheath removed were also right-handed helices similar in shape to JR1 and HL51. Purified PFs were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and several protein species were identified. Western blot analysis using antisera to Treponema pallidum PF proteins along with N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated T. denticola PFs are composed of one class A sheath protein of 38 kDa (FlaA) and three class B proteins of 35 kDa (FlaB1 and FlaB2) and one of 34 kDa (FlaB3). The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the FlaA and FlaB proteins of T. denticola were most similar to those of T. pallidum and Treponema phagedenis. Because these proteins were present in markedly reduced amounts or were absent in HL51, PF synthesis is

  12. Characterization of the major outer membrane antigens of Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Wannemuehler, M J; Hubbard, R D; Greer, J M

    1988-01-01

    Outer membrane extracts of Treponema hyodysenteriae were used to evaluate the antibody responses in immunized or convalescent pigs. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis identified antibodies in sera reactive with 14- to 19-kilodalton (kDa) antigens. Reactivity against these antigens could be removed only by absorption of sera with butanol-water-extracted endotoxin from the homologous strain of T. hyodysenteriae. Treatment of the outer membrane extracts with 0.1 M sodium meta-periodate, but not with proteinase K, abolished reactivity with both outer membrane and endotoxin antigens (14 and 19 kDa). These results indicate that swine vaccinated with the outer membrane extract of T. hyodysenteriae develop antibody responses to outer membrane antigens qualitatively similar to those of swine convalescing from active infection, especially antibodies against low-molecular-mass antigens. The nature of the 14- to 19-kDa antigens appears consistent with that of treponemal endotoxin and lipopolysaccharide. Images PMID:2460406

  13. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Nivière, V; Lombard, M; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2001-05-25

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species. PMID:11377434

  14. Global Challenge of Antibiotic-Resistant Treponema pallidum▿

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, Lola V.

    2010-01-01

    Syphilis is a multistage infectious disease that is usually transmitted through contact with active lesions of a sexual partner or from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus. Despite elimination efforts, syphilis remains endemic in many developing countries and has reemerged in several developed countries, including China, where a widespread epidemic recently occurred. In the absence of a vaccine, syphilis control is largely dependent upon identification of infected individuals and treatment of these individuals and their contacts with antibiotics. Although penicillin is still effective, clinically significant resistance to macrolides, a second-line alternative to penicillin, has emerged. Macrolide-resistant strains of Treponema pallidum are now prevalent in several developed countries. An understanding of the genetic basis of T. pallidum antibiotic resistance is essential to enable molecular surveillance. This review discusses the genetic basis of T. pallidum macrolide resistance and the potential of this spirochete to develop additional antibiotic resistance that could seriously compromise syphilis treatment and control. PMID:19805553

  15. Treponema infection associated with genital ulceration in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Knauf, S; Batamuzi, E K; Mlengeya, T; Kilewo, M; Lejora, I A V; Nordhoff, M; Ehlers, B; Harper, K N; Fyumagwa, R; Hoare, R; Failing, K; Wehrend, A; Kaup, F J; Leendertz, F H; Mätz-Rensing, K

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe genital alterations and detailed histologic findings in baboons naturally infected with Treponema pallidum. The disease causes moderate to severe genital ulcerations in a population of olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) at Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. In a field survey in 2007, 63 individuals of all age classes, both sexes, and different grades of infection were chemically immobilized and sampled. Histology and molecular biological tests were used to detect and identify the organism responsible: a strain similar to T pallidum ssp pertenue, the cause of yaws in humans. Although treponemal infections are not a new phenomenon in nonhuman primates, the infection described here appears to be strictly associated with the anogenital region and results in tissue alterations matching those found in human syphilis infections (caused by T pallidum ssp pallidum), despite the causative pathogen's greater genetic similarity to human yaws-causing strains. PMID:21411621

  16. Activation and Proteolytic Activity of the Treponema pallidum Metalloprotease, Pallilysin

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Honeyman, Lisa; Hassler, Julia; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is a highly invasive pathogen that undergoes rapid dissemination to establish widespread infection. Previous investigations identified the T. pallidum adhesin, pallilysin, as an HEXXH-containing metalloprotease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage and degrades laminin and fibrinogen. In the current study we characterized pallilysin's active site, activation requirements, cellular location, and fibrin clot degradation capacity through both in vitro assays and heterologous treponemal expression and degradation studies. Site-directed mutagenesis showed the pallilysin HEXXH motif comprises at least part of the active site, as introduction of three independent mutations (AEXXH [H198A], HAXXH [E199A], and HEXXA [H202A]) abolished pallilysin-mediated fibrinogenolysis but did not adversely affect host component binding. Attainment of full pallilysin proteolytic activity was dependent upon autocatalytic cleavage of an N-terminal pro-domain, a process which could not occur in the HEXXH mutants. Pallilysin was shown to possess a thrombin cleavage site within its N-terminal pro-domain, and in vitro studies confirmed cleavage of pallilysin with thrombin generates a truncated pallilysin fragment that has enhanced proteolytic activity, suggesting pallilysin can also exploit the host coagulation process to facilitate protease activation. Opsonophagocytosis assays performed with viable T. pallidum demonstrated pallilysin is a target of opsonic antibodies, consistent with a host component-interacting, surface-exposed cellular location. Wild-type pallilysin, but not the HEXXA mutant, degraded fibrin clots, and similarly heterologous expression of pallilysin in the non-invasive spirochete Treponema phagedenis facilitated fibrin clot degradation. Collectively these results identify pallilysin as a surface-exposed metalloprotease within T. pallidum that possesses an HEXXH active site motif and requires autocatalytic or host-mediated cleavage of a pro-domain to attain

  17. Haemophilus influenzae triggers autophagy in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Reyes-Picaso, Carolina; Garcés-Pérez, Miriam S; Jardón-Serrano, Cynthia V; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The MAP-LC3 system regulates the intracellular formation of autophagy-associated vacuoles. These vacuoles contain the LC3 protein; thus it has been utilized as a marker to identify autophagosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Haemophilus influenzae strains and their supernatants could activate autophagy in human larynx carcinoma cell line (HEp-2). We demonstrate that higher expression of the LC3B-II protein was induced, particularly by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) 49766 and by supernatants, containing <50 kDa proteins, of both strains. Ultrastructural studies demonstrate vacuoles with a double membrane and/or membrane material inside, showing similar features to those of autophagic vacuoles. Together, our findings demonstrate that H. influenzae strains and their supernatants trigger an autophagic process. PMID:26537814

  18. Maternal and neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type d.

    PubMed

    Warren, S; Tristram, S; Bradbury, R S

    2010-03-01

    A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with signs of sepsis and threatened pre-term labour. The premature neonate also showed signs of sepsis. Haemophilus influenzae biotype III was cultured from a midstream urine sample taken from the mother, maternal placental swabs and neonatal blood cultures. The placental and neonatal isolates were both found to be serotype d by PCR, and were indistinguishable by PFGE. PMID:19926730

  19. Organization, transcription, and expression of the 5' region of the fla operon of Treponema phagedenis and Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, R J; Slivienski, L L; El-Afandi, M C; Dantuono, L A

    1996-01-01

    A locus encoding polypeptides associated with flagellar structure and function was identified, sequenced, and characterized in Treponema phagedenis and Treponema pallidum. This locus includes homologs of the FlgD, FlgE, MotA, MOB, FliL, and FliM polypeptides found in Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis. These polypeptides are extensively conserved between the two treponemes. Several additional polypeptides or unknown function, including Tapl, located upstream of FlgD, and ORF4, located between FlgE and MotA, were also identified. Transcription analysis using RNA PCR indicated that these genes are likely transcribed as part of a single operon and comprise the 5' region of the treponemal fla operon. Primer extension analysis identified a putative promoter, preceding T. phagedenis tap1 in a region of divergent transcription. Pfla resembles the class II or class III motility-related promoters of S. typhimurium. FlgE and Tap1 were further characterized. Western blotting (immunoblotting) indicated that T. pallidum FlgE exhibited an unusual polypeptide ladder that was similar but not identical to that of T. phagedenis. Triton X-114 phase partitioning of T. phagedenis cells coupled with Western blotting revealed that Tap1 was located in the aqueous phase. Computer analysis indicated that Tap1 had no significant membrane spanning regions, suggesting that it resides primarily in the cytoplasm. The organization and expression of this operon are similar in both treponemes but different from those of previously described motility-related operons. These results indicate that despite extensive amino acid sequence conservation, the expression of spirochete flagellar polypeptides is different from that in other bacteria. PMID:8755894

  20. Development of a system for expressing heterologous genes in the oral spirochete Treponema denticola and its use in expression of the Treponema pallidum flaA gene.

    PubMed

    Chi, B; Chauhan, S; Kuramitsu, H

    1999-07-01

    The present communication describes the construction of a new Escherichia coli-Treponema denticola shuttle vector based on the naturally occurring spirochete plasmid pTS1 and the expression of the heterologous T. pallidum flaA gene from the plasmid in T. denticola. This new shuttle vector system should prove useful in characterizing virulence factors from unculturable pathogenic spirochetes. PMID:10377154

  1. Genome Sequences for Five Strains of the Emerging Pathogen Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, I. King; Conley, Andrew B.; Antonov, Ivan V.; Arthur, Robert A.; Cook, Erin D.; Cooper, Guy P.; Jones, Bernard L.; Knipe, Kristen M.; Lee, Kevin J.; Liu, Xing; Mitchell, Gabriel J.; Pande, Pushkar R.; Petit, Robert A.; Qin, Shaopu; Rajan, Vani N.; Sarda, Shruti; Sebastian, Aswathy; Tang, Shiyuyun; Thapliyal, Racchit; Varghese, Neha J.; Ye, Tianjun; Katz, Lee S.; Wang, Xin; Rowe, Lori; Frace, Michael; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first whole-genome sequences for five strains, two carried and three pathogenic, of the emerging pathogen Haemophilus haemolyticus. Preliminary analyses indicate that these genome sequences encode markers that distinguish H. haemolyticus from its closest Haemophilus relatives and provide clues to the identity of its virulence factors. PMID:21952546

  2. Histopathological Characterization of the Lesions of Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis and Immunolabelling of Treponema-like Organisms.

    PubMed

    Angell, J W; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Duncan, J S; Carter, S D; Blundell, R

    2015-11-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is a cause of severe lameness in sheep and the three Treponema phylogroups Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like, Treponema phagedenis-like and Treponema pedis have been associated with clinical disease. The aims of this study were: (1) to describe the histopathological changes associated with each previously established grade of clinical lesion, and (2) to investigate immunohistochemically the association of the Treponema-like organisms with the observed histopathological changes. Early lesions were characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the distal digital skin, with suppurative coronitis and intracorneal pustules. In more advanced stages of the disease there was complete separation of the dorsal wall of the hoof with a necrotizing and fibrinosuppurative exudate and dermatitis. The later lesions were mostly resolved, but with milder suppurative changes remaining within the cornified layer and periosteal reaction of the dorsal aspect of the distal phalanx. Large numbers of Treponema-like organisms were identified within early grade lesions (as well as later, more advanced grade lesions) and were specifically associated with the observed histopathological changes. The results of this study provide some evidence in support of the hypothesis that the three CODD-associated Treponema phylogroups are involved in the aetiopathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26597022

  3. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  4. Molecular specificities of monoclonal antibodies directed against virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Marchitto, K S; Selland-Grossling, C K; Norgard, M V

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) and Western blot analyses with specific anti-Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum monoclonal antibodies were used to identify antigens with apparent masses of 102, 84, 54, 53, 52, 47, 32, 29, and 24 kilodaltons (kDa). Cross-reactivity of these antibodies with T. pallidum subsp. pertenue antigens and lack of cross-reactivity with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter, T. vincentii, T. refringens, T. scoliodontum, and T. denticola were also demonstrated by RIP and Western blot analyses. Reactivities in the T. pallidum immobilization test, along with the RIP of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination products, suggested that the identified antigens were surface associated. The abundance and surface association of the 47- and 84-kDa antigens were supported by reactivity in the microhemagglutination test for T. pallidum and by strong reactivity of monoclonal antibodies upon indirect immunofluorescence assays with rabbit-cultivated T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, respectively, but not with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Anti-47-kDa and anti-84-kDa monoclonal antibodies were also reactive in indirect immunofluorescence assays using treponemes found in dark-field-positive smears of human genital ulcers. Images PMID:3510168

  5. Plasmonic ELISA for the ultrasensitive detection of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin-Min; Huang, Rong; Dong, Cai-Xia; Tang, Li-Juan; Gui, Rong; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2014-08-15

    In this report, we have developed a plasmonic ELISA strategy for the detection of syphilis. Plasmonic ELISA is an enzyme-linked immunoassay combined with enzyme-mediated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Immune response of the Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) antibodies triggers the acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine to produce abundant thiocholine. The positive charged thiol, in turn, alters the surface charge distribution the AuNPs and leads to the agglomeration of the AuNPs. The induced strong localized SPR effect of the agglomerate AuNPs can, thus, allow the quantitative assay of T. pallidum antibodies due to the remarkable color and absorption spectral response changes of the reaction system. The plasmonic ELISA exhibited a quasilinear response to the logarithmic T. pallidum antibody concentrations in the range of 1pg/mL-10ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.98pg/mL. Such a low detection limit was 1000-fold improvements in sensitivity over a conventional ELISA. The results of plasmonic ELISA in syphilis assays of serum specimens from 60 patients agreed with those obtained using a conventional ELISA method. The plasmonic ELISA has characteristics (analyte specific, cost-effective, ease of automatic, low limit of detection) that provide potential for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of syphilis. PMID:24662060

  6. Treponema pallidum, the Stealth Pathogen, Doth Change, But How?

    PubMed Central

    Radolf, Justin D.; Desrosiers, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Treponema pallidum rapidly disseminates from a genital site of inoculation to diverse organs where it establishes persistent infection. T. pallidum has long been regarded as a stealth pathogen because of its poorly antigenic and non-inflammatory surface. There is now increasing evidence that antigenic variation also contributes to the ability of the spirochete to evade host defences. Among the small number of proteins encoded by the T. pallidum genome with sequence similarity to well characterized transcription factors is TP0262, an orthologue for cAMP regulatory protein (CRP) of E. coli. Giacani and co-workers identified sequences matching the CRP consensus-binding motif upstream of the promoters of tprE, tprG, and tprJ, three members of the T. pallidum repeat (tpr) gene family (Subfamily II). Using EMSA, DNaseI footprinting, and an E. coli-based reporter system, they demonstrated that TP0262 specifically recognizes the putative binding sequences and that DNA binding is cAMP-dependent. Their report, a major methodological advance for syphilis research, suggests that T. pallidum has appropriated a paradigmatic global regulator of metabolic processes in heterotrophic bacteria to further its capacity for immune evasion in its obligate human host. PMID:19432802

  7. Membrane topology of Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J D; Bourell, K W; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1995-01-01

    A critical issue regarding the molecular architectures of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi, the agents of venereal syphilis and Lyme disease, respectively, concerns the membrane topologies of their major lipoprotein immunogens. A related question is whether these lipid-modified membrane proteins form intramembranous particles during freeze fracture electron microscopy. To address these issues, native borrelial and treponemal lipoproteins were reconstituted into liposomes of diverse composition. The importance of the covalently associated lipids for membrane association of lipoproteins was revealed by the observation that nonlipidated recombinant forms of both B. burgdorferi OspA and the T. pallidum 47-kDa immunogen (Tpp47) showed very weak or no binding to model bilayer vesicles. In contrast to control liposomes reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin or bovine rhodopsin, two well-characterized transmembrane proteins, none of the lipoprotein-liposomes contained particles when examined by freeze fracture electron microscopy. To extend these findings to prokaryotic lipoproteins with relatively amphiphilic polypeptides, similar experiments were conducted with a recombinant nonlipidated form of Escherichia coli TraT, a lipoprotein which has putative transmembrane domains. The nonlipidated TraT oligomers bound vesicles derived from E. coli lipids but, surprisingly, did not form particles in the freeze-fractured liposomes. These findings support (i) a proposed topology of spirochetal lipoproteins in which the polypeptide is extrinsic to the membrane surface and (ii) the contention that particles visualized in freeze-fractured spirochetal membranes represent poorly characterized transmembrane proteins. PMID:7790053

  8. Detection of Treponema pallidum by a sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Centurion-Lara, A; Castro, C; Shaffer, J M; Van Voorhis, W C; Marra, C M; Lukehart, S A

    1997-01-01

    Syphilis is diagnosed by serologic testing or by identification of the causative agent, Treponema pallidum. The bacterium has historically been detected in clinical specimens by dark-field microscopy, immunostaining with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies, or the rabbit inoculation test (RIT). RIT is considered to be very sensitive and specific, although it is available only in research settings and is not clinically useful due to the length of time required to obtain a result. In recent years, several PCR methods have been developed for the detection of T. pallidum, but none of these has shown a clear advantage in sensitivity over RIT. We have developed a specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) that targets a 366 bp region of the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum. This RT-PCR can detect a single organism by Southern analysis when whole organisms are diluted and 10(-2) to 10(-3) T. pallidum organisms when RNA equivalents are used to make cDNA. The test was demonstrated to detect 10(-2) T. pallidum RNA equivalents in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty different strains of T. pallidum, isolated from cerebrospinal fluids, aqueous humor, blood, and chancres, were shown to be detectable by this test. This efficient and sensitive technique could be more useful than existing methods for detecting very low numbers of organisms in clinical samples. PMID:9163442

  9. Detection of Treponema pallidum in the vitreous by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Müller, M; Ewert, I; Hansmann, F; Tiemann, C; Hagedorn, H J; Solbach, W; Roider, J; Nölle, B; Laqua, H; Hoerauf, H

    2007-01-01

    Background Ocular involvement of syphilis still poses a clinical challenge due to the chameleonic behaviour of the disease. As the serodiagnosis has significant limitations, the direct detection of Treponema pallidum (TP) in the vitreous represents a desirable diagnostic tool. Methods Real‐time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of TP was applied in diagnostic vitrectomies of two patients with acute chorioretinitis. Qualitative verification of TP by real‐time PCR and melting point analysis according to a modified protocol was ruled out. Patients underwent complete ophthalmological examination with fundus photographs, fluorescein angiography, serological examination, antibiotic treatment and follow‐up. Results In two cases of acute chorioretinitis of unknown origin, real‐time PCR of vitreous specimens of both patients provided evidence of TP and was 100% specific. Initial diagnosis of presumed viral retinitis was ruled out by PCR of vitreous specimen. Patients were treated with systemic antibiotics and showed prompt improvement in visual function and resolution of fundus lesions. Conclusions With real‐time PCR, detection of TP in the vitreous was possible and delivered a sensitive, quick and inexpensive answer to a disease rather difficult to assess. In cases of acute chorioretinitis, the use of PCR‐based assays of vitreous specimens in the diagnostic evaluation of patients is advisable. Although syphilitic chorioretinitis is a rare disease, PCR should include search for TP, as diagnostic dilemmas prolong definitive treatment in a sight‐threatening disease. PMID:17108014

  10. Virulent Treponema pallidum activates human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Hansen, E J; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1992-03-01

    Perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, fibrin deposition, and endothelial cell abnormalities consistent with cellular activation are prominent histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum. Because activated endothelial cells play important roles in lymphocyte homing and hemostasis, the ability of virulent T. pallidum to activate cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated. T. pallidum induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and procoagulant activity on the surface of HUVEC. Electron microscopy of T. pallidum-stimulated HUVEC revealed extensive networks of fibrin strands not observed in cultures without treponemes. ICAM-1 expression in HUVEC also was promoted by a 47-kDa integral membrane lipoprotein purified from T. pallidum, implicating a role for spirochete membrane lipoproteins in endothelial cell activation. The combined findings are consistent with the pathology of syphilis and provide the first evidence that a pathogenic spirochetal bacterium such as T. pallidum or its constituent integral membrane lipoprotein(s) can activate directly host vascular endothelium. PMID:1347056

  11. Comparison of Six Automated Treponema-Specific Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Park, Borae G; Yoon, Jihoon G; Rim, John Hoon; Lee, Anna; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Six different Treponema (TP)-specific immunoassays were compared to the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. A total of 615 samples were tested. The overall percent agreement, analytical sensitivity, and analytical specificity of each assay compared to the FTA-ABS test were as follows: Architect Syphilis TP, 99.2%, 96.8%, and 100%; Cobas Syphilis, 99.8%, 99.4%, and 100%; ADVIA Centaur Syphilis, 99.8%, 99.4%, and 100%; HISCL Anti-TP assay kit, 99.7%, 98.7%, and 100%; Immunoticles Auto3 TP, 99.0%, 97.5%, and 99.6%; Mediace TPLA, 98.0%, 98.1%, and 98.0%. All results that were discrepant between the TP-specific assays were associated with samples from noninfectious cases (11 immunoassay false positives and 7 from previous syphilis cases). Our study demonstrated that TP-specific immunoassays generally showed high sensitivities, specificities, and percentages of agreement compared to FTA-ABS, with rare cases of false-positive or false-negative results. Therefore, most TP-specific immunoassays are acceptable for use in screening for syphilis. However, it is important to perform a thorough review of a patient's clinical and treatment history for interpreting the results of syphilis serology. PMID:26560543

  12. Treponema pallidum, the stealth pathogen, changes, but how?

    PubMed

    Radolf, Justin D; Desrosiers, Daniel C

    2009-06-01

    Treponema pallidum rapidly disseminates from a genital site of inoculation to diverse organs where it establishes persistent infection. T. pallidum has long been regarded as a stealth pathogen because of its poorly antigenic and non-inflammatory surface. There is now increasing evidence that antigenic variation also contributes to the ability of the spirochaete to evade host defences. Among the small number of proteins encoded by the T. pallidum genome with sequence similarity to well-characterized transcription factors is TP0262, an orthologue for cAMP regulatory protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli. Giacani and co-workers identified sequences matching the CRP consensus-binding motif upstream of the promoters of tprE, tprG and tprJ, three members of the T. pallidum repeat (tpr) gene family (subfamily II). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, DNaseI footprinting and an E. coli-based reporter system, they demonstrated that TP0262 specifically recognizes the putative binding sequences and that DNA binding is cAMP-dependent. Their report, a major methodological advance for syphilis research, suggests that T. pallidum has appropriated a paradigmatic global regulator of metabolic processes in heterotrophic bacteria to further its capacity for immune evasion in its obligate human host. PMID:19432802

  13. Genetic diversity in Treponema pallidum: implications for pathogenesis, evolution and molecular diagnostics of syphilis and yaws.

    PubMed

    Smajs, David; Norris, Steven J; Weinstock, George M

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes, similar to syphilis-causing Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, include T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, T. pallidum ssp. endemicum and Treponema carateum, which cause yaws, bejel and pinta, respectively. Genetic analyses of these pathogens revealed striking similarity among these bacteria and also a high degree of similarity to the rabbit pathogen, Treponema paraluiscuniculi, a treponeme not infectious to humans. Genome comparisons between pallidum and non-pallidum treponemes revealed genes with potential involvement in human infectivity, whereas comparisons between pallidum and pertenue treponemes identified genes possibly involved in the high invasivity of syphilis treponemes. Genetic variability within syphilis strains is considered as the basis of syphilis molecular epidemiology with potential to detect more virulent strains, whereas genetic variability within a single strain is related to its ability to elude the immune system of the host. Genome analyses also shed light on treponemal evolution and on chromosomal targets for molecular diagnostics of treponemal infections. PMID:22198325

  14. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Shah, Mahek; Codolosa, J Nicolas; Climaco, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors. PMID:27051571

  15. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation. [uv

    SciTech Connect

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-07-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation.

  16. Viability and growth of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Jones, J B

    1985-08-01

    Studies were done on clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to investigate viability and determine the effects of disc-agar diffusion (DAD) medium modification on antimicrobial susceptibility results. Most isolates were viable for two days in distilled water, up to a week on chocolate agar and months when frozen in skim milk at -70 degrees C. Differences in viability were not related to biotype, serotype, beta-lactamase production or site of isolation of isolates. Several medium modifications resulted in better growth of isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by DAD, but the zone sizes of inhibition differed from those of the recommended medium. PMID:3877620

  17. The Haemophilus somnus disease complex (Hemophilosis): A review

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Frederick W.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1989-01-01

    Haemophilus somnus has long been associated with thrombotic meningoencephalomyelitis but has also been identified as the agent responsible for other clinical diseases including respiratory disease, reproductive problems, myocarditis, otitis, conjunctivitis, mastitis, and polyarthritis. Exposure to the bacteria is widespread and infection may occur via the respiratory tract from urogenital excretions and secretions. Diagnosis and treatment of hemophilosis may be easy or difficult depending on the manifestation presented, and special procedures must be taken to facilitate isolation of the organism. Satisfactory control measures are not available; vaccination is the only preventive measure demonstrating a beneficial effect. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17423440

  18. Virulent Treponema pallidum promotes adhesion of leukocytes to human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    Perivasculitis and endothelial cell abnormalities are characteristic histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. To extend earlier studies demonstrating that T. pallidum activates endothelial cells, we now show that virulent T. pallidum, but not heat-killed T. pallidum or nonpathogenic Treponema phagedenis, promotes increased adherence of lymphocytes and monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Lymphocytes and monocytes are the two cell types prominent in the histopathology of syphilis. Recognition that T. pallidum can stimulate endothelial cells to bind leukocytes provides important insights into the early mechanisms of syphilis immunopathogenesis. Images PMID:7927729

  19. Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 Compared with Those of Four Other Agents against Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Clark, Catherine; Bryskier, Andre; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787, a new 2-fluoroketolide, and its (des)-fluor derivative, RU 64399, were tested against 111 Haemophilus influenzae and 26 H. parainfluenzae strains and compared with those of telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. HMR 3787 and RU 64399 MICs were comparable with those of azithromycin but were less affected by incubation in CO2. Time-kill studies of 12 strains showed that HMR 3787, RU 64399, and telithromycin were bactericidal against all strains after 24 h at two times the MIC. PMID:12499225

  20. Molecular analysis of a haemagglutinin of Haemophilus paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Hobb, Rhonda I; Tseng, Hsing-Ju; Downes, John E; Terry, Tamsin D; Blackall, Patrick J; Takagi, Masami; Jennings, Michael P

    2002-07-01

    The gene encoding a haemagglutinin of H. paragallinarum, hagA, has been identified and the full-length nucleotide sequence determined. A approximately 39 kDa protein, recognized by an anti-haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody, mAb4D, was purified from H. paragallinarum strain 0083 and the N-terminal sequence obtained. The full-length nucleotide sequence was obtained by inverse PCR and the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein encoded was shown to be similar to other outer-membrane proteins of closely related organisms in the HAP group (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Pasteurella), especially the P5 protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The hagA gene was cloned into a His-tag expression vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15(pREP4). The identity of the purified recombinant protein as a H. paragallinarum haemagglutinin was confirmed by haemagglutination of chicken red blood cells and reactivity, in a Western blot, with the monoclonal antibody specific for the serovar A haemagglutinin. PMID:12101304

  1. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    PubMed

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection. PMID:25837816

  2. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei. PMID:26647445

  3. Composition and Localization of Treponema denticola Outer Membrane Complexes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Godovikova, Valentina; Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Treponema denticola outer membrane lipoprotein-protease complex (dentilisin) contributes to periodontal disease by degrading extracellular matrix components and disrupting intercellular host signaling pathways. We recently demonstrated that prcB, located upstream of and cotranscribed with prcA and prtP, encodes a 22-kDa lipoprotein that interacts with PrtP and is required for its activity. Here we further characterize products of the protease locus and their roles in expression, formation, and localization of outer membrane complexes. PrcB migrates in native gels as part of a >400-kDa complex that includes PrtP and PrcA, as well as the major outer sheath protein Msp. PrcB is detectable as a minor constituent of the purified active protease complex, which was previously reported to consist of only PrtP and auxiliary polypeptides PrcA1 and PrcA2. Though it lacks the canonical ribosome binding site present upstream of both prcA and prtP, PrcB is present at levels similar to those of PrtP in whole-cell extracts. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated cell surface exposure of the mature forms of PrtP, PrcA1, PrcB, and Msp. The 16-kDa N-terminal acylated fragment of PrtP (predicted to be released during activation of PrtP) was present in cell extracts but was detected neither in the purified active protease complex nor on the cell surface. PrcA2, detectable on the surface of Msp-deficient cells but not that of wild-type cells, coimmunoprecipitated with Msp. Our results indicate that PrcB is a component of the outer membrane lipoprotein protease complex and that Msp and PrcA2 interaction may mediate formation of a very-high-molecular-weight outer membrane complex. PMID:21986628

  4. Characterization and Serologic Analysis of the Treponema pallidum Proteome▿ †

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Melanie A.; Edmondson, Diane G.; Carroll, James A.; Cook, Richard G.; Orkiszewski, Ralph S.; Norris, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease characterized by widespread tissue dissemination and chronic infection. In this study, we analyzed the proteome of T. pallidum by the isoelectric focusing (IEF) and nonequilibrating pH gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE) forms of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE), coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. We determined the identity of 148 T. pallidum protein spots, representing 88 T. pallidum polypeptides; 63 of these polypeptides had not been identified previously at the protein level. To examine which of these proteins are important in the antibody response to syphilis, we performed immunoblot analysis using infected rabbit sera or human sera from patients at different stages of syphilis infection. Twenty-nine previously described antigens (predominantly lipoproteins) were detected, as were a number of previously unidentified antigens. The reactivity patterns obtained with sera from infected rabbits and humans were similar; these patterns included a subset of antigens reactive with all serum samples tested, including CfpA, MglB-2, TmpA, TmpB, flagellins, and the 47-kDa, 17-kDa, and 15-kDa lipoproteins. A unique group of antigens specifically reactive with infected human serum was also identified and included the previously described antigen TpF1 and the hypothetical proteins TP0584, TP0608, and TP0965. This combined proteomic and serologic analysis further delineates the antigens potentially useful as vaccine candidates or diagnostic markers and may provide insight into the host-pathogen interactions that occur during T. pallidum infection. PMID:20385758

  5. Fatty acids of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, J T; Brandt, M E; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    A fundamental ultrastructural feature shared by the spirochetal pathogens Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum) and Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agents of venereal syphilis and Lyme disease, respectively, is that their most abundant membrane proteins contain covalently attached fatty acids. In this study, we identified the fatty acids covalently bound to lipoproteins of B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum and examined potential acyl donors to these molecules. Palmitate was the predominant fatty acid of both B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum lipoproteins. T. pallidum lipoproteins also contained substantial amounts of stearate, a fatty acid not typically prevalent in prokaryotic lipoproteins. In both spirochetes, the fatty acids of cellular lipids differed from those of their respective lipoproteins. To characterize phospholipids in these organisms, spirochetes were metabolically labeled with [3H]palmitate or [3H]oleate; B. burgdorferi contained only phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine, while T. pallidum contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, and cardiolipin. Although palmitate predominated in the lipoproteins, there were no apparent differences in the incorporation of these two fatty acids into phospholipids (putative acyl donors). Phospholipase A1 and A2 digestion of phosphatidylcholine from B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum labeled with either [3H]palmitate or [3H]oleate also revealed that neither fatty acid was incorporated preferentially into the 1 and 2 positions (potential acyl donor sites) of the glycerol backbone. The combined findings suggest that fatty acid utilization during lipoprotein synthesis is determined largely by the fatty acid specificities of the lipoprotein acyl transferases. These findings also provide the basis for ongoing efforts to elucidate the relationship between lipoprotein acylation and the physiological functions and inflammatory

  6. Kanamycin Resistance Cassette for Genetic Manipulation of Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuebin; Ruby, John

    2015-01-01

    Treponema denticola has been recognized as an important oral pathogen of the “red complex” bacterial consortium that is associated with the pathogenesis of endodontal and periodontal diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of T. denticola due to its recalcitrant genetic system. The difficulty in genetically manipulating oral spirochetes is partially due to the lack of antibiotic resistance cassettes that are useful for gene complementation following allelic replacement mutagenesis. In this study, a kanamycin resistance cassette was identified and developed for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola ATCC 35405. Compared to the widely used ermF-ermAM cassette, the kanamycin cassette used in the transformation experiments gave rise to additional antibiotic-resistant T. denticola colonies. The kanamycin cassette is effective for allelic replacement mutagenesis as demonstrated by inactivation of two open reading frames of T. denticola, TDE1430 and TDE0911. In addition, the cassette is also functional in trans-chromosomal complementation. This was determined by functional rescue of a periplasmic flagellum (PF)-deficient mutant that had the flgE gene coding for PF hook protein inactivated. The integration of the full-length flgE gene into the genome of the flgE mutant rescued all of the defects associated with the flgE mutant that included the lack of PF filament and spirochetal motility. Taken together, we demonstrate that the kanamycin resistance gene is a suitable cassette for the genetic manipulation of T. denticola that will facilitate the characterization of virulence factors attributed to this important oral pathogen. PMID:25888173

  7. Murine monoclonal antibodies specific for virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols).

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S M; Kettman, J R; Miller, J N; Norgard, M V

    1982-01-01

    Murine anti-Treponema pallidum (Nichols) lymphocyte hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies against a variety of treponemal antigens have been generated. Hybridomas isolated were of three major types: those that were directed specifically against T. pallidum antigens, those that were directed against treponemal group antigens (as evidenced by their cross-reactivity with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter antigens), and those that cross-reacted with both treponemal as well as rabbit host testicular tissue antigens. The majority (31 of 39 clones) of these anti-T. pallidum hybridomas, which produced monoclonal antibodies of mouse isotypes immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3 or IgM, were directed specifically against T. pallidum and not other treponemal or rabbit antigens tested by radioimmunoassay. Four of these T. pallidum-specific hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies with greater binding affinity for "aged" rather than freshly isolated intact T. pallidum cells, suggesting a possible specificity for "unmasked" surface antigens of T. pallidum. Six anti-T. pallidum hybridomas produced complement-fixing monoclonal antibodies (IgG2a, IgG2b, or IgM) that were capable of immobilizing virulent treponemes in the T. pallidum immobilization (TPI) test; these may represent biologically active monoclonal antibodies against treponemal surface antigens. Three other hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies which bound to both T. pallidum and T. phagedenis biotype Reiter antigens, thus demonstrating a possible specificity for treponemal group antigens. Five hybridoma cell lines were also isolated which produced IgM monoclonal antibodies that cross-reacted with all treponemal and rabbit host testicular tissue antigens employed in the radioimmunoassays. This report describes the construction and characteristics of these hybridoma cell lines. The potential applications of the anti-T. pallidum monoclonal antibodies are discussed. PMID:7047388

  8. Genome-Wide Relatedness of Treponema pedis, from Gingiva and Necrotic Skin Lesions of Pigs, with the Human Oral Pathogen Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Svartström, Olov; Mushtaq, Memoona; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pedis and T. denticola are two genetically related species with different origins of isolation. Treponema denticola is part of the human oral microbiota and is associated with periodontitis while T. pedis has been isolated from skin lesions in animals, e.g., digital dermatitis in cattle and necrotic ulcers in pigs. Although multiple Treponema phylotypes may exist in ulcerative lesions in pigs, T. pedis appears to be a predominant spirochete in these lesions. Treponema pedis can also be present in pig gingiva. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of T. pedis strain T A4, isolated from a porcine necrotic ear lesion, and compared its genome with that of T. denticola. Most genes in T. pedis were homologous to those in T. denticola and the two species were similar in general genomic features such as size, G+C content, and number of genes. In addition, many homologues of specific virulence-related genes in T. denticola were found in T. pedis. Comparing a selected pair of strains will usually not give a complete picture of the relatedness between two species. We therefore complemented the analysis with draft genomes from six T. pedis isolates, originating from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in pigs, and from twelve T. denticola strains. Each strain carried a considerable amount of accessory genetic material, of which a large part was strain specific. There was also extensive sequence variability in putative virulence-related genes between strains belonging to the same species. Signs of lateral gene-transfer events from bacteria known to colonize oral environments were found. This suggests that the oral cavity is an important habitat for T. pedis. In summary, we found extensive genomic similarities between T. pedis and T. denticola but also large variability within each species. PMID:23977007

  9. Comparative Analyses of the Lipooligosaccharides from Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus Show Differences in Sialic Acid and Phosphorylcholine Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Ketterer, Margaret R.; Coffin, Jeremy E.; Reinders, Lorri M.; Munson, Robert S.; Bair, Thomas; Murphy, Timothy F.; Foster, Eric D.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus haemolyticus and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are closely related upper airway commensal bacteria that are difficult to distinguish phenotypically. NTHi causes upper and lower airway tract infections in individuals with compromised airways, while H. haemolyticus rarely causes such infections. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is an outer membrane component of both species and plays a role in NTHi pathogenesis. In this study, comparative analyses of the LOS structures and corresponding biosynthesis genes were performed. Mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that NTHi LOS contained terminal sialic acid more frequently and to a higher extent than H. haemolyticus LOS did. Genomic analyses of 10 strains demonstrated that H. haemolyticus lacked the sialyltransferase genes lic3A and lic3B (9/10) and siaA (10/10), but all strains contained the sialic acid uptake genes siaP and siaT (10/10). However, isothermal titration calorimetry analyses of SiaP from two H. haemolyticus strains showed a 3.4- to 7.3-fold lower affinity for sialic acid compared to that of NTHi SiaP. Additionally, mass spectrometric and immunochemical analyses showed that the LOS from H. haemolyticus contained phosphorylcholine (ChoP) less frequently than the LOS from NTHi strains. These differences observed in the levels of sialic acid and ChoP incorporation in the LOS structures from H. haemolyticus and NTHi may explain some of the differences in their propensities to cause disease. PMID:26729761

  10. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  13. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in testing of ulcers for diagnosis of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  14. Complete Genome Sequence and Annotation of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Chicago Strain ▿

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Brendan M.; Molini, Barbara J.; Le, HoaVan T.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2010-01-01

    In syphilis research, the Nichols strain of Treponema pallidum, isolated in 1912, has been the most widely studied. Recently, important differences among T. pallidum strains emerged; therefore, we sequenced and annotated the Chicago strain genome to facilitate and encourage the use of this strain in studying the pathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:20348263

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; King, Jordon C. K.; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of Three Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Dual Detection of HIV and Treponema pallidum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jennifer S.; Chung, Jun Ho; Sokovic, Anita; Bristow, Claire C.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of three research-use-only, dual HIV and syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was evaluated for 150 patient serum samples and compared to reference HIV and Treponema pallidum antibody detection methods. The RDTs performed comparably, with sensitivities of 93 to 99% and specificities of 97 to 100%. The kappa statistic between the RDTs was 0.95. PMID:25297332

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L; King, Jordon C K; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

  18. Laboratory evaluation of three rapid diagnostic tests for dual detection of HIV and Treponema pallidum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Romney M; Woo, Jennifer S; Chung, Jun Ho; Sokovic, Anita; Bristow, Claire C; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-12-01

    The performance of three research-use-only, dual HIV and syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was evaluated for 150 patient serum samples and compared to reference HIV and Treponema pallidum antibody detection methods. The RDTs performed comparably, with sensitivities of 93 to 99% and specificities of 97 to 100%. The kappa statistic between the RDTs was 0.95. PMID:25297332

  19. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. Role of outer membrane architecture in immune evasion by Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Radolf, J D

    1994-09-01

    Combined ultrastructural and molecular studies have revealed that the syphilis and Lyme-disease spirochetes, Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi, have distinctive molecular architectures. Both organisms persist in their hosts and have strategies for immune evasion that include the use of rare, poorly immunogenic surface-exposed proteins as potential virulence determinants. PMID:7812663

  3. Characterization of Treponema spp. isolates from pigs with ear necrosis and shoulder ulcers.

    PubMed

    Svartström, Olov; Karlsson, Frida; Fellström, Claes; Pringle, Märit

    2013-10-25

    Ear necrosis and shoulder ulcers in pigs are animal welfare problems and ethical issues that can cause economic losses for producers. Spirochetes have been observed microscopically in scrapings from pig ulcers since the early 1900s, but have until recently not been cultured and therefore not characterized. In this study, 12 Treponema spp. isolates were acquired from porcine ear necrosis, shoulder ulcers and gingiva. DNA analysis of the 16S rRNA-tRNA(Ile) intergenic spacer region (ISR2) or the 16S rRNA gene revealed relatedness to oral treponemes found in dogs and humans. All isolates except one aligned into two clusters, Treponema pedis and Treponema sp. OMZ 840-like. The 16S rRNA gene of the remaining isolate shared 99% nucleotide identity with Treponema parvum. Genetic fingerprinting of the isolates was performed through random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In addition, the isolates were characterized by biochemical tests, including api(®)ZYM, tryptophanase and hippuricase activity, and by testing the antimicrobial susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, tylosin, tylvalosin, lincomycin and doxycycline using broth dilution. All isolates except two showed unique RAPD fingerprints, whereas metabolic activity tests could not differentiate between the isolates. The MICs of all antimicrobial agents tested were low. PMID:23948134

  4. Activation of the classical and alternative pathways of complement by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and Treponema vincentii.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T J

    1987-09-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro studies have indicated that complement plays an important role in the syphilitic immune responses. Few quantitative data are available concerning activation of the classical pathway by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and no information is available on treponemal activation of the alternative pathway. Activation of both pathways was compared by using T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and the nonpathogen T. vincentii. With rabbit and human sources of complement, both organisms rapidly activated the classical pathway, as shown by hemolysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C4a. With human sources of complement, both organisms also activated the alternative pathway, as shown by hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C3a in the presence of magnesium ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). During incubation, organisms remained actively mobile and did not lyse, indicating that activation was a function of complement reactivity with the intact outer treponemal surface. In addition, freshly harvested T. pallidum subsp. pallidum immediately activated both pathways of complement; preincubation of organisms did not enhance complement reactivity. T. vincentii was a more potent activator of this pathway. T. pallidum subsp. pallidum contained almost four times as much surface sialic acid as T. vincentii did. When sialic acid was enzymatically removed from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, enhanced activation of the alternative pathway was detected. It is proposed that T. pallidum subsp. pallidum retards complement-mediated damage by the alternative pathway through surface-associated sialic acid. This may be an important virulence determinant that enables these organisms to readily disseminate through the bloodstream to infect other tissues. PMID:3305362

  5. Virulence, transmission, and heterologous protection of four isolates of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease, a syndrome of polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis in swine. Previous studies with H. parasuis have revealed virulence disparity among isolates and inconsistent heterologous protection. In this study, virulence, direct transmission, and heterologous...

  6. The microbiological flora of penile ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Chapel, T; Brown, W J; Jeffries, C; Stewart, J A

    1978-01-01

    The penile ulcerations of 100 consecutive men were tested for microorganisms. A polymicrobial flora was identified in the ulcers of 97 men. The microorganisms recovered from these ulcers included combinations of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria (including Mycoplasma), herpes simplex virus, yeasts, and filamentous fungi. Fifty-three study entrants had microorganisms, identified by culture or serologic tests, that were considered primary in ulcer pathogenesis. Herpes simplex virus was the most prevalent and Treponema pallidum was the next most prevalent pathogen identified. Of our patients, 5% had two recognized pathogens confirmed by laboratory tests, and only one of these was suspected at clinical examination. In addition, the study suggests that microorganisms other than Haemophilus ducreyi can produce ulcers with a morphology mimicking chancroid. PMID:203634

  7. Low occurrence of 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus' misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in cystic fibrosis respiratory specimens, and frequent recurrence of persistent H. influenzae clones despite antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mette G; Ridderberg, Winnie; Olesen, Hanne V; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-12-01

    Non-influenzae commensal Haemophilus species of low pathogenicity may be difficult to discriminate from Haemophilus influenzae. We investigated the level of misidentifications in respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients and evaluated the colonisation dynamics of genuine H. influenzae isolates. One hundred and ninety-two presumptive H. influenzae isolates were re-examined by assessment of marker genes sodC and fucK, and isolates with aberrant genotypes were subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Misidentifications (3%) were mainly caused by failure to identify porphyrin-synthesising strains, and only a single strain (0.5%) could be classified as 'non-haemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus'. Sequential isolates of confirmed H. influenzae isolates from individual patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Despite the routine prescription of antimicrobial therapy, the majority of H. influenzae isolates were identical with at least one of the strains cultured from the two preceding positive samples from the same patient. PMID:23177564

  8. Treponemycin, a nitrile antibiotic active against Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Gurusiddaiah, S; Whalen, J W

    1985-02-01

    inactive dimethyl ester. Apparently both the nitrile and the lactone functions are essential for the treponomycin molecule to show antimicrobial activity. The antibiotic showed inhibitory activity against several species of bacteria, especially Treponema hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery. In view of the oral 50% lethal dose of 400 mg/g and its low MIC against four stains of T.hyodysenteriae, the antibiotic may have value as a swine dysentery therapeutic. PMID:3838636

  9. Antigenic diversity of lipooligosaccharides of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnari, A A; Gupta, M R; Dudas, K C; Murphy, T F; Apicella, M A

    1987-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae are an antigenically heterogeneous group of macromolecules. Immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition studies with phenol-water-extracted LOS and absorbed antisera specific for the oligosaccharide portion of the LOS identified six LOS strain-specific antigens. To facilitate screening large numbers of strains to search for LOS antigenic heterogeneity, a system utilizing proteinase K whole cell digests in Western blots was developed. Seventy-two nontypable H. influenzae LOS extracts were analyzed in this Western blot assay. Thirty-seven of these extracts could be segregated into 10 antigenically distinct LOS groups based on immunologic recognition by one or more of the rabbit antisera. Thirty-five of the strains did not contain these LOS antigens. These results demonstrate that antigenic differences exist among the LOS of nontypable H. influenzae strains, and this heterogeneity has the potential to be used to establish an LOS-based serogrouping system. Images PMID:3549563

  10. Structure and Function of the Haemophilus influenzae Autotransporters

    PubMed Central

    Spahich, Nicole A.; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Autotransporters are a large class of proteins that are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are almost universally implicated in virulence. These proteins consist of a C-terminal β-domain that is embedded in the outer membrane and an N-terminal domain that is exposed on the bacterial surface and is endowed with effector function. In this article, we review and compare the structural and functional characteristics of the Haemophilus influenzae IgA1 protease and Hap monomeric autotransporters and the H. influenzae Hia and Hsf trimeric autotransporters. All of these proteins play a role in colonization of the upper respiratory tract and in the pathogenesis of H. influenzae disease. PMID:22919571

  11. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Pereira, João; Ferreira, Carla; Jordão, Maria José; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-05-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI features were compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), although a differential diagnosis included cerebritis or vasculitis, secondary to bacterial meningitis. The patient was treated with high-dose steroids which resulted in a gradual improvement followed by complete clinical recovery. We propose a diagnosis of ADEM was the best diagnosis because of the radiological features and response to steroids. The occurrence of ADEM associated with acute meningitis, however rare, represents an important diagnostic challenge for the clinician. PMID:18355336

  12. Genome Scanning in Haemophilus influenzae for Identification of Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Karl A.; Chovan, Linda; Hessler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a method for identifying essential genes by using an in vitro transposition system, with a small (975 bp) insertional element containing an antibiotic resistance cassette, and mapping these inserts relative to the deduced open reading frames of Haemophilus influenzae by PCR and Southern analysis. Putative essential genes are identified by two methods: mutation exclusion or zero time analysis. Mutation exclusion consists of growing an insertional library and identifying open reading frames that do not contain insertional elements: in a growing population of bacteria, insertions in essential genes are excluded. Zero time analysis consists of monitoring the fate of individual insertions after transformation in a growing culture: the loss of inserts in essential genes is observed over time. Both methods of analysis permit the identification of genes required for bacterial survival. Details of the mutant library construction and the mapping strategy, examples of mutant exclusion, and zero time analysis are presented. PMID:10438768

  13. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Janessa L.; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J.; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C.; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  14. Polypeptides of Treponema pallidum: progress toward understanding their structural, functional, and immunologic roles. Treponema Pallidum Polypeptide Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J

    1993-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis, is unusual in a number of respects, including its small genome size, inability to grow under standard in vitro culture conditions, microaerophilism, apparent paucity of outer membrane proteins, structurally complex periplasmic flagella, and ability to evade the host immune responses and cause disease over a period of years to decades. Many of these attributes are related ultimately to its protein content. Our knowledge of the activities, structure, and immunogenicity of its proteins has been expanded by the application of recombinant DNA, hybridoma, and structural fractionation techniques. The purpose of this monograph is to summarize and correlate this new information by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, monoclonal antibody reactivity, sequence data, and other properties as the bases of polypeptide identification. The protein profiles of the T. pallidum subspecies causing syphilis, yaws, and endemic syphilis are virtually indistinguishable but differ considerably from those of other treponemal species. Among the most abundant polypeptides are a group of lipoproteins of unknown function that appear to be important in the immune response during syphilitic infection. The periplasmic flagella of T. pallidum and other spirochetes are unique with regard to their protein content and ultrastructure, as well as their periplasmic location. They are composed of three core proteins (homologous to the other members of the eubacterial flagellin family) and a single, unrelated sheath protein; the functional significance of this arrangement is not understood at present. Although the bacterium contains the chaperonins GroEL and DnaK, these proteins are not under the control of the heat shock regulon as they are in most organisms. Studies of the immunogenicity of T. pallidum proteins indicate that many may be useful for immunodiagnosis and immunoprotection. Future goals in T. pallidum polypeptide

  15. TREPONEMA MUCOSUM (NEW SPECIES), A MUCIN-PRODUCING SPIROCHAETA FROM PYORRHEA ALVEOLARIS, GROWN IN PURE CULTURE.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H

    1912-08-01

    1. A mucin-producing spirochoeta has been obtained in pure culture from a case of pyorrhea alveolaris. This organism is an independent species of the genus Treponema and, as it is recognized for the first time, I propose for it the name Treponema mucosum. 2. Morphologically the mucosum is difficult to separate from the pallidum and microdentium, but, through its biological properties and animal reactions it is easily differentiated from all the rest of the spirochoetae. 3. The mucosum is not parasitic in the strict sense of the term, but exerts a certain pyogenous action when the tissue has been so injured by foreign substances as to enable it to survive. 4. The strong fetid odor in the discharge from pyorrhea alveolaris is due, at least in part, to the presence of the mucosum in the affected tissue. PMID:19867565

  16. Genetic diversity in Treponema pallidum: implications for pathogenesis, evolution and molecular diagnostics of syphilis and yaws

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Norris, Steven J.; Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes, similar to syphilis-causing Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, include T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, T. pallidum ssp. endemicum and Treponema carateum, which cause yaws, bejel and pinta, respectively. Genetic analyses of these pathogens revealed striking similarity among these bacteria and also a high degree of similarity to the rabbit pathogen, T. paraluiscuniculi, a treponeme not infectious to humans. Genome comparisons between pallidum and non-pallidum treponemes revealed genes with potential involvement in human infectivity, whereas comparisons between pallidum and pertenue treponemes identified genes possibly involved in the high invasivity of syphilis treponemes. Genetic variability within syphilis strains is considered as the basis of syphilis molecular epidemiology with potential to detect more virulent strains, whereas genetic variability within a single strain is related to its ability to elude the immune system of the host. Genome analyses also shed light on treponemal evolution and on chromosomal targets for molecular diagnostics of treponemal infections. PMID:22198325

  17. Outer membrane ultrastructure explains the limited antigenicity of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V; Schulz, W W

    1989-03-01

    Freeze fracture and deep etching were used to investigate the ultrastructural basis for the observation that anti-treponemal antibodies bind poorly to the surface of virulent Treponema pallidum. Fractures of T. pallidum outer membranes contained scarce, uniformly sized intramembranous particles (IMPs). IMPs on the convex faces often appeared to form linear arrays that wound in spirals about the organism. In contrast to the outer membrane, IMPs of the cytoplasmic membrane were randomly distributed, numerous, and heterogeneous in size. In Escherichia coli and T. pallidum cofractures, IMPs of the E. coli outer membranes were densely packed within the concave fracture faces, while the T. pallidum fractures were identical to the experiments lacking the E. coli internal controls. Outer membranes of two representative nonpathogenic treponemes, Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter and Treponema denticola, contained numerous IMPs, which segregated preferentially with the concave halves. Examination of apposed replicas and deep-etched specimens indicated that at least some of the IMPs extend through the T. pallidum outer membrane and are exposed on the surface of the organism. The outer membrane of intact T. pallidum appears to contain a paucity of integral membrane proteins that can serve as targets for specific antibodies. These findings appear to represent an unusual parasitic strategy for evasion of host humoral defenses. PMID:2648388

  18. Characterization and comparative analysis of the genes encoding Haemophilus parasuis outer membrane proteins P2 and P5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a swine pathogen of significant industry concern, but little is known about how this organism causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenza, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane protei...

  19. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins P2 and P5 in Haemophilus parsuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a serious swine pathogen but little is known about how it causes disease. A related human pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae, has been better studied and many of its virulence factors have been identified. Two of these, outer membrane proteins P2 and P5, have been shown to ha...

  20. Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Protein P6 Molecular Characterization May Not Differentiate All Strains of H. Influenzae from H. haemolyticus▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Adlowitz, Diana G.; Yellamatty, Edna; Pichichero, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates by outer membrane protein (OMP) P6 gene sequencing is complicated by sequence variants in isolates. Further testing using RapID NH and multilocus sequence analysis may not help identify some isolates. Translated OMP P6 gene sequences are not conserved among all isolates presumed to be H. influenzae. PMID:20686092

  1. [Urinary tract infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae in 3 children with uropathies].

    PubMed

    Allard, L; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Champion, G

    2012-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children but Haemophilus is rarely involved. In our institution, only 3 children below the age of 15 years presented with UTI due to Haemophilus influenzae between January 2010 and October 2011. These children had typical symptoms of UTI: fever, abdominal pain and dysuria. In all 3 patients, standard urinalysis remained negative, but H. influenzae was found after bacterial growth in special media, i.e., blood agar (or chocolate agar). These patients had abnormalities of the urinary tract. The first patient, a 5-year-old girl, had a right ureteropelvic junction syndrome found after her UTI. The second, a 4-year-old girl, had a bilateral ureteral duplication found after many UTIs. The third, a 2-month-old boy, had a right ureteropelvic junction syndrome that had been diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound. In our hospital, during the study period, the prevalence of UTI caused by Haemophilus was 0.02% of all pediatric UTIs. There are few reports in the literature on UTI caused by Haemophilus in children (<1%): they are frequently associated with urinary tract abnormalities. The bacterium is not able to grow in usual media, so that when there is a clinical UTI with Gram negative bacilli on the direct exam but not found in the culture, an infection with Haemophilus should be discussed, and blood agar used, which is all the more important when there are underlying abnormalities of the urinary tract. PMID:22795780

  2. Serological classification of Haemophilus paragallinarum with a hemagglutinin system.

    PubMed Central

    Kume, K; Sawata, A; Nakai, T; Matsumoto, M

    1983-01-01

    Antigens, prepared from 17 strains of Haemophilus paragallinarum by treatment with potassium thiocyanate followed by sonication, uniformly agglutinated glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken erythrocytes and formed specific hemagglutination inhibition antibodies in rabbits. Attempts were made to classify the strains into serotypes by a combination of cross-hemagglutination inhibition and cross-absorption tests, using the hemagglutinating antigens, designated as HA-L hemagglutinin, and their antisera. The cross-hemagglutination inhibition tests showed the existence of three distinct groups among the 17 strains. Further cross-absorption studies indicated that two of the three groups could be subdivided into three serotypes each, forming a total of seven serotypes, designated HA-1 through HA-7. Classification based on the serotype-specific HA-L system was found to be superior in its wider and more clearly defined specificities to other previous classifications, which are based on the agglutination test. There appeared to be a correlation between serotypes and geographic origins of the strains. PMID:6874914

  3. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease, Europe, 1996–2006

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Mary P.E.; Heath, Paul T.; von Gottberg, Anne; Chandra, Manosree; Ramsay, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    An international collaboration was established in 1996 to monitor the impact of routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination on invasive H. influenzae disease; 14 countries routinely serotype all clinical isolates. Of the 10,081 invasive H. influenzae infections reported during 1996–2006, 4,466 (44%, incidence 0.28 infections/100,000 population) were due to noncapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi); 2,836 (28%, 0.15/100,000), to Hib; and 690 (7%, 0.036/100,000), to non–b encapsulated H. influenzae. Invasive ncHi infections occurred in older persons more often than Hib (median age 58 years vs. 5 years, p<0.0001) and were associated with higher case-fatality ratios (12% vs. 4%, p<0.0001), particularly in infants (17% vs. 3%, p<0.0001). Among non-b encapsulated H. influenzae, types f (72%) and e (21%) were responsible for almost all cases; the overall case-fatality rate was 9%. Thus, the incidence of invasive non–type b H. influenzae is now higher than that of Hib and is associated with higher case fatality. PMID:20202421

  4. Lineage-specific Virulence Determinants of Haemophilus influenzae Biogroup aegyptius

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Power, Peter; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Corton, Nicola; van Tonder, Andries; Quail, Michael A.; Langford, Paul R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    An emergent clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae) is responsible for outbreaks of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). First recorded in Brazil in 1984, the so-called BPF clone of Hae caused a fulminant disease that started with conjunctivitis but developed into septicemic shock; mortality rates were as high as 70%. To identify virulence determinants, we conducted a pan-genomic analysis. Sequencing of the genomes of the BPF clone strain F3031 and a noninvasive conjunctivitis strain, F3047, and comparison of these sequences with 5 other complete H. influenzae genomes showed that >77% of the F3031 genome is shared among all H. influenzae strains. Delineation of the Hae accessory genome enabled characterization of 163 predicted protein-coding genes; identified differences in established autotransporter adhesins; and revealed a suite of novel adhesins unique to Hae, including novel trimeric autotransporter adhesins and 4 new fimbrial operons. These novel adhesins might play a critical role in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:22377449

  5. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Zhonghui; Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Nix, Jay C.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  6. Bovine plasma proteins increase virulence of Haemophilus somnus in mice.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Kimball, Richard A; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2007-01-01

    The role of bovine serum or plasma proteins in Haemophilus somnus virulence was investigated in a mouse model of septicemia. An increase in virulence was detected when the organism was pre-incubated for 5 min and inoculated with fetal calf serum. When purified bovine serum or plasma proteins were pre-incubated with H. somnus before inoculating into mice, transferrin was found to increase virulence. Bovine lactoferrin was also noted to increase virulence, but to a lesser extent and had a delayed time course when compared with transferrin. Using an ELISA assay, an increased amount of H. somnus whole cells and culture supernatant bound to bovine transferrin when the organism was grown in iron-restricted media. Lactoferrin also bound to H. somnus, but binding was not affected by growth in iron-restricted media and it was eliminated with 2M NaCl, which reversed charge mediated binding. Transferrin, but not lactoferrin, supported growth of H. somnus on iron-depleted agar based media using a disk assay. Therefore, lactoferrin increased virulence by an undetermined mechanism whereas transferrin increased virulence of H. somnus by binding to iron-regulated outer-membrane proteins (IROMPs) and providing iron to the pathogen. PMID:17125964

  7. Effect of marbofloxacin on Haemophilus parasuis nasal carriage.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, Carles; Galofré, Nuria; Aragon, Virginia; Pérez de Rozas, Ana María; Fraile, Lorenzo

    2012-09-14

    Haemophilus parasuis is a colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and the causative agent of Glässer's disease in swine. This study focused on the nasal carriage of H. parasuis after treatment with marbofloxacin. Three marbofloxacin treatments (three doses of 2mg/kg body weight [bw] every 24h, two doses of 4 mg/kg bw every 48 h and 8 mg/kg bw in one single shot) were used and all of them reduce significantly (p<0.05) the nasal carriage of H. parasuis as compared to control animals. Moreover, H. parasuis was not detected in the nasal cavities of piglets after administering the highest dose. The effect of a dose of 8 mg marbofloxacin/kg bw in one shot was further studied in a farm with clinical cases of Glässer's disease using a longitudinal study. Statistically significant reduction of nasal carriage of H. parasuis was detected during the first week after treatment in comparison with the control group. However, a clear relationship between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the different strains, their putative virulence or the treatment group (antibiotic or control) from which they were isolated was not detected. Finally, the effect induced by the antibiotic treatment on the bacterial strains seemed to be transitory, since diverse H. parasuis strains (with high and low marbofloxacin MICs) were observed 7 days after finishing the treatment. PMID:22487455

  8. The relationship between biofilm formations and capsule in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Kida, Yutaka; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kaji, Chiharu; Sakai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Kiwao; Furumoto, Akitsugu; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the biofilm formation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and H. influenzae type b (Hib) clinical isolates, we conducted the following study. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify β-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS), β-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR), TEM-1 type β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant (BLPAR)-NTHi, and Hib. Biofilm formation was investigated by microtiter biofilm assay, as well as visually observation with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in a continuous-flow chamber. As a result, totally 99 strains were investigated, and were classified into 4 groups which were 26 gBLNAS, 22 gBLNAR, 28 gBLPAR-NTHi and 23 Hib strains. The mean OD600 in the microtiter biofilm assay of gBLNAS, gBLNAR, gBLPAR-NTHi, and Hib strains were 0.57, 0.50, 0.34, and 0.08, respectively. NTHi strains were similar in terms of biofilm formations, which were observed by SEM and CLSM. Five Hib strains with the alternated type b cap loci showed significantly increased biofilm production than the other Hib strains. In conclusion, gBLNAS, gBLNAR, and gBLPAR-NTHi strains were more capable to produce biofilms compared to Hib strains. Our data suggested that resistant status may not be a key factor but capsule seemed to play an important role in H. influenzae biofilm formation. PMID:24560562

  9. Transformation of Natural Genetic Variation into Haemophilus Influenzae Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Shumilina, Svetlana; Hall, Ira M.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria are able to efficiently bind and take up double-stranded DNA fragments, and the resulting natural transformation shapes bacterial genomes, transmits antibiotic resistance, and allows escape from immune surveillance. The genomes of many competent pathogens show evidence of extensive historical recombination between lineages, but the actual recombination events have not been well characterized. We used DNA from a clinical isolate of Haemophilus influenzae to transform competent cells of a laboratory strain. To identify which of the ∼40,000 polymorphic differences had recombined into the genomes of four transformed clones, their genomes and their donor and recipient parents were deep sequenced to high coverage. Each clone was found to contain ∼1000 donor polymorphisms in 3–6 contiguous runs (8.1±4.5 kb in length) that collectively comprised ∼1–3% of each transformed chromosome. Seven donor-specific insertions and deletions were also acquired as parts of larger donor segments, but the presence of other structural variation flanking 12 of 32 recombination breakpoints suggested that these often disrupt the progress of recombination events. This is the first genome-wide analysis of chromosomes directly transformed with DNA from a divergent genotype, connecting experimental studies of transformation with the high levels of natural genetic variation found in isolates of the same species. PMID:21829353

  10. Transcriptional profiling of Haemophilus parasuis SH0165 response to tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingyu; Chen, Pin; Wang, Yang; Li, Wentao; Cheng, Shuang; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Anding; He, Qigai

    2012-12-01

    The Haemophilus parasuis respiratory tract pathogen poses a severe threat to the swine industry despite available antimicrobial therapies. To gain a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying H. parasuis response to tilmicosin treatment, microarray technology was applied to analyze the variation in gene expression of isolated H. parasuis SH0165 treated in vitro with subinhibitory (0.25 μg/ml) and inhibitory (8 μg/ml) concentrations. Tilmicosin treatment induced differential expression of 405 genes, the encoded products of which are mainly involved in the heat shock response, protein synthesis, and intracellular transportation. The subinhibitory and inhibitory concentrations of tilmicosin induced distinctive gene expression profiles of shared and unique changes, respectively. These changes included 302 genes mainly involved in protein export and the phosphotransferase system to sustain cell growth, and 198 genes mainly related to RNA polymerase, recombination, and repair to inhibit cell growth. In silico analysis of functions related to the differentially expressed genes suggested that adaptation of H. parasuis SH0165 to tilmicosin involves modulation of protein synthesis and membrane transport. Collectively, the genes comprising each transcriptional profile of H. parasuis response to tilmicosin provide novel insights into the physiological functions of this economically significant bacterium and may represent targets of future molecular therapeutic strategies. PMID:22935051

  11. A Cross-Sectional Study of ‘Yaws’ in Districts of Ghana Which Have Previously Undertaken Azithromycin Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma Control

    PubMed Central

    Ghinai, Rosanna; El-Duah, Philip; Chi, Kai-Hua; Pillay, Allan; Solomon, Anthony W.; Bailey, Robin L.; Agana, Nsiire; Mabey, David C. W.; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is reportedly endemic in Ghana. Mass distribution of azithromycin is now the cornerstone of the WHO yaws eradication campaign. Mass distribution of azithromycin at a lower target dose was previously undertaken in two regions of Ghana for the control of trachoma. Ongoing reporting of yaws raises the possibility that resistance may have emerged in T. pallidum pertenue, or that alternative infections may be responsible for some of the reported cases. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in thirty communities in two districts of Ghana where MDA for trachoma had previously been conducted. Children aged 5–17 years with ulcerative lesions compatible with yaws were enrolled. Samples for treponemal serology and lesion PCR were collected from all children. 90 children with 98 lesions were enrolled. Syphilis serology was negative in all of them. PCR for T. pallidum ssp pertenue was negative in all children, but Haemophilus ducreyi DNA was detected in 9 lesions. In these communities, previously treated for trachoma, we found no evidence of ongoing transmission of yaws. H. ducreyi was associated with a proportion of skin lesions, but the majority of lesions remain unexplained. Integration of diagnostic testing into both pre and post-MDA surveillance systems is required to better inform yaws control programmes. PMID:25632942

  12. A cross-sectional study of 'yaws' in districts of Ghana which have previously undertaken azithromycin mass drug administration for trachoma control.

    PubMed

    Ghinai, Rosanna; El-Duah, Philip; Chi, Kai-Hua; Pillay, Allan; Solomon, Anthony W; Bailey, Robin L; Agana, Nsiire; Mabey, David C W; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Marks, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is reportedly endemic in Ghana. Mass distribution of azithromycin is now the cornerstone of the WHO yaws eradication campaign. Mass distribution of azithromycin at a lower target dose was previously undertaken in two regions of Ghana for the control of trachoma. Ongoing reporting of yaws raises the possibility that resistance may have emerged in T. pallidum pertenue, or that alternative infections may be responsible for some of the reported cases. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in thirty communities in two districts of Ghana where MDA for trachoma had previously been conducted. Children aged 5-17 years with ulcerative lesions compatible with yaws were enrolled. Samples for treponemal serology and lesion PCR were collected from all children. 90 children with 98 lesions were enrolled. Syphilis serology was negative in all of them. PCR for T. pallidum ssp pertenue was negative in all children, but Haemophilus ducreyi DNA was detected in 9 lesions. In these communities, previously treated for trachoma, we found no evidence of ongoing transmission of yaws. H. ducreyi was associated with a proportion of skin lesions, but the majority of lesions remain unexplained. Integration of diagnostic testing into both pre and post-MDA surveillance systems is required to better inform yaws control programmes. PMID:25632942

  13. Serodiagnosis of syphilis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified recombinant Treponema pallidum antigen 4D.

    PubMed

    Radolf, J D; Lernhardt, E B; Fehniger, T E; Lovett, M A

    1986-06-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for syphilis has been developed that detects IgG antibody to purified recombinant Treponema pallidum surface antigen 4D. The 4D ELISA was capable of detecting 25 ng of 4D antigen-specific antibody. Neither 172 nonsyphilitic sera nor 20 false-positive sera in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test reacted in the 4D ELISA. The sensitivity of the 4D ELISA was comparable to that of the adsorbed fluorescent treponemal antibody test in primary, secondary, and latent disease. Most sera from patients with yaws or pinta were also reactive, a result indicating that a 4D antigen-like molecule also exists in the closely related pathogenic treponemes Treponema pertenue and Treponema carateum. PMID:3517186

  14. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Manitoba, Canada, in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Mubareka, Samira; Sill, Michelle L; Wylie, John; Skinner, Stuart; Law, Dennis K S

    2006-04-01

    Fifty-two Haemophilus influenzae isolates from patients with invasive disease in the province of Manitoba, Canada, were examined for serotype, biotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility. Half of the 52 isolates were found to be serotype a, and 38.5% (20 isolates) were found to be nonserotypeable (NST). There were only three serotype b strains and one each for serotypes c, d, and f. All 26 serotype a isolates belonged to biotype II and demonstrated identical or highly similar DNA fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. An analysis of these isolates by multilocus sequence typing showed that they belong to the clonal complex ST-23. While 69% (18 of 26) of the serotype a cases were found in males, only 9 (45%) of the 20 patients with NST isolates were males. Twenty (77%) of the 26 serotype a isolates were from patients who were

  15. Application of multilocus enzyme gel electrophoresis to Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Porras, O; Caugant, D A; Lagergård, T; Svanborg-Edén, C

    1986-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was adapted to the study of Haemophilus influenzae. Protein extracts from sonicated whole bacteria were subjected to starch gel electrophoresis. After staining with substrates, the position of each isoenzyme (electromorph) was registered. Each isolate was assigned an electrophoretic type (ET) by the combination of electromorphs for the enzymes stained. Twenty-seven enzymes were tested; 12 were expressed in H. influenzae. Six enzymes were selected for subsequent study: malate dehydrogenase (MDH), phenylalanylleucine peptidase (PE2), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PG), adenylate kinase (AK), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6P), and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI). They were polymorphic and occurred in all isolates. Six electromorphs were found for PE2, G6P, and PGI, five for MDH, four for 6PG, and three for AK. PE2, G6P, and PGI contributed most of the ET resolution (48 of 49 ETs). Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis showed several advantages over previous typing techniques. An ET could be assigned to both typable and nontypable (NT) isolates. The technique was powerful in resolving differences among isolates. The 94 isolates comprised 49 ETs, five biotypes, and six capsular types and NT isolates. Strains known to be related expressed the same ET, e.g., RAB b+ and b-, ET12; Ma a+ and a-, ET1. ET variability among type b isolates was low; 26 of 28 clinical isolates expressed ET14; 2 of 28 expressed ET13 and ET15, differing from ET14 by one electromorph each. In contrast, the 47 NT isolates comprised 38 different ETs. No ETs were shared between non-type b capsulated strains and type b or NT strains. Interestingly, five NT isolates expressed the same ET as type b strains. (iv) Strains of the same capsular type but different biotypes expressed different ETs. ET determinations will thus be useful in studying the epidemiology and evolution of H. influenzae. Images PMID:3522433

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  17. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed "respiration assisted fermentation" where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part of

  18. Metabolic versatility in Haemophilus influenzae: a metabolomic and genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Schirra, Horst; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a host adapted human pathogen known to contribute to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract as well as the middle ear. At the sites of infection as well as during growth as a commensal the environmental conditions encountered by H. influenzae will vary significantly, especially in terms of oxygen availability, however, the mechanisms by which the bacteria can adapt their metabolism to cope with such changes have not been studied in detail. Using targeted metabolomics the spectrum of metabolites produced during growth of H. influenzae on glucose in RPMI-based medium was found to change from acetate as the main product during aerobic growth to formate as the major product during anaerobic growth. This change in end-product is likely caused by a switch in the major route of pyruvate degradation. Neither lactate nor succinate or fumarate were major products of H. influenzae growth under any condition studied. Gene expression studies and enzyme activity data revealed that despite an identical genetic makeup and very similar metabolite production profiles, H. influenzae strain Rd appeared to favor glucose degradation via the pentose phosphate pathway, while strain 2019, a clinical isolate, showed higher expression of enzymes involved in glycolysis. Components of the respiratory chain were most highly expressed during microaerophilic and anaerobic growth in both strains, but again clear differences existed in the expression of genes associated e.g., with NADH oxidation, nitrate and nitrite reduction in the two strains studied. Together our results indicate that H. influenzae uses a specialized type of metabolism that could be termed “respiration assisted fermentation” where the respiratory chain likely serves to alleviate redox imbalances caused by incomplete glucose oxidation, and at the same time provides a means of converting a variety of compounds including nitrite and nitrate that arise as part

  19. Treponema-Specific Tests for Serodiagnosis of Syphilis: Comparative Evaluation of Seven Assays▿

    PubMed Central

    Binnicker, M. J.; Jespersen, D. J.; Rollins, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis is challenging and often relies on serologic tests to detect treponemal or nontreponemal antibodies. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories proposed an update to the syphilis serology testing algorithm, in which serum samples are first tested using a treponema-specific test and positive samples are analyzed with a nontreponemal assay. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of seven treponemal assays (BioPlex 2200 syphilis IgG [Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA], fluorescent treponemal antibody [FTA] assay [Zeus Scientific, Raritan, NJ], Treponema pallidum particle agglutination [TP-PA; Fujirebio Diagnostics, Malvern, PA], Trep-Sure enzyme immunoassay [EIA; Phoenix Biotech, Oakville, Ontario, Canada], Trep-Chek EIA [Phoenix Biotech], Trep-ID EIA [Phoenix Biotech], and Treponema ViraBlot IgG [Viramed Biotech AG, Planegg, Germany]) using serum samples (n = 303) submitted to our reference laboratory. In addition to testing with these 7 assays, all samples were tested by a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay and a treponemal IgM Western blot assay (Viramed ViraBlot). Compared to the FTA assay as the gold standard, the evaluated treponemal tests demonstrated comparable levels of performance, with percent agreement ranging from 95.4% (95% confidence interval, 92.3 to 97.3) for the Trep-Sure EIA to 98.4% (96.1 to 99.4) for the Trep-ID EIA. Compared to a “consensus of the test panel” (defined as at least 4 of 7 treponemal tests being in agreement), the percent agreement ranged from 95.7% (92.7 to 97.5) for Trep-Sure to 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9) for Trep-ID. These data may assist clinical laboratories that are considering implementing a treponemal test for screening or confirmatory purposes. PMID:21346050

  20. A curated multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) database for Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis is the etiologic agent of Glasser's disease and pneumonia in swine. Serotyping has traditionally been used for classification of strains but results are subjective and not highly reproducible and the required reagents are expensive to produce, not widely available, a...

  1. Use of an Avirulent Isolate of Haemophilus parasuis as a Vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs from an experimental herd free from known swine pathogens were used in a study to determine the virulence of several Haemophilus parasuis isolates and determine whether an avirulent isolate could provide protection against subsequent challenge with heterologous virulent isolates. Four groups of...

  2. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. A commerc...

  3. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  4. Whole-Genome Sequences of Nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae Strains Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giufrè, Maria; De Chiara, Matteo; Censini, Stefano; Guidotti, Silvia; Torricelli, Giulia; De Angelis, Gabriella; Cardines, Rita; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Soriani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen involved in invasive disease. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of 11 nonencapsulated H. influenzae (ncHi) strains isolated from both invasive disease and healthy carriers in Italy. This genomic information will enrich our understanding of the molecular basis of ncHi pathogenesis. PMID:25814593

  5. Innate Immune Responses are Enhanced in Pigs After Sequential Infection with Influenza Virus and Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) infection alone causes significant disease characterized by respiratory distress and poor growth. However, SIV also plays a significant role in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC), though the mechanism in which this occurs is not clearly defined. Haemophilus pa...

  6. A Modified Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) Scheme for Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Haemophilus parasuis is the etiologic agent of Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in swine. Phenotypic classification systems are of assistance in epidemiologic studies but molecular methods provide numerous distinct advantages. An MLST scheme proposed by others appears promising (4). How...

  7. Draft genome sequences for ten isolates of the swine respiratory pathogen Haemophilus Parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a swine pathogen that causes pneumonia and Glässer’s disease, a systemic syndrome of polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis. We report here the draft genomes of ten geographically diverse isolates collectively representing the full virulence spectrum of H. parasuis. These...

  8. Comparative virulence and genomic analysis of 10 strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glasser's disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  9. Virulence and draft genome sequence overview of multiple strains of the swine pathogen Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. Characterization of this animal disease is complicated by the enormous differences in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis str...

  10. Comparative studies of the genome, virulence, and protection of 10 Haemophilus parasuis strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer’s disease in swine, which is characterized by systemic infection resulting in polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. An enormous difference exists in the severity of disease caused by H. parasuis strains, ranging from lethal systemic disease to asympto...

  11. [Surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae serotypes in Argentina from 2005 to 2010 during the Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine era].

    PubMed

    Efron, Adriana M; Moscoloni, María A; Reijtman, Vanesa R; Regueira, Mabel

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in the immunization programs of many countries has greatly reduced this invasive disease and the carriage caused by this serotype, also increasing other capsular types and non-capsular isolations. There were 313 isolations of H. influenzae under study, which were recovered from a sterile site coming from pediatric and adult patients carrying the invasive disease. Patients were treated at 90 different hospitals belonging to the Red Nacional de Laboratorios para Meningitis e Infecciones Respiratorias Agudas Bacterianas (National Lab Network for Meningitis and Acute Bacterial Respiratory Infections) from 2005 to 2010 for the following disorders: pneumonia, 40.3% (n=126), meningitis, 30.0% (n=94) and bacteremia, 26.5% (n=83). In pediatric patients (n=279), the highest frequency of isolations corresponded to children under the age of 2 years, 74.5% (n=208). Regarding type distribution, 61.3% corresponded to non-capsular H. influenzae (n=192), 20.1% to type b (n=63), 11.2% to type a (n=35), 4.8% to type f, and 2.6% to other types. Capsular H. influenzae was predominant in meningitis whereas non-capsular H. influenzae in pneumonia and bacteremia. The biotype was determined in 306 isolations. The totality (100%) of type a (n=35) was biotype II whereas 66.7% of type b (n=63) was biotype I. Slide agglutination and PCR tests were used in 220 isolations. There was a match of 0.982 (IC: 0.92-1.00) between them. During the last year, there was a great increase in type b, showing the importance of clinical and laboratory-based surveillance of the invasive disease caused by H. influenzae. PMID:24401777

  12. Genome size of human oral Treponema species by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Correia, F F; Plummer, A R; Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E

    2004-04-01

    The genome sizes of seven strains of oral treponemes were determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). These strains represent members from six of the currently known cultivable oral treponeme groups. The PFGE fragments were digitally recorded and then quantitated using GIMP v 1.2, an image manipulation program. The results show that the six oral treponeme genomes are comparable in size, ranging from approximately 2.2 to 2.5 Mbp. The genome sizes of these strains are 20-25% smaller than Treponema denticola strains, which have genome sizes of approximately 2.8-3.0 Mbp. PMID:14871355

  13. Effect of freezing conditions in liquid nitrogen on biological properties of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Potomski, J; Metzger, M; Smogór, W; Ruczkowska, J

    1979-01-01

    The influence of various conditions of freezing in liquid nitrogen on the motility, virulence, antigens, and immunogenicity of Treponema pallidum was studied. The suspending medium, rate of freezing, kind and concentration of cryprotector, and duration of preincubation with cryoprotector were found to be critical. On the basis of the results obtained the optimal conditions of freezing of T. pallidum in liquid nitrogen were established. These are: the Nelson-Diesendruck medium with the addition of 10% DMSO; freezing rate 1 degree per min, and thawing rate between 12.6 degrees and 120 degrees per min. PMID:375869

  14. Development of of macrophage migration inhibition in rabbits infected with virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Pavia, C S; Folds, J D; Baseman, J B

    1977-09-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells from rabbits infected with Treponema pallidum Nichols were used as indicators of macrophage migration inhibitory factor activity. Between 3 and 15 weeks after infection, the migration of peritoneal exudate cells was inhibited in the presence of 3 to 25 microgram of T. phagedenis biovar Reiter protein per ml. Before this period, the migration patterns of peritoneal exudate cells from infected animals were uninhibited and similar to those from noninfected control rabbits. These observations were correlated with the development of active cell-mediated immunity during experimental T. pallidum infection. PMID:332632

  15. Frequent oligonucleotides and peptides of the Haemophilus influenzae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Mrázek, J; Campbell, A M

    1996-01-01

    The complete Haemophilus influenzae genome (1.83 Mb, Rd strain) provides opportunities for characterizing global genomic inhomogeneities and for detecting important sequence signals. Along these lines, new methods for identifying frequent words (oligonucleotides and/or peptides) and their distributions are applied to the H.influenzae genome with some comparisons and contrasts made with frequent words of other bacterial genomes. Three major classes of frequent oligonucleotides stand out: (i) oligos related to the familiar uptake signal sequences (USSs), AAGTGCGGT (USS+) and its inverted complement (USS-), (ii) multiple tetranucleotide iterations and (iii) intergenic dyad sequences (ISDs) found as AAGCCCACCCTAC and its dyad form. The USS+ and USS- occur in almost equal counts, are remarkably evenly spaced around the genome, and appear predominantly in the same reading frame of protein coding domains (USS+ translated to Ser-Ala-Val, USS- translated to Thr-Ala-Leu). These observations suggest that USSs contribute to global genomic functions, for example, in replication and/or repair processes, or as membrane attachment sites, or as sequences helping to pack DNA. The long tetranucleotide iterations, virtually unique to H.influenzae (i.e., unknown in other prokaryotes), through polymerase slippage during replication and/or homologous recombination may produce subpopulations expressing alternative proteins. The 13 bp frequent IDS words, invariably intergenic, occur mostly in clusters and provide potential for complex secondary structures suggesting that these sequences may be important signals for regulating the activity of their flanking genes. The frequent oligopeptides of H.influenzae are principally of two kinds--those induced by oligonucleotide frequent words (USSs, tetranucleotide iterations), and those associated with ATP or GTP binding sites that are generally composed of three motifs: the A-box which contributes to delineating the binding pocket; the B-box which

  16. Complete genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A: the loss of infectivity to humans is associated with genome decay.

    PubMed

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A; Weinstock, George M

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  17. Complete Genome Sequence for Treponema sp. OMZ 838 (ATCC 700772, DSM 16789), Isolated from a Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yuki; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C.; Huo, Yong-Biao; Keung Leung, W.

    2014-01-01

    The oral treponeme bacterium Treponema sp. OMZ 838 was originally isolated from a human necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) lesion. Its taxonomic status remains uncertain. The complete genome sequence length was determined to be 2,708,067 bp, with a G+C content of 44.58%, and 2,236 predicted coding DNA sequences (CDS). PMID:25540346

  18. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  19. Genetic analysis of a Treponema phagedenis locus encoding antigenic lipoproteins with potential for antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Loftsdottir, Heidur; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo; Zuerner, Richard; Rosander, Anna

    2016-06-30

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a painful and debilitating claw disease in cattle. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The occurrence of Treponema phagedenis in DD lesions, especially near the interface of healthy and diseased tissue, suggests that this species contributes to the development and/or progression of the lesions. In this study we characterized a genetic locus in T. phagedenis that contains coding regions for three antigenic proteins, PrrA, VpsA, and VpsB. Comparative analysis of homologous loci from fifteen strains suggests that prrA may be transposed into or out of this locus. Alterations in the copy number of TA repeats within the putative promoter region may regulate VpsA/B expression. The vpsA and prrA genes occur in allelic variants in different T. phagedenis isolates and may provide one explanation for the antigenic variation observed in T. phagedenis DD isolates. PMID:27259832

  20. A new attempt to distinguish serologically the subspecies of Treponema pallidum causing syphilis and yaws.

    PubMed Central

    Noordhoek, G T; Cockayne, A; Schouls, L M; Meloen, R H; Stolz, E; van Embden, J D

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to serologically differentiate syphilis from yaws, 69 monoclonal antibody species raised against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were tested by immunoblotting for their reactivity with Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue. All monoclonal antibodies reacted with antigens with the same molecular weight of both subspecies. Furthermore, no differences in reactivity between sera from yaws patients and from syphilis patients were found by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cell lysates of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue. We tried to exploit the only known molecular difference between the subspecies. The subunits of the 190-kilodalton multimeric proteins TpF1 and TyF1 of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, respectively, have previously been shown to differ in one amino acid residue at position 40. In this study, no difference was found in immunoreactivity of TpF1 or TyF1 with either syphilis sera or yaws sera. Synthetic peptides based on the sequence of TpF1 and of TyF1 were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with syphilis sera and yaws sera. Again, no difference in reactivity between the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum- and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue-derived peptides was observed. Images PMID:2199521

  1. Sensitive detection of Treponema pallidum by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Burstain, J M; Grimprel, E; Lukehart, S A; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive assay for Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of veneral syphilis, based upon the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A 658-bp portion of the gene encoding the 47-kDa membrane immunogen was amplified, and the PCR products were probed by DNA-DNA hybridization with a 496-bp fragment internal to the amplitifed DNA. The assay detected approximately 0.01 pg of purified T. pallidum DNA, and positive results were obtained routinely from suspensions of treponemes calculated to contain 10 or more organism and from some suspensions calculated to contain a single organism. Specific PCR products were obtained for the closely related agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue, but not with human DNA or DNAs from other spirochetes (including Borrelia burgdoferi), skin microorganisms, sexually transmitted disease pathogens, and central nervous system pathogens. T. pallidum DNA was detected in serum, cerebrospinal fluids, and amniotic fluids from syphilis patients but not in in nonsyphilitic controls. T. pallidum DNA was also amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue. The diagnosis of syphillis by using PCR may become a significant addition to the diagnostic armamentarium and a valuable technique for the investigation of syphilis pathogenesis. Images PMID:1993770

  2. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  3. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum strain SS14 determined with oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Matějková, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sodergren, Erica; Norton, Jason E; Singh, Jaz; Richmond, Todd A; Molla, Michael N; Albert, Thomas J; Weinstock, George M

    2008-01-01

    Background Syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum remains the enigmatic pathogen, since no virulence factors have been identified and the pathogenesis of the disease is poorly understood. Increasing rates of new syphilis cases per year have been observed recently. Results The genome of the SS14 strain was sequenced to high accuracy by an oligonucleotide array strategy requiring hybridization to only three arrays (Comparative Genome Sequencing, CGS). Gaps in the resulting sequence were filled with targeted dideoxy-terminators (DDT) sequencing and the sequence was confirmed by whole genome fingerprinting (WGF). When compared to the Nichols strain, 327 single nucleotide substitutions (224 transitions, 103 transversions), 14 deletions, and 18 insertions were found. On the proteome level, the highest frequency of amino acid-altering substitution polymorphisms was in novel genes, while the lowest was in housekeeping genes, as expected by their evolutionary conservation. Evidence was also found for hypervariable regions and multiple regions showing intrastrain heterogeneity in the T. pallidum chromosome. Conclusion The observed genetic changes do not have influence on the ability of Treponema pallidum to cause syphilitic infection, since both SS14 and Nichols are virulent in rabbit. However, this is the first assessment of the degree of variation between the two syphilis pathogens and paves the way for phylogenetic studies of this fascinating organism. PMID:18482458

  4. The Treponema denticola Major Sheath Protein Is Predominantly Periplasmic and Has Only Limited Surface Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Bourell, Kenneth W.; Bannister, Teresa D.; Cox, David L.; Radolf, Justin D.

    1999-01-01

    The recent discovery that the Treponema pallidum genome encodes 12 orthologs of the Treponema denticola major sheath protein (Msp) prompted us to reexamine the cellular location and topology of the T. denticola polypeptide. Experiments initially were conducted to ascertain whether Msp forms an array on or within the T. denticola outer membrane. Transmission electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained and ultrathin-sectioned organisms failed to identify a typical surface layer, whereas freeze-fracture EM revealed that the T. denticola outer membrane contains heterogeneous transmembrane proteins but no array. In contrast, a lattice-like structure was observed in vesicles released from mildly sonicated treponemes; combined EM and biochemical analyses demonstrated that this structure was the peptidoglycan sacculus. Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) subsequently was performed to localize Msp in T. denticola. Examination of negatively stained whole mounts identified substantial amounts of Msp in sonicated organisms. IEM of ultrathin-sectioned, intact treponemes also demonstrated that the preponderance of antigen was unassociated with the outer membrane. Lastly, immunofluorescence analysis of treponemes embedded in agarose gel microdroplets revealed that only minor portions of Msp are surface exposed. Taken as a whole, our findings challenge the widely held belief that Msp forms an array within the T. denticola outer membrane and demonstrate, instead, that it is predominantly periplasmic with only limited surface exposure. These findings also have implications for our evolving understanding of the contribution(s) of Msp/Tpr orthologs to treponemal physiology and disease pathogenesis. PMID:10417176

  5. The genome of Treponema pallidum: new light on the agent of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, G M; Hardham, J M; McLeod, M P; Sodergren, E J; Norris, S J

    1998-10-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp, pallidum, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease syphilis, is a fastidious, microaerophilic obligate parasite of humans. This bacterium is one of the few prominent infectious agents that has not been cultured continuously in vitro and consequently relatively little is known about its virulence mechanisms at the molecular level. T. pallidum therefore represented an attractive candidate for genomic sequencing. The complete genome sequence of T. pallidum has now been completed and comprises 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted protein coding sequences. An important goal of this project is to identify possible virulence factors. Analysis of the genome indicates a number of potential virulence factors including a family of 12 proteins related to the Msp protein of Treponema denticola, a number of putative hemolysins, as well as several other classes of proteins of interest. The results of this analysis are reviewed in this article and indicate the value of whole genome sequences for rapidly advancing knowledge of infectious agents. PMID:9862125

  6. Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Rekha; Myers, Garry S A; Tettelin, Hervé; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, John F; Dodson, Robert J; Davidsen, Tanja M; DeBoy, Robert T; Fouts, Derrick E; Haft, Dan H; Selengut, Jeremy; Ren, Qinghu; Brinkac, Lauren M; Madupu, Ramana; Kolonay, Jamie; Durkin, Scott A; Daugherty, Sean C; Shetty, Jyoti; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Malek, Joel; Ayodeji, Bola; Shatsman, Sofiya; McLeod, Michael P; Smajs, David; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Pal, Sangita; Amin, Anita; Vashisth, Pankaj; McNeill, Thomas Z; Xiang, Qin; Sodergren, Erica; Baca, Ernesto; Weinstock, George M; Norris, Steven J; Fraser, Claire M; Paulsen, Ian T

    2004-04-13

    We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function. PMID:15064399

  7. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Tr

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Scheuner, Carmen; Han, Cliff; Lu, Megan; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bac- terium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of in- terest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clos- tridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassi- fication of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional ge- nomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Conservation of the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein among Treponema pallidum subspecies and strains and other pathogenic treponemes: genetic and antigenic analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Centurion-Lara, A; Arroll, T; Castillo, R; Shaffer, J M; Castro, C; Van Voorhis, W C; Lukehart, S A

    1997-01-01

    The 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum is a major immunogen during natural syphilis infection in humans and experimental infection in other hosts. The humoral and cellular immune responses to this molecule appear late in infection as resistance to reinfection is developing. One therefore might hypothesize that this antigen is important for protective immunity. This possibility is explored by using both genetic and antigenic approaches. Limited or no cross-protection has been demonstrated between the T. pallidum subspecies and strains or between Treponema species. We therefore hypothesized that if the 15-kDa antigen was of major importance in protective immunity, it might be a likely site of antigenic diversity. To explore this possibility, the sequences of the open reading frames of the 15-kDa gene have been determined for Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols and Bal-3 strains), T. pallidum subsp. pertenue (Gauthier strain), T. pallidum subsp. endemicum (Bosnia strain), Treponema paraluiscuniculi (Cuniculi A, H, and K strains), and a little-characterized simian isolate of Treponema sp. (Fribourg-Blanc strain). No significant differences in DNA sequences of the genes for the coding region of the 15-kDa antigen were found among the different species and subspecies studied. In addition, all organisms showed expression of the 15-kDa antigen as determined by monoclonal antibody staining. The role of the 15-kDa antigen in protection against homologous infection with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols was examined in rabbits immunized with a purified recombinant 15-kDa fusion protein. No alteration in chancre development was observed in immunized, compared to unimmunized, rabbits, and the antisera induced by the immunization failed to enhance phagocytosis of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum by macrophages in vitro. These results do not support a major role for this antigen in protection against syphilis infection. PMID:9119485

  9. High-Level Association of Bovine Digital Dermatitis Treponema spp. with Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions and Presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, S. R.; Angell, J. W.; Newbrook, K.; Blowey, R. W.; Carter, S. D.; Bell, J.; Duncan, J. S.; Grove-White, D. H.; Murray, R. D.; Evans, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. “Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like,” “Treponema phagedenis-like,” and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  10. High-level association of bovine digital dermatitis Treponema spp. with contagious ovine digital dermatitis lesions and presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L E; Clegg, S R; Angell, J W; Newbrook, K; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Bell, J; Duncan, J S; Grove-White, D H; Murray, R D; Evans, N J

    2015-05-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like," "Treponema phagedenis-like," and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  11. Immune response against Treponema spp. and ELISA detection of digital dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Anklam, K S; Cook, N B; Rieman, J; Dunbar, K A; Cooley, K E; Socha, M T; Döpfer, D

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the immune response against Treponema spp. infection in dairy heifers affected with digital dermatitis (DD). In addition, the accuracy of an indirect ELISA detecting anti-Treponema IgG antibodies in identifying clinical DD status has been assessed. A cohort of 688 pregnant Holstein heifers was evaluated at least 3 times before calving during a period of 6 mo. Complete clinical assessment of DD presence on the back feet of each heifer and blood extraction were performed in a stand-up chute. Digital dermatitis cases were characterized by the M-stage classification system and size and level of skin proliferation. An ELISA was performed on blood serum samples obtained from a subcohort of 130 heifers. For description purposes, the animals were classified by the number of clinical cases experienced during the study period as type I (no clinical cases were observed), type II (only 1 acute clinical case diagnosed), and type III (at least 2 acute clinical cases diagnosed). Multivariable repeated-measures models were used to evaluate the immune response against Treponema spp. infection. A binormal Bayesian model for the ELISA data without cut-point values was used to assess the accuracy of the ELISA as a diagnostic tool. Animals that never experienced a DD event throughout the study kept a constant low level of antibody titer. A 56% increase in mean ELISA titer was observed in heifers upon a first clinical DD case diagnosis. After topical treatment of an acute DD case with oxytetracycline, the antibody titer decreased progressively in type II heifers, achieving mean levels of those observed in healthy cows after a mean of 223 d. Surprisingly, antibody titer was not increased in the presence of M1 (DD lesion <20mm in diameter surrounded by healthy skin) and M4.1 (DD lesion <20mm in diameter embedded in a circumscribed dyskeratotic or proliferative skin alteration) DD stages. Type III cows showed a slight increase in

  12. Distribution and Diversity of hmw1A Among Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahini Shams Abadi, Milad; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Vaziri, Farzam; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Pourazar, Shahin; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Ghazanfari, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) begins with adhesion to the rhinopharyngeal mucosa. Almost 38–80% of NTHi clinical isolates produce proteins that belong to the High Molecular Weight (HMW) family of adhesins, which are believed to facilitate colonization. Methods: In the present study, the prevalence of hmwA, which encodes the HMW adhesin, was determined for a collection of 32 NTHi isolates. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to advance our understanding of hmwA binding sequence diversity. Results: The results demonstrated that hmwA was detected in 61% of NTHi isolates. According to RFLP, isolates were divided into three groups. Conclusion: Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that some strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae infect some specific areas more than other parts. PMID:27141269

  13. Clinical and microbiological features of Haemophilus influenzae vulvovaginitis in young girls

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Slack, M P E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To define the clinical and microbiological features of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls whose genital swabs yielded Haemophilus influenzae. Methods: Laboratory based study and retrospective collection of clinical data from the requesting doctors. Results: Thirty eight isolates of non-capsulate Haemophilus influenzae and one of H parainfluenzae were isolated from 32 girls aged 18 months to 11 years. No other pathogens, such as β haemolytic streptococci or yeasts, were present with H influenzae. The most common biotype was biotype II, comprising 57% of the 26 isolates biotyped. Six children had more than one episode of vulvovaginitis caused by H influenzae and a total of 14 children had recurrent vaginal symptoms. Conclusion: Children who have H influenzae vulvovaginitis are at risk of recurrent symptoms. Biotype II is the one most commonly associated with this condition. PMID:12461068

  14. Functional characterization of UvrD helicases from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchika; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori are major bacterial pathogens that face high levels of genotoxic stress within their host. UvrD, a ubiquitous bacterial helicase that plays important roles in multiple DNA metabolic pathways, is essential for genome stability and might, therefore, be crucial in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. In this study, the functional characterization of UvrD helicase from Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori is reported. UvrD from Haemophilus influenzae (HiUvrD) and Helicobacter pylori (HpUvrD) exhibit strong single-stranded DNA-specific ATPase and 3'-5' helicase activities. Mutation of highly conserved arginine (R288) in HiUvrD and glutamate (E206) in HpUvrD abrogated their activities. Both the proteins were able to bind and unwind a variety of DNA structures including duplexes with strand discontinuities and branches, three- and four-way junctions that underpin their role in DNA replication, repair and recombination. HiUvrD required a minimum of 12 nucleotides, whereas HpUvrD preferred 20 or more nucleotides of 3'-single-stranded DNA tail for efficient unwinding of duplex DNA. Interestingly, HpUvrD was able to hydrolyze and utilize GTP for its helicase activity although not as effectively as ATP, which has not been reported to date for UvrD characterized from other organisms. HiUvrD and HpUvrD were found to exist predominantly as monomers in solution together with multimeric forms. Noticeably, deletion of distal C-terminal 48 amino acid residues disrupted the oligomerization of HiUvrD, whereas deletion of 63 amino acids from C-terminus of HpUvrD had no effect on its oligomerization. This study presents the characteristic features and comparative analysis of Haemophilus influenzae and Helicobacter pylori UvrD, and constitutes the basis for understanding the role of UvrD in the biology and virulence of these pathogens. PMID:22500516

  15. Emergence of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Strains among Elderly Patients but Not among Children▿

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Ohkoshi, Yasuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2008-01-01

    We screened 457 Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated in Japan during 2002 to 2004 and identified 12 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains (2.6%). The resistant strains were divided into three genotypes (eight, three, and one of each type). These were isolated from patients over 58 years of age. Several fluoroquinolone-resistant clones appeared to have invaded the population of elderly patients in a particular area, Sapporo city. PMID:17977993

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Highly Virulent Haemophilus parasuis Serotype 11 Strain SC1401

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ke; Jin, Jin; Wen, Xintian; He, Lvqin; Cao, Sanjie; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis, a normal Gram-negative bacterium, may cause Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in pigs. This study aims to identify the genes related to natural competence of the serotype 11 strain SC1401, which frequently shows competence and high pathogenicity. SC1401 shows many differences from strains without natural competence within the molecular basis. We performed complete genome sequencing together with restriction modification system analysis to lay the foundation for later study. PMID:27445368

  17. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Mural Endocarditis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Giurgea, Luca T.; Lahey, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae, which uncommonly causes endocarditis, has never been documented to cause mural involvement. A 62-year-old immunocompetent female without predisposing risk factors for endocarditis except for poor dentition presented with fever, emesis, and dysmetria. Echocardiography found a mass attached to the left ventricular wall with finger-like projections. Computed tomography showed evidence of embolic phenomena to the brain, kidneys, spleen, and colon. Cardiac MRI revealed involvement of the chordae tendineae of the anterior papillary muscles. Blood cultures grew Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The patient was treated successfully with ceftriaxone with resolution of symptoms, including neurologic deficits. After eleven days of antibiotics a worsening holosystolic murmur was discovered. Worsening mitral regurgitation on echocardiography was only found three weeks later. Nine weeks after presentation, intraoperative evaluation revealed chord rupture but no residual vegetation and mitral repair was performed. Four weeks after surgery, the patient was back to her baseline. This case illustrates the ability of Haemophilus parainfluenzae to form large mural vegetations with high propensity of embolization in otherwise normal cardiac tissue among patients with dental risk factors. It also underscores the importance of physical examination in establishing a diagnosis of endocarditis and monitoring for progression of disease. PMID:27382494

  18. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Mural Endocarditis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Giurgea, Luca T; Lahey, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae, which uncommonly causes endocarditis, has never been documented to cause mural involvement. A 62-year-old immunocompetent female without predisposing risk factors for endocarditis except for poor dentition presented with fever, emesis, and dysmetria. Echocardiography found a mass attached to the left ventricular wall with finger-like projections. Computed tomography showed evidence of embolic phenomena to the brain, kidneys, spleen, and colon. Cardiac MRI revealed involvement of the chordae tendineae of the anterior papillary muscles. Blood cultures grew Haemophilus parainfluenzae. The patient was treated successfully with ceftriaxone with resolution of symptoms, including neurologic deficits. After eleven days of antibiotics a worsening holosystolic murmur was discovered. Worsening mitral regurgitation on echocardiography was only found three weeks later. Nine weeks after presentation, intraoperative evaluation revealed chord rupture but no residual vegetation and mitral repair was performed. Four weeks after surgery, the patient was back to her baseline. This case illustrates the ability of Haemophilus parainfluenzae to form large mural vegetations with high propensity of embolization in otherwise normal cardiac tissue among patients with dental risk factors. It also underscores the importance of physical examination in establishing a diagnosis of endocarditis and monitoring for progression of disease. PMID:27382494

  19. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection. PMID:26153407

  20. Clinical utility of a competitive ELISA to detect antibodies against Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Vergara, M J; Soto, M J; Piédrola, G; Maroto, M d

    2000-01-01

    Screening for Treponema pallidum infection is carried out on a large human population. To reduce costs, fewer tests which still offer adequate sensitivity and specificity could be performed. We studied the reliability of a novel indirect ELISA method to test for this infection. Several panels of sera were used that corresponded to 40 primary infections (group 1), 13 recurrences (group 2), 348 latent infections (group 3), 5 samples with anticardiolipin antibodies (group 4), 15 samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis (group 5), and 400 samples from blood donors and healthy pregnant women (group 6). The ELISA showed a global sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 99.5%, respectively. Our evaluation shows that Enzygnost Syphilis is a sensitive, specific, and simple test to screen for this infection. PMID:10683619

  1. Tp17 membrane protein of Treponema pallidum activates endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Wang, Qian-Qiu; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Yang, Li-Jia

    2015-04-01

    Tp17, a membrane immunogen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, was initially recognized as an inflammatory mediator of syphilis. Because the histopathology of syphilis is characterized by endothelial cell abnormalities, we investigated the effects of recombinant Tp17 (rTp17) on endothelial cell activation in vitro. Using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and whole-cell ELISA, we found that rTp17 activated endothelial cells, as demonstrated by the up-regulated expression and increased gene transcription of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). rTp17 also enhanced the migration and subsequent adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells as well as increased transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data suggest that the ability of Tp17 to activate endothelial cells may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25744604

  2. [Macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in the Czech Republic and in other countries].

    PubMed

    Grillová, L; Mikalová, L; Zákoucká, H; Židlická, J; Šmajs, D

    2015-03-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA) is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease syphilis. In the Czech Republic, several hundred cases of syphilis are reported annually; e.g. in 2012, 696 syphilis cases were documented. In the last decades, an increasing prevalence of macrolide resistant TPA strains harboring A2058G or A2059G mutations in the 23S rRNA gene has been reported. Macrolides were used (and rarely are still being used) in the Czech Republic for the treatment of syphilis in patients allergic to penicillin. While 37% of TPA strains were resistant to macrolides between 2004 and 2010, this rate increased to 67% between 2011-2013. High prevalence of A2058G or A2059G mutations and increasing rates of macrolide resistant TPA strains have also been documented in other developed countries. Therefore, macrolides should not be used in the treatment of syphilis. PMID:25872989

  3. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in Denmark: A Nationwide Study of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Cowan, Susan; Gerstoft, Jan; Larsen, Helle Kiellberg; Hoffmann, Steen; Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this nationwide study is to determine the strain type diversity among patients diagnosed with syphilis by PCR during a 4-year period in Denmark. Epidemiological data, including HIV status, for all patients were obtained from the Danish national syphilis registration system. Molecular strain typing was based on characterization of 3 variable treponemal genes, arp, tpr and tp0548. A total of 278 specimens from 269 patients were included. Among the fully typeable specimens (n = 197), 22 strain types were identified, with 1 type, 14d/g, accounting for 54%. The majority (93%) of the patients reported acquiring syphilis in Denmark. Among patients with concurrent HIV, 9 full strain types were identified and no difference in strain type was found by HIV status (p = 0.197). In conclusion, the majority of patients were infected in Denmark and the HIV-infected syphilis patients were diagnosed with a wide spectrum of different strain types of Treponema pallidum. PMID:26122912

  4. Differences in susceptibility to infection with Treponema pallidum (Nichols) between five strains of guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Wicher, K; Wicher, V; Gruhn, R F

    1985-02-01

    Groups of 10 young male guinea pigs of inbred strains 2 and 13 and outbred strains Hartley A, Hartley B, and one deficient in the fourth component of complement (C4D) were infected intradermally with 80 X 10(6) Treponema pallidum (Nichols). The course of infection and production of antitreponemal antibody were examined. Strain C4D guinea pigs were the most susceptible to infection (100%); inbred strains 2 and 13 and outbred strain Hartley B showed 80-90% symptomatic infection; and the Hartley A strain was the least susceptible to infection (10%). Strain 13 animals responded with the highest antitreponemal antibody activity, and the Hartley A strain with the lowest. The results suggest that genetic factors or complement, or both, may influence the degree of susceptibility to infection with T pallidum in guinea pigs. PMID:3910539

  5. Electrophysiological dysfunction and cellular disruption of sensory neurones during incubation with Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Oakes, S G; Repesh, L A; Pozos, R S; Fitzgerald, T J

    1982-08-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) was incubated with cultured nerve cells derived from dorsal root ganglia of rat embryos. The electrophysiological response of these neuronal cells was then investigated. Cells exposed to 2 X 10(8) treponemes/ml responded abnormally after 13 hours and failed to respond after 18 hours. In contrast, control preparations exposed to heat-inactivated treponemes or to culture medium responded normally after 72 hours. Extended incubation with viable treponemes resulted in various degrees of nerve cell disruption as shown by scanning electron microscopy. With some cells holes in the cytoplasmic membrane were detected; with others a coagulated matrix of apparent nuclear material and remnants of cytoskeletal elements indicated more severe destruction. These findings may explain the painless nature of many of the clinical manifestations of syphilis as well as the severe damage to central nervous system tissue in tertiary and congenital syphilis. PMID:7049316

  6. Asymptomatic transmission of Treponema pallidum (syphilis) through deceased donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tariciotti, L; Das, I; Dori, L; Perera, M T P R; Bramhall, S R

    2012-06-01

    A 55-year-old woman underwent liver transplantation (LT) with a graft from a deceased donor. Mandatory pre-donation investigations showed positive syphilis serology that was available only after the transplant, with high Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay titer compatible with donor syphilis infection. Despite the institution of appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis, the recipient demonstrated latent seroconversion; however, liver graft function improved without evidence of syphilitic hepatitis or other manifestations of the disease. Through this first reported case of asymptomatic transmission of syphilis following LT, we highlight the investigations and treatment strategies for donor-derived syphilis in liver transplant recipients. This report supplements the existing limited evidence on safe use of infected grafts from syphilitic donors through appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:22624823

  7. Yaws: 110 years after Castellani's discovery of Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Lola V

    2015-07-01

    Yaws is a neglected infectious disease that affects mostly children and adolescents living in poor, rural communities in humid, tropical areas of Africa, southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. The etiological agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue (T. pertenue), was discovered by Aldo Castellani in 1905 shortly after Schaudinn and Hoffmann discovered the etiological agent of syphilis, T. pallidum subspecies pallidum. The discovery of T. pertenue enabled the development of animal models and the identification of an effective antibiotic treatment (i.e., penicillin) for yaws. A World Health Organization (WHO) mass treatment campaign from 1952 to 1964 reduced the global burden of yaws by 95%, but failed to eradicate this disease. Today, 110 years after Castellani's discovery of T. pertenue, yaws is again targeted for eradication. Recent advances in the treatment and diagnosis of yaws improve the likelihood of success this time. However, several challenges must be overcome to make the goal of yaws eradication attainable. PMID:25870417

  8. Cryo-Electron Tomography Elucidates the Molecular Architecture of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Jacques; Renken, Christian; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Dunham-Ems, Star; La Vake, Carson; Gebhardt, Linda L.; Limberger, Ronald J.; Cox, David L.; Marko, Michael; Radolf, Justin D.

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) was used to examine the native cellular organization of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete. T. pallidum cells appeared to form flat waves, did not contain an outer coat and, except for bulges over the basal bodies and widening in the vicinity of flagellar filaments, displayed a uniform periplasmic space. Although the outer membrane (OM) generally was smooth in contour, OM extrusions and blebs frequently were observed, highlighting the structure's fluidity and lack of attachment to underlying periplasmic constituents. Cytoplasmic filaments converged from their attachment points opposite the basal bodies to form arrays that ran roughly parallel to the flagellar filaments along the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). Motile treponemes stably attached to rabbit epithelial cells predominantly via their tips. CET revealed that T. pallidum cell ends have a complex morphology and assume at least four distinct morphotypes. Images of dividing treponemes and organisms shedding cell envelope-derived blebs provided evidence for the spirochete's complex membrane biology. In the regions without flagellar filaments, peptidoglycan (PG) was visualized as a thin layer that divided the periplasmic space into zones of higher and lower electron densities adjacent to the CM and OM, respectively. Flagellar filaments were observed overlying the PG layer, while image modeling placed the PG-basal body contact site in the vicinity of the stator-P-collar junction. Bioinformatics and homology modeling indicated that the MotB proteins of T. pallidum, Treponema denticola, and Borrelia burgdorferi have membrane topologies and PG binding sites highly similar to those of their well-characterized Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori orthologs. Collectively, our results help to clarify fundamental differences in cell envelope ultrastructure between spirochetes and gram-negative bacteria. They also confirm that PG stabilizes the flagellar motor

  9. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum Is a Thiamine-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ΔTDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. PMID:25605310

  10. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum: a 5-Year Surveillance in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ting; Li, Kang; Lu, Haikong; Gu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Previously, a small study showed that 14f was the predominant subtype of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai, China. The result was quite different from the genotype distribution in other areas of China. This study aimed to identify the strain types of Treponema pallidum in samples collected over a 5-year period in Shanghai. From 2007 to 2011, genital swabs were collected from patients with syphilis from the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital. Positive specimens were typed by the enhanced typing method by adding a tp0548 gene to the existing arp and tpr genotype system. In total, 304 of the 372 enrolled patients yielded fully typeable DNA. Ten arp types (4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 19), 3 tpr types (a, d, and o), and 5 tp0548 types (a, c, f, g, and i) were identified. In total, 12 subtypes were identified with a combination of the arp and tpr genes. Subtype 14d was found in 270 samples (88.8%). When the combination included the tp0548 gene, the 12 CDC subtypes identified were divided into 14 strain types. The predominant type was 14d/f (88.8%), followed by 15d/f (3.6%), 13d/f (1.3%), and 19d/c (1.3%). Two of the 44 14d/f-infected patients and both of the 19d/c-infected patients who underwent a lumbar puncture were diagnosed with neurosyphilis. This study showed that the predominant type in Shanghai was 14d/f. While this is in keeping with data from other areas in China, it is different from an earlier report showing that 14f is the most common genotype in Shanghai. Further studies are needed to better understand the association between strain types and neurosyphilis. PMID:22972832

  11. Survival of Treponema pallidum in banked blood for prevention of Syphilis transmission

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu O.; Akanni, Olufemi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Every year, millions of people are exposed to avoidable, life-threatening risks through the trans-fusion of unsafe blood. Aim: To determine the survival time of Treponema pallidum in banked donor blood. Material and Methods: Two groups of male Wistar rats (group A and B) were inoculated intratesticularly with 0.5ml of artificially infected donor blood (final density of Nichols treponemes: 5×105 /ml) stored at 4°C for various periods of time. In group A, a pair each of the rats was injected every 12 hours, starting at 0 hr, up to a maximal storage time of 96 hr. In group B, the rats were injected after 72, 120, 192 and 336 hours of storage of the treponemes-blood mixture. Group C which is a control group was injected with blood only, while group D rats were injected with heat-killed treponemes suspended in blood every 12 hours. The detection of Treponema pallidum IgG/IgM was based on the principle of double antigen sandwich immunoassay, in which purified recombinant antigens are employed sufficiently to identify antibodies to Syphilis. The outcomes of interest included the proportion of Syphilis positive rats and the maximal survival hours of T. pallidum in banked blood. Results: 14 rats (77.8%) out of the 18 rats that were involved in group A developed orchitis and positive serology up to 72 hours of storage time, p<0.05. 2 rats (25%) in group B developed orchitis after 72hrs of storage time. All the 18 rats (100%) in the control group C and D showed neither clinical nor serological changes. Conclusion: It was concluded that the survival time of T. pallidum in banked donor blood lies between 72-120hrs in this study. Regardless of blood banking temperature, T. pallidum and other transfusion transmissible infections should be screened for prior to allogeneic transfusion. PMID:22540107

  12. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum is a thiamine-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Li, Chunhao

    2015-04-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ΔTDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. PMID:25605310

  13. Cryo-electron tomography elucidates the molecular architecture of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jacques; Renken, Christian; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Dunham-Ems, Star; La Vake, Carson; Gebhardt, Linda L; Limberger, Ronald J; Cox, David L; Marko, Michael; Radolf, Justin D

    2009-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) was used to examine the native cellular organization of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete. T. pallidum cells appeared to form flat waves, did not contain an outer coat and, except for bulges over the basal bodies and widening in the vicinity of flagellar filaments, displayed a uniform periplasmic space. Although the outer membrane (OM) generally was smooth in contour, OM extrusions and blebs frequently were observed, highlighting the structure's fluidity and lack of attachment to underlying periplasmic constituents. Cytoplasmic filaments converged from their attachment points opposite the basal bodies to form arrays that ran roughly parallel to the flagellar filaments along the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). Motile treponemes stably attached to rabbit epithelial cells predominantly via their tips. CET revealed that T. pallidum cell ends have a complex morphology and assume at least four distinct morphotypes. Images of dividing treponemes and organisms shedding cell envelope-derived blebs provided evidence for the spirochete's complex membrane biology. In the regions without flagellar filaments, peptidoglycan (PG) was visualized as a thin layer that divided the periplasmic space into zones of higher and lower electron densities adjacent to the CM and OM, respectively. Flagellar filaments were observed overlying the PG layer, while image modeling placed the PG-basal body contact site in the vicinity of the stator-P-collar junction. Bioinformatics and homology modeling indicated that the MotB proteins of T. pallidum, Treponema denticola, and Borrelia burgdorferi have membrane topologies and PG binding sites highly similar to those of their well-characterized Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori orthologs. Collectively, our results help to clarify fundamental differences in cell envelope ultrastructure between spirochetes and gram-negative bacteria. They also confirm that PG stabilizes the flagellar motor

  14. Characterization of the cytoplasmic filament protein gene (cfpA) of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    You, Y; Elmore, S; Colton, L L; Mackenzie, C; Stoops, J K; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1996-01-01

    Treponema pallidum and other members of the genera Treponema, Spirochaeta, and Leptonema contain multiple cytoplasmic filaments that run the length of the organism just underneath the cytoplasmic membrane. These cytoplasmic filaments have a ribbon-like profile and consist of a major cytoplasmic filament protein subunit (CfpA, formerly called TpN83) with a relative molecular weight of approximately 80,000. Degenerate DNA primers based on N-terminal and CNBr cleavage fragment amino acid sequences of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) CfpA were utilized to amplify a fragment of the encoding gene (cfpA). A 6.8-kb EcoRI fragment containing all but the 5' end of cfpA was identified by hybridization with the resulting PCR product and cloned into Lambda ZAP II. The 5' region was obtained by inverse PCR, and the complete gene sequence was determined. The cfpA sequence contained a 2,034-nucleotide coding region, a putative promoter with consensus sequences (5'-TTTACA-3' for -35 and 5'-TACAAT-3' for -10) similar to the sigma70 recognition sequence of Escherichia coli and other organisms, and a putative ribosome-binding site (5'-AGGAG-3'). The deduced amino acid sequence of CfpA indicated a protein of 678 residues with a calculated molecular mass of 78.5 kDa and an estimated pI of 6.15. No significant homology to known proteins or structural motifs was found among known prokaryotic or eukaryotic sequences. Expression of a LacZ-CfpA fusion protein in E. coli was detrimental to survival and growth of the host strain and resulted in the formation of short, irregular filaments suggestive of partial self-assembly of CfpA. The cytoplasmic filaments of T. pallidum and other spirochetes appear to represent a unique form of prokaryotic intracytoplasmic inclusions. PMID:8655496

  15. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  16. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Katz, Samantha; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C; Solomon, Anthony W; Chen, Cheng Y; Pillay, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  17. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Pillay, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  18. Detection of cryptic genospecies misidentified as Haemophilus influenzae in routine clinical samples by assessment of marker genes fucK, hap, and sodC.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2009-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were assessed for the presence of fucK, hap, and sodC by hybridization with gene-specific probes, and isolates diverging from the expected H. influenzae genotype were characterized by phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Two of 480 isolates were finally classified as variant strains ("nonhemolytic Haemophilus haemolyticus"). PMID:19535530

  19. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  20. Localization of high-molecular-weight adhesion proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakaletz, L O; Barenkamp, S J

    1994-01-01

    A family of high-molecular-weight (HMW) surface-exposed proteins important in the attachment of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to human epithelial cells was previously identified (J. W. St. Geme III, S. Falkow, and S. J. Barenkamp, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:2875-2879, 1993). In the present investigation, indirect immunogold labeling and electron microscopy were used to localize these proteins on three clinical isolates of NTHi, mutants deficient in expression of one or both HMW proteins, and embedded sections of human oropharyngeal cells after incubation with NTHi strain 12. The filamentous material comprising the proteins was labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against two prototype HMW proteins (HMW1 and HMW2) of prototype NTHi strain 12. Gold labeling was observed as a cap or discrete aggregate off one pole or centrally along one long axis of the bacterial cell. Heavily labeled, non-bacterial-cell-associated, disk-like aggregates of the HMW proteins were frequently noted in both bacterial preparations as well as in association with the oropharyngeal cell surface and intracellularly. Mutants demonstrated diminished labeling or an absence thereof, respectively, which correlated well with their previously demonstrated reduced ability or inability to adhere to Chang conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro. The Haemophilus HMW proteins share antigenic determinants with and demonstrate amino acid sequence similarity to the filamentous hemagglutinin protein of Bordetella pertussis, a critical adhesin of that organism. The studies presented here demonstrate that the Haemophilus proteins and B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin show impressive morphologic and perhaps additional functional similarity. Images PMID:7927710

  1. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Alberta L.; Li, Jing; Tucker, Joseph D.; Yin, Yue-Ping; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Syphilis is resurgent in many regions of the world. Molecular typing is a robust tool for investigating strain diversity and epidemiology. This study aimed to review original research on molecular typing of Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) with three objectives: (1) to determine specimen types most suitable for molecular typing; (2) to determine T. pallidum subtype distribution across geographic areas; and (3) to summarize available information on subtypes associated with neurosyphilis and macrolide resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Two researchers independently searched five databases from 1998 through 2010, assessed for eligibility and study quality, and extracted data. Search terms included “Treponema pallidum,” or “syphilis,” combined with the subject headings “molecular,” “subtyping,” “typing,” “genotype,” and “epidemiology.” Sixteen eligible studies were included. Publication bias was not statistically significant by the Begg rank correlation test. Medians, inter-quartile ranges, and 95% confidence intervals were determined for DNA extraction and full typing efficiency. A random-effects model was used to perform subgroup analyses to reduce obvious between-study heterogeneity. Primary and secondary lesions and ear lobe blood specimens had an average higher yield of T. pallidum DNA (83.0% vs. 28.2%, χ2 = 247.6, p<0.001) and an average higher efficiency of full molecular typing (80.9% vs. 43.1%, χ2 = 102.3, p<0.001) compared to plasma, whole blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. A pooled analysis of subtype distribution based on country location showed that 14d was the most common subtype, and subtype distribution varied across geographic areas. Subtype data associated with macrolide resistance and neurosyphilis were limited. Conclusions/Significance Primary lesion was a better specimen for obtaining T. pallidum DNA than blood. There was wide geographic variation in T. pallidum subtypes. More research is needed

  2. Diversity of the P2 protein among nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J; Grass, S; Jeanteur, D; Munson, R S

    1994-01-01

    The genes for outer membrane protein P2 of four nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains were cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences were compared with the outer membrane protein P2 sequence from H. influenzae type b MinnA and the sequences of P2 from three additional nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The sequences were 76 to 94% identical. The sequences had regions with considerable variability separated by regions which were highly conserved. The variable regions mapped to putative surface-exposed loops of the protein. PMID:8188390

  3. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  4. Prevalence of Haemophilus parasuis serovars isolated in Spain from 1993 to 1997.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, X; Kielstein, P; Costa, L; Riera, P; Artigas, C; Espuña, E

    1999-04-19

    From 1993 to 1997, 327 strains of Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from spanish swine in our Diagnostic Laboratory and 174 strains (53.2%) were serotyped. Four serotypes, sv. 5 (18.4%), sv 4 (16%), sv. 2 (9.2%) and sv. 13 (8%) were the most frequently isolated and 29.3% of the studied strains were classified as non typable. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of the serotypes in Spain is very similar to that found by other researchers in Germany, Australia, Canada and alike to that found in the United States. PMID:10227126

  5. Photodynamic Action on Native and Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    León, Manuel Ponce-De; Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano

    1970-01-01

    The photodynamic inactivation of native or denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae is described. The inactivation at the same pH was higher for denatured than native DNA. At acidic pH, the inactivation both for native and denatured DNA was faster than at alkaline pH. The guanine content of photoinactivated native DNA at neutral pH was less than untreated DNA. The inactivation of biological activity was more extensive than the alteration of guanine. The absorption spectrum of photoinactivated native or denatured DNA was only slightly different than the control DNA at the different experimental conditions. PMID:5309576

  6. The influence of protein binding on the antibacterial activity of faropenem against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, I; Cars, O

    2004-10-01

    The effects of albumin and human serum on the pharmacodynamics of faropenem were studied. The protein binding of faropenem was 91-95%, corresponding to the increase in MICs for Haemophilus influenzae in broth supplemented with albumin. Time-kill experiments in albumin-containing medium and in inactivated human serum 50% v/v showed that much higher drug concentrations were needed to achieve a bactericidal effect than were needed in broth. Active human serum alone exerted a strain-dependent bactericidal effect. It was concluded that it is the free fraction of faropenem in serum that has antibacterial activity against H. influenzae. PMID:15373892

  7. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease in elderly nursing home residents: two related cases.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, T. C.; Hewitt, M. C.; Jalaludin, B.; Roberts, C.; Capon, A. G.; Jelfs, P.; Gilbert, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated two fatal cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection in a community nursing home in western Sydney, Australia. Two elderly women had lived in the same room, and the onset of their illness was 5 days apart. Hib isolates from blood cultures showed identical profiles by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. These findings suggest that Hib infection was transmitted within this nursing home. Serious Hib disease may be underrecognized in this setting. Continued surveillance and serotyping of invasive H. influenzae disease is essential for identifying groups at increasing risk that may benefit from immunization against Hib. PMID:9204300

  8. Bone and Joint Infections due to Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Conar R; Wilson, Evan; Missaghi, Bayan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the human respiratory tract. However it is an increasingly recognized pathogen in invasive infections, particularly in the immunocompromised host and where there is disruption of the normal skin or mucosal barriers. We present a case of a 56-year-old female with a history of asplenia who developed H. parainfluenzae septic arthritis of the hip following an intra-articular steroid injection. We also summarize previously reported cases of bone and joint infections caused by H. parainfluenzae. PMID:27516778

  9. Population genetics of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a in three Canadian provinces.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Shuel, Michelle; Wylie, John; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Hoang, Linda; Law, Dennis K S

    2013-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is an important pathogen since the introduction of vaccines for control of disease due to serotype b strains. Using a sodC-based polymerase chain reaction, Hia can be divided into 2 phylogenetic divisions, each with their own unique multilocus sequence types. Most Canadian Hia belongs to clonal division I and the ST-23 clonal complex. The recently described hypervirulent clone of ST-4 was found in a single Canadian isolate. Therefore, surveillance of invasive H. influenzae disease should include serotyping to detect Hia and multilocus sequence typing to detect hypervirulent clones. PMID:23647351

  10. Bone and Joint Infections due to Haemophilus parainfluenzae: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Evan; Missaghi, Bayan

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the human respiratory tract. However it is an increasingly recognized pathogen in invasive infections, particularly in the immunocompromised host and where there is disruption of the normal skin or mucosal barriers. We present a case of a 56-year-old female with a history of asplenia who developed H. parainfluenzae septic arthritis of the hip following an intra-articular steroid injection. We also summarize previously reported cases of bone and joint infections caused by H. parainfluenzae. PMID:27516778

  11. [A case of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy after Haemophilus influenzae infection].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Udaka, F; Kubori, T; Oka, N; Kameyama, M

    2000-08-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed consciousness disturbance, and experienced hallucinations while traveling abroad, and then went into critical condition. She was placed in the critical care unit, and had flaccid tetraparesis requiring mechanical ventilation. Haemophilus influenzae was cultured from the sputum. The level of protein of the cerebrospinal fluid was elevated to 114 mg/dl, nerve conduction study showed findings of pure axonal damage, and the sural nerve biopsy revealed severe axonal degeneration. She improved gradually by plasma exchange. The diagnosis of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy (AMSAN) based on autoimmune mechanism was made. We speculate that H. influenzae infection may have elicited AMSAN in this case. PMID:11218707

  12. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  13. Motility and Chemotaxis in Tissue Penetration of Oral Epithelial Cell Layers by Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Renate; Miller, James N.; Park, No-Hee; Shi, Wenyuan

    2001-01-01

    The ability to penetrate tissue is an important virulence factor for pathogenic spirochetes. Previous studies have recognized the role of motility in allowing pathogenic spirochetes to invade tissues and migrate to sites favorable for bacterial proliferation. However, the nature of the movements, whether they are random or controlled by chemotaxis systems, has yet to be established. In this study, we addressed the role of motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration by the periodontal disease-associated oral spirochete Treponema denticola using an oral epithelial cell line-based experimental approach. Wild-type T. denticola ATCC 35405 was found to penetrate the tissue layers effectively, whereas a nonmotile mutant was unable to overcome the tissue barrier. Interestingly, the chemotaxis mutants also showed impaired tissue penetration. A cheA mutant that is motile but lacks the central kinase of the chemotaxis pathway showed only about 2 to 3% of the wild-type penetration rate. The two known chemoreceptors of T. denticola, DmcA and DmcB, also appear to be involved in the invasion process. The dmc mutants were actively motile but exhibited reduced tissue penetration of about 30 and 10% of the wild-type behavior, respectively. These data suggest that not only motility but also chemotaxis is involved in the tissue penetration by T. denticola. PMID:11553571

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of Treponema pallidum in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Annett; Rojas, Pablo; Schulze, Julia; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Giacani, Lorenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Hertel, Moritz; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Syphilis is often called the great imitator because of its frequent atypical clinical manifestations that make the disease difficult to recognize. Because Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the infectious agent of syphilis, is yet uncultivated in vitro, diagnosis is usually made using serology; however, in cases where serology is inconclusive or in patients with immunosuppression where these tests may be difficult to interpret, the availability of a molecular tool for direct diagnosis may be of pivotal importance. Here we present a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that simultaneously identifies and analyzes spatial distribution of T. pallidum in histological tissue sections. For this assay the species-specific FISH probe TPALL targeting the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum was designed in silico and evaluated using T. pallidum infected rabbit testicular tissue and a panel of non-syphilis spirochetes as positive and negative controls, respectively, before application to samples from four syphilis-patients. In a HIV positive patient, FISH showed the presence of T. pallidum in inguinal lymph node tissue. In a patient not suspected to suffer from syphilis but underwent surgery for phimosis, numerous T. pallidum cells were found in preputial tissue. In two cases with oral involvement, FISH was able to differentiate T. pallidum from oral treponemes and showed infection of the oral mucosa and tonsils, respectively. The TPALL FISH probe is now readily available for in situ identification of T. pallidum in selected clinical samples as well as T. pallidum research applications and animal models. PMID:26365167

  15. The Riboswitch Regulates a Thiamine Pyrophosphate ABC Transporter of the Oral Spirochete Treponema denticola ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Shen, Hongwu; Tu, Youbin; Yu, Aiming; Li, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a biologically active form of thiamine (vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Microorganisms either synthesize TPP via de novo biosynthesis pathways or uptake exogenous thiamine from the environment via specific transporters. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is an important pathogen that is associated with human periodontal diseases. It lacks a de novo TPP biosynthesis pathway and needs exogenous TPP for growth, suggesting that it may obtain exogenous TPP via a thiamine transporter. In this study, we identified a gene cluster that encodes a TPP ABC transporter which consists of a TPP-binding protein (TDE0143), a transmembrane permease (TDE0144), and a cytosolic ATPase (TDE0145). Transcriptional and translational analyses showed that the genes encoding these three proteins are cotranscribed and form an operon (tbpABCTd) that is initiated by a σ70-like promoter. The expression level of this operon is negatively regulated by exogenous TPP and is mediated by a TPP-sensing riboswitch (Tdthi-box). Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that the TDE0143 deletion mutant (T. denticola ΔtbpA) had a decreased ability to transport exogenous TPP, and the mutant failed to grow when exogenous TPP was insufficient. These results taken together indicate that the tbpABCTd operon encodes an ABC transporter that is required for the uptake of exogenous TPP and that the expression of this operon is regulated by a TPP-binding riboswitch via a feedback inhibition mechanism. PMID:21622748

  16. Electron Microscopic Observations on the Structure of Treponema zuelzerae and Its Axial Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Bharier, M. A.; Eiserling, F. A.; Rittenberg, S. C.

    1971-01-01

    The fine structure of the spirochete Treponema zuelzerae, and particularly of its axial filaments, was investigated by using the electron microscope. The cell consists of a protoplasmic core surrounded by two concentric envelopes, each approximately 12 nm in width. Between these envelopes are two axial filaments, one originating at each pole of the cell, which overlap and lie side by side in the central region of the cell. The diameter of the axial filaments is 18.0 to 18.5 nm. The terminal region of each filament at its proximal end consists of a hook-like structure, very similar in appearance to the proximal end of a bacterial flagellum. The outer envelope of the cell is readily disrupted with distilled water, and this treatment often results in the release of the filaments from their axial position. A sheath is seen surrounding the filaments when cells are treated with distilled water for no more than 1 min and fixed immediately with osmium tetroxide or glutaraldehyde. This sheath has a striated fine structure and a diameter of 46 nm. Images PMID:5541022

  17. Evaluation of a PCR Test for Detection of Treponema pallidum in Swabs and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Grange, P. A.; Gressier, L.; Dion, P. L.; Farhi, D.; Benhaddou, N.; Gerhardt, P.; Morini, J. P.; Deleuze, J.; Pantoja, C.; Bianchi, A.; Lassau, F.; Avril, M. F.; Janier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis diagnosis is based on clinical observation, serological analysis, and dark-field microscopy (DFM) detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis, in skin ulcers. We performed a nested PCR (nPCR) assay specifically amplifying the tpp47 gene of T. pallidum from swab and blood specimens. We studied a cohort of 294 patients with suspected syphilis and 35 healthy volunteers. Eighty-seven of the 294 patients had primary syphilis, 103 had secondary syphilis, 40 had latent syphilis, and 64 were found not to have syphilis. The T. pallidum nPCR results for swab specimens were highly concordant with syphilis diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 95%. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results obtained with the nPCR and DFM methods (kappa = 0.53). No agreement was found between the nPCR detection of T. pallidum in blood and the diagnosis of syphilis, with sensitivities of 29, 18, 14.7, and 24% and specificities of 96, 92, 93, and 97% for peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), plasma, serum, and whole-blood fractions, respectively. HIV status did not affect the frequency of T. pallidum detection in any of the specimens tested. Swab specimens from mucosal or skin lesions seemed to be more useful than blood for the efficient detection of the T. pallidum genome and, thus, for the diagnosis of syphilis. PMID:22219306

  18. Serological characterization and gene localization of an Escherichia coli-expressed 37-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, G C; Laird, W J; Coates, S R; Mack, D H; Huston, M; Sninsky, J J

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA fragment of the Treponema pallidum genome was characterized by endonuclease mapping, and the encoded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed by use of in vitro transcription and translation. One of the proteins, identified as having a molecular weight of 37,000 (37K protein), was selected for further study. Initially, the seroreactivity of the partially purified 37K antigen was demonstrated by immunoblotting. After its purification to near homogeneity, the cloned T. pallidum protein was assessed for diagnostic significance by radioimmunoassay. Although first identified as seroreactive by screening with secondary syphilitic sera (T. E. Fehniger, A. M. Walfield, T. M. Cunningham, J. D. Radolf, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Abstr. Annu. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. 1985, B156, p. 44), the antigen was shown to be serologically reactive with antibodies in serum from all stages of syphilis but was not recognized by serum from controls by both immunoblotting and radioimmune assay. Further, a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum generated to the 37K antigen recognized a polypeptide of the same molecular weight from T. pallidum but did not efficiently recognize proteins from five nonpathogenic treponemes tested. Therefore, because of reactivity with and specificity for T. pallidum antibodies, the 37K antigen may be of serodiagnostic value in the detection of syphilis. Images PMID:3522427

  19. Cloning and expression of the major 47-kilodalton surface immunogen of Treponema pallidum in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Norgard, M V; Chamberlain, N R; Swancutt, M A; Goldberg, M S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against the 47-kilodalton (kDa) major outer membrane surface immunogen of virulent Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were used to select Escherichia coli recombinant clones expressing the 47-kDa immunogen. The phenotype of the clones was dependent on the presence of recombinant plasmid in the host cell. Southern hybridization revealed that the cloned T. pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA sequence was an accurate representation of the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum genomic DNA arrangement. Purified immunoglobulin G from rabbits experimentally infected with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and human secondary syphilitic sera specifically reacted with the clones, while normal human serum or immunoglobulin G from normal rabbit serum did not. Results of Southern hybridization indicated that a homologous 47-kDa immunogen gene was absent in at least four species of nonpathogenic treponemes tested, as well as from total rabbit genomic DNA. Rabbit anti-T. phagedenis biotype Reiter (treponemal nonpathogen) antiserum and a monoclonal antibody directed against a common treponemal determinant were unreactive with the clones. Western blotting and radioimmunoprecipitation experiments with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed that the recombinant (E. coli) and native (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum) forms of the antigen had identical electrophoretic mobilities. The availability of recombinant 47-kDa immunogen provides a new opportunity for biochemical analysis of the protein, structure-function studies, examination of its role in microbial pathogenesis, and assessment of its diagnostic and vaccinogenic potentials. Images PMID:3021631

  20. Recombinant antigen-based enzyme immunoassay for screening of Treponema pallidum antibodies in blood bank routine.

    PubMed Central

    Zrein, M; Maure, I; Boursier, F; Soufflet, L

    1995-01-01

    This work reports a comparison of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) using two major Treponema pallidum recombinant antigens with a T. pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) assay and a nontreponemal Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory (VDRL) test. A total of 1,822 normal donor serum samples was tested for cardiolipin and T. pallidum antibodies, respectively, by the VDRL assay and EIA. Among these samples, 440 were further tested by TPHA technology. Four samples were found positive by EIA, while all were reported to be negative by both TPHA and VDRL routine assays. Subsequent testing of EIA-positive samples confirmed 100% (four of four samples) and 25% (one of four samples) positive results, respectively, by immunofluorescence assay and a Western blot (immunoblot) syphilis kit. The sensitivity of the recombinant EIA was estimated at virtually 100% with a reference panel of 50 syphilitic samples. According to this study, the newly developed EIA kit shows 100% sensitivity combined to a specificity greater than 99.8% for detecting treponemal immunoglobulin G antibodies in blood bank syphilis screening. PMID:7751351

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Mixed Microbial Infection in a Rat Model of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Raj K.; Rajapakse, Sunethra; Meka, Archana; Hamrick, Clayton; Pola, Sheela; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Nair, Madhu; Wallet, Shannon M.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2010-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are periodontal pathogens that express virulence factors associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are synergistic in terms of virulence; using a model of mixed microbial infection in rats. Groups of rats were orally infected with either P. gingivalis or T. denticola or mixed microbial infections for 7 and 12 weeks. P. gingivalis genomic DNA was detected more frequently by PCR than T. denticola. Both bacteria induced significantly high IgG, IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a antibody levels indicating a stimulation of Th1 and Th2 immune response. Radiographic and morphometric measurements demonstrated that rats infected with the mixed infection exhibited significantly more alveolar bone loss than shaminfected control rats. Histology revealed apical migration of junctional epithelium, rete ridge elongation, and crestal alveolar bone resorption; resembling periodontal disease lesion. These results showed that P. gingivalis and T. denticola exhibit no synergistic virulence in a rat model of periodontal disease. PMID:20592756

  2. A mgl-like operon in Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete.

    PubMed

    Porcella, S F; Popova, T G; Hagman, K E; Penn, C W; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1996-10-24

    A 38-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the syphilis spirochete, previously was identified as a putative homolog of E. coli MglB [Becker et al. (1994) Infect. Immun. 62, 1381-1391]. In the present study, genome walking in regions adjacent to the T. pallidum 38-kDa lipoprotein gene has identified three contiguous genes (tp-mglB [formerly tpp38], tp-mglA, and tp-mglC) which appear to comprise a mgl-like operon in T. pallidum. A prominent transcript corresponding to tp-mglB, the first gene of the operon which encodes the carbohydrate receptor, is synthesized by T. pallidum along with lesser abundant transcript(s) corresponding to the entire T. pallidum mgl operon. An active promoter 135 bp upstream of tp-mglB is believed to direct mRNA synthesis for the operon. This is the first membrane protein-encoding operon of T. pallidum for which a putative function (glucose import) has been assigned. Furthermore, by analogy with E. coli MglB which interacts with the sensory transducer Trg to induce a chemotactic response, it is possible that T. pallidum also contains a homolog of E. coli Trg or other methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The existence of a mgl operon in T. pallidum thus may have important implications with respect to T. pallidum survival, tissue dissemination, and sensory transduction during virulence expression. PMID:8921855

  3. Prevalence survey of infection with Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Badie; Yavari, Zeinab; Esmaeeli, Shooka; Paydary, Koosha; Emamzadeh-Fard, Sahra; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Rasoulinejad, Mehrnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of syphilis among Iranian HIV-positive patients. Methods A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of syphilis and HIV co-infection among 450 patients diagnosed with HIV infection was conducted between 2004 and 2008 at Imam Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran. The lab tests including CD4 cell count, cerebrospinal fluid, veneral disease research laboratory (VDRL), fluorescent treponema antibody-absorption (FTA-Abs) and viral load were performed for all the patients. Data regarding medical history and their demographics were also collected. Results Of all 450 HIV-positive patients, 24 (5.3%) had a positive VDRL test and only two men had a FTA-Abs positive test which means 0.45% of them had a definite co-infection of syphilis. 65.3% of the HIV-positive patients were injection drug users that the co-infection prevalence of them was 0.7%. We did not find any patient with neurosyphilis. Conclusions Considering the increasing prevalence of HIV and also extensive use of highly active antiretroviral therapy in developing nations, the diagnosis of syphilis should be timely established using screening tests among such patients. PMID:23620862

  4. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  5. The Binary Protein Interactome of Treponema pallidum – The Syphilis Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Goll, Johannes; Häuser, Roman; McKevitt, Matthew T.; Palzkill, Timothy; Uetz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Protein interaction networks shed light on the global organization of proteomes but can also place individual proteins into a functional context. If we know the function of bacterial proteins we will be able to understand how these species have adapted to diverse environments including many extreme habitats. Here we present the protein interaction network for the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum which encodes 1,039 proteins, 726 (or 70%) of which interact via 3,649 interactions as revealed by systematic yeast two-hybrid screens. A high-confidence subset of 991 interactions links 576 proteins. To derive further biological insights from our data, we constructed an integrated network of proteins involved in DNA metabolism. Combining our data with additional evidences, we provide improved annotations for at least 18 proteins (including TP0004, TP0050, and TP0183 which are suggested to be involved in DNA metabolism). We estimate that this “minimal” bacterium contains on the order of 3,000 protein interactions. Profiles of functional interconnections indicate that bacterial proteins interact more promiscuously than eukaryotic proteins, reflecting the non-compartmentalized structure of the bacterial cell. Using our high-confidence interactions, we also predict 417,329 homologous interactions (“interologs”) for 372 completely sequenced genomes and provide evidence that at least one third of them can be experimentally confirmed. PMID:18509523

  6. Motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration of oral epithelial cell layers by Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Lux, R; Miller, J N; Park, N H; Shi, W

    2001-10-01

    The ability to penetrate tissue is an important virulence factor for pathogenic spirochetes. Previous studies have recognized the role of motility in allowing pathogenic spirochetes to invade tissues and migrate to sites favorable for bacterial proliferation. However, the nature of the movements, whether they are random or controlled by chemotaxis systems, has yet to be established. In this study, we addressed the role of motility and chemotaxis in tissue penetration by the periodontal disease-associated oral spirochete Treponema denticola using an oral epithelial cell line-based experimental approach. Wild-type T. denticola ATCC 35405 was found to penetrate the tissue layers effectively, whereas a nonmotile mutant was unable to overcome the tissue barrier. Interestingly, the chemotaxis mutants also showed impaired tissue penetration. A cheA mutant that is motile but lacks the central kinase of the chemotaxis pathway showed only about 2 to 3% of the wild-type penetration rate. The two known chemoreceptors of T. denticola, DmcA and DmcB, also appear to be involved in the invasion process. The dmc mutants were actively motile but exhibited reduced tissue penetration of about 30 and 10% of the wild-type behavior, respectively. These data suggest that not only motility but also chemotaxis is involved in the tissue penetration by T. denticola. PMID:11553571

  7. Native cellular architecture of Treponema denticola revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Jacques; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Limberger, Ronald J.; Mannella, Carmen A.; Marko, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Using cryo-electron tomography, we are developing a refined description of native cellular structures in the pathogenic spirochete Treponema denticola. Tightly organized bundles of periplasmic flagella were readily observed in intact plunge-frozen cells. The periplasmic space was measured in both wild-type and aflagellate strains, and found to widen by less than the diameter of flagella when the latter are present. This suggests that a structural change occurs in the peptidoglycan layer to accommodate the presence of the flagella. In dividing cells, the flagellar filaments were found to bridge the cytoplasmic cylinder constriction site. Cytoplasmic filaments, adjacent to the inner membrane, run parallel to the tightly organized flagellar filaments. The cytoplasmic filaments may be anchored by a narrow plate-like structure. The tapering of the cell ends was conserved between cells, with a patella-shaped structure observed in the periplasm at the tip of each cytoplasmic cylinder. Several incompletely characterized structures have been observed in the periplasm between dividing cells, including a cable-like structure linking two cytoplasmic cylinders and complex foil-shaped structures. PMID:18468917

  8. Assessment of cell-surface exposure and vaccinogenic potentials of Treponema pallidum candidate outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tomson, Farol L.; Conley, Patrick G.; Norgard, Michael V.; Hagman, Kayla E.

    2007-01-01

    Syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum, remains a global public health problem. T. pallidum is believed to be an extracellular pathogen and, as such, the identification of T. pallidum outer membrane proteins that could serve as targets for opsonic or bactericidal antibodies has remained a high research priority for vaccine development. However, the identification of T. pallidum outer membrane proteins has remained highly elusive. Recent studies and bioinformatics have implicated four treponemal proteins as potential outer membrane proteins (TP0155, TP0326, TP0483 and TP0956). Indirect immunofluorescence assays performed on treponemes encapsulated within agarose gel microdroplets failed to provide evidence that any of these four molecules were surface-exposed in T. pallidum. Second, recombinant fusion proteins corresponding to all four candidate outer membrane proteins were used separately, or in combination, to vaccinate New Zealand White rabbits. Despite achieving high titers (>1:50,000) of serum antibodies, none of the rabbits displayed chancre immunity after intradermal challenge with viable T. pallidum. PMID:17890130

  9. The outer membrane, not a coat of host proteins, limits antigenicity of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D L; Chang, P; McDowall, A W; Radolf, J D

    1992-01-01

    Virulent Treponema pallidum reacts poorly with the specific antibodies present in human and rabbit syphilitic sera, a phenomenon often attributed to an outer coat of host serum proteins. Here we present additional evidence that the limited antigenicity of virulent organisms actually is due to a paucity of proteins in the outer membrane. Initially, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that the outer membrane is highly susceptible to damage from physical manipulation (i.e., centrifugation and resuspension) and nonionic detergents. Organisms with disrupted outer membranes were markedly more antigenic than intact treponemes as determined by immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) with rabbit syphilitic and antiendoflagellar antisera. Data obtained with a new radioimmunoassay, designated the T. pallidum surface-specific radioimmunoassay, corroborated these IEM findings by demonstrating that the major T. pallidum immunogens are not surface exposed; the assay also was unable to detect serum proteins, including fibronectin, on the surfaces of intact organisms. Furthermore, IEM of T. pallidum on ultrathin cryosections with monospecific anti-47-kDa-immunogen antiserum confirmed the intracellular location of the 47-kDa immunogen. On the basis of these and previous findings, we proposed a new model for T. pallidum ultrastructure in which the outer membrane contains a small number of transmembrane proteins and the major membrane immunogens are anchored by lipids to the periplasmic leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane. This unique ultrastructure explains the remarkable ability of virulent organisms to evade the humoral immune response of the T. pallidum-infected host. Images PMID:1541522

  10. A Novel Treponema pallidum Antigen, TP0136, Is an Outer Membrane Protein That Binds Human Fibronectin▿

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Mary Beth; McGill, Melanie A.; Pettersson, Jonas; Rogers, Arthur; Matějková, Petra; Šmajs, David; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The antigenicity, structural location, and function of the predicted lipoprotein TP0136 of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were investigated based on previous screening studies indicating that anti-TP0136 antibodies are present in the sera of syphilis patients and experimentally infected rabbits. Recombinant TP0136 (rTP0136) protein was purified and shown to be strongly antigenic during human and experimental rabbit infection. The TP0136 protein was exposed on the surface of the bacterial outer membrane and bound to the host extracellular matrix glycoproteins fibronectin and laminin. In addition, the TP0136 open reading frame was shown to be highly polymorphic among T. pallidum subspecies and strains at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Finally, the ability of rTP0136 protein to act as a protective antigen to subsequent challenge with infectious T. pallidum in the rabbit model of infection was assessed. Immunization with rTP0136 delayed ulceration but did not prevent infection or the formation of lesions. These results demonstrate that TP0136 is expressed on the outer membrane of the treponeme during infection and may be involved in attachment to host extracellular matrix components. PMID:18332212

  11. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  12. Factors affecting the attachment of Treponema pallidum to mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wong, G H; Steiner, B; Faine, S; Graves, S

    1983-02-01

    Attachment of Treponema pallidum (Nichols) to mammalian cells is probably the first step in the pathogenesis of syphilis. It may also be important for the multiplication of T pallidum in vitro. When factors affecting the attachment of T pallidum to mammalian cells in vitro were studied significantly greater numbers of treponemes were found to attach to baby rabbit genital organ (BRGO) cells than to five other mammalian cell lines. When attached to BRGO cells T pallidum survived longer in vitro than unattached treponemes. Eagle's minimal essential medium was superior to three other culture media in increasing attachment and maintaining the survival of treponemes. Dithiothreitol (0.25-1.0 mmol/l) had no effect on the attachment of T pallidum to BRGO cells. Anaerobic conditions were superior to microaerophilic conditions, and the latter were superior to aerobic conditions for the attachment and survival of T pallidum to BRGO cells. Within the range of concentrations tested the number of treponemes attached to the BRGO cells was directly dependent on the concentrations of viable treponemes in the inoculum. Greater numbers of treponemes attached to actively metabolising BRGO cells than to quiescent or slowly growing cells. PMID:6337680

  13. Identification of functional candidates amongst hypothetical proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  14. Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue displays pathogenic properties different from those of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Wicher, K; Wicher, V; Abbruscato, F; Baughn, R E

    2000-06-01

    The present study described the susceptibility of C4D guinea pigs to cutaneous infection with Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue Haiti B strain. The general manifestations of the disease in adults and neonates differ, to a certain degree, from those induced by T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain. Noticeable differences between the infections were reflected in the character of the skin lesions, their onset and persistence, and the kinetics of the humoral response. The incidence and dissemination of cutaneous yaws lesions in very young guinea pigs were remarkably different from the low frequency observed in a similar age group of syphilis infection, 100 versus 17%, respectively. Moreover, as opposed to T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue does not cross the placenta. Offspring born to yaws-infected mothers did not produce immunoglobulin M antibodies and their organs, examined by PCR and rabbit infectivity test (RIT), were all negative. Examination of a large number of tissues and organs in adult, neonate, and maternal yaws by PCR and RIT clearly demonstrated that, unlike syphilis, there was a low incidence and short persistence of the yaws pathogen in internal organs. These findings stress the dermotropic rather than the organotropic character of yaws and provide further evidence of distinctive biological and pathological differences between yaws and venereal syphilis. PMID:10816466

  15. Redox potential and survival of virulent Treponema pallidum under microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Steiner, B; McLean, I; Graves, S

    1981-10-01

    A strongly reduced culture medium, capable of maintaining the virulence of Treponema pallidum (Nichols) for several days, was exposed to an atmosphere of 3% oxygen in nitrogen for 2-3 days before inoculation with T pallidum. By using various volumes of medium in uniform tubes a range of redox potentials (Ecal) from -94 mV to -325 mV was produced depending on the surface area-to-volume ratios of the medium. The anaerobic medium had an Ecal value of -387 mV. The medium was inoculated with T pallidum and incubated in an atmosphere of 3% oxygen. The survival of treponemes at different redox potentials was monitored by observing the retention of motility and by measuring the latent period of infection after inoculation of the cultures into the shaved backs of rabbits. Under these conditions T pallidum survived longest at low (electronegative) redox potential. An inverse linear relationship was observed between the redox potential of the culture medium and the survival of T pallidum, as measured by the time required for a 90% reduction of virulent organisms. No optimum redox potential was detected, the most electronegative medium (-325 mV, Ecal) giving the best survival. PMID:7028206

  16. Prolonged survival of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) in cell-free and tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Fieldsteel, A H; Becker, F A; Stout, J G

    1977-10-01

    Survival of Treponema pallidum was found to be prolonged in the presence of tissue culture. Of the 12 cultures studied, cottontail rabbit epithelium (Sf1Ep) supported T. pallidum for the longest time. In horizontal Leighton tubes with reduced medium and an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in N2, the 50% survival time (ST50) was 5 to 6 days for treponemes associated with monolayers of Sf1Ep cells. Comparable cell-free tubes had ST50 values of less than 4 days. In vertical Leighton tubes containing 6 ml of prereduced medium incubated aerobically, gradients of O2 tension and redox potential were established. Attachment and survival of T. pallidum were greatest at a depth of about 10 to 20 mm. Motility was between 70 and 95% in this area throughout the first 14 days of incubation. Occasionally, greater than 50% motility was observed for as long as 21 days. The redox potential and O2 tension in the optimal area of gradient cultures were reproduced by adjusting the medium depth in a shell vial culture system containing cells on a horizontal cover slip. Treponemes associated with the cell monolayer in both gradient and shell vial cultures were still virulent after 21 days in vitro. The dilution of testis extract and the concentration of T. pallidum were found to be important factors in survival of T. pallidum. PMID:332639

  17. Molecular characterization of Treponema denticola infection-induced bone and soft tissue transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bakthavatchalu, V.; Meka, A.; Sathishkumar, S.; Lopez, M.C.; Verma, R.K.; Wallet, S.M.; Bhattacharyya, I.; Boyce, B.F.; Mans, J.; Lamont, R.J.; Baker, H.V.; Ebersole, J.L.; Kesavalu, L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Treponema denticola is associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis and with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which T. denticola impacts periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone resorption remain unclear. Here, we examined changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a T. denticola infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. T. denticola was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over the calvaria of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and the calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated and analysed for transcript profiling using Murine GeneChip® arrays. Following T. denticola infection, 2905 and 1234 genes in the infected calvarial bones and soft tissues, respectively, were differentially expressed (p ≤ 0.05). Biological pathways significantly impacted by T. denticola infection in calvarial bone and calvarial tissue included leukocyte transendothelial migration, cell adhesion (immune system) molecules, cell cycle, extracellular matrix–receptor interaction, focal adhesion, B-cell receptor signaling and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways resulting in proinflammatory, chemotactic effects, and T-cell stimulation. In conclusion, localized T. denticola infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes, the profiles of which differed between inflamed calvarial bone and soft tissues. PMID:20618700

  18. Effects of fatty acids on motility retention by Treponema pallidum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, H M; Jenkin, H M; Crilly, K; Sandok, P L

    1978-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols virulent strain) was incubated under 75% N2 + 20% H2 + 5% CO2 in prereduced serum-free modified Eagle-Richter medium supplemented with different concentrations of various long-chain fatty acids complexed with fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin. Motility retention was greater in medium with oleic acid containing 15 rather than 2 mg of albumin per ml. Palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid alone caused rapid loss of motility at concentrations as low as 5 microgram/ml. Elaidic acid (92 microgram/ml) alone had no effect on motility. Various combinations of saturated plus unsaturated fatty acids did not inhibit motility retention or were less inhibitory than either of the individual fatty acid components. The combination of palmitic plus oleic acids was least toxic. Rapid loss of motility occurred with pairs of unsaturated or saturated fatty acids, or with Tween 40, 60, or 80, alone or combined. Autoxidation of oleic acid resulted in decreased toxicity for T. pallidum but increased toxicity for baby hamster kidney cells. PMID:346485

  19. Comparison of performance of two Treponema pallidum automated chemiluminescent immunoassays in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Sabia, Chiara; Esposito, Antonella; Iannone, Carmela; Montesano, Maria Lourdes; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The recrudescence of syphilis is leading to the development of new serological tests. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the more recent Elecsys Syphilis assay, the Electro Chemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA), with the former Architect Syphilis TP assay, the Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA), for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in blood donors. Serum samples of 5543 voluntary blood donors were screened in parallel with two tests. All repeatedly reactive (RR) samples by one or both assays were further analysed for confirmation by immmunoblot INNO-LIA and TPHA. Of 32 RR samples by CMIA, 21 were confirmed positive; of 21 RR samples by ECLIA, 20 were confirmed positive. The sensitivities of CMIA and ECLIA were 100% and 95.24% (95% CI = 85.71-100), respectively, not significant (p > 0.05). The specificity and predictive positive value (PPV) of CMIA were 99.86% (95% CI = 99.74-99.94) and 72.41%, respectively, while the specificity and PPV of ECLIA were both 100%, being statistically significant (p = 0.01 for both). The overall agreement was 99.80% and the Cohen's kappa coefficients was 0.79. In conclusion, the recent Elecsys Syphilis assay could represent another reliable assay for blood donor screening. PMID:27030921

  20. Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP) integrates spirochaetes within oral microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Cogoni, Valentina; Morgan-Smith, Alex; Fenno, J. Christopher; Dymock, David

    2012-01-01

    Treponema denticola is found ubiquitously in the human oral cavity and is mainly associated with bacterial communities implicated in the establishment and development of periodontal disease. The ability to become integrated within biofilm communities is crucial to the growth and survival of oral bacteria, and involves inter-bacterial coaggregation, metabolic cooperation, and synergy against host defences. In this article we show that the chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), found within a high-molecular-mass complex on the cell surface, mediates adherence of T. denticola to other potential periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Parvimonas micra. Proteolytic activity per se did not appear to be required for the interactions, and expression of the major outer-sheath protein (Msp) was not necessary, except for binding Parv. micra. Biofilms of densely packed cells and matrix, up to 40 µm in depth, were formed between T. denticola and P. gingivalis on salivary pellicle, with T. denticola cells enriched in the upper layers. Expression of CTLP, but not Msp, was critical for dual-species biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. T. denticola did not form dual-species biofilms with any of the other three periodontal bacterial species under various conditions. Synergy between T. denticola and P. gingivalis was also shown by increased inhibition of blood clotting, which was CTLP-dependent. The results demonstrate the critical role of CTLP in interactions of T. denticola with other oral micro-organisms, leading to synergy in microbial community development and host tissue pathogenesis. PMID:22313692

  1. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  2. Identification of Functional Candidates amongst Hypothetical Proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  3. Native cellular architecture of Treponema denticola revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jacques; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Limberger, Ronald J; Mannella, Carmen A; Marko, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Using cryo-electron tomography, we are developing a refined description of native cellular structures in the pathogenic spirochete Treponema denticola. Tightly organized bundles of periplasmic flagella were readily observed in intact plunge-frozen cells. The periplasmic space was measured in both wild-type and aflagellate strains, and found to widen by less than the diameter of flagella when the latter are present. This suggests that a structural change occurs in the peptidoglycan layer to accommodate the presence of the flagella. In dividing cells, the flagellar filaments were found to bridge the cytoplasmic cylinder constriction site. Cytoplasmic filaments, adjacent to the inner membrane, run parallel to the tightly organized flagellar filaments. The cytoplasmic filaments may be anchored by a narrow plate-like structure. The tapering of the cell ends was conserved between cells, with a patella-shaped structure observed in the periplasm at the tip of each cytoplasmic cylinder. Several incompletely characterized structures have been observed in the periplasm between dividing cells, including a cable-like structure linking two cytoplasmic cylinders and complex foil-shaped structures. PMID:18468917

  4. Impact of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine introduction in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    von Gottberg, A.; de Gouveia, L.; Madhi, S. A.; du Plessis, M.; Quan, V.; Soma, K.; Huebner, R.; Flannery, B.; Schuchat, A.; Klugman, Kp

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in reported invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in South Africa within the first five years of introduction of conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the routine child immunization schedule. METHODS: We used national laboratory-based surveillance data to identify cases of invasive H. influenzae disease between July 1999 and June 2004, and submitted isolates for serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. FINDINGS: The absolute number of Hib cases (reported to the national surveillance system) among children below one year of age decreased by 65%, from 55 cases in 1999-2000 to 19 cases in 2003-04. Enhanced surveillance initiated in 2003, identified human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection and incomplete vaccination as contributing factors for Hib transmission. The total number of laboratory-confirmed cases of H. influenzae remained unchanged because non-type b disease was being increasingly reported to the surveillance system concomitant with system enhancements. Children with non-typable disease were more likely to be HIV-positive (32 of 34, 94%) than children with Hib disease (10 of 14, 71%), P = 0.051. Recent Hib isolates were more likely to be multidrug resistant (2% in 1999-2000 versus 19% in 2003-04, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Data from a newly established national laboratory-based surveillance system showed a decrease in Hib disease burden among South African children following conjugate vaccine introduction and identified cases of non-typable disease associated with HIV infection. PMID:17128361

  5. The Lung Immune Response to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (Lung Immunity to NTHi)

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is divided into typeable or nontypeable strains based on the presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule. The typeable strains (such as type b) are an important cause of systemic infection, whilst the nontypeable strains (designated as NTHi) are predominantly respiratory mucosal pathogens. NTHi is present as part of the normal microbiome in the nasopharynx, from where it may spread down to the lower respiratory tract. In this context it is no longer a commensal and becomes an important respiratory pathogen associated with a range of common conditions including bronchitis, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, and particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NTHi induces a strong inflammatory response in the respiratory tract with activation of immune responses, which often fail to clear the bacteria from the lung. This results in recurrent/persistent infection and chronic inflammation with consequent lung pathology. This review will summarise the current literature about the lung immune response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a topic that has important implications for patient management. PMID:26114124

  6. Efficacy of immunization of feedlot calves with a commercial Haemophilus somnus bacterin.

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, C S; Jim, G K; Janzen, E D

    1988-01-01

    Two cohorts, consisting of 10,723 calves total, were identified in this prospective follow-up study to investigate whether immunization of auction market beef calves immediately upon arrival at the feedlot with a commercial Haemophilus somnus whole cell killed bacterin would reduce subsequent mortality. In addition to mortality rate, the use of incidence rate of fatal disease is introduced as an effect measure to examine vaccine efficacy in the feedlot. The Haemophilus somnus bacterin had no significant effect on the overall crude mortality rate; however, the bacterin appeared to significantly (p less than 0.05) reduce the incidence rate of fatal disease and the mortality rate during the first two months in the feedlot, when risk of fatal disease onset was highest. Once mortalities likely not associated with hemophilosis (for example, a fractured femoral neck) were removed from the analysis, steer mortality rate, but not heifer mortality rate, was reduced significantly (p less than 0.05) in the vaccinated group. The attributable percent overall for steers was 17.4%; this suggests that 17.4% of fatal respiratory disease in the unvaccinated steers could have been prevented by vaccination with the H. somnus bacterin. Heifer calves demonstrated a significantly (p less than 0.01) higher incidence rate of fatal disease during the first week than did steer calves, indicating that a different pattern of fatal disease existed for the two sexes. Use of a second vaccination two weeks after arrival did little to decrease mortality risk. PMID:3370554

  7. “BLACK LIGHT” INACTIVATION OF TRANSFORMING DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID FROM HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano

    1964-01-01

    Cabrera-Juárez, Emiliano (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F., Mexico). “Black light” inactivation of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid from Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 87:771–778. 1964.—The biological activity (intrinsic genetic markers or nitrous acid mutable regions) of transforming deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Haemophilus influenzae has been inactivated by “black light” (BL) by two mechanisms: (i) photodynamic action (oxygen-dependent) and (ii) “BL inactivation” (oxygen-independent). The BL inactivation is greater in denatured than in native DNA, and it is dependent on the pH. It does not depend on the temperature, and the damage produced is stable. The effective wavelength of inactivation is between 330 and 360 mμ. The BL inactivation is not reactivated by photoreactivating enzyme or nitrous acid. The BL and ultraviolet inactivations are additive, suggesting that the changes produced by BL and ultraviolet irradiation on transforming DNA are different. T2 phage was also inactivated by BL. The nature of the photochemical changes produced in DNA by BL is not known. PMID:14139527

  8. The tryptophanase gene cluster of Haemophilus influenzae type b: evidence for horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Martin, K; Morlin, G; Smith, A; Nordyke, A; Eisenstark, A; Golomb, M

    1998-01-01

    Among strains of Haemophilus influenzae, the ability to catabolize tryptophan (as detected by indole production) varies and is correlated with pathogenicity. Tryptophan catabolism is widespread (70 to 75%) among harmless respiratory isolates but is nearly universal (94 to 100%) among strains causing serious disease, including meningitis. As a first step in investigating the relationship between tryptophan catabolism and virulence, we have identified genes in pathogenic H. influenzae which are homologous to the tryptophanase (tna) operon of Escherichia coli. The tna genes are located on a 3.1-kb fragment between nlpD and mutS in the H. influenzae type b (Eagan) genome, are flanked by 43-bp direct repeats of an uptake signal sequence downstream from nlpD, and appear to have been inserted as a mobile unit within this sequence. The organization of this insertion is reminiscent of pathogenicity islands. The tna cluster is found at the same map location in all indole-positive strains of H. influenzae surveyed and is absent from reference type d and e genomes. In contrast to H. influenzae, most other Haemophilus species lack tna genes. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that the tna cluster was acquired by intergeneric lateral transfer, either by H. influenzae or a recent ancestor, and that E. coli may have acquired its tnaA gene from a related source. Genomes of virulent H. influenzae resemble those of pathogenic enterics in having an island of laterally transferred DNA next to mutS. PMID:9422600

  9. A model aerosol exposure system for induction of porcine Haemophilus pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Sebunya, T N; Saunders, J R; Osborne, A D

    1983-01-01

    One group of six pigs and another group of three pigs were separately exposed in a polyethylene enclosed chamber for ten minutes, respectively, to Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 and Bacillus subtilis aerosols generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer. Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae and B. subtilis were deposited throughout the lungs immediately following aerosol exposure. The number of H. pleuropneumoniae and B. subtilis deposited varied within and between lungs in each group. The mean numbers of both organisms deposited in the posterior (caudal and accessory) lobes were significantly greater than those in the anterior (cranial and middle) lobes (P less than 0.001). The four principals that received H. pleuropneumoniae aerosols and the two contact controls developed fatal fibrinous pneumonia which simulated that seen in natural infections. Since this exposure system consistently resulted in clinical disease it has good potential as a model for the study of pathogenesis of the disease and more specifically for the evaluation of vaccines. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6403208

  10. IgA Protease Activity in Haemophilus parasuis in the Absence of a Recognizable IgA Protease Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser’s disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems. Little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of H. parasuis infection. In some Pasteurellaceae species, IgA proteases aid in d...

  11. In Vitro Activities of the Ketolide HMR 3647 against Recent Gram-Positive Clinical Isolates and Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Arthur L.; Fuchs, Peter C.; Brown, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    The ketolide HMR 3647 (previously RU 66647) was evaluated against 2,563 recent clinical isolates of gram-positive pathogens and 200 Haemophilus influenzae isolates. HMR 3647 was active against macrolide-resistant streptococci, including pneumococci, but was not active against macrolide- or lincosamide-resistant staphylococci. Against H. influenzae, the potency of HMR 3647 was similar to that of azithromycin. PMID:9687424

  12. Studies of Pathogenesis, Transmission, and Heterologous Protection of Four Isolates of Haemophilus parasuis in a Highly Susceptible Swine Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs from an experimental herd that is free from known swine pathogens were used in a study with several Haemophilus parasuis isolates in an effort to identify isolates of varying virulence to sequence in order to determine virulence factors for this pathogen. Each of 4 groups of 5 pigs each varyin...

  13. In Vitro Capability of Faropenem To Select for Resistant Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  14. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been use...

  15. Prior Colonization with an Avirulent Haemophilus parasuis Isolate Prevents Disease from a Subsequent Virulent Challenge with a Heterologous Isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four groups of pigs were inoculated with a different isolate of Haemophilus parasuis intranasally (SW114, 12939, MN-H, and 29755), with a fifth group serving as sham inoculated controls. Three of the 4 isolates (12939, MN-H, and 29755) caused systemic disease, while the SW114 pigs remained healthy ...

  16. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  17. Partial heterologous protection against Glässer’s disease in pigs colonized with an avirulent isolate of Haemophilus parasuis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. This bacterium can exist as a commensal in the upper respiratory tract in swine, but can also cause pneumonia and can systemically invade causing Glässer’s disease, which is characterized by polyserositis, men...

  18. A curated public database for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and analysis of Haemophilus parasuis based on an optimized typing scheme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer’s disease and pneumonia in swine. Serotyping is often used to classify isolates but requires reagents that are costly to produce and not standardized or widely available. Sequence-based methods, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), offer many advantages ov...

  19. [Haemophilus influenzae type b in Italy--after thirty years of vaccination may we lower our guard?].

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Elisa; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) is responsible for meningitis, systemic infections and acute respiratory illness, especially in children. The use of the conjugate vaccines against Hib reduced the incidence of the disease worldwide. In Italy, after the decrease resulted from vaccination, the disease may reappear due to the reduction in vaccination coverage, the presence of infections in adults and vaccine failures. PMID:26722830

  20. STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS : VII. REINOCULATION OF TREATED AND UNTREATED SYPHILITIC RABBITS WITH HETEROLOGOUS STRAINS OF TREPONEMA PALLIDUM.

    PubMed

    Chesney, A M; Halley, C R; Kemp, J E

    1927-07-31

    Syphilitic rabbits, whether untreated or treated after the 90th day of infection, were found to be more refractory to subsequent inoculation with the homologous strain of Treponema pallidum than to inoculation with heterologous strains of the same organism, when clinical criteria alone were employed in judging the outcome of reinoculation. The incidence of second infection with homologous strains was 5.4 per cent, as against 50 per cent with heterologous strains.(2) The resistance which develops in rabbits during the course of a syphilitic infection appears therefore to be strain-specific rather than species-specific. The protection afforded against homologous strains was found to persist for at least as long as 6 months after treatment was discontinued. A given strain may afford a higher degree of protection against some strains than against others, but whether this is to be explained upon the basis of biologic relationship or of differences in virulence, or possibly as the result of both of these factors was not disclosed by the experiments. Rabbits infected with a strain (Nichols) which had been adapted to this species for over a decade could be infected with strains which had been recovered recently from the human body. The previous existence of a syphilitic lesion in the testis which was used as the site for reinoculation did not seem to exert any influence upon the incidence of successful second infections obtained with heterologous strains of Treponema pallidum. Sometimes the course of the second infection produced by inoculation with heterologous strains was less pronounced than that observed in the controls, but in most instances no significant alteration was observed. In syphilitic rabbits treated late in the course of the disease and reinoculated with heterologous strains of Treponema pallidum no lesion may develop at the site of reinoculation but nevertheless the Wassermann reaction may become positive and remain so for weeks thereafter. It is suggested

  1. Molecular evolution of the tprC, D, I, K, G, and J genes in the pathogenic genus Treponema.

    PubMed

    Gray, R R; Mulligan, C J; Molini, B J; Sun, E S; Giacani, L; Godornes, C; Kitchen, A; Lukehart, S A; Centurion-Lara, A

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the evolution of 6 genes from the Treponema pallidum repeat (tpr) gene family, which encode potential virulence factors and are assumed to have evolved through gene duplication and gene conversion events. The 6 loci (tprC, D, G, J, I, and K) were sequenced and analyzed in several members of the genus Treponema, including the 3 subspecies of human T. pallidum (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, pertenue, and endemicum), Treponema paraluiscuniculi (rabbit syphilis), and the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc (simian) isolate. Phylogenetic methods, recombination analysis, and measures of nucleotide diversity were used to investigate the evolutionary history of the tpr genes. Numerous instances of gene conversion were detected by all 3 methods including both homogenizing gene conversion that involved the entire length of the sequence as well as site-specific conversions that affected smaller regions. We determined the relative age and directionality of the gene conversion events whenever possible. Our data are also relevant to a discussion of the evolution of the treponemes themselves. Higher levels of variation exist between the human subspecies than within them, supporting the classification of the human treponemes into 3 subspecies. In contrast to published theories, the divergence and diversity of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue relative to the other subspecies does not support a much older origin of yaws at the emergence of modern human, nor is the level of divergence seen in T. pallidum subsp. pallidum consistent with a very recent (< 500 years) origin of this subspecies. In general, our results demonstrate that intragenomic recombination has played a significant role in the evolution of the studied tpr genes and emphasize that efforts to infer evolutionary history of the treponemes can be complicated if past recombination events are not recognized. PMID:16926243

  2. Pore-forming properties of the major 53-kilodalton surface antigen from the outer sheath of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Egli, C; Leung, W K; Müller, K H; Hancock, R E; McBride, B C

    1993-01-01

    A 53-kDa protein from the outer sheath of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola was purified to homogeneity and shown to reconstitute channels in black lipid bilayer model membranes. The channel had a single-channel conductance of 1.8 nS in 0.1 M KCl, making this the largest porin channel observed to date (estimated diameter, 3.4 nm). Electron micrographs of 53-kDa-protein-containing outer sheaths of T. denticola showed a regular hexagonal array of darker staining pits. Images PMID:7682993

  3. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  4. Glucose metabolism and NADH recycling by Treponema hyodysenteriae, the agent of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T B

    1989-09-01

    Glucose metabolism and the mechanisms of NADH oxidation by Treponema hyodysenteriae were studied. Under an N2 atmosphere, washed cell suspensions of the spirochete consumed glucose and produced acetate, butyrate, H2, and CO2. Approximately twice as much H2 as CO2 was produced. Determinations of radioactivity in products of [14C]glucose and [14C]pyruvate metabolism and analyses of enzyme activities in cell lysates revealed that glucose was catabolized to pyruvate via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The results of pyruvate exchange reactions with NaH14CO3 and Na14COOH demonstrated that pyruvate was converted to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), H2, and CO2 by a clostridium-type phosphoroclastic mechanism. NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase activities were present in cell lysates and produced H2 from NADH oxidation. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-CoA. Butyrate was formed from acetyl-CoA via a pathway that involved 3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and butyryl-CoA transferase. T. hyodysenteriae cell suspensions generated less H2 and butyrate under 10% O2-90% N2 than under 100% N2. Cell lysates contained NADH oxidase, NADH peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities. These findings indicated there are three major mechanisms that T. hyodysenteriae cells use to recycle NADH generated from the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway--enzymes in the pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyrate, NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and NADH oxidase. Versatility in methods of NADH oxidation and an ability to metabolize oxygen could benefit T. hyodysenteriae cells in the colonization of tissues of the swine large bowel. PMID:2802610

  5. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  6. Interaction of Treponema denticola TD-4, GM-1, and MS25 with human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, A; Holt, S C

    1990-01-01

    The adherence of Treponema denticola GM-1, TD-4, and MS25 to human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was studied to serve as an introduction to investigations into the interactions of these oral bacteria with human host cells. Under both aerobic (5% CO2) and anaerobic (85% N2 plus 10% H2 plus 5% CO2) environments, the interactions with the HGFs were such that strains GM-1 and MS25 were consistently more adherent than strain TD-4. Polyclonal antibodies to GM-1 inhibited GM-1 adherence by 70%, while MS25 and TD-4 showed differing degrees of cross-reactive inhibition, indicative of common but not identical epitopes on the surface of the three T. denticola strains. Pretreatment of the three strains with trypsin did not inhibit adherence; proteinase K did, however, inhibit this interaction by 80%. Trypsin pretreatment of the HGFs resulted in increases in adherence of 50 and 86% for GM-1 and MS25, respectively, while a decrease of 41% was noted for TD-4. Exposure of the T. denticola strains to sugars and lectin pretreatment of the HGFs implicated adherence mediation by mannose and galactose residues on the HGF surface. Periodate treatment of HGFs resulted in a 50% drop in adherence for GM-1 and MS25, but did not decrease that of TD-4. Addition of fetal bovine serum inhibited adherence of the three strains to differing degrees, with TD-4 being the most susceptible. Addition of purified fibronectin (100 micrograms/ml) resulted in greater than 50% inhibition in GM-1 and MS25 adherence, while a 25% increase occurred with TD-4. While strain differences were noted in some of the parameters studied, the results indicate two possibilities for T. denticola-HGF adherence: a lectinlike adhesin(s) on the T. denticola surface with affinity for galactose and mannose on the HGF surface, and a serum host factor(s) bridging T. denticola and HGFs. Images PMID:2160430

  7. Comparison of molecular and microscopic techniques for detection of Treponema pallidum in genital ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Jethwa, H S; Schmitz, J L; Dallabetta, G; Behets, F; Hoffman, I; Hamilton, H; Lule, G; Cohen, M; Folds, J D

    1995-01-01

    We compared the ability of direct immunofluorescent staining (DFA) and the PCR to detect Treponema pallidum in specimens from patients with genital ulcer disease. Touch preparations from 156 patients with genital lesions were fixed in acetone and stained with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody specific for the 37-kDa antigen of T. pallidum. After microscopic examination, the smear was removed from the slide with a swab. DNA was extracted with phenol-chloroform and precipitated with isopropanol. Ten microliters of the extracted DNA was amplified by PCR using primers for the gene encoding the 47-kDa protein of T. pallidum and hybridized to an internal probe. Twenty-two of 156 specimens were positive for T. pallidum by DFA and PCR, while 127 were negative by both methods, yielding a concordance of 95.5% (kappa = 0.84). Four specimens were positive by PCR and negative by DFA, while three specimens were negative by PCR and positive by DFA. The DFA-negative, PCR-positive specimens may have resulted from the presence of large numbers of leukocytes on the slides, obscuring visualization of treponemes. The DFA-positive, PCR-negative results were not due to inhibition of the PCR since purified T. pallidum DNA was amplified when added to aliquots of these specimens. Negative results in these specimens were most likely due to inefficient recovery of their DNA. These data suggest that DFA and PCR are equivalent methods for detection of T. pallidum on touch preparations of genital lesions. Further refinements of the PCR assay are necessary for it to significantly improve the detection of T. pallidum in genital lesions. PMID:7535311

  8. Bifunctional Role of the Treponema pallidum Extracellular Matrix Binding Adhesin Tp0751 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Francescutti, Teresa; Hawkes, Aaron; Boulanger, Martin J.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is a highly invasive pathogenic spirochete capable of attaching to host cells, invading the tissue barrier, and undergoing rapid widespread dissemination via the circulatory system. The T. pallidum adhesin Tp0751 was previously shown to bind laminin, the most abundant component of the basement membrane, suggesting a role for this adhesin in host tissue colonization and bacterial dissemination. We hypothesized that similar to that of other invasive pathogens, the interaction of T. pallidum with host coagulation proteins, such as fibrinogen, may also be crucial for dissemination via the circulatory system. To test this prediction, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methodology to demonstrate specific binding of soluble recombinant Tp0751 to human fibrinogen. Click-chemistry-based palmitoylation profiling of heterologously expressed Tp0751 confirmed the presence of a lipid attachment site within this adhesin. Analysis of the Tp0751 primary sequence revealed the presence of a C-terminal putative HEXXH metalloprotease motif, and in vitro degradation assays confirmed that recombinant Tp0751 purified from both insect and Escherichia coli expression systems degrades human fibrinogen and laminin. The proteolytic activity of Tp0751 was abolished by the presence of the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Further, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry showed that Tp0751 binds zinc and calcium. Collectively, these results indicate that Tp0751 is a zinc-dependent, membrane-associated protease that exhibits metalloprotease-like characteristics. However, site-directed mutagenesis of the HEXXH motif to HQXXH did not abolish the proteolytic activity of Tp0751, indicating that further mutagenesis studies are required to elucidate the critical active site residues associated with this protein. This study represents the first published description of a T. pallidum protease capable of degrading host

  9. A longitudinal evaluation of Treponema pallidum PCR testing in early syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Syphilis is a growing public health problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) globally. Rapid and accurate detection of syphilis is vital to ensure patients and their contacts receive timely treatment and reduce ongoing transmission. Methods We evaluated a PCR assay for the diagnosis of Treponema pallidum using swabs of suspected early syphilis lesions in longitudinally assessed MSM. Results We tested 260 MSM for T pallidum by PCR on 288 occasions: 77 (26.7%) had early syphilis that was serologically confirmed at baseline or within six weeks, and 211 (73.3%) remained seronegative for syphilis. Of 55 men with primary syphilis, 49 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% CI: 77.8%-95.9%) and a specificity of 99.1% (95% CI: 96.5%-99.9%). Of 22 men with secondary syphilis, 11 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 50% (95% CI: 28.2%-71.8%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 66.4%-71.8%). Of the 77 syphilis cases, 43 (56%) were HIV positive and the sensitivity and specificity of the PCR test did not vary by HIV status. The PCR test was able to detect up to five (10%) primary infections that were initially seronegative, including one HIV positive man with delayed seroconversion to syphilis (72 to 140 days) and one HIV positive man who did not seroconvert to syphilis over 14 months follow-up. Both men had been treated for syphilis within a week of the PCR test. Conclusions T pallidum PCR is a potentially powerful tool for the early diagnosis of primary syphilis, particularly where a serological response has yet to develop. PMID:23241398

  10. Evaluation of the Recombinant Protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for Serodiagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  11. Physical map of the genome of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols).

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E M; Howell, J K; You, Y; Hoffmaster, A R; Heath, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1995-01-01

    A physical map of the chromosome of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols), the causative agent of syphilis, was constructed from restriction fragments produced by NotI, SfiI, and SrfI. These rare-cutting restriction endonucleases cleaved the T. pallidum genome into 16, 8, and 15 fragments, respectively. Summation of the physical lengths of the fragments indicates that the chromosome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum is approximately 1,030 to 1,080 kbp in size. The physical map was constructed by hybridizing a variety of probes to Southern blots of single and double digests of T. pallidum genomic DNA separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. Probes included cosmid clones constructed from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum genomic DNA, restriction fragments excised from gels, and selected genes. Physical mapping confirmed that the chromosome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum is circular, as the SfiI and SrfI maps formed complete circles. A total of 13 genes, including those encoding five membrane lipoproteins (tpn47, tpn41, tpn29-35, tpn17, and tpn15), a putative outer membrane porin (tpn50), the flagellar sheath and hook proteins (flaA and flgE), the cytoplasmic filament protein (cfpA), 16S rRNA (rrnA), a major sigma factor (rpoD), and a homolog of cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (cysS), have been localized in the physical map as a first step toward studying the genetic organization of this noncultivable pathogen. PMID:7896703

  12. Lack of Humoral Immune Protection against Treponema denticola Virulence in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Holt, Stanley C.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of humoral immune responses to Treponema denticola following primary infection, reinfection, and active immunization, as well as immune protection in mice. Primary infection with T. denticola induced a significant (400-fold) serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) response compared to that in control uninfected mice. The IgG response to reinfection was 20,000-fold higher than that for control mice and 10-fold higher than that for primary infection. Mice actively immunized with formalin-killed treponemes developed serum antibody levels seven- to eightfold greater than those in animals after primary infection. Nevertheless, mice with this acquired antibody following primary infection or active immunization demonstrated no significant alterations of lesion induction or decreased size of the abscesses following a challenge infection. Mice with primary infection developed increased levels of IgG3, IgG2b, and IgG2a antibodies, with IgG1 being lower than the other subclasses. Reinfected mice developed enhanced IgG2b, IgG2a, and IgG3 and less IgG1. In contrast, immunized mice developed higher IgG1 and lower IgG3 antibody responses to infection. These IgG subclass distributions indicate a stimulation of both Th1 and Th2 activities in development of the humoral immune response to infection and immunization. Our findings also demonstrated a broad antigen reactivity of the serum antibody, which was significantly increased with reinfection and active immunization. Furthermore, serum antibody was effective in vitro in immobilizing and clumping the bacteria but did not inhibit growth or passively prevent the treponemal infection. These observations suggest that humoral immune responses, as manifested by antibody levels, isotype, and antigenic specificity, were not capable of resolving a T. denticola infection. PMID:10531223

  13. Neelaredoxin, an iron-binding protein from the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum, is a superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, T; Ascenso, C; Hazlett, K R; Sikkink, R; Krebs, C; Litwiller, R; Benson, L M; Moura, I; Moura, J J; Radolf, J D; Huynh, B H; Naylor, S; Rusnak, F

    2000-09-15

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of venereal syphilis, is a microaerophilic obligate pathogen of humans. As it disseminates hematogenously and invades a wide range of tissues, T. pallidum presumably must tolerate substantial oxidative stress. Analysis of the T. pallidum genome indicates that the syphilis spirochete lacks most of the iron-binding proteins present in many other bacterial pathogens, including the oxidative defense enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase, but does possess an orthologue (TP0823) for neelaredoxin, an enzyme of hyperthermophilic and sulfate-reducing anaerobes shown to possess superoxide reductase activity. To analyze the potential role of neelaredoxin in treponemal oxidative defense, we examined the biochemical, spectroscopic, and antioxidant properties of recombinant T. pallidum neelaredoxin. Neelaredoxin was shown to be expressed in T. pallidum by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Recombinant neelaredoxin is a 26-kDa alpha(2) homodimer containing, on average, 0.7 iron atoms/subunit. Mössbauer and EPR analysis of the purified protein indicates that the iron atom exists as a mononuclear center in a mixture of high spin ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The fully oxidized form, obtained by the addition of K(3)(Fe(CN)(6)), exhibits an optical spectrum with absorbances at 280, 320, and 656 nm; the last feature is responsible for the protein's blue color, which disappears upon ascorbate reduction. The fully oxidized protein has a A(280)/A(656) ratio of 10.3. Enzymatic studies revealed that T. pallidum neelaredoxin is able to catalyze a redox equilibrium between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a result consistent with it being a superoxide reductase. This finding, the first description of a T. pallidum iron-binding protein, indicates that the syphilis spirochete copes with oxidative stress via a primitive mechanism, which, thus far, has not been described in pathogenic

  14. Function and Protective Capacity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Caroline E.; Castro, Christa; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    1998-01-01

    Infectious syphilis, caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, remains a public health concern worldwide. The immune-response evasion mechanisms employed by T. pallidum are poorly understood, and prior attempts to identify immunoprotective antigens for subsequent vaccine design have been unsuccessful. Previous investigations conducted in our laboratory identified the T. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase as a potential immunoprotective antigen by using a differential immunologic expression library screen. In studies reported here, heterologous expression of the T. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase in Escherichia coli yielded a full-length, enzymatically active protein. Characterization of the recombinant molecule showed it to be bifunctional, in that it exhibited specific binding to human immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgD, and IgG in addition to possessing enzymatic activity. IgG fractionation studies revealed specific binding of the recombinant enzyme to the Fc fragment of human IgG, a characteristic that may play a role in enabling the syphilis spirochete to evade the host immune response. In further investigations, immunization with the recombinant enzyme significantly protected rabbits from subsequent T. pallidum challenge, altering lesion development at the sites of challenge. In all cases, animals immunized with the recombinant molecule developed atypical pale, flat, slightly indurated, and nonulcerative reactions at the challenge sites that resolved before lesions appeared in the control animals. Although protection in the immunized rabbits was incomplete, as demonstrated by the presence of T. pallidum in the rabbit infectivity test, glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase nevertheless represents a significantly immunoprotective T. pallidum antigen and thus may be useful for inclusion in an antigen cocktail vaccine for syphilis. PMID:9826352

  15. pyrF as a Counterselectable Marker for Unmarked Genetic Manipulations in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Kurniyati, Kurni

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Treponema denticola, an oral pathogen associated with both periodontal and endodontic infections, is poorly understood due to its fastidious growth and recalcitrance to genetic manipulations. Counterselectable markers are instrumental in constructing clean and unmarked mutations in bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that pyrF, a gene encoding orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase, can be used as a counterselectable marker in T. denticola to construct marker-free mutants. T. denticola is susceptible to 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA). To establish a pyrF-based counterselectable knockout system in T. denticola, the pyrF gene was deleted. The deletion conferred resistance to 5-FOA in T. denticola. Next, a single-crossover mutant was constructed by reintroducing pyrF along with a gentamicin resistance gene (aacC1) back into the chromosome of the pyrF mutant at the locus of choice. In this study, we chose flgE, a flagellar hook gene that is located within a large polycistronic motility gene operon, as our target gene. The obtained single-crossover mutant (named FlgEin) regained the susceptibility to 5-FOA. Finally, FlgEin was plated on solid agar containing 5-FOA. Numerous colonies of the 5-FOA-resistant mutant (named FlgEout) were obtained and characterized by PCR and Southern blotting analyses. The results showed that the flgE gene was deleted and FlgEout was free of selection markers (i.e., pyrF and aacC1). Compared to previously constructed flgE mutants that contain an antibiotic selection marker, the deletion of flgE in FlgEout has no polar effect on its downstream gene expression. The system developed here will provide us with a new tool for investigating the genetics and pathogenicity of T. denticola. PMID:26682856

  16. gamma-Glutamyltransferase from the outer cell envelope of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, P L; Mäkinen, K K

    1997-01-01

    The human oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was shown to exhibit relatively high enzyme activity toward the gamma-glutamyl amide bond present in N-gamma-L-glutamyl-4-nitroaniline. The enzyme responsible for this catalysis (gamma-glutamyltransferase [GGT]; EC 2.3.2.2) was purified by means of fast protein liquid chromatography to two sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-pure forms from a mild (0.1%) Triton X-100 extract of washed cells. The GGT was studied primarily with regard to its hydrolytic activity by using N-gamma-L-glutamyl-4-nitroaniline as a substrate, although the GGT was shown to catalyze transpeptidation reactions. The high-molecular-mass form of the GGT gave a value of about 213 kDa by SDS-PAGE when heat treatment was omitted and one of 26 kDa after heat treatment; mass spectrometry gave a value of 26.877. The larger form may represent an aggregate with nonprotein structures (possibly of a carbohydrate nature). The preliminary N-terminal sequence of the GGT is MKKPLIGITGSXLYETSQXXF. The enzyme was highly active on glutathione, transferring its Glu residue either to a water molecule or to the Gly-L-Leu dipeptide. The GGT stability was absolutely dependent on the presence of free thiol(s), while no evidence of metalloenzyme nature was obtained. The proposed location of the GGT in the outer cell envelope and its high activity on glutathione, a major nonprotein thiol present in virtually all cells, suggest that the GGT may play a role in the propagation of T. denticola within inflamed periodontal tissues. PMID:9009331

  17. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  18. Genomic and Metagenomic Analysis of Diversity-Generating Retroelements Associated with Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Nimkulrat, Sutichot; Lee, Heewook; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are genetic cassettes that can produce massive protein sequence variation in prokaryotes. Presumably DGRs confer selective advantages to their hosts (bacteria or viruses) by generating variants of target genes—typically resulting in target proteins with altered ligand-binding specificity—through a specialized error-prone reverse transcription process. The only extensively studied DGR system is from the Bordetella phage BPP-1, although DGRs are predicted to exist in other species. Using bioinformatics analysis, we discovered that the DGR system associated with the Treponema denticola species (a human oral-associated periopathogen) is dynamic (with gains/losses of the system found in the isolates) and diverse (with multiple types found in isolated genomes and the human microbiota). The T. denticola DGR is found in only nine of the 17 sequenced T. denticola strains. Analysis of the DGR-associated template regions and reverse transcriptase gene sequences revealed two types of DGR systems in T. denticola: the ATCC35405-type shared by seven isolates including ATCC35405; and the SP32-type shared by two isolates (SP32 and SP33), suggesting multiple DGR acquisitions. We detected additional variants of the T. denticola DGR systems in the human microbiomes, and found that the SP32-type DGR is more abundant than the ATCC35405-type in the healthy human oral microbiome, although the latter is found in more sequenced isolates. This is the first comprehensive study to characterize the DGRs associated with T. denticola in individual genomes as well as human microbiomes, demonstrating the importance of utilizing both individual genomes and metagenomes for characterizing the elements, and for analyzing their diversity and distribution in human populations. PMID:27375574

  19. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  20. Comparative Genome Analysis of the Pathogenic Spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, G.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Aravind, L.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the predicted protein sequences encoded in the complete genomes of Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum provides a number of insights into evolutionary trends and adaptive strategies of the two spirochetes. A measure of orthologous relationships between gene sets, termed the orthology coefficient (OC), was developed. The overall OC value for the gene sets of the two spirochetes is about 0.43, which means that less than one-half of the genes show readily detectable orthologous relationships. This emphasizes significant divergence between the two spirochetes, apparently driven by different biological niches. Different functional categories of proteins as well as different protein families show a broad distribution of OC values, from near 1 (a perfect, one-to-one correspondence) to near 0. The proteins involved in core biological functions, such as genome replication and expression, typically show high OC values. In contrast, marked variability is seen among proteins that are involved in specific processes, such as nutrient transport, metabolism, gene-specific transcription regulation, signal transduction, and host response. Differences in the gene complements encoded in the two spirochete genomes suggest active adaptive evolution for their distinct niches. Comparative analysis of the spirochete genomes produced evidence of gene exchanges with other bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic hosts that seem to have occurred at different points in the evolution of the spirochetes. Examples are presented of the use of sequence profile analysis to predict proteins that are likely to play a role in pathogenesis, including secreted proteins that contain specific protein-protein interaction domains, such as von Willebrand A, YWTD, TPR, and PR1, some of which hitherto have been reported only in eukaryotes. We tentatively reconstruct the likely evolutionary process that has led to the divergence of the two spirochete lineages; this reconstruction seems

  1. Physiology and nutrition of Treponema primitia, an H2/CO2-acetogenic spirochete from termite hindguts.

    PubMed

    Graber, Joseph R; Breznak, John A

    2004-03-01

    Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, the first spirochetes to be isolated from termite hindguts (J. R. Leadbetter, T. M. Schmidt, J. R. Graber, and J. A. Breznak, Science 283:686-689, 1999), were examined for nutritional, physiological, and biochemical properties relevant to growth and survival in their natural habitat. In addition to using H(2) plus CO(2) as substrates, these strains were capable of homoacetogenic growth on mono- and disaccharides and (in the case of ZAS-2) methoxylated benzenoids. Cells were also capable of mixotrophic growth (i.e., simultaneous utilization of H(2) and organic substrates). Cell extracts of T. primitia possessed enzyme activities of the Wood/Ljungdahl (acetyl coenzyme A) pathway of acetogenesis, including tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes of the methyl group-forming branch. However, a folate compound was required in the medium for growth. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 growing on H(2) plus CO(2) displayed H(2) thresholds of 650 and 490 ppmv, respectively. Anoxic cultures of ZAS-1 and ZAS-2 maintained growth after the addition of as much as 0.5% (vol/vol) O(2) to the headspace atmosphere. Cell extracts exhibited NADH and NADPH peroxidase and NADH oxidase activities but neither catalase nor superoxide dismutase activity. Results indicate that (i) T. primitia is able to exploit a variety of substrates derived from the food of its termite hosts and in so doing contributes to termite nutrition via acetogenesis, (ii) in situ growth of T. primitia is likely dependent on secretion of a folate compound(s) by other members of the gut microbiota, and (iii) cells possess enzymatic adaptations to oxidative stress, which is likely to be encountered in peripheral regions of the termite hindgut. PMID:15006747

  2. Function and protective capacity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C E; Castro, C; Lukehart, S A; Van Voorhis, W C

    1998-12-01

    Infectious syphilis, caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, remains a public health concern worldwide. The immune-response evasion mechanisms employed by T. pallidum are poorly understood, and prior attempts to identify immunoprotective antigens for subsequent vaccine design have been unsuccessful. Previous investigations conducted in our laboratory identified the T. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase as a potential immunoprotective antigen by using a differential immunologic expression library screen. In studies reported here, heterologous expression of the T. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase in Escherichia coli yielded a full-length, enzymatically active protein. Characterization of the recombinant molecule showed it to be bifunctional, in that it exhibited specific binding to human immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgD, and IgG in addition to possessing enzymatic activity. IgG fractionation studies revealed specific binding of the recombinant enzyme to the Fc fragment of human IgG, a characteristic that may play a role in enabling the syphilis spirochete to evade the host immune response. In further investigations, immunization with the recombinant enzyme significantly protected rabbits from subsequent T. pallidum challenge, altering lesion development at the sites of challenge. In all cases, animals immunized with the recombinant molecule developed atypical pale, flat, slightly indurated, and nonulcerative reactions at the challenge sites that resolved before lesions appeared in the control animals. Although protection in the immunized rabbits was incomplete, as demonstrated by the presence of T. pallidum in the rabbit infectivity test, glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase nevertheless represents a significantly immunoprotective T. pallidum antigen and thus may be useful for inclusion in an antigen cocktail vaccine for syphilis. PMID:9826352

  3. Molecular Surveillance of True Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: An Evaluation of PCR Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Temple, Beth; Kirkham, Lea-Ann; Wiertsema, Selma P.; Dunne, Eileen M.; Richmond, Peter C.; Marsh, Robyn L.; Leach, Amanda J.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Unambiguous identification of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is not possible by conventional microbiology. Molecular characterisation of phenotypically defined NTHi isolates suggests that up to 40% are Haemophilus haemolyticus (Hh); however, the genetic similarity of NTHi and Hh limits the power of simple molecular techniques such as PCR for species discrimination. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we assess the ability of previously published and novel PCR-based assays to identify true NTHi. Sixty phenotypic NTHi isolates, classified by a dual 16S rRNA gene PCR algorithm as NTHi (n = 22), Hh (n = 27) or equivocal (n = 11), were further characterised by sequencing of the 16S rRNA and recA genes then interrogated by PCR-based assays targeting the omp P2, omp P6, lgtC, hpd, 16S rRNA, fucK and iga genes. The sequencing data and PCR results were used to define NTHi for this study. Two hpd real time PCR assays (hpd#1 and hpd#3) and the conventional iga PCR assay were equally efficient at differentiating study-defined NTHi from Hh, each with a receiver operator characteristic curve area of 0.90 [0.83; 0.98]. The hpd#1 and hpd#3 assays were completely specific against a panel of common respiratory bacteria, unlike the iga PCR, and the hpd#3 assay was able to detect below 10 copies per reaction. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest an evolutionary continuum between NTHi and Hh and therefore no single gene target could completely differentiate NTHi from Hh. The hpd#3 real time PCR assay proved to be the superior method for discrimination of NTHi from closely related Haemophilus species with the added potential for quantification of H. influenzae directly from specimens. We suggest the hpd#3 assay would be suitable for routine NTHi surveillance and to assess the impact of antibiotics and vaccines, on H. influenzae carriage rates, carriage density, and disease. PMID:22470516

  4. Characterization of a novel family of fibronectin-binding proteins with M23 peptidase domains from Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, C.V.; Francescutti, T.; Cameron, C.E.; Jenkinson, H.F.; Dymock, D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Interactions with fibronectin are important in the virulence strategies of a range of disease-related bacteria. The periodontitis-associated oral spirochaete Treponema denticola expresses at least two fibronectin-binding proteins, designated Msp (major surface protein) and OppA (oligopeptide-binding protein homologue). To identify other T. denticola outer membrane fibronectin-binding proteins, the amino acid sequence of the Treponema pallidum fibronectin-binding protein Tp0155 was used to survey the T. denticola genome. Seven T. denticola genes encoding orthologous proteins were identified. All but two were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified recombinant proteins bound fibronectin. Using antibodies to the N-terminal region of Tp0155, it was demonstrated that T. denticola TDE2318, with highest homology to Tp0155, was cell surface localized. Like Tp0155, the seven T. denticola proteins contained an M23 peptidase domain and four (TDE2318, TDE2753, TDE1738, TDE1297) contained one or two LysM domains. M23 peptidases can degrade peptidoglycan whereas LysM domains recognize carbohydrate polymers. In addition, TDE1738 may act as a bacteriocin based on homology with other bacterial lysins and the presence of an adjacent gene encoding a putative immunity factor. Collectively, these results suggest that T. denticola expresses fibronectin-binding proteins associated with the cell surface that may also have cell wall modifying or lytic functions. PMID:21040511

  5. TpF1 from Treponema pallidum activates inflammasome and promotes the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Babolin, Chiara; Amedei, Amedeo; Ozolins, Dzintars; Zilevica, Aija; D'Elios, Mario Milco; de Bernard, Marina

    2011-08-01

    Human syphilis is a multistage disease, with diverse and wide-ranging manifestations caused by Treponema pallidum. Despite the fact that a cell-mediated immune response takes part in the course of syphilis, T. pallidum often manages to evade host immunity and, in untreated individuals, may trigger chronic infection. With this study, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Treponema pallidum induces a regulatory T (Treg) response in patients with secondary syphilis and we found that the miniferritin TpF1, produced by the bacterium, is able to expand this response and promote the production of TGF-β. Accordingly, TpF1 stimulates monocytes to release IL-10 and TGF-β, the key cytokines in driving Treg cell differentiation. Interestingly, we also found that TpF1 stimulates monocytes to synthesize and release several proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, the latter following the activation of the multiprotein complex inflammasome. Collectively, these data strongly support a central role for TpF1 both in the inflammation process, which occurs in particular during the early stage of syphilis, and in the long-term persistence of the spirochete within the host by promoting Treg response and TGF-β production. PMID:21709157

  6. Developing a vaccine to prevent otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nadeem; Ren, Dabin; Kaur, Ravinder; Basha, Saleem; Zagursky, Robert; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a predominant organism of the upper respiratory nasopharyngeal microbiota. Its disease spectrum includes otitis media, sinusitis, non-bacteremic pneumonia and invasive infections. Protein-based vaccines to prevent NTHi infections are needed to alleviate these infections in children and vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One NTHi protein is included in a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and has been shown to provide efficacy. Our lab has been interested in understanding the immunogenicity of NTHi vaccine candidates P6, protein D and OMP26 for preventing acute otitis media in young children. We expect that continued investigation and progress in the development of an efficacious protein based vaccine against NTHi infections is achievable in the near future. PMID:26894630

  7. Ribotyping, biotyping and capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients in Campinas, southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Marcelo; Pace, Fernanda de; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Villares, Maria Cecília Barisson; Brocchi, Marcelo; Silveira, Wanderley Dias da

    2008-10-01

    Forty-five Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from patients were characterized based on biochemical characteristics. Their capsular types were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); they were compared, using two molecular methods [ribotyping with a specific DNA probe amplified from the 16S rDNA region from H. influenzae and through restriction fragment length polymorphism (RLFP) of an amplified 16S DNA region]. The strains were better discriminated by the ribotyping technique that used the 16S probe and by the combination of both techniques. Biotypes I and IV were the most common, followed by biotypes VI, VIII and III. Biotypes II and VII were not found. Most of the capsular samples were nontypable (89%), with capsular types a and b found in 2 and 9% of the samples, respectively. We concluded that there is a very close genetic identity among pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. PMID:19219284

  8. Immunology of the infant rat experimental model of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, R L; Norden, C W

    1977-01-01

    The age-related acquisition of serum anticapsular and bactericidal antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b observed in rats was similar to that of humans. The antigenic source for this "natural" immunity was not identified since neither pharyngeal infection with H. influenzae b nor enteric colonization by cross-reacting bacteria was detected. Infant rats surviving H. influenzae b bacteremia failed to respond immunologically to the capsular polysaccharide. However, surviving rats demonstrated no impairment of immune responsiveness to this antigen after subsequent immunization with live bacteria in adulthood. In passive protection experiments, antibodies directed against the type b capsular polysaccharide represented the major protective specificity. However, a small protective effect of antibodies to noncapsular antigens also appeared to have been demonstrated. PMID:301506

  9. [Haemophilus influenzae b: a review on the determinants of pathogenicity and immune response to the infection].

    PubMed

    Gómez de León, P; Cabrera-Contreras, R; Cravioto, A

    1991-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is still one of the main causes of diverse invasive diseases in children in México. Epidemiologic data indicate that these processes affect primarily the central nervous system and the respiratory tract. Several factors are involved in the expression of infectious disease by this organism, among them the pathogenic determinants of the parasite and those related with resistance in the host. Occurrence of disease is usually the result of the interaction between these determinants. Knowledge of these pathogenic determinants of the parasite and of factors involved in the immune response of the host have allowed an understanding of the infectious process and have directed research in a least three areas: 1) identification of bacterial membrane fractions related with diagnosis of the disease, 2) screening for immunogenic components in the bacterias as vaccine candidates to be used in the prevention of the disease and, 3) the planning of appropriate alternatives for specific antimicrobial therapy. PMID:1948428

  10. Haemophilus influenzae serotype a as a cause of serious invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Marina; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, particularly H influenzae serotype b (Hib), is an important pathogen that causes serious diseases like meningitis and septicaemia. Since the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccines in the 1990s, the epidemiology of invasive H influenzae disease has changed substantially, with most infections now caused by non-Hib strains. We discuss the importance of H influenzae serotype a (Hia) as a cause of serious morbidity and mortality and its global epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, immunology, prevention, and control. Much like Hib, the capsule of Hia is an important virulence factor contributing to the development of invasive disease. Molecular typing of Hia has identified distinct clonal groups, with some linked to severe disease and high case-fatality rates. Similarities between Hia and Hib capsules, their clinical presentation, and immunology of infection suggest that a bivalent Hia-Hib capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine could offer protection against these two important serotypes of H influenzae. PMID:24268829

  11. Serological grouping of meningococci and encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains by latex agglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, M; Sivonen, A

    1979-01-01

    The latex agglutination method, utilizing antibody-coated latex particles, was adapted for serogrouping of Neisseria meningitidis and serotyping of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains from agar plates. It was found to give more clear-cut results than conventional slide agglutination. A 100% agreement with the antiserum agar method was found for all strains isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Many meningococcal strains from nasopharyngeal carriers are autoagglutinable, but some of these gave a positive reaction with the group B latex reagent, although they were negative by the antiserum agar method. The latex agglutination method has several advantages over others: the lack of autoagglutination, easy performance, easy interpretation, and very low consumption of antisera. PMID:118981

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to ampicillin-sulbactam.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, J E; LaRocco, M; Himes, S L; Inderlied, C; Daly, J A; Campos, J M; Mendelman, P M

    1990-01-01

    A total of 1092 clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae (306 type b; 786 non-type-b), from five medical centers were obtained during 1987 and 1988. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibilities were obtained for all isolates, and broth microdilution susceptibilities were obtained for 502 isolates. Beta-lactamase was produced by 34.3% of type-b and 22.1% of non-type-b isolates, with some geographic variations. Using disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing, all isolates were susceptible to ampicillin-sulbactam, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, and rifampin; two isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol. Whether tested using a fixed ratio of ampicillin to sulbactam of 2:1 or a fixed concentration of sulbactam, the ampicillin-sulbactam combination demonstrated good activity against clinical isolates of H. influenzae. Only 8 of the 1092 isolates did not produce beta-lactamase but demonstrated MICs of greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml for ampicillin. PMID:2076596

  13. Epidemiology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs: a survey of Ontario Pork Producers, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendal, S; Mitchell, W R

    1983-01-01

    Information about factors associated with the spread and the effect of pleuropneumonia was obtained from 418 pork producers in Ontario, who returned a mailed questionnaire. The overall herd prevalence of pleuropneumonia was 23.2%. The prevalence among herds with feeder pigs only was 34.3% and 16% among sow herds. The chance of pleuropneumonia breaking out in a herd was increased with increased traffic of pigs into the herd. The source of supplementary stock had an important effect on the chance of pleuropneumonia occurring. The highest risk resulted from introducing stock from salesbarns and the lowest from stock of health status known to the purchaser and supplied by one breeder only. Mortality, primarily among feeder pigs, and unthriftiness were the major effects of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection. Stress, such as crowding or inclement climatic conditions, was associated with outbreaks of pleuropneumonia. This would suggest that the infection with H. pleuropneumoniae can be subclinical until stress precipitates the disease. PMID:6831302

  14. Antibiotic sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae strains including three recent chloramphenicol-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Zackrisson, G; Brorson, J E

    1980-08-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity of 100 recent isolates of Haemophilus influenzae was determined. Three strains were resistant to chloramphenicol with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 16 microgram/ml. Of these three resistant strains, one produced betalactamase and one was resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. The remaining strains were inhibited by 0.25-2.0 microgram/ml of chloramphenicol. Ampicillin and benzylpenicillin were found to inhibit all but the betalactamase-producing strains at low concentrations. Regarding sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim 96% had minimal inhibitory concentrations of 2.5-0.12 microgram/ml or less, while two strains were resistant. The invitro efficacy of erythromycin against H. influenzae was low. The majority of the strains was inhibited by low concentrations of doxycycline and cefuroxime while cefoxitin exhibited minimal inhibitory concentrations values usually exceeding 1 microgram/ml. The minimal inhibitory concentrations registered are compared to the concentrations of the different antibiotics attainable in certain body fluids. PMID:6968146

  15. Expression and Purification of Haemophilus influenzae Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease GlpG for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Pankaj; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are membrane-embedded proteases that cleave peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins. They play a variety of roles in cell signaling events. The rhomboid protease GlpG from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG) is a canonical form of rhomboid protease having six transmembrane segments. In this unit, detailed protocols are presented for optimization of hiGlpG expression using the araBAD promotor system in the pBAD vector. The parameters for optimization include concentration of inducing agent, induction temperature, and time. Optimization of these key factors led to the development of a protocol yielding 1.6 to 2.5 mg/liter protein purified after ion metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further purification can include size exclusion chromatography (SEC). PMID:24692018

  16. Connection between Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Use and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Bergman, Miika; Voipio, Tinna; Paakkari, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    The association between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among the major respiratory tract pathogens was investigated by comparing regional consumption of the drug to regional resistance in the following year in 21 central hospital districts in Finland. A total of 23,530 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 28,320 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 14,138 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were tested for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptibility during the study period (1998-2004). Among the S. pneumoniae isolates, a statistically significant connection was found between regional consumption and resistance. No statistically significant connection was found between regional trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates. According to our results, it seems that only in pneumococci can the development of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance be influenced by restricting its use. However, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains an important antimicrobial agent because of its reasonable price. Hence, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole among these pathogens needs continuous monitoring. PMID:18443116

  17. Haemophilus influenzae vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6 is not conserved in all strains

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Kaur, Ravinder; Michel, Lea Vacca; Casey, Janet R

    2011-01-01

    An outer membrane protein (OMP) of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), P6, is a vaccine candidate because it has been characterized as conserved among all H. influenzae strains. Among 151 isolates from children, age 6 to 30 months, evaluating NTHi nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (OP) colonization and tympanocentesis confirmed acute otitis media we identified 14 strains (9.3%) that had variant protein sequences of P6. One atypical omp P6 isolate had sequence mutations in the binding site of a proposed major antigenic epitope of omp P6 identified by monoclonal antibody 7F3. Eight strains (5.3%) had non-homologous variations in amino acids that could result in significant changes to the protein structure of P6, and 5 other strains had amino acid substitutions at four previously described key residue sites. These results show that NTHi omp P6 is not invariant in its structure among respiratory isolates from children. PMID:21285530

  18. Cell vacuolation induced by Haemophilus influenzae supernatants in HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Arteaga-Garibay, Ramón I; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae belongs to respiratory tract microbiota. We observed vacuoles formation in previous studies with H. influenzae culture supernatants, so in this work we characterised that cytotoxic effect. We observed an abundant production of acidic cytoplasmic vacuoles due to the presence of a “vacuolating factor” in H. influenzae supernatants which was characterised as thermolabile. Greatest vacuolating activity was observed when utilizing the fraction > 50 kDa. The presence of a large number of vacuoles in HEp-2 cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy and some vacuoles were identified with a double membrane and/or being surrounded by ribosomes. These results suggest similar behaviour to that of vacuolating effects described by autotransporter proteins an undescribed cytotoxic effect induced by H. influenzae . PMID:24402145

  19. Effect of enrofloxacin in the carrier stage of Haemophilus parasuis in naturally colonized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Nubia; Rovira, Albert; Oliveira, Simone; Holtcamp, Andrew; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of enrofloxacin in the carrier stage of Haemophilus parasuis in naturally colonized weaned pigs. Twenty-three pigs colonized by H. parasuis received either 7.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) of enrofloxacin or a saline solution intramuscularly at weaning. Nasal and tonsillar swab samples were collected daily throughout the study and at necropsy and tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The H. parasuis isolates obtained from samples collected at necropsy were subjected to genotyping by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and a multiplex PCR for the detection of the virulence-associated trimeric autotransporter (vtaA) genes. Haemophilus parasuis was detected in the nasal cavity and tonsils of pigs in the control group throughout the study. Antibiotic-treated pigs tested negative for H. parasuis at 1 d post-treatment and the proportion of nasal samples that tested positive was higher for control pigs than for treated pigs at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 d post-treatment and at 2, 4, and 5 d post-treatment for tonsil samples (P < 0.003). Genotyping by ERIC-PCR demonstrated that pigs were colonized with a common H. parasuis strain at the end of the study. Isolates were negative for the vtaA gene, which indicates the absence of vtaA virulence factor. In conclusion, enrofloxacin significantly reduced the H. parasuis load in naturally colonized pigs, but was unable to completely eliminate the organism. PMID:24396176

  20. HrrF Is the Fur-Regulated Small RNA in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Harrison, Alistair; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth D.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; White, Peter; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are Gram-negative commensal bacteria that reside in the nasopharynx. NTHi can also cause multiple upper and lower respiratory tract diseases that include sinusitis, conjunctivitis, bronchitis, and otitis media. In numerous bacterial species the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) acts as a global regulator of iron homeostasis by negatively regulating the expression of iron uptake systems. However in NTHi strain 86-028NP and numerous other bacterial species there are multiple instances where Fur positively affects gene expression. It is known that many instances of positive regulation by Fur occur indirectly through a small RNA intermediate. However, no examples of small RNAs have been described in NTHi. Therefore we used RNA-Seq analysis to analyze the transcriptome of NTHi strain 86-028NPrpsL and an isogenic 86-028NPrpsLΔfur strain to identify Fur-regulated intergenic transcripts. From this analysis we identified HrrF, the first small RNA described in any Haemophilus species. Orthologues of this small RNA exist only among other Pasteurellaceae. Our analysis showed that HrrF is maximally expressed when iron levels are low. Additionally, Fur was shown to bind upstream of the hrrF promoter. RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify targets of HrrF which include genes whose products are involved in molybdate uptake, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. The stability of HrrF is not dependent on the RNA chaperone Hfq. This study is the first step in an effort to investigate the role small RNAs play in altering gene expression in response to iron limitation in NTHi. PMID:25157846

  1. Evolution of an autotransporter: domain shuffling and lateral transfer from pathogenic Haemophilus to Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Davis, J; Smith, A L; Hughes, W R; Golomb, M

    2001-08-01

    The genomes of pathogenic Haemophilus influenzae strains are larger than that of Rd KW20 (Rd), the nonpathogenic laboratory strain whose genome has been sequenced. To identify potential virulence genes, we examined genes possessed by Int1, an invasive nonencapsulated isolate from a meningitis patient, but absent from Rd. Int1 was found to have a novel gene termed lav, predicted to encode a member of the AIDA-I/VirG/PerT family of virulence-associated autotransporters (ATs). Associated with lav are multiple repeats of the tetranucleotide GCAA, implicated in translational phase variation of surface molecules. Laterally acquired by H. influenzae, lav is restricted in distribution to a few pathogenic strains, including H. influenzae biotype aegyptius and Brazilian purpuric fever isolates. The DNA sequence of lav is surprisingly similar to that of a gene previously described for Neisseria meningitidis. Sequence comparisons suggest that lav was transferred relatively recently from Haemophilus to Neisseria, shortly before the divergence of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Segments of lav predicted to encode passenger and beta-domains differ sharply in G+C base content, supporting the idea that AT genes have evolved by fusing domains which originated in different genomes. Homology and base sequence comparisons suggest that a novel biotype aegyptius AT arose by swapping an unrelated sequence for the passenger domain of lav. The unusually mobile lav locus joins a growing list of genes transferred from H. influenzae to Neisseria. Frequent gene exchange suggests a common pool of hypervariable contingency genes and may help to explain the origin of invasiveness in certain respiratory pathogens. PMID:11443098

  2. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E

    2015-11-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  3. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S.; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  4. Sequence analysis, expression, and binding activity of recombinant major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Fenno, J C; Müller, K H; McBride, B C

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding the major outer sheath protein (Msp) of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Preliminary sequence analysis showed that the 5' end of the msp gene was not present on the 5.5-kb cloned fragment described in a recent study (M. Haapasalo, K. H. Müller, V. J. Uitto, W. K. Leung, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 60:2058-2065,1992). The 5' end of msp was obtained by PCR amplification from a T. denticola genomic library, and an open reading frame of 1,629 bp was identified as the coding region for Msp by combining overlapping sequences. The deduced peptide consisted of 543 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 58,233 Da. The peptide had a typical prokaryotic signal sequence with a potential cleavage site for signal peptidase 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showing the msp transcript to be approximately 1.7 kb was consistent with the identification of a promoter consensus sequence located optimally upstream of msp and a transcription termination signal found downstream of the stop codon. The entire msp sequence was amplified from T. denticola genomic DNA and cloned in E. coli by using a tightly regulated T7 RNA polymerase vector system. Expression of Msp was toxic to E. coli when the entire msp gene was present. High levels of Msp were produced as inclusion bodies when the putative signal peptide sequence was deleted and replaced by a vector-encoded T7 peptide sequence. Recombinant Msp purified to homogeneity from a clone containing the full-length msp gene adhered to immobilized laminin and fibronectin but not to bovine serum albumin. Attachment of recombinant Msp was decreased in the presence of soluble substrate. Attachment of T. denticola to immobilized laminin and fibronectin was increased by pretreatment of the substrate with recombinant Msp. These studies lend further support to the hypothesis that Msp mediates the extracellular matrix binding activity of T. denticola. PMID

  5. Antibody and T Cell Responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in Health and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jieun; Kho, Sang-A; Choi, Yun S.; Kim, Yong C.; Rhyu, In-Chul; Choi, Youngnim

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris) and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9). The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA) were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA)- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:23335969

  6. Clinical Value of Treponema pallidum Real-Time PCR for Diagnosis of Syphilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Heymans, R.; van der Helm, J. J.; de Vries, H. J. C.; Fennema, H. S. A.; Coutinho, R. A.; Bruisten, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis can be complicated when it is based on diverse clinical manifestations, dark-field microscopy, and serology. In the present study, therefore, we examined the additional clinical value of a Treponema pallidum real-time TaqMan PCR for the detection of primary and secondary syphilis. The additional value of the T. pallidum real-time PCR for the diagnosis of primary syphilis was evaluated by the use of three different algorithms: (i) a head-to-head comparison of the dark-field microscopy result and the T. pallidum real-time PCR result, (ii) comparison of the clinical diagnosis made in a sexually transmitted infection clinic (STI) (including by dark-field microscopy) and the T. pallidum real-time PCR result, and (iii) comparison of the clinical diagnosis made in a general practitioner's office (without dark-field microscopy) and the T. pallidum real-time PCR result. A fourth algorithm was used to determine the performance of the T. pallidum real-time PCR regarding the detection of secondary syphilis. From December 2006 to April 2008, 716 patients with suspected cases of primary syphilis and 133 patients with suspected cases of secondary syphilis were included in the study. A kappa value of 0.601 was found for the agreement between dark-field microscopy and the T. pallidum real-time PCR. Good agreement was found between the T. pallidum real-time PCR and both the diagnosis of the general practitioner (kappa = 0.745) and the diagnosis of the STI clinic (kappa = 0.769). The sensitivity with respect to the STI clinic diagnosis was 72.8%, the specificity was 95.5%, the positive predictive value was 89.2%, and the negative predictive value was 95.0%. The T. pallidum real-time PCR is a fast, efficient, and reliable test for the diagnosis of primary syphilis in an STI outpatient clinic and a general practitioner setting, but it has no added diagnostic value for the diagnosis of secondary syphilis. PMID:20007388

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of a class B periplasmic-flagellum gene of Treponema phagedenis.

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, R J; Slivienski, L L; Yelton, D B; Charon, N W

    1992-01-01

    Treponema phagedenis is a host-associated spirochete with multiple polypeptides making up its periplasmic flagella (PFs). Each PF has a 39-kDa polypeptide making up the sheath (class A PF polypeptide) and two to four antigenically similar 33- to 34-kDa polypeptide species making up the core (class B PF polypeptides). A genetic analysis of the PF-deficient mutants T-40 and T-55 has shown that the PFs are involved in motility. To better understand the synthesis and assembly of these complex organelles and to compare the PF genes with those of other spirochetes, we cloned and characterized the T. phagedenis flaB2 gene, which encodes one class B polypeptide. The flaB2 gene consists of an open reading frame of 858 nucleotides capable of encoding a protein of 31.5 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of the FlaB2 polypeptide was 92% identical to that of T. pallidum FlaB2, with a 76% identity at the nucleotide level. These results confirm previous immunological and N-terminal-sequence analyses which suggested that the PF genes are well conserved in the spirochetes. Primer extension analysis of T. phagedenis flaB2 indicated that the start site of transcription was 127 nucleotides upstream from the ATG initiation codon. Preceding the start site is a DNA sequence similar to the sigma 28 consensus promoter sequence commonly found associated with motility genes. Northern (RNA) blots probed with a segment of flaB2 DNA revealed a 1,000-nucleotide monocistronic transcript in the wild type and in PF-deficient mutants T-40 and T-55. DNA sequencing of most of the flaB2 gene of the mutants revealed no differences from the wild-type gene. Because the mutants fail to synthesize detectable class B PF polypeptides yet synthesize extensive amounts of flaB2 mRNA, PF synthesis in T. phagedenis is likely to involve regulation at the translational level. Images PMID:1400192

  8. Western Immunoblotting with Five Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Sambri, Vittorio; Marangoni, Antonella; Eyer, Christina; Reichhuber, Christine; Soutschek, Erwin; Negosanti, Massimo; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Cevenini, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Five immunodominant Treponema pallidum recombinant polypeptides (rTpN47, rTmpA, rTpN37, rTpN17, and rTpN15) were blotted onto strips, and 450 sera (200 from blood donors, 200 from syphilis patients, and 50 potentially cross-reactive) were tested to evaluate the diagnostic performance of recombinant Western blotting (recWB) in comparison with in-house whole-cell lysate antigen-based immunoblotting (wclWB) and T. pallidum hemagglutination (MHA-TP) for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. None of the serum specimens from blood donors or from potential cross-reactors gave a positive result when evaluated by recWB, wclWB, or MHA-TP. The evaluation of the immunoglobulin G immune response by recWB in sera from patients with different stages of syphilis showed that rTmpA was the most frequently identified antigen (95%), whereas only 41% of the specimens were reactive to rTpN37. The remaining recombinant polypeptides were recognized as follows: rTpN47, 92.5%; rTpN17, 89.5%; and rTpN15, 67.5%. The agreement between recWB and MHA-TP was 95.0% (100% with sera from patients with latent and late disease), and the concordance between wclWB and MHA-TP was 92.0%. The overall concordance between recWB and wclWB was 97.5% (100% with sera from patients with secondary and late syphilis and 94.6 and 98.6% with sera from patients with primary and latent syphilis, respectively). The overall sensitivity of recWB was 98.8% and the specificity was 97.1% with MHA-TP as the reference method. These values for sensitivity and specificity were slightly superior to those calculated for wclWB (sensitivity, 97.1%, and specificity, 96.1%). With wclWB as the standard test, the sensitivity and specificity of recWB were 98.9 and 99.3%, respectively. These findings suggest that the five recombinant polypeptides used in this study could be used as substitutes for the whole-cell lysate T. pallidum antigens and that this newly developed recWB test is a good, easy-to-use confirmatory method for the

  9. Antimicrobial activity of rabbit leukocyte defensins against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, L A; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I; Miller, J N

    1991-04-01

    Defensins, which are peptides with broad antimicrobial activity, are major constituents of rabbit neutrophils and certain macrophages. We tested six rabbit defensins, NP-1, NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5, for activity against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Mixtures of T. pallidum and defensin in 10% normal rabbit serum (NRS) or heat-inactivated NRS (HI-NRS) were incubated anaerobically for various time periods ranging between 0 and 16 h and then examined by dark-field microscopy for treponemal motility or inoculated intradermally into rabbits to assess treponemal virulence. Immobilization of T. pallidum by NP-1 (400 micrograms/ml) occurred after 4 and 8 h of coincubation in mixtures containing NRS and HI-NRS, respectively. Similarly, neutralization of T. pallidum by NP-1 occurred more rapidly and was complete when incubations were performed in NRS as compared with that in HI-NRS. Endpoint titration confirmed the augmentation of NP-1 antitreponemal activity by heat-labile serum factors; NP-1 showed neutralizing activity at 4 micrograms/ml (about 1 microM) in NRS and at 40 micrograms/ml in HI-NRS. When NP-1 was tested in serum that was deficient in C6, the T. pallidum neutralizing activity of NP-1 was reduced to levels slightly greater than that observed in HI-NRS. NP-1 that had been reduced and alkylated was inactive against T. pallidum. When NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5 were tested at 400 micrograms/ml, all exerted potent treponemicidal activity, manifested by abrogation or delayed development of cutaneous lesions relative to that of controls. These data suggest that defensins may equip certain macrophages and neutrophils to participate in host defense against T. pallidum, that the direct activity of defensins against T. pallidum is enhanced by heat-labile serum factors (presumably complement), and that conformational factors influence the biological activity of the defensin molecule. PMID:2004816

  10. Characterization of the low-molecular-mass proteins of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Parrish, E A

    1994-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Treponema pallidum cells incubated in vitro in the presence of heat-inactivated normal rabbit serum (HINRS) synthesize, in very small quantities, several pathogen-specific, low-molecular-mass proteins that appear to be localized extracellularly. In this study, we have taken advantage of our ability to metabolically radiolabel T. pallidum cells to high specific activity to further characterize these antigens. We found that the low-molecular-mass proteins are not related to the 15- and 17-kDa detergent-phase proteins (J. D. Radolf, N. R. Chamberlain, A. Clausell, and M. V. Norgard, Infect. Immun. 56:490-498, 1988). The low-molecular-mass proteins did not incorporate 3H-labeled fatty acids and were not precipitated by rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies directed against glutathione S-transferase fusions to the nonlipidated 15- and 17-kDa proteins. We prepared polyclonal antisera to the low-molecular-mass proteins by immunizing two rabbits with the concentrated supernatant of T. pallidum cells. IgG antibodies present in the sera of both rabbits precipitated a 21.5-kDa protein from solubilized extracts of T. pallidum supernatant and cells. IgG antibodies in the serum of the second rabbit precipitated an additional 15.5-kDa low-molecular-mass protein only from solubilized extracts of supernatant. While investigating the effect of eliminating HINRS from the extraction medium, we observed that the low-molecular-mass proteins remained associated with treponemal cells that were incubated in the absence of HINRS. These proteins could be eluted from the cells by the addition of HINRS or rabbit serum albumin, suggesting that they are located on or near the treponemal cell surface. The 15.5- and 21.5-kDa low-molecular-mass proteins were not washed off treponemal cells with buffer containing 1 M KCl. Experiments employing selective solubilization of the T. pallidum outer membrane with 0.1% Triton X-114 and proteinase K accessibility indicated

  11. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  12. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-08-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  13. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  14. Case Report of Haemophilus parainfluenzae Sepsis in a Newborn Infant Following Water Birth and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Manu; Bober, Brittany; Eisenfeld, Leonard; Hussain, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    Water birth has grown in popularity over the recent years. Although beneficial for mothers, there are concerns for the infants. There are previous reports of infection following water birth. The information regarding infection with Haemophilus parainfluenzae is limited. We report a case of a neonate with H. parainfluenzae bacteremia following water birth. The child was successfully treated with both antibiotic and supportive care. Previous reports of neonatal H. parainfluenzae infection are reviewed. PMID:26495182

  15. The Association of Chronic Hepatitis C with Respiratory Microbiota Disturbance on the Basis of Decreased Haemophilus Spp. Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Biernasiuk, Anna; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Kiciak, Sławomir; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemophilus species are the most common microbiota in humans. The aim of this paper was to investigate Haemophilus spp., mainly H. parainfluenzae prevalence, in the upper respiratory tract of chronic hepatitis C (CHC-positive) patients with or without therapy using pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin. Material/Methods We collected 462 samples from 54 healthy people and 100 CHC-positive patients at various stages: before (group A), during (group B), and after (group C) antiviral therapy. Identification of bacterial isolates including biotypes and antimicrobials susceptibility was accomplished by means of standard microbiological methods. Results In 70.4% of healthy people (control group) and in 27.0% of CHC-positive patients, the presence of haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae was observed, and those differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Statistically significant differences in Haemophilus spp. colonization were also observed among healthy people and CHC-positive patients from group A (p=0.0012) and from B or C groups (p<0.0001). Resistance to ampicillin in beta-lactamase-positive isolates and multidrug resistance (MDR) of H. parainfluenzae was detected mainly in group A. Conclusions The obtained data suggest that chronic hepatitis C, together with antiviral therapy, may influence the respiratory tract microbiota composition as found using haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae. PMID:26912163

  16. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  17. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25883794

  18. The Association of Chronic Hepatitis C with Respiratory Microbiota Disturbance on the Basis of Decreased Haemophilus Spp. Colonization.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Urszula; Biernasiuk, Anna; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Kiciak, Sławomir; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Haemophilus species are the most common microbiota in humans. The aim of this paper was to investigate Haemophilus spp., mainly H. parainfluenzae prevalence, in the upper respiratory tract of chronic hepatitis C (CHC-positive) patients with or without therapy using pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin. MATERIAL AND METHODS We collected 462 samples from 54 healthy people and 100 CHC-positive patients at various stages: before (group A), during (group B), and after (group C) antiviral therapy. Identification of bacterial isolates including biotypes and antimicrobials susceptibility was accomplished by means of standard microbiological methods. RESULTS In 70.4% of healthy people (control group) and in 27.0% of CHC-positive patients, the presence of haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae was observed, and those differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Statistically significant differences in Haemophilus spp. colonization were also observed among healthy people and CHC-positive patients from group A (p=0.0012) and from B or C groups (p<0.0001). Resistance to ampicillin in beta-lactamase-positive isolates and multidrug resistance (MDR) of H. parainfluenzae was detected mainly in group A. CONCLUSIONS The obtained data suggest that chronic hepatitis C, together with antiviral therapy, may influence the respiratory tract microbiota composition as found using haemophili, mainly H. parainfluenzae. PMID:26912163

  19. Epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections in England and Wales in the pre-vaccination era (1990-2).

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, E. C.; Begg, N. T.; Crawshaw, S. C.; Hargreaves, R. M.; Howard, A. J.; Slack, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    This survey defined the pattern of invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections during 1990-2 in six regions in England and Wales during the pre-vaccination era providing a baseline against which any changes in patterns of disease due to the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination programme can be monitored. A total of 946 cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae were recorded during the survey period of which almost 90% were due to type b and most of the remainder were non-typeable. Type b infections occurred predominantly in children less than 5 years of age (88%) with the highest attack rate in male infants in the 6-11 month age group. Diagnostic category varied with both age and serotype; meningitis was the commonest presentation overall but pneumonia and bacteraemia were more common in adults and non-typeable isolates. Mortality was highest in neonates and the elderly (over 65 years of age) who were more likely to have an underlying predisposing condition than older children and adults. Children under 5 years of age had a higher case fatality rate for non-typeable than for type b infections. Ampicillin resistance was 15% and there were no cefotaxime resistant type b isolates. PMID:7641841

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of TP0435 (Tp17) from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the bacterial spirochete Treponema pallidum, remains a prominent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Despite sequencing of the genome of this obligate human pathogen 15 years ago, the functions of a large number of the gene products of T. pallidum are still unknown, particularly with respect to those of the organism’s periplasmic lipoproteins. To better understand their functions, a structural biology approach has been pursued. To this end, the soluble portion of the T. pallidum TP0435 lipoprotein (also known as Tp17) was cloned, hyper-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The protein crystals obtained from this preparation diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and had the symmetry of space group R3. In the hexagonal setting, the unit-cell parameters were a = b = 85.7, c = 85.4 Å. PMID:23545658

  1. Whole Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, Strain Mexico A, Suggests Recombination between Yaws and Syphilis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Zobaníková, Marie; Čejková, Darina; Mikalová, Lenka; Pospíšilová, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Chen, Lei; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M.; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), the causative agent of syphilis, and Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), the causative agent of yaws, are closely related spirochetes causing diseases with distinct clinical manifestations. The TPA Mexico A strain was isolated in 1953 from male, with primary syphilis, living in Mexico. Attempts to cultivate TPA Mexico A strain under in vitro conditions have revealed lower growth potential compared to other tested TPA strains. Methodology/Principal Findings The complete genome sequence of the TPA Mexico A strain was determined using the Illumina sequencing technique. The genome sequence assembly was verified using the whole genome fingerprinting technique and the final sequence was annotated. The genome size of the Mexico A strain was determined to be 1,140,038 bp with 1,035 predicted ORFs. The Mexico A genome sequence was compared to the whole genome sequences of three TPA (Nichols, SS14 and Chicago) and three TPE (CDC-2, Samoa D and Gauthier) strains. No large rearrangements in the Mexico A genome were found and the identified nucleotide changes occurred most frequently in genes encoding putative virulence factors. Nevertheless, the genome of the Mexico A strain, revealed two genes (TPAMA_0326 (tp92) and TPAMA_0488 (mcp2-1)) which combine TPA- and TPE- specific nucleotide sequences. Both genes were found to be under positive selection within TPA strains and also between TPA and TPE strains. Conclusions/Significance The observed mosaic character of the TPAMA_0326 and TPAMA_0488 loci is likely a result of inter-strain recombination between TPA and TPE strains during simultaneous infection of a single host suggesting horizontal gene transfer between treponemal subspecies. PMID:23029591

  2. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum during a Local Syphilis Epidemic in Men Who Have Sex with Men in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Norbert; Fyfe, Janet; Leslie, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection of significant public health importance. Since 2000 there has been a marked increase in the number of cases of syphilis infections notified in Victoria, Australia, with the majority of cases occurring in men who have sex with men (MSM) and the highest incidence being in HIV-infected MSM. The molecular subtyping method described by Pillay et al. (A. Pillay et al., Sex. Transm. Dis. 25:408–414, 1998) has been used in this study to determine the diversity of T. pallidum subtypes circulating locally and to look for any relationship between T. pallidum subtypes and HIV status over a 6-year period (2004 to 2009). Treponema pallidum DNA was detected in 303 patient specimens (n = 3,652), and full subtyping profiles were obtained from 90 of these (from 88 patients). A total of 11 T. pallidum subtypes were identified: types 14e (28, 31.1%), 14d (15, 16.7%), 14k (13, 14.4%), 14p (12, 13.3%), 14i (7, 7.8%) 14b (6, 6.7%), 14l (5, 5.6%), and 12i, 13b, 13i, and 13e (1 each, 1.1%). This study showed a similar level of variation among circulating T. pallidum strains compared with that in other studies using the same methodology. A different mix of strains and different predominating strains have been found at each geographical study location, with type 14e emerging as the predominant local strain in Victoria. There was no detectable trend between T. pallidum subtypes and the specimen collection site or stage of syphilis (where known), nor was there any relationship between particular strains and HIV status. PMID:22422857

  3. A Retrospective Study on Genetic Heterogeneity within Treponema Strains: Subpopulations Are Genetically Distinct in a Limited Number of Positions

    PubMed Central

    Čejková, Darina; Strouhal, Michal; Norris, Steven J.; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes comprise human and animal pathogens including agents of syphilis, yaws, bejel, pinta, and venereal spirochetosis in rabbits and hares. A set of 10 treponemal genome sequences including those of 4 Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA) strains (Nichols, DAL-1, Mexico A, SS14), 4 T. p. ssp. pertenue (TPE) strains (CDC-2, Gauthier, Samoa D, Fribourg-Blanc), 1 T. p. ssp. endemicum (TEN) strain (Bosnia A) and one strain (Cuniculi A) of Treponema paraluisleporidarum ecovar Cuniculus (TPLC) were examined with respect to the presence of nucleotide intrastrain heterogeneous sites. Methodology/Principal Findings The number of identified intrastrain heterogeneous sites in individual genomes ranged between 0 and 7. Altogether, 23 intrastrain heterogeneous sites (in 17 genes) were found in 5 out of 10 investigated treponemal genomes including TPA strains Nichols (n = 5), DAL-1 (n = 4), and SS14 (n = 7), TPE strain Samoa D (n = 1), and TEN strain Bosnia A (n = 5). Although only one heterogeneous site was identified among 4 tested TPE strains, 16 such sites were identified among 4 TPA strains. Heterogeneous sites were mostly strain-specific and were identified in four tpr genes (tprC, GI, I, K), in genes involved in bacterial motility and chemotaxis (fliI, cheC-fliY), in genes involved in cell structure (murC), translation (prfA), general and DNA metabolism (putative SAM dependent methyltransferase, topA), and in seven hypothetical genes. Conclusions/Significance Heterogeneous sites likely represent both the selection of adaptive changes during infection of the host as well as an ongoing diversifying evolutionary process. PMID:26436423

  4. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  5. The etiology of genital ulcer disease by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and relationship to HIV infection among patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Risbud, A; Chan-Tack, K; Gadkari, D; Gangakhedkar, R R; Shepherd, M E; Bollinger, R; Mehendale, S; Gaydos, C; Divekar, A; Rompalo, A; Quinn, T C

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of genital ulcer disease (GUD) and the relationship between GUD and HIV infection were investigated in 302 patients presenting to a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Pune, India, in a 3-month period in 1994. Swabs of each genital ulcer were tested for herpes simplex virus (HSV) antigen by enzyme immunoassay and processed in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for simultaneous detection of HSV, Treponema pallidum, and Haemophilus ducreyi. The seroprevalence of HIV in this series was 22.2%. Clinical diagnosis of GUD was undermined when HIV infection was present. The etiology of GUD according to M-PCR was HSV in 26%, chancroid in 23%, primary syphilis in 10%, and multiple infections in 7%; no etiology could be identified in the remaining 34% of cases. Attempts to differentiate the etiology of GUD based solely on clinical grounds resulted in many inaccurate diagnoses. Chancroid was the most common clinical diagnosis (40%), followed by HSV (24%), syphilis (20%), and multiple infections (3%). HIV seroprevalence was significantly higher in patients with HSV compared with other etiologies (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.7), presumably as a result of HIV-induced immunosuppression and consequent HSV reactivation. Until rapid, inexpensive, and sensitive assays become available, syndromic treatment with antibiotics should be provided to patients with GUD in order to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV infection. PMID:9918324

  6. Prevalence of Treponema pallidum DNA among blood donors with two different serologic tests profiles for syphilis in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S C; de Almeida-Neto, C; Nishiya, A S; Di-Lorenzo-Oliveira, C; Ferreira, J E; Alencar, C S; Levi, J E; Salles, N A; Mendrone-Junior, A; Sabino, E C

    2014-05-01

    The presence of Treponema pallidum DNA was assessed by real-time PCR in samples of blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis. Treponema pallidum DNA was detected in two (1·02%) of 197 samples of VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors, and in no sample from 80 VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors. Donors VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ lack demonstrable T. pallidum DNA in their blood and are unlike to transmit syphilis. Donors VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ carry the risk of syphilis infectivity even in concomitance to antibodies detection. Serologic screening for syphilis may still play a role to prevent its transfusion transmission. PMID:24877236

  7. Mutations in polI but not mutSLH destabilize Haemophilus influenzae tetranucleotide repeats.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Christopher D; van de Ven, Tamsin; Moxon, E Richard

    2002-03-15

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi), an obligate upper respiratory tract commensal/pathogen, uses phase variation (PV) to adapt to host environment changes. Switching occurs by slippage of nucleotide repeats (microsatellites) within genes coding for virulence molecules. Most such microsatellites in Hi are tetranucleotide repeats, but an exception is the dinucleotide repeats in the pilin locus. To investigate the effects on PV rates of mutations in genes for mismatch repair (MMR), insertion/deletion mutations of mutS, mutL, mutH, dam, polI, uvrD, mfd and recA were constructed in Hi strain Rd. Only inactivation of polI destabilized tetranucleotide (5'AGTC) repeat tracts of chromosomally located reporter constructs, whereas inactivation of mutS, but not polI, destabilized dinucleotide (5'AT) repeats. Deletions of repeats were predominant in polI mutants, which we propose are due to end-joining occurring without DNA polymerization during polI-deficient Okazaki fragment processing. The high prevalence of tetranucleotides mediating PV is an exceptional feature of the Hi genome. The refractoriness to MMR of hypermutation in Hi tetranucleotides facilitates adaptive switching without the deleterious increase in global mutation rates that accompanies a mutator genotype. PMID:11889052

  8. Population genetics and antibiotic susceptibility of invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Manitoba, Canada, from 2000 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Sill, Michelle L; Law, Dennis K S; Zhou, Jianwei; Skinner, Stuart; Wylie, John; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2007-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-two isolates of Haemophilus influenzae causing invasive disease were collected in Manitoba, Canada, from 2000 to 2006 and examined for serotype, biotype, sequence type (ST) by multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility. Nonserotypeable (NST) isolates accounted for over half of the isolates collected (69 isolates, 56.6%). There were 36 serotype a, five serotype b, two serotype c, one serotype d, four serotype e and five serotype f isolates collected. The 69 NST isolates were found to be very diverse, with isolates representing six biotypes and 45 STs. The serotypeable isolates were more clonal, with each of the serotypes showing little diversity in their biotypes and STs. Of the 122 isolates, 17% were resistant to ampicillin due to beta-lactamase production, 10.7% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 1.6% were resistant to clarithromycin, 2.5% were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and none was resistant to ciprofloxacin or moxifloxacin. Antibiotic resistance was more common in the NST strains, with 37.7% showing resistance to at least one antibiotic compared to 15% in the serotypeable strains. The results of this study suggest a shift in the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae infections in the post-Hib vaccine era, and surveillance should include all serotypeable and NST isolates. PMID:17922774

  9. Antisera Against Certain Conserved Surface-Exposed Peptides of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Are Protective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause significant disease, including otitis media in children, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and invasive disease in susceptible populations. No vaccine is currently available to prevent NTHi disease. The interactions of NTHi and the human host are primarily mediated by lipooligosaccharide and a complex array of surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) that act as receptors, sensors and secretion systems. We hypothesized that certain SEPs are present in all NTHi strains and that a subset of these may be antibody accessible and represent protective epitopes. Initially we used 15 genomic sequences available in the GenBank database along with an additional 11 genomic sequences generated by ourselves to identify the core set of putative SEPs present in all strains. Using bioinformatics, 56 core SEPs were identified. Molecular modeling generated putative structures of the SEPs from which potential surface exposed regions were defined. Synthetic peptides corresponding to ten of these highly conserved surface-exposed regions were used to raise antisera in rats. These antisera were used to assess passive protection in the infant rat model of invasive NTHi infection. Five of the antisera were protective, thus demonstrating their in vivo antibody accessibility. These five peptide regions represent potential targets for peptide vaccine candidates to protect against NTHi infection. PMID:26390432

  10. [Influenza outbreak in weaners with involvement of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Christine; Wöchtl, Bettina; Spergser, Joachim; Brunthaler, Rene; Untersperger, Matthias; Lillie-Jaschniski, Kathrin; Dürrwald, Ralf; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2016-08-17

    In a closed farrow-to-finish piglet producing farm 80% of 7-week-old piglets displayed respiratory disease with a 5% mortality rate. In addition to purulent bronchopneumonia in combination with interstitial pneumonia predominantly in the apical and middle lobes, fibrinous serositis was present in the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Further investigations succeeded in confirming the non-pandemic strain of porcine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) subtype H1avN1. The molecular genetic studies on Mycoplasma (M.) hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus were negative, whereas M. hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from serous membranes. The possible importance of the underrated M. hyorhinis as a cofactor for viral infections should be emphasized and we demonstrated that the cause of apical lobe pneumonia is not restricted to M. hyopneumoniae. Mother pigs had been vaccinated with an influenza vaccine covering the subtype H1avN1. Only 33% of the examined piglets had maternal antibodies in the 7th week of life. The difficulty of prophylaxis of infections by FLUAVsw in weaners due to lack of vaccine authorization for piglets before their 56th day is reflected by this observation. PMID:27273027

  11. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  12. Dynamics of Clarithromycin and Azithromycin Efficacies against Experimental Haemophilus influenzae Pulmonary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alder, J. D.; Ewing, P. J.; Nilius, A. M.; Mitten, M.; Tovcimak, A.; Oleksijew, A.; Jarvis, K.; Paige, L.; Tanaka, S. K. T.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of clarithromycin and azithromycin efficacy against pulmonary Haemophilus influenzae infection in rats were evaluated. Efficacy was measured by reduction in pulmonary H. influenzae burden on days 3 and 7 postinoculation. Clarithromycin therapy was effective on day 3 or 7 of therapy, while azithromycin was effective on day 7 but not on day 3 of therapy. Both macrolides produced marked efficacy against all six strains of H. influenzae tested, including four strains for which MICs were above the susceptible breakpoint (8 μg/ml) concentration of clarithromycin. The two macrolides demonstrated markedly different pharmacokinetic characteristics, with clarithromycin present in both blood and tissue, while azithromycin was concentrated primarily in tissue. During pulmonary infection in rats, H. influenzae was found in both intracellular locations and an extracellular location in the lung. Blood concentrations of clarithromycin and azithromycin approximated human pharmacokinetics, and the blood concentrations for either macrolide rarely exceeded MICs for H. influenzae. At dosages producing blood concentrations similar to values achieved clinically, clarithromycin produced efficacy on day 3 of therapy, while both clarithromycin and azithromycin were equally effective on day 7. The different dynamics of clarithromycin and azithromycin suggest that length of therapy should be considered as a key parameter in evaluations of drug efficacy. PMID:9736568

  13. Metatranscriptomics reveals metabolic adaptation and induction of virulence factors by Haemophilus parasuis during lung infection.

    PubMed

    Bello-Ortí, Bernardo; Howell, Kate J; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J; Aragon, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a common inhabitant of the upper respiratory tract of pigs, and the causative agent of Glässer's disease. This disease is characterized by polyserositis and arthritis, produced by the severe inflammation caused by the systemic spread of the bacterium. After an initial colonization of the upper respiratory tract, H. parasuis enters the lung during the early stages of pig infection. In order to study gene expression at this location, we sequenced the ex vivo and in vivo H. parasuis Nagasaki transcriptome in the lung using a metatranscriptomic approach. Comparison of gene expression under these conditions with that found in conventional plate culture showed generally reduced expression of genes associated with anabolic and catabolic pathways, coupled with up-regulation of membrane-related genes involved in carbon acquisition, iron binding and pathogenesis. Some of the up-regulated membrane genes, including ABC transporters, virulence-associated autotransporters (vtaAs) and several hypothetical proteins, were only present in virulent H. parasuis strains, highlighting their significance as markers of disease potential. Finally, the analysis also revealed the presence of numerous antisense transcripts with possible roles in gene regulation. In summary, this data sheds some light on the scarcely studied in vivo transcriptome of H. parasuis, revealing nutritional virulence as an adaptive strategy for host survival, besides induction of classical virulence factors. PMID:26395877

  14. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  15. Genome sequencing of disease and carriage isolates of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae identifies discrete population structure.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Matteo; Hood, Derek; Muzzi, Alessandro; Pickard, Derek J; Perkins, Tim; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Dougan, Gordon; Rappuoli, Rino; Moxon, E Richard; Soriani, Marco; Donati, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    One of the main hurdles for the development of an effective and broadly protective vaccine against nonencapsulated isolates of Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) lies in the genetic diversity of the species, which renders extremely difficult the identification of cross-protective candidate antigens. To assess whether a population structure of NTHi could be defined, we performed genome sequencing of a collection of diverse clinical isolates representative of both carriage and disease and of the diversity of the natural population. Analysis of the distribution of polymorphic sites in the core genome and of the composition of the accessory genome defined distinct evolutionary clades and supported a predominantly clonal evolution of NTHi, with the majority of genetic information transmitted vertically within lineages. A correlation between the population structure and the presence of selected surface-associated proteins and lipooligosaccharide structure, known to contribute to virulence, was found. This high-resolution, genome-based population structure of NTHi provides the foundation to obtain a better understanding, of NTHi adaptation to the host as well as its commensal and virulence behavior, that could facilitate intervention strategies against disease caused by this important human pathogen. PMID:24706866

  16. Characterization and Vaccine Potential of Outer Membrane Vesicles Produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structures has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria. PMID:26930282

  17. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27330052

  18. HtrA Is Important for Stress Resistance and Virulence in Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luhua; Li, Ying; Wen, Yiping; Lau, Gee W; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Ma, Xiaoping; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-08-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an opportunistic pathogen that causes Glässer's disease in swine, with polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. The high-temperature requirement A (HtrA)-like protease, which is involved in protein quality control, has been reported to be a virulence factor in many pathogens. In this study, we showed that HtrA of H. parasuis (HpHtrA) exhibited both chaperone and protease activities. Finally, nickel import ATP-binding protein (NikE), periplasmic dipeptide transport protein (DppA), and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) were identified as proteolytic substrates for HpHtrA. The protease activity reached its maximum at 40°C in a time-dependent manner. Disruption of the htrA gene from strain SC1401 affected tolerance to temperature stress and resistance to complement-mediated killing. Furthermore, increased autoagglutination and biofilm formation were detected in the htrA mutant. In addition, the htrA mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence in the murine model of infection. Together, these data demonstrate that HpHtrA plays an important role in the virulence of H. parasuis. PMID:27217419

  19. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD+ utilization pathway by dephosphorylating NMN to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases, which are nonspecific 5′-, 3′-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with NMN, 5′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, which explains the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, which is consistent with observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5′- and 3′-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme’s direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5′ substrates in an anti conformation and 3′ substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B and C acid phosphatases share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  20. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin. PMID:27188378

  1. Safety and Immunological Outcomes Following Human Inoculation With Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Patricia L.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Doern, Gary V.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Apicella, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) exclusively infects humans, causing significant numbers of upper respiratory tract infections. The goal of this study was to develop a safe experimental human model of NTHi nasopharyngeal colonization. Methods. A novel streptomycin-resistant strain of NTHi was developed, and 15 subjects were inoculated in an adaptive-design phase I trial to rapidly identify colonizing doses of NTHi. Bayesian analysis was used to estimate the human colonizing dose 50 and 90 (HCD50 and HCD90, respectively). Side effects and immunological responses to whole-cell sialylated NTHi were measured. Results. Nine subjects were colonized and tolerated colonization well. Immunological analyses demonstrated that 7 colonized subjects and 0 noncolonized subjects had a 4-fold rise in serum levels of immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin M, or immunoglobulin G. Preexisting immunity to whole-cell NTHi did not predict success or failure of colonization. Conclusions. The statistical design incorporated a slow escalation to higher dose levels. HCD50 and HCD90 Bayesian estimates were identified as approximately 2000 and 150 000 colony-forming units, respectively; credible interval estimates were broad. This study provides a potential platform for early proof of concept studies for NTHi vaccines, as well as a way to evaluate bacterial factors associated with colonization. PMID:23715660

  2. Characterization and vaccine potential of outer membrane vesicles produced by Haemophilus parasuis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCaig, William D.; Loving, Crystal L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Charbit, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the upper respiratory tract of swine and is capable of causing a systemic infection, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. H. parasuis isolates display a wide range of virulence and virulence factors are largely unknown. Commercial bacterins are often used to vaccinate swine against H. parasuis, though strain variability and lack of cross-reactivity can make this an ineffective means of protection. Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are spherical structures naturally released from the membrane of bacteria and OMV are often enriched in toxins, signaling molecules and other bacterial components. Examination of OMV structuresmore » has led to identification of virulence factors in a number of bacteria and they have been successfully used as subunit vaccines. We have isolated OMV from both virulent and avirulent strains of H. parasuis, have examined their protein content and assessed their ability to induce an immune response in the host. Lastly, vaccination with purified OMV derived from the virulent H. parasuis Nagasaki strain provided protection against challenge with a lethal dose of the bacteria.« less

  3. Major subtypes of invasive Haemophilus influenzae from 1983 to 1985 in Atlanta, Ga.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Pigott, N; Cochi, S L; Facklam, R R

    1990-01-01

    We compared outer membrane protein (OMP) patterns of Haemophilus influenzae isolated in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga., from July 1983 to June 1985. Of 74 randomly selected H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates (24% of the total number of H. influenzae, and 32% of the total number of H. influenzae serotype b, biotype I, isolates), 66 (89.2%) had the same OMP pattern. Of the remaining eight, five (6.7%) had an identical OMP pattern. The other three isolates had separate and distinct patterns. A greater diversity of OMP patterns was found with H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, and nonserotypeable H. influenzae. Of the 18 H. influenzae serotype b, biotype II, isolates (5.8% of the total number of H. influenzae isolates), 1 had an OMP pattern similar to that of the predominate biotype I OMP type, 6 (33% of the biotype II) had the same pattern, and 11 had heterogeneous patterns. Of the 19 recoverable, nonserotypeable biotype II isolates (6.8% of the total number of H. influenzae), 18 had different OMP patterns, and no pattern was similar to those observed with serotype b. These findings indicate that most H. influenzae strains isolated during this 2-year period were indistinguishable by serotype, biotype, or OMP patterns. Images PMID:2191007

  4. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence of the pilin gene from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Grass, S; Munson, R

    1991-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37 adheres to human buccal epithelial cells and exhibits mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human erythrocytes. An isogenic variant of this strain which was deficient in hemagglutination was isolated. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 22,000 was present in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel profile of sarcosyl-insoluble proteins from the hemagglutination-proficient strain but was absent from the profile of the isogenic hemagglutination-deficient variant. A monoclonal antibody which reacts with the hemagglutination-proficient isolate but not with the hemagglutination-deficient isolate has been characterized. This monoclonal antibody was employed in an affinity column for purification of the protein as well as to screen a genomic library for recombinant clones expressing the gene. Several clones which contained overlapping genomic fragments were identified by reaction with the monoclonal antibody. The gene for the 22-kDa protein was subcloned and sequenced. The gene for the type b pilin from H. influenzae type b strain MinnA was also cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the strain MinnA gene was identical to that reported previously for two other type b strains. The DNA sequence of the strain M37 gene is 77% identical to that of the type b pilin gene, and the derived amino acid sequence is 68% identical to that of the type b pilin. Images PMID:1673447

  5. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f Case Reports in Mazovia Province, Poland.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Anna; Kuch, Alicja; Gawrońska, Agnieszka; Albrecht, Piotr; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kutylowska, Ewa; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    After successful introduction of anti-Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) serotype b vaccination program in Poland, invasive non-b or nontypeable H. influenzae infections have been reported more frequently alike in other countries all over the world. In this paper, we report 2 cases of H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) meningitis with severe clinical presentations which are rarely seen in previously healthy children.The first case is a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to pediatric ward with signs of meningitis. Laboratory tests confirmed bacteremic meningitis caused by Hif. The girl responded very well to administered treatment and recovered without any further complications. No underlying comorbidities were found. The second patient was a 4-year-old boy who, in course of Hif bacteremic meningitis, developed rapid septicemia and, despite aggressive treatment, died within a few hours of hospitalization. The child's past history was unremarkable.By presenting these cases, we would like to remind clinicians that invasive non-b Hi infections can become fatal not only in the group of the youngest children or children with coexisting comorbidities, as most commonly reported in the worldwide literature. At the same time, we want to emphasize the legitimacy of constant monitoring Hi epidemiology in order to take accurate actions if necessary. PMID:26844500

  6. Haemophilus influenzae increases the susceptibility and inflammatory response of airway epithelial cells to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gulraiz, Fahad; Bellinghausen, Carla; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), a common colonizer of lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), can enhance expression of the cellular receptor intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), which in turn can be used by major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs) for attachment. Here, we evaluated the effect of NTHI-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 on viral replication and inflammatory responses toward different respiratory viruses. Therefore, human bronchial epithelial cells were pretreated with heat-inactivated NTHI (hi-NTHI) and subsequently infected with either HRV16 (major group), HRV1B (minor group), or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pretreatment with hi-NTHI significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 in BEAS-2B cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells. Concomitantly, release of infectious HRV16 particles was increased in cells pretreated with hi-NTHI. Pretreatment with hi-NTHI also caused a significant increase in HRV16 RNA, whereas replication of HRV1B and RSV were increased to a far lesser extent and only at later time points. Interestingly, release of IL-6 and IL-8 after RSV, but not HRV, infection was synergistically increased in hi-NTHI-pretreated BEAS-2B cells. In summary, exposure to hi-NTHI significantly enhanced sensitivity toward HRV16 but not HRV1B or RSV, probably through ICAM-1 up-regulation. Furthermore, hi-NTHI pretreatment may enhance the inflammatory response to RSV infection, suggesting that preexisting bacterial infections might exaggerate inflammation during secondary viral infection. PMID:25411435

  7. Loss of plasmids containing cloned inserts coding for novobiocin resistance or novobiocin sensitivity in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Spikes, D; Ledbetter, M

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids pNov1 and pNov1s , coding for resistance and sensitivity to novobiocin, respectively, were readily lost from wild-type Haemophilus influenzae but retained in a strain lacking an inducible defective prophage. The plasmid loss could be partly or wholly eliminated by a low-copy-number mutation in the plasmid or by the presence of certain antibiotic resistance markers in the host chromosome. Release of both phage HP1c1 , measured by plaque assay, and defective phage, measured by electron microscopy, was increased when the plasmids were present. The frequency of recombination between pNov1 and the chromosome, causing the plasmid to be converted to pNov1s , could under some circumstances be decreased from the normal 60 to 70% to below 10% by the presence of a kanamycin resistance marker in the chromosome. This suggested that a gene product coded for by the plasmid, the expression of which was affected by the kanamycin resistance marker, was responsible for the high recombination frequency. Evidence was obtained from in vitro experiments that the gene product was a gyrase. Images PMID:6327644

  8. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  9. Intranasal Immunization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Vesicles Induces Cross-Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feldman, Mario F.; Krohne, Georg; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that can act as a commensal and a pathogen of the respiratory tract. Especially nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is a major threat to public health and is responsible for several infectious diseases in humans, such as pneumonia, sinusitis, and otitis media. Additionally, NTHi strains are highly associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against NTHi commercially available. Thus, this study investigated the utilization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a potential vaccine candidate against NTHi infections. We analyzed the immunogenic and protective properties of OMVs derived from various NTHi strains by means of nasopharyngeal immunization and colonization studies with BALB/c mice. The results presented herein demonstrate that an intranasal immunization with NTHi OMVs results in a robust and complex humoral and mucosal immune response. Immunoprecipitation revealed the most important immunogenic proteins, such as the heme utilization protein, protective surface antigen D15, heme binding protein A, and the outer membrane proteins P1, P2, P5 and P6. The induced immune response conferred not only protection against colonization with a homologous NTHi strain, which served as an OMV donor for the immunization mixtures, but also against a heterologous NTHi strain, whose OMVs were not part of the immunization mixtures. These findings indicate that OMVs derived from NTHi strains have a high potential to act as a vaccine against NTHi infections. PMID:22880074

  10. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  11. Ampicillin resistance of invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates in Germany 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Lâm, Thiên-Trí; Claus, Heike; Elias, Johannes; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    In this retrospective study covering a four-year observation period (2009-2012) the prevalence of aminopenicillin resistance of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) in Germany was analyzed. The main resistance mechanism against aminopenicillins is conferred by β-lactamase production, which can be inhibited by clavulanate or sulbactam. Apart from that, β-lactamase negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) has been reported due to mutations in the penicillin-binding protein PBP3. The prevalence of BLNAR varies considerably in different countries. Representative data from Germany have not been reported. We analyzed 704 culture positive cases with bacteraemia or detection of Hi in cerebrospinal fluid; 82 isolates (11.6%) were phenotypically resistant to ampicillin. Among these isolates, 65 (79.3%) showed β-lactamase production, and 17 isolates (20.7%) were phenotypic BLNAR Hi. The proportion of ampicillin resistant isolates remained stable over the observation period. Analysis of the PBP3 sequences of 133 isolates with different susceptibility phenotypes including susceptible, BLNAR, and β-lactamase positive isolates, revealed a high genetic diversity. Previously described PBP3 mutations were associated to elevated MIC values, albeit not exclusively, since few highly susceptible strains were found to be positive for the mutations. Furthermore, since ampicillin susceptible strains with elevated MIC values frequently harboured these mutations, prediction of the resistance phenotype using ftsI sequencing appears to be impossible. PMID:26321008

  12. SAFETY OF A CRM197-CONJUGATED HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B VACCINE IN KOREAN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyoyoung; Bock, Hans; Guadagno, Alana; Costantini, Marco; Baehner, Frank; Kim, Yeon Ho; Ahn, Seung In; Son, Ki Hyuk; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of meningitis and pneumonia with high morbidity and mortality rates in young children. The introduction of effective and well-tolerated conjugate Hib vaccines, has nearly eradicated this disease in many countries. We investigated the safety of the Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine in a multi-center post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study. Korean children (N = 764) aged 1-33 months were enrolled when receiving a routine primary immunization or a booster vaccine with Hib PRP-CRM197 and solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded using a diary card for 7 and 28 days after each vaccination, respectively. In this study, AEs were reported by 66% of subjects but were generally mild, with 42% of subjects reporting solicited AEs and 46% reporting unsolicited AEs. Among the unsolicited AEs, 98% were determined to be unrelated to the study vaccine. The studied Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine was well tolerated by the study group and found to have a similar safety profile to that reported in other clinical studies. This vaccine is suitable for routine immunization against Hib disease among Korean children. AEs due to this vaccine will continue to be monitored. PMID:26867395

  13. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Brockman, Kenneth L; Clark, Tyson A; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M; Jen, Freda E-C; McEwan, Alastair G; Grimmond, Sean M; Smith, Arnold L; Barenkamp, Stephen J; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N(6)-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  14. A biphasic epigenetic switch controls immunoevasion, virulence and niche adaptation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Fox, Kate L.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Brockman, Kenneth L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Boitano, Matthew; Power, Peter M.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Smith, Arnold L.; Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Korlach, Jonas; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contains an N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (ModA) that is subject to phase-variable expression (random ON/OFF switching). Five modA alleles, modA2, modA4, modA5, modA9 and modA10, account for over two-thirds of clinical otitis media isolates surveyed. Here, we use single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis to identify the DNA-recognition motifs for all five of these modA alleles. Phase variation of these alleles regulates multiple proteins including vaccine candidates, and key virulence phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance (modA2, modA5, modA10), biofilm formation (modA2) and immunoevasion (modA4). Analyses of a modA2 strain in the chinchilla model of otitis media show a clear selection for ON switching of modA2 in the middle ear. Our results indicate that a biphasic epigenetic switch can control bacterial virulence, immunoevasion and niche adaptation in an animal model system. PMID:26215614

  15. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:25368297

  16. [Relationship between protein binding and antimicrobial activities of antibiotics against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    Fifty isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 42 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from the blood of children admitted to pediatric wards of hospitals in subprefucture between January 1998 and December 2005. The susceptibilities were measured by a microbroth dilution method using a standard broth and a broth containing 4.5% albumin. Against S. pneumoniae, penicillin G, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, vancomycin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used and against H. influenzae, ampicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid/ amoxicillin, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, faropenem and tebipenem were used. Against S. pneumoniae, tebipenem was the highest antimicrobial activity in oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and panipenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.12 microg/ml). Against H. influenzae, cefditoren was the highest activity for oral antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 0.06 microg/ml) and meropenem showed the highest activity for intravenous antibiotics (MIC90; < or = 50.06 microg/ml). The MIC90s measured by albumin containing broth were higher than those measured by standard broth. Protein binding rates of ceftriaxone, cefditoren, and faropenem were greater than 90%, and the MIC90 of these antibiotics measured by albumin addition methods were over 4-fold higher than those measured by standard methods. PMID:17180806

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Causing Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Calatayud, Laura; Martí, Sara; Tubau, Fe; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen which causes a variety of respiratory infections. The objectives of the study were to determine its antimicrobial susceptibility, to characterize the β-lactam resistance, and to establish a genetic characterization of NTHi isolates. Ninety-five NTHi isolates were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by microdilution, and the ftsI gene (encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, PBP3) was PCR amplified and sequenced. Thirty (31.6%) isolates were non-susceptible to ampicillin (MIC≥2 mg/L), with 10 of them producing β-lactamase type TEM-1 as a resistance mechanism. After ftsI sequencing, 39 (41.1%) isolates showed amino acid substitutions in PBP3, with Asn526→ Lys being the most common (69.2%). Eighty-four patients were successfully treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin. Eight patients died due either to aspiration or complication of their comorbidities. In conclusion, NTHi causing CAP in adults shows high genetic diversity and is associated with a high rate of reduced susceptibility to ampicillin due to alterations in PBP3. The analysis of treatment and outcomes demonstrated that NTHi strains with mutations in the ftsI gene could be successfully treated with ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones. PMID:24349303

  18. Characterization of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae collected from respiratory infections and invasive disease cases in Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    Shuel, Michelle; Law, Dennis; Skinner, Stuart; Wylie, John; Karlowsky, James; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2010-03-01

    With the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccine, invasive Hib disease has decreased substantially, but nontypeable H. influenzae (NT Hi) disease appears to be increasing. In order to understand the origin of NT Hi strains and their relationship with serotypeable strains, we analysed 125 NT Hi isolates collected from individual patients with either invasive disease (70 isolates) or respiratory tract infections (55 isolates). Serotype-specific and capsular transport genes were absent by PCR analysis, confirming their nonencapsulated status, which also suggested the NT Hi isolates were not encapsulated strains that shed their capsules. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed the NT Hi isolates did not have the same genetic background as serotypeable strains, including Hib. Despite the genetic heterogeneity found, two major genetic clusters were identified, both containing invasive and respiratory isolates. Fourteen invasive isolates and nine respiratory isolates produced beta-lactamase and were ampicillin resistant. More invasive (26.8%) than respiratory isolates (10.9%) showed decreased susceptibility towards ampicillin by a mechanism unrelated to beta-lactamase production. Besides a change in the capsule status of invasive Hi strains, the burden of invasive Hi disease, which used to be mainly a childhood disease, has now shifted to involve both adults and infants. PMID:20041949

  19. HtrA Is Important for Stress Resistance and Virulence in Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luhua; Li, Ying; Wen, Yiping; Lau, Gee W.; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Ma, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an opportunistic pathogen that causes Glässer's disease in swine, with polyserositis, meningitis, and arthritis. The high-temperature requirement A (HtrA)-like protease, which is involved in protein quality control, has been reported to be a virulence factor in many pathogens. In this study, we showed that HtrA of H. parasuis (HpHtrA) exhibited both chaperone and protease activities. Finally, nickel import ATP-binding protein (NikE), periplasmic dipeptide transport protein (DppA), and outer membrane protein A (OmpA) were identified as proteolytic substrates for HpHtrA. The protease activity reached its maximum at 40°C in a time-dependent manner. Disruption of the htrA gene from strain SC1401 affected tolerance to temperature stress and resistance to complement-mediated killing. Furthermore, increased autoagglutination and biofilm formation were detected in the htrA mutant. In addition, the htrA mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence in the murine model of infection. Together, these data demonstrate that HpHtrA plays an important role in the virulence of H. parasuis. PMID:27217419

  20. Lower airway colonization and inflammatory response in COPD: a focus on Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Lydia J; Ritchie, Andrew; Pollard, Elizabeth; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common both in stable patients and during acute exacerbations. The most frequent bacteria detected in COPD patients is Haemophilus influenzae, and it appears this organism is uniquely adapted to exploit immune deficiencies associated with COPD and to establish persistent infection in the lower respiratory tract. The presence of bacteria in the lower respiratory tract in stable COPD is termed colonization; however, there is increasing evidence that this is not an innocuous phenomenon but is associated with airway inflammation, increased symptoms, and increased risk for exacerbations. In this review, we discuss host immunity that offers protection against H. influenzae and how disturbance of these mechanisms, combined with pathogen mechanisms of immune evasion, promote persistence of H. influenzae in the lower airways in COPD. In addition, we examine the role of H. influenzae in COPD exacerbations, as well as interactions between H. influenzae and respiratory virus infections, and review the role of treatments and their effect on COPD outcomes. This review focuses predominantly on data derived from human studies but will refer to animal studies where they contribute to understanding the disease in humans. PMID:25342897

  1. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  2. Combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines for primary immunisation.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, F; Martin, A; Blondeau, C; Thornton, C; Chaplais, J; Finn, A

    1996-01-01

    A total of 146 infants were immunised at ages 2, 3, and 4 months with a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTP)--Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine (Pasteur Merieux) to assess the antibody response and adverse events associated with immunisation. Adverse events, including fever, were recorded by parents in a diary for three days following each injection. Blood was taken before the first immunisation and four weeks after the third immunisation to assess antibody response. Data were compared with those from historical controls who had received DTP and PRP-T vaccines by separate injection. The combined vaccine was well tolerated. Rates of local and general reactions were similar to those reported for infants immunised by separate injection. All infants achieved protective antibody titres (> 0.01 IU/ml) for diphtheria and tetanus; 98% acquired Hib (PRP) antibody > 0.15 microgram/ml and 82.5% > 1.0 microgram/ml. Pertussis antibody titres (pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, total agglutinins, and agglutinins 2 and 3) showed appreciable rise following immunisation. DTP and PRP-T vaccines provide similar antibody responses and adverse effects whether mixed in the same syringe or administered by separate injection. The vaccines could be combined for use in the United Kingdom primary immunisation schedule. PMID:8984914

  3. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal. PMID:25547799

  4. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Scherer, S; van Leeuwen, W; Willemse, D; van Alphen, L; Verbrugh, H

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide repeats were identified, confirming and extending previous findings on the existence of variable-number-of-tandem-repeat loci (VNTRs). Repeats with units of 7 or 8 nucleotides were not encountered. For all of the 3- to 6-nucleotide repeats in the H. influenzae chromosome, PCR tests capable of detecting allelic polymorphisms were designed. Fourteen of 18 of the potential VNTRs were indeed highly polymorphic when different strains were screened. Two of the potential VNTRs appeared to be short and homogeneous in length; another one may be specific for the H. influenzae Rd strain only. One of the primer sets generated fingerprint-type DNA banding patterns. The various repeat types differed with respect to intrinsic stability as well. It was noted for separate colonies derived from a single clinical specimen or strains passaged for several weeks on chocolate agar plates that the lengths of the VNTRs did not change. When several strains from different patients infected during an outbreak of lung disease were analyzed, increased but limited variation was encountered in all VNTR sites analyzed. One of the 5-nucleotide VNTRs proved to be hypervariable. This variability may reflect the molecular basis of a mechanism used by H. influenzae bacteria to successfully colonize and infect different human individuals. PMID:9393791

  5. Extensive Cotransformation of Natural Variation into Chromosomes of Naturally Competent Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Lee, Jae Yun; Firme, Marlo; Sinha, Sunita; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally competent bacterial species actively take up environmental DNA and can incorporate it into their chromosomes by homologous recombination. This can bring genetic variation from environmental DNA to recipient chromosomes, often in multiple long “donor” segments. Here, we report the results of genome sequencing 96 colonies of a laboratory Haemophilus influenzae strain, which had been experimentally transformed by DNA from a diverged clinical isolate. Donor segments averaged 6.9 kb (spanning several genes) and were clustered into recombination tracts of ~19.5 kb. Individual colonies had replaced from 0.1 to 3.2% of their chromosomes, and ~1/3 of all donor-specific single-nucleotide variants were present in at least one recombinant. We found that nucleotide divergence did not obviously limit the locations of recombination tracts, although there were small but significant reductions in divergence at recombination breakpoints. Although indels occasionally transformed as parts of longer recombination tracts, they were common at breakpoints, suggesting that indels typically block progression of strand exchange. Some colonies had recombination tracts in which variant positions contained mixtures of both donor and recipient alleles. These tracts were clustered around the origin of replication and were interpreted as the result of heteroduplex segregation in the original transformed cell. Finally, a pilot experiment demonstrated the utility of natural transformation for genetically dissecting natural phenotypic variation. We discuss our results in the context of the potential to merge experimental and population genetic approaches, giving a more holistic understanding of bacterial gene transfer. PMID:24569039

  6. Structural basis for haem piracy from host haemopexin by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Zambolin, Silvia; Clantin, Bernard; Chami, Mohamed; Hoos, Sylviane; Haouz, Ahmed; Villeret, Vincent; Delepelaire, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an obligate human commensal/pathogen that requires haem for survival and can acquire it from several host haemoproteins, including haemopexin. The haem transport system from haem-haemopexin consists of HxuC, a haem receptor, and the two-partner-secretion system HxuB/HxuA. HxuA, which is exposed at the cell surface, is strictly required for haem acquisition from haemopexin. HxuA forms complexes with haem-haemopexin, leading to haem release and its capture by HxuC. The key question is how HxuA liberates haem from haemopexin. Here, we solve crystal structures of HxuA alone, and HxuA in complex with the N-terminal domain of haemopexin. A rational basis for the release of haem from haem-haemopexin is derived from both in vivo and in vitro studies. HxuA acts as a wedge that destabilizes the two-domains structure of haemopexin with a mobile loop on HxuA that favours haem ejection by redirecting key residues in the haem-binding pocket of haemopexin. PMID:27188378

  7. Extensive cotransformation of natural variation into chromosomes of naturally competent Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Lee, Jae Yun; Firme, Marlo; Sinha, Sunita; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2014-04-01

    Naturally competent bacterial species actively take up environmental DNA and can incorporate it into their chromosomes by homologous recombination. This can bring genetic variation from environmental DNA to recipient chromosomes, often in multiple long "donor" segments. Here, we report the results of genome sequencing 96 colonies of a laboratory Haemophilus influenzae strain, which had been experimentally transformed by DNA from a diverged clinical isolate. Donor segments averaged 6.9 kb (spanning several genes) and were clustered into recombination tracts of ~19.5 kb. Individual colonies had replaced from 0.1 to 3.2% of their chromosomes, and ~1/3 of all donor-specific single-nucleotide variants were present in at least one recombinant. We found that nucleotide divergence did not obviously limit the locations of recombination tracts, although there were small but significant reductions in divergence at recombination breakpoints. Although indels occasionally transformed as parts of longer recombination tracts, they were common at breakpoints, suggesting that indels typically block progression of strand exchange. Some colonies had recombination tracts in which variant positions contained mixtures of both donor and recipient alleles. These tracts were clustered around the origin of replication and were interpreted as the result of heteroduplex segregation in the original transformed cell. Finally, a pilot experiment demonstrated the utility of natural transformation for genetically dissecting natural phenotypic variation. We discuss our results in the context of the potential to merge experimental and population genetic approaches, giving a more holistic understanding of bacterial gene transfer. PMID:24569039

  8. The antibacterial activity and action mechanism of emodin from Polygonum cuspidatum against Haemophilus parasuis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Li, Zhengwen; Zhou, Xun; Zou, Yuanfeng; Li, Lixia; Yin, Lizi; Yue, Guizhou; Ye, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Shi, Wenjing; Fu, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, which leads to serious economic loss to the swine industry. Although antibiotics are widely used to control infections, outbreaks of this disease repeatedly happen. In this study, emodin from Polygonum cuspidatum showed potent inhibitory effect against H. parasuis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of emodin were 32 and 64μg/mL, respectively. The antibacterial kinetic curves indicated the antibacterial activity of emodin was in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell membrane permeability and flow cytometry assays proved that emodin could destroy cell membrane integrity and increase membrane permeability, and fluorescence spectra assay indicated emodin has influenced conformation of membrane protein. Under transmission electron microscopy, serious lesions of H. parasuis exposed to emodin (64μg/mL) were found, including irregular cell shape, plasmolysis, ruptured cell wall and membrane and cytoplasmic vacuolation. These results suggested that emodin could be used as candidate for treating Glässer's disease. PMID:27242151

  9. Haemophilus influenzae pili are composite structures assembled via the HifB chaperone.

    PubMed Central

    St Geme, J W; Pinkner, J S; Krasan, G P; Heuser, J; Bullitt, E; Smith, A L; Hultgren, S J

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative bacterium that represents a common cause of human disease. Disease due to this organism begins with colonization of the upper respiratory mucosa, a process facilitated by adhesive fibers called pili. In the present study, we investigated the structure and assembly of H. influenzae pili. Examination of pili by electron microscopy using quick-freeze, deep-etch and immunogold techniques revealed the presence of two distinct subassemblies, including a flexible two-stranded helical rod comprised of HifA and a short, thin, distal tip structure containing HifD. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrated that the biogenesis of H. influenzae pili is dependent on a periplasmic chaperone called HifB, which belongs to the PapD family of immunoglobulin-like chaperones. HifB bound directly to HifA and HifD, forming HifB-HifA and HifB-HifD complexes, which were purified from periplasmic extracts by ion-exchange chromatography. Continued investigation of the biogenesis of H. influenzae pili should provide general insights into organelle development and may suggest novel strategies for disease prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8876237

  10. Sap Transporter Mediated Import and Subsequent Degradation of Antimicrobial Peptides in Haemophilus

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Catherine L.; Raffel, Forrest K.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Johnson, Sara M.; Mason, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) contribute to host innate immune defense and are a critical component to control bacterial infection. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is a commensal inhabitant of the human nasopharyngeal mucosa, yet is commonly associated with opportunistic infections of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. An important aspect of NTHI virulence is the ability to avert bactericidal effects of host-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The Sap (sensitivity to antimicrobial peptides) ABC transporter equips NTHI to resist AMPs, although the mechanism of this resistance has remained undefined. We previously determined that the periplasmic binding protein SapA bound AMPs and was required for NTHI virulence in vivo. We now demonstrate, by antibody-mediated neutralization of AMP in vivo, that SapA functions to directly counter AMP lethality during NTHI infection. We hypothesized that SapA would deliver AMPs to the Sap inner membrane complex for transport into the bacterial cytoplasm. We observed that AMPs localize to the bacterial cytoplasm of the parental NTHI strain and were susceptible to cytoplasmic peptidase activity. In striking contrast, AMPs accumulated in the periplasm of bacteria lacking a functional Sap permease complex. These data support a mechanism of Sap mediated import of AMPs, a novel strategy to reduce periplasmic and inner membrane accumulation of these host defense peptides. PMID:22072973

  11. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  12. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  13. Use of a proposed antimicrobial susceptibility testing method for Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Dayao, Denise Ann E; Kienzle, Marco; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2014-08-27

    The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 97 Haemophilus parasuis cultured from Australian pigs. As there is no existing standard antimicrobial susceptibility technique available for H. parasuis, methods utilising the supplemented media, BA/SN for disc diffusion and test medium broth (TMB) for a microdilution technique, were initially evaluated with the reference strains recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The results of the media evaluation suggested that BA/SN and TMB can be used as suitable media for susceptibility testing of H. parasuis. The proposed microdilution technique was then used with 97 H. parasuis isolates and nine antimicrobial agents. The study found that Australian isolates showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin (1%), penicillin (2%), erythromycin (7%), tulathromycin (9%), tilmicosin (22%), tetracycline (31%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (40%). This study has described potential antimicrobial susceptibility methods for H. parasuis and has detected a low percentage of Australian H. parasuis isolates with elevated antimicrobial MICs. PMID:24984947

  14. ERIC-PCR genotypic characterization of Haemophilus parasuis isolated from Brazilian swine.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Castilla, Karina Salvagni; de Gobbi, Débora Dirani Sena; Coutinho, Tania Alen; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2011-10-01

    Haemophilus parasuis infection, known as Glässer's disease, is characterized by fibrinous polyserositis, arthritis and meningitis in piglets. Although traditional diagnosis is based on herd history, clinical signs, bacterial isolation and serotyping, the molecular-based methods are alternatives for species-specific tests and epidemiologic study. The aim of this study was to characterize H. parasuis strains isolated from different states of Brazil by serotyping, PCR and ERIC-PCR. Serotyping revealed serovar 4 as the most prevalent (24 %), followed by serovars 14 (14 %), 5 (12 %), 13 (8 %) and 2 (2 %), whereas 40 % of the strains were considered as non-typeable. From 50 strains tested 43 (86%) were positive to Group 1 vtaA gene that have been related to virulent strains of H.parasuis. ERIC-PCR was able to type isolates tested among 23 different patterns, including non-typeable strains. ERIC-PCR patterns were very heterogeneous and presented high similarity between strains of the same animal or farm origin. The results indicated ERIC-PCR as a valuable tool for typing H. parasuis isolates collected in Brazil. PMID:24031772

  15. Performance of the 47-kilodalton membrane protein versus DNA polymerase I genes for detection of Treponema pallidum by PCR in ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Laurent, Frédéric; Schrenzel, Jacques; Charton, Béatrice; Jimenez-Getaz, Gisela; Tangomo, Manuela; Ferry, Tristan; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Cavassini, Matthias; Emonet, Stéphane; Perneger, Thomas; Salord, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) is a direct diagnostic method for primary and secondary syphilis, but there is no recommendation regarding the best choice of target gene. In this study, we sequentially tested 272 specimens from patients with sexually transmitted ulcers using Tp-PCR targeting the tpp47 and then polA genes. The two methods showed similar accuracies and an almost-perfect agreement. PMID:25520453

  16. Performance of the 47-Kilodalton Membrane Protein versus DNA Polymerase I Genes for Detection of Treponema pallidum by PCR in Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frédéric; Schrenzel, Jacques; Charton, Béatrice; Jimenez-Getaz, Gisela; Tangomo, Manuela; Ferry, Tristan; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Cavassini, Matthias; Emonet, Stéphane; Perneger, Thomas; Salord, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) is a direct diagnostic method for primary and secondary syphilis, but there is no recommendation regarding the best choice of target gene. In this study, we sequentially tested 272 specimens from patients with sexually transmitted ulcers using Tp-PCR targeting the tpp47 and then polA genes. The two methods showed similar accuracies and an almost-perfect agreement. PMID:25520453

  17. First Report of the 23S rRNA Gene A2058G Point Mutation Associated With Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum From Syphilis Patients in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Noda, Angel A; Matos, Nelvis; Blanco, Orestes; Rodríguez, Islay; Stamm, Lola Virginia

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the presence of macrolide-resistant Treponema pallidum subtypes in Havana, Cuba. Samples from 41 syphilis patients were tested for T. pallidum 23S rRNA gene mutations. Twenty-five patients (61%) harbored T. pallidum with the A2058G mutation, which was present in all 8 subtypes that were identified. The A2059G mutation was not detected. PMID:27100771

  18. Discovery of Bovine Digital Dermatitis-Associated Treponema spp. in the Dairy Herd Environment by a Targeted Deep-Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Martin W.; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim K.

    2014-01-01

    The bacteria associated with the infectious claw disease bovine digital dermatitis (DD) are spirochetes of the genus Treponema; however, their environmental reservoir remains unknown. To our knowledge, the current study is the first report of the discovery and phylogenetic characterization of rRNA gene sequences from DD-associated treponemes in the dairy herd environment. Although the spread of DD appears to be facilitated by wet floors covered with slurry, no DD-associated treponemes have been isolated from this environment previously. Consequently, there is a lack of knowledge about the spread of this disease among cows within a herd as well as between herds. To address the issue of DD infection reservoirs, we searched for evidence of DD-associated treponemes in fresh feces, in slurry, and in hoof lesions by deep sequencing of the V3 and V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with identification at the operational-taxonomic-unit level. Using treponeme-specific primers in this high-throughput approach, we identified small amounts of DNA (on average 0.6% of the total amount of sequence reads) from DD-associated treponemes in 43 of 64 samples from slurry and cow feces collected from six geographically dispersed dairy herds. Species belonging to the Treponema denticola/Treponema pedis-like and Treponema phagedenis-like phylogenetic clusters were among the most prevalent treponemes in both the dairy herd environment and the DD lesions. By the high-throughput approach presented here, we have demonstrated that cow feces and environmental slurry are possible reservoirs of DD-associated treponemes. This method should enable further clarification of the etiopathogenesis of DD. PMID:24814794

  19. Comparison of Phadebact coagglutination, Bactogen latex agglutination, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis for detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b antigens in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J K; Kelly, M T

    1983-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected meningitis were screened with the Phadebact Haemophilus Test (Pharmacia Diagnostics), with Bactogen (Wampole Laboratories), and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. With culture-positive fluids, Phadebact coagglutination detected 95%, Bactogen latex agglutination detected 91%, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis detected only 79%. Both agglutination techniques were 25-fold more sensitive than counterimmunoelectrophoresis when tested with dilutions of positive fluids. To obtain specific reactions with the Phadebact reagents it was necessary to heat treat (95 degrees C, 5 min) the fluid; with Bactogen and counterimmunoelectrophoresis this was not necessary. PMID:6603467

  20. Conservation and antigenic cross-reactivity of the transferrin-binding proteins of Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Holland, J; Parsons, T R; Hasan, A A; Cook, S M; Stevenson, P; Griffiths, E; Williams, P

    1996-12-01

    Haemophilus influenzae acquires iron from the iron-transporting glycoprotein transferrin via a receptor-mediated process. This involves two outer-membrane transferrin-binding proteins (Tbps) termed Tbp1 and Tbp2 which show considerable preference for the human form of transferrin. Since the Tbps are attracting considerable attention as potential vaccine components, we used transferrin affinity chromatography to examine their conservation amongst 28 H. influenzae type b strains belonging to different outer-membrane-protein subtypes as well as six non-typable strains. Whole cells of all type b and non-typable strains examined bound human transferrin; whilst most strains possessed a Tbp1 of approximately 105 kDa, the molecular mass of Tbp2 varied from 79 to 94 kDa. Antisera raised against affinity-purified native H. influenzae Tbp1/Tbp2 receptor complex cross-reacted on Western blots with the respective Tbps of all the Haemophilus strains examined. When used to probe Neisseria meningitidis Tbps, sera from each of four mice immunized with the Haemophilus Tbp1/2 complex recognized the 68 kDa Tbp2 of N. meningitidis strain B16B6 but not the 78 kDa Tbp2 of N. meningitidis strain 70942. Serum from one mouse also reacted weakly with Tbp1 of strain B16B6. Apart from a weak reaction with the Tbp2 of a serotype 5 strain, this mouse antiserum failed to recognize the Tbps of the porcine pathogen A. pleuropneumoniae. However, a monospecific polyclonal antiserum raised against the denatured Tbp2 of Neisseria meningitidis B16B6 recognized the Tbps of all Haemophilus and Actinobacillus strains examined. Since H. influenzae forms part of the natural flora of the upper respiratory tract, human sera were screened for the presence of antibodies to the Tbps. Sera from healthy adults contained antibodies which recognized both Tbp1 and Tbp2 from H. influenzae but not N. meningitidis. Convalescent sera from meningococcal meningitis patients contained antibodies which, on Western blots

  1. Induction of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular antibody in neonatal rabbits by gastrointestinal colonization with cross-reacting Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R L; Handzel, Z T; Scheerson, R; Robbins, J B

    1973-02-01

    In two separate experiments, newborn rabbits were fed a live suspension of either of two Escherichia coli strains which possess a "K" antigen cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b. Both feedings were harmless and resulted in fecal excretion of the fed E. coli in most animals as well as active immunization of fed animals toward H. influenzae type b. Feeding non-enteropathogenic, cross-reacting E coli to newborns may be a method for inducing active immunity toward H. influenzae type b diseases by accelerating the acquisition of "natural" immunity. PMID:4572607

  2. rRNA gene restriction patterns of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    PubMed Central

    Irino, K; Grimont, F; Casin, I; Grimont, P A

    1988-01-01

    The rRNA gene restriction patterns of 92 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius, associated with conjunctivitis or Brazilian purpuric fever in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were studied with 16 + 23S rRNA from Escherichia coli as a probe. All strains were classified into 15 patterns. Isolates from Brazilian purpuric fever cases were seen only in patterns 3 (most frequently) and 4 (rarely), whereas isolates from conjunctivitis were found in all 15 patterns. The study demonstrated that rRNA from E. coli can serve as a probe for molecular epidemiology. Images PMID:2459153

  3. Otitis media associated polymorphisms in the hemin receptor HemR of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are also an important cause of otitis media (OM). Previous studies have demonstrated that some genes are more prevalent in OM-causing NTHi strains than in commensal strains, suggesting a role in virulence. These studies, however, are unable to investigate the possible associations between gene polymorphisms and disease. This study examined amino acid polymorphisms and sequence diversity in a potential virulence gene, the hemin receptor hemR, from a previously characterized NTHi strain collection containing both commensal and OM organisms to identify possible associations between the polymorphisms and otitis media. The full open reading frame of hemR was sequenced from a total of 146 NTHi isolates, yielding a total of 47 unique HemR amino acid sequences. The predicted structure of HemR showed substantial similarity to a class of monomeric TonB dependent, ligand-gated channels involved in iron acquisition in other gram negative bacteria. Fifteen amino acid polymorphisms were significantly more prevalent at the 90% confidence level among commensal compared to OM isolates. Upon controlling for the confounding effect of population structure, over half of the polymorphism-otitis media relationships lost statistical significance, emphasizing the importance of assessing the effect of population structure in association studies. The seven polymorphisms that retained significance were dispersed throughout the protein in various functional and structural domains, including the signal peptide, N-terminal plug domain, and intra- and extracellular loops. The alternate amino acid of only one of these seven polymorphisms was more common among OM isolates, demonstrating a strong trend toward the consensus sequence among disease causing NTHi. We hypothesize that variability at these positions in HemR may result in a reduced ability to acquire iron, rendering NTHi with such versions of the gene

  4. Prospects for prevention of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease by immunization.

    PubMed

    Granoff, D M; Munson, R S

    1986-03-01

    A vaccine consisting of the polysaccharide (PS) capsule of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has recently been licensed in the United States. This vaccine is safe and effective in preventing invasive Hib disease in children two years of age and older, but it is ineffective in younger children, the group at greatest risk of disease. The PS vaccine also may be ineffective in preventing disease in certain subgroups of the population that are genetically at increased risk of disease and show impaired antibody responses to immunization. Thus, new strategies need to be considered. Currently, several new Hib PS-protein conjugate vaccines are being evaluated. These vaccines differ in their method of preparation, carrier protein, and PS size. In contrast to the plain Hib PS vaccine, conjugate vaccines are immunogenic in infants and elicit boostable increases in antibody to PS upon reinjection of vaccine. However, some infants less than six months of age do not respond. To confer protection on all infants, it may be necessary to modify further the conjugate vaccines. One approach is to use outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as vaccine components. Five major OMPs have been purified from Hib, and three, P1 (50 kilodalton [kDa]), P2 (37 kDa), and P6 (16 kDa), contain antigens capable of eliciting strain-specific protective antibodies in experimental animals. In summary, PS-protein conjugate vaccines hold enormous promise for the prevention of Hib disease in infants, but further work is needed to define the optimal carrier protein, PS size, and method of coupling. Information is also needed on whether genetic factors influence responses to these vaccines. PMID:3485160

  5. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  6. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  7. Expression of the Haemophilus influenzae transferrin receptor is repressible by hemin but not elemental iron alone.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, D J; Musser, J M; Stull, T L

    1993-01-01

    The absolute requirement for elemental iron and the porphyrin nucleus for growth of Haemophilus influenzae led us to investigate the role of iron and hemin in regulation of expression of the H. influenzae transferrin receptor. H. influenzae type b strain H1689 was grown in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with beta-NAD and either 10 or 0.1 microgram of hemin ml-1. Transferrin-binding ability was determined with a dot blot assay using human transferrin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Cells grown in media with 0.1 microgram of hemin ml-1 bound transferrin, but organisms grown in media with 10 micrograms ml-1 did not. In hemin-restricted media, transferrin binding occurred despite addition of up to 10 mM ferric nitrate, ferric citrate, or ferric PPi, whereas addition of 10 micrograms of hemoglobin ml-1 repressed expression. The breadth of species distribution of this mode of regulation was determined with strains previously characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. When grown in hemin-restricted media, 24 of 28 type b strains and 52 of 57 serologically nontypeable strains exhibited transferrin binding, although none did so in hemin- and iron-sufficient media. Strain H1689 and serologically nontypeable strain HI1423 grown in heat-inactivated pooled normal human serum, human cerebrospinal fluid, or human breast milk exhibited transferrin binding. Growth in these fluids with 10 micrograms of added hemin ml-1 abolished transferrin binding, whereas addition of 10 mM ferric nitrate did not. These data suggest that the transferrin receptor of H. influenzae is regulated by levels of hemin but not elemental iron alone and that this property is widely distributed among several major cloned families in the species. Images PMID:8406790

  8. Accelerating Policy Decisions to Adopt Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccine: A Global, Multivariable Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Jessica C.; Stack, Meghan L.; Richmond, Marcie R.; Bear, Allyson P.; Hajjeh, Rana A.; Bishai, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Adoption of new and underutilized vaccines by national immunization programs is an essential step towards reducing child mortality. Policy decisions to adopt new vaccines in high mortality countries often lag behind decisions in high-income countries. Using the case of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, this paper endeavors to explain these delays through the analysis of country-level economic, epidemiological, programmatic and policy-related factors, as well as the role of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI Alliance). Methods and Findings Data for 147 countries from 1990 to 2007 were analyzed in accelerated failure time models to identify factors that are associated with the time to decision to adopt Hib vaccine. In multivariable models that control for Gross National Income, region, and burden of Hib disease, the receipt of GAVI support speeded the time to decision by a factor of 0.37 (95% CI 0.18–0.76), or 63%. The presence of two or more neighboring country adopters accelerated decisions to adopt by a factor of 0.50 (95% CI 0.33–0.75). For each 1% increase in vaccine price, decisions to adopt are delayed by a factor of 1.02 (95% CI 1.00–1.04). Global recommendations and local studies were not associated with time to decision. Conclusions This study substantiates previous findings related to vaccine price and presents new evidence to suggest that GAVI eligibility is associated with accelerated decisions to adopt Hib vaccine. The influence of neighboring country decisions was also highly significant, suggesting that approaches to support the adoption of new vaccines should consider supply- and demand-side factors. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20305714

  9. A chalcone with potent inhibiting activity against biofilm formation by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Baothong, Sudarat; Khetkam, Pichit; Chokchaisiri, Suwadee; Suksamrarn, Apichart

    2014-10-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), an important human respiratory pathogen, frequently causes biofilm infections. Currently, resistance of bacteria within the biofilm to conventional antimicrobials poses a major obstacle to effective medical treatment on a global scale. Novel agents that are effective against NTHi biofilm are therefore urgently required. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic chalcones with various chemical substituents were evaluated in vitro for their antibiofilm activities against strong biofilm-forming strains of NTHi. Of the test chalcones, 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity, its mean minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 ) being 16 μg/mL (71.35 μM), or approximately sixfold more active than the reference drug, azithromycin (MBIC50 419.68 μM). The inhibitory activity of chalcone 8, which is a chemically modified chalcone, appeared to be superior to those of the natural chalcones tested. Significantly, chalcone 8 inhibited biofilm formation by all studied NTHi strains, indicating that the antibiofilm activities of this compound occur across multiple strong-biofilm forming NTHi isolates of different clinical origins. According to antimicrobial and growth curve assays, chalcone 8 at concentrations that decreased biofilm formation did not affect growth of NTHi, suggesting the biofilm inhibitory effect of chalcone 8 is non-antimicrobial. In terms of structure-activity relationship, the possible substituent on the chalcone backbone required for antibiofilm activity is discussed. These findings indicate that 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) has powerful antibiofilm activity and suggest the potential application of chalcone 8 as a new therapeutic agent for control of NTHi biofilm-associated infections. PMID:25154700

  10. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A.; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J.; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C.; Post, J. Christopher; Hu, Fen Z.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Janto, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  11. Ferric Uptake Regulator and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Szelestey, Blake R.; Newsom, David E.; White, Peter; Mason, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a commensal microorganism of the human nasopharynx, and yet is also an opportunistic pathogen of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Host microenvironments influence gene expression patterns, likely critical for NTHi persistence. The host sequesters iron as a mechanism to control microbial growth, and yet iron limitation influences gene expression and subsequent production of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Careful regulation of iron uptake, via the ferric uptake regulator Fur, is essential in multiple bacteria, including NTHi. We hypothesized therefore that Fur contributes to iron homeostasis in NTHi, is critical for bacterial persistence, and likely regulates expression of virulence factors. Toward this end, fur was deleted in the prototypic NTHi clinical isolate, 86-028NP, and we assessed gene expression regulated by Fur. As expected, expression of the majority of genes that encode proteins with predicted roles in iron utilization was repressed by Fur. However, 14 Fur-regulated genes encode proteins with no known function, and yet may contribute to iron utilization or other biological functions. In a mammalian model of human otitis media, we determined that Fur was critical for bacterial persistence, indicating an important role for Fur-mediated iron homeostasis in disease progression. These data provide a profile of genes regulated by Fur in NTHi and likely identify additional regulatory pathways involved in iron utilization. Identification of such pathways will increase our understanding of how this pathogen can persist within host microenvironments, as a common commensal and, importantly, as a pathogen with significant clinical impact. PMID:23381990

  12. Synergistic activation of NF-kappaB by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Jono, Hirofumi; Han, Jiahuai; Lim, David J; Li, Jian-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen causing otitis media in children and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Like most other bacterial infections, NTHi infections are also characterized by inflammation, which is mainly mediated by cytokines and chemokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Among a variety of transcription regulators, NF-kappaB has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the expression of large numbers of genes encoding inflammatory mediators. In review of the current studies on NF-kappaB regulation, most of them have focused on investigating how NF-kappaB is activated by a single inducer at a time. However, in bacteria-induced inflammation in vivo, multiple inducers including both exogenous and endogenous mediators are present simultaneously. A key issue that has yet to be addressed is whether the exogenous inducers such as NTHi and the endogenous factors such as TNF-alpha activate NF-kappaB in a synergistic manner. We show that NTHi and TNF-alpha, when present together, synergistically induce NF-kappaB activation via two distinct signaling pathways: NF-kappaB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-kappaB translocation-dependent pathway involves NF-kappaB-inducing kinase-IkappaB kinase beta/gamma-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, whereas the NF-kappaB translocation-independent pathway involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase kinase 1-dependent activation of MAPK kinase 3/6-p38 MAPK pathway. In addition, the same signaling pathways are also involved in synergistic induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-8. These studies should deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the combinatorial regulation of inflammation and lead to development of therapeutic strategies for NTHi-induced infections. PMID:14993593

  13. Protein D of Haemophilus influenzae is not a universal immunoglobulin D-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, K; Munson, R S

    1993-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b and nontypeable H. influenzae have been reported to bind human immunoglobulin D (IgD). IgD myeloma sera from five patients were tested for the ability of IgD to bind to H. influenzae. Serotype b strains bound human IgD in four of the five sera tested. IgD in the fifth serum bound strongly to type b strain MinnA but poorly to other type b strains. Additionally, IgD binding was not observed when nontypeable strains were tested. The gene for protein D, the putative IgD-binding protein, was cloned from the IgD-binding H. influenzae type b strain MinnA and expressed in Escherichia coli. IgD binding to E. coli expressing protein D was not demonstrable. Recombinant protein D was purified, and antisera were generated in rabbits. Using these rabbit sera, we detected protein D in nontypeable as well as serotype b strains by Western blotting (immunoblotting). In contrast, IgD myeloma protein 4490, which was previously reported to bind to protein D by Ruan and coworkers (M. Ruan, M. Akkoyunlu, A. Grubb, and A. Forsgren, J. Immunol. 145:3379-3384), bound strongly to both type b and nontypeable H. influenzae as well as to E. coli expressing protein D. Thus, IgD binding is a general property of H. influenzae type b strains but not a general property of nontypeable strains, although both type b and nontypeable strains produce protein D. With the exception of IgD myeloma protein 4490 binding, we have no evidence for a role of protein D in IgD binding to H. influenzae. Images PMID:8514409

  14. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S. M.; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M.; Hanson, Jeffrey O.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  15. Contribution of a 28-kilodalton membrane protein to the virulence of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Chanyangam, M; Smith, A L; Moseley, S L; Kuehn, M; Jenny, P

    1991-01-01

    A Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) membrane protein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa bound polyclonal antisera raised against a highly purified Hib fimbrial subunit. We cloned the gene encoding this protein and found that the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis identified an 843-bp open reading frame which predicted a 26.78-kDa protein with an amino-terminal signal sequence and a mature protein with 70% similarity to the 28-kDa lipoprotein of E. coli (F. Yu, S. Inouye, and M. Inouye, J. Biol. Chem. 261:2284, 1986). Colony blot hybridization analysis with an intergenic probe of the cloned gene demonstrated that 29 of 32 H. influenzae strains hybridize with this gene. Insertion of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene into the open reading frame inactivated expression of the 28-kDa protein in E. coli. Isogenic Hib strains were derived by marker exchange mutagenesis to generate mutants which no longer expressed the 28-kDa protein as recognized with Western immunoblot analysis. There was no difference in the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of infant rats or monkeys by the isogenic mutants which lacked the 28-kDa protein compared with colonization by the wild-type strain. In contrast, the frequency of invasion and density of bacteremia in infant rats caused by the isogenic mutants were reduced relative to those caused by the wild-type Hib strain. We conclude that this 28-kDa outer membrane protein aids transepithelial invasion of type b strains but is not essential. Images PMID:1987077

  16. Maturation of molybdoenzymes and its influence on the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Rabeb; Pg Othman, Dk S M; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hansbro, Phil M; Hanson, Jeffrey O; McEwan, Alastair G; Kappler, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum enzymes of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family occur exclusively in prokaryotes, and a loss of some these enzymes has been linked to a loss of bacterial virulence in several cases. The MobA protein catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of the molybdenum guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor that is exclusive to enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. MobA has been proposed as a potential target for control of virulence since its inhibition would affect the activities of all molybdoenzymes dependent upon MGD. Here, we have studied the phenotype of a mobA mutant of the host-adapted human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. H. influenzae causes and contributes to a variety of acute and chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and several enzymes of the DMSO reductase family are conserved and highly expressed in this bacterium. The mobA mutation caused a significant decrease in the activities of all Mo-enzymes present, and also resulted in a small defect in anaerobic growth. However, we did not detect a defect in in vitro biofilm formation nor in invasion and adherence to human epithelial cells in tissue culture compared to the wild-type. In a murine in vivo model, the mobA mutant showed only a mild attenuation compared to the wild-type. In summary, our data show that MobA is essential for the activities of molybdenum enzymes, but does not appear to affect the fitness of H. influenzae. These results suggest that MobA is unlikely to be a useful target for antimicrobials, at least for the purpose of treating H. influenzae infections. PMID:26594204

  17. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza

    PubMed Central

    Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A.; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J.; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe “transformed recombinant enrichment profiling” (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  18. Transformed Recombinant Enrichment Profiling Rapidly Identifies HMW1 as an Intracellular Invasion Locus in Haemophilus influenza.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Viadas, Cristina; Moleres, Javier; Sinha, Sunita; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Porsch, Eric A; St Geme, Joseph W; Nislow, Corey; Redfield, Rosemary J; Garmendia, Junkal

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species actively take up and recombine homologous DNA into their genomes, called natural competence, a trait that offers a means to identify the genetic basis of naturally occurring phenotypic variation. Here, we describe "transformed recombinant enrichment profiling" (TREP), in which natural transformation is used to generate complex pools of recombinants, phenotypic selection is used to enrich for specific recombinants, and deep sequencing is used to survey for the genetic variation responsible. We applied TREP to investigate the genetic architecture of intracellular invasion by the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae, a trait implicated in persistence during chronic infection. TREP identified the HMW1 adhesin as a crucial factor. Natural transformation of the hmw1 operon from a clinical isolate (86-028NP) into a laboratory isolate that lacks it (Rd KW20) resulted in ~1,000-fold increased invasion into airway epithelial cells. When a distinct recipient (Hi375, already possessing hmw1 and its paralog hmw2) was transformed by the same donor, allelic replacement of hmw2AHi375 by hmw1A86-028NP resulted in a ~100-fold increased intracellular invasion rate. The specific role of hmw1A86-028NP was confirmed by mutant and western blot analyses. Bacterial self-aggregation and adherence to airway cells were also increased in recombinants, suggesting that the high invasiveness induced by hmw1A86-028NP might be a consequence of these phenotypes. However, immunofluorescence results found that intracellular hmw1A86-028NP bacteria likely invaded as groups, instead of as individual bacterial cells, indicating an emergent invasion-specific consequence of hmw1A-mediated self-aggregation. PMID:27124727

  19. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine. PMID:25659268

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and immunologic properties of detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Tsai, C M; Ueyama, T; Barenkamp, S J; Robbins, J B; Lim, D J

    1996-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important cause of otitis media in children and of pneumonitis in adults with depressed resistance. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is a major surface antigen of NTHi and elicits bactericidal and opsonic antibodies. We prepared detoxified LOS (dLOS) protein conjugates from NTHi for use as experimental vaccines. LOS from NTHi 9274 was treated with anhydrous hydrazine and had its toxicity reduced to clinically acceptable levels. dLOS was bound to tetanus toxoid (TT) or high- molecular-weight proteins (HMPs) from NTHi through a linker of adipic acid dihydrazide to form dLOS-TT or dLOS-HMP. The molar ratio of the dLOS to protein carriers ranged from 26:1 to 50:1. The antigenicity of the conjugates was similar to that of the LOS alone as determined by double immunodiffusion. Subcutaneous or intramuscular injection of the conjugates elicited a 28- to 486-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in mice to the homologous LOS after two or three injections and a 169- to 243-fold rise in the level of immunoglobulin G antibodies in rabbits after two injections. The immunogenicity of the conjugates in mice and rabbits was enhanced by formulation with monophosphoryl lipid A plus trehalose dimycolate. In rabbits, conjugate-induced LOS antibodies induced complement-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain 9274 and prototype strain 3189. These results indicate that a detoxified LOS-protein conjugate is a candidate vaccine for otitis media and pneumonitis caused by NTHi. PMID:8926067

  1. Molecular Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Tirado-Vélez, José Manuel; Calatayud, Laura; Tubau, Fe; Garmendia, Junkal; Ardanuy, Carmen; Marti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory infections in adults, who are frequently treated with fluoroquinolones. The aims of this study were to characterize the genotypes of fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates and their mechanisms of resistance. Among 7,267 H. influenzae isolates collected from adult patients from 2000 to 2013, 28 (0.39%) were ciprofloxacin resistant according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. In addition, a nalidixic acid screening during 2010 to 2013 detected five (0.23%) isolates that were ciprofloxacin susceptible but nalidixic acid resistant. Sequencing of their quinolone resistance-determining regions and genotyping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing of the 25 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates available and all 5 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates were performed. In the NTHi isolates studied, two mutations producing changes in two GyrA residues (Ser84, Asp88) and/or two ParC residues (Ser84, Glu88) were associated with increased fluoroquinolone MICs. Strains with one or two mutations (n = 15) had ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of 0.12 to 2 μg/ml, while those with three or more mutations (n = 15) had MICs of 4 to 16 μg/ml. Long persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains was observed in three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. High genetic diversity was observed among fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates. Although fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat respiratory infections, the proportion of resistant NTHi isolates remains low. The nalidixic acid disk test is useful for detecting the first changes in GyrA or in GyrA plus ParC among fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains that are at a potential risk for the development of resistance under selective pressure by fluoroquinolone treatment. PMID:25385097

  2. Immunologic and Structural Relationships of the Minor Pilus Subunits among Haemophilus influenzae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Kirk W.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Marrs, Carl F.; Clemans, Daniel; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    1998-01-01

    Two proteins, HifD and HifE, have been identified as structural components of Haemophilus influenzae pili. Both are localized at the pilus tip, and HifE appears to mediate pilus adherence to host cells. In this study we examined the immunologic and structural diversity of these pilus subunits among type b H. influenzae (Hib) and nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI) strains. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that antibodies directed against the C terminus of HifD and HifE from Hib strain Eagan bound to HifD and HifE proteins, respectively, of all piliated Hib and NTHI strains tested. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that antibodies specific for native HifD or HifE of strain Eagan also bound to all piliated Hib strains but did not bind to the piliated NTHI strains. Antibodies against HifE of strain Eagan inhibited the binding of Hib to human erythrocytes but did not inhibit the binding of NTHI strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to determine strain-to-strain structural differences within hifD and hifE genes, either by PCR or by nucleotide sequence analysis. DNA and derived amino acid sequence analyses of HifD and HifE confirmed the uniqueness of the RFLP types. The hifD and hifE genes of all type b strains showed identical restriction patterns. Analysis of hifD and hifE genes from the NTHI strains, however, revealed seven unique RFLP patterns, suggesting that these genes encode proteins with diverse primary structures. These results indicate that HifD and HifE are immunologically and structurally similar among the Hib strains but vary among the NTHI strains. PMID:9746580

  3. Development and technology transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Beurret, Michel; Hamidi, Ahd; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2012-07-13

    This paper describes the development of a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment/Netherlands Vaccine Institute (RIVM/NVI, Bilthoven, The Netherlands), and the subsequent transfer of its production process to manufacturers in developing countries. In 1998, at the outset of the project, the majority of the world's children were not immunized against Hib because of the high price and limited supply of the conjugate vaccines, due partly to the fact that local manufacturers in developing countries did not master the Hib conjugate production technology. To address this problem, the RIVM/NVI has developed a robust Hib conjugate vaccine production process based on a proven model, and transferred this technology to several partners in India, Indonesia, Korea and China. As a result, emerging manufacturers in developing countries acquired modern technologies previously unavailable to them. This has in turn facilitated their approach to producing other conjugate vaccines. As an additional spin-off from the project, a World Health Organization (WHO) Hib quality control (QC) course was designed and conducted at the RIVM/NVI, resulting in an increased regulatory capacity for conjugate vaccines in developing countries at the National Regulatory Authority (NRA) level. For the local populations, this has translated into an increased and sustainable supply of affordable Hib conjugate-containing combination vaccines. During the course of this project, developing countries have demonstrated their ability to produce large quantities of high-quality modern vaccines after a successful transfer of the technology. PMID:22683521

  4. Haemophilus influenzae serotype B (Hib) seroprevalence in England and Wales in 2009.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Sn; Ramsay, Me; Flood, Js; Campbell, H; Slack, Mp; Pebody, R; Findlow, J; Newton, E; Wilding, M; Warrington, R; Crawford, H; Min, Sy; Gray, K; Martin, S; Frankland, S; Bokuvha, N; Laher, G; Borrow, R

    2012-01-01

    A national seroprevalence study was performed to determine the prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) antibodies in England and Wales in 2009, when Hib disease incidence was the lowest ever recorded. A total of 2,693 anonymised residual sera from routine diagnostic testing submitted by participating National Health Service hospital laboratories were tested for Hib anti-polyribosyl-ribitol phosphate (PRP) IgG antibodies using a fluorescent bead assay. Median anti-PRP IgG concentrations were highest in toddlers aged 1–4 years (2.65 μg/ml), followed by children aged 5–9 years (1.95 μg/ml). Antibody concentrations were significantly lower after this age, but were still significantly higher among 10–19 year-olds (0.54 μg/ml) compared with adults aged >20 years (0.16 μg/ ml; p<0.0001). Half of the adults (51%) did not have Hib antibody concentrations ≥0.15 μg/ml, the level considered to confer short-term protection. Thus, the current excellent Hib control appears to be the result of high anti-PRP antibody concentrations in children aged up to 10 years, achieved through the various childhood vaccination campaigns offering booster immunisation. The lack of seroprotection in adults emphasises the importance of maintaining control of the disease and, most probably carriage, in children, therefore raising the question as to whether long-term routine boosting of either pre-school children or adolescents may be required. PMID:23171823

  5. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M; Hiller, N Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C; Post, J Christopher; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Janto, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites. PMID:26977929

  6. Detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins confers protection against otitis media in chinchillas.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Sun, J; Jin, S; Barenkamp, S J; Lim, D J; Robbins, J B; Battey, J

    1997-01-01

    Detoxified-lipooligosaccharide (dLOS)-protein conjugates from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) elicited a significant rise of anti-LOS antibodies with bactericidal activity in rabbits (X.-X. Gu, C.-M. Tsai, T. Ueyama, S. J. Barenkamp, J. B. Robbins, and D. J. Lim, Infect. Immun. 64:4047-4053, 1996). In this study, we evaluated whether vaccination with the conjugates would protect against NTHi otitis media in chinchillas. Fifty-eight chinchillas received three subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of dLOS-conjugated tetanus toxoid, dLOS-conjugated high-molecular-weight proteins from NTHi, or saline (control) in Freund's adjuvant and then were challenged by intrabullar inoculation with 140 CFU of NTHi. All vaccinated animals responded with elevated serum titers of anti-LOS antibody, and 49% (19 of 39) demonstrated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain. Otitis media with culture-positive NTHi effusions developed in all 19 controls and 56% (22 of 39) of the vaccinated animals during a period of 21 days (P < 0.001). Bacterial counts of the middle ear effusions were lower in the vaccine groups than in the controls (P < 0.01). The incidences of infection in the unchallenged ear or inner ear were 26 or 28% in the vaccine groups and 53 or 58% in the controls (P < 0.05). The signs of infection observed by otoscopy were less severe in the vaccine groups than in the controls. There was no significant difference between the two vaccine groups. These data indicate that active immunization with LOS-based conjugates reduces the incidence of NTHi-induced otitis media. PMID:9353024

  7. Oral non-typable Haemophilus influenzae enhances physiological mechanism of airways protection.

    PubMed

    Clancy, R L; Dunkley, M L

    2010-07-01

    Oral immunotherapy with inactivated non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) prevents exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of protection. This was a placebo versus active prospective study over 3 months in 64 smokers. The active treatment was three courses of oral NTHi given at monthly intervals, followed by measurement of bacteriological and immunological parameters. The results can be summarized: (i) NTHi-specific T cells increased in the placebo treatment group over time (P<0.05); (ii) the T cell response in the oral NTHi group started earlier than that in the placebo group (P<0.05); and (iii) serum NTHi-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G had significantly greater variation in the placebo group (P<0.0001). The increase in antibody in placebos over time correlated with exposure to live H. influenzae (P<0.05) determined from culture of gargles; (iv) reduction in saliva lysozyme over time (P<0.05) was detected only in the oral NTHi treatment group. These data are consistent with T cell priming of gut lymphoid tissue by aspiration of bronchus content into the gut, with oral immunotherapy augmenting this process leading to enhanced bronchus protection. The evidence for protection was a stable IgG antibody level through the study in the oral NTHi treatment group, contrasting with an increase in antibody correlating with exposure of the airways to H. influenzae in the placebo group. Saliva lysozyme was a useful biomarker of mucosal inflammation, falling after oral NTHi consistent with a reduction in the level of intralumenal inflammation. PMID:20408861

  8. Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay for Rapid Molecular Serotyping of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sarah E.; Wang, Jinhong; Hernandez-Garcia, Juan; Weinert, Lucy A.; Luan, Shi-Lu; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Angen, Øystein; Aragon, Virginia; Williamson, Susanna M.; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Tucker, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis causes Glässer's disease and pneumonia in pigs. Indirect hemagglutination (IHA) is typically used to serotype this bacterium, distinguishing 15 serovars with some nontypeable isolates. The capsule loci of the 15 reference strains have been annotated, and significant genetic variation was identified between serovars, with the exception of serovars 5 and 12. A capsule locus and in silico serovar were identified for all but two nontypeable isolates in our collection of >200 isolates. Here, we describe the development of a multiplex PCR, based on variation within the capsule loci of the 15 serovars of H. parasuis, for rapid molecular serotyping. The multiplex PCR (mPCR) distinguished between all previously described serovars except 5 and 12, which were detected by the same pair of primers. The detection limit of the mPCR was 4.29 × 105 ng/μl bacterial genomic DNA, and high specificity was indicated by the absence of reactivity against closely related commensal Pasteurellaceae and other bacterial pathogens of pigs. A subset of 150 isolates from a previously sequenced H. parasuis collection was used to validate the mPCR with 100% accuracy compared to the in silico results. In addition, the two in silico-nontypeable isolates were typeable using the mPCR. A further 84 isolates were analyzed by mPCR and compared to the IHA serotyping results with 90% concordance (excluding those that were nontypeable by IHA). The mPCR was faster, more sensitive, and more specific than IHA, enabling the differentiation of 14 of the 15 serovars of H. parasuis. PMID:26424843

  9. In vitro pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of S-013420 against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Hori, Toshihiko; Ohshiro, Merime; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori; Shimada, Jingoro; Kuwahara, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters and the antibacterial activity of S-013420, a novel bicyclolide, against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, including macrolide-resistant isolates, were investigated using an in vitro PD model. Various time-concentration curves were artificially constructed by modifying the PK data obtained in phase I studies. The activity against H. influenzae was evaluated using two parameters, that is, the area above the killing curve (AAC) and the viable cell reduction at 24 h. The relationships between the antibacterial activity of S-013420 and the three PK/PD parameters were investigated by fitting the data to the sigmoid maximum effective concentration model. The square of the correlation coefficient (R(2)) values for AAC versus the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MIC, the peak concentration (C(max))/MIC, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the drug concentration exceeded the MIC under steady-state PK conditions (%T(MIC)) were 0.92, 0.87, and 0.49, respectively. The R(2) values for viable cell reduction at 24 h versus AUC(0-24)/MIC, C(max)/MIC, and %T(MIC) were 0.93, 0.61, and 0.56, respectively. These results demonstrated that AUC(0-24)/MIC is the most significant parameter for evaluation of the antibacterial activity of S-013420. The values of AUC(0-24)/MIC required for maximum and static efficacy were 10.8 and 9.63, respectively, for H. influenzae and 16.3 to 22.3 and 4.66 to 9.01, respectively, for S. pneumoniae. This analysis is considered useful for determining the AUC value at the infection site, which would be required for efficacy in clinical use. PMID:20660692

  10. Relationship between Azithromycin Susceptibility and Administration Efficacy for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Euba, Begoña; Moleres, Javier; Viadas, Cristina; Barberán, Montserrat; Caballero, Lucía; Grilló, María-Jesús; Bengoechea, José Antonio; de-Torres, Juan Pablo; Liñares, Josefina; Leiva, José

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic pathogen that is an important cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). COPD is an inflammatory disease of the airways, and exacerbations are acute inflammatory events superimposed on this background of chronic inflammation. Azithromycin (AZM) is a macrolide antibiotic with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties and a clinically proven potential for AECOPD prevention and management. Relationships between AZM efficacy and resistance by NTHI and between bactericidal and immunomodulatory effects on NTHI respiratory infection have not been addressed. In this study, we employed two pathogenic NTHI strains with different AZM susceptibilities (NTHI 375 [AZM susceptible] and NTHI 353 [AZM resistant]) to evaluate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of AZM on the NTHI-host interplay. At the cellular level, AZM was bactericidal toward intracellular NTHI inside alveolar and bronchial epithelia and alveolar macrophages, and it enhanced NTHI phagocytosis by the latter cell type. These effects correlated with the strain MIC of AZM and the antibiotic dose. Additionally, the effect of AZM on NTHI infection was assessed in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. AZM showed both preventive and therapeutic efficacies by lowering NTHI 375 bacterial counts in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and by reducing histopathological inflammatory lesions in the upper and lower airways of mice. Conversely, AZM did not reduce bacterial loads in animals infected with NTHI 353, in which case a milder anti-inflammatory effect was also observed. Together, the results of this work link the bactericidal and anti-inflammatory effects of AZM and frame the efficacy of this antibiotic against NTHI respiratory infection. PMID:25712355

  11. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children. PMID:27113355

  12. Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes

  13. Residual Activity of Thermally Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Benjamin J.

    1965-01-01

    Barnhart, Benjamin J. (Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md.). Residual activity of thermally denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid from Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 89:1271–1279. 1965.—The level of residual transforming activity of heated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (i.e., 1 to a few per cent of native DNA-transforming activity) was found to be independent of the heating and quenching temperatures and less susceptible than native or renatured DNA to heat inactivation upon prolonged heating above or below the critical melting temperature. Similar dose-response curves were obtained for inactivation by formamide of native and renatured DNA, but the residual-active material was much more resistant. Heating DNA above the Tm in the presence of 1% formaldehyde resulted in a level of residual activity 4 logs lower than that obtained without formaldehyde. Residual-active material was not inactivated by Escherichia coli phosphodiesterase, but it was susceptible to snake venom phosphodiesterase. A new genetic marker was induced in heated-quenched DNA but not in purified residual-active material following nitrous acid treatment. Residual activity was found to be less susceptible to ultraviolet inactivation and to band at a higher density region in CsCl than native DNA. In conclusion, it is suggested that the residual-active material is a structure formed by intrastrand hydrogen bonding of the separated units of heated-quenched DNA. Such a configuration would result in at least a partially double-stranded structure, which is probably the essential characteristic of the residual-active material endowing it with biological activity. PMID:14292997

  14. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Serotypes by Standard Slide Agglutination Serotyping and PCR-Based Capsule Typing

    PubMed Central

    LaClaire, Leslye L.; Tondella, Maria Lucia C.; Beall, David S.; Noble, Corie A.; Raghunathan, Pratima L.; Rosenstein, Nancy E.; Popovic, Tanja

    2003-01-01

    To resolve discrepancies in slide agglutination serotyping (SAST) results from state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we characterized 141 of 751 invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates that were identified in the United States from January 1998 to December 1999 through an active, laboratory-based, surveillance program coordinated by the CDC. We found discrepancies between the results of SAST performed at state health departments and those of PCR capsule typing performed at the CDC for 56 (40%) of the isolates characterized: 54 isolates that were identified as a particular serotype by SAST were shown to be unencapsulated by PCR, and two isolates that were reported as serotypes b and f were found to be serotypes f and e, respectively, by PCR. The laboratory error most likely to affect the perceived efficacy of the conjugate H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was the misidentification of isolates as serotype b: of 40 isolates identified as serotype b by SAST, 27 (68%) did not contain the correlating capsule type genes. The frequency of errors fell substantially when standardized reagents and routine quality control of SAST were used during a study involving three laboratories. An overall 94% agreement between SAST and PCR results showed that slide agglutination could be a valid and reliable method for serotyping H. influenzae if the test was performed correctly, in accordance with standardized and recommended procedures. An ongoing prospective analysis of all H. influenzae surveillance isolates associated with invasive disease in children less than 5 years old will provide more accurate national figures for the burden of invasive disease caused by Hib and other H. influenzae serotypes. PMID:12517878

  15. The Epidemiologic and Pharmacodynamic Cutoff Values of Tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Hao, Haihong; Li, Jun; Ahmad, Ijaz; Cheng, Guyue; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis, which is an important pathogen of respiratory tract infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 103 H. parasuis isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. The wild type (WT) distribution and epidemiologic cutoff value (ECV) were evaluated by statistical analysis. The new bronchoaveolar lavage was used to establish intrapulmonary pharmacokinetic (PK) model in swine. The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of tilmicosin, both in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and in plasma, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography method and WinNonlin software. The pharmacodynamic cutoff (COPD) was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. Our results showed that 100% of WT isolates were covered when the ECV was set at 16 μg/mL. The tilmicosin had concentration-dependent activity against H. parasuis. The PK data indicated that tilmicosin concentrations in PELF was rapidly increased to high levels at 4 h and kept stable until 48 h after drug administration, while the tilmicosin concentration in plasma reached maximum levels at 4 h and continued to decrease during 4–72 h. Using Monte Carlo simulation, COPD was defined as 1 μg/mL. Conclusively, the ECV and COPD of tilmicosin against H. parasuis were established for the first time based on the MIC distribution and PK-PD analysis in the target tissue, respectively. These values are of great importance for detection of tilmicosin-resistant H. parasuis and for effective treatment of clinical intrapulmonary infection caused by H. parasuis. PMID:27047487

  16. DNA aptamers for the detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b by cell SELEX.

    PubMed

    Bitaraf, F S; Rasooli, I; Mousavi Gargari, S L

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children, with a mortality rate of about 3-6 % of the affected patients. ABM can lead to death during a period of hours to several days and, hence, rapid and early detection of the infection is crucial. Aptamers, the short single-stranded DNA or RNA with high affinity to target molecules, are selected by a high-flux screening technique known as in vitro screening and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technology (SELEX). In this study, whole-cell SELEX was applied for the selection of target-specific aptamers with high affinity to Hib. ssDNA aptamers prepared by lambda exonuclease were incubated with the target cells (Hib). The aptameric binding rate to Hib was characterized for binding affinity after seven SELEX rounds by flow cytometry. The aptamers with higher binding affinity were cloned. Four of 68 aptamer clones were selected for sequencing. The dissociation constant (Kd) of the high-affinity aptamer clones 45 and 63 were 47.10 and 28.46 pM, respectively. These aptamers did not bind to other bacterial species, including the seven meningitis-causing bacteria. They showed distinct affinity to various H. influenzae strains only. These aptamers showed the highest affinity to Hib and the lowest affinity to H. influenzae type c and to other meningitis-causing bacteria. Clone 63 could detect Hib in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples at 60 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. The results indicate applicability of the aptamers for rapid and early detection of infections brought about by Hib. PMID:26768582

  17. HPAEC-PAD quantification of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide in upstream and downstream samples.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Robert M F; de Haan, Alex; van den IJssel, Jan G M; Hamidi, Ahd; Beurret, Michel

    2015-11-27

    Due to the rapidly increasing introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and other conjugate vaccines worldwide during the last decade, reliable and robust analytical methods are needed for the quantitative monitoring of intermediate samples generated during fermentation (upstream processing, USP) and purification (downstream processing, DSP) of polysaccharide vaccine components. This study describes the quantitative characterization of in-process control (IPC) samples generated during the fermentation and purification of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS), polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP), derived from Hib. Reliable quantitative methods are necessary for all stages of production; otherwise accurate process monitoring and validation is not possible. Prior to the availability of high performance anion exchange chromatography methods, this polysaccharide was predominantly quantified either with immunochemical methods, or with the colorimetric orcinol method, which shows interference from fermentation medium components and reagents used during purification. Next to an improved high performance anion exchange chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) method, using a modified gradient elution, both the orcinol assay and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analyses were evaluated. For DSP samples, it was found that the correlation between the results obtained by HPAEC-PAD specific quantification of the PRP monomeric repeat unit released by alkaline hydrolysis, and those from the orcinol method was high (R(2)=0.8762), and that it was lower between HPAEC-PAD and HPSEC results. Additionally, HPSEC analysis of USP samples yielded surprisingly comparable results to those obtained by HPAEC-PAD. In the early part of the fermentation, medium components interfered with the different types of analysis, but quantitative HPSEC data could still be obtained, although lacking the specificity of the HPAEC-PAD method. Thus, the HPAEC

  18. Understanding Haemophilus parasuis infection in porcine spleen through a transcriptomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongbo; Li, Changchun; Fang, Mingdi; Zhu, Mengjin; Li, Xinyun; Zhou, Rui; Li, Kui; Zhao, Shuhong

    2009-01-01

    Background Haemophilus parasuis (HPS) is an important swine pathogen that causes Glässer's disease, which is characterized by fibrinous polyserositis, meningitis and arthritis. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of the disease remain poorly understood, particularly the resistance of porcine immune system to HPS invasion. In this study, we investigated the global changes in gene expression in the spleen following HPS infection using the Affymetrix Porcine Genechip™. Results A total of 931 differentially expressed (DE) transcripts were identified in the porcine spleen 7 days after HPS infection; of these, 92 unique genes showed differential expression patterns based on analysis using BLASTX and Gene Ontology. The DE genes involved in the immune response included genes for inflammasomes (RETN, S100A8, S100A9, S100A12), adhesion molecules (CLDN3, CSPG2, CD44, LGALS8), transcription factors (ZBTB16, SLC39A14, CEBPD, CEBPB), acute-phase proteins and complement (SAA1, LTF, HP, C3), differentiation genes for epithelial cells and keratinocytes (TGM1, MS4A8B, CSTA), and genes related to antigen processing and presentation (HLA-B, HLA-DRB1). Further immunostimulation analyses indicated that mRNA levels of S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12 in porcine PK-15 cells increased within 48 h and were sustained after administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Poly(I:C) respectively. In addition, mapping of DE genes to porcine health traits QTL regions showed that 70 genes were distributed in 7 different known porcine QTL regions. Finally, 10 DE genes were validated by quantitative PCR. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate previously unrecognized changes in gene transcription that are associated with HPS infection in vivo, and many potential cascades identified in the study clearly merit further investigation. Our data provide new clues to the nature of the immune response in mammals, and we have identified candidate genes that are related to resistance to HPS. PMID

  19. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage and Novel Bacterial Population Structure among Children in Urban Kathmandu, Nepal▿

    PubMed Central

    Williams, E. J.; Lewis, J.; John, T.; Hoe, J. C.; Yu, L.; Dongol, S.; Kelly, D. F.; Griffiths, D. T.; Shah, A.; Limbu, B.; Pradhan, R.; Mawas, F.; Shrestha, S.; Thorson, S.; Werno, A. M.; Murdoch, D. R.; Adhikari, N.; Pollard, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of invasive bacterial infection in children that can be prevented by a vaccine, but there is still uncertainty about its relative importance in Asia. This study investigated the age-specific prevalence of Hib carriage and its molecular epidemiology in carriage and disease in Nepal. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from children in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 3 different settings: a hospital outpatient department (OPD), schools, and children's homes. Hib was isolated using Hib antiserum agar plates, and serotyping was performed with latex agglutination. Hib isolates from children with invasive disease were obtained during active microbiological surveillance at Patan Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. Genotyping of disease and carriage isolates was undertaken using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Swabs were taken from 2,195 children, including 1,311 children at an OPD, 647 children attending schools, and 237 children in homes. Overall, Hib was identified in 5.0% (110/2,195; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.9% to 6.4%). MLST was performed on 108 Hib isolates from children carrying Hib isolates and 15 isolates from children with invasive disease. Thirty-one sequence types (STs) were identified, and 20 of these were novel STs. The most common ST isolates were sequence type 6 (ST6) and the novel ST722. There was marked heterogeneity among the STs from children with disease and children carrying Hib. STs identified from invasive infections were those commonly identified in carriage. This study provides evidence of Hib carriage among children in urban Nepal with genetically diverse strains prior to introduction of universal vaccination. The Hib carriage rate in Nepal was similar to the rates observed in other populations with documented high disease rates prior to vaccination, supporting implementation of Hib vaccine in Nepal in 2009. PMID:21270225

  20. Characterization of nasopharyngeal isolates of type b Haemophilus influenzae from Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Kandarpa K.; Das, Bimal K.; Bewal, Ramesh K.; Kapil, Arti; Arora, N.K.; Sood, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of mortality and morbidity among young children in developing countries. Increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance especially production of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) has made treatment and management of H. influenzae infection more difficult. Nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates are excellent surrogate for determination of antibiotic resistance prevalent among invasive H. influenzae isolates. In this study, we characterized nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates obtained from healthy school going children in Delhi. Methods: Nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates were collected from healthy school going children and subjected to serotyping, fimbrial typing and antibiogram profiling. ESBL production was recorded using phenotypic as well as molecular methods. Multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of 13 representative nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates was performed as per guidelines. Results: A significant proportion (26 of 80, 32.5%) of nasopharyngeal isolates of H. influenzae were identified as serotype b. Fimbrial gene (hifA) was detected in 23 (28.75%) isolates. Resistance against commonly prescribed antibiotics (Amp, Tet, Chloro, Septran, Cephalexin) were observed to be high among the nasopharyngeal commensal H. influenzae. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production was observed in a five (6.25%) isolates by both double disk diffusion and molecular typing. MLST identified several novel alleles as well as novel sequence types. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed high resistance against common antibiotics and detection of ESBL in nasopharyngeal H. influenzae isolates collected from normal healthy school going children in Delhi. Detection of H. influenzae type b capsular gene and the presence of fimbrial gene (hif A) suggest virulence potential of these isolates. Discovery of novel alleles and presence of new sequence types (STs) among nasopharyngeal H

  1. Activity and local delivery of azithromycin in a mouse model of Haemophilus influenzae lung infection.

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, E; Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Pocidalo, J J; Bergogne-Bérézin, E

    1992-01-01

    We compared the activities of azithromycin and erythromycin against Haemophilus influenzae in a mouse model of nonparenchymatous lower respiratory tract infection. In vitro and in vivo efficacy data for both drugs were analyzed relative to their pharmacokinetics in lungs and in vivo uptake by phagocytes. Aged C57BL/6 mice (mean age, 15.1 +/- 1.9 months) were infected intratracheally with 10(8) CFU of H. influenzae serotype b. Oral drug administration was initiated 4 h after infection by various dosage regimens. In terms of bacterial killing in the lung, azithromycin was much more active than erythromycin (P less than 0.01). Its in vivo activity was also more durable after a single administration relative to the durability of three doses of erythromycin given at 6-h intervals. The MIC of azithromycin was eightfold lower than that of erythromycin, and better penetration and a longer half-life in lung tissue were achieved after a single oral administration. Phagocytes delivered increased amounts of both drugs to the infected lungs, particularly at the site of infection (bronchoalveolar airspaces), and detectable levels of azithromycin were maintained locally for long periods. The fact that the efficacy of azithromycin coincided with the arrival of large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes within the airspaces suggests that active extracellular concentrations were provided by the release of azithromycin from these cells. This further supports the potential value of once-daily azithromycin regimens for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in humans, provided that inhibitory concentrations against common pathogens such as H. influenzae are maintained for adequate periods of time. PMID:1324644

  2. Acute-phase protein response in pigs experimentally infected with Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Martín de la Fuente, A J; Carpintero, R; Rodríguez Ferri, E F; Alava, M A; Lampreave, F; Gutiérrez Martín, C B

    2010-12-01

    The acute-phase protein (APP) response to an infection caused by Haemophilus parasuis, the etiological agent of Glässer's disease in pigs, was characterized measuring serum concentrations of pig major acute-phase protein (pig MAP), haptoglobin (HPT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) in colostrum-deprived pigs. They were divided into six experimental groups: non-immunized control group (I); immunized with a non-commercial bacterin (II); with an OMP-vaccine (III); with a sublethal dose (IV); and with two commercial bacterins (V and VI). All groups were challenged intratracheally with 5 × 10(9)CFU of H. parasuis 37 days after immunisation. The highest levels of the positive APPs (pig MAP, HPT and CRP) and the lowest levels of the negative APPs (ApoA-I) were observed in the animals that died as a consequence of the infection, both those in the non-immunized and in the immunized groups. However, the surviving animals (all of them in groups II, V and VI, two pigs in group III, and three in group IV) showed a minor variation in APP response, mainly on day 1 post-challenge (p.c.), and then tended to recover the initial values. APP response was still less pronounced in the groups of pigs previously immunized with bacterins. In conclusion, APP response can reflect Glässer-disease ongoing, showing a correlation between the severity and duration of the clinical signs and lesions and the magnitude of changes in the APP levels. PMID:19117607

  3. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the "fuzzy species" strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment. PMID:26378279

  4. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing

    PubMed Central

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the “fuzzy species” strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment. PMID:26378279

  5. Interaction of Haemophilus parasuis with nasal and tracheal mucosa following intranasal inoculation of cesarean derived colostrum deprived (CDCD) swine.

    PubMed Central

    Vahle, J L; Haynes, J S; Andrews, J J

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three cesarean derived, colostrum deprived pigs were obtained at 5 wk of age and inoculated intranasally with either 1.4 x 10(8) colony forming units of Haemophilus parasuis or sterile phosphate buffered saline. Pigs were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, 26, or 36 h post-inoculation and tissues from the oropharynx and respiratory tract were obtained for qualitative bacterial culture, immunohistochemistry for H. parasuis antigens, and light and transmission electron microscopy. Haemophilus parasuis was consistently isolated from the nasal cavity (17/17, 100%) and trachea (13/17, 76%) and rarely isolated from the lung (3/17, 18%) and blood stream (1/17, 6%) of infected pigs. Antigens of H. parasuis were sporadically detected on the nasal mucosa (6/17, 35%) and trachea (8/17, 47%). Light microscopic lesions included submucosal and intraepithelial infiltrates of neutrophils and infrequent, patchy loss of cilia. Ultrastructural changes in nasal mucosal epithelial cells included cell protrusion, loss of cilia, and dilation of the cytocavitary network. Bacteria were infrequently identified and were either within an amorphous material at the apical surface of the cilia or were between individual cilia. These results suggest H. parasuis associates with the nasal mucosa and can induce a suppurative rhinitis with nasal mucosal epithelial cell degeneration. This process may represent an initial event in the pathogenesis of H. parasuis infection of swine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9243000

  6. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  7. In Vitro Activity of ABT-773, a New Ketolide, against Recent Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Angela B.; Doern, Gary V.; Huynh, Holly K.; Wingert, Elizabeth M.; Rhomberg, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ABT-773 was evaluated against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates. ABT-773 was the most active antimicrobial tested against S. pneumoniae. ABT-773 and azithromycin were equivalent in activity against H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis and more active than either clarithromycin or erythromycin. PMID:10639382

  8. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage among Young Children in Metropolitan Atlanta in the Context of Vaccine Shortage and Booster Dose Deferral ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Jackson, Michael L.; Sharma, Dolly; Mair, Raydel; Bach, Michelle C.; Castillo, Dana; Ejigiri, O. Grace; Satola, Sarah; Cohn, Amanda C.; Jerris, Robert; Jain, Shabnam; Farley, Monica M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Messonnier, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term deferral of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine booster dose during a recent U.S. Hib vaccine shortage did not result in widespread Hib carriage in Atlanta, as the Hib carriage rate was found to be 0.3% (1/342). Hib colonization was significantly more common among males and day care attendees. PMID:22012977

  9. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  10. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  11. Detection of Treponema Denticola in Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis and in Symptomatic Apical Abscesses by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Ozbek, Ahmet; Erdogan, Aziz S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Treponema denticola in symptomatic apical periodontitis and in symptomatic apical abscesses by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Methods: Microbial samples were collected from 60 single-rooted teeth having carious lesions and necrotic pulps. For each tooth, clinical data including patient symptoms were recorded. Teeth were categorized by diagnosis as having symptomatic apical periodontitis or symptomatic apical abscess. Aseptic microbial samples were collected using paper points from 30 infected root canals and from aspirates of 30 abscesses. DNA was extracted from the samples by using a QIAamp® DNA mini-kit and analyzed with real-time PCR. Results: T. denticola was detected in 24 of 30 cases diagnosed as symptomatic apical abscesses (80%), and 19 of 30 cases diagnosed as symptomatic apical periodontitis (63.3%). In general T. denticola was found in 43 of 60 cases (71.6%). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that T. denticola can participate in the pathogenesis of symptomatic apical abscesses. PMID:19421390

  12. Treponema pallidum Lipoprotein TP0435 Expressed in Borrelia burgdorferi Produces Multiple Surface/Periplasmic Isoforms and mediates Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Nasereddin, Thayer; Alter, Laura; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Parveen, Nikhat

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete to colonize various tissues requires the presence of surface-exposed adhesins that have been difficult to identify due to the inability to culture and genetically manipulate T. pallidum. Using a Borrelia burgdorferi-based heterologous system and gain-in-function approach, we show for the first time that a highly immunogenic lipoprotein TP0435 can be differentially processed into multiple isoforms with one variant stochastically displayed on the spirochete surface. TP0435 was previously believed to be exclusively located in T. pallidum periplasm. Furthermore, non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain expressing TP0435 acquires the ability to bind to a variety of host cells including placental cells and exhibits slow opsonophagocytosis in vitro similar to poor ex vivo phagocytosis of T. pallidum by host macrophages reported previously. This phenomenon of production of both surface and periplasmic immunogenic lipoprotein isoforms has possible implications in immune evasion of the obligate pathogen T. pallidum during infection. PMID:27161310

  13. Prevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Sandoval-Sánchez, Juan Joel; Huerta-García, Gloria; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique; Mata-Marín, Luis Alberto; Sandoval-Ramirez, Jorge Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was developed, and 318 HIV-positive patients were evaluated from January to February 2013 at Hospital de Infectología, National Medical Center 'La Raza' (a tertiary care hospital specialising in infectious diseases in Mexico City). Laboratory data were screened for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Patients completed a questionnaire relating to socio-demographic data and factors associated with syphilis. Of the 318 patients, 83% were men. The mean age ± SD was 36 ± 11 years; 52% were men who have sex with men and 47% had undertaken higher education. The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among these patients was 25% (95% confidence interval 21%, 30%). Men who have sex with men had a significantly higher seroprevalence (30% vs. 15%, p = 0.009). We conclude that, in Mexico, there is a high seroprevalence of syphilis antibodies in HIV-infected patients and that men who have sex with men are the group most affected. PMID:24713227

  14. Recombinant Treponema pallidum Protein Tp0965 Activates Endothelial Cells and Increases the Permeability of Endothelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  15. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D’Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen’s factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  16. Treponema denticola Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Pathways through Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:17923521

  17. Treponema denticola Superoxide Reductase: In Vivo Role, In Vitro Reactivities and a Novel [Fe(Cys)4] Site†

    PubMed Central

    Caranto, Jonathan D.; Gebhardt, Linda L.; MacGowan, Charles E.; Limberger, Ronald J.; Kurtz, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo results are presented demonstrating that superoxide reductase (SOR) from the air-sensitive oral spirochete, Treponema denticola Td), is a principal enzymatic scavenger of superoxide in this organism. This SOR contains the characteristic non-heme [Fe(His)4Cys] active sites. No other metal-binding domain has been annotated for Td SOR. However, we found that Td SOR also accommodates a [Fe(Cys)4] site whose spectroscopic and redox properties resemble those in so-called 2Fe-SORs. Spectroscopic comparisons of the wild type and engineered Cys → Ser variants indicate that three of the Cys ligands correspond to those in [Fe(Cys)4] sites of “canonical” 2Fe-SORs, whereas the fourth Cys ligand residue has no counterpart in canonical 2Fe-SORs or in any other known [Fe(Cys)4] protein. Structural modeling is consistent with iron ligation of the “non-canonical” Cys residue across subunit interfaces of the Td SOR homodimer. The Td SOR was isolated with only a small percentage of [Fe(Cys)4] sites. However, quantitative formation of stable [Fe(Cys)4] sites was readily achieved by exposing the as-isolated protein to an iron salt, a disulfide reducing agent and air. The disulfide/dithiol status and iron occupancy of the Td SOR [Fe(Cys)4] sites could, thus, reflect intracellular redox status, particularly during periods of oxidative stress. PMID:22715932

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes isolated from dairy cattle with papillomatous digital dermatitis lesions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takahisa; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Chuma, Takehisa; Misawa, Naoaki

    2010-03-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 23 Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes isolated from dairy cattle with papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) lesions in Japan were investigated by a broth microdilution method using 15 antimicrobial agents. Although all MIC values showed a monomodal distribution, the MICs of the antimicrobial agents for 90% (MIC(90)) of the isolates tested varied among the agents examined. The MIC(90) values for penicillin G, ampicillin, and erythromycin were <0.06 microg/ml. In contrast, the MIC(90) values for kanamycin, streptomycin, rifampicin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and colistin were >128 microg/ml. Oxytetracycline, lincomycin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, ceftiofur, and gentamicin showed intermediate values, i.e., 0.5~32 microg/ml. The present study suggested that no isolate had acquired resistance to the antimicrobial agents examined, although they may have natural resistance to some agents. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility data would provide helpful information for PDD treatment and the development of a selective medium for isolating the organism effectively. PMID:19996562

  19. In vitro culture system to determine MICs and MBCs of antimicrobial agents against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain).

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J; Edmondson, D G

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for determining the susceptibility of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum to antimicrobial agents was developed, utilizing a tissue culture system which promotes the in vitro multiplication of this organism. In the absence of antibiotics, T. pallidum (Nichols virulent strain) multiplied an average of 10-fold when incubated for 7 days in the presence of Sf1Ep cottontail rabbit epithelial cell cultures. Varied concentrations of penicillin G, tetracycline, erythromycin, and spectinomycin were added to triplicate cultures to determine their effects on treponemal multiplication, motility, and virulence. The MIC of each antibiotic was defined as the lowest concentration which prevented treponemal multiplication, whereas the MBC was defined as the lowest concentration which abrogated the ability of the cultured treponemes to multiply and cause lesions in rabbits. The in vitro culture technique provided highly reproducible MICs and (in parentheses) MBCs of each of the antibiotics tested: aqueous penicillin G, 0.0005 (0.0025) microgram/ml; tetracycline, 0.2 (0.5) microgram/ml; erythromycin, 0.005 (0.005) microgram/ml; and spectinomycin, 0.5 (0.5) microgram/ml. The significance of these results in light of the in vivo activities and the previous in vitro evaluations of these antibiotics is discussed. The T. pallidum in vitro cultivation system shows promise as a method for studying the interaction between T. pallidum and antimicrobial agents and for screening new antibiotics for syphilis therapy. PMID:2964810

  20. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-Barrel Assembly Machinery A (BamA) Ortholog and Rare Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A. D.; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum (Tp) rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in Tp with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modeling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat-modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in Tp considerably larger than that of E. coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. Tp-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  1. Binding of glycosaminoglycans to the surface of Treponema pallidum and subsequent effects on complement interactions between antigen and antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T J; Miller, J N; Repesh, L A; Rice, M; Urquhart, A

    1985-01-01

    Acidified bovine serum albumin (acid BSA) reacts with glycosaminoglycans to form a precipitate. This reaction was adapted to Treponema pallidum to show glycosaminoglycans associated with the surface of the micro-organism. As testicular infection progressed from days 4 to 18, treponemes showed increasing amounts of these surface components. High speed centrifuging effectively removed the glycosaminoglycans, thus indicating that they were loosely bound. The subsequent addition of commercial preparations of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulphate resulted in their immediate adherence to the surface of the pathogens T pallidum and T pertenue, but not to the non-pathogens T vincenti, T denticola, or T phagedenis. The amount adhering to the treponemal surface varied depending on the concentration added. Intradermal inoculation showed that the virulence of T pallidum was not altered by the glycosaminoglycans associated with its surface. The coating of treponemes with hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulphate did not interfere with neutralising antibodies or antibodies found by radioimmunoassay using whole organisms. In contrast, hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulphate on the treponemal surface did interfere with immobilising antibodies. Results are discussed in terms of the potential role of the treponemal glycosaminoglycans in the infectious process. Images PMID:3936770

  2. Antigenic variation in Treponema pallidum: TprK sequence diversity accumulates in response to immune pressure during experimental syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Molini, Barbara J.; Kim, Eric Y.; Godornes, B. Charmie; Leader, B. Troy; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause chronic infections often employ antigenic variation to evade the immune response and persist in the host. In Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), the causative agent of syphilis, the TprK antigen undergoes variation of seven variable regions (V1-V7) by nonreciprocal recombination of silent donor cassettes with the tprK expression site. These V regions are the targets of the host humoral immune response during experimental infection. The present study addresses the causal role of the acquired immune response in the selection of TprK variants in two ways: 1) by investigating TprK variants arising in immunocompetent vs immunosuppressed hosts, and 2) by investigating the effect of prior specific immunization on selection of TprK variants during infection. V region diversity, particularly in V6, accumulates more rapidly in immunocompetent rabbits than in pharmacologically immunosuppressed rabbits (treated with weekly injections of methylprednisolone acetate). In a complementary experiment, rabbits pre-immunized with V6 region synthetic peptides had more rapid accumulation of V6 variant treponemes than control rabbits. These studies demonstrate that the host immune response selects against specific TprK epitopes expressed on T. pallidum, resulting in immune selection of new TprK variants during infection, confirming a role for antigenic variation in syphilis. PMID:20190145

  3. Recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 activates endothelial cells and increases the permeability of endothelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  4. Efficient preparation and metal specificity of the regulatory protein TroR from the human pathogen Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Li, Wei; Wei, Yaozhu; Jiang, Yindi; Tan, Xiangshi

    2013-10-01

    TroR is a putative metal-dependent regulatory protein that has been linked to the virulence of the human pathogen Treponema pallidum. It shares high homology with the well-known iron-dependent regulatory protein DtxR from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, as well as the manganese-dependent MntR from Bacillus subtilis. However, it has been uncertain whether manganese or zinc is the natural cofactor of TroR to date. Herein, we established an efficient method named "double-fusion tagging" to obtain soluble TroR for the first time. A series of studies, including ICP, CD, fluorescence, ITC, and electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), were performed to resolve the discrepancies in its metal-binding specificity. In addition, bioinformatic analysis as well as mutation studies were carried out to find the genetic relationships of TroR with its homology proteins. In conclusion, our findings indicate that TroR is a manganese-dependent rather than a zinc-dependent regulatory protein. PMID:23945957

  5. Biophysical and Bioinformatic Analyses Implicate the Treponema pallidum Tp34 Lipoprotein (Tp0971) in Transition Metal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Ouyang, Zhiming; Machius, Mischa; Knutsen, Gregory; Tomchick, Diana R.

    2012-01-01

    Metal ion homeostasis is a critical function of many integral and peripheral membrane proteins. The genome of the etiologic agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, is compact and devoid of many metabolic enzyme genes. Nevertheless, it harbors genes coding for homologs of several enzymes that typically require either iron or zinc. The product of the tp0971 gene of T. pallidum, designated Tp34, is a periplasmic lipoprotein that is thought to be tethered to the inner membrane of this organism. Previous work on a water-soluble (nonacylated) recombinant version of Tp34 established that this protein binds to Zn2+, which, like other transition metal ions, stabilizes the dimeric form of the protein. In this study, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation to establish that four transition metal ions (Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) readily induce the dimerization of Tp34; Cu2+ (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 1.7 μM) and Zn2+ (EC50 = 6.2 μM) were the most efficacious of these ions. Mutations of the crystallographically identified metal-binding residues hindered the ability of Tp34 to dimerize. X-ray crystallography performed on crystals of Tp34 that had been incubated with metal ions indicated that the binding site could accommodate the metals examined. The findings presented herein, coupled with bioinformatic analyses of related proteins, point to Tp34's likely role in metal ion homeostasis in T. pallidum. PMID:23042995

  6. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidum repeat) genes (tprE, tprG, and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames (ORFs) with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors (TFs), including four catabolite activator protein (CAP) homologs. In this work, sequences matching the E. coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG, and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homolog, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator which influences tpr promoter activity. PMID:19432808

  7. Characterization of the Treponema denticola prtP gene encoding a prolyl-phenylalanine-specific protease (dentilisin).

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Miura, T; Kuramitsu, H K; Okuda, K

    1996-01-01

    A chymotrypsin-like protease from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was purified by chromatographic techniques. The purified enzyme consisted of three polypeptides (38, 43, and 72 kDa). The protease exhibited specificity for peptide bonds containing phenylalanine and proline at the P1 and P2 positions, respectively, and was classified as a serine protease on the basis of inhibition studies. Naturally occurring protease inhibitors such as alpha1-antitrypsin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin had no effect on enzymatic activity. The enzyme degraded fibronectin, alpha1-antitrypsin, and gelatin while weakly degrading the immunoglobulin G heavy chain and type IV collagen. N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined for the 43- and 72-kDa proteins. On the basis of these sequences, the genes coding for the 43- and 72-kDa proteins were isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame which codes for the 72-kDa protein was designated prtP. This gene consists of 2,169 bp and codes for a protein with an Mr of 77,471. The protein appeared to be composed of a signal peptide region followed by a prosequence and the mature protein domain. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited similarity with that of the Bacillus subtilis serine protease subtilisin. The deduced properties of the sequence suggest that the 72-kDa protein is a chymotrypsin-like protease. However, the nature and function of the 43-kDa protein have not yet been determined. PMID:8945563

  8. Treponema pallidum Major Sheath Protein Homologue Tpr K Is a Target of Opsonic Antibody and the Protective Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Castro, Christa; Barrett, Lynn; Cameron, Caroline; Mostowfi, Maryam; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a family of genes that code for targets for opsonic antibody and protective immunity in T. pallidum subspecies pallidum using two different approaches, subtraction hybridization and differential immunologic screening of a T. pallidum genomic library. Both approaches led to the identification of a polymorphic multicopy gene family with predicted amino acid homology to the major sheath protein of Treponema denticola. One of the members of this gene family, tpr K, codes for a protein that is predicted to have a cleavable signal peptide and be located in the outer membrane of the bacterium. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of T. pallidum reveals that Tpr K is preferentially transcribed in the Nichols strain of T. pallidum. Antibodies directed to purified recombinant variable domain of Tpr K can opsonize T. pallidum, Nichols strain, for phagocytosis, supporting the hypothesis that this portion of the protein is exposed at the surface of the treponeme. Immunization of rabbits with the purified recombinant variable domain of Tpr K provides significant protection against infection with the Nichols strain of T. pallidum. This gene family is hypothesized to be central to pathogenesis and immunity during syphilis infection. PMID:9989979

  9. Treponema pallidum putative novel drug target identification and validation: rethinking syphilis therapeutics with plant-derived terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Upendra N; Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential proteins led to discovery of nineteen proteins distributed among six metabolic pathways unique to T. pallidum. One hundred plant-derived terpenoids, as potential therapeutic molecules against T. pallidum, were screened for their drug likeness and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity) properties. Subsequently the resulting nine terpenoids were docked with five unique T. pallidum targets through molecular modeling approaches. Out of five targets analyzed, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase was found to be the most promising target, while terpenoid salvicine was the most potent inhibitor. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of the best docked readily available natural compound, namely pomiferin (flavonoid) with that of the best docked terpenoid salvicine, revealed that salvicine was a more potent inhibitor than that of pomiferin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a terpenoid as a potential therapeutic molecule against T. pallidum with D-alanine:D-alanine ligase as a novel target. Further studies are warranted to evaluate and explore the potential clinical ramifications of these findings in relation to syphilis that has public health importance worldwide. PMID:25683888

  10. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen's factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  11. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  12. The time-dependent clearance of virulent Treponema pallidum in susceptible and resistant strains of guinea pigs is significantly different.

    PubMed

    Wicher, V; Wicher, K; Abbruscato, F; Auger, I; Rudofsky, U

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of clearance of Treponema pallidum spp. pallidum Nichols from skin and testes of susceptible C4-deficient (C4D) and -resistant Albany (Alb) strains of guinea pigs (gps) was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the rabbit infectivity test (RIT). For each strain there were two groups of animals, one infected with virulent T. pallidum (TP) and one control injected with heat-killed treponemes (HKTP). The kinetic studies and their statistical analysis showed that in the C4D strain the microbial clearance in both tissues was significantly slower (p < 0.005) and still incomplete at 3 months after infection. In the Alb strain the clearance was faster and apparently completed within a month. A greater permissiveness in bacterial growth in C4D compared to Alb appears to be one critical factor determining the different rate of local elimination after primary infection. In both strains there was some correlation between the severity and duration of cutaneous lesions and the local persistence of viable organisms. This correlation was not observed in testes. These studies suggest a genetic basis for the strain-specific susceptibility and resistance phenotypes in the pathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:10219257

  13. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidumrepeat) genes (tprE, tprG and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors, including four catabolite activator protein homologues. In this work, sequences matching the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homologue, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator that influences tpr promoter activity. PMID:19432808

  14. Treponema pallidum Lipoprotein TP0435 Expressed in Borrelia burgdorferi Produces Multiple Surface/Periplasmic Isoforms and mediates Adherence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Nasereddin, Thayer; Alter, Laura; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Giacani, Lorenzo; Parveen, Nikhat

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete to colonize various tissues requires the presence of surface-exposed adhesins that have been difficult to identify due to the inability to culture and genetically manipulate T. pallidum. Using a Borrelia burgdorferi-based heterologous system and gain-in-function approach, we show for the first time that a highly immunogenic lipoprotein TP0435 can be differentially processed into multiple isoforms with one variant stochastically displayed on the spirochete surface. TP0435 was previously believed to be exclusively located in T. pallidum periplasm. Furthermore, non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain expressing TP0435 acquires the ability to bind to a variety of host cells including placental cells and exhibits slow opsonophagocytosis in vitro similar to poor ex vivo phagocytosis of T. pallidum by host macrophages reported previously. This phenomenon of production of both surface and periplasmic immunogenic lipoprotein isoforms has possible implications in immune evasion of the obligate pathogen T. pallidum during infection. PMID:27161310

  15. Cellular Architecture of Treponema pallidum: Novel Flagellum, Periplasmic Cone, and Cell Envelope as Revealed by Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Bradley, Sherille D.; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z. Hong; Norris, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member in the spirochetal family. High resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided the detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of gram-negative bacteria. The 4 nm lipid bilayer of both outer and cytoplasmic membranes resolved in 3-D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located, cone-shaped structure at both ends of bacterium. Furthermore, 3-D subvolume averages of the periplasmic flagellar motors and filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Together, our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of the periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and escape host immune responses. PMID:20850455

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoea, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Treponema pallidum infection in antenatal and gynecological patients at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Apea-Kubi, Kwasi Akyem; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Sakyi, Bright; Kishimoto, Toshio; Ofori-Adjei, David; Hagiwara, Toshikatsu

    2004-12-01

    Five hundred and seventeen women attending the gynecology and obstetrics clinics of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital were examined for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Vaginal swabs were examined for Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Gardnerella vaginalis infection. Endocervical swabs were examined for Neisseria gonorrhoea and Chlamydia trachomatis using a recently developed RNA detection kit. Strain typing was performed to identify serovars of C. trachomatis. Sera were analyzed for Treponema pallidum with a passive-particle agglutination assay kit. The prevalence of infection with N. gonorrhoea was 0.6%, C. trachomatis 3.0%, and T. pallidum 5.6%. Eight samples were PCR-positive for C. trachomatis. Five of these were serovar G, and the rest were serovar E. All cases of mixed infections occurred in pregnant women. In conclusion, a high transmissible risk of T. pallidum infection was observed among our study population and in particular among our pregnant women. The absence of association between the presenting symptoms, clinical findings, and specific pathogens has implications for the syndromic approach to STI case management. The low prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoea may be due to self medication and requires further research in primary health institutions in rural areas to compare rates. PMID:15623949

  17. Sequence divergence in the Treponema denticola FhbB protein and its impact on factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel P.; McDowell, John V.; Rhodes, DeLacy V.; Allard, Anna; Caimano, Melissa; Bell, Jessica; Marconi, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Treponema denticola is an anaerobic spirochete whose abundance in the subgingival crevice correlates with the development and severity of periodontal disease. T. denticola’s ability to survive and thrive in the hostile environment of the periodontal pocket is due, at least in part, to its ability to bind factor H (FH), a negative regulator of the alternative complement pathway. The FH binding protein of T. denticola has been identified as FhbB and its atomic structure has been determined. The interaction of FH with T. denticola is unique in that FH bound to the cell surface is cleaved by the T. denticola protease, dentilisin. It has been postulated that FH cleavage by T. denticola leads to immune dysregulation in periodontal pockets. In this study, we conduct a comparative assessment of the sequence, properties, structure, and ligand binding kinetics of the FhbB proteins of strains 33521 and 35405. The biological outcome of the interaction of these strains with FH could differ significantly as 33521 lacks dentilisin activity. The data presented here offer insight into our understanding of the interactions of T. denticola with the host and its potential to influence disease progression. PMID:23601078

  18. Epitope mapping of B-cell determinants on the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15) with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Demecs, M; Taber, L H; Musher, D M

    1996-01-01

    The antigenicity of the 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15 or TpN15) was comprehensively evaluated in epitope-scanning studies with overlapping deca- and octapeptides and polygonal rabbit and human infant immunoglobulins (Igs) and antisera. This approach enabled us to identify potentially important regions and to determine the optimal dilutions of Igs or antisera for use in further studies. IgM and IgG from both species were capable of recognizing multiple, continuous epitopes. A total of 13 peptides, principally clustered in the central regions of the protein, were recognized by all syphilitic sera and Ig fractions. On the basis of window analyses, frequency profiles, and alanine substitution studies, five heptapeptides were selected for mimetic studies. Two of these five immunodominant, continuous epitopes initially appeared to be species specific; however, antisera elicited against mimetics of all five epitopes were polyspecific, recognizing similar motifs on several other treponemal proteins, including those of avirulent organisms. The only mimetic which yielded positive reactions with infant IgM and syphilitic sera in the absence of cross-reactions with rabbit antisera to avirulent treponemes was the variant of the VMYASSG motif. These findings are relevant to the development of simple, inexpensive assays for the serodiagnosis of active syphilis. PMID:8698467

  19. Gene conversion: a mechanism for generation of heterogeneity in the tprK gene of Treponema pallidum during infection.

    PubMed

    Centurion-Lara, Arturo; LaFond, Rebecca E; Hevner, Karin; Godornes, Charmie; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2004-06-01

    The tprK gene sequence of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) is heterogeneous within and among isolates. Heterogeneity in the tprK open reading frame is localized in seven discrete variable (V) regions, and variability results from apparent base changes, insertions or deletions. The TprK V regions are the focus of anti-TprK antibodies arising during infection. To test our hypothesis that V region sequences change during infection and passage, we developed a clonal isolate from the Chicago strain of T. pallidum and confirmed V region diversification during passage of this isolate. We describe the sequence anatomy of the seven V regions of tprK and the identification of putative donor sites for new V region sequences, and we propose a model for generation of new V regions by segmental gene conversion. These findings suggest that antigenic variation of TprK occurs in T. pallidum and may be important in immune evasion and persistence. PMID:15186410

  20. Protection against syphilis correlates with specificity of antibodies to the variable regions of Treponema pallidum repeat protein K.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cecilia A; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2003-10-01

    Syphilis has been recognized as a disease since the late 1400s, yet there is no practical vaccine available. One impediment to the development of a vaccine is the lack of understanding of multiple reinfections in humans despite the development of robust immune responses during the first episode. It has been shown that the Treponema pallidum repeat protein K (TprK) differs in seven discrete variable (V) regions in isolates and that the antibody response during infection is directed to these V regions. Immunization with TprK confers significant protection against infection with the homologous strain. We hypothesize that the antigenic diversity of TprK is involved in immune evasion, which contributes to the lack of heterologous protection. Here, using the rabbit model, we show a correlation between limited heterologous protection and tprK diversity in the challenge inoculum. We demonstrate that antibody responses to the V regions of one TprK molecule show limited cross-reactivity with heterologous TprK V regions. PMID:14500480