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Sample records for hairy cell leukemia

  1. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  2. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  3. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  4. Stages of Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  5. Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plenderleith, I. H.

    1970-01-01

    The clinical findings in 12 patients with an unusual type of leukemia have been reviewed. The leukemic cell cannot be identified with any of the normal hematopoietic cells or with any of the lymphomas and may best be referred to by the descriptive term “hairy cell”, which describes its appearance, most clearly seen on phase contrast microscopy. The patients were all males and the major clinical features were enlargement of the liver and spleen, with little lymph node enlargement. Hematologic findings in most patients have been anemia and thrombocytopenia with the characteristic abnormal cells present in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. The disease most often runs an indolent course and has shown little or no response to a variety of forms of treatment. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4939244

  6. General Information about Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  7. Treatment Options for Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  8. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  9. Hairy cell leukemia. Immunological study.

    PubMed

    Stela, R; Berceanu, S; Munteanu, N; Ursea, C; Motoiu, I; Moraru, I

    1990-01-01

    The study has been performed on peripheral blood and splenic malignant cells from 16 patients with hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). The cell surface markers were identified by rosette techniques and using monoclonal antibodies (m Ab). The surface markers' expression of the hairy cells (HC) varied. The E receptors, the T-cell antigens, the HLA-DR antigens and smIgG were either expressed or not according to the affected organ, the progress of illness, or the treatment. The surface pattern changed sometimes in the same patient during the progress of illness. These observations demonstrate that HCL is a unique disease with malignant cells characterized by a marked variability of the cell surface markers. To demonstrate the ability of hairy cells to bind labile smIgG, the cells were studied by affinity chromatography on SpA-Sepharose 6MB and by ES-rosette assay. The percent of cells bound on SpA-Sepharose varied between 6% and 66%, representing the hairy cells with labile-bound smIgG. With affinity chromatography it was also possible to separate the hairy cells with a special phenotype: T3+ T4+ T8+ T11+ surface membrane labile-bound IgG+ (11gG+) FcR+, HLA-DR+ EACD+ (Ripley rosette forming cells), resembling a normal subset of large granular lymphocytes (LGL). The percentage of these cells varied between 60% and 86% of the bound cells. These observations suggest that in HCL, the malignant transformation might involve a common progenitor for the B, T and LGL lineages, the hairy cell being a hybrid type of malignant cell. Its main immunological peculiarity is the marked mobility of the surface membrane structures and hence the lability (plasticity) of the surface markers' expression. PMID:2101805

  10. Hairy-cell leukemia and toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Chrobák, L; Bostíková, D; Mirová, S; Hozák, A; Radochová, D

    1982-01-01

    Investigation for Toxoplasma gondii infection using complement fixation test and microprecipitation method in agar gel was performed in fifteen patients with clinically and morphologically typical hairy-cell leukemia. Positive complement fixation test was found in four patients. In three patients an initially high complement fixation titer or its considerable increase associated with positive microprecipitation in agar gel suggested a recent toxoplasmosis. The importance of search for Toxoplasma gondii infection in hairy-cell leukemia patients especially before splenectomy and the necessity of reinvestigation after splenectomy is stressed. PMID:7133241

  11. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  12. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) About PLL and HCL There are other, less common types of leukemia, but they are generally subcategories of one ... both of which are types of chronic B-cell leukemia. B cells are a specific ...

  13. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  14. BRAF MUTATIONS IN HAIRY CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Trifonov, Vladimir; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Holmes, Antony; Kern, Wolfgang; Martelli, Maria Paola; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Pacini, Roberta; Wells, Victoria; Sportoletti, Paolo; Pettirossi, Valentina; Mannucci, Roberta; Elliott, Oliver; Liso, Arcangelo; Ambrosetti, Achille; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Forconi, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Inghirami, Giorgio; Capponi, Monia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Patti, Caterina; Arcaini, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Pileri, Stefano; Haferlach, Claudia; Schnittger, Susanne; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Foà, Robin; Farinelli, Laurent; Haferlach, Torsten; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Falini, Brunangelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a well defined clinico-pathological entity whose underlying genetic lesion is still obscure. Methods We searched for HCL-associated mutations by massively parallel sequencing of the whole exome of leukemic and matched normal mononuclear cells purified from the peripheral blood of one patient with HCL. Results Whole exome sequencing identified 5 missense somatic clonal mutations that were confirmed at Sanger sequencing, including a heterozygous V600E mutation involving the BRAF gene. Since the BRAF V600E mutation is oncogenic in other tumors, further analyses were focused on this genetic lesion. Sanger sequencing detected mutated BRAF in 46/46 additional HCL patients (47/47 including the index case; 100%). None of the 193 peripheral B-cell lymphomas/leukemias other than HCL that were investigated carried the BRAF V600E mutation, including 36 cases of splenic marginal zone lymphomas and unclassifiable splenic lymphomas/leukemias. Immunohistological and Western blot studies showed that HCL cells express phospho-MEK and phospho-ERK (the downstream targets of the BRAF kinase), indicating a constitutive activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in HCL. In vitro incubation of BRAF-mutated primary leukemic cells from 5 HCL patients with PLX-4720, a specific inhibitor of active BRAF, led to marked decrease of phosphorylated ERK and MEK. Conclusions The BRAF V600E mutation was present in all HCL patients investigated. This finding may have relevant implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis and targeted therapy of HCL (Funded by the Associazione Italiana Ricerca Cancro and others). PMID:21663470

  15. Laparoscopic splenectomy for hairy cell leukemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Adeniji, Beni Adegoke; Fallas, Moses; Incerpi, Marc; Hamburg, Solomon; Katz, Robert; Ogunyemi, Dotun

    2010-01-01

    Objective. We present a successful case of laparoscopic splenectomy for a massively enlarged spleen at 25 weeks of gestation for hairy cell leukemia in pregnancy in a woman with initial hemoglobin of 4.3 gm/dl and platelet count of 18,000/mm(3). Study Design. Case report. Results. This report provides an approach to management that may be applicable in those cases where thrombocytopenia or other clinical imperatives preclude delaying treatment till after pregnancy. Conclusion. Hairy cell leukemia is a clonal B-Cell malignancy, for which there is very limited experience worldwide for its management when it occurs during pregnancy. Laparoscopic splenectomy should be considered as a therapeutic option, even with a significantly enlarged spleen, in order to avoid the risks of fetal exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Unique considerations relating to pregnancy are highlighted. PMID:20886009

  16. Laparoscopic Splenectomy for Hairy Cell Leukemia in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Beni Adegoke; Fallas, Moses; Incerpi, Marc; Hamburg, Solomon; Katz, Robert; Ogunyemi, Dotun

    2010-01-01

    Objective. We present a successful case of laparoscopic splenectomy for a massively enlarged spleen at 25 weeks of gestation for hairy cell leukemia in pregnancy in a woman with initial hemoglobin of 4.3 gm/dl and platelet count of 18,000/mm3. Study Design. Case report. Results. This report provides an approach to management that may be applicable in those cases where thrombocytopenia or other clinical imperatives preclude delaying treatment till after pregnancy. Conclusion. Hairy cell leukemia is a clonal B-Cell malignancy, for which there is very limited experience worldwide for its management when it occurs during pregnancy. Laparoscopic splenectomy should be considered as a therapeutic option, even with a significantly enlarged spleen, in order to avoid the risks of fetal exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Unique considerations relating to pregnancy are highlighted. PMID:20886009

  17. 75 FR 54496 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 53202), an amendment to 38 CFR 3.309 to add hairy cell leukemia and other chronic B-cell leukemias, Parkinson's disease and ischemic heart disease to the list of diseases subject to... Cell Leukemia and Other Chronic B-Cell Leukemias, Parkinson's Disease and Ischemic Heart...

  18. Hairy cell leukemia: Update on molecular profiling and therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Grever, Michael R; Blachly, James S; Andritsos, Leslie A

    2014-09-01

    Hairy cell leukemia was initially described as a clinicopathologic entity more than 50 years ago. We have subsequently discovered that HCL is really at least two diseases: classical HCL and the hairy cell leukemia variant. The former is among a small group of cancers exceptional for being (nearly) unified by a single genetic lesion, the BRAF V600E mutation. Over the past three decades, tremendous progress in both diagnostic and prognostic clarification has been accompanied by therapeutic advances in classical HCL. Consequently, this once uniformly fatal disease has been converted in most cases into a chronic illness enabling patients to live long and productive lives. In response to standard therapy, patients have high complete remission rates. Unfortunately, the long-term survival curves have not plateaued, revealing that this disease is controlled but not cured. Though rare and representing only about 10% of an already rare disease, those patients with the variant fare exceptionally poorly with standard therapy: complete response rates to purine nucleoside analogs are reported to be less than 50%, whereas the complete response rates in classical HCL are up to 90%. Novel small molecules targeting BRAF and the B-cell receptor signaling complex, and biologic agents like antibodies and immunotoxin conjugates are being explored for those patients who have relapsed. Substantial opportunities for continued research remain. This complex and multi-faceted disease incorporates challenges from altered immunity associated with the underlying disease and its treatments. Considering the rarity of this malignancy, optimization of patient management requires multi-institutional collaboration. The Hairy Cell Leukemia Foundation (www.hairycellleukemia.org) was formed to coordinate these efforts. PMID:25110197

  19. Synchronous gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a hairy cell leukemia patient treated with pentostatin eight years prior.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Frank J; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-06-01

    Hairy cell leukemia patients are at increased risk for second malignancies, including both solid and lymphoid neoplasms. Along with other factors, multiple immune defects present in hairy cell leukemia likely contribute to subsequent carcinogenesis. We report herein a case of synchronous high-grade gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a patient with a history of hairy cell leukemia treated eight years prior with pentostatin. We include a review of immune alterations induced by both hairy cell leukemia and its therapies, and link them with the occurrence of second cancers in these patients. PMID:25712625

  20. CD27-positive hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Rie; Tabata, Chiharu; Iwama, Hideaki; Yasumizu, Ryoji; Kojima, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    We report a very rare case of a 45-year-old Japanese male patient with hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant (HCL-JV) expressing CD27. The patient showed a high number of abnormal peripheral lymphocytes, thrombocytopenia, and severe splenomegaly but no lymphadenopathy. Histology of the resected spleen showed small-sized lymphoma cells diffusely infiltrating the red pulp without follicle formation. By immunohistochemistry, lymphoma cells were negative for CD3, CD5, CD8, CD10, CD34, cyclin-D1, and annexin A1 but positive for CD20 and BCL2. BRAF V600E mutation was not observed. Bone marrow aspirate showed preserved normal hematopoietic cells with invasion of lymphoma cells in an interstitial pattern without obvious nodules. The cells had abundant pale cytoplasm and round nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli. After natural drying, the cells had unevenly distributed microvilli. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated positivity for CD11a, CD11c, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD27, surface IgG, and λ but not for CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD21, CD23, CD25, CD30, CD34, CD38, CD43, CD56, CD57, CD103, IgD, IgM, and κ. Monoclonal expansion of B cells was confirmed by an immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) rearrangement band as demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization. The lymphoma cells had unevenly distributed long, large, and broad-based microvilli, which resembled splenic diffuse red pulp small B cell lymphoma (SDRPL) cells. CD27 expression is extremely rare in HCL-JV, but the young age of the patient and high peripheral WBC counts were similar to HCL-JV, which suggests, in this case, an intermediate disease between SDRPL and HCL-JV. PMID:26868143

  1. The value of bone marrow biopsy in the prognosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL).

    PubMed

    Podzimek, K; Kerekes, Z; Chrobák, L; Skalská, H; Voglová, J; Mirová, S; Dulícek, P; Zák, P

    1994-01-01

    Histological findings in the bone marrow and their changes in the course of the disease and therapy were evaluated with respect to the prognosis in a group of 32 patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Two types of bone marrow infiltration by hairy cells (HCs), the diffuse type and the interstitial type, respectively were found. The diffuse type of infiltration and the minimal or absent residual hematopoiesis (RH) at presentation were found with statistical significance to be unfavorable prognostic findings when compared with interstitial infiltration and persisting RH (p < 0.01). Reticulin fibrosis is a characteristic finding in HCL and was found in all but 2 patients. PMID:7870215

  2. Epidemiology and environmental risk in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is an orphan subtype of leukaemia which constitutes less than 2% of all leukaemia's, with an incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 persons per annum. Median age at presentation is 55 years and it is 3-4 times more frequent in males. It is also more frequently encountered in whites and less in Asians, Africans and Arabs. The epidemiologic data are multi-factorial and influenced by ethnicity and geographical factors. Other reported associations relate to some environmental exposures and possible occupational factors. Smoking appears to have an inverse correlation with the development of hairy cell leukaemia, while farming and exposure to pesticides, petroleum products, diesel and ionizing radiation have also been reported to be associated with an increased risk. National and international collaborative efforts are needed in order to undertake more extensive studies involving larger patient cohorts, aiming to determine the role of occupational and environmental risk factors in the development of this rare form of chronic leukaemia. PMID:26614895

  3. Disseminated ulcerating lupus panniculitis emerging under interferon therapy of hairy cell leukemia: treatment- or disease-related?

    PubMed

    Urosevic-Maiwald, Mirjana; Nobbe, Stephan; Kerl, Katrin; Benz, Rudolf

    2014-04-01

    We report a 43-year-old woman, who underwent therapy with interferon-α for hairy cell leukemia. During interferon-α therapy she developed multiple subcutaneous swellings, accompanied by fever and fatigue. A skin biopsy revealed lobular, T-cell lymphocytic panniculitis. In conjunction with the clinical and immunological findings, the diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was made and interferon-α therapy stopped. Initially, she responded well to oral prednisone and hydroxychloroquine, but after several months she became resistant to it. Her condition worsened, she developed skin ulcers in the inflamed regions. Only with the leukemia-targeted therapy using cladribine and rituximab her skin condition could be controlled, suggesting hairy cell leukemia as an additional trigger of the lupus panniculitis. Our report is the first one to show induction of lupus panniculitis under interferon therapy of hairy cell leukemia and its presumable sustentation by the latter. PMID:24612373

  4. Disseminated ulcerating lupus panniculitis emerging under interferon therapy of hairy cell leukemia: treatment- or disease-related?

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Urosevic-Maiwald M; Nobbe S; Kerl K; Benz R

    2014-04-01

    We report a 43-year-old woman, who underwent therapy with interferon-α for hairy cell leukemia. During interferon-α therapy she developed multiple subcutaneous swellings, accompanied by fever and fatigue. A skin biopsy revealed lobular, T-cell lymphocytic panniculitis. In conjunction with the clinical and immunological findings, the diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was made and interferon-α therapy stopped. Initially, she responded well to oral prednisone and hydroxychloroquine, but after several months she became resistant to it. Her condition worsened, she developed skin ulcers in the inflamed regions. Only with the leukemia-targeted therapy using cladribine and rituximab her skin condition could be controlled, suggesting hairy cell leukemia as an additional trigger of the lupus panniculitis. Our report is the first one to show induction of lupus panniculitis under interferon therapy of hairy cell leukemia and its presumable sustentation by the latter.

  5. Targeting Mutant BRAF with Vemurafenib in Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Park, Jae H.; De Carolis, Luca; Chung, Stephen S.; Broccoli, Alessandro; Scott, Sasinya; Zaja, Francesco; Devlin, Sean; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Chung, Young Rock; Cimminiello, Michele; Kim, Eunhee; Rossi, Davide; Stone, Richard M.; Motta, Giovanna; Saven, Alan; Varettoni, Marzia; Altman, Jessica K.; Anastasia, Antonella; Grever, Michael R.; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rai, Kanti R.; Fraticelli, Vincenzo; Lacouture, Mario E.; Carella, Angelo Michele; Levine, Ross L.; Leoni, Pietro; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Ascani, Stefano; Capponi, Monia; Martelli, Maria Paola; Park, Christopher Y.; Pileri, Stefano Aldo; Rosen, Neal; Foà, Robin; Berger, Michael F.; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Falini, Brunangelo; Tallman, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BRAF-V600E is the genetic lesion underlying hairy cell leukemia. We assessed the safety and activity of the oral BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib in patients with hairy cell leukemia who relapsed after or were refractory to purine analogues. METHODS We conducted in Italy and USA two phase-2 single-arm multicenter studies of vemurafenib (960 mg twice daily) given for a median of 16 and 18 weeks, respectively. Primary endpoints were complete remission rate and overall response rate. Patient enrollment was completed (n=28) in the Italian trial in April 2013 and is still open (n=26/36) in the American trial. RESULTS Drug-related adverse events were usually of grade 1-2, and those most frequently requiring dose reductions were rash and arthralgia/arthritis; secondary cutaneous tumors (treated with simple excision) developed in 6/50 patients. Overall response rates were 96% (25/26 evaluable Italian patients) and 100% (24/24 evaluable American patients), obtained after a median of 8 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Complete response rates were 34.6% (9/26) and 41.7% (10/24), respectively. In the Italian trial, after a median follow-up of 23 months, the median relapse-free and treatment-free survivals were respectively 19 and 25 months in complete responders, and 6 and 18 months in partial responders. In the American trial, 1-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% and 91%, respectively. Frequent persistence of phospho-ERK+ bone marrow leukemic cells at the end of treatment suggests bypass MEK-ERK reactivation as a resistance mechanism. CONCLUSIONS A short oral course of vemurafenib proved safe and highly effective in relapsed/refractory hairy cell leukemia patients (Funded by AIRC, ERC, Roche/Genentech and others; EudractCT number: 2011-005487-13, ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01711632). PMID:26352686

  6. TGF-β1 induces bone marrow reticulin fibrosis in hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Medhat; Schwarzmeier, Josef D.; Hilgarth, Martin; Hubmann, Rainer; Duechler, Markus; Gisslinger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms that lead to reticulin fibrosis of bone marrow (BM) in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of TGF-β1, a potent fibrogenic cytokine, in this process. Immunoassays revealed that TGF-β1 is present at higher concentrations in BM, serum, and plasma of HCL patients in comparison with healthy donors (P < 0.001). RT-PCR and immunofluorescence studies showed that TGF-β1 is overexpressed at the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood, spleen, and BM mononuclear cells and that hairy cells (HCs) are the main source of TGF-β1. Active TGF-β1 correlated significantly with grades of BM fibrosis, infiltration with HCs, and serum procollagen type III aminoterminal propeptide (PIIINP). Ex vivo studies demonstrated that TGF-β1 significantly enhances the production and deposition of reticulin and collagen fibers by BM fibroblasts. In addition, BM plasma of HCL patients increased the synthesis of type I and type III procollagens, the main components of reticulin fibers, at the mRNA and protein levels. This fibrogenic activity of BM plasma was abolished by neutralizing anti–TGF-β1 antibodies. These results show, for the first time to our knowledge, that TGF-β1 is highly expressed in HCs and is directly involved in the pathogenesis of BM reticulin fibrosis in HCL. PMID:14991065

  7. Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia in a patient with hairy-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, A; Perazzo, A

    2010-06-01

    Severe pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1) infection is associated with risk factors such as pregnancy, obesity and immunosuppression. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of more severe or prolonged infection. We report a case of a hairy cell leukemia patient with H1N1 pneumonia which caused severe and prolonged illness. H1N1 virus pneumonia with meticillin-resistant Staphilococcus Aerues (MRSA) coinfection causing Acute Lung Injury (ALI) was treated with a double-dose of osentamyvir, a high dose of teicoplanin and a low dose of corticosteroids. Haematological findings included leucopenia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, reduction of gamma-globulins and natural killer (NK) cells. Reduction of NK and gamma-globulins may explain the development of severe illness and the prolonged illness Neutropenia may explain the MRSA co-infection. Lymphopenia is directly associated with virus action and is considered to be a marker of the swine influenza in adults. PMID:20949777

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  9. Current Therapy and New Directions in the Treatment of Hairy Cell Leukemia: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sarvaria, Aditya; Topp, Zheng; Saven, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic B-cell leukemia noted for an indolent course that ultimately results in cytopenias and massive splenomegaly. Whereas treatment with the nucleoside purine analogues cladribine and pentostatin results in lengthy remissions in nearly all patients with HCL, most patients will experience relapse while a small percentage of patients' disease fails to respond to therapy in the first place. Retreatment with a purine nucleoside analogue often leads to an effective but limited response. For decades, few other viable therapeutic options were available to these patients who required retreatment. Recently, new insights into the mechanism of disease of HCL have led to research in new potential treatment agents, either alone or with a purine nucleoside analogue. Clinical trials with rituximab, bendamustine, and conjugate immunotoxins will reveal what role these therapies will have in HCL treatment. A better understanding of the BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway and the B-cell signaling pathway has allowed further exploration into the novel drugs vemurafenib, dabrafenib, trametinib, and ibrutinib. PMID:26513168

  10. Recurrent CDKN1B (p27) mutations in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sascha; Hüllein, Jennifer; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Hutter, Barbara; Gonzalez, David; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J S; Oleś, Małgorzata; Else, Monica; Liu, Xiyang; Słabicki, Mikołaj; Wu, Bian; Troussard, Xavier; Dürig, Jan; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Dearden, Claire; von Kalle, Christof; Granzow, Martin; Jauch, Anna; Fröhling, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Torsten; Ho, Anthony D; Richter, Daniela; Brors, Benedikt; Glimm, Hanno; Matutes, Estella; Abdel Wahab, Omar; Zenz, Thorsten

    2015-08-20

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is marked by near 100% mutational frequency of BRAFV600E mutations. Recurrent cooperating genetic events that may contribute to HCL pathogenesis or affect the clinical course of HCL are currently not described. Therefore, we performed whole exome sequencing to explore the mutational landscape of purine analog refractory HCL. In addition to the disease-defining BRAFV600E mutations, we identified mutations in EZH2, ARID1A, and recurrent inactivating mutations of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1B (p27). Targeted deep sequencing of CDKN1B in a larger cohort of HCL patients identify deleterious CDKN1B mutations in 16% of patients with HCL (n = 13 of 81). In 11 of 13 patients the CDKN1B mutation was clonal, implying an early role of CDKN1B mutations in the pathogenesis of HCL. CDKN1B mutations were not found to impact clinical characteristics or outcome in this cohort. These data identify HCL as having the highest frequency of CDKN1B mutations among cancers and identify CDNK1B as the second most common mutated gene in HCL. Moreover, given the known function of CDNK1B, these data suggest a novel role for alterations in regulation of cell cycle and senescence in HCL with CDKN1B mutations. PMID:26065650

  11. Glucose metabolism of hairy cells.

    PubMed

    Kraut, E H; Husney, R M; Sagone, A L

    1992-08-01

    Hairy cell leukemia is a malignant B-cell disorder characterized by splenomegaly and pancytopenia. The malignant cell is morphologically unique and characterized by fine cytoplasmic projections. Although studies of the cell have revealed important information about its proliferative capacity, cell surface, and membrane composition, less is known about the metabolic characteristics of the cell. We have previously investigated the oxidative metabolism of the hairy cell and have suggested that hairy cells might have a unique glucose metabolism compared to normal lymphocytes. This is indicated by a high rate of [6-14C]glucose oxidation in short-term culture consistent with an active Kreb's cycle and a high ratio of [6-14C]glucose oxidation to [1-14C] glucose oxidation. In this study, we evaluated an additional group of patients with hairy cell leukemia prior to or after treatment with the experimental drug 2'-deoxycoformycin (dCF). We found that in seven of eight patients the leukemic cells had a pattern similar to that previously described and that all of these seven patients had a significant response to therapy. The cells of the eighth patient had minimal Kreb's cycle activity, and at the time of study the patient was resistant to therapy with dCF. The metabolic activity of hairy cells may distinguish them from other lymphoid populations and may be a marker for sensitivity to dCF. PMID:1640737

  12. Is it really possible to cure hairy cell leukemia patients only with frontline therapy?

    PubMed

    Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Stefoni, Vittorio; Broccoli, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Gandolfi, Letizia; Casadei, Beatrice; Maglie, Roberto; Pileri, Stefano; Argnani, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) patients could have an excellent prognosis with adequate treatment. Treatments are not generally curative but are extremely effective in inducing long-lasting clinical remissions. An observational retrospective study was conducted on a single-center registry of 144 patients with a median follow-up of 11.5 years, focusing on long-lasting continuous first complete remissions (CR) wondering if patients can be cured only with front-line approach. CR for more than 5 years after first-line therapy were found in 22.2 % cases. The median duration of response was 9.8 years, while for relapsed patients, the first response had a median duration of 2.4 years. Three different subsets of long-lasting first CR were identified: 15 patients are between 5 and 10 years with a median duration of CR of 6.5 years; 7 patients are between 10 and 15 years with a median duration of CR of 12.3 years; and 10 patients present a follow-up superior to 15 years with a median duration of CR of 20.0 years. There is a need for continuous study in this field to better define the optimal therapeutic regimen and, in particular, the biological issues since at least 20-25 % of HCL patients can be cured with only one treatment. PMID:24752417

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Cladribine: Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Administration in Hairy Cell Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Ola; Namour, Alfred Elias; El-Gammal, Mosaad M; Mahmoud, Tarek Yakout; Fortpied, Catherine; Abdel-Malek, Raafat; Ramadan, Safaa

    2015-01-01

    Cladribine induces durable complete remission (CR) in approximately 85% of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) patients. In Egypt, cladribine is mainly used as IV continuous infusion at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day for 7 days and as SC bolus injection at a dose of 0.14 mg/kg/day for 5 days. We aimed to compare the outcome and toxicity between these two regimens. We retrospectively collected data from HCL patients treated at the National Cancer Institute and its affiliated center, Nasser Institute, Cairo, Egypt. Forty-nine patients were identified, 18 treated with the IV regimen (IV group) and 31 with the SC regimen (SC group). Forty-one patients were newly diagnosed. Patient characteristics were balanced across the two groups. The CR rates in the IV and the SC group were 94% and 97%, respectively. The main complications in the IV group and the SC were neutropenia G3–4 (67% vs. 87%), mucositis mainly G1–2 (67% vs 32%) and infections (mainly viral, 78% vs 34%). In the IV group, five patients died, three of progression and infection, one of unknown cause and one of late heart failure. In the SC group, one patient died of disease progression and one of second cancer. After 33.5 months, median follow-up, the 3-year event free survival was 60% and 96%, respectively (p=0.104). The 3-year overall survival was 81% and 100%, respectively (p=0.277). In conclusion, SC cladribine is an excellent alternative to the IV regimen for the treatment of HCL. PMID:26543527

  14. [Lymph node enlargement in hairy cell leukemia and problems with significant abdominal lymphadenopathy].

    PubMed

    Zák, P; Chrobák, L; Simáková, E; Michl, A; Voglová, J; Mirová, S; Podzimek, K

    1993-09-01

    Enlargement of nodes in leukaemia with hairy cells (LVB) during the initial examination is rarely encountered. In the final stage of the disease it was found in six of our ten patients. A special situation is marked enlargement of retroperitoneal nodes observed in two patients. In one of them the nodes diminished after irradiation, in the second patient irradiation was not possible because of severe pancytopenia. Treatment with alpha-interferon failed previously in this patient. The question remains whether marked enlargement of the abdominal nodes is part of the picture of the disease or whether it is the manifestation of transformation of the disease into a more acute type. The authors recommend examination of the abdominal nodes by means of computed tomography (CT) already during the initial examination and during the subsequent course of the disease, in particular when there are signs of relapse. PMID:8212645

  15. T lymphocyte function in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sabbe, L J; Meijer, C J; Jansen, J

    1980-01-01

    The high incidence of infections characteristic of impaired cell-mediated immunity in patients with hairy cell leukemia led us to study T lymphocyte function in sixteen patients with the lymphocyte transformation test. All patients showed imparied responses to mitogens, attributable to one or more of the following causes: dilution of responsive T cells by inert hairy cells, shortage of monocytes to give adequate interaction with the T cells and a significant decrease in the number of T cells with Fcmu receptors proportional to the percentage of hairy cells in the peripheral blood. The response to antigens was severely depressed; PPD was one of the few antigens that induced positive reactions in half the cases. We conclude that in patients with hairy cell leukaemia, T lymphocyte function, as tested in a proliferative assay, is severely impaired and that this may contribute to the deficient resistance to infection. PMID:6970640

  16. A comprehensive immunophenotypic marker analysis of hairy cell leukemia in paraffin-embedded bone marrow trephine biopsies--a tissue microarray study.

    PubMed

    Tth-Liptk, Judit; Piukovics, Klra; Borbnyi, Zita; Demeter, Judit; Bagdi, Enik?; Krencs, Lszl

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is an uncommon B cell lymphoproliferation characterized by a unique immunophenotype. Due to low number of circulating neoplastic cells and 'dry tap' aspiration, the diagnosis is often based on BM trephine biopsy. We have performed a consecutive immunohistochemical analysis to evaluate diagnostic usefulness of various HCL markers (CD11c, CD25, CD68, CD103, CD123, CD200, annexin A1, cyclin D1, DBA.44, HBME-1, phospho-ERK1/2, TRAP, and T-bet) currently available against fixation resistant epitopes. We analyzed tissue microarrays consisting of samples gained from 73 small B-cell lymphoma cases, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL) (n = 32), HCL variant (HCL-v) (n = 4), B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) (n = 11), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) (n = 3), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (n = 10), splenic diffuse red pulp small B cell lymphoma (SDRPL) (n = 2), splenic B cell marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (n = 8), and splenic B cell lymphoma/leukemia, unclassifiable (SBCL) (n = 3) cases. The HCL cases were 100% positive for all but 2 (DBA.44 and CD123) of these markers. Annexin A1 showed 100% specificity and accuracy, which was followed by CD123, pERK, CD103, HBME-1, CD11c, CD25, CD68, cyclin D1, CD200, T-bet, DBA.44, and TRAP, in decreasing order. In conclusion, our results reassured the high specificity of annexin A1 and pERK, as well as the diagnostic value of standard HCL markers of CD11c, CD25, CD103, and CD123 also in paraffin-embedded BM samples. Additional markers, including HBME-1, cyclin D1, CD200, and T-bet also represent valuable tools in the differential diagnosis of HCL and its mimics. PMID:24903677

  17. [An unusual course in hairy-cell leukemia with marked abdominal lymphadenopathy, leukemic infiltration of the cornea and skin changes].

    PubMed

    Zák, P; Chrobák, L; Podzimek, K; Hejcmanová, D; Voglová, J; Dulícek, P; Mirová, S

    1996-07-01

    The authors describe a female patient suffering from hairy-cell leukaemia. Already at the onset of the disease, apart from marked splenomegaly, sonography revealed marked retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. During the subsequent course skin changes developed such as vasculitis and leukaemic infiltrates of the cornea on both eyes. The patient was successfully treated with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA, Leustatin). PMID:8928422

  18. A role for radiation in the treatment of hairy cell leukemia complicated by massive lymphadenopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Orringer, E P; Varia, M A

    1980-04-15

    A patient with leukemic reticuloendotheliosis is described who two years following splenectomy developed massive retroperitoneal, abdominal, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Therapeutic intervention was necessary because the bulky tumor masses produced disabling pain in the back and chest regions. Low-dose radiation to the involved fields produced prompt regression of the adenopathy along with dramatic pain relief. This case suggests that hairy cells may be quite sensitive to radiation, and this therapeutic modality should be considered, especially when local problems are present. PMID:6154523

  19. An otherwise typical case of non-Japanese hairy cell leukemia with CD10 and CDw75 expression: response to cladaribine phosphate therapy.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, C H; Oza, Y V; Skelly, M E

    1999-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) in Western patients typically expresses CD19, CD20, CD11c, CD25, HLA-DR, and IgG/lambda and lacks expression of CD5 and CD10. The immunophenotype is in contrast to Japanese HCL which typically expresses CD5 and CD10. Western and Japanese HCL also differ in their clinical presentation and response to treatment with alpha-interferon. We report a case of non-Japanese HCL which presented typically with pancytopenia; however, the immunophenotype was atypical with expression of CD10 and CDw75. CDw75 expression has not previously been described in either Japanese or non-Japanese HCL. The patient achieved a marked partial pathologic response and complete clinical response to treatment with cladaribine phosphate. PMID:10414592

  20. Hairy Cell Leukemia Presenting with Isolated Skeletal Involvement Successfully Treated by Radiation Therapy and Cladribine: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Bulut-Dereli, Sanem; Yıldız, Eren; Dogan, Ibrahim Oner; Nalcaci, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) in a 55-year-old male presenting with isolated skeletal disease as the initial manifestation without abnormal peripheral blood counts, bone marrow involvement, or splenomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only two previous reports of a similar case. The patient presented with pain in the right femur. Anteroposterior radiographs of both femurs revealed mixed lytic-sclerotic lesions. PET scan showed multiple metastatic lesions on axial skeleton, pelvis, and both femurs. Histopathological examination of the bone biopsy revealed an infiltrate of HCL. Localized radiation therapy to both proximal femurs and subsequently 4 weeks later, a 7-day course of 0.1 mg/kg/day cladribine provided complete remission with relief of symptoms and resolution of bone lesions. We addressed the manifestations and management of HCL patients with skeletal involvement. PMID:26788382

  1. Multicenter retrospective analysis regarding the clinical manifestations and treatment results in patients with hairy cell leukemia: twenty-four year Turkish experience in cladribine therapy.

    PubMed

    Hacioglu, Sibel; Bilen, Yusuf; Eser, Ali; Sivgin, Serdar; Gurkan, Emel; Yildirim, Rahsan; Aydogdu, Ismet; Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kayikci, Omur; Tombak, Anil; Kuku, Irfan; Celebi, Harika; Akay, Meltem Olga; Esen, Ramazan; Korkmaz, Serdal; Keskin, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this multicenter retrospective analysis, we aimed to present clinical, laboratory and treatment results of 94 patients with Hairy cell leukemia diagnosed in 13 centers between 1990 and 2014. Sixty-six of the patients were males and 28 were females, with a median age of 55. Splenomegaly was present in 93.5% of cases at diagnosis. The laboratory findings that came into prominence were pancytopenia with grade 3 bone marrow fibrosis. Most of the patients with an indication for treatment were treated with cladribine as first-line treatment. Total and complete response of cladribine was 97.3% and 80.7%. The relapse rate after cladribine was 16.6%, and treatment related mortality was 2.5%. Most preferred therapy (95%) was again cladribine at second-line, and third line with CR rate of 68.4% and 66.6%, respectively. The 28-month median OS was 91.7% in all patients and 25-month median OS 96% for patients who were given cladribine as first-line therapy. In conclusion, the first multicenter retrospective Turkish study where patients with HCL were followed up for a long period has revealed demographic characteristics of patients with HCL, and confirmed that cladribine treatment might be safe and effective in a relatively large series of the Turkish study population. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25393847

  2. Medical History, Lifestyle, and Occupational Risk Factors for Hairy Cell Leukemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.; Hughes, Ann Maree; Smith, Alex; Glimelius, Bengt; Habermann, Thomas M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Staines, Anthony; Norman, Aaron D.; Cerhan, James R.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with marked male predominance. Our aim was to identify key risk factors for HCL. Methods A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 154 histologically confirmed HCL cases and 8834 controls from five case–control studies, conducted in Europe and Australia, was undertaken. Age-, race and/or ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results The usual patterns for age and sex in HCL were observed, with a median age of 55 years and sex ratio of 3.7 males to females. Cigarette smoking was inversely associated with HCL (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.71) with dose–response relationships observed for duration, frequency, and lifetime cigarette smoking (P trend < .001). In contrast, occupation as a farmer was positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.36 to 4.01), with a dose–response relationship observed for duration (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 0.85 to 3.88 for ≤10 years vs never; and OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.50 to 5.93 for >10 years vs never; P trend = .025). Adult height was also positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.39 to 5.29 for upper vs lower quartile of height). The observed associations remained consistent in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our observations of an increased risk of HCL from farming exposures and decreased risk from smoking exposures, independent of one another, support a multifactorial origin and an etiological specificity of HCL compared with other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. The positive association with height is a novel finding that needs replication. PMID:25174032

  3. Concentrations of organochlorines related to titers to Epstein-Barr virus early antigen IgG as risk factors for hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, M; Hardell, L; Lindström, G; Wingfors, H; Hardell, K; Linde, A

    2000-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare chronic B-cell malignancy that, according to modern classifications, is a subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). A rapid increase in incidence of NHL has been reported in many countries. The reasons for this increase are largely unknown, but exposure to organochlorines has been suggested as a risk factor. Epstein-Barr virus is a human herpesvirus that has been associated with certain subgroups of NHL. In this study, we measured lipid adjusted blood concentrations (in nanogram per gram) of 36 congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and four subgroups of chlordanes (trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor, MC6, and oxychlordane) in incident cases of HCL and controls from the general population. We obtained results on organochlorines and antibodies for 54 cases and 54 controls. Titers of antibodies to the Epstein-Barr early antigen and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen, measured as P107, were correlated to concentrations of organochlorines to evaluate the possibility of an interaction between these factors in the pathogenesis of HCL. We found no significant difference in lipid-adjusted blood concentrations of total PCBs, p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes between cases and controls. Titers of antibodies to Epstein-Barr early antigen IgG [Greater and equal to] 40 were correlated to an increased risk for HCL. This risk was further increased in those with a level above the median value of p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes, suggesting an interaction between Epstein-Barr virus and a higher concentration of these chemicals. We also found increased risk for the sum of immunotoxic PCB group. PMID:10811571

  4. Replication of type I herpes simplex virus in primary cultures of hairy cell leukemic leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pozner, L. H.; Daniels, C. A.; Cooper, J. A.; Cohen, H. J.; Logue, G. L.; Croker, B. P.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of leukemic leukocytes to support the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) was studied. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from the peripheral blood of patients with a variety of lymphoid leukemias were isolated on Ficoll-Hypaque gradients and infected with HSV at a multiplicity of infection of 5 to 10. No virus growth was detected in cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9), acute lymphocytic leukemia (1), or lymphosarcoma cell leukemia (2), HSV replication did occur in hairy cell leukemic MNL from all of 4 patients studied. Maximal titers of 10(3.7) to 10(4.7) PFU/ml occurred 1 to 7 days after incubation. By electron microscopy, herpesvirus particles were seen in the nuclei of these infected cells after 3 days of culture, but none was seen in the cells not exposed to virus. Fluorescent antibody examination confirmed the presence of HSV antigens in the nuclei of infected hairy cells. No difference in the adsorption or penetration of the virus was found with the various MNL studied. Productive infection of the cells thus appeared to depend on the ability of the leukocyte ;o support a later stage of infection, either uncoating or replication of the virus. Images Figure 1 PMID:202167

  5. A predictive nutritional model for plant cells and hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Bouchard-Marchand, E; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2008-01-01

    A structured nutritional model is proposed to describe growth and nutritional behavior of Eschscholtzia californica suspension cells and Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota hairy roots in in vitro culture. The model describes the cells specific growth rate from concentration of intracellular nutrients such as inorganic phosphate (Pi), nitrogen sources (NO(3) (-) and NH(4) (+)) and sugars. Two-level Michaelis-Menten kinetics are used to describe Pi and NO(3) (-) uptake and simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics for description of sugars uptake. Model parameters for each cell line were calibrated using data from batch cultures. The predictive capacity of the model was tested using data from medium exchange hairy root cultures. The model describes growth and nutritional behavior for the cell and hairy root lines. A sensitivity analysis was performed to identify critical model parameters and effect of initial conditions. The cell and hairy roots lines are also compared from their kinetic parameters. The kinetic model is efficient for describing and predicting growth and nutritional behaviors of suspension cells and hairy roots. PMID:17614323

  6. Hairy cell leukaemia-variant: Disease features and treatment.

    PubMed

    Matutes, Estella; Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Campo, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia-variant (HCL-V) is a rare B-cell malignancy that affects elderly males and manifests with splenomegaly, lymphocytosis and cytopenias without monocytopenia. The neoplastic cells have morphological features of prolymphocytes and hairy cells. The immunophenotype is that of a clonal B-cell CD11c and CD103 positive but, unlike classical HCL, CD25, CD123 and CD200 negative. The spleen histology is similar to classical HCL and the pattern of bone marrow infiltration is interstitial and/or intrasinusoidal. Mutations of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGVH) are seen in two thirds of cases with a preferential VH4-34 family usage. There is no distinct chromosomal abnormality but del17p13 and mutations of the TP53 gene are frequent. Mutations in the MAP2K1 gene have been documented in half of the cases. The course is chronic with median survivals of 7-9 years. Patients are refractory to purine analogues and the most effective therapy is the combination of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine and Rituximab. PMID:26614904

  7. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  8. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma and hairy cell leukaemia variant. This can be done by assessment of the spleen but as this is now rarely performed in this disorder distinction is almost always possible by a combination of morphological and immunophenotypic studies on bone marrow trephine biopsy, which can be supplemented by assessment of BRAF-V600E mutation assessment in borderline cases. PMID:26614898

  9. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of

  10. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  11. Donor cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arguelles, Alejandro

    2012-04-01

    Minimal residual disease refers to the tumour cells that are still present in a given patient after completion of a therapeutic scheme. The demonstration and quantification of residual neoplastic cells has a crucial impact in clinical decision making, for it might prompt continuation of treatment, while the absence of such cells might serve as evidence to withdraw therapy. Therefore, both sensitivity and specificity of the methods used to unravel residual neoplastic cells must be highly reliable and robust. Flow cytometry has been widely used for this purpose, and its clinical performance depends mainly on the criteria of interpretation, rather than in the technique by itself; molecular biology techniques have proved to be highly sensitive and specific but unfortunately they cannot be used in all patients or in all types of leukemia. Finally, the development of donor cell leukemia in transplanted patients, might mimic residual disease and add more confusion to an already controversial issue. These topics are discussed in this paper. PMID:22507784

  12. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation. PMID:23243287

  13. Spontaneous mouse erythrocyte-rosette formation: correlation with surface immunoglobulin phenotype in hairy-cell leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, G F; Cawley, J C

    1980-01-01

    Mouse-rosette formation was investigated in a variety of leukaemias and lymphomas, and it was found that this phenomenon was restricted to the B lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and hairy-cell leukaemia. Eighteen of nineteen cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia expressed the mouse receptor, but only eight of fifteen cases of hairy-cell leukaemia showed significant mouse rosette formation by peripheral blood cells. A much higher percentage of splenic hairy cells, compared with peripheral blood cells, formed mouse rosettes, but receptor expression was found to be dependent on the surface immunoglobulin (SIg) phenotype. Cases forming mouse rosettes had multiple heavy chain isotypes including IgD on the surface, but the ontogenically more mature SIgG-only cells from other cases failed to form rosettes, whether from peripheral blood or spleen. Cultured hairy cells lost the ability to form mouse rosettes, and receptor expression by peripheral blood hairy cells fluctuated widely in the days following splenectomy. The results suggest that the mouse erythrocyte receptor is an early marker in B cell differentiation and that receptor expression by individual cells may depend on the age of the cell. PMID:6966990

  14. [Plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Aurlie; Bay, Jacques Olivier; Tournilhac, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare disorder which develops spontaneously (primary PCL) or evolves in patients with multiple myeloma (secondary PCL). It is defined by the presence of 2 10(9)/L peripheral blood plasma cells or plasmacytosis accounting for more than 20 % of the differential white cell count. PCL presents more often extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, as well as impaired renal function. Cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations observed in PCL lead to escape from immune surveillance and independence from the bone marrow microenvironment with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokines receptors. The outcome of PCL has improved with combination approaches with novel agents (including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide) and with autologous stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently available for young patients. This article is an overview of this rare and severe disease and the different therapeutics options that are recommended. PMID:25418598

  15. Characterisation of a new cell line (CJ18) from a patient with 'hairy' cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Skinnider, L F; Ha, T; Bergen, S; Wang, H C

    1985-10-01

    A cell line (CJ18) has been established from the peripheral blood of a patient with hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) in a leukaemic phase. They grow slowly in large clumps with a doubling time of 3-4 d. 8% show positivity for surface immunoglobulin G and a small percentage (5%) are positive for intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin. They are B1,Ia1 positive and CALL, TdT and OKM1 negative. Although they are Epstein Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) positive they have several features not found in other EBNA positive B lymphoblastoid cell lines which suggest they may be derived from the patient's leukaemic hairy cells. They are strongly positive for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, esterase positive, contain numerous lysosomes and are able to phagocytose sheep red blood cells after exposure to tetradecanoyl-12, 13-phorbol acetate (TPA). Following exposure to retinoic acid and TPA they adhere to plastic with numerous slender processes, a feature seen in HCL cells. PMID:4081642

  16. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-21

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  17. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  19. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic up Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic - Statistics › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - Chronic ...

  1. Myelosuppression in HCL: role of hairy cells, T cells and haematopoietic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmeier, J D; Gasché, C G; Hilgarth, M F; Reinisch, W W; Göbl, S; Berger, R

    1994-05-01

    To elucidate mechanisms which may be responsible for the haematopoietic insufficiency in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), we investigated in an autologous in vitro system the influence of haematopoietic growth factors (CSFs) and the effects of hairy cells (HCs) as well as T cells on the formation of haematopoietic colonies (CFU). Colony forming assays were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 6 HCL patients. To remove HCs, PBMCs were subjected to complement-mediated lysis, T cells were removed by E-rosette formation. Assays were done with and without recombinant human (rh) interleukin-3 (IL-3) and rh granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). All 6 patients exhibited a severe reduction of their circulating progenitor cell (CPC) compartment. There was no correlation between the degree of colony reduction and the number of HCs. However, a correlation was found between the numbers of CPCs of HCL patients and healthy donors and the monocyte counts in these groups (r = 0.8573, p < 0.001). The removal of autologous HCs, but also of T cells, resulted in a significant increase in colony formation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-mix). In none of the experiments, however, did colony numbers come close to the normal range. This was only achieved by supplementation of the culture medium with rh IL-3 and rh GM-CSF. The results suggest that the haematopoietic failure observed in HCL patients is probably due to an inadequate supply of CSFs as well as to an inhibitory activity of HCs and T cells which might exert their effects in a synergistic fashion. There is also evidence that the lack of monocytes plays a role in the development of the haematopoietic insufficiency in HCL. PMID:8020624

  2. Leukemia stem cells: the root of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2015-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a chromosome translocation that generates the Bcr-Abl oncogene encoding a constitutive kinase activity. Despite remarkable success in controlling CML at chronic phase by Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a significant proportion of CML patients treated with TKIs develop drug resistance due to the inability of TKIs to kill leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are responsible for initiation, drug resistance, and relapse of CML. Therefore, there is an urgent need for more potent and safer therapies against leukemia stem cells for curing CML. A number of LSC-associated targets and corresponding signaling pathways, including CaMKII-γ, a critical molecular switch for co-activating multiple LSC-associated signaling pathways, have been identified over the past decades and various small inhibitors targeting LSC are also under development. Increasing evidence shows that leukemia stem cells are the root of CML and targeting LSC may offer a curable treatment option for CML patients. This review summarizes the molecular biology of LSC and its-associated targets, and the potential clinical application in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:25749979

  3. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... two are acute, meaning they get worse quickly. chronic lymphocytic leukemia chronic myeloid leukemia acute myeloid leukemia acute lymphocytic leukemia Chronic and Acute Leukemia Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia are ...

  4. Sensory Cells of the Fish Ear: A Hairy Enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, A. N.; Saidel, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of the ears in teleost fishes has led to the tentative suggestion that otolithic endorgans may function differently, in different species. Recently, evidence has demonstrated different 'types' of sensory hair cells can be found in the ears of teleost fishes, and individual hair cell types are found in discrete regions of individual sensory, epithelia. The presence of multiple hair cell types in fishes provides strong support to the hypothesis of regional differences in the responses of individual otolithic sensory epithelia. The finding of hair cell types in fishes that closely resemble those found in amniote vestibular endorgans also suggests that hair cell heterogeneity arose earlier in the evolution of the vertebrate ear than previously thought.

  5. Coexistent hairy cell leukaemia and hepatosplenic t-cell lymphoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a chronic B-cell leukaemia characterized by expansion of neoplastic cells in the spleen, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms of HCL are related to pancytopenia and immune deficiency. Patients with HCL have an increased risk of second malignancy either in a form of synchronous disease or in a form of an increased incidence of a second neoplasm after the treatment of HCL. Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare form of aggressive extranodal T-cell lymphoma. Its pathogenesis is connected to a chronic immune deficiency status and its coexistence with other neoplasms is practically non-existent. Case We present a case of a 53-year-old female patient suffering from hepatosplenomegaly, peripheral lymphadenopathy and related B symptoms. An excisional biopsy of the enlarged axillary lymph node revealed partial infiltration with CD3+/CD56+/TIA + T cell lymphoma. Bone marrow trephine biopsy and flow cytometric immunophenotypization of bone marrow cells and peripheral blood showed presence of two types of neoplastic cells in the peripheral blood and in the bone marrow (composite lymphoma). One of them showed typical morphologic characteristics and immunohistochemical features of HCL, while another one was morphologically and immunophenotypically consistent with the diagnosis of HSTCL, respectively. The patient was treated with multivalent chemotherapy including rituximab but all treatments turned out to be only partially effective. While HCL responded to the treatment, HSTCL was refractory to the chemotherapy and the patient died 7 months after the initial diagnosis because of haematemesis induced by Mallory-Weiss syndrome. Conclusion This is the first recorded case of coexistent HCL and HSTCL in the same patient. A multidisciplinary approach, encompassing careful morphology interpretation, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular analyses, is mandatory to obtain an accurate diagnosis of composite lymphoma. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9354870531161685. PMID:24621139

  6. Accumulation of cell wall-bound phenolic metabolites and their upliftment in hairy root cultures of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2008-07-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of cell wall material of tomato hairy roots yielded ferulic acid as the major phenolic compound. Other phenolics were 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin and 4-coumaric acid. The content of phenolics was much higher at the early stage of hairy root growth. The ferulic acid content decreased up to 30 days and then sharply increased to 360 microg/g at 60 days of growth. Elicitation of hairy root cultures with Fusarium mat extract (FME) increased ferulic acid content 4-fold after 24 h. As the pathogen-derived elicitors have specific receptors in plants, FME may thus be used for inducing resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. PMID:18273552

  7. Adoptive T-cell therapy for Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garber, Haven R; Mirza, Asma; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Alatrash, Gheath

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is the most robust form of adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) and has been tremendously effective in the treatment of leukemia. It is one of the original forms of cancer immunotherapy and illustrates that lymphocytes can specifically recognize and eliminate aberrant, malignant cells. However, because of the high morbidity and mortality that is associated with alloSCT including graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), refining the anti-leukemia immunity of alloSCT to target distinct antigens that mediate the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect could transform our approach to treating leukemia, and possibly other hematologic malignancies. Over the past few decades, many leukemia antigens have been discovered that can separate malignant cells from normal host cells and render them vulnerable targets. In concert, the field of T-cell engineering has matured to enable transfer of ectopic high-affinity antigen receptors into host or donor cells with greater efficiency and potency. Many preclinical studies have demonstrated that engineered and conventional T-cells can mediate lysis and eradication of leukemia via one or more leukemia antigen targets. This evidence now serves as a foundation for clinical trials that aim to cure leukemia using T-cells. The recent clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) cells for treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia displays the potential of this new therapeutic modality. In this review, we discuss some of the most promising leukemia antigens and the novel strategies that have been implemented for adoptive cellular immunotherapy of lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. It is important to summarize the data for ACT of leukemia for physicians in-training and in practice and for investigators who work in this and related fields as there are recent discoveries already being translated to the patient setting and numerous accruing clinical trials. We primarily focus on ACT that has been used in the clinical setting or that is currently undergoing preclinical testing with a foreseeable clinical endpoint. PMID:26056592

  8. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-09

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  9. Monoclonal antibodies of IPO series against B cell differentiation antigens in leukemia and lymphoma immunophenotyping.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, S P; Vetrova, E P; Yurchenko, O V; Berdova, A G; Shlapatskaya, L N; Gluzman, D F

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of IPO series were developed following immunization with human B cell lines RPMI-1788, Daudi, and spleen cells from a patient with hairy cell leukemia. Reactivity of these mAbs was studied on 19 human cell lines, mononuclear cells of 50 healthy persons and 142 patients with leukemias and lymphomas. It was shown that mAbs IPO-3, IPO-10 and IPO-24 define B cell-specific antigens expressed at different stages of maturation. MAb IPO-3 reacted with activated B lymphocytes. MAb IPO-10 defined the antigen which appears on B cell progenitors following HLA-DR and proceeding CD19, CD10, CD22, CD37; cy mu and CD20 and have been lost during terminal differentiation. The antigen detected by mAb IPO-24 was expressed throughout B cell ontogeny from pre-B cell until the B-blasts. MAb IPO-4 detected an antigen of activated T and B lymphocytes. These mAbs are useful tools in the leukemia and lymphoma phenotypic characterization and classification. PMID:1528302

  10. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W.

    1980-10-03

    To test the possibility of a casual relationship between leukemia and exposure to nuclear radiation, the frequency of leukemia in personnel observing the detonation of a nuclear device called ''Smoky'' during August 1957 was determined. Of some 3224 men who witnessed the detonation, nine cases of leukemia were observed. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, one of hairy cell lymphocyctic leukemia, and one of acute lymphocytic luekemia. These findings represent a significant increase over the expected leukemia incidence of 3.5 cases. Mean film-badge gamma radiation dose for the study group was 466.2 mrem. (17 references, 3 tables)

  11. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Long-term follow-up after purine analogue therapy in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Else, Monica; Dearden, Claire E; Catovsky, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Since 2006 when we last reviewed the literature concerning the use of purine analogues in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), results from several new and updated series have been published. Here we examine these reports and consider their implications for patient management. The two purine analogues pentostatin and cladribine remain the first-line treatments of choice for all patients with HCL. Although they have not been compared in randomised trials, they appear to be equally effective. A complete response is important for the long-term outcome and we look at how best this can be achieved. Evidence is emerging which supports the use of either purine analogue plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody after relapse, though questions remain concerning the scheduling of the monoclonal antibody. Patients refractory to the purine analogues may require alternative agents. PMID:26614900

  13. Fluctuations in the T and B characteristics of two cases of T-cell hairy-cell leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, G F; Worman, C P; Cawley, J C

    1980-01-01

    A new case of hairy-cell leukaemia (HCL) in which the hairy cells (HCs) formed spontaneous sheep erythrocyte (E) rosettes is described, and this E-rosette formation is shown to be an active process independent of surface immunoglobulin (SIg). Sequential studies with a panel of markers of this and of a case of HCL with T-cell features previously described from this laboratory show that both these cases, at certain times of study, possessed combined T- and B-cell features. Extensive follow-up study revealed wide fluctuations in the surface phenotype of peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells, while the total leucocyte count remained stable. At various times, the PB mononuclear cells showed the following phenotypes: E+SIg+gamma Fc+C3-, E-SIg-gamma Fc+C3-, E+SIg-gamma Fc+/-C3-, and the significance of these phenotypic changes is discussed. The importance of sequential studies with a panel of markers in the characterization of lymphoproliferative disorders is emphasized. PMID:6966989

  14. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  15. Autofluorescence characteristics of human leukemia cells and mononuclear cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lifu; Liao, Xiaoying; Lin, Lisheng; Huang, Huifang; Chen, Yuanzhong; Li, Buhong

    2010-11-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful method to identify the endogenous fluorophores in normal and cancerous cells. The purpose of this study is to characterize the autofluorescence spectra of human normal and leukemia cells. Autofluorescence measurements of each cell line are performed over a wide range of cell concentrations. All of the leukemia cells indicate a statistically significant increase in the tryptophan fluorescence relative to that of the normal cells, while no statistically significant differences are observed in the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) fluorescence between the normal and leukemia cells. The results suggest that the differences in autofluorescence spectra for leukemia cells and mononuclear cells may be attributed in part to differences in endogenous fluorophores of different cells.

  16. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  17. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  19. Mast cell leukemia: an extremely rare disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hong, Ying-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2014-08-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by pathologic proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in at least one extracutaneous organ such as liver, spleen, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. The clinical features are highly variable depending on impairment of the involved organ systems. It often raises diagnostic challenges. Here we report a case of a 78-year-old patient with mast cell leukemia. The literature is reviewed regarding the diagnosis and updated management of this rare disease. PMID:25028296

  20. Haematological profile of 21 patients with hairy cell leukaemia in a tertiary care centre of north India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Das, Reena; Naseem, Shano; Sharma, Prashant; Kumar, Narender; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a B cell neoplasm which constitutes around 2 per cent of all the lymphoid leukaemias. It has a characteristic morphology and immunophenotypic profile. It is important to distinguish HCL from other B cell lymphoproliferative disorders due to availability of different chemotherapeutic agents. This study presents clinical, haematological and immunophenotypic profile of patients with HCL seen over a period of four years in a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: Twenty one cases of hairy cell leukaemia were analyzed for their clinical details, haemogram, bone marrow examination and immunophenotypic findings. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 28-76 yr with male predominance. Weakness and fever were commonest presentations. Splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, lymphadenopathy were seen in decreasing order of frequency. Anaemia was noted in all 21 patients, leukopenia in 15 and thrombocytopenia in 19 cases. Fourteen patients were pancytopenic. Bone marrow examination showed typical hairy cells in all cases. Immunophenotyping showed expression of CD19, CD20, CD103, CD25 and CD11c in all cases, while positivity was seen for CD79b in 93.7 per cent, kappa light chain restriction in 60 per cent and lambda in 40 per cent cases. Notably, 20 per cent showed CD10 and 12 per cent showed CD23 expression. Interpretation & conclusions: This study reveals some unusual findings in otherwise classical disease entity, like absence of palpable spleen, presence of lymphadenopathy, normal or elevated leukocyte counts, expression of CD10, which at times could be diagnostically challenging. PMID:26609034

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Survival regulation of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiguo; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a subpopulation cells at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for disease continuous propagation. In this article, we discuss some cellular and molecular components, which are critical for LSC survival. These components include intrinsic signaling pathways and extrinsic microenvironments. The intrinsic signaling pathways to be discussed include Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hox genes, Hh pathway, Alox5, and some miRNAs, which have been shown to play important roles in regulating LSC survival and proliferation. The extrinsic components to be discussed include selectins, CXCL12/CXCR4, and CD44, which involve in LSC homing, survival, and proliferation by affecting bone marrow microenvironment. Potential strategies for eradicating LSCs will also discuss. PMID:26686687

  3. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  4. Cx25 contributes to leukemia cell communication and chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G.; Nesmiyanov, Pavel; Shaw, Jeremy; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Eurich, Jennifer T.; Hale, James S.; Bogdanova, Anna; Hitomi, Masahiro; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Huang, Alex Y.; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Lathia, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia encompasses several hematological malignancies with shared phenotypes that include rapid proliferation, abnormal leukocyte self-renewal, and subsequent disruption of normal hematopoiesis. While communication between leukemia cells and the surrounding stroma supports tumor survival and expansion, the mechanisms underlying direct leukemia cell-cell communication and its contribution to tumor growth are undefined. Gap junctions are specialized intercellular connections composed of connexin proteins that allow free diffusion of small molecules and ions directly between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. To characterize homotypic leukemia cell communication, we employed in vitro models for both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and measured gap junction function through dye transfer assays. Additionally, clinically relevant gap junction inhibitors, carbenoxolone (CBX) and 1-octanol, were utilized to uncouple the communicative capability of leukemia cells. Furthermore, a qRT-PCR screen revealed several connexins with higher expression in leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. Cx25 was identified as a promising adjuvant therapeutic target, and Cx25 but not Cx43 reduction via RNA interference reduced intercellular communication and sensitized cells to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data demonstrate the presence of homotypic communication in leukemia through a Cx25-dependent gap junction mechanism that can be exploited for the development of anti-leukemia therapies. PMID:26375552

  5. An unusual indication for splenectomy in hairy cell leukaemia: a report of three cases with persistent splenomegaly after chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Nadav; Ahmad, Humayun N; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Dearden, Claire E; Else, Monica; Catovsky, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    We describe three cases of relapsed hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) treated with pentostatin plus rituximab. All three achieved bone marrow complete remission but had persistent splenomegaly and hypersplenism. Because of the clinical uncertainty of its significance, they were all splenectomized. The spleen histology showed no evidence of HCL, but a five-fold thickening of the splenic capsule and areas of fibrosis in the red pulp. This process may have contributed to the lack of elasticity and caused the persistent splenomegaly. We discuss the clinical implications for future patient management. The three patients remain in remission at 1 + , 5 + and 9 + years. PMID:26403440

  6. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL. PMID:23060864

  7. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel 'off-the-shelf' product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  8. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel ‘off-the-shelf’ product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  9. Lactoferrin binding by leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Amagasaki, T.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Green, R.

    1987-07-01

    Monocytes and macrophages have receptors for the iron-binding protein lactoferrin. Lactoferrin acts as a potent inhibitor of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor production when it binds to these cells. Using a rosette assay and immunofluorescence, we have shown that cultured leukemia cells, including the human erythroid leukemia cell line K562, also have lactoferrin binding sites. The number of binding sites on K562 cells was estimated using soluble /sup 59/Fe-lactoferrin. Inhibition studies demonstrate that lactoferrin binding sites are distinct and unrelated to receptors for transferrin or the Fc portion of IgG, which are present on K562 cells. However, electrostatic forces may be important for lactoferrin binding, since other polycationic proteins (eg, protamine) inhibit lactoferrin binding. Prior treatment of K562 cells with trypsin nearly abolishes lactoferrin binding. However, these cells recover their ability to bind lactoferrin when trypsin is removed. Unlike transferrin receptors, the expression of lactoferrin binding sites is not regulated by cellular iron status. Cytosine arabinoside arrests the proliferation of K562 cells and simultaneously leads to a reduction in lactoferrin surface binding, suggesting that lactoferrin binding may be dependent on cell proliferation.

  10. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  11. CXCR4 Is Required for Leukemia-Initiating Cell Activity in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Diana; Irigoyen, Marta; Catherinet, Claire; Gachet, Stéphanie; Da Costa De Jesus, Cindy; Lasgi, Charlène; Tran Quang, Christine; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Impaired cell migration has been demonstrated in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells upon calcineurin inactivation, among other phenotypic traits including increased apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation, and ultimately inhibition of leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) activity. Herein we demonstrate that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is essential to the LIC activity of T-ALL leukemic cells both in NOTCH-induced mouse T-ALL and human T-ALL xenograft models. We further demonstrate that calcineurin regulates CXCR4 cell-surface expression in a cortactin-dependent manner, a mechanism essential to the migratory properties of T-ALL cells. Because 20%-25% of pediatric and over 50% of adult patients with T-ALL do not achieve complete remission and relapse, our results call for clinical trials incorporating CXCR4 antagonists in T-ALL treatment. PMID:26058076

  12. Stem cell persistence in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deininger, M

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of BCR-ABL have turned chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from a deadly disease into a chronic ailment. Unfortunately, evidence is accumulating that TKIs are not curative, since CML stem cells are not addicted to BCR-ABL, and persist despite TKI therapy. On closer view this is not surprising, as it reflects fundamental principles of CML pathogenesis. Strategies to eradicate CML stem cells will most likely be based on synthetic lethality though parallel inhibition of BCR-ABL and other critical pathways.

  13. Cell cycle control in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schnerch, Dominik; Yalcintepe, Jasmin; Schmidts, Andrea; Becker, Heiko; Follo, Marie; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the result of a multistep transforming process of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs) which enables them to proceed through limitless numbers of cell cycles and to become resistant to cell death. Increased proliferation renders these cells vulnerable to acquiring mutations and may favor leukemic transformation. Here, we review how deregulated cell cycle control contributes to increased proliferation in AML and favors genomic instability, a prerequisite to confer selective advantages to particular clones in order to adapt and independently proliferate in the presence of a changing microenvironment. We discuss the connection between differentiation and proliferation with regard to leukemogenesis and outline the impact of specific alterations on response to therapy. Finally, we present examples, how a better understanding of cell cycle regulation and deregulation has already led to new promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:22957304

  14. Cell cycle control in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schnerch, Dominik; Yalcintepe, Jasmin; Schmidts, Andrea; Becker, Heiko; Follo, Marie; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the result of a multistep transforming process of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs) which enables them to proceed through limitless numbers of cell cycles and to become resistant to cell death. Increased proliferation renders these cells vulnerable to acquiring mutations and may favor leukemic transformation. Here, we review how deregulated cell cycle control contributes to increased proliferation in AML and favors genomic instability, a prerequisite to confer selective advantages to particular clones in order to adapt and independently proliferate in the presence of a changing microenvironment. We discuss the connection between differentiation and proliferation with regard to leukemogenesis and outline the impact of specific alterations on response to therapy. Finally, we present examples, how a better understanding of cell cycle regulation and deregulation has already led to new promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:22957304

  15. Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rico, J. Felipe; Hassane, Duane C.; Guzman, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite reaching remission with traditional chemotherapy, most adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will relapse and die of their disease. Numerous studies have identified a rare subset of leukemia cells that evade traditional chemotherapy and are capable of self-renewal and initiating leukemia. These cells are thought to be responsible for relapse and are termed leukemia stem cells (LSCs). This article will review the current LSC translational research and focus on new approaches to detect LSC burden and its prognostic implications, as well as the identification and development of therapeutic agents active against LSCs. PMID:22713929

  16. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  17. How I treat plasma cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lokhorst, Henk M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive plasma cell proliferative disorder with a very poor prognosis and with distinct biologic, clinical, and laboratory features. Compared with multiple myeloma, pPCL presents more often with extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, elevated serum β2-microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase levels, as well as impaired renal function. Many of the genetic aberrations observed in newly diagnosed pPCL are typically found in advanced multiple myeloma. These cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations lead to increased proliferation, enhanced inhibition of apoptosis, escape from immune surveillance, and independence from the BM microenvironment, with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokine receptors. The outcome of pPCL has improved with the introduction of autologous stem cell transplantation and combination approaches with novel agents, including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide. In this review, we provide an overview of currently available therapeutic options with recommendations of how these treatment modalities can best be used to improve outcome for plasma cell leukemia patients. PMID:22837533

  18. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CML) Acute lymphocytic (or lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) In acute leukemias, the bone marrow cells ... start in those cells. The main difference between lymphocytic leukemias and lymphomas is ... myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is another chronic leukemia that ...

  19. Cordycepin Regulates GSK-3?/?-Catenin Signaling in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-An; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Shen, Tang-Long; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a limitless cell source for the initiation and maintenance of leukemia. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway is required for the survival and development of LSCs. Therefore, targeting ?-catenin is considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. The goal of this study was to explore whether cordycepin, an active component of the traditional medicine Cordyceps sinensis, regulates ?-catenin expression in leukemia cells. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we found that cordycepin significantly suppressed cell proliferation in all malignant cancer cells, including U937, K562, A549, HepG2, SK-Hep1 and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cordycepin reduced ?-catenin levels in U937, K562 and THP1 leukemia cells and had no effect on other solid cancer cells. In addition, treatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed leukemia colony formation in soft agar assay. Cordycepin enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation and inhibited nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in leukemia cells. Cordycepin-reduced ?-catenin stability was restored by the addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3?, indicating that cordycepin-suppressed ?-catenin stability is mediated by the activation of GSK-3?. Furthermore, cordycepin abolished the effect of Wnt3a-induced ?-catenin in leukemia cells. In addition, cordycepin-impaired ?-catenin is regulated by Akt activation but is not significantly influenced by AMPK or mTOR signal pathways. Significance Our findings show for the first time that codycepin selectively reduces ?-catenin stability in leukemia but not in other solid tumor cells. This suppressive effect is mediated by regulating GSK-3?. A synergistic combination of cordycepin with other treatments should be used as a novel strategy to eradicate leukemia via elimination of LSCs. PMID:24086728

  20. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias, loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems. PMID:21765975

  1. The target cell of transformation is distinct from the leukemia stem cell in murine CALM/AF10 leukemia models.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Krause, A; Vosberg, S; Herold, T; Ksienzyk, B; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Tizazu, B; Chopra, M; Graf, A; Krebs, S; Blum, H; Greif, P A; Vetter, A; Metzeler, K; Rothenberg-Thurley, M; Schneider, M R; Dahlhoff, M; Spiekermann, K; Zimber-Strobl, U; Wolf, E; Bohlander, S K

    2016-05-01

    The CALM/AF10 fusion gene is found in various hematological malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and malignant lymphoma. We have previously identified the leukemia stem cell (LSC) in a CALM/AF10-driven murine bone marrow transplant AML model as B220+ lymphoid cells with B-cell characteristics. To identify the target cell for leukemic transformation or 'cell of origin of leukemia' (COL) in non-disturbed steady-state hematopoiesis, we inserted the CALM/AF10 fusion gene preceded by a loxP-flanked transcriptional stop cassette into the Rosa26 locus. Vav-Cre-induced panhematopoietic expression of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene led to acute leukemia with a median latency of 12 months. Mice expressing CALM/AF10 in the B-lymphoid compartment using Mb1-Cre or CD19-Cre inducer lines did not develop leukemia. Leukemias had a predominantly myeloid phenotype but showed coexpression of the B-cell marker B220, and had clonal B-cell receptor rearrangements. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified an average of two to three additional mutations per leukemia, including activating mutations in known oncogenes such as FLT3 and PTPN11. Our results show that the COL for CALM/AF10 leukemia is a stem or early progenitor cell and not a cell of B-cell lineage with a phenotype similar to that of the LSC in CALM/AF10+ leukemia. PMID:26686248

  2. Stem Cell Biomarkers in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yun; Forrest, Donna; Smith, Clayton; Eaves, Allen; Eaves, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal multi-step myeloproliferative disease that is initially produced and ultimately sustained by a rare subpopulation of BCR-ABL+ cells with multi-lineage stem cell properties. These BCR-ABL+ CML stem cells are phenotypically similar to normal hematopoietic stem cells which are also maintained throughout the course of the disease at varying levels in different patients. Defining the unique properties of the leukemic stem cells that produce the chronic phase of CML has therefore had to rely heavily on access to samples from rare patients in which the stem cell compartment is dominated by leukemic elements. Here we review past and ongoing approaches using such samples to identify biologically and clinically relevant biomarkers of BCR-ABL+ stem cells that explain their unusual biology and that may help to design, or at least predict, improved treatment responses in CML patients. These studies are of particular interest in light of recent evidence that chronic phase CML stem cells are not only innately resistant to imatinib mesylate and other drugs that target the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, but are also genetically unstable. PMID:18525114

  3. Pushing the Limits: Defeating Leukemia Stem Cells by Depleting Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ya-Huei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), featuring unlimited self-renewal capacity and chemoresistance, are critical cellular targets for new treatments to improve outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this issue, Bruedigam et al. demonstrate that inhibition of telomerase is damaging to LSCs and may represent a promising therapeutic approach in AML. PMID:25479742

  4. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. Donor cell leukemia after bone marrow transplantation in the Friend leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kreja, L; Seidel, H J; Kohne, E

    1980-02-01

    After lethal irradiation (800 R) Friend virus (FV-P)-infected leukemic DBA/2 mice were transplanted with normal bone marrow cells. Isogeneic transplantation led to an immediate relapse of leukemia. Therefore, allogeneic bone marrow cells were taken from almost FV-P resistant C57BL/6 mice. A measure of leukemia development was given by the number of erythropoietin-independent erythroid colonies (CFU-EI) in bone marrow and spleen, characteristic for the Friend leukemia. Even after allogeneic transplantation leukemia recurred after 5 to 19 days. By an electrophoretic analysis of the hemoglobin, it could be shown that the transformed erythropoiesis was donor derived. Thus, marrow of C57BL/6 origin loses its FV-P resistance in allogeneic leukemic lethally irradiated recipients and is transformed by the surviving virus. PMID:6986694

  6. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... FR. The acute leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ... Brien S. The chronic leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ...

  7. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kana; Tanaka, Satomi; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tatsumi, Naoya; Nakata, Jun; Takashima, Satoshi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Oji, Yusuke; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo; Hosen, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia. PMID:26658107

  8. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias. PMID:24427158

  9. 75 FR 14391 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is proposing to amend its adjudication regulations concerning presumptive service connection for certain diseases based upon the most recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine committee report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2008 (Update 2008). This proposed amendment is necessary to implement a decision of the Secretary of......

  10. 75 FR 53202 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... relationship between PTSD or stress and cardiovascular disease. Another commenter wanted VA to give greater... number.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 25, 2010, VA published in the Federal Register (75 FR 14391... between myocardial oxygen supply and demand.'' 75 FR 14393; See Harrison's Principles of Internal...

  11. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  12. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (n, D0) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL50 (n . 1.3, D0 . 117 rad(1.17 Gy)), promyelocytic leukemia; K562 (n . 1.4, D0 . 165 rad(1.65 Gy)), erythroleukemia; 45 (n . 1.1, D0 . 147 rad(1.47 Gy)), acute lymphocyte leukemia; and 176 (n . 4.0, D0 . 76 rad(0.76 Gy)), acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  13. A case of Mollitias and Fragilitas Ossium - unusual presentation of hairy cell leukaemia followed by the diagnosis of nonsecretory myeloma.

    PubMed

    Besser, M W; Goonetileke, C; Min, M S Young; Thomas, D W

    2008-10-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a B-cell malignancy with a late developmental arrest. This report describes a patient that presented with leucocytosis and splenomegaly. The abnormal leucocytes showed typical morphology and expressed CD103, CD11c, CD19 and CD20 but not CD25 by immunophenotyping. The patient failed to respond to splenectomy and then developed lytic bone lesions and pathological fractures, which progressed despite a single course of cladribine chemotherapy. Review of the pathology of the bone reamings showed nonsecretory myeloma of the same kappa-light chain isotype. He went on to receive induction chemotherapy in preparation for an autologous stem-cell transplant but failed to mobilize sufficient numbers of stem cells. He has had two localized relapses with bony lesions, one within 6 weeks of stopping chemotherapy for which he received localized radiotherapy and thalidomide consolidation. Sequential myeloma has been described in HCL. There is controversy whether this represents clonal evolution or a secondary malignancy. An increased rate of secondary malignancies has been reported by some, but not other, authors in long-term survivors of HCL. This case illustrates the value of a repeat pathological review in case of unexpected complications. PMID:19046317

  14. Laser nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells using functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liopo, Anton V.; Conjusteau, André; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we present the use of gold nanorods as plasmonic nanoparticles for selective photothermal therapy of human acute (HL-60) and chronicle (K-562) leukemia cells using a near-infrared laser. We improved a published methodology of gold nanorods conjugation to generate high yields of narrow band gold nanorods with an optical absorption centered at 760 nm. The manufactured nanorods were pegylated and conjugated with monoclonal antibody to become non-toxic as biocompatible nanothermolysis agent. Gold nanorods are synthesized and conjugated to CD33 monoclonal antibody. After pegylation, or conjugation with CD33 antibody, gold nanorods were non-toxic to acute and chronic leukemia cells. Our modified gold nanorods CD33 conjugates shown high level of accumulation for both leukemia cell lines, and successful used for nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells in vitro. Each sample was illuminated with 1 or 3 laser shots as for low and for high laser fluence. The radiation was provided by a Quanta Systems q-switched titanium sapphire laser, and the system was designed for maximum sample coverage using non-focused illumination. HL-60 and K-562 cells were treated for 45 min with gold nanorods CD33 conjugated, or with pegylated gold nanorods. The effect of pulsed-laser nanothermolysis for acute and chronic leukemia cells were investigated with cell counting for number of living cells, percentage of cell death and functional parameters such as damage of cell membrane and metabolic activity. Gold nanorods CD33 conjugates significantly increase cell damage for low fluence laser and completely destroyed cancer cells after 3 pulses for low fluence (acute leukemia) and for high fluence laser as for HL-60 (acute) and for K-562 (chronicle) leukemia cells. PMID:22720194

  15. Laser nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells using functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liopo, Anton V; Conjusteau, André; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Oraevsky, Alexander A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we present the use of gold nanorods as plasmonic nanoparticles for selective photothermal therapy of human acute (HL-60) and chronicle (K-562) leukemia cells using a near-infrared laser. We improved a published methodology of gold nanorods conjugation to generate high yields of narrow band gold nanorods with an optical absorption centered at 760 nm. The manufactured nanorods were pegylated and conjugated with monoclonal antibody to become non-toxic as biocompatible nanothermolysis agent. Gold nanorods are synthesized and conjugated to CD33 monoclonal antibody. After pegylation, or conjugation with CD33 antibody, gold nanorods were non-toxic to acute and chronic leukemia cells. Our modified gold nanorods CD33 conjugates shown high level of accumulation for both leukemia cell lines, and successful used for nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells in vitro. Each sample was illuminated with 1 or 3 laser shots as for low and for high laser fluence. The radiation was provided by a Quanta Systems q-switched titanium sapphire laser, and the system was designed for maximum sample coverage using non-focused illumination. HL-60 and K-562 cells were treated for 45 min with gold nanorods CD33 conjugated, or with pegylated gold nanorods. The effect of pulsed-laser nanothermolysis for acute and chronic leukemia cells were investigated with cell counting for number of living cells, percentage of cell death and functional parameters such as damage of cell membrane and metabolic activity. Gold nanorods CD33 conjugates significantly increase cell damage for low fluence laser and completely destroyed cancer cells after 3 pulses for low fluence (acute leukemia) and for high fluence laser as for HL-60 (acute) and for K-562 (chronicle) leukemia cells. PMID:22720194

  16. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  17. Plasma cell leukemia: from biology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas; Kryukov, Fedor; Rihova, Lucie; Hajek, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a very aggressive and rare form of malignant monoclonal gammopathy characterized by the presence of plasmocytes in peripheral blood. It is classified as primary PCL occuring 'de novo', or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinicopathological entity from myeloma with different cytogenetic abnormalities and molecular findings, which are usually found only in advanced multiple myeloma. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and reduced overall survival. The diagnostic criteria are based on the percentage (>20%) and absolute number (2 × 10(9) /L) of plasma cells in peripheral blood. After establishing diagnosis, induction therapy should begin promptly which is aimed to rapid disease control and to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens, followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation, are recommended. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. This article reviews recent knowledge of this hematological malignancy that is associated with a very poor prognosis. PMID:25778450

  18. Epstein-Barr virus gene expression and epithelial cell differentiation in oral hairy leukoplakia.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. A.; Felix, D. H.; Wray, D.; Southam, J. C.; Cubie, H. A.; Crawford, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Hairy leukoplakia (HL) is an Epstein-Barr (EB) virus related lesion of oral mucosa that is principally associated with human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression. To understand the nature of EB virus involvement in these lesions, this study compares the distribution of EB virus DNA and EB viral gene products with the pattern of keratinocyte differentiation in 12 lateral tongue biopsies of HL. Evidence of replicating EB viral infection and abundant virus production was demonstrated in the superficial epithelium of most (92%) samples by means of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical techniques. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein also was identified in 45% of samples, suggesting that this viral gene product, which is usually associated with EB virus latent infection, may be transiently expressed during viral replication in HL epithelium. The absence of detectable EB virus involvement in basal keratinocytes, however, fails to support the theory that latent infection occurs in basal epithelium. From this study, EB viral gene expression in HL appears to be linked with epithelial maturation. Conversely, the normal patterns of keratinocyte differentiation in these lesions do not appear to be appreciably altered by association with EB virus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p[1373]-d Figures 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1661074

  19. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Neutrophil elastase and its therapeutic effect on leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, KAI-LING; MA, PENG-PENG; YANG, XIAO-QUN; ZHONG, LIANG; WANG, HUI; ZHU, XIN-YU; LIU, BEI-ZHONG

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an early myeloid-specific serine protease, which is predominantly produced by promyelocytes. A previous study demonstrated that NE has an important role in the development of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The process of APL was shown to be accelerated in animals that expressed abundant NE, whereas NE-deficient mice were protected from APL development; thus suggesting an important role for NE in the development of APL. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of NE. Up- and downregulation of NE in various leukemia cell lines was conducted in order to explore its significance in the occurrence and procession of leukemia, with the aim of identifying novel targeted therapeutic drugs for the treatment of leukemia. NE was overexpressed in cells following infection with an adenovirus, and Cell Counting kit-8 and flow cytometry results demonstrated that cell proliferation was promoted, and cell apoptosis was inhibited, as compared with the untreated cells. NE was downregulated in the cells by both RNA interference and treatment with GW311616A, a specific inhibitor of NE, following which cell growth was shown to be inhibited and apoptosis was induced. These results suggested that NE may promote the development of APL, therefore, NE may be a therapeutic target and its inhibitor GW311616A may be a potential therapeutic drug for leukemia. Furthermore, the apoptosis-associated protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein was significantly increased, whereas Bcl-2 was markedly decreased in the cells with downregulated NE. Further experiments revealed that the probable apoptosis-associated signaling pathway was the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to demonstrate that GW311616A, a specific NE inhibitor, may act as a potential targeted drug for leukemia, which may have a profound impact on the future of leukemia-targeted therapy. PMID:26081156

  1. Conjugated linoleic acid modulation of cell membrane in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Agatha, Gerhard; Voigt, Astrid; Kauf, Eberhard; Zintl, Felix

    2004-06-01

    This study compared the cellular uptake of pure conjugated linoleic acid isomers (CLA(9c,11t) and CLA(9c,11c)) to linoleic acid (LA) and their effects on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, its metabolism into conjugated long chain fatty acids (FAs) by desaturation and chain-elongation as well as cell proliferation and the associated anticarcinogenic effects on various human leukemia cell lines (K562, REH, CCRF-CEM and U937 cells). Furthermore, selective effects of this individual isomers of CLA on desaturation steps involved in the biosynthesis of PUFAs associated with cell growth were investigated. CLA isomers supplemented in the culture medium was readily incorporated and esterified into phospholipids (PLs) in the four cell lines in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The incorporation of the specific CLA isomers in PLs was similar to LA. All four incubating leukemia cells (40 microM CLA for 48 h) showed very high cellular CLA content in PLs (range: 32-63 g FA/100 g total phospholipid fatty acid) affected by the nature of CLA and the cell type. Supplementation with CLA or LA altered also cell membrane composition by n-6 PUFA synthesis. Accordingly, CLA metabolism interferes with LA metabolism. We were able to show that CLA isomers are converted by the leukemia cells of the same metabolic pathway into conjugated diene fatty acids (CDFAs) as LA into non-conjugated PUFAs. In this view, the gas chromatography-flame ionization detector detection of major CDFAs (CD-18:3, CD-20:2 and CD-20:3) in cell membrane of CLA-treated cultures resulted from successive Delta6-desaturation, elongation and Delta5-desaturation of CLA isomers. However, in comparison to LA, relatively lower amounts of elongation and/or desaturation metabolites were detected for CLA(9c,11t), and only minor amounts or trace CDFAs were observed for CLA(9c,11c). Furthermore, CLA(9c,11t) revealed only very low levels of CD-20:4 FA and no CLA(9c,11c)-conversion could be detected. The metabolization of CLA indicated that CLA(9c,11c)cells or for the Delta5-desaturation/elongation in the K562 cells. CLA(9c,11t) suppresses Delta6-desaturation in CCRF-CEM, REH, and U937 cells (43.5, 54.6 and 58.8% Delta6-inhibition, respectively) and as well Delta9-desaturation in all four cell lines (Delta9-inhibition; 47.1, 33.9, 29.8 and 25.9% for CCRF-CEM, REH, K562 and U937 cells, respectively). However, CLA(9c,11c) does not inhibit or only slightly affected these desaturations. CLA(9c,11t) isomer was found as an Delta6-desaturase inhibitor with a dose-dependent relationship between inhibition of Delta6-desaturase activity and decreases in cell growth. The growth inhibitory effects of CLA (with 30-120 microM) on leukemia cells were dependent upon the type and concentration of CLA isomers present. CLA-supplemented cells with low concentrations (<60 microM) were not sufficient to impair cell proliferation. Nevertheless, higher amounts of CLAs (>60 microM) had the CLA type dependent antiproliferative effects. Thus, the 9cis,11trans- and the 9cis,11cis-CLA isomers regulate cell growth and survival in different leukemia cell types through their existence alone and/or by their inhibitory effects of desaturase activity. PMID:15145524

  2. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Large-scale production of hairy root.

    PubMed

    Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Many products of interest are synthesized in organized tissues, but not formed in suspension or callus culture. Therefore, most attention has been focused on root cultures. The transgenic plant,"hairy root", has brought us to dramatic improvements in growth rate and high content of desirable products. Since the roots are quite different from callus in morphology, the culture manner should be explored independently. By providing a growth environment, an elite hairy root can be a more attractive plant. Both of strain selection to generate more competent plants in breeding and engineering development are necessary to overcome various limitations. In this chapter the engineering issues involved in using hairy root culture are discussed, as follows. 1. Measurement of cell concentration on line, and a designing bioreactors for hairy root in liquid culture. 2. High cell density culture and its kinetic parameters. 3. Secretion of target products. 4. The micropropagation of the regenerated hairy root by means of artificial seed system. In some cases where callus and suspension culture show negligible productivity, organ culture will be necessary to achieve good formation. This study on hairy root culture indicates one of the best attempts to the recovery of products from the organ culture in plant biotechnology. PMID:15453193

  4. Signaling proteins and pathways affected by flavonoids in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoliang; Ye, Fei; Wu, Josephine; How, Brian; Li, Wei; Zhang, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of plant secondary metabolites that are found ubiquitously in plants and in the human diet. Our objective is to investigate the antiproliferative effects of flavonoids (baicalein, luteolin, genistein, apigenin, scutellarin, galangin, chrysin, and naringenin) toward leukemia cells (HL-60, NB4, U937, K562, Jurkat) as well as the relationship between their antileukemic potencies and molecular structures. At the proteomic level, we evaluate the effects of different flavonoids on the expression levels of various proteins using Protein Pathway Array (PPA) technology. Our results showed a dose-dependent cytotoxicity of flavonoids toward various types of leukemia cells. The results of PPA illustrated that flavonoids, such as baicalein, genistein, and scutellarin affected different proteins in different leukemia cell lines. Cell cycle regulatory proteins, such as CDK4, CDK6, Cyclin D1, Cyclin B1, p-CDC2, and p-RB were affected in different leukemia cells. Furthermore, we found that baicalein suppresses CDK4 and activates p-ERK in most leukemia cells; genistein mainly affects CDK4, p-ERK, p-CDC2, while scutellarin dysregulated the proteins, cell division control protein 42, Notch4, and XIAP. Collectively, a wide variety of dysregulation of key signaling proteins related to apoptosis and cell-cycle regulation contributes to the antileukemic properties of these flavonoids. PMID:25588108

  5. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the “verge of apoptosis”. When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways. PMID:26716897

  6. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kukreja, Manisha; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Szer, Jeffrey; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Buser, Andreas; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) has led some clinicians to recommend allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). However, the data to support this approach is limited to case-reports and small case-series. We reviewed the database of the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research to determine outcomes after allotransplant for patients with PLL. We identified 47 patients with a median age of 54 years (range, 3075). With a median follow-up of 13 months, progression-free survival was 33% (95% Confidence Interval 2047%) at 2 years. The most common cause of death was relapse or progression in 49%. The cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality at 1-year post transplant was 28%. The small patient population prohibited prognostic factor analysis but these data support consideration of allotransplant for PLL. Further study of a larger population of patients is needed to determine which patients are more likely to benefit. PMID:19961946

  7. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in single cells from leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Ogasawara, Yoji; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Falcão, Roberto P.; Pintão, Maria-Carolina; McCoy, J. Philip; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil; Young, Neal S.

    2007-01-01

    A high frequency of mtDNA somatic mutation has been observed in many tumors as well as in aging tissues. In this study, we analyzed the mtDNA control region sequence variation in 3534 single normal cells and individual blasts from 18 patients with leukemia and 10 healthy donors, to address the mutation process in leukemic cells. We found significant differences in mtDNA sequence, as represented by the number of haplotypes and the mean number of cells with each nonaggregate haplotype in a population of cells, in patients compared to controls. Patients with similar clinical leukemia types, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML), did not show a uniform pattern of sequence variation in single blasts. Some patients at relapse presented a complex shift of major haplotypes in single cells. Four patients showed high frequencies of cells containing mutations 189, 260, 16150, and 16488, respectively, as a result of clonal expansion and could be considered as potential markers for their respective disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale study of mtDNA variation in single malignant cells. Our results suggest that the somatic mutation process in leukemia is complex, leading to diverse levels of genetic alterations due to either intrinsic aspects of leukemia pathophysiology or chemotherapy effects. PMID:16946307

  8. Akt inhibitors induce apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Mercè; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Cosialls, Ana M.; Coll-Mulet, Llorenç; Santidrián, Antonio F.; González-Gironès, Diana M.; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Pons, Gabriel; Gil, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway has been described to be critical in the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. In this study we analyzed the effect of two selective chemical inhibitors of Akt (Akti-1/2 and A-443654) on the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Design and Methods Using cytometry we studied the cytotoxic effects of Akt inhibitors on peripheral B and T lymphocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and from healthy donors. We studied the changes induced by Akti-1/2 and A-443654 at the mRNA level by performing reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation–dependent probe amplification. We also studied the changes induced by both Akt inhibitors in some BCL-2 protein family members on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by western blotting. Moreover, we analyzed the cytotoxic effect of Akt inhibitors in patients’ cells with deleted/mutated TP53. Results Both inhibitors induced apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia were more sensitive to Akt inhibitors than T cells from leukemic patients, and B or T cells from healthy donors. Survival factors for chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, such as interleukin-4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1α, were not able to block the apoptosis induced by either Akt inhibitor. Akti-1/2 did not induce any change in the mRNA expression profile of genes involved in apoptosis, while A-443654 induced some changes, including an increase in NOXA and PUMA mRNA levels, suggesting the existence of additional targets for A-443654. Both inhibitors induced an increase in PUMA and NOXA protein levels, and a decrease in MCL-1 protein level. Moreover, Akti-1/2 and A-443654 induced apoptosis irrespective of TP53 status. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Akt inhibitors induce apoptosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and might be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:19815839

  9. The prognostic impact of clinical and molecular features in hairy cell leukaemia variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hockley, Sarah L; Else, Monica; Morilla, Alison; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Dearden, Claire; Catovsky, Daniel; Gonzalez, David; Matutes, Estella

    2012-08-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia variant (HCL-variant) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) are disorders with overlapping features. We investigated the prognostic impact in these disorders of clinical and molecular features including IGH VDJ rearrangements, IGHV gene usage and TP 53 mutations. Clinical and laboratory data were collected before therapy from 35 HCL-variant and 68 SMZL cases. End-points were the need for treatment and overall survival. 97% of HCL-variant and 77% of SMZL cases required treatment (P = 0·009). Survival at 5 years was significantly worse in HCL-variant [57% (95% confidence interval 38-73%)] compared with SMZL [84% (71-91%); Hazard Ratio 2·25 (1·20-4·25), P = 0·01]. In HCL-variant, adverse prognostic factors for survival were older age (P = 0·04), anaemia (P = 0·01) and TP 53 mutations (P = 0·02). In SMZL, splenomegaly, anaemia and IGHV genes with >98% homology to the germline predicted the need for treatment; older age, anaemia and IGHV unmutated genes (100% homology) predicted shorter survival. IGHV gene usage had no impact on clinical outcome in either disease. The combination of unfavourable factors allowed patients to be stratified into risk groups with significant differences in survival. Although HCL-variant and SMZL share some features, they have different outcomes, influenced by clinical and biological factors. PMID:22594855

  10. Stem Cell Modeling of Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Even though clonally originated from a single cell, acute leukemia loses its homogeneity soon and presents at clinical diagnosis as a hierarchy of cells endowed with different functions, of which only a minority possesses the ability to recapitulate the disease. Due to their analogy to hematopoietic stem cells, these cells have been named “leukemia stem cells,” and are thought to be chiefly responsible for disease relapse and ultimate survival after chemotherapy. Core Binding Factor (CBF) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is cytogenetically characterized by either the t(8;21) or the inv(16)/t(16;16) chromosomal abnormalities, which, although being pathognomonic, are not sufficient per se to induce overt leukemia but rather determine a preclinical phase of disease when preleukemic subclones compete until the acquisition of clonal dominance by one of them. In this review we summarize the concepts regarding the application of the “leukemia stem cell” theory to the development of CBF AML; we will analyze the studies investigating the leukemogenetic role of t(8;21) and inv(16)/t(16;16), the proposed theories of its clonal evolution, and the role played by the hematopoietic niches in preserving the disease. Finally, we will discuss the clinical implications of stem cell modeling of CBF AML for the therapy of the disease. PMID:26880987

  11. Establishment and culture of leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hans G

    2011-01-01

    The advent of continuous human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines as a rich resource of abundant, accessible, and manipulable living cells has contributed significantly to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hematopoietic tumors. The first leukemia-lymphoma cell lines were established in 1963 and since then large numbers of new cell lines have been described. The major advantages of continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines are the unlimited supply and worldwide availability of identical cell material and the infinite viable storability in liquid nitrogen. These cell lines are characterized generally by monoclonal origin and differentiation arrest, sustained proliferation in vitro under preservation of most cellular features, and by specific genetic alterations. Here some of the more promising techniques for establishing new leukemia-lymphoma cell lines and the basic principles for culturing these cells are described. Several clinical and cell culture parameters might have some influence on the success rate, e.g., choice of culture medium and culture conditions, specimen site of the primary cells, and status of the patient at the time of sample collection. PMID:21516408

  12. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  13. Core Circadian Clock Genes Regulate Leukemia Stem Cells in AML.

    PubMed

    Puram, Rishi V; Kowalczyk, Monika S; de Boer, Carl G; Schneider, Rebekka K; Miller, Peter G; McConkey, Marie; Tothova, Zuzana; Tejero, Héctor; Heckl, Dirk; Järås, Marcus; Chen, Michelle C; Li, Hubo; Tamayo, Alfred; Cowley, Glenn S; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2016-04-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) have the capacity to self-renew and propagate disease upon serial transplantation in animal models, and elimination of this cell population is required for curative therapies. Here, we describe a series of pooled, in vivo RNAi screens to identify essential transcription factors (TFs) in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with genetically and phenotypically defined LSCs. These screens reveal the heterodimeric, circadian rhythm TFs Clock and Bmal1 as genes required for the growth of AML cells in vitro and in vivo. Disruption of canonical circadian pathway components produces anti-leukemic effects, including impaired proliferation, enhanced myeloid differentiation, and depletion of LSCs. We find that both normal and malignant hematopoietic cells harbor an intact clock with robust circadian oscillations, and genetic knockout models reveal a leukemia-specific dependence on the pathway. Our findings establish a role for the core circadian clock genes in AML. PMID:27058663

  14. Antibody May Lower Rejection Rates After Stem Cell Transplant in Leukemia Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 156552.html Antibody May Lower Rejection Rates After Stem Cell Transplant in Leukemia Patients Study showed many ... leukemia who were given antibody therapy before a stem cell transplant fared better than those who didn' ...

  15. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Linker-Israeli, M; Billing, R J; Foon, K A; Terasaki, P I

    1981-12-01

    Two cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (D5D6 and C10H5) were raised to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells. One of them, D5D6, reacted with 100% of the cells from 44/50 AML patients. The second, C10H5, reacted with 100% of the cells from 13/39 AML patients. D5D6 and C10H5 were cytotoxic to 100% of the monocytes from all healthy donors tested. Apart from monocytes, these antibodies did not react with any other peripheral blood cells from normal donors or with cancerous cells either from cell culture lines or from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), lymphoid leukemias, or solid tumors. These antibodies inhibited the growth of the myeloid-monocytic stem cell, the CFU-C, and reacted with a minor population of normal bone marrow cells by immunofluorescence. Both D5D6 and CH5 have potential utility for the differential diagnosis of acute leukemia, for the detection of early leukemic relapse, and for enrichment of human stem cells. PMID:7028873

  16. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Linker-Israeli M; Billing RJ; Foon KA; Terasaki PI

    1981-12-01

    Two cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (D5D6 and C10H5) were raised to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells. One of them, D5D6, reacted with 100% of the cells from 44/50 AML patients. The second, C10H5, reacted with 100% of the cells from 13/39 AML patients. D5D6 and C10H5 were cytotoxic to 100% of the monocytes from all healthy donors tested. Apart from monocytes, these antibodies did not react with any other peripheral blood cells from normal donors or with cancerous cells either from cell culture lines or from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), lymphoid leukemias, or solid tumors. These antibodies inhibited the growth of the myeloid-monocytic stem cell, the CFU-C, and reacted with a minor population of normal bone marrow cells by immunofluorescence. Both D5D6 and CH5 have potential utility for the differential diagnosis of acute leukemia, for the detection of early leukemic relapse, and for enrichment of human stem cells.

  17. Novel non-viral method for transfection of primary leukemia cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schakowski, Frank; Buttgereit, Peter; Mazur, Martin; Mrten, Angela; Schttker, Bjrn; Gorschlter, Marcus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo GH

    2004-01-12

    BACKGROUND: Tumor cells such as leukemia and lymphoma cells are possible targets for gene therapy. However, previously leukemia and lymphoma cells have been demonstrated to be resistant to most of non-viral gene transfer methods. METHODS: The aim of this study was to analyze various methods for transfection of primary leukemia cells and leukemia cell lines and to improve the efficiency of gene delivery. Here, we evaluated a novel electroporation based technique called nucleofection. This novel technique uses a combination of special electrical parameters and specific solutions to deliver the DNA directly to the cell nucleus under mild conditions. RESULTS: Using this technique for gene transfer up to 75% of primary cells derived from three acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and K562 cells were transfected with the green flourescent protein (GFP) reporter gene with low cytotoxicity. In addition, 49(+/- 9.7%) of HL60 leukemia cells showed expression of GFP. CONCLUSION: The non-viral transfection method described here may have an impact on the use of primary leukemia cells and leukemia cell lines in cancer gene therapy. PMID:14715084

  18. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-29

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  19. Incomplete Chromatin Condensation in Enlarged Rat Myelocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trencsenyi, Gyorgy; Nagy, Gabor; Bako, Fruzsina; Kertai, Pal

    2012-01-01

    The distinguishable morphologic features of nuclei of acute myelogenous leukemia cells with enlarged size and finely distributed nuclear chromatin indicate incomplete chromosome condensation that can be related to elevated gene expression. To confirm this, interphase chromosome structures were studied in exponentially growing rat myelomonocytic leukemia 1 cells isolated at the University of Debrecen (My1/De cells). This cell line was established from primary rat leukemia chemically induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene treatment. The enlarged nuclei of My1/De cells allowed improved fluorescent visualization of chromosomal structures. Increased resolution revealed major interphase intermediates consisting of (1) veil-like chromatin, (2) chromatin ribbon, (3) chromatin funnel, (4) chromatin bodies, (5) elongated prechromosomes, (6) seal-ring, spiral shaped, and circular chromosomal subunits, (7) elongated, bent, u- and v-shaped prechromosomes, and (8) metaphase chromosomes. Results confirmed the existence of the chromatin funnel, the first visible interphase chromosome generated by the supercoiling of the chromatin ribbon. Other intermediates not seen previously included the spiral subunits that are involved in the chromonemic folding of metaphase chromosomes. The existence of spiral subunits favors the helical coil model of chromosome condensation. Incomplete chromatin condensation in leukemia cells throughout the cell cycle is an indication of euchromatization contributing to enhanced gene expression and is regarded as a leukemic factor. PMID:21942442

  20. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  1. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. The bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765) blocks hairy cell leukaemia survival, proliferation and B cell receptor signalling: a new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A

    2014-07-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, as well as B cell migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited also CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. PMID:24697238

  3. Novel Pharmacotherapies for B-Cell Lymphomas and Leukemias.

    PubMed

    Tees, Michael T; Sokol, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Novel pharmacotherapeutic agents were recently approved for treatment of low-grade B-cell neoplasms, and many other agents are under investigation. Several agents have demonstrated impressive activity in targeting malignant B-cell processes and specific pathways, all with the potential to expand our ability to effectively treat B-cell malignancies. The inhibitors of several cell regulatory proteins, including Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K), B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), and histone deacetylases, as well as immunomodulatory agents are a few of the many pharmacotherapeutic agents under study. A comprehensive review and assessment is presented of the current pharmacotherapies under investigation targeting B-cell lymphomas and leukemias. PMID:25549076

  4. Rewired Metabolism in Drug-resistant Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stäubert, Claudia; Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Lindahl, Anna; Broom, Oliver Jay; Zhu, Yafeng; Islam, Saiful; Linnarsson, Sten; Lehtiö, Janne; Nordström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells that escape induction therapy are a major cause of relapse. Understanding metabolic alterations associated with drug resistance opens up unexplored opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we applied a broad spectrum of technologies including RNA sequencing, global untargeted metabolomics, and stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry to identify metabolic changes in P-glycoprotein overexpressing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, which escaped a therapeutically relevant daunorubicin treatment. We show that compared with sensitive ALL cells, resistant leukemia cells possess a fundamentally rewired central metabolism characterized by reduced dependence on glutamine despite a lack of expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), a higher demand for glucose and an altered rate of fatty acid β-oxidation, accompanied by a decreased pantothenic acid uptake capacity. We experimentally validate our findings by selectively targeting components of this metabolic switch, using approved drugs and starvation approaches followed by cell viability analyses in both the ALL cells and in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) sensitive/resistant cell line pair. We demonstrate how comparative metabolomics and RNA expression profiling of drug-sensitive and -resistant cells expose targetable metabolic changes and potential resistance markers. Our results show that drug resistance is associated with significant metabolic costs in cancer cells, which could be exploited using new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25697355

  5. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  6. Systemic mastocytosis: progressive evolution of an occult disease into fatal mast cell leukemia: unique findings on an unusual hematological neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Gülen, T; Sander, B; Nilsson, G; Palmblad, J; Sotlar, K; Horny, H-P; Hägglund, H

    2012-12-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) may be associated with a clonal hematopoietic non-mast cell-lineage disease (AHNMD). SM and AHNMD even may be clonally related. This report contributes to a better understanding of the different morphological aspects of SM by demonstrating that various AHNMDs can be detected in one patient during the course of disease. Routinely processed biopsy specimens of bone marrow and spleen removed from a 63-year-old man were investigated including a broad panel of immunohistochemical stainings. KIT codon 816 mutation analysis was carried out by melting point analysis of nested PCR products amplified from DNA of pooled microdissected mast cells. The histomorphological features of the initial bone marrow showed diffuse infiltration by hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Occult SM was only detected retrospectively by demonstration of a slight diffuse increase in loosely scattered, spindle-shaped mast cells carrying the activating point mutation KIT ( D816V ). In the second bone marrow, core biopsy removed about two years later HCL had been completely eradicated, while a diagnosis of SM-AHNMD with multifocal compact mast cell infiltrates associated with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and significant increase in eosinophilic granulocytes was established. The third and last bone marrow biopsy specimen lacked the features of both MPN and HCL but showed progression into a secondary mast cell leukemia (MCL) with a focal sarcomatous component. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of a case of SM-AHNMD with coexisting hematological neoplasms of lymphatic and myeloid origin initially presenting as occult disease and terminating as secondary MCL. PMID:22661384

  7. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  8. HES1 activation suppresses proliferation of leukemia cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chen; Yu, Yong; Jia, Yongsheng; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-09-01

    Although aberrant Notch activation contributes to leukemogenesis in T cells, the role of Notch pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains controversial. To address this issue, we compared the expression levels of its downstream effector HES1 and p21 in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) from 30 newly diagnosed AML patients and three AML cell lines to normal BMNCs. The results showed that both of them were downregulated in AML cells. In vitro, induced activation of HES1 by retrovirus in AML cell lines consistently led to AML cell growth arrest and apoptosis induction, which was associated with enhanced p21 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of HES1 in primary AML cells inhibited growth of AML in a xenograft mice model. In conclusion, we demonstrated the tumor suppressor role of HES1 in AML. PMID:26092281

  9. Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia with tetraploidy.

    PubMed

    Dinol, Gna?; Palandz, Skr; Nalaci, Meliha; Uur, Ali; Bykaydin, Banu

    2005-12-01

    Myeloid/natural killer (NK) cell precursor acute leukemia is characterized by coexpression of myeloid and natural killer cell antigens and an aggressive clinical course. Here we report a case of myeloid/NK precursor acute leukemia in a 37-year-old woman. Clinical presentation was correlated with leukemic blast morphology, immunophenotype, and cytogenetic analysis. The patient had noted fever, weakness, purpura, peripheral lymphadenopathy, and moderate hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood smears and bone marrow aspirate smears at presentation revealed blastic cells, which were generally L2 shaped, with variation in cell size, round to moderately irregular nuclei and prominent nucleoli, pale cytoplasm, and a lack of azurophilic granules. Immunophenotypic analysis of the blasts displayed coexpression of myeloid and natural killer cell antigens with relatively immature phenotype: CD7+, CD33+, CD34+, CD56+, CD57+, CD16-, MPO-. Cytogenetic analysis of marrow cells showed 62% of cells with a normal female karyotype; in the remaining 38%, tetraploid changes were detected, where the chromosome number was 92, with no preferential losses or gains of chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the same abnormality. The patient did not respond to chemotherapy (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) and died of a septic complication on the 34th day after admission. To our knowledge, this is the first description of tetraploidy in myeloid/NK cell precursor acute leukemia. PMID:16337859

  10. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y J; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin(-)CD34(+) cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  11. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  12. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Spontaneous Cell Fusion of Acute Leukemia Cells and Macrophages Observed in Cells with Leukemic Potential12

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Gregato, Giuliana; Agliano, Alice; Malazzi, Omar; Mancuso, Patrizia; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Viale, Andrea; Bertolini, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Cell fusion plays a well-recognized physiological role during development, while its function during progression is still unclear. Here, we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells spontaneously fused with murine host cells in vivo. AML cells fused in most cases with mouse macrophages. Other targets of AML cell fusion were dendritic and endothelial cells. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis revealed that successive recipients conserved detectable amounts of parental DNA. Moreover, in a mouse AML1-ETO model where female AML1-ETO-leukemic cells, expressing CD45.2, were injected in congenic CD45.1 male mice AML cells, we found hybrid cells expressing both allelic types of CD45 and XXY set of sexual chromosomes. More importantly, the fusion protein AML1-ETO was transferred in the hybrid cells. When sorted hybrid cells were reinjected in a secondary recipient, they gave rise to leukemia with 100% penetrance and similar time of onset of leukemic cells. Our data indicate that in vivo fusion of cancer cells with host cells may be a mechanism of gene transfer for cancer dissemination and suggest that fused cells may be used to identify still unrecognized leukemogenic genes that are conserved in hybrid cells and able to perpetuate leukemia in vivo. PMID:23226099

  14. Inhibition of histone methyltransferase EZH2 depletes leukemia stem cell of mixed lineage leukemia fusion leukemia through upregulation of p16.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Koki; Yoshimi, Akihide; Kagoya, Yuki; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Marquez, Victor E; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-05-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSC) are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and persistent LSC after chemotherapy are supposed to be a major cause of relapse. However, information on genetic or epigenetic regulation of stem cell properties is still limited and LSC-targeted drugs have scarcely been identified. Epigenetic regulators are associated with many cellular processes including maintenance of stem cells. Of note are polycomb group proteins, because they potentially control stemness, and can be pharmacologically targeted by a selective inhibitor (DZNep). Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic potential of EZH2 inhibition in mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion leukemia. Intriguingly, EZH2 inhibition by DZNep or shRNA not only suppressed MLL fusion leukemia proliferation but also reduced leukemia initiating cells (LIC) frequency. Expression analysis suggested that p16 upregulation was responsible for LICs reduction. Knockdown of p16 canceled the survival advantage of mice treated with DZNep. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EZH2 was highly enriched around the transcription-start-site of p16, together with H3K27 methylation marks in MLL/ENL and Hoxa9/Meis1 transduced cells but not in E2A/HLF transduced cells. Although high expression of Hoxa9 in MLL fusion leukemia is supposed to be responsible for the recruitment of EZH2, our data also suggest that there may be some other mechanisms independent of Hoxa9 activation to suppress p16 expression, because expression levels of Hoxa9 and p16 were not inversely related between MLL/ENL and Hoxa9/Meis1 transduced cells. In summary, our findings show that EZH2 is a potential therapeutic target of MLL fusion leukemia stem cells. PMID:24612037

  15. Scalarized hairy black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2015-05-01

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar-tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  16. Identification of CD34+ and CD34? leukemia-initiating cells in MLL-rearranged human acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takashi; Saito, Yoriko; Kuroki, Yoko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Mariko; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Kaneko, Akiko; Ono, Rintaro; Sato, Kaori; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiki, Saera; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Mizutani, Shuki

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with AF4, AF9, or ENL results in acute leukemia with both lymphoid and myeloid involvement. We characterized leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in primary infant MLL-rearranged leukemia using a xenotransplantation model. In MLL-AF4 patients, CD34+CD38+CD19+ and CD34?CD19+ cells initiated leukemia, and in MLL-AF9 patients, CD34?CD19+ cells were LICs. In MLL-ENL patients, either CD34+ or CD34? cells were LICs, depending on the pattern of CD34 expression. In contrast, in patients with these MLL translocations, CD34+CD38?CD19?CD33? cells were enriched for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with in vivo long-term multilineage hematopoietic repopulation capacity. Although LICs developed leukemic cells with clonal immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) rearrangement in vivo, CD34+CD38?CD19?CD33? cells repopulated recipient bone marrow and spleen with B cells, showing broad polyclonal IGH rearrangement and recipient thymus with CD4+ single positive (SP), CD8+ SP, and CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells. Global gene expression profiling revealed that CD9, CD32, and CD24 were over-represented in MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, and MLL-ENL LICs compared with normal HSCs. In patient samples, these molecules were expressed in CD34+CD38+ and CD34? LICs but not in CD34+CD38?CD19?CD33? HSCs. Identification of LICs and LIC-specific molecules in primary human MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for MLL-rearranged leukemia. PMID:25538041

  17. Survivin Selectively Modulates Genes Deregulated in Human Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Seiji; Abe, Mariko; Onishi, Chie; Taketani, Takeshi; Purevsuren, Jamiyan; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Conway, Edward M.; Pelus, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    ITD-Flt3 mutations are detected in leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. While antagonizing Survivin normalizes ITD-Flt3-induced acute leukemia, it also impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function, indicating that identification of differences in signaling pathways downstream of Survivin between LSC and HSC are crucial to develop selective Survivin-based therapeutic strategies for AML. Using a Survivin-deletion model, we identified 1,096 genes regulated by Survivin in ITD-Flt3-transformed c-kit+, Sca-1+, and lineageneg (KSL) cells, of which 137 are deregulated in human LSC. Of the 137, 124 genes were regulated by Survivin exclusively in ITD-Flt3+ KSL cells but not in normal CD34neg KSL cells. Survivin-regulated genes in LSC connect through a network associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway and falls into various functional categories independent of effects on apoptosis. Pathways downstream of Survivin in LSC that are distinct from HSC can be potentially targeted for selective anti-LSC therapy. PMID:21253548

  18. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  19. Autophagy is associated with cucurbitacin D-induced apoptosis in human T cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tsukasa; Song, Yuan; He, Cuiying; Wang, Duo; Morita, Kentaro; Tsukada, Junichi; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD) induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the effects of co-treatment with an additional Bcl-xL inhibitor, Z36. Treatment with Z36 induced cell death in leukemia cell lines, with MT-4 cells exhibiting the lowest sensitivity to Z36. Co-treatment of cells with Z36 and CuD resulted in a greater degree of cell death for Hut78 and Jurkat cells than treatment with CuD alone. In contrast, co-treatment of MT-4 cells with Z36 and CuD had a suppressive effect on cell death. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) suppressed the growth of leukemia cell lines HuT78, Jurkat, MT-1, and MT-4. CuD-induced cell death was enhanced by 3-MA in Jurkat cells, but inhibited in MT-4 cells. Western blotting results revealed cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), supporting CuD-induced cell death; 3-MA enhanced CuD-Z36-induced PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy negatively regulates chemical-induced cell death of leukemia cells, and that controlling autophagy could be beneficial in the development of more effective chemotherapies against leukemia. PMID:26913856

  20. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  1. T-cell phenotypes in chemically induced leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kreja, L; Hartmann, W; Seidel, H J

    1985-01-01

    T-cell leukemias were induced in adult BDF mice by a single i.v. injection of 50 mg kg-1 of methylnitrosourea (MNU). Leukemic cells from the thymus and other organ sites showed the theta antigen and were peanut-negative, but were heterogeneous with respect to Lyt-1 and Lyt-2. The acute cytotoxic effect of the MNU showed no preferential toxicity to a special T-cell subset in the thymus. During the latency period of leukemogenesis a continuous fall in peanut-positive cells in the thymus was found. PMID:3872975

  2. Zerumbone induces apoptosis in T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Mohan, Syam; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Syam, Suvitha; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Mariod, Abdelbasit Adam

    2011-02-01

    Zerumbone (ZER) is a potential anticancer natural compound, isolated from Zingiber zerumbet Smith. In this investigation, the anticancer properties of ZER were evaluated on cancer cells of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CEM-ss. The results showed that ZER has cytotoxic effect against CEM-ss cells with an IC(50) of 8.4 ± 1.9 μg/ml (coefficient of variation < 30%). Comparatively, 5-fluorouracil (positive control), imposed an inhibitory effect on CEM-ss cells with an IC(50) of 1.94 ± 0.06 μg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed abnormalities such as membrane blebbing, holes and cytoplasmic extrusions, all of which are characteristics of apoptosis. In addition, ZER has increased the number of TUNEL-positive stain and the cellular level of caspase-3, the hallmarks of apoptosis, on treated CEM-ss cells. It could be concluded that, ZER was able to produce apoptosis on T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CEM-ss. The current findings suggest that ZER might be helpful for improving the usefulness of anticancer agents in the therapy of leukemia. PMID:20708800

  3. Targeting Leukemia Stem Cells in vivo with AntagomiR-126 Nanoparticles in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Neviani, Paolo; Ferenchak, Greg J.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Ozer, Hatice G; Hoellarbauer, Pia; Khalife, Jihane; Hill, Emily B.; Yadav, Marshleen; Bolon, Brad N.; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, L.James; Croce, Carlo M.; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci., Guido

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to “stemness” and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (≥60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles (NP) containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, i.e., miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients. PMID:26055302

  4. Targeting leukemia stem cells in vivo with antagomiR-126 nanoparticles in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, A M; Neviani, P; Ferenchak, G J; Huang, X; Nicolet, D; Maharry, K S; Ozer, H G; Hoellarbauer, P; Khalife, J; Hill, E B; Yadav, M; Bolon, B N; Lee, R J; Lee, L J; Croce, C M; Garzon, R; Caligiuri, M A; Bloomfield, C D; Marcucci, G

    2015-11-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to 'stemness' and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (⩾60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, that is, miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients. PMID:26055302

  5. Deregulated expression of TCL1 causes T cell leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Laura; Lazzeri, Cristina; Bichi, Roberta; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Narducci, Maria Grazia; Russo, Giandomenico; Rothstein, Jay L.; Croce, Carlo M.

    1998-01-01

    The TCL1 oncogene on human chromosome 14q32.1 is involved in the development of T cell leukemia in humans. These leukemias are classified either as T prolymphocytic leukemias, which occur very late in life, or as T chronic lymphocytic leukemias, which often arise in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at a young age. The TCL1 oncogene is activated in these leukemias by juxtaposition to the α or β locus of the T cell receptor, caused by chromosomal translocations t(14:14)(q11:q32), t(7:14)(q35:q32), or by inversions inv(14)(q11:q32). To show that transcriptional alteration of TCL1 is causally involved in the generation of T cell neoplasia we have generated transgenic mice that carry the TCL1 gene under the transcriptional control of the p56lck promoter element. The lck-TCL1 transgenic mice developed mature T cell leukemias after a long latency period. Younger mice presented preleukemic T cell expansions expressing TCL1, and leukemias developed only at an older age. The phenotype of the murine leukemias is CD4−CD8+, in contrast to human leukemias, which are predominantly CD4+CD8−. These studies demonstrate that transcriptional activation of the TCL1 protooncogene can cause malignant transformation of T lymphocytes, indicating the role of TCL1 in the initiation of malignant transformation in T prolymphocytic leukemias and T chronic lymphocytic leukemias. PMID:9520462

  6. Potential role of AKT/mTOR signalling proteins in hairy cell leukaemia: association with BRAF/ERK activation and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Levidou, Georgia; Angelopoulou, Maria K.; Adamopoulos, Christos; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Rassidakis, George; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Gainaru, Gabriella; Flevari, Pagona; Sachanas, Sotirios; Saetta, Angelica A.; Sepsa, Athanasia; Moschogiannis, Maria; Kalpadakis, Christina; Tsesmetzis, Nikolaos; Milionis, Vassilios; Chatziandreou, Ilenia; Thymara, Irene; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Dimopoulou, Maria; Plata, Eleni; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Piperi, Christina; Korkolopoulou, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of AKT/mTOR signalling proteins and its association with the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway was investigated in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). BRAFV600E expression and activated forms of AKT, mTOR, ERK1/2, p70S6k and 4E-BP1 were immunohistochemically assessed in 77 BM biopsies of HCL patients and correlated with clinicopathological and BM microvascular characteristics, as well as with c-Caspase-3 levels in hairy cells. Additionally, we tested rapamycin treatment response of BONNA-12 wild-type cells or transfected with BRAFV600E. Most HCL cases expressed p-p70S6K and p-4E-BP1 but not p-mTOR, being accompanied by p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT. AKT/mTOR activation was evident in BONNA-12 cells irrespective of the presence of BRAFV600E mutation and was implicated in cell proliferation enhancement. In multivariate analysis p-AKT/p-mTOR/p-4E-BP1 overexpression was an adverse prognostic factor for time to next treatment conferring earlier relapse. When p-AKT, p-mTOR and p-4E-BP1 were examined separately only p-4E-BP1 remained significant. Our findings indicate that in HCL, critical proteins up- and downstream of mTOR are activated. Moreover, the strong associations with Raf-MEK-ERK signalling imply a possible biologic interaction between these pathways. Most importantly, expression of p-4E-BP1 alone or combined with p-AKT and p-mTOR is of prognostic value in patients with HCL. PMID:26893254

  7. Rotating hairy black holes.

    PubMed

    Kleihaus, B; Kunz, J

    2001-04-23

    We construct stationary black-hole solutions in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing nontrivial non-Abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent nonperturbative rotating hairy black holes. PMID:11329304

  8. B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel

    MedlinePlus

    B lymphocyte cell surface markers ... sample is needed. In some cases, white blood cells are removed during a bone marrow biopsy . The ... to a laboratory, where a specialist checks the cell type and characteristics. This procedure is called immunophenotyping. ...

  9. Acute leukemia after successful chemotherapy for oat cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, V.L.; Keppen, M.D.; Eichner, E.R.; Pitha, J.V.; Murray, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A report of acute myelomonocytic leukemia following successful therapy for oat cell carcinoma is presented. The patient had been treated with extensive cytotoxic and radiation therapy, and was without clinical evidence of disease at one year follow-up. Eighteen months later, a peripheral smear revealed numerous blasts with monocytoid characteristics. This unusual presentation is discussed and compared with several other cases appearing in the recent literature.

  10. Targeting leukemia stem cells: which pathways drive self-renewal activity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed

    Belmonte, M; Hoofd, C; Weng, A P; Giambra, V

    2016-02-01

    T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (t-all) is a malignancy of white blood cells, characterized by an uncontrolled accumulation of T-cell progenitors. During leukemic progression, immature T cells grow abnormally and crowd into the bone marrow, preventing it from making normal blood cells and spilling out into the bloodstream. Recent studies suggest that only discrete cell populations that possess the ability to recreate the entire tumour might be responsible for the initiation and propagation of t-all. Those unique cells are commonly called "cancer stem cells" or, in the case of hematopoietic malignancies, "leukemia stem cells" (lscs). Like normal hematopoietic stem cells, lscs are thought to be capable of self-renewal, during which, by asymmetrical division, they give rise to an identical copy of themselves as well as to a daughter cell that is no longer capable of self-renewal activity and represents a more "differentiated" progeny. Here, we review the main pathways of self-renewal activity in lscs, focusing on their involvement in the maintenance and development of t-all. New stem cell-directed therapies and lsc-targeted agents are also discussed. PMID:26966402

  11. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-01-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival. PMID:24488563

  12. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Modulate Mouse ENT1 Activity and Protect Leukemia Cells from Cytarabine Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Leisewitz, Andrea; Broekhuizen, Richard; Cautivo, Kelly; Barriga, Francisco M.; Leisewitz, Francisco; Gidi, Victoria; Riquelme, Erick; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Swett, Pilar; Besa, Pelayo; Ramirez, Pablo; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Kalergis, Alexis M.; Holt, Matthew; Rettig, Michael; DiPersio, John F.; Nervi, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a high response rate to chemotherapy, the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are destined to relapse due to residual disease in the bone marrow (BM). The tumor microenvironment is increasingly being recognized as a critical factor in mediating cancer cell survival and drug resistance. In this study, we propose to identify mechanisms involved in the chemoprotection conferred by the BM stroma to leukemia cells. Methods Using a leukemia mouse model and a human leukemia cell line, we studied the interaction of leukemia cells with the BM microenvironment. We evaluated in vivo and in vitro leukemia cell chemoprotection to different cytotoxic agents mediated by the BM stroma. Leukemia cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and western blotting. The activity of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1), responsible for cytarabine cell incorporation, was investigated by measuring transport and intracellular accumulation of 3H-adenosine. Results Leukemia cell mobilization from the bone marrow into peripheral blood in vivo using a CXCR4 inhibitor induced chemo-sensitization of leukemia cells to cytarabine, which translated into a prolonged survival advantage in our mouse leukemia model. In vitro, the BM stromal cells secreted a soluble factor that mediated significant chemoprotection to leukemia cells from cytarabine induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the BM stromal cell supernatant induced a 50% reduction of the ENT1 activity in leukemia cells, reducing the incorporation of cytarabine. No protection was observed when radiation or other cytotoxic agents such as etoposide, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil were used. Conclusion The BM stroma secretes a soluble factor that significantly protects leukemia cells from cytarabine-induced apoptosis and blocks ENT1 activity. Strategies that modify the chemo-protective effects mediated by the BM microenvironment may enhance the benefit of conventional chemotherapy for patients with AML. PMID:22629369

  13. Antileukemic potency of CD19-specific T cells against chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Klamer, Guy; Joshi, Swapna; Xu, Ning; Yang, Lu; Micklethwaite, Kenneth; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2015-12-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells (CART cells) has exhibited great promise in clinical trials, with efficient response correlated with CART-cell expansion and persistence. Despite extensive clinical use, the mechanisms regulating CART-cell expansion and persistence have not been completely elucidated. We have examined the antileukemia potency of CART cells targeting CD19 antigen using second-generation CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain cloned into piggyBac-transposon vector and patient-derived chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples. In the presence of large numbers of target cells characteristic of patients with high leukemia burden, excessive proliferation of CART cells leads to differentiation into short-lived effector cells. Transient leukemia growth delay was induced by CART-cell infusion in mice xenografted with rapidly growing CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and was followed by rapid CART-cell extinction. Conditioning with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-activating caspase 3 and promotion of apoptosis in leukemia cells maximized the effect of CART cells and improved CART-cell persistence. These data suggest that the clinical use of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine before CART cells could be considered. Coculture of leukemia cells with bone marrow stroma cells reduced target cell loss, suggesting that leukemia cell mobilization into circulation may help to remove the protective effect of bone marrow stroma and increase the efficacy of CART-cell therapy. PMID:26384559

  14. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer1,2. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males3. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is significantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20228800

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  17. Targeting leukemia stem cells: which pathways drive self-renewal activity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, M.; Hoofd, C.; Weng, A.P.; Giambra, V.

    2016-01-01

    T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (t-all) is a malignancy of white blood cells, characterized by an uncontrolled accumulation of T-cell progenitors. During leukemic progression, immature T cells grow abnormally and crowd into the bone marrow, preventing it from making normal blood cells and spilling out into the bloodstream. Recent studies suggest that only discrete cell populations that possess the ability to recreate the entire tumour might be responsible for the initiation and propagation of t-all. Those unique cells are commonly called “cancer stem cells” or, in the case of hematopoietic malignancies, “leukemia stem cells” (lscs). Like normal hematopoietic stem cells, lscs are thought to be capable of self-renewal, during which, by asymmetrical division, they give rise to an identical copy of themselves as well as to a daughter cell that is no longer capable of self-renewal activity and represents a more “differentiated” progeny. Here, we review the main pathways of self-renewal activity in lscs, focusing on their involvement in the maintenance and development of t-all. New stem cell–directed therapies and lsc-targeted agents are also discussed. PMID:26966402

  18. Integrated molecular analysis of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kitanaka, Akira; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shimamura, Teppei; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Totoki, Yasushi; Chiba, Kenichi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Nagae, Genta; Ishii, Ryohei; Muto, Satsuki; Kotani, Shinichi; Watatani, Yosaku; Takeda, June; Sanada, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Sato, Yusuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Makishima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Munakata, Wataru; Ogasawara, Hideaki; Sato, Toshitaka; Sasai, Ken; Muramoto, Kenzo; Penova, Marina; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Shide, Kotaro; Kubuki, Yoko; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kameda, Takuro; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Tobinai, Kensei; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nureki, Osamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Matsuoka, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T cell neoplasm of largely unknown genetic basis, associated with human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here we describe an integrated molecular study in which we performed whole-genome, exome, transcriptome and targeted resequencing, as well as array-based copy number and methylation analyses, in a total of 426 ATL cases. The identified alterations overlap significantly with the HTLV-1 Tax interactome and are highly enriched for T cell receptor-NF-κB signaling, T cell trafficking and other T cell-related pathways as well as immunosurveillance. Other notable features include a predominance of activating mutations (in PLCG1, PRKCB, CARD11, VAV1, IRF4, FYN, CCR4 and CCR7) and gene fusions (CTLA4-CD28 and ICOS-CD28). We also discovered frequent intragenic deletions involving IKZF2, CARD11 and TP73 and mutations in GATA3, HNRNPA2B1, GPR183, CSNK2A1, CSNK2B and CSNK1A1. Our findings not only provide unique insights into key molecules in T cell signaling but will also guide the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics in this intractable tumor. PMID:26437031

  19. Mast cell leukemia with rapidly progressing portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masayuki; Nishikawa, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yohei; Doi, Yuko; Tokairin, Takuo; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Omori, Yasufumi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takahashi, Naoto; Yoshioka, Tomoko; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Enomoto, Katsuhiko

    2009-11-01

    Reported herein is an autopsy case of mast cell leukemia, a rare form of systemic mastocytosis, complicated with portal hypertension. A 52-year-old woman presented with urticaria-like skin symptoms, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Atypical mast cells (CD2+, CD25+, CD117+) with toluidine blue metachromasia were found in the peripheral blood and on bone marrow aspiration smears. Chemotherapy with cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin was ineffective and the patient died of multi-organ failure with rapidly progressing hepatosplenomegaly and large-volume ascites 3 months after admission. At autopsy the bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lymph nodes were extensively infiltrated by atypical tumor cells with occasional bi- or multi-lobated nuclei. They were positive for mast cell tryptase and possessed an activating mutation of the c-kitgene (D816V). Ascites (2200 mL) and non-ruptured esophageal varices with submucosal hemorrhage indicated the presence of severe portal hypertension. Although there was no evidence of liver cirrhosis, the hepatic sinusoids were clogged with tumor cells, with a tendency to be more severe in the perivenular areas, and the lumens of central veins were obliterated by tumor cell infiltration. The present case demonstrates that non-cirrhotic portal hypertension due to blocking of sinusoidal and venous flow could be a serious complication in mast cell leukemia. PMID:19883434

  20. Stem cell niche as a prognostic factor in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga-Young; Kim, Jin-A; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-01-01

    Despite high interests on microenvironmental regulation of leukemic cells, little is known for bone marrow (BM) niche in leukemia patients. Our recent study on BMs of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients showed that the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are altered during leukemic conditions in a clinical course-dependent manner. Leukemic blasts caused reprogramming of transcriptomes in MSCs and remodeling of niche cross-talk, selectively suppressing normal primitive hematopoietic cells while supporting leukemogenesis and chemo-resistance. Notably, differences in BM stromal remodeling were correlated to heterogeneity in subsequent clinical courses of AML, i.e., low numbers of mesenchymal progenitors at initial diagnosis were correlated to complete remission for 5-8 years, and high contents of mesenchymal progenitor or MSCs correlated to early or late relapse, respectively. Thus, stromal remodeling by leukemic cell is an intrinsic part of leukemogenesis that can contribute to the clonal dominance of leukemic cells over normal hematopoietic cells, and can serve as a biomarker for prediction of prognosis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 427-428] PMID:26198094

  1. Microenvironmental cues for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Diana; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens have led to a substantial improvement in the cure rate of patients suffering from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite this progress, about 15% and 50% of pediatric and adult cases, respectively, show resistance to treatment or relapse with dismal prognosis, calling for further therapeutic investigations. T-ALL is an heterogeneous disease, which presents intrinsic alterations leading to aberrant expression of transcription factors normally involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development and mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and T-cell development. Gene expression profiling allowed the classification of T-ALL into defined molecular subgroups that mostly reflects the stage of their differentiation arrest. So far this knowledge has not translated into novel, targeted therapy. Recent evidence points to the importance of extrinsic signaling cues in controlling the ability of T-ALL to home, survive, and proliferate, thus offering the perspective of new therapeutic options. This review summarizes the present understanding of the interactions between hematopoietic cells and bone marrow/thymic niches during normal hematopoiesis, describes the main signaling pathways implicated in this dialog, and finally highlights how malignant T cells rely on specific niches to maintain their ability to sustain and propagate leukemia. PMID:27088913

  2. Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Leukemia Cell-Derived Exosomes More Efficiently Induce Antileukemic Immunities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Shen, Chang; Deng, Xiaohui; Chen, Linjun; Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cell-derived exosomes have been used to develop antitumor vaccines. However, the biological properties and antileukemic effects of leukemia cell-derived exosomes (LEXs) are not well described. In this study, the biological properties and induction of antileukemic immunity of LEXs were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, western blot analysis, cytotoxicity assays, and animal studies. Similar to other tumor cells, leukemia cells release exosomes. Exosomes derived from K562 leukemia cells (LEXK562) are membrane-bound vesicles with diameters of approximately 50–100 μm and harbor adhesion molecules (e.g., intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and immunologically associated molecules (e.g., heat shock protein 70). In cytotoxicity assays and animal studies, LEXs-pulsed DCs induced an antileukemic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response and antileukemic immunity more effectively than did LEXs and non-pulsed DCs (P<0.05). Therefore, LEXs may harbor antigens and immunological molecules associated with leukemia cells. As such, LEX-based vaccines may be a promising strategy for prolonging disease-free survival in patients with leukemia after chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24622345

  3. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-15

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  5. A hairy situation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nader; Wooles, Nicola Rachel; Elloy, Marianne; Da Forno, Philip

    2015-01-01

    A 2-day-old neonate was transferred to a specialist paediatric otolaryngology centre with stridor at rest, feeding difficulties and an apparent mass in the oropharynx. The newborn displayed evidence of respiratory distress, however, she remained self-ventilating. MRI highlighted a fat-containing lesion in the postnasal space with no intracranial extension. A CT scan under general anaesthesia showed no underlying bony abnormality, and hence an examination of the nasopharynx, oropharynx and microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy were performed. The macroscopically hairy lesion arising from the superior aspect of the soft palate was resected. Histology displayed a benign growth measuring 28×17×12 mm in keeping with a hairy polyp. This is one of very few cases, to the best of our knowledge, in which a hairy polyp (bigerminal choristomas) has resulted in stridor in the first few days of life. Nasal masses in neonates, although a rare phenomenon, remain clinically important as they are obligate nasal breathers. PMID:26055604

  6. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-01-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 691-695] PMID:26077028

  7. Genetic landscape of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T-cell malignancy associated with HTLV-1 infection. To decipher the genetic landscape of ATL, we performed an integrated molecular analysis, which included whole-genome, whole-exome, transcriptome and targeted sequencing, as well as array-based copy number and methylation analyses. The somatic alterations are highly enriched for T-cell receptor/NF-κB signaling, the G-protein coupled receptor associated with T-cell migration, and other T-cell-related pathways as well as immune surveillance related genes. Among these, PLCG1, PRKCB, CARD11, VAV1, IRF4, CCR4, and CCR7 activating mutations and CTLA4-CD28 and ICOS-CD28 fusion genes have been identified. In addition, these genes significantly overlap with HTLV-1 Tax interactome. These results provide an important basis for the development of new ATL diagnostics and therapeuticsregimens. PMID:27169444

  8. Crown Gall Disease and Hairy Root Disease 1

    PubMed Central

    Gelvin, Stanton B.

    1990-01-01

    The neoplastic diseases crown gall and hairy root are incited by the phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes, respectively. Although the molecular mechanism of T-DNA transfer to the plant most likely is the same for both species, the physiological basis of tumorigenesis is fundamentally different. Crown gall tumors result from the over-production of the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin specified by A. tumefaciens T-DNA genes. Although the T-DNA of some Riplasmids of A. rhizogenes contains auxin biosynthetic genes, these loci are not always necessary for hairy root formation. Recent experiments suggest that hairy root tumors result from the increased sensitivity of transformed cells to endogenous auxin levels. An understanding of hairy root tumorigenesis will likely result in an increased knowledge of plant developmental processes. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667272

  9. Selected epidemiologic observations of cell-specific leukemia mortality in the United States, 1969-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Levin, L.I.; Merrill, D.W.; Winkelstein, W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Utilizing a newly available data set which includes for the first time cell-specific leukemia mortality rates for the United States during 1969-1977, age and sex distributions, time trends and geographic patterns were analyzed. Four major cell types of leukemia were considered. Acute lymphatic leukemia had a bimodal distribution with the first peak in the 5-9-year age group and lowest rates in age group 35-44, after which rates rose geometrically. Acute myeloid leukemia had only a very small childhood peak with a low in the age group 5-9, after which the rates also rose geometrically. For both chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemia the rates rose geometrically after age 15. Rates among females were consistently lower for each age group. The highest sex ratio was found for chronic lymphatic leukemia and is proposed to be the result of a lag period between male and female rates. During the period under study acute lymphatic leukemia mortality in adults declined by almost 10% while acute myeloid leukemia mortality increased by almost 20%. Analysis of the geographic variation of the four major cell types revealed a geographic association between acute lymphatic and acute myeloid leukemia in children, a lack of association between childhood and adult cell types, and an association of acute and chronic cell types in adults.

  10. Selected epidemiological observations of cell-specific leukemia mortality in the USA, 1969-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Levin, L.I.; Merrill, D.W.; Winkelstein, W. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    Utilizing a newly available data set which includes for the first time cell-specific leukemia mortality rates for the USA during the period 1969-1977, age and sex distributions, time trends and geographic patterns have been analyzed. Four major cell types of leukemia were considered. Acute lymphatic leukemia had a bimodal distribution with the first peak in the 5 to 9 year age group and lowest rates in age group 35 to 44 after which rates rose geometrically. Acute myeloid leukemia had only a very small childhood peak with a low in the age group 5 to 9, after which the rates also rose geometrically. For both chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemia the rates rose geometrically after age 15. Rates among females were consistently lower for each age group. The highest sex ratio was found for chronic lymhatic leukemia and is proposed to be the result of a lag period between male and female rates. During the period under study acute lymphatic leukemia mortality in adults declined by almost 10% while acute myeloid leukemia mortality increased by almost 20%. Analysis of the geographic variation of the four major cell types revealed a geographic association between acute lymphatic and acute myeloid leukemia in children, a lack of association between childhood and adult cell types and an association of acute and chronic cell types in adults.

  11. Expression of the myeloperoxidase gene in AC133 positive leukemia cells relates to the prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Jun; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Tsutsumi, Chizuko; Sawayama, Yasushi; Ando, Koji; Tsushima, Hideki; Fukushima, Takuya; Hata, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Honda, Sumihisa; Jinnai, Itsuro; Mano, Hiroyuki; Tomonaga, Masao

    2006-09-01

    We previously reported that the percentage of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive blasts had a prognostic impact on survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To extend this observation, we quantitatively measured the level of the MPO gene in AC133 positive leukemia cells that would contain a putative AML stem/progenitor compartment. AML cases were divided into the MPO gene high (MPOg-H) and MPO gene low (MPOg-L) groups. Only patients belonging to the MPOg-H group had a favorable chromosomal translocation, t(8;21), and having no morphological dysplasia that was associated with MPOg-L. The difference in the survival of MPOg-H and MPOg-L was statistically meaningful, demonstrating the possible prognostic impact of the expression of MPO gene in AC133 positive leukemia cells. PMID:16457884

  12. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  13. Targeting of the BLT2 in chronic myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia stem/progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meifang; Ai, Hongmei; Li, Tao; Rajoria, Pasupati; Shahu, Prakash; Li, Xiansong

    2016-04-15

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has significantly improved clinical outcome for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. However, patients develop resistance when the disease progresses to the blast phase (BP) and the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that BCR-ABL activates BLT2 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to promote leukemogenesis and this involves the p53 signaling pathway. Compared to normal bone marrow (NBM), the mRNA and protein levels of BLT2 are significantly increased in BP-CML CD34(+) stem/progenitor cells. This is correlated with increasing BCR-ABL expression. In contrast, knockdown of BCR-ABL or inhibition of its tyrosine kinase activity decreases Blt2 protein level. BLT2 inhibition induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, colony formation and self-renewal capacity of CD34(+) cells from TKI-resistant BP-CML patients. Importantly, the inhibitory effects of BCR-ABL TKI on CML stem/progenitor cells are further enhanced upon combination with BLT2 inhibition. We further show that BLT2 activation selectively suppresses p53 but not Wnt or BMP-mediated luciferase activity and transcription. Our results demonstrate that BLT2 is a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL and critically involved in the resistance of BP-CML CD34(+) stem/progenitors to TKIs treatment. Our findings suggest that BLT2 and p53 can serve as therapeutic targets for CML treatment. PMID:26966074

  14. The Newly Identified T Helper 22 Cells Lodge in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Rastegar Pouyani, Mohsen; Navabi, Shadi sadat; Yazdani, Reza; Kiaee, Fatemeh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological tumor in which the malignant myeloid or lymphoid subsets play a pivotal role. Newly identified T helper cell 22 (Th22) is a subset of CD4+ T cells with distinguished gene expression, function and specific properties apart from other known CD4+ T cell subsets.Th22 cells are characterized by production of a distinct profile of effector cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). The levels of Th22 and cytokine IL-22 are increased and positively related to inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Recently, several studies have reported the changes in frequency and function of Th22 in acute leukemic disorders as AML and ALL. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of leukemic disease. PMID:26261700

  15. p27 and leukemia: cell cycle and beyond.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anita; Banerjee, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Cell division is the foundation to development and the regulation of cell cycle progression is therefore of paramount importance to the living organisms. Primary control of cell cycle is achieved by an array of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). The functions of these cyclin-CDK complexes are again regulated by a host of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKI). Till date CDKIs are broadly classified into two groups-INK4 family (p15, p16, p18, and p19) and the cip/kip family (p21, p27, and p57). Collectively these CDKIs regulate the progression from G1 to S phase of cell cycle. This review summarizes the functions of p27 while highlighting its emerging roles in leukemia. PMID:25205053

  16. The Newly Identified T Helper 22 Cells Lodge in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Rastegar Pouyani, Mohsen; Navabi, Shadi Sadat; Yazdani, Reza; Kiaee, Fatemeh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    Leukemia is a hematological tumor in which the malignant myeloid or lymphoid subsets play a pivotal role. Newly identified T helper cell 22 (Th22) is a subset of CD4(+) T cells with distinguished gene expression, function and specific properties apart from other known CD4(+) T cell subsets.Th22 cells are characterized by production of a distinct profile of effector cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The levels of Th22 and cytokine IL-22 are increased and positively related to inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Recently, several studies have reported the changes in frequency and function of Th22 in acute leukemic disorders as AML and ALL. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of leukemic disease. PMID:26261700

  17. Insights into cell ontogeny, age, and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Shahzya S; Morison, Jessica K; Gibson, Brenda E S; Keeshan, Karen

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The pathogenesis of AML involves cytogenetic abnormalities, genetic mutations, and epigenetic anomalies. Although it is widely accepted that the cellular biology, gene expression, and epigenetic landscape of normal HSCs change with age, little is known about the interplay between the age at which the cell becomes leukemic and the resultant leukemia. Despite its rarity, childhood AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. Treatment is in general extrapolated from adult AML on the assumption that adult AML and pediatric AML are similar biological entities. However, distinct biological processes and epigenetic modifications in pediatric and adult AML may mean that response to novel therapies in children may differ from that in adults with AML. A better understanding of the key pathways involved in transformation and how these differ between childhood and adult AML is an important step in identifying effective treatment. This review highlights both the commonalities and differences between pediatric and adult AML disease biology with respect to age. PMID:26051919

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Increased expression of CX43 on stromal cells promotes leukemia apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Maihong; Chen, Guo; Gong, Yi; Zhong, Jiangjian; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiang F.; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) induced apoptosis has been reported in solid tumors, but the effect of Cx43 expressed by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in leukemia has not been fully investigated. Manipulating Cx43 expression could be a potential therapeutic strategy for leukemia. Here, we investigate the effect of Cx43 expressed by BMSCs (human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells over-expressed CX43, Cx43-hUCSC) on leukemia cells. When co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC, leukemia cells show significant lower growth rate with increasing apoptosis activity, and more leukemia cells enter S phase. Functional assays of fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP) showed improved gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) on leukemia cells when co-cultured with Cx43-hUCSC (p < 0.01). In a mouse minimal disease model, the mean survival time and mortality rate were significantly improved in mice transplanted with Cx43-hUCSC. Our results indicate that Cx43 expressed by BMSC induces apoptosis on leukemia cells. Small molecules or other pharmaceutical approaches for modulating Cx43 expression in BMSCs could be used for delaying relapse of leukemia. PMID:26517241

  20. New strategies in the chemotherapy of leukemia: eradicating cancer stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stefanachi, A; Leonetti, F; Nicolotti, O; Catto, M; Pisani, L; Cellamare, S; Altomare, C; Carotti, A

    2012-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by the Philadelphia-positive chromosome deriving from a translocation between chromosomes 22 and 9. The oncogenic product of this aberrant chromosome is the constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL that is responsible for leukemic cell growth, proliferation and survival driven by the dysregulation of a large array of signal transduction pathways. Inhibition of BCR-ABL with tyrosine kinase inhibitors proved to be an efficient therapy of CML in the chronic phase. Unfortunately, the impressive success of BCR-ABL inhibitors as front-line therapy in CML has been tempered by problems of disease persistence or relapse arising from different mechanisms, including mutations in the kinase domain of the enzyme BCRABL and mechanisms independent from BCR-ABL activity. Growing evidence has also suggested a pivotal role of persistent leukemic cancer stem cells, characterized by high self-renewal and pluripotency, in CML maintenance and/or relapse. The present review deals with the most recent advances in this challenging field and focuses on the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches to eradicate the subtle and dangerous leukemic stem cells responsible for maintaining and sustaining tumor growth. PMID:22414010

  1. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150μgmL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites. PMID:26971029

  2. Paraptosis Cell Death Induction by the Thiamine Analog Benfotiamine in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Akiyoshi; Kondo, Yukio; An, Dao Thi; Sasaki, Motoko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakao, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential. PMID:25849583

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Primary Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Tournilhac, Olivier; Halty, Christelle; Veyrat-Masson, Richard; Akil, Saïda; Berger, Marc; Hérault, Olivier; Callanan, Mary; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 µM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity. PMID:26734128

  4. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  5. Resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia: non-participation of splenic natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    St.-Pierre, Y.; Hugo, P.; Lemieux, S.; Lussier, G.; Potworowski, E.F.

    1988-08-01

    The phenotypic expression of genetically determined resistance to radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia in mice has been shown to reside in the bone marrow. Because the bone marrow contains precursors of natural killer (NK) cells, known to play a role in retrovirally induced infections, and because these cells have been suggested as participating in resistance to radiation-induced leukemia, it was pertinent to establish whether their levels differed in strains of mice susceptible and resistant to leukemia. We therefore tested splenic NK cell levels in C57BL/Ka (susceptible) and B10.A(5R) (resistant) mice before viral inoculation, immediately after viral inoculation, and throughout the preleukemic period and showed that they were not different. This indicates that splenic NK cell levels have no bearing on the resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia and that other immune or non-immune mechanisms must be sought.

  6. Targeting SLUG sensitizes leukemia cells to ADR-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chang-Rong; Liu, Jun; Yu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Slug is an E-cadherin repressor and a suppressor of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) and it has recently been demonstrated that Slug plays an important role in controlling apoptosis. In this study, we examined whether Slug’s ability to silence expression suppresses the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells and/or sensitizes leukemia HL-60 cells to adriamycin (ADR) through induction of apoptosis. Methods: SLUG siRNA was transfected into the HL-60 and HL-60ADR cell lines (an adriamycin resistant cell line). The stably SLUG siRNA transfected HL-60 and HL-60ADR cells was transiently transfected with PUMA siRNA. The mRNA and protein expression of SLUG and PUMA were determined by Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot assay. The effects of SLUG siRNA alone or combined with ADR or PUMA siRNA on growth and apoptosis in HL-60 and HL-60ADR cells was detected by MTT, ELISA and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results: The results showed that SLUG was less expressed in the HL-60 cells, and high expressed in the HL-60ADR cells. Obvious down-regulation of SLUG mRNA and protein levels and up-regulation of PUMA mRNA and protein levels after SLUG siRNA transfection was showed in the HL-60ADR cells. Treatment with ADR induced SLUG mRNA and protein in the HL-60 cells. Significant positive correlation was observed between basal SLUG mRNA and protein and ADR sensitivity. SLUG gene silencing by SLUG siRNA transfection inhibited growth and induced apoptosis, and increased ADR killing of the HL-60 and HL-60ADR cell lines. After the SLUG siRNA transfected HL-60 and HL-60ADR cells was transiently transfected with PUMA siRNA, did not increase ADR killing of the HL-60 and HL-60ADR cell lines. Conclusion: SLUG level positively correlated with sensitivity to ADR. SLUG siRNA could effectively reduce SLUG expression and induce PUMA expression and restore the drug sensitivity of resistant leukemic cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26885188

  7. Induction of cell cycle entry eliminates human leukemia stem cells in a mouse model of AML.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoriko; Uchida, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Aoki, Yuki; Wake, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Shultz, Leonard D; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Cancer stem cells have been proposed to be important for initiation, maintenance and recurrence of various malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We have previously reported that CD34+CD38- human primary AML stem cells residing in the endosteal region of the bone marrow are relatively chemotherapy resistant. Using a NOD/SCID/IL2rgamma(null) mouse model of human AML, we now show that the AML stem cells in the endosteal region are cell cycle quiescent and that these stem cells can be induced to enter the cell cycle by treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In combination with cell cycle-dependent chemotherapy, G-CSF treatment significantly enhances induction of apoptosis and elimination of human primary AML stem cells in vivo. The combination therapy leads to significantly increased survival of secondary recipients after transplantation of leukemia cells compared with chemotherapy alone. PMID:20160717

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin cytotoxicity in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) is a widely used anti-tumor drug for the treatment of a broad range of human malignancies with successful therapeutic outcomes for head and neck, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It has been found to inhibit cell cycle progression and to induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. However, its molecular mechanisms of cytotoxic action are poorly understood. We hypothesized that cisplatin induces cytotoxicity through DNA adduct formation, oxidative stress, transcriptional factors (p53 and AP-1), cell cycle regulation, stress signaling and apoptosis in APL cells. We used the APL cell line as a model, and applied a variety of molecular tools to elucidate the cytototoxic mode of action of cisplatin. We found that cisplatin inhibited cell proliferation by a cytotoxicity, characterized by DNA damage and modulation of oxidative stress. Cisplatin also activated p53 and phosphorylated activator protein (AP-1) component, c-Jun at serine (63, 73) residue simultaneously leading to cell cycle arrest through stimulation of p21 and down regulation of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases in APL cell lines. It strongly activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis through alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome C, and up-regulation of caspase 3 activity. It also down regulated the p38MAPK pathway. Overall, this study highlights the molecular mechanisms that underline cisplatin toxicity to APL cells, and provides insights into selection of novel targets and/or design of therapeutic agents to treat APL. PMID:26486083

  9. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion.

    PubMed

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Collins, Andrew R; Sahota, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  10. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Collins, Andrew R.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  11. Lenalidomide interferes with tumor-promoting properties of nurse-like cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Audrito, Valentina; Zucchini, Patrizia; Colaci, Elisabetta; Potenza, Leonardo; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario; Deaglio, Silvia; Marasca, Roberto; Maffei, Rossana

    2015-02-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent clinically active in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. The specific mechanism of action is still undefined, but includes modulation of the microenvironment. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, nurse-like cells differentiate from CD14(+) mononuclear cells and protect chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells from apoptosis. Nurse-like cells resemble M2 macrophages with potent immunosuppressive functions. Here, we examined the effect of lenalidomide on the monocyte/macrophage population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. We found that lenalidomide induces high actin polymerization on CD14(+) monocytes through activation of small GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Rap1 that correlated with increased adhesion and impaired monocyte migration in response to CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL12. We observed that lenalidomide increases the number of nurse-like cells that lost the ability to nurture chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, acquired properties of phagocytosis and promoted T-cell proliferation. Gene expression signature, induced by lenalidomide in nurse-like cells, indicated a reduction of pivotal pro-survival signals for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, such as CCL2, IGF1, CXCL12, HGF1, and supported a modulation towards M1 phenotype with high IL2 and low IL10, IL8 and CD163. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of action of lenalidomide that mediates a pro-inflammatory switch of nurse-like cells affecting the protective microenvironment generated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia into tissues. PMID:25398834

  12. Lenalidomide interferes with tumor-promoting properties of nurse-like cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Audrito, Valentina; Zucchini, Patrizia; Colaci, Elisabetta; Potenza, Leonardo; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario; Deaglio, Silvia; Marasca, Roberto; Maffei, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent clinically active in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. The specific mechanism of action is still undefined, but includes modulation of the microenvironment. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, nurse-like cells differentiate from CD14+ mononuclear cells and protect chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells from apoptosis. Nurse-like cells resemble M2 macrophages with potent immunosuppressive functions. Here, we examined the effect of lenalidomide on the monocyte/macrophage population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. We found that lenalidomide induces high actin polymerization on CD14+ monocytes through activation of small GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Rap1 that correlated with increased adhesion and impaired monocyte migration in response to CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL12. We observed that lenalidomide increases the number of nurse-like cells that lost the ability to nurture chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, acquired properties of phagocytosis and promoted T-cell proliferation. Gene expression signature, induced by lenalidomide in nurse-like cells, indicated a reduction of pivotal pro-survival signals for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, such as CCL2, IGF1, CXCL12, HGF1, and supported a modulation towards M1 phenotype with high IL2 and low IL10, IL8 and CD163. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of action of lenalidomide that mediates a pro-inflammatory switch of nurse-like cells affecting the protective microenvironment generated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia into tissues. PMID:25398834

  13. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G G; Kelley, D B; Heath, C W

    1980-10-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3,224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion "Smoky." This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia. At time of diagnosis, patient ages ranged from 21 to 60 years (mean, 41.8 years) and the interval from time of nuclear test to diagnosis from two to 19 years (mean, 14.2 years). Film-badge records, which are available for eight of the nine men, indicated gamma radiation exposure levels ranging from 0 to 2,977 mrem (mean, 1,033 mrem). Mean film-badge gamma dose for the entire Smoky cohort was 466.2 mrem. PMID:6932516

  14. Leukemia among participants in military maneuvers at a nuclear bomb test. [Plumbbob Project

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, G.G.; Kelley, D.B.; Heath, C.W. Jr.

    1980-10-03

    Preliminary studies indicate that nine cases of leukemia have occurred among 3224 men who participated in military maneuvers during the 1957 nuclear test explosion Smoky. This represents a significant increase over the expected incidence of 3.5 cases. They included four cases of acute myelocytic leukemia, three of chronic myelocytic leukemia, and one each of hairy cell and acute lymphocytic leukemia. At time of diagnosis, patient ages ranged from 21 to 60 years (mean, 41.8 years) and the interval from time of nuclear test to diagnosis from two to 19 years (mean, 14.2 years). Film-badge records, which are available for eight of the nine men, indicated gamma radiation exposure levels ranging from 0 to 2977 mrem (mean, 1033 mrem). Mean film-badge gamma dose for the entire Smoky cohort was 466.2 mrem.

  15. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-01-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells. PMID:3855866

  16. Leydig cell damage after testicular irradiation for lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shalet, S.M.; Horner, A.; Ahmed, S.R.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of testicular irradiation on Leydig cell function has been studied in a group of boys irradiated between 1 and 5 years earlier for a testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six of the seven boys irradiated during prepubertal life had an absent testosterone response to HCG stimulation. Two of the four boys irradiated during puberty had an appropriate basal testosterone level, but the testosterone response to HCG stimulation was subnormal in three of the four. Abnormalities in gonadotropin secretion consistent with testicular damage were noted in nine of the 11 boys. Evidence of severe Leydig cell damage was present irrespective of whether the boys were studied within 1 year or between 3 and 5 years after irradiation, suggesting that recovery is unlikely. Androgen replacement therapy has been started in four boys and will be required by the majority of the remainder to undergo normal pubertal development.

  17. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  18. Identification of H7 as a novel peroxiredoxin I inhibitor to induce differentiation of leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dongjun; Chen, Yingyi; Liu, Chuanxu; Xia, Li; Wang, Tongdan; Lei, Hu; Yu, Yun; Huang, Min; Tong, Yin; Xu, Hanzhang; Gao, Fenghou

    2016-01-01

    Identifying novel targets to enhance leukemia-cell differentiation is an urgent requirment. We have recently proposed that inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin I (Prdx I) may induce leukemia-cell differentiation. However, this concept remains to be confirmed. In this work, we identified H7 as a novel Prdx I inhibitor through virtual screening, in vitro activity assay, and surface plasmon resonance assay. Cellular thermal shift assay showed that H7 directly bound to Prdx I but not to Prdxs II–V in cells. H7 treatment also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and cell differentiation in leukemia cells, as reflected by the upregulation of the cell surface differentiation marker CD11b/CD14 and the morphological maturation of cells. The differentiation-induction effect of H7 was further observed in some non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and primary leukemia cells apart from APL NB4 cells. Moreover, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine significantly reversed the H7-induced cell differentiation. We demonstrated as well that H7-induced cell differentiation was associated with the activation of the ROS-Erk1/2-C/EBPβ axis. Finally, we showed H7 treatment induced cell differentiation in an APL mouse model. All of these data confirmed that Prdx I was novel target for inducing leukemia-cell differentiation and that H7 was a novel lead compound for optimizing Prdx I inhibition. PMID:26716647

  19. Identification of H7 as a novel peroxiredoxin I inhibitor to induce differentiation of leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Ma, Chunmin; Cao, Yang; Yang, Li; Huang, Zhimin; Qin, Dongjun; Chen, Yingyi; Liu, Chuanxu; Xia, Li; Wang, Tongdan; Lei, Hu; Yu, Yun; Huang, Min; Tong, Yin; Xu, Hanzhang; Gao, Fenghou; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Ying-Li

    2016-01-26

    Identifying novel targets to enhance leukemia-cell differentiation is an urgent requirement. We have recently proposed that inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin I (Prdx I) may induce leukemia-cell differentiation. However, this concept remains to be confirmed. In this work, we identified H7 as a novel Prdx I inhibitor through virtual screening, in vitro activity assay, and surface plasmon resonance assay. Cellular thermal shift assay showed that H7 directly bound to Prdx I but not to Prdxs II-V in cells. H7 treatment also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and cell differentiation in leukemia cells, as reflected by the upregulation of the cell surface differentiation marker CD11b/CD14 and the morphological maturation of cells. The differentiation-induction effect of H7 was further observed in some non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and primary leukemia cells apart from APL NB4 cells. Moreover, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine significantly reversed the H7-induced cell differentiation. We demonstrated as well that H7-induced cell differentiation was associated with the activation of the ROS-Erk1/2-C/EBPβ axis. Finally, we showed H7 treatment induced cell differentiation in an APL mouse model. All of these data confirmed that Prdx I was novel target for inducing leukemia-cell differentiation and that H7 was a novel lead compound for optimizing Prdx I inhibition. PMID:26716647

  20. Black hairy tongue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-08-21

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient's re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment. PMID:25152586

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Coligan, J E; Essex, M

    1984-01-01

    Type I and type II human T-cell leukemia viruses (HTLV) contain in their genomes three structural genes, gag, pol, and env and a putative transforming gene, lor. Using a living cell membrane immunofluorescence assay, antibodies to surface-expressed env gene products of HTLV-MA have been detected in healthy carriers living in the HTLV-I endemic areas, and in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Similar antibody reactivities were detected in patient MO, from whom HTLV-II was first isolated, and in a proportion of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Amino acid sequence homology between env gene products of HTLV-I and HTLV-II provides the molecular basis for the observed serological crossreactivity. Detection of HTLV-specific antibody in a proportion of AIDS patients suggested that agents related to HTLV-I may be the etiological cause of AIDS. Several lines of evidence have now suggested that HTLV-III is the etiological agent of AIDS. Flanked by the env gene and 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) is a region originally described by Seiki et al. as "X." A 42 kdalton and a 38 kdalton product have been detected in HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed cells, respectively. These two proteins appear to be translated from a long open reading (lor) frame in the X region, and from a yet to be defined region upstream to the lor gene. The identification of lor products provides direct evidence for the presence of previously unidentified functional genes in HTLV-I and HTLV-II.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6100639

  2. Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and pure red cell aplasia associated with an occult large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Dominic W; Loughran, Thomas P; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Sasu, Sebastian; Song, Sophie X; Epling-Burnette, P K; Paquette, Ronald L

    2008-05-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and pure red cell aplasia rarely occur concurrently. We report a case in which these disorders were associated with an occult large granular lymphocyte leukemia. The peripheral blood cytopenias improved after glucocorticoids and intravenous immunoglobulin were administered, and response was maintained with cyclosporine. Large granular lymphocyte leukemia should be suspected in the setting of unexplained bone marrow failure. PMID:17915315

  3. T-cell/Natural killer-cell neoplasms presenting as leukemia- Case series from single tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Shano; Kaur, Maninderbir; Sachdeva, Manupdesh Singh; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Das, Reena; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mature T/ NK-cell neoplasms are a rare group of disorders and their presentation as leukemia is even rarer. Most of the previous studies have focused on mature B-cell lineage leukemias and there is a paucity of data on mature T/NK-cell lineage leukemias. We, therefore, planned this study to analyze their spectrum, frequency, morphology and immunophenotypic features. Subjects and Methods: All cases of lymphomas presenting as leukemia over a period of two and a half years were evaluated. Detailed analysis of cases with T/NK-cell lineage was done for their clinical, hematological and immunophenotypic features. Results: A total of 262 cases of mature lymphoid neoplasms presented as leukemia during the study period. Of whom, only 8 (3.1%) cases were of T /NK-cell lineage and the remaining (96.9%) were of B-cell lineage. Of 8 cases, 4 (50%) had T-prolymphocytic leukemia, 2 (25%) had chronic lymphoproliferative disorder- natural killer cell and 1 (12.5%) case of each T-large granular lymphocytic leukemia and hepatosplenic γ/δ T-NHL. Conclusion: T/NK-cell leukemias are rare. Along with clinical and morphological features, pattern of immunophenotypic markers is vital for their diagnosis and subcategorization. PMID:27047646

  4. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    PubMed

    Speziali, Craig; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The majority of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will achieve a first complete remission (CR). However relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure. Outcomes after relapse remain poor, with long-term survival in the order of 10 %. Treatment decisions made at the time of first complete remission are thus critical to ensuring long-term survival. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is effective at preventing relapse in many transplant recipients but is also associated with significant treatment related morbidity and mortality. Alternatively, ongoing systemic chemotherapy offers lower toxicity at the expense of increased relapse rates. Over the past decades, both the safety of transplant and the efficacy of non-transplant chemotherapy have improved. Emerging data show substantially improved outcomes for young adults treated with pediatric-inspired chemotherapy regimens that question the role of HCT in the upfront setting. In this review, we review the data supporting the role of allogeneic transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and we propose a therapeutic algorithm for upfront therapy of adults with ALL. PMID:26984203

  5. Hairy Root Transformation Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes as a Tool for Exploring Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression and Function Using Tomato as a Model1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Mily; Kajala, Kaisa; Pauluzzi, Germain; Wang, Dongxue; Reynoso, Mauricio A.; Zumstein, Kristina; Garcha, Jasmine; Winte, Sonja; Masson, Helen; Inagaki, Soichi; Federici, Fernán; Sinha, Neelima; Deal, Roger B.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Brady, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes (or Rhizobium rhizogenes) is able to transform plant genomes and induce the production of hairy roots. We describe the use of A. rhizogenes in tomato (Solanum spp.) to rapidly assess gene expression and function. Gene expression of reporters is indistinguishable in plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as compared with A. rhizogenes. A root cell type- and tissue-specific promoter resource has been generated for domesticated and wild tomato (Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum pennellii, respectively) using these approaches. Imaging of tomato roots using A. rhizogenes coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy is facilitated by the use of a membrane-tagged protein fused to a red fluorescent protein marker present in binary vectors. Tomato-optimized isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types and translating ribosome affinity purification binary vectors were generated and used to monitor associated messenger RNA abundance or chromatin modification. Finally, transcriptional reporters, translational reporters, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease9 genome editing demonstrate that SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW gene function is conserved between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato. PMID:24868032

  6. Real-time PCR-based analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in low and intermediate grade lymphomas confirms frequent occurrence in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ewalt, Mark; Nandula, Subhadra; Phillips, Adrienne; Alobeid, Bachir; Murty, Vundavalli V; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Bhagat, Govind

    2012-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a rare type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), which is not known to be associated with any characteristic recurrent karyotypic abnormality. A recent study that used massively parallel whole exome sequencing identified an activating V600E mutation in BRAF, which appeared specific for HCL. Here, we confirm the specificity of BRAF V600E for HCL among low and intermediate grade B-NHL and describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for detecting this mutation in cases with low tumour burden. The V600E mutation does not appear to be associated with microsatellite instability, unlike the case in colorectal cancer. Thus, in conjunction with prior data, our results suggest incorporation of BRAF V600E mutation analysis in the diagnostic workup of HCL cases. Additionally, targeting the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk-Map kinase pathway should be investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with this disease. PMID:22246856

  7. Defective immunoregulatory T-cell function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T.; Ozer, H.; Henderson, E.S.; Dadey, B.; Nussbaum-Blumenson, A.; Barcos, M.

    1981-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) of B-cell origin results in the malignant proliferation of small immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes. There is currently a controversy in the literature regarding both the ability of this leukemic population to differentiate into mature plasma cells, as well as the ability of apparently normal T cells from these patients to regulate allogeneic B-cell differentiation. In the present study we have examined the lymphocytes of CLL patients in various clinical stages of their disease and with different surface phenotypes of their leukemic B-cell population. Our results show that leukemic CLL B cells from all 20 patients (including one patient with a monoclonal IgM paraprotein and another with a monoclonal IgG paraprotein) are incapable of further differentiation even in the absence of suppressor T cells and the presence of helper T lymphocytes. This lack of capacity to differentiate is unaffected by clinical stage, by therapy, or by the phenotype of the malignant population. Since the leukemic B population did not suppress normal allogeneic B-cell differentiation, the maturation deficit is evidently intrinsic to the leukemic clone rather than a result of activity of non-T suppressor cells. T helper function was also variably depressed in the blood of some patients with CLL, and this depression did not correlate with clinical stage, with therapy, or with the degree of lymphocytosis. Dysfunction of radiosensitive T suppressor cells was found to be the most consistent regulatory deficit of CLL T cells. Each of 11 patients whose leukemic cell population was of the ..mu..delta, ..mu cap alpha.., or ..mu.. phenotype had both helper and suppressor cell defects.

  8. Functional Niche Competition Between Normal Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Glait-Santar, Chen; Desmond, Ronan; Feng, Xingmin; Bat, Taha; Chen, Jichun; Heuston, Elisabeth; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Mulloy, James C; Bodine, David M; Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in a specialized niche that regulates their proliferative capacity and their fate. There is increasing evidence for similar roles of marrow niches on controlling the behavior of leukemic cells; however, whether normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic cells reside in or functionally compete for the same marrow niche is unclear. We used the mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 (MLL-AF9) murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a competitive repopulation model to investigate whether normal HSPC and leukemic cells functionally compete for the same marrow niches. Irradiated recipient mice were transplanted with fixed numbers of MLL-AF9 cells mixed with increasing doses of normal syngeneic whole bone marrow (WBM) or with purified HSPC (LSK). Survival was significantly increased and leukemic progression was delayed proportional to increasing doses of normal WBM or normal LSK cells in multiple independent experiments, with all doses of WBM or LSK cells studied above the threshold for rapid and complete hematopoietic reconstitution in the absence of leukemia. Confocal microscopy demonstrated nests of either leukemic cells or normal hematopoietic cells but not both in the marrow adjacent to endosteum. Early following transplantation, leukemic cells from animals receiving lower LSK doses were cycling more actively than in those receiving higher doses. These results suggest that normal HSPC and AML cells compete for the same functional niche. Manipulation of the niche could impact on response to antileukemic therapies, and the numbers of normal HSPC could impact on leukemia outcome, informing approaches to cell dose in the context of stem cell transplantation. Stem Cells 2015;33:3635-3642. PMID:26388434

  9. Establishment and characterization of a new canine B-cell leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Nakaichi, M; Taura, Y; Kanki, M; Mamba, K; Momoi, Y; Tsujimoto, H; Nakama, S

    1996-05-01

    A new cell line derived from a spontaneous canine leukemia was established and designated GL-1. The cells have been cultured in a floating fashion and passaged for over two years. They were round with rich cytoplasm containing many rough endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria. Peroxidase staining was negative. The nuclei of many cells were round, but segmented nuclei were seen frequently. The doubling time of the cells was 27.3 hr and they had 78 chromosomes. Surface marker analysis using monoclonal antibodies (MABs) and flowcytometry revealed that GL-1 possessed CD45 and surface IgG. However, the cells did not react with MABs detecting T-cell markers. These results indicate that GL-1 has a lymphocytic lineage and is derived from a B-cell leukemia. PMID:8741612

  10. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  11. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  12. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  13. Enhancement of anti-leukemia activity of NK cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibition of leukemia cell-induced NK cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Arriga, Roberto; Caratelli, Sara; Coppola, Andrea; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Venditti, Adriano; Amadori, Sergio; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Palomba, Patrizia; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Capuani, Barbara; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induce, in vitro, NK cell abnormalities (NKCAs) including apoptosis and activating receptor down-regulation. The potential negative impact of AML cells on the therapeutic efficacy of NK cell-based strategies prompted us to analyze the mechanisms underlying NKCAs and to develop approaches to protect NK cells from NKCAs. NKCA induction by the AML leukemia cells target a subpopulation of peripheral blood NK cells and is interleukin-2 independent but is abrogated by a long-term culture of NK (LTNK) cells at 37°C. LTNK cells displayed a significantly enhanced ability to damage AML cells in vitro and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of ML-2 cells grafted into CB17 SCID mice. Actinomycin D restored the susceptibility of LTNK cells to NKCAs while TAPI-0, a functional analog of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3, inhibits ML-2 cell-induced NKCAs suggesting that the generation of NK cell resistance to NKCAs involves RNA transcription and metalloproteinase (MPP) inactivation. This conclusion is supported by the reduced susceptibility to AML cell-induced NKCAs of LTNK cells in which TIMP3 gene and protein are over-expressed. This information may contribute to the rational design of targeted strategies to enhance the efficacy of NK cell-based-immunotherapy of AML with haploidentical NK cells. PMID:26655503

  14. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Geyh, S; Rodrguez-Paredes, M; Jger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:26601782

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Radiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Discrimination and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2015-05-01

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to identify and classify leukemia cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early and accurate diagnosis. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to identify normal B cells, collected from healthy patients, and three ALL cell lines (RS4;11, REH and MN60 at different differentiation level, respectively). Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for leukemia cell identification. Principal Component Analysis was finally used to confirm the significance of these markers for identify leukemia cells and classifying the data. The obtained results indicate a sorting accuracy of 96% between the three leukemia cell lines.

  17. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: a review and principles for the development of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Pollyea, Daniel A.; Gutman, Jonathan A.; Gore, Lia; Smith, Clayton A.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an increasingly rich understanding of its pathogenesis, acute myeloid leukemia remains a disease with poor outcomes, overwhelmingly due to disease relapse. In recent years, work to characterize the leukemia stem cell population, the disease compartment most difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and most responsible for relapse, has been undertaken. This, in conjunction with advances in drug development that have allowed for increasingly targeted therapies to be engineered, raises the hope that we are entering an era in which the leukemia stem cell population can be eliminated, resulting in therapeutic cures for acute myeloid leukemia patients. For these therapies to become available, they must be tested in the setting of clinical trials. A long-established clinical trials infrastructure has been employed to shepherd new therapies from proof-of-concept to approval. However, due to the unique features of leukemia stem cells, drugs that are designed to specifically eliminate this population may not be adequately tested when applied to this model. Therefore, in this review article, we seek to identify the relevant features of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells for clinical trialists, discuss potential strategies to target leukemia stem cells, and propose a set of guidelines outlining the necessary elements of clinical trials to allow for the successful testing of stem cell-directed therapies. PMID:25082785

  18. Essential role of PU.1 in maintenance of mixed lineage leukemia-associated leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Yukiko; Yamagata, Kazutsune; Katsumoto, Takuo; Shima, Yutaka; Shino, Mika; Stanley, E Richard; Cleary, Michael L; Akashi, Koichi; Tenen, Daniel G; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal malignant disorder derived from a small number of leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Rearrangements of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene are found in acute myeloid leukemia associated with poor prognosis. The upregulation of Hox genes is critical for LSC induction and maintenance, but is unlikely to support malignancy and the high LSC frequency observed in MLL leukemias. The present study shows that MLL fusion proteins interact with the transcription factor PU.1 to activate the transcription of CSF-1R, which is critical for LSC activity. Acute myeloid leukemia is cured by either deletion of PU.1 or ablation of cells expressing CSF-1R. Kinase inhibitors specific for CSF-1R prolong survival time. These findings indicate that PU.1-mediated upregulation of CSF-1R is a critical effector of MLL leukemogenesis. PMID:25529853

  19. Involvement of memory T-cells in the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Rodolfo Patussi; Matos e Silva, Flávia Amoroso; Bacal, Nydia Strachman; Campregher, Paulo Vidal; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of T-cells in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has recently gained much attention due to the importance of the constant interaction between neoplastic B-cells with microenvironment substratum and T-cells. It is believed that these interactions modulate the clinical course of the disease, mainly through the regulation of the expansion, differentiation, and survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cells. Importantly, this crosstalk may also change the number, function, and memory phenotype of normal T-cells, thereby altering the amplitude and/or efficiency of adaptive immunity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. The present study presents an overview on important aspects of this immunological crosstalk, particularly on the abnormalities of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cells and the alterations in normal T-cells, with focus on the CD4 memory T-cell compartment that could offer survival signals to chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cell clone(s) and contribute to the establishment and progression of the disease. The authors believe that understanding the biological consequences of the interaction between normal T- and neoplastic B-cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia may allow for improvements in the prognostic information and therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:24624038

  20. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  1. Role of suppressor cells in feline leukemia virus-associated immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Langweiler, M; Cockerell, G L; deNoronha, F

    1983-05-01

    Protein from detergent-disrupted feline leukemia virus was found to suppress lymphocyte blastogenic responsiveness of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal cats. When suppressive doses of this protein were substituted for mitogen in the preactivation step of the concanavalin A-induced suppressor cell assay, significant suppression was observed in five of eleven cats tested. These results suggest that feline leukemia virus-associated immunosuppression may be mediated by a virus-induced suppressor cell. PMID:6299534

  2. Alternative Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kanakry, Christopher G; de Lima, Marcos J; Luznik, Leo

    2015-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) provides a potentially curative therapy for patients with high-risk or chemorefractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Historically, the applicability of alloHCT has been limited as only 30%-35% of patients have human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings and outcomes using other donor types have been markedly inferior due to excess toxicity, graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and consequently non-relapse mortality. Advances in HLA typing, GVHD prophylactic approaches, and other transplantation techniques have successfully addressed these historical challenges. Herein, we review recent alloHCT studies using volunteer unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or HLA-haploidentical donors, specifically focusing on studies that compared outcomes between donor sources. Although none are randomized and most are retrospective, these analyses suggest that current outcomes for AML patients using most alternative donor types are comparable to those seen using HLA-matched siblings. PMID:26111471

  3. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  4. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  5. Maintenance of Leukemia-Initiating Cells Is Regulated by the CDK Inhibitor Inca1

    PubMed Central

    Bäumer, Nicole; Bäumer, Sebastian; Berkenfeld, Frank; Stehling, Martin; Köhler, Gabriele; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Tschanter, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Functional differences between healthy progenitor and cancer initiating cells may provide unique opportunities for targeted therapy approaches. Hematopoietic stem cells are tightly controlled by a network of CDK inhibitors that govern proliferation and prevent stem cell exhaustion. Loss of Inca1 led to an increased number of short-term hematopoietic stem cells in older mice, but Inca1 seems largely dispensable for normal hematopoiesis. On the other hand, Inca1-deficiency enhanced cell cycling upon cytotoxic stress and accelerated bone marrow exhaustion. Moreover, AML1-ETO9a-induced proliferation was not sustained in Inca1-deficient cells in vivo. As a consequence, leukemia induction and leukemia maintenance were severely impaired in Inca1−/− bone marrow cells. The re-initiation of leukemia was also significantly inhibited in absence of Inca1−/− in MLL—AF9- and c-myc/BCL2-positive leukemia mouse models. These findings indicate distinct functional properties of Inca1 in normal hematopoietic cells compared to leukemia initiating cells. Such functional differences might be used to design specific therapy approaches in leukemia. PMID:25525809

  6. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Transcriptome sequencing of hematopoietic stem cells and chronic myelgenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Naka, Kazuhito

    2016-03-01

    Dipeptide species are accumulated in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells [1]. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the accumulation of dipeptide species in CML stem cells, we performed transcriptome sequencing of long-term stem cells, short-term stem cells, progenitor cells from healthy control and CML-affected mice (GSE70031). The transcriptome data revealed that the expression of a dipeptide transporter (solute carrier family 15, member 2 (SLC15A2)) was elevated only in the CML stem cells. This result indicates that dipeptide species accumulates in CML stem cells through a dipeptide transporter SLC15A2. PMID:26981360

  8. Transcriptome sequencing of hematopoietic stem cells and chronic myelgenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Naka, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptide species are accumulated in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells [1]. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the accumulation of dipeptide species in CML stem cells, we performed transcriptome sequencing of long-term stem cells, short-term stem cells, progenitor cells from healthy control and CML-affected mice (GSE70031). The transcriptome data revealed that the expression of a dipeptide transporter (solute carrier family 15, member 2 (SLC15A2)) was elevated only in the CML stem cells. This result indicates that dipeptide species accumulates in CML stem cells through a dipeptide transporter SLC15A2. PMID:26981360

  9. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Retrodifferentiation--an alternative biological pathway in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hass, R

    1992-06-01

    Human myeloid leukemia cells (i.e., HL-60, U937, THP-1) which are induced to differentiate along the monocytic pathway by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), revert back to the undifferentiated phenotype after 3 to 4 weeks. During this differentiation and retrodifferentiation process the cells obviously establish a distinct sequence of biological processes which is integrally regulated to simultaneously control differentiation and cell growth. Thus, induction of monocytic markers by TPA is associated with a down-regulation of cell cycle genes and cessation of proliferation. In particular, crosstalk between the TPA-induced translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) and the activation of transcription factors, especially AP-1, enhances the expression of genes associated with the monocytic phenotype. This is accompanied by induction of intermediate filament proteins, surface glycoproteins, changes in membrane properties and intracellular metabolism. In parallel, the cells cease to divide, and genes associated with cell cycle progression including cdc2, cyclins, cdc25, and histones are down-regulated. Although signals responsible for arrested cell growth remain unclear, there are several control mechanisms regarding cell cycle genes and differentiation parameters (for a review, see Nigg, E. A., Seminars in Cell Biol., 2, 262-270, 1991). For example, activated p34cdc2 kinase is involved in lamina disassembly by direct phosphorylation of lamin proteins which may contribute to nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis (Enoch, T., M. Peter, P. Nurse, J. Cell Biol. 112, 797-807 (1991)). Moreover, endomembrane traffic is arrested by a cdc2-like kinase probably via phosphorylation of members of the rab protein family which contributes to vesiculation and membrane transport by hydrolyzing GTP (Tuomikoski, T., et al., Nature 342, 942-945 (1989)). Although there are several reports on a possible feedback control between differentiation and cell cycle, including phosphorylation of cyclins and activation of a ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic degradation, signaling pathways and possible mechanisms for retrodifferentiation and reentry into the cell cycle remain unclear. While some terminally differentiated cells are committed to die, the major part of the differentiated monocytic population undergoes retrodifferentiation. All cellular signals characterized so far are reverted during retrodifferentiation: Redistribution of PKC and down-regulation of c-fos and c-jun contribute to an interruption of the differentiation-associated transsignaling cascade. Thus, down-regulation of markers associated with monocytic differentiation in combination with metabolic changes restore the original cell phenotype. At the same time cell cycle genes are up-regulated, and the cells regain proliferative capacity. Finally, retrodifferentiated and untreated control cells demonstrate indistinguishable properties. PMID:1644056

  11. Leukemia mortality by cell type in petroleum workers with potential exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, G.K.; Wong, O.

    1996-12-01

    Workers in the petroleum industry are potentially exposed to a variety of petrochemicals, including benzene or benzene-containing liquids. Although a large number of studies of petroleum workers have been conducted to examine leukemia and other cancer risks, few existing studies have investigated cell-type-specific leukemias. One of the major reasons for the lack of cell-type-specific analysis was the small number of deaths by cell type in individual studies. In the present investigation, all cohort studies of petroleum workers in the United States and the United Kingdom were combined into a single database for cell-type-specific leukemia analysis. The majority of these workers were petroleum refinery employees, but production, pipeline, and distribution workers in the petroleum industry were also included. The combined cohort consisted of more than 208,000 petroleum workers, who contributed more than 4.6 million person-years of observation. Based on a meta-analysis of the combined data, cell-type-specific leukemia risks were expressed in terms of standardized mortality ratios (meta-SMRs). The meta-SMR for acute myeloid leukemia was 0.96. The lack of an increase of acute myeloid leukemia was attributed to the low levels of benzene exposure in the petroleum industry, particularly in comparison to benzene exposure levels in some previous studies of workers in other industries, who had been found to experience an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia. Similarly, no increase in chronic myeloid, acute lymphocytic, or chronic lymphocytic leukemias was found in petroleum workers (meta-SMRs of 0.89, 1.16, and 0.84, respectively). Stratified meta-analyses restricted to refinery studies or to studies with at least 15 years of follow-up yielded similar results. The findings are consistent with those from several recent case-control studies of cell-type-specific leukemia. 95 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Autologous stem cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, Eduardo

    2007-10-01

    Autografting was first attempted for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in transformation in order to restore a second chronic phase (CP). The principal rationale for autografting in CP resides on the reduction of the tumor burden and the number of leukemic cells at risk of developing blastic transformation, and the possibility of eradicating already mutated cells. In a European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Registry survey, patients with CML in CP, undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) for the first time, had an overall survival of 65% at 5 years from transplant with more than 50% of all patients remaining in CP. The main point made by this retrospective study was that in patients refractory to interferon-alpha (IFN), 70% achieved a cytogenetic response post autografting, which was complete or major in 31%. Since the advent of imatinib, autografting in CML has experienced a substantial decline. Theoretically, there are several possible ways of using auto-SCT in combination with imatinib: (1) to reverse resistance to imatinib; (2) to eliminate a Ph-positive clone bearing a BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation; and (3) to reduce the level of residual disease after a cytogenetic response to imatinib in patients in whom Ph-negative cells had been harvested. The exact role of auto-SCT in the present management of CML remains unanswered. PMID:17961724

  13. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  14. Asymptomatic T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia with an unusual immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Petsa, Panagiota K; Karamoutsios, Achilleas; Dova, Lefkothea; Benetatos, Leonidas; Petsiou, Asimina; Kolaitis, Nikolaos; Georgopoulos, Antonis; Vartholomatos, Georgios

    2012-05-29

    T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia represents a clonal proliferation of cytotoxic T-cells which etiology has not been entirely elucidated. However, CD4(+), CD4(-), CD8(-), CD4(+), CD8(+) cases have been described. The disease is usually characterized by cytopenias and a modest lymphocytosis. The majority of patients with T-LGL leukemia remains asymptomatic for a long period and will require treatment later during the course of their disease. Hereby we describe a case of T-LGL leukemia diagnosed by flow cytometry, which presented indolent course and required no treatment so far. PMID:24765467

  15. Asymptomatic T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia with an unusual immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Petsa, Panagiota K.; Karamoutsios, Achilleas; Dova, Lefkothea; Benetatos, Leonidas; Petsiou, Asimina; Kolaitis, Nikolaos; Georgopoulos, Antonis; Vartholomatos, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia represents a clonal proliferation of cytotoxic T-cells which etiology has not been entirely elucidated. However, CD4+, CD4−, CD8−, CD4+, CD8+ cases have been described. The disease is usually characterized by cytopenias and a modest lymphocytosis. The majority of patients with T-LGL leukemia remains asymptomatic for a long period and will require treatment later during the course of their disease. Hereby we describe a case of T-LGL leukemia diagnosed by flow cytometry, which presented indolent course and required no treatment so far. PMID:24765467

  16. Synergistic Interactions between HDAC and Sirtuin Inhibitors in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cea, Michele; Soncini, Debora; Fruscione, Floriana; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Garuti, Anna; Emionite, Laura; Moran, Eva; Magnone, Mirko; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Reverberi, Daniele; Caffa, Irene; Salis, Annalisa; Cagnetta, Antonia; Bergamaschi, Micaela; Casciaro, Salvatore; Pierri, Ivana; Damonte, Gianluca; Ansaldi, Filippo; Gobbi, Marco; Pistoia, Vito; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity is frequent in human leukemias. However, while classical, NAD+-independent HDACs are an established therapeutic target, the relevance of NAD+-dependent HDACs (sirtuins) in leukemia treatment remains unclear. Here, we assessed the antileukemic activity of sirtuin inhibitors and of the NAD+-lowering drug FK866, alone and in combination with traditional HDAC inhibitors. Primary leukemia cells, leukemia cell lines, healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors were treated with sirtuin inhibitors (sirtinol, cambinol, EX527) and with FK866, with or without addition of the HDAC inhibitors valproic acid, sodium butyrate, and vorinostat. Cell death was quantified by propidium iodide cell staining and subsequent flow-cytometry. Apoptosis induction was monitored by cell staining with FITC-Annexin-V/propidium iodide or with TMRE followed by flow-cytometric analysis, and by measuring caspase3/7 activity. Intracellular Bax was detected by flow-cytometry and western blotting. Cellular NAD+ levels were measured by enzymatic cycling assays. Bax was overexpressed by retroviral transduction. Bax and SIRT1 were silenced by RNA-interference. Sirtuin inhibitors and FK866 synergistically enhanced HDAC inhibitor activity in leukemia cells, but not in healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors. In leukemia cells, HDAC inhibitors were found to induce upregulation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family-member whose translocation to mitochondria is normally prevented by SIRT1. As a result, leukemia cells become sensitized to sirtuin inhibitor-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, NAD+-independent HDACs and sirtuins cooperate in leukemia cells to avoid apoptosis. Combining sirtuin with HDAC inhibitors results in synergistic antileukemic activity that could be therapeutically exploited. PMID:21818379

  17. Establishment and characterization of human B cell precursor-leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Y; Drexler, H G

    1998-07-01

    A large number of continuous human leukemia cell lines have been established over the last three decades. Clearly, leukemia cell lines have become important research tools. Here, we have summarized the immunological, molecular and standard cytogenetic features of a panel of well characterized B cell precursor (BCP)-leukemia cell lines which were derived from patients with acute lymphoblastic/undifferentiated leukemia (ALL/AUL) or chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in blast crisis. Following the recently proposed immunological EGIL classification, we assigned our panel of 27 BCP-cell lines to one of the following categories: B-I pro-B cell line; B-II common-B cell line; and B-III pre-B cell line. All cell lines express general B-lineage associated surface markers (HLA-DR, CD22, CD79a) being negative for surface immunoglobulin (Ig); the differences between the subgroups reside in expression of CD10 and cytoplasmic Ig. Several BCP-cell lines show the myelomonocytic cell-associated markers CD13 and/or CD33. These immunologically 'biphenotypic' BCP-cell lines are generally TdT+ CD10+ CD13+ CD19+ CD22+ CD34+ and carry the Philadelphia (Ph) translocation. The BCP-cell lines display surface receptors for interferon-gamma (CD119), interleukin-7 (CD127) and FLT-3 ligand (CD135). All BCP-cell lines examined have complex numerical and structural chromosomal alterations including translocations commonly seen in BCP-ALL such as t(4;11), t(9;22), t(11;19), t(12;21), and t(17;19) involving the fusion genes MLL-AF4, BCR-ABL, ENL-MLL, TEL/ETV6-AML1 and E2A-HLF, respectively. Besides the expected rearrangement of the Ig heavy chain receptor gene, several cell lines also have rearrangements of the T cell receptor genes beta, gamma or delta. While some BCP-cell lines express (aberrantly) myeloperoxidase at the mRNA level, most lines are negative in the immunological or cytochemical staining. Several large series documented the difficulty in establishing such BCP cell lines with success rates in the range of 10-20% (on average 15%). Still, since the establishment of the first bonafide BCP-cell line in 1974 (cell line REH), some 150 cell lines have been established of which, however, only a small percentage have been sufficiently well characterized and described. A higher success rate for immortalizing any given leukemia cell might depend on a closer emulation of the physiological in vivo microenvironment. The possibility to grow in vitro leukemia cells at will would represent ideal experimental systems permitting basic research and patient-specific investigations. In summary, the use of well-characterized BCP-cell lines provide unprecedented opportunities for studying a multitude of biological aspects related to normal and neoplastic B-lymphocytes. PMID:9680106

  18. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  19. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tusar T; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-02-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box-like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  20. Blocking autophagy enhanced leukemia cell death induced by recombinant human arginase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Wang, Shaofei; Fan, Jiajun; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Mei, Xiaobin; Ju, Dianwen

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant human arginase (rhArg) is an arginine-degrading enzyme that has been evaluated as effective therapeutics for varieties of malignant tumors and is in clinical trials for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment nowadays. Our previous studies have reported that rhArg could induce autophagy and apoptosis in lymphoma cells and inhibiting autophagy could enhance the efficacy of rhArg on lymphoma. However, whether rhArg could induce autophagy and what roles autophagy plays in leukemia cells are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that rhArg treatment could lead to the formation of autophagosomes and the upregulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 II (LC3-II) in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and human acute T cell leukemia Jurkat cells. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) could significantly enhance rhArg-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Taken together, these findings indicated that rhArg induced autophagy in leukemia cells and inhibiting autophagy enhanced anti-leukemia effect of rhArg, which might encourage the treatment of leukemia by targeting arginine depletion and autophagy in clinics. PMID:26643895

  1. The quality and quantity of leukemia-derived dendritic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are a predictive factor for the lytic potential of dendritic cells-primed leukemia-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Dreyig, Julia; Kremser, Andreas; Kroell, Tanja; Freudenreich, Markus; Schmid, Christoph; Schweiger, Cornelia; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochen; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-06-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an important therapy option to reduce relapse rates after stem-cell transplantation in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloid leukemic cells can regularly be induced to differentiate into leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)), regaining the stimulatory capacity of professional dendritic cells (DCs) while presenting the known/unknown leukemic antigen repertoire. So far, induced antileukemic T-cell responses are variable or even mediate opposite effects. To further elicit DC/DC(leu)-induced T-cell-response patterns, we generated DC from 17 Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 myelodysplastic syndrome cases and carried out flowcytometry and (functional) nonradioactive fluorolysis assays before/after mixed lymphocyte cultures of matched (allogeneic) donor T cells (n=6), T cells prepared at relapse after stem-cell transplantation (n=4) or (autologous) patients' T cells (n=7) with blast containing mononuclear cells ("MNC") or DC(leu) ("DC"). Compared with "MNC", "DC" were better mediators of antileukemic-activity, although not in every case effective. We could define DC subtypes and cut-off proportions of DC subtypes/qualities (mature DC/DC(leu)) after "DC" priming, which were predictive for an antileukemic activity of primed T cells and the clinical course of the disease after immunotherapy (allogeneic stem-cell transplantation/donor lymphocytes infusion/therapy). In summary, our data show that the composition and quality of DC after a mixed lymphocyte culture-priming phase is predictive for a successful ex vivo antileukemic response, especially with respect to proportions of mature and leukemia-derived DC. These data contribute not only to predict DC-mediated functions or the clinical course of the diseases but also to develop and refine DC-vaccination strategies that may pave the way to develop and modify adoptive immunotherapy, especially for patients at relapse after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:20463595

  2. Nucleotide composition analysis of tRNA from leukemia patient cell samples and human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Agris, P F

    1975-01-01

    A technique developed for analysis of less than microgram quantities of tRNA has been applied to the study of human leukemia. Leucocytes from peripheal blood and bone marrow samples of six, untreated leukemia patients and cells of five different established human cell lines were maintained for 18 hours in media containing (32P)-phosphate. Incorporation of radioactive phosphate into the cells from the patient samples was slightly less than that of the cell lines. Likewise, incorporation of (32P)-phosphate into the tRNA of the patient samples (approximately 5 x 106 DPM/mug tRNA) was also less then that incorporated into the tRNA of the cell lines. The major and minor nucleotide compositions of the unfractionated tRNA preparations from each patient sample and each cell line were determined and compared. Similarities and differences in the major and minor nucleotide compositions of the tRNA preparations are discussed with reference to types of leukemia and the importance of patient sample analysis versus analysis of cultured human cells. PMID:1057159

  3. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  4. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. PMID:25900577

  5. Presence of Gumprecht shadows (smudge cells) in bovine leukemia virus-positive cattle.

    PubMed

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Larsen, Alejandra; González, Ester Teresa; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a chronic disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Smudge cells, also known as Gumprecht shadows, are not simple artifacts of slide preparation, but ragged lymphoid cells found mainly in peripheral blood smears from human patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, we report the presence of Gumprecht shadows in peripheral blood from BLV-positive cattle. PMID:23886563

  6. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  7. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  8. Metabolism of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Khaleghian, Ali; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Ahmadian, Shahin; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively induces complete clinical and molecular remissions in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients and triggers apoptosis in APL cells. The effect induced by As2O3 is also associated with extensive genomic-wide epigenetic changes with large-scale alterations in DNA methylation. We investigated the As2O3 metabolism in association with factors involved in the production of its methylated metabolites in APL-derived cell line, NB4. We used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique to detect As2O3 metabolites in NB4 cells. The effects of As2O3 on glutathione level, S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) levels were investigated. Also, we studied the expression levels of arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) by real-time PCR. Our results show that after As2O3 entry into the cell, it was converted into methylated metabolites, mono-methylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic (DMA). The glutathione (GSH) production was increased in parallel with the methylated metabolites formations. As2O3 treatment inhibited DNMTs (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) in dose- and time-dependent manners. The SAH levels in As2O3-treated cells were increased; however, the SAM level was not affected. The present study shows that APL cell is capable of metabolizing As2O3. The continuous formation of intracellular methylated metabolites, the inhibition of DNMTs expression levels and the increase of SAH level by As2O3 biotransformation would probably affect the DNMTs-methylated DNA methylation in a manner related to the extent of DNA hypomethylation. Production of intracellular methylated metabolites and epigenetic changes of DNA methylation during As2O3 metabolism may contribute to the therapeutic effect of As2O3 in APL. PMID:24819152

  9. Adult T-cell leukemia cells overexpress Wnt5a and promote osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Marcia; Ko, Nga Ling; Lee, Min-Jung; Yao, Yuan; Waldmann, Thomas A; Trepel, Jane B; Nicot, Christophe

    2013-06-20

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is etiologically linked to infection with the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-I). ATL is classified into 4 distinct clinical diseases: acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering. Acute ATL is the most aggressive form, representing 60% of cases and has a 4-year survival of < 5%. A frequent complication and cause of death in acute ATL patients is the presence of lytic bone lesions and hypercalcemia. We analyzed the Wnt/?-catenin pathway because of its common role in cancer and bone remodeling. Our study demonstrated that ATL cells do not express high levels of ?-catenin but displayed high levels of LEF-1/TCF genes along with elevated levels of ?-catenin (LEF-1/TCF target genes) responsive genes. By profiling Wnt gene expression, we discovered that ATL patient leukemia cells shifted expression toward the noncanonical Wnt pathway. Interestingly, ATL cells overexpressed the osteolytic-associated genes-Wnt5a, PTHLH, and RANKL. We further show that Wnt5a secreted by ATL cells favors osteoclast differentiation and expression of RANK. Our results suggest that Wnt5a is a major contributing factor to the increase in osteolytic bone lesions and hypercalcemia found in ATL patients. Anti-Wnt5a therapy may prevent or reduce osteolytic lesions found in ATL patients and improve therapy outcome. PMID:23660959

  10. Kinase-Independent Mechanisms of Resistance of Leukemia Stem Cells to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib mesylate have changed the clinical course of chronic myeloid leukemia; however, the observation that these inhibitors do not target the leukemia stem cell implies that patients need to maintain lifelong therapy. The mechanism of this phenomenon is unclear: the question of whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors are inactive inside leukemia stem cells or whether leukemia stem cells do not require breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)-Abl signaling is currently under debate. Herein, I propose an alternative model: perhaps the leukemia stem cell requires Bcr-Abl, but is dependent on its kinase-independent functions. Kinases such as epidermal growth factor receptor and Janus kinase 2 possess kinase-independent roles in regulation of gene expression; it is worth investigating whether Bcr-Abl has similar functions. Mechanistically, Bcr-Abl is able to activate the Ras, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and/or the Src-kinase Hck/Stat5 pathways in a scaffolding-dependent manner. Whereas the scaffolding activity of Bcr-Abl with Grb2 is dependent on autophosphorylation, kinases such as Hck can use Bcr-Abl as substrate, inducing phosphorylation of Y177 to enable scaffolding ability in the absence of Bcr-Abl catalytic activity. It is worth investigating whether leukemia stem cells exclusively express kinases that are able to use Bcr-Abl as substrate. A kinase-independent role for Bcr-Abl in leukemia stem cells would imply that drugs that target Bcr-Abls scaffolding ability or its DNA-binding ability should be used in conjunction with current therapeutic regimens to increase their efficacy and eradicate the stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia PMID:24598782

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  12. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  13. Leukemic Stem Cell Frequency: A Strong Biomarker for Clinical Outcome in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Terwijn, Monique; Zeijlemaker, Wendelien; Kelder, Angèle; Rutten, Arjo P.; Snel, Alexander N.; Scholten, Willemijn J.; Pabst, Thomas; Verhoef, Gregor; Löwenberg, Bob; Zweegman, Sonja; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia is probably caused by the presence of leukemia initiating cells, also referred to as leukemic stem cells, at diagnosis and their persistence after therapy. Specific identification of leukemia stem cells and their discrimination from normal hematopoietic stem cells would greatly contribute to risk stratification and could predict possible relapses. Results For identification of leukemic stem cells, we developed flow cytometric methods using leukemic stem cell associated markers and newly-defined (light scatter) aberrancies. The nature of the putative leukemic stem cells and normal hematopoietic stem cells, present in the same patient's bone marrow, was demonstrated in eight patients by the presence or absence of molecular aberrancies and/or leukemic engraftment in NOD-SCID IL-2Rγ-/- mice. At diagnosis (n = 88), the frequency of the thus defined neoplastic part of CD34+CD38- putative stem cell compartment had a strong prognostic impact, while the neoplastic parts of the CD34+CD38+ and CD34- putative stem cell compartments had no prognostic impact at all. After different courses of therapy, higher percentages of neoplastic CD34+CD38- cells in complete remission strongly correlated with shorter patient survival (n = 91). Moreover, combining neoplastic CD34+CD38- frequencies with frequencies of minimal residual disease cells (n = 91), which reflect the total neoplastic burden, revealed four patient groups with different survival. Conclusion and Perspective Discrimination between putative leukemia stem cells and normal hematopoietic stem cells in this large-scale study allowed to demonstrate the clinical importance of putative CD34+CD38- leukemia stem cells in AML. Moreover, it offers new opportunities for the development of therapies directed against leukemia stem cells, that would spare normal hematopoietic stem cells, and, moreover, enables in vivo and ex vivo screening for potential efficacy and toxicity of new therapies. PMID:25244440

  14. The cytotoxic effect of 2-acylated-1,4-naphthohydroquinones on leukemia/lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza, Diego A.; De Leon, Fernando; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Lema, Carolina; Aguilera, Renato J.; Mito, Shizue

    2014-01-01

    Here, we tested seven 2-acylated-1,4-hydronaphthoquinones for their cytotoxic effects on a panel of cancer lymphoma/leukemia cells and compared to a non-cancer origin cell line. Several naphthohydroquinones exhibited selective cytotoxic effects on lymphoma/leukemia cells with lowest activity on non-cancer cells. The mode of cell death induced by an acylated naphthohydroquinone, which has a long alkyl chain, was found to be via apoptosis. Furthermore, the naphthohydroquinone provoked mitochondria depolarization and activation of its downstream effector, caspase-3, thus implicating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway as its mechanism to exert cell death. PMID:24368029

  15. Epigenetic therapy overcomes treatment resistance in T cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasanali, Zainul S; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Stuart, August; Shimko, Sara; Evans, Juanita; Vinod Shah, Mithun; Sharma, Kamal; Leshchenko, Violetta V; Parekh, Samir; Loughran, Thomas P; Epner, Elliot M

    2015-06-24

    T cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare, mature T cell neoplasm with distinct features and an aggressive clinical course. Early relapse and short overall survival are commonplace. Use of the monoclonal anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab has improved the rate of complete remission and duration of response to more than 50% and between 6 and 12 months, respectively. Despite this advance, without an allogeneic transplant, resistant relapse is inevitable. We report seven complete and one partial remission in eight patients receiving alemtuzumab and cladribine with or without a histone deacetylase inhibitor. These data show that administration of epigenetic agents can overcome alemtuzumab resistance. We also report epigenetically induced expression of the surface receptor protein CD30 in T-PLL. Subsequent treatment with the anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin overcame organ-specific (skin) resistance to alemtuzumab. Our findings demonstrate activity of combination epigenetic and immunotherapy in the incurable illness T-PLL, particularly in the setting of previous alemtuzumab therapy. PMID:26109102

  16. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, A; Österroos, A; Hassan, S; Gullbo, J; Rickardson, L; Jarvius, M; Nygren, P; Fryknäs, M; Höglund, M; Larsson, R

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis. PMID:25885427

  17. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  18. Glycosylation Status of CD43 Protein Is Associated with Resistance of Leukemia Cells to CTL-Mediated Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kana; Tanaka, Satomi; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakano, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Hiroko; Okumura, Atsushi; Fujioka, Yuka; Urakawa, Rika; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tatsumi, Naoya; Nakata, Jun; Takashima, Satoshi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Oji, Yusuke; Miyoshi, Eiji; Hirata, Takako; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo; Hosen, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    To improve cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand how tumor cells counteract immune-surveillance. In this study, we sought to identify cell-surface molecules associated with resistance of leukemia cells to cytotoxic T cell (CTL)-mediated cytolysis. To this end, we first established thousands of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with MLL/AF9 mouse leukemia cells. Only two of these mAbs, designated R54 and B2, bound preferentially to leukemia cells resistant to cytolysis by a tumor cell antigen–specific CTLs. The antigens recognized by these mAbs were identified by expression cloning as the same protein, CD43, although their binding patterns to subsets of hematopoietic cells differed significantly from each other and from a pre-existing pan-CD43 mAb, S11. The epitopes of R54 and B2, but not S11, were sialidase-sensitive and expressed at various levels on leukemia cells, suggesting that binding of R54 or B2 is associated with the glycosylation status of CD43. R54high leukemia cells, which are likely to express sialic acid-rich CD43, were highly resistant to CTL-mediated cytolysis. In addition, loss of CD43 in leukemia cells or neuraminidase treatment of leukemia cells sensitized leukemia cells to CTL-mediated cell lysis. These results suggest that sialic acid-rich CD43, which harbors multiple sialic acid residues that impart a net negative surface charge, protects leukemia cells from CTL-mediated cell lysis. Furthermore, R54high or B2high leukemia cells preferentially survived in vivo in the presence of adaptive immunity. Taken together, these results suggest that the glycosylation status of CD43 on leukemia is associated with sensitivity to CTL-mediated cytolysis in vitro and in vivo. Thus, regulation of CD43 glycosylation is a potential strategy for enhancing CTL-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:27011118

  19. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Sustained Remissions in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A.; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M.; Bunin, Nancy J.; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. METHODS We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×106 to 20.6×106 CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. RESULTS A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti–interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. CONCLUSIONS Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by Novartis and others; CART19 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01626495 and NCT01029366.) PMID:25317870

  20. Differential effects of antofine N-oxide on solid tumor and leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bour, Tania; Yang, Xianwen; Li, Weihong; Bernardin, Francois; Kaoma, Tony; Muller, Arnaud; Vallar, Laurent; Steinmetz, André

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the anti-cancer activities of antofine N-oxide isolated and purified from the medicinal plant Cynanchum vincetoxicum. Antofine N-oxide displayed a strong inhibitory effect on several solid tumor cell lines (glioblastoma, breast carcinoma and lung carcinoma) and on a T-cell leukemia cell line. Remarkably, its cytotoxic effect was considerably weaker in non-cancer cells. Antofine N-oxide was found to inhibit proliferation of the solid tumor cells whereas it caused apoptotic cell death in the leukemia cells. A microarray analysis after a short treatment revealed that the number of differentially expressed genes was considerably higher in solid tumor than in leukemia cells. Up-regulated genes in the three solid tumor cell lines include genes related to TNFα signaling, of which TNFα was among the most significantly induced. A functional analysis revealed that TNFR1 signaling was most likely activated in the solid tumor cells. The increased mRNA levels of several genes of this pathway (namely TNFα, TNFAIP3 and BIRC3) were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR after different treatment durations. Finally a slight inhibition of NFκB-mediated transcription was observed in the same cells. Together our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation in solid tumor cells essentially occurs through TNFα signaling whereas this pathway is not activated in leukemia cells. Apoptotic cell death in the latter is induced by a distinct yet unknown pathway. PMID:24962072

  1. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  2. Dose-dependent killing of leukemia cells by low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, N.; Laroussi, M.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma towards the progression of cancerous human T-cell leukemia cells was investigated. The plasma pencil, which utilizes short duration high voltage pulses, was used to generate a low-temperature plasma (LTP) plume in ambient air. Our data showed that cell morphology and cell viability were affected in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LTP. The outcome of this study revealed that the effect of plasma exposure was not immediate, but had a delayed effect and increasing the time of plasma exposure resulted in increased leukemia cell death.

  3. Knockdown of WAVE1 enhances apoptosis of leukemia cells by downregulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxia; Wu, Benqing; Chai, Wenwen; Cao, Lizhi; Wang, Yangping; Yu, Yan; Yang, Liangchun

    2016-06-01

    Chemoresistance of leukemia constitutes a great challenge for successful treatment of leukemia. Autophagy has recently attracted increasing attention for its role in conferring resistance to various conventional anti-neoplastic regiments. In the present study, the authors showed that WAVE1, a member of WASP family verprolin-homologous proteins, is a critical regulator of chemoresistance during autophagy. It is positively correlated with clinical status in pediatric acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and leukemia cell lines. The knockdown of WAVE1 expression decreased autophagy was accompanied by an upregulation of autophagic marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-Ⅱ, a degradation of SQSTM1/sequestosome 1 (p62) and the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, a suppression of WAVE1 expression increased the sensitivity of leukemia cells to chemotherapy and apoptosis, and depletion of WAVE1 expression promoted the translocation of Bcl-2 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. In addition, a knockdown of PI3K-Ⅲ expression significantly inhibited WAVE1-mediated autophagy. Furthermore, suppression of WAVE1 expression blocked the interactions between Beclin1 and PI3K-Ⅲ and the disassociation of Beclin1-Bcl-2 during enhanced autophagy. The above results suggested that WAVE1 is a critical pro-autophagic protein capable of enhancing cell survival and regulating chemoresistance in leukemia cells potentially through the Beclin1/Bcl-2 and Beclin1/PI3K-Ⅲ complex-dependent pathways. PMID:27035872

  4. Radotinib Induces Apoptosis of CD11b+ Cells Differentiated from Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Sook-Kyoung; Noh, Eui-Kyu; Yoon, Dong-Joon; Jo, Jae-Cheol; Choi, Yunsuk; Koh, SuJin; Baek, Jin Ho; Park, Jae-Hoo; Min, Young Joo; Kim, Hawk

    2015-01-01

    Radotinib, developed as a BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is approved for the second-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in South Korea. However, therapeutic effects of radotinib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that radotinib significantly decreases the viability of AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Kasumi-1 cells were more sensitive to radotinib than NB4, HL60, or THP-1 cell lines. Furthermore, radotinib induced CD11b expression in NB4, THP-1, and Kasumi-1 cells either in presence or absence of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). We found that radotinib promoted differentiation and induced CD11b expression in AML cells by downregulating LYN. However, CD11b expression induced by ATRA in HL60 cells was decreased by radotinib through upregulation of LYN. Furthermore, radotinib mainly induced apoptosis of CD11b+ cells in the total population of AML cells. Radotinib also increased apoptosis of CD11b+ HL60 cells when they were differentiated by ATRA/dasatinib treatment. We show that radotinib induced apoptosis via caspase-3 activation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in CD11b+ cells differentiated from AML cells. Our results suggest that radotinib may be used as a candidate drug in AML or a chemosensitizer for treatment of AML by other therapeutics. PMID:26065685

  5. Homoharringtonine acts synergistically with SG235-TRAIL, a conditionally replicating adenovirus, in human leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hai-tao; Li, Lu; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ying; Li, Gong-chu; Qian, Wen-bin

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the synergistic effects of SG235-TRAIL, a novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and homoharringtonine (HHT) in human leukemia cell lines. Methods: The combined effect of SG235-TRAIL and HHT was assessed using a crystal violet assay and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, followed by combination index analysis. Cell apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry combined with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-Annexin V staining. The activation of caspase pathway and the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, TRAIL, and E1A were examined using Western blotting. Results: HHT synergized the cytotoxicity of SG235-TRAIL against leukemia cell lines Kasumi-1, KG-1, HL-60, and U937, concomitantly with increased apoptosis and enhanced activity of caspase-3 and -9. The combination therapy resulted in significantly lower levels of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and Bid compared to treatment of cells with either HHT or SG235-TRAIL alone, suggesting that HHT sensitizes leukemia cells to SG235-TRAIL virus through alteration of anti-apoptotic signaling elements. Importantly, HHT combined with SG235-TRAIL did not show significant cytotoxicity to normal human mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusion: Combining oncolytic adenovirus SG235-TRAIL and HHT synergistically enhances cytotoxicity in leukemia cells in vitro, suggesting that the combination therapy could represent a rational approach for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:19820719

  6. Transmembrane TNF-α preferentially expressed by leukemia stem cells and blasts is a potent target for antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Shiqiu; Li, Baihua; Li, Qinlu; Gao, Lili; Li, Dan; Gong, Quan; Zhu, Li; Wang, Jue; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhao, Lei; Li, Zhuoya; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2015-09-17

    To design an effective antibody therapy to improve clinical outcomes in leukemia, the identification of novel cell surface antigens is needed. Herein, we demonstrate a role for transmembrane tumor necrosis factor-α (tmTNF-α) in leukemia. To characterize tmTNF-α expression in acute leukemia (AL), normal hematopoietic cells, and nonhematopoietic tissues, we used a monoclonal antibody, termed C1, which specifically recognizes the tmTNF-α domain. We found that tmTNF-α was preferentially expressed by AL and leukemia stem cells (LSCs). More abundant expression correlated with poor risk stratification, extramedullary infiltration, and adverse clinical parameters. Moreover, knockdown of tmTNF-α(+) expression rendered leukemia cells more sensitive to chemotherapy in vitro and delayed regeneration of leukemia in NOD-SCID mice. Targeting tmTNF-α by C1 resulted in leukemia cell killing via antibody-dependent cell-mediated and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and inhibited leukemia cell growth in vivo while simultaneously sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Notably, C1 administration impaired the regeneration of leukemia in secondary serial transplantation into NOD-SCID mice. In conclusion, tmTNF-α has a favorable AL- and LSC-associated expression profile and is important for the survival and proliferation of these cells. C1-mediated targeting shows potent anti-LSC activity, indicating that tmTNF-α represents a novel target antigen in AL. PMID:26224647

  7. Stem cell transplantation for indolent lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, John G; Hosing, Chitra; Maloney, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The indolent lymphomas, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) remain incurable with standard therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT[JHA1]) is feasible and has low treatment related mortality in follicular lymphoma, but there are questions relating to optimal timing of the procedure, conditioning regimen and late effects. Myeloablative allogeneic HSCT is associated with high treatment related morbidity and mortality, few late relapses, but is applicable to only a small number of patients. The major focus of HSCT in these lymphomas has been with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic HSCT, which is applicable to the age distribution of these diseases and which exploit the graft versus lymphoma effect in these diseases. Steps to further decrease the morbidity and mortality of the RIC HSCT and in particular to reduce the incidence of chronic extensive graft versus host disease while maintaining tumor control remain the major focus. Many potential treatments are available for indolent lymphomas and CLL, and appropriate patient selection and the timing of HSCT remain controversial. The use of HSCT must always be weighed against the risk of the underlying disease, particularly in a setting where improvements in treatment are leading to improved outcome. PMID:21195313

  8. Nonsecretory myeloma, immunoglobulin D myeloma, and plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bladé, J; Kyle, R A

    1999-12-01

    Nonsecretory myeloma, which accounts for 1% to 5% of all myelomas, is characterized by the absence of detectable M-protein in serum and urine. The presenting features of nonsecretory myeloma are similar to those in patients with a detectable M-protein, except for the absence of renal function impairment. The response to therapy and survival of patients with nonsecretory myeloma are similar to those of patients with measurable M-protein. Immunoglobulin D myeloma represents 2% of all myelomas. Patients with IgD myeloma usually present with a small band or no evident M-spike on serum electrophoresis and heavy light-chain proteinuria. Thus, IgD myeloma can be considered a variant of Bence Jones myeloma; the presence of the IgD M-protein and the predominance of the lambda light chain are the only distinctive features. The median survival of patients with IgD myeloma is almost 2 years, with one fifth of them surviving for more than 5 years. Plasma cell leukemia is also a rare form of plasma cell dyscrasia (2% to 4% of all myelomas). The primary form accounts for 60% of the cases. In primary PCL, the constellation of adverse biologic prognostic factors in patients with advanced aggressive myeloma is already present at diagnosis. In fact, primary PCL has a more aggressive clinical presentation than MM, with a higher frequency of extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, and renal failure. Treatment with a single alkylating agent plus prednisone is not appropriate. Combination chemotherapy with VAD, cyclophosphamide and etoposide, or VCMP/VBAP is a better initial option. Given the poor prognosis of primary PCL, intensification with high-dose therapy followed by stem cell rescue should be offered to affected patients. PMID:10626149

  9. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  10. Leukemia stem cells in T-ALL require active Hif1α and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Giambra, Vincenzo; Jenkins, Catherine E; Lam, Sonya H; Hoofd, Catherine; Belmonte, Miriam; Wang, Xuehai; Gusscott, Sam; Gracias, Deanne; Weng, Andrew P

    2015-06-18

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to play important roles in normal hematopoietic stem cell biology and in the development of both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Its role in maintaining established leukemia stem cells, which are more directly relevant to patients with disease, however, is less clear. To address what role Wnt signaling may play in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we used a stably integrated fluorescent Wnt reporter construct to interrogate endogenous Wnt signaling activity in vivo. In this study, we report that active Wnt signaling is restricted to minor subpopulations within bulk tumors, that these Wnt-active subsets are highly enriched for leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), and that genetic inactivation of β-catenin severely reduces LIC frequency. We show further that β-catenin transcription is upregulated by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) stabilization, and that deletion of Hif1α also severely reduces LIC frequency. Of note, the deletion of β-catenin or Hif1α did not impair the growth or viability of bulk tumor cells, suggesting that elements of the Wnt and Hif pathways specifically support leukemia stem cells. We also confirm the relevance of these findings to human disease using cell lines and patient-derived xenografts, suggesting that targeting these pathways could benefit patients with T-ALL. PMID:25934477

  11. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. p27kip1 Maintains a Subset of Leukemia Stem Cells in the Quiescent State in Murine MLL-Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Seet, Christopher; Sun, Clare; Li, Jing; You, Dewen; Volk, Andrew; Breslin, Peter; Li, Xingyu; Wei, Wei; Qian, Zhijian; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Jiwang

    2013-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia)-fusion genes induce the development of leukemia through deregulation of normal MLL target genes, such as HOXA9 and MEIS1. Both HOXA9 and MEIS1 are required for MLL-fusion gene-induced leukemogenesis. Co-expression of HOXA9 and MEIS1 induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) similar to that seen in mice in which MLL-fusion genes are over-expressed. p27kip1 (p27 hereafter), a negative regulator of the cell cycle, has also been defined as an MLL target, the expression of which is up-regulated in MLL leukemic cells (LCs). To investigate whether p27 plays a role in the pathogenesis of MLL-leukemia, we examined the effects of p27 deletion (p27-/-) on MLL-AF9 (MA9)-induced murine AML development. HOXA9/MEIS1 (H/M)-induced, p27 wild-type (p27+/+) and p27-/- AML were studied in parallel as controls. We found that LCs from both MA9-AML and H/M-AML can be separated into three fractions, a CD117-CD11bhi differentiated fraction as well as CD117+CD11bhi and CD117+CD11blo, two less differentiated fractions. The CD117+CD11blo fraction, comprising only 1-3% of total LCs, expresses higher levels of early hematopoietic progenitor markers but lower levels of mature myeloid cell markers compared to other populations of LCs. p27 is expressed and is required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of the CD117+CD11blo fraction of MA9-LCs but not of H/M-LCs. p27 deletion significantly compromises the leukemogenic capacity of CD117+CD11blo MA9-LCs by reducing the frequency of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) but does not do so in H/M-LCs. In addition, we found that p27 is highly expressed and required for cell cycle arrest in the CD117-CD11bhi fraction in both types of LCs. Furthermore, we found that c-Myc expression is required for maintaining LCs in an undifferentiated state independently of proliferation. We concluded that p27 represses the proliferation of LCs, which is specifically required for maintaining the quiescent and drug-resistant states of a small subset of MA9-LSCs in collaboration with the differentiation blockage function of c-Myc. PMID:23988911

  13. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I.; Anis, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  14. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  15. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

  19. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Metformin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Drug-Resistant Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lirio, A.; Pérez-Yarza, G.; Fernández-Suárez, M. R.; Alonso-Tejerina, E.; Boyano, M. D.; Asumendi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the antidiabetic drug metformin has chemosensitizing and chemopreventive effects against carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that metformin exerts varying degrees of antitumor activity against human leukemia cells, as reflected by differences in growth inhibition, apoptosis, and alterations to metabolic enzymes. In metformin-sensitive cells, autophagy was not induced but rather it blocked proliferation by means of arresting cells in the S and G2/M phases which was associated with the downregulation of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and cdc2, but not that of cyclin E. In 10E1-CEM cells that overexpress Bcl-2 and are drug-resistant, the effect of metformin on proliferation was more pronounced, also inducing the activation of the caspases 3/7 and hence apoptosis. In all sensitive cells, metformin decreased the Δψm and it modified the expression of enzymes involved in energy metabolism: PKCε (PKCepsilon) and PKCδ (PKCdelta). In sensitive cells, metformin altered PKCε and PKCδ expression leading to a predominance of PKCε over PKCδ which implies a more glycolytic state. The opposite occurs in the nonresponsive cells. In conclusion, we provide new insights into the activity of metformin as an antitumoral agent in leukemia cells that could be related to its capability to modulate energy metabolism. PMID:26688757

  1. Inverse relationship of tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia infiltration in the lungs of F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, D.L.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    In 1970 and F344 rat, along with the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse, were selected as the standard rodents for the National Cancer Institute Carcinogenic Bioassay program for studies of potentially carcinogenic chemicals. The F344 rat has also been used in a variety of other carcinogenesis studies, including numerous studies at ITRI. A major concern to be considered in evaluating carcinogenic bioassay studies using the F344 rat is the relatively high background incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia (MCL) (also referred to as large granular lymphocytic leukemia, Fischer rat leukemia, or monocytic leukemia). Incidences of MCL ranging from 10 to 72% in male F344 rats to 6 to 31% in female F344 rats have been reported. Gaining the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the negative correlations noted should enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of lung cancer.

  2. Regain control of p53: Targeting leukemia stem cells by isoform-specific HDAC inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ya-Huei; Qi, Jing; Cook, Guerry J

    2016-05-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are self-renewable, leukemia-initiating populations that are often resistant to traditional chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently used for treatment of acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. The persistence and continued acquisition of mutations in resistant LSCs represent a major cause of refractory disease and/or relapse after remission. Understanding the mechanisms regulating LSC growth and survival is critical in devising effective therapies that will improve treatment response and outcome. Several recent studies indicate that the p53 tumor suppressor pathway is often inactivated in de novo myeloid leukemia through oncogenic-specific mechanisms, which converge on aberrant p53 protein deacetylation. Here, we summarize our current understanding of the various mechanisms underlying deregulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which could be exploited to restore p53 activity and enhance targeting of LSCs in molecularly defined patient subsets. PMID:26923266

  3. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  4. MCL-1-dependent leukemia cells are more sensitive to chemotherapy than BCL-2-dependent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, Joslyn K; Ryan, Jeremy; Yecies, Derek; Opferman, Joseph T; Letai, Anthony

    2009-11-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) are anti-apoptotic proteins in the BCL-2 protein family often expressed in cancer. To compare the function of MCL-1 and BCL-2 in maintaining cancer survival, we constructed complementary mouse leukemia models based on Emu-Myc expression in which either BCL-2 or MCL-1 are required for leukemia maintenance. We show that the principal anti-apoptotic mechanism of both BCL-2 and MCL-1 in these leukemias is to sequester pro-death BH3-only proteins rather than BAX and BAK. We find that the MCL-1-dependent leukemias are more sensitive to a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents acting by disparate mechanisms. In common across these varied treatments is that MCL-1 protein levels rapidly decrease in a proteosome-dependent fashion, whereas those of BCL-2 are stable. We demonstrate for the first time that two anti-apoptotic proteins can enable tumorigenesis equally well, but nonetheless differ in their influence on chemosensitivity. PMID:19948485

  5. MN1-Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1-friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1-Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1-Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3'ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1-Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  6. Potentiation of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Differentiation and Prevention of Leukemia Development in Mice by Oleanolic Acid.

    PubMed

    Rawendra, Reynetha D S; Lin, Ping-Yuan; Chang, Ching-Dong; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Shih, Wen-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Although differentiation therapy with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces complete remission in most acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients, it is associated with organ toxicity. The present study focused on investigating the effects of the natural compounds oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) on proliferation and differentiation of human APL HL-60 cells in vitro and murine APL WEHI-3 cells in vivo. Results demonstrated that OA and UA significantly inhibited cellular proliferation of HL-60 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Non-cytotoxic concentration of OA exhibited a marked differentiation-inducing effect on HL-60 and enhanced ATRA-induced HL-60 differentiation. In contrast, UA showed only a moderate effect. Activation of MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway was likely found to be involved in the mechanism. Moreover, OA increased survival duration of WEHI-3 transplanted BALB/c mice, and decreased leukemia cells infiltration in the liver and spleen. Thus, these results may provide new insight for developing alternative therapy in APL patients. PMID:26637873

  7. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  8. [Mitochondrial mechanisms of apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells induced by AVVC-1].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ru-Qi; Zhang, Gen-Bao; Huang, Lu; Ma, Kai-Ran; Wu, Juan; Li, Shu

    2013-06-01

    This study was purpose to investigate apoptosis pathway of leukemia K562 cells induced by anticoagulant fraction from Agkistrodon acutus venom (AVVC-1). The mitochondrial transmembrane potential (??m) of leukemia K562 cells was detected by flow cytometry with JC-1 single staining. The expression of cytochrome C in the mitochondrial of leukemia K562 cells was analyzed by Western blot after AVVC-1 treatment. The distribution of cytochrome C in leukemia K562 cells was measured by immuno-fluorescence test. The results showed that the potential of mitochondrial membrane decreased after treatment with different concentrations of AVVC-1 (12.5, 25, 50, 100 g/ml) for 6 h (P < 0.01). The expression level of cytochrome C protein in mitochondria obviously declined after treatment with 30 g/ml AVVC-1 for 48 h, and the fluorescent intensity of cytochrome C in cytosol was enhanced at the same time. It is concluded that AVVC-1-induced K562 cell apoptosis is related with mitochondrial damage, and cytochrome C may be a useful agent for investigating human leukemia therapy by using AVVC-1. PMID:23815904

  9. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  10. CD317 is over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shunyou; Osei, Ebenezer S; Kaplan, David; Chen, Youhai H; Meyerson, Howard

    2015-01-01

    CD317 was first identified as a multiple myeloma-associated antigen. Here we report the expression of CD317 in normal B cells and B-cell malignancies. In normal bone marrow, CD317 demonstrates a biphasic expression pattern, with higher expression on stage 1 and stage 3 hematogones, but not on stage 2 hematogones. CD317 is over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and appears associated with negative CD38 expression. Moreover, CD317 is barely detectable in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our results suggest that CD317 expression might be of prognostic significance for B-CLL, and CD317 could be used as a new marker for minimal residual disease detection in B-ALL. PMID:25973046

  11. Cell size variations of large granular lymphocyte leukemia: Implication of a small cell subtype of granular lymphocyte leukemia with STAT3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takezawa, Yuka; Ito, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Nishina, Sayaka; Senoo, Noriko; Sakai, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-06-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (LGL-L) has been morphologically defined as a group of lymphoproliferative disorders, including T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL-L), chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK) and aggressive NK cell leukemia. We investigated the morphological features of LGL leukemic cells in 26 LGL-L patients in order to elucidate relationships with current classifications and molecular backgrounds. LGL-L cells were mostly indistinguishable from normal LGL. Patients with STAT3 SH2 domain mutations showed significantly smaller cells compared with patients without STAT3 mutations. Four patients with T-LGL-L showed smaller granular lymphocytes with a median diameter of less than 13μm, which were rarely seen in normal subjects. This small subtype of T-LGL-L was recognized among rather young patients and was associated with D661Y mutations in the STAT3 gene SH2 domain. In addition, all of them showed anemia including two cases with pure red cell aplasia. These results suggest the heterogeneity of T-LGL-L and a specific subtype with small variants of T-LGL-L. PMID:27064362

  12. All-trans retinoic acid inhibits HOXA7 expression in leukemia cell NB4.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Jiang, Q; Liu, W; Bai, Y

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is a malignant proliferative disease of blood system, which is caused by hyperplasia of white blood cells and infiltration into other tissues and organs with blood flow, leading to a series of clinical manifestations. In this study, we detected the expression of HOXA7 gene in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4. The expression level of HOXA7 decreased in the presence of ATRA, which was able to inhibit the proliferation of NB4 cells. Furthermore, ATRA altered the morphology of NB4 cells. The study suggested that HOXA7 might be a new gene candidate that influences the maturation of acute myeloid leukemia, and provided the molecular basis for the treatment for acute promyelocyticleukemia. PMID:26828989

  13. Systemic mastocytosis in association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and plasma cell myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shouying; Rashidi, Hooman H; Le, Dzung T; Kipps, Thomas J; Broome, H Elizabeth; Wang, Huan-You

    2010-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis with associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD) is a heterogeous group of mast cell disorders with different clinical, pathologic and underlying molecular characteristics. While myelomonocytic/myeloid neoplasia overwhelmingly predominates the AHNMD component, lymphoproliferative disorders rarely occur as an AHNMD component of SM-AHNMD. Here we report two cases of SM-AHNMD, in which the AHNMD component is chronic lymphocytic leukemia in one case, and concurrent chronic lymphocytic leukemia as well as plasma cell myeloma in another case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SM-AHNMD with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and plasma cell dyscrasia simultaneously. PMID:20490336

  14. CD52 expression in T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia--implications for treatment with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Del Giudice, I; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Morilla, R; Dunlop, A; Catovksy, D

    2005-05-01

    Few reports on the successful treatment of T-cell large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia with the humanized anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab are emerging in the literature. The expression of CD52 by LGLs has not been previously investigated. Using semi-quantitative 2- and 3-color flow cytometry, we documented the expression of CD52 in 100% of abnormal cells in T-cell LGL leukemia (n = 11) and natural killer (NK) cell LGL leukemia (n = 2), and showed no significant difference in CD52 expression between T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) and T-cell LGL leukemia. Higher CD52 expression has been noted in responders to alemtuzumab in T-cell PLL and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a B-cell disorder. The strong and consistent expression of CD52 shown here highlights the potential role of alemtuzumab in the treatment of refractory T-cell LGL leukemia and possibly aggressive NK cell leukemia. PMID:16019510

  15. Differential mechanisms of cell death induction via delivery of therapeutic nanoliposomal ceramide in leukemias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryland, Lindsay K.

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is a rare lymphoproliferative malignancy that involves blood, bone marrow and spleen infiltration. Clinically, LGL leukemia can manifest as a chronic lymphocytosis or as an aggressive leukemia that is fatal within a short period of time. A segment of LGL leukemia patients are unresponsive to immunosuppressive therapy and currently there is no known curative treatment for this disease. Another hematological malignancy, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia in adults in Western countries and accounts for approximately 30% of all diagnosed leukemia cases. Around 95% of all CLL cases involve clonal expansion and abnormal proliferation of neoplastic B lymphocytes in lymphoid organs, bone marrow and peripheral blood. Similar to LGL leukemia, CLL is also incurable with current therapies. Therefore, this represents a need for new therapeutic approaches for treatment of these diseases. Recent advances in nanotechnology have illustrated the feasibility of generating nanoliposomes that encapsulate hydrophobic compounds, like ceramide, to facilitate treatment of LGL leukemia and CLL. Ceramide is an anti-proliferative sphingolipid metabolite that has been shown to selectively induce cell death in cancer cells. However, the use of ceramide as a chemotherapeutic agent is limited due to hydrophobicity. While it is understood how nanoliposomal ceramide induces cell death in several types of cancers and hematological malignancies, the effect of nanoliposomal ceramide treatment in LGL leukemia and CLL remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the differential mechanisms of cell death induction following nanoliposomal C6-ceramide treatment in both LGL leukemia and CLL. We show that nanoliposomal C6-ceramide displays minimal cytotoxicity in normal donors. peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and is a well-tolerated therapy during in vivo treatment in these leukemia models. To further examine this mechanism of selectivity, we utilize CLL as a cancer model which has an increased dependency on glycolysis. As most tumors exhibit a preferential switch to glycolysis, as described in the "Warburg effect," we hypothesize that ceramide nanoliposomes selectively target this activated glycolytic pathway in cancer. We demonstrate that nanoliposomal ceramide inhibits both the RNA and protein expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an intermediate enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, which is overexpressed in a subset of CLL patients. Taken together, our results suggest that C6-ceramide nanoliposomes preferentially inhibit the enhanced metabolism of glucose in leukemic CLL cells, which results in induction of cell death. We conclude that selective inhibition of the glycolytic pathway in CLL cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide could potentially be an effective therapy for this leukemia by targeting the Warburg effect. In addition, we conclude that nanoliposomal C6-ceramide could also be an effective therapy for patients with LGL leukemia. Collectively, the results of this dissertation emphasize exploitation of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolism in design and development of novel chemotherapeutics.

  16. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  17. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Kalina, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients.To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p< 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation.In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences in protein expression between particular leukemia subgroups. Forty-seven of SEC-MAP identified targets were validated by other conventional method in this study. PMID:26785729

  18. Metabolic effects of acute thiamine depletion are reversed by rapamycin in breast and leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqian; Miriyala, Sumitra; Keaton, Mignon A; Jordan, Craig T; Wiedl, Christina; Clair, Daret K St; Moscow, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also reversed by rapamycin. Thus, these studies demonstrate that acute intracellular thiamine depletion by recombinant thiaminase results in metabolic changes in thiamine-dependent metabolism, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of thiamine-dependent metabolism. PMID:24454921

  19. CD44, Hyaluronan, the Hematopoietic Stem Cell, and Leukemia-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Zöller, Margot

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is an adhesion molecule that varies in size due to glycosylation and insertion of so-called variant exon products. The CD44 standard isoform (CD44s) is highly expressed in many cells and most abundantly in cells of the hematopoietic system, whereas expression of CD44 variant isoforms (CD44v) is more restricted. CD44s and CD44v are known as stem cell markers, first described for hematopoietic stem cells and later on confirmed for cancer- and leukemia-initiating cells. Importantly, both abundantly expressed CD44s as well as CD44v actively contribute to the maintenance of stem cell features, like generating and embedding in a niche, homing into the niche, maintenance of quiescence, and relative apoptosis resistance. This is surprising, as CD44 is not a master stem cell gene. I here will discuss that the functional contribution of CD44 relies on its particular communication skills with neighboring molecules, adjacent cells and, last not least, the surrounding matrix. In fact, it is the interaction of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 with its prime ligand, which strongly assists stem cells to fulfill their special and demanding tasks. Recent fundamental progress in support of this "old" hypothesis, which may soon pave the way for most promising new therapeutics, is presented for both hematopoietic stem cell and leukemia-initiating cell. The contribution of CD44 to the generation of a stem cell niche, to homing of stem cells in their niche, to stem cell quiescence and apoptosis resistance will be in focus. PMID:26074915

  20. CD44, Hyaluronan, the Hematopoietic Stem Cell, and Leukemia-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, Margot

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is an adhesion molecule that varies in size due to glycosylation and insertion of so-called variant exon products. The CD44 standard isoform (CD44s) is highly expressed in many cells and most abundantly in cells of the hematopoietic system, whereas expression of CD44 variant isoforms (CD44v) is more restricted. CD44s and CD44v are known as stem cell markers, first described for hematopoietic stem cells and later on confirmed for cancer- and leukemia-initiating cells. Importantly, both abundantly expressed CD44s as well as CD44v actively contribute to the maintenance of stem cell features, like generating and embedding in a niche, homing into the niche, maintenance of quiescence, and relative apoptosis resistance. This is surprising, as CD44 is not a master stem cell gene. I here will discuss that the functional contribution of CD44 relies on its particular communication skills with neighboring molecules, adjacent cells and, last not least, the surrounding matrix. In fact, it is the interaction of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 with its prime ligand, which strongly assists stem cells to fulfill their special and demanding tasks. Recent fundamental progress in support of this “old” hypothesis, which may soon pave the way for most promising new therapeutics, is presented for both hematopoietic stem cell and leukemia-initiating cell. The contribution of CD44 to the generation of a stem cell niche, to homing of stem cells in their niche, to stem cell quiescence and apoptosis resistance will be in focus. PMID:26074915

  1. Enhancement of fludarabine sensitivity by all-trans-retinoic acid in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calotti, Paula X.; Lopez-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2012-01-01

    Background A subset of patients with fludarabine-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia has previously been shown to express elevated intracellular levels of the concentrative high-affinity fludarabine transporter hCNT3, without any detectable related activity. We have recently shown that all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of inducing hCNT3 trafficking to plasma membrane in the MEC1 cell line. We, therefore, evaluated the effect of all-trans-retinoic acid on hCNT3 in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells as a suitable mechanism to improve fludarabine-based therapy of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Design and Methods Cells from 23 chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients wild-type for P53 were analyzed for ex vivo sensitivity to fludarabine. hCNT3 activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell samples was evaluated by measuring the uptake of [8-3H]-fludarabine. The amounts of transforming growth factor-β1 and hCNT3 messenger RNA were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effect of all-trans-retinoic acid on hCNT3 subcellular localization was analyzed by confocal microscopy and its effect on fludarabine-induced apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis using annexin V staining. Results Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases showing higher ex vivo basal sensitivity to fludarabine also had a greater basal hCNT3-associated fludarabine uptake capacity compared to the subset of patients showing ex vivo resistance to the drug. hCNT3 transporter activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells from the latter patients was either negligible or absent. Treatment of the fludarabine-resistant subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with all-trans-retinoic acid induced increased fludarabine transport via hCNT3 which was associated with a significant increase in fludarabine sensitivity. Conclusions Improvement of ex vivo fludarabine sensitivity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is associated with increased hCNT3 activity after all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. PMID:22180426

  2. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia. PMID:26334102

  3. Central nervous system acute lymphoblastic leukemia: role of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Frishman-Levy, Liron; Shemesh, Avishai; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Ma, Chao; Ni, Zhenya; Frenkel, Shahar; Muench, Vera; Bruckmueller, Hilke; Vokuhl, Christian; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Eckert, Cornelia; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Campbell, Kerry S; Loewenthal, Ron; Schewe, Denis M; Hochman, Jacob; Meyer, Lueder H; Kaufman, Dan; Cario, Gunnar; Porgador, Angel; Izraeli, Shai

    2015-05-28

    Central nervous system acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CNS-ALL) is a major clinical problem. Prophylactic therapy is neurotoxic, and a third of the relapses involve the CNS. Increased expression of interleukin 15 (IL-15) in leukemic blasts is associated with increased risk for CNS-ALL. Using in vivo models for CNS leukemia caused by mouse T-ALL and human xenografts of ALL cells, we demonstrate that expression of IL-15 in leukemic cells is associated with the activation of natural killer (NK) cells. This activation limits the outgrowth of leukemic cells in the periphery, but less in the CNS because NK cells are excluded from the CNS. Depletion of NK cells in NOD/SCID mice enabled combined systemic and CNS leukemia of human pre-B-ALL. The killing of human leukemia lymphoblasts by NK cells depended on the expression of the NKG2D receptor. Analysis of bone marrow (BM) diagnostic samples derived from children with subsequent CNS-ALL revealed a significantly high expression of the NKG2D and NKp44 receptors. We suggest that the CNS may be an immunologic sanctuary protected from NK-cell activity. CNS prophylactic therapy may thus be needed with emerging NK cell-based therapies against hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:25896649

  4. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nik Man, Nik Muhd Khuzaimi; Hassan, Rosline; Ang, Cheng Yong; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohd Radzi, Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS), human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11) and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11) cell lines. PMID:26613081

  5. Compound MMH01 possesses toxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Chou, Cheng-Jen; Chang, Tun-Tschu

    2009-04-01

    MMH01 is a compound isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea. MMH01 markedly inhibited growth of human leukemia U937 and pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells. It resulted in distinct patterns of cell cycle distribution in U937 (G2/M, sub-G1 and polyploidy) and BxPC3 cells (G0/G1 and sub-G1). The modes of cell death in U937 cells include apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe, whereas apoptosis-associated events or necrosis in BxPC3 cells. Neither mitochondrial membrane permeabilization nor caspase dependence was noted. Proteins involving mitotic catastrophe-associated cell death such as cyclin B1 and checkpoint kinase 2 were activated in U937 cells. Only slight to moderate viability inhibition was noted to human monocytes, the normal counterpart of these myeloid leukemic cells. In conclusion, MMH01 possesses cytotoxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:19344682

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Identification of Glycan Structure Alterations on Cell Membrane Proteins in Desoxyepothilone B Resistant Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2–6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2–6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2–6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2–6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance. PMID:21859949

  8. CD80-Transfected acute myeloid leukemia cells induce primary allogeneic T-cell responses directed at patient specific minor histocompatibility antigens and leukemia-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Mutis, T; Schrama, E; Melief, C J; Goulmy, E

    1998-09-01

    Despite sufficient levels of HLA class I and class II expression, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells usually fail to induce a significant T-cell response in vitro. Therefore, we investigated whether in vitro modifications could enhance the T-cell stimulatory properties of AML cells. AML cells were either cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-4 (IL-4), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or transfected with the CD80 (B7.1) gene and used as stimulator cells for primed and unprimed allogeneic T cells. Cytokine treatment increased HLA class I and II expression, but did not induce CD80 on AML cells. Cytokine-treated AML cells efficiently presented nominal and allo-antigens to primed T-cell clones, induced strong T-cell proliferation in HLA mismatched mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR), but failed to induce primary T-cell responses from an HLA identical bone marrow donor in MLR. In contrast, CD80-transfected AML cells induced T-cell proliferation of HLA-identical bone marrow donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in primary MLR, allowing the generation of leukemia reactive CD4(+) T-cell lines and clones. The majority of the generated oligoclonal (25 of 35) T-cell cultures showed patient specific reactivity that did not discriminate between patient's leukemic cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells (EBV-LCL). The remaining 10 oligoclonal T-cell cultures recognized only leukemic cells. One of these latter leukemia reactive oligoclonal T cells was cloned. The majority of the clones (25 of 29) reacted against both leukemic cells and patient's EBV-LCL. A minority of the T-cell clones with the CD4 phenotype (four of 29) showed strong HLA-DP restricted reactivity against leukemic cells, but not against patient's EBV-LCL or against HLA-matched nonleukemic cells, indicating that their target antigens are preferentially expressed by leukemic cells. In conclusion, our study shows that the in vitro allogeneic T-cell response induced by CD80-transfected AML cells is mainly directed against patient's specific minor histocompatibility antigens, while antigens preferentially expressed by leukemic cells can also trigger T-cell responses. PMID:9716596

  9. Quantitation, in vitro propagation, and characterization of preleukemic cells induced by radiation leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Yefenof, E.; Epszteyn, S.; Kotler, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Intrathymic (i.t.) inoculation of radiation leukemia virus into C57BL/6 mice induces a population of preleukemic (PL) cells that can progress into mature thymic lymphomas upon transfer into syngeneic recipients. A minimum of 10(3) PL thymic cells are required to induce lymphomas in the recipient. Most of the individual lymphomas developed in mice which were inoculated with cells of a single PL thymus, derived from different T-cell precursors. PL thymic cells could be grown in vitro on a feeder layer consisting of splenic stromal cells. Growth medium was supplemented with supernatant harvested from an established radiation leukemia virus-induced lymphoma cell line (SR4). The in vitro-grown PL cells were characterized as Thy-1+, CD4+, CD8- T-cells, most of which expressed radiation leukemia virus antigens. Cultured PL cells were found to be nontumorigenic, based on their inability to form s.c. tumors. However, these cells could develop into thymic lymphomas if inoculated i.t. into syngeneic recipients. A culture of PL cells, maintained for 2 mo, showed clonal T-cell receptor arrangement. Lymphomas which developed in several recipient mice upon injection with these PL cells were found to possess the same T-cell receptor arrangement. These results indicate that PL cells can be adapted for in vitro growth while maintaining their preleukemic character.

  10. Therapeutic antagonists of microRNAs deplete leukemia-initiating cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Chaubey, Aditya; Phelan, James D.; Horman, Shane R.; Wunderlich, Mark; Guzman, Monica L.; Jegga, Anil G.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Chen, Jianjun; Mulloy, James C.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Marcucci, Guido; Bhat, Balkrishen; Gebelein, Brian; Grimes, H. Leighton

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) subtypes that result from oncogenic activation of homeobox (HOX) transcription factors are associated with poor prognosis. The HOXA9 transcription activator and growth factor independent 1 (GFI1) transcriptional repressor compete for occupancy at DNA-binding sites for the regulation of common target genes. We exploited this HOXA9 versus GFI1 antagonism to identify the genes encoding microRNA-21 and microRNA-196b as transcriptional targets of HOX-based leukemia oncoproteins. Therapeutic inhibition of microRNA-21 and microRNA-196b inhibited in vitro leukemic colony forming activity and depleted in vivo leukemia-initiating cell activity of HOX-based leukemias, which led to leukemia-free survival in a murine AML model and delayed disease onset in xenograft models. These data establish microRNA as functional effectors of endogenous HOXA9 and HOX-based leukemia oncoproteins, provide a concise in vivo platform to test RNA therapeutics, and suggest therapeutic value for microRNA antagonists in AML. PMID:24334453

  11. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  12. Induction of apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by isolated fractions from strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberries contain phytochemicals that have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. We investigated the ability of isolated fractions from strawberry extracts to induce apoptotic cell death in three pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) lines, including SEM and RS4;11 cell lines derived fr...

  13. Apoptosis triggered by vitexin in U937 human leukemia cells via a mitochondrial signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chao-Ying; Chien, Yung-Shin; Chiu, Tai-Hui; Huang, Wen-Wen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2012-11-01

    Vitexin, a lignan compound, has been shown to exert apoptotic actions on human breast cancer cell lines and to have anti-inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, there is currently no study addressing the effects of vitexin on the induction of apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cells. The aim of this study was to determine the anticancer effects and molecular mechanisms of vitexin on U937 leukemia cells. We showed that vitexin can potently induce programmed cell death in U937 leukemia cell growth as well as morphological changes that were examined by MTT assay and phase contrast microscopy, respectively. The DNA content and the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) were determined by flow cytometric analysis. The cell cycle arrest-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels were measured by western blotting. Vitexin-triggered apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease of the level of ∆Ψm and the percentage of viability and provoked apoptosis in U937 cells. The downregulation of the protein level for Bcl-2 with the simultaneous upregulation of caspase-3 and -9 protein expression in U937 cells were observed after treatment with vitexin. Therefore, our data provide a potential mechanism for the chemopreventive activity of vitexin, and we suggest that vitexin may serve as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human leukemia. PMID:22941432

  14. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody and Combination Chemotherapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Lymphoid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α enhances apoptosis induced by nuclear factor-κB inhibition in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, QIAO-MEI; LING, CHUN; CHEN, XUAN; ZHAO, LI

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) results in antitumor activity in leukemia cells, and may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. However, a significant limitation of NF-κB inhibition in the treatment of leukemia is the low efficiency of this technique. NF-κB inhibitor treatment induces apoptosis in leukemia cells; however, it additionally causes inflammatory molecules to induce increased sensitivity of healthy hematopoietic cells to cell death signals, therefore limiting its clinical applications. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a key regulator of inflammation, and induces a variety of actions in leukemic and healthy hematopoietic cells. TNF-α induces NF-κB-dependent and -independent survival signals, promoting the proliferation of leukemia cells. However, in healthy hematopoietic cells, TNF-α induces death signaling, an effect which is enhanced by the inhibition of NF-κB. Based on these observations, the present study hypothesized that inhibition of TNF-α signaling may be able to protect healthy hematopoietic cells and other tissue cells, while increasing the anti-leukemia effects of NF-κB inhibition on leukemia cells. The role and underlying molecular mechanisms of TNF-α inhibition in the regulation of NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells was therefore investigated in the present study. The results indicated that inhibition of TNF-α enhanced NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. It was also revealed that protein kinase B was significant in the regulation of TNF-α and NF-κB inhibition-induced apoptosis. During this process, intrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. A combination of NF-κB and TNF-α inhibition may be a potential specific and effective novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:26788210

  16. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  17. Enhancement of flavone levels through overexpression of chalcone isomerase in hairy root cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam Il; Xu, Hui; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Sun-Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2011-09-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding Scutellaria baicalensis chalcone isomerase (SbCHI) was isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction. After the treatment of wounding or methyl jasmonate, SbCHI transcripts were increased in S. baicalensis cell suspensions. SbCHI-overexpressed and SbCH-silenced transgenic hairy root lines were established by using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated system. SbCHI-overexpressed hairy root lines not only enhanced SbCHI gene expression but also produced more flavones (i.e., baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin) than the control hairy root line. In contrast, SbCHI-silenced hairy root lines reduced SbCHI transcripts and flavone production compared to those of the control hairy roots. In addition, the amount of wogonin in all hairy root cultures was increased compared to that of wild-type roots of S. baicalensis. Finally, this study showed the importance of CHI in flavone biosynthesis and the efficiency of metabolic engineering in S. baicalensis hairy roots. PMID:21538138

  18. The outcome of B-cell receptor signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: proliferation or anergy

    PubMed Central

    Packham, Graham; Krysov, Serge; Allen, Alex; Savelyeva, Natalia; Steele, Andrew J.; Forconi, Francesco; Stevenson, Freda K.

    2014-01-01

    Biologists and clinicians agree that the B-cell receptor influences the behavior of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and promising new drugs are aimed at receptor-associated kinases. Engagement of surface immunoglobulin by antigen is a key driver of malignant cells with outcome influenced by the nature of the cell, the level of stimulation and the microenvironment. Analysis of surface immunoglobulin-mediated signaling in the two major disease subsets defined by IGHV mutational status reveals bifurcation of responses toward proliferation or anergy. Mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia, generally of relatively good prognosis, is mainly, but not exclusively, driven towards anergy in vivo. In contrast, unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia shows less evidence for anergy in vivo retaining more responsiveness to surface immunoglobulin M-mediated signaling, possibly explaining increased tumor progression. Expression and function of surface immunoglobulin M in unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia appear rather homogeneous, but mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibits a highly heterogeneous profile that may relate to further variable clinical behavior within this subset. Anergy should increase susceptibility to apoptosis but, in leukemic cells, this may be countered by overexpression of the B-cell lymphoma-2 survival protein. Maintained anergy spreads to chemokines and adhesion molecules, restraining homing and migration. However, anergy is not necessarily completely benign, being able to reverse and regenerate surface immunoglobulin M-mediated responses. A two-pronged attack on proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways may succeed. Increased understanding of how chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are driven to anergy or proliferation should reveal predictive biomarkers of progression and of likely response to kinase inhibitors, which could assist therapeutic decisions. PMID:24986876

  19. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  1. Induction of apoptosis and differentiation by atractylenolide-1 isolated from Atractylodes macrocephala in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Lan; Lin, Tzu-Wen; Huang, Yu-Ling; Huang, Ray-Ling

    2016-04-15

    Atractylodes macrocephula Koidz (A. macrocephula, also known as Baizhu) is an important ingredient in several traditional Chinese herb complexes for the treatment of abdominal pain and gastroenterology diseases for thousands of years. We previously demonstrated the induction of ROS-mediated apoptosis by methanol extract of A. macrocephula in human leukemia cells. After purification and assessment of those active compounds from A. macrocephula ethanol extracts, in this study, we focused on the major active compound, atractylenolide I (ATL-I). Through MTT assay and morphology observation, we found cytotoxic effect of ATL-I in human K562 chronic myeloblastic leukemia (CML), U937 acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and Jurkat T lymphoma cells. In addition, ATL-I-induced apoptosis was demonstrated by sub G1 and fragmented chromosomal DNA detection using flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agarose electrophoresis. Finally, we found ATL-I also induced caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation through the detection of procaspase-3, procaspase-9 and caspase-3 substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by immunoblotting. Interestingly, we found that ATL-I induced not only apoptosis but also differentiation, as upregulation of CD14 and CD68 surface markers and increase of phagocytosis ability were discovered in ATL-I-treated K562 CML and U937 AML cells. Our study thus suggests the potential of developing new leukemia therapies by using ATL-I for leukemia treatment in the future. PMID:26988300

  2. Disruption of Annexin II /p11 Interaction Suppresses Leukemia Cell Binding, Homing and Engraftment, and Sensitizes the Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E. Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Mason, Robert W.; Napper, Andrew; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays an important role in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation, maintenance, and resistance to chemotherapy. Annexin II (ANX2) is abundantly expressed on bone marrow cells and complexes with p11 to form ANX2/p11-hetero-tetramer (ANX2T). We present evidence that p11 is upregulated in refractory ALL cell lines and patient samples. A small molecule inhibitor that disrupts ANX2/p11 interaction (ANX2T inhibitor), an anti-ANX2 antibody, and knockdown of p11, abrogated ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, indicating that ANX2/p11 interaction facilitates binding and retention of ALL cells in the bone marrow. Furthermore, ANX2T inhibitor increased the sensitivity of primary ALL cells co-cultured with osteoblasts to dexamethasone and vincristine induced cell death. Finally, in an orthotopic leukemia xenograft mouse model, the number of ALL cells homing to the bone marrow was reduced by 40–50% in mice injected with anti-ANX2 antibody, anti-p11 antibody or ANX2T inhibitor compared to respective controls. In a long-term engraftment assay, the percentage of ALL cells in mouse blood, bone marrow and spleen was reduced in mice treated with agents that disrupt ANX2/p11 interaction. These data show that disruption of ANX2/p11 interaction results in reduced ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, increased ALL cell sensitization to chemotherapy, and suppression of ALL cell homing and engraftment. PMID:26465153

  3. Suppression of Philadelphia1 leukemia cell growth in mice by BCR-ABL antisense oligodeoxynucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Skorski, T; Nieborowska-Skorska, M; Nicolaides, N C; Szczylik, C; Iversen, P; Iozzo, R V; Zon, G; Calabretta, B

    1994-01-01

    When injected into SCID mice, the Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia-blast crisis cell line BV173 induces a disease process closely resembling that seen in leukemia patients. At 1 and 3 weeks after injection of 10(6) BV173 cells, CD10+ cells were detected in the bone marrow of the mice, leukemic colonies grew from bone marrow and spleen cell suspensions, and BCR-ABL transcripts were detectable in bone marrow, spleen, peripheral blood, liver, and lungs. Systemic treatment of the leukemic mice with a 26-mer BCR-ABL antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (1 mg/day for 9 days) induced disappearance of CD10+ and clonogenic leukemic cells and a marked decrease in BCR-ABL mRNA in mouse tissues. Untreated mice or mice treated with a BCR-ABL sense oligodeoxynucleotide or a 6-base-mismatched antisense oligodeoxynucleotide oligodeoxynucleotide were dead 8-13 weeks after leukemia cell injection; in marked contrast, mice treated with BCR-ABL antisense oligodeoxynucleotide died of leukemia 18-23 weeks after injection of leukemic cells. These findings provide evidence for the in vivo effectiveness of an anticancer therapy based on antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting a tumor-specific gene. Images PMID:8183938

  4. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A. J.; Ungerbäck, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of genetic changes in leukemia has revealed that several key regulators of normal B-cell development, including IKZF1, TCF3, EBF1, and PAX5, are genetically altered in a large portion of the human B-lineage acute leukemias. This opens the possibility of directly linking the disrupted development as well as aberrant gene expression patterns in leukemic cells to molecular functions of defined transcription factors in normal cell differentiation. This review article focuses on the roles of transcription factors in early B-cell development and their involvement in the formation of human leukemia. PMID:25990863

  5. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A J; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2015-07-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of genetic changes in leukemia has revealed that several key regulators of normal B-cell development, including IKZF1, TCF3, EBF1, and PAX5, are genetically altered in a large portion of the human B-lineage acute leukemias. This opens the possibility of directly linking the disrupted development as well as aberrant gene expression patterns in leukemic cells to molecular functions of defined transcription factors in normal cell differentiation. This review article focuses on the roles of transcription factors in early B-cell development and their involvement in the formation of human leukemia. PMID:25990863

  6. Enkephalins stimulate leukemia cell migration and surface expression of CD9.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Duca, K; Finberg, R W

    1995-01-01

    Opioid peptides have been implicated in the regulation of tumor growth and biology; however, little attention has been given to the mechanisms that are involved. In this study we show that physiological concentrations of the endogenous opioid neuropeptide methionine-enkephalin (MET-ENK) and the synthetic enkephalins D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly(ol)5 and D-Ala2, D-Leu5 are stimulants for the in vitro migration of pre-B acute lymphoblastoid leukemia (ALL) cells. Activation of the human pre-B ALL cell lines NALM 6 and LAZ 221 with MET-ENK resulted in both an increase in their migration and an augmentation in the surface expression of the leukemia cell marker CD9. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone reversed these enkephalin-induced effects on the leukemia cells. When the pre-B ALL cells were preincubated with an anti-CD9 mAb before challenge with MET-ENK their migration to the enkephalin was markedly reduced. These studies show that endogenous and synthetic opioid peptides are stimulants for pre-B ALL cell migration and suggest that CD9 is important in the regulation of leukemia cell motility. Images PMID:7657811

  7. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)–induced adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL) was explored using an infectious molecular viral clone and a transgenic mouse model. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the HTLV transcriptional trans-activator protein Tax was found to be important for lymphocyte immortalization and tumorigenesis. Interferon-γ regulates tumor development owing primarily to angiostatic effects. Translational clinical studies of chemotherapy, interferon-α, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have also assisted in identifying the pathogenic features of ATLL. PMID:16106073

  8. A model with competition between the cell lines in leukemia under treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Halanay, A.; Cândea, D.; Rădulescu, R.

    2014-12-10

    The evolution of leukemia is modeled with a delay differential equation model of four cell populations: two populations (healthy and leukemic) ) of stem-like cells involving a larger category consisting of proliferating stem and progenitor cells with self-renew capacity and two populations (healthy and leukemic) of mature cells, considering the competition of healthy vs. leukemic cell populations and three types of division that a stem-like cell can exhibit: self-renew, asymmetric division and differentiation. In the model it is assumed that the treatment acts on the proliferation rate of the leukemic stem cells and on the apoptosis of stem and mature cells. The emphasis in this model is on establishing relevant parameters for chronic and acute manifestations of leukemia. Stability of equilibria is investigated and sufficient conditions for local asymptotic stability will be given using a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional.

  9. A model with competition between the cell lines in leukemia under treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halanay, A.; Cândea, D.; Rǎdulescu, R.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of leukemia is modeled with a delay differential equation model of four cell populations: two populations (healthy and leukemic) ) of stem-like cells involving a larger category consisting of proliferating stem and progenitor cells with self-renew capacity and two populations (healthy and leukemic) of mature cells, considering the competition of healthy vs. leukemic cell populations and three types of division that a stem-like cell can exhibit: self-renew, asymmetric division and differentiation. In the model it is assumed that the treatment acts on the proliferation rate of the leukemic stem cells and on the apoptosis of stem and mature cells. The emphasis in this model is on establishing relevant parameters for chronic and acute manifestations of leukemia. Stability of equilibria is investigated and sufficient conditions for local asymptotic stability will be given using a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional.

  10. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Nasr, Samih H; Leung, Nelson; Hanson, Curtis A; Chaffee, Kari G; Schwager, Susan M; Achenbach, Sara J; Call, Timothy G; Parikh, Sameer A; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2015-09-01

    While the renal complications of plasma cell dyscrasia have been well-described, most information in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is derived from case reports. This is a retrospective analysis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who underwent kidney biopsy for renal insufficiency and/or nephrotic syndrome. Between January 1995 and June 2014, 49 of 4,024 (1.2%) patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=44) or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (n=5) had a renal biopsy: 34 (69%) for renal insufficiency and 15 (31%) for nephrotic syndrome. The most common findings on biopsy were: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n=10, 20%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia interstitial infiltration as primary etiology (n=6, 12%), thrombotic microangiopathy (n=6, 12%), and minimal change disease (n=5, 10%). All five membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide and prednisone-based regimens had recovery of renal function compared to 0/3 patients treated with rituximab with or without steroids. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia infiltration as the primary cause of renal abnormalities was typically observed in relapsed/refractory patients (4/6). Thrombotic microangiopathy primarily occurred as a treatment-related toxicity of pentostatin (4/6 cases), and resolved with drug discontinuation. All cases of minimal change disease resolved with immunosuppressive agents only. Renal biopsy plays an important role in the management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who develop renal failure and/or nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26088927

  11. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo; Nasr, Samih H.; Leung, Nelson; Hanson, Curtis A.; Chaffee, Kari G.; Schwager, Susan M.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Call, Timothy G.; Parikh, Sameer A.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

    2015-01-01

    While the renal complications of plasma cell dyscrasia have been well-described, most information in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is derived from case reports. This is a retrospective analysis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who underwent kidney biopsy for renal insufficiency and/or nephrotic syndrome. Between January 1995 and June 2014, 49 of 4,024 (1.2%) patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=44) or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (n=5) had a renal biopsy: 34 (69%) for renal insufficiency and 15 (31%) for nephrotic syndrome. The most common findings on biopsy were: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n=10, 20%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia interstitial infiltration as primary etiology (n=6, 12%), thrombotic microangiopathy (n=6, 12%), and minimal change disease (n=5, 10%). All five membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide and prednisone-based regimens had recovery of renal function compared to 0/3 patients treated with rituximab with or without steroids. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia infiltration as the primary cause of renal abnormalities was typically observed in relapsed/refractory patients (4/6). Thrombotic microangiopathy primarily occurred as a treatment-related toxicity of pentostatin (4/6 cases), and resolved with drug discontinuation. All cases of minimal change disease resolved with immunosuppressive agents only. Renal biopsy plays an important role in the management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who develop renal failure and/or nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26088927

  12. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  13. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p < 0.001) were included in biological function categories involving cancer, cell development, cell growth and proliferation, cell signaling, inflammatory response, and cell death and survival. Further pathway analysis revealed upregulation of c-Fos and genes involved in chemotaxis such as CXCL16. AML-derived endothelial cells are similar in phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. PMID:26851308

  14. Current progress in the development of a cell-based vaccine for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klammer, Matthias; Roddie, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Evidence that immunological control contributes to the elimination of residual leukemia has emerged from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This review assesses the current understanding of immunobiology of acute myeloid leukemia and how dendritic cells and T cells may be harnessed using in vitro and in vivo priming techniques. Preclinical and clinical dendritic cell vaccine trials reported to date are considered and the prospects for immunotherapy with dendritic cell-based vaccine constructs evaluated. PMID:16608421

  15. Adrenomedullin in the growth modulation and differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Di Liddo, Rosa; Bridi, Deborah; Gottardi, Michele; De Angeli, Sergio; Grandi, Claudio; Tasso, Alessia; Bertalot, Thomas; Martinelli, Giovanni; Gherlinzoni, Filippo; Conconi, Maria Teresa

    2016-04-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a regulatory peptide endowed with multiple biological effects, including the regulation of blood pressure, cell growth and innate host defence. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADM signaling could be involved in the impaired cellular differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells to mature granulocytes or monocytes by modulating RAMPs/CRLR expression, PI3K/Akt cascade and the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. When exogenously administered to in vitro cultures of HL60 promyelocytic leukemia cells, ADM was shown to exert a strong proliferative effect with minimal upregulation in the expression level of monocyte antigen CD14. Notably, the experimental inhibition of ADM signaling with inhibitor ADM22-52 promoted a differentiative stimulation towards monocytic and granulocytic lineages. Moreover, based on the expression of CD31 relative to CD38, we hypothesized that an excess of ADM in bone marrow (BM) niche could increase the transendothelial migration of leukemia cells while any inhibitory event of ADM activity could raise cell retention in hyaluronate matrix by upregulating CD38. Taken into consideration the above evidence, we concluded that ADM and ADM22-52 could differently affect the growth of leukemia cells by autocrine/paracrine mechanisms and may have clinical relevance as biological targets for the intervention of tumor progression. PMID:26847772

  16. Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase activity associates with white blood cell count in myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Jantunen, Esa; Mäntymaa, Pentti; Mustjoki, Satu; Alhonen, Leena; Uimari, Anne

    2014-07-01

    The metabolism of polyamines, the cationic small molecules essential for cell proliferation and differentiation, is altered in cancer cells and can be exploited in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), which regulates intracellular levels of polyamines by catabolizing spermidine and spermine, has a controversial role in the development of cancers. In this study, the polyamine metabolism and function of SSAT were characterized in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute lymphoid leukemia patient samples. Also, mice overexpressing SSAT and having a myeloproliferative phenotype were analyzed for their response to decitabine and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. The presence of epigenetic factors in the bone marrow cells of SSAT mice was analyzed. Elevated levels of spermidine and spermine, as well as increased activity of SSAT, were detected in AML, CML, and acute lymphoid leukemia patients compared with the controls. However, we found SSAT activity to be associated with white blood cell count only in AML and CML patients. Decitabine treatment brought the peripheral blood and bone marrow cell counts of SSAT mice to the level of wild-type mice. Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase mice had increased histone methylation and an increased level of histone deacetylase 1 in their bone marrow cells. The study suggests that SSAT influences the development of myeloid malignancies, and epigenetic factors partly contribute to the SSAT overexpression-induced myeloproliferative disease in mice. PMID:24607957

  17. Bafilomycin A1 targets both autophagy and apoptosis pathways in pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Na; Song, Lin; Zhang, Suping; Lin, Weiwei; Cao, Yan; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhijian; Cai, Jinyang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yi; Mao, Xinliang; Zhao, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Chen, Suning; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-03-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common type of pediatric leukemia. Despite improved remission rates, current treatment regimens for pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are often associated with adverse effects and central nervous system relapse, necessitating more effective and safer agents. Bafilomycin A1 is an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that is frequently used at high concentration to block late-phase autophagy. Here, we show that bafilomycin A1 at a low concentration (1 nM) effectively and specifically inhibited and killed pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. It targeted both early and late stages of the autophagy pathway by activating mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and by disassociating the Beclin 1-Vps34 complex, as well as by inhibiting the formation of autolysosomes, all of which attenuated functional autophagy. Bafilomycin A1 also targeted mitochondria and induced caspase-independent apoptosis by inducing the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria to the nucleus. Moreover, bafilomycin A1 induced the binding of Beclin 1 to Bcl-2, which further inhibited autophagy and promoted apoptotic cell death. In primary cells from pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a xenograft model, bafilomycin A1 specifically targeted leukemia cells while sparing normal cells. An in vivo mouse toxicity assay confirmed that bafilomycin A1 is safe. Our data thus suggest that bafilomycin A1 is a promising candidate drug for the treatment of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25512644

  18. Production and analysis of HH 10 monoclonal antibodies reactive to immature hematopoietic cells and their use for monitoring acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Naoe, T; Hiraiwa, A; Namikawa, R; Suzuki, S; Yamada, K; Shiku, H

    1985-06-01

    A clone of murine monoclonal antibody HH 10 (IgM) was raised by fusing NS-1 myeloma cells and spleen cells of a mouse hyperimmunized with acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Serological analysis by means of immune adherence assays showed that HH 10 reacts with immature hematopoietic cells including thymocytes and myeloid precursor cells (defined as colony-forming units in culture assays). The antibodies were not reactive to either peripheral blood cells or bone marrow cells obtained from normal individuals. Lymphoid blasts induced with phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, or concanavalin A were also non-reactive, and all non-hematopoietic cultured cells examined were also negative. The antibodies were, however, reactive to leukemia cells in 67 cases out of 91 cases (74%) of acute leukemia. In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 43 out of 52 cases (83%) were positive and, in particular, all of 12 T-cell-type acute leukemias were reactive to HH 10. Comparison of percent HH 10 positive cells in the bone marrow of patients with acute leukemia with the results of cytological studies showed a good correlation. Analysis of sequentially collected bone marrow cells of acute leukemia patients using HH 10 revealed its usefulness for monitoring leukemia cells. PMID:3926583

  19. The Perceived Threat in Adults with Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Zahra; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Negarandeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) create physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distresses in patients. Understanding this threatening situation in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT will assist health care professionals in providing holistic care to the patients. Objectives: The aim of the present study was exploring the perceived threat in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT. Patients and Methods: This article is part of a longitudinal qualitative study which used the grounded theory approach and was conducted in 2009-2011. Ten adults with acute leukemia scheduled for HSCT were recruited from the Hematology–Oncology Research Center and Stem Cell Transplantation, Shariati Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A series of pre-transplant and post-transplant in-depth interviews were held in the hospital’s HSCT wards. Totally, 18 interviews were conducted. Three written narratives were also obtained from the participants. The Corbin and Strauss approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Perceived threat was one of the main categories that emerged from the data. This category included four subcategories, "inattention to the signs and symptoms", "doubt and anxiety", "perception of danger and time limitation" and "change of life conditions", which occurred in linear progression over time. Conclusion: Suffering from leukemia and experiencing HSCT are events that are uniquely perceived by patients. This threatening situation can significantly effect perception of patients and cause temporary or permanent alterations in patients' lives. Health care professionals can help these patients by deeper understanding of their experiences and effective interventions. PMID:25414863

  20. Intracellular ROS Generation Mediates Maleimide-induced Cytotoxicity in Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Rosolen, Daiane; Noldin, Vania F; Winter, Evelyn; Filippin-Monteiro, Fabiola B; Campos-Buzzi, Fatima; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Creczynski-Pasa, Tania B

    2015-01-01

    Maleimides consist of an important class of compounds easily synthesized with multiple functional group modification that provides expressive pharmacological properties including, antitumoral activity, mediated mainly by oxidative stress. For this reason, the present study was designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in maleimide-induced cell death. Cell viability assays were performed to determine the cell death type in leukemia cell line induced by the compounds. The oxidative stress in maleimidetreated cells was characterized by antioxidant enzymes activities, intracellular ROS generation, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, we evaluated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level. Maleimide derivatives exhibited cytotoxic effects in leukemia cells with significantly increased ROS generation. However, cell viability was partly restored by catalase-treated cells. Caspases activities and caspase-independent key genes related to apoptosis were not altered by maleimides, suggesting necrosis as the main cell death process. Maleimide-induced necrosis was associated with oxidative stress, as an imbalance between ROS levels and glutathione reductase (GR) activity. This damage was also demonstrated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP depletion in cells treated with maleimide derivatives. These findings strongly confirmed that maleimide derivatives promoted cell death in leukemia cells triggered by oxidative stress, indicating that these compounds might be promising antitumor agents or lead molecules. PMID:26118709

  1. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Hemorrhagic Skin Nodules and Plaques: A Diagnostic Clue to Underlying Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranjan; Nath, Amiya Kumar; Subbian, Murugavel; Basu, Debdatta; Hamide, Abdoul; D'Souza, Mariette

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by a malignant proliferation of plasma cells (PC) in blood and marrow. Cutaneous involvement is very rare in PCL. We present the case of a 45-year-old lady who presented with multiple hemorrhagic nodules and plaques in the skin. Her total leucocyte count was 2,00,200/cmm with 85% abnormal plasmacytoid cells in peripheral smear. Biopsy of the skin lesions revealed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells with ‘choked’ blood vessels. A diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia with cutaneous involvement was made. On the second day of admission, the patient expired probably because of intracranial bleed due to thrombocytopenia. Post-mortem bone marrow and liver biopsy also showed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells. Monoclonality of the cells was proven by demonstrating the production of only kappa light chains. PMID:27057024

  3. Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia by blocking cytokine alterations found in normal stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Welner, Robert S; Amabile, Giovanni; Bararia, Deepak; Czibere, Akos; Yang, Henry; Zhang, Hong; Pontes, Lorena Lobo De Figueiredo; Ye, Min; Levantini, Elena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Martinelli, Giovanni; Tenen, Daniel G

    2015-05-11

    Leukemic cells disrupt normal patterns of blood cell formation, but little is understood about the mechanism. We investigated whether leukemic cells alter functions of normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Exposure to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) caused normal mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells to divide more readily, altered their differentiation, and reduced their reconstitution and self-renewal potential. Interestingly, the normal bystander cells acquired gene expression patterns resembling their malignant counterparts. Therefore, much of the leukemia signature is mediated by extrinsic factors. Indeed, IL-6 was responsible for most of these changes. Compatible results were obtained when human CML were cultured with normal human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, neutralization of IL-6 prevented these changes and treated the disease. PMID:25965572

  4. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

  5. Tuning surface wettability by designing hairy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Han-Wen; Liu, Hong; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Zhu, You-Liang

    2015-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study on the controlling factors that influence the wettability of a hairy surface. By adopting the hairs with appropriate grafting density, hair length, and hair rigidity, the hairy surface shows good performance on droplet repellency. When the droplet sits on the hairy surface, the flexible hairs can spontaneously bundle with the appropriate amount of neighboring hairs to enhance the surface hydrophobicity, thus providing a new possibility to control the surface wettability. The hairy surface with tunable grafting density and hair rigidity, bridges the gap between surfaces with soft polymer brushes and surfaces that are completely hard but porous.

  6. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Increased incidence of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following therapy in patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Chak, L.Y.; Sikic, B.I.; Tucker, M.A.; Horns, R.C. Jr.; Cox, R.S.

    1984-05-01

    A group of 158 patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were followed for 174.5 person-years of observation to determine the risk of acute leukemia. Three cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia were observed at 2.3, 2.7, and 3.0 years. The relative risk of developing leukemia was 316 (95% confidence limit, 76-818) and the actuarial risk was 25% +/- 13% at 3.1 years. The relative risk for leukemia was significantly increased in these patients (p less than 0.0001).

  8. Lenalidomide Induces Immunomodulation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Enhances Antitumor Immune Responses Mediated by NK and CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Ana Pilar; Fernandez-Guizan, Azahara; Payer, Angel R.; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with therapeutic activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, it has pleiotropic effects, and the mechanism of action responsible for its therapeutic activity has not been well defined yet. Herein, we show that lenalidomide treatment does not have an effect on the proliferation of leukemia cells, but it increases the proliferation of B cells from healthy donors. Lenalidomide did not exert a direct effect on the apoptosis of leukemia cells obtained from CLL patients, although it indirectly induced their apoptosis through the activation of nonmalignant immune cells. Thus, lenalidomide markedly increased the proliferation of NK and CD4 T cells. The effect of lenalidomide on NK cells was secondary to the induction of IL-2 production by CD4 T cells. Accordingly, depletion of T cells or blockade of IL-2 activity completely abrogated the proliferation of NK cells. Additionally, lenalidomide enhanced NK and NKT-like cell-mediated natural cytotoxicity against leukemia cells from CLL patients. Lenalidomide also upregulated CD20 expression on leukemia cells and, accordingly, it had a synergistic effect with rituximab on promoting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against primary leukemia cells. Overall, these observations provide a support for combining lenalidomide with rituximab as a treatment in CLL. PMID:25313353

  9. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT. PMID:26787415

  10. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death. PMID:26774450

  11. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. Modes of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmission, Replication and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Barez, Pierre-Yves; Hamaidia, Malik; Gazon, Hélène; de Brogniez, Alix; Perike, Srikanth; Gillet, Nicolas; Willems, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes cancer (Adult T cell Leukemia, ATL) and a spectrum of inflammatory diseases (mainly HTLV-associated myelopathy—tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP). Since virions are particularly unstable, HTLV-1 transmission primarily occurs by transfer of a cell carrying an integrated provirus. After transcription, the viral genomic RNA undergoes reverse transcription and integration into the chromosomal DNA of a cell from the newly infected host. The virus then replicates by either one of two modes: (i) an infectious cycle by virus budding and infection of new targets and (ii) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. HTLV-1 replication initiates a series of mechanisms in the host including antiviral immunity and checkpoint control of cell proliferation. HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to counteract these defense mechanisms allowing continuous persistence in humans. PMID:26198240

  13. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sugihara, M.; Nagao, T.; Arimori, S.

    1984-08-01

    The distribution within the body of autologous leukemic cells labeled with indium-111 oxine was studied in seven patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The leukemic blood cells initially entered the spleen and liver, and the major site of localization was the former rather than the latter. The majority of the leukemic cells had not left the spleen and liver within 48 hr. Liver radioactivity fell transitorily up to the third hr after the initial rise. The clearance curve of radioactivity from the blood showed a plateau or the appearance of a ''hump'' from 1 to 5 hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. These results might reflect recirculation of a portion of the leukemic cells between these organs and the bloodstream. In a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia. OKM1 monoclonal-antibody-treated monoblasts showed the lowest recovery into the blood and a greater increase of liver than splenic radioactivity at 30 min after injection. These results suggest the removal of damaged cells by the cytotoxic effects of antibody mediated by reticuloendothelial clearance mainly of the liver and others. In one patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia, leukemic cells accumulated in both kidneys, indicating the possible infiltration of these cells. Since indium-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damaged in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics.

  15. Molecular Targeting of the Oncoprotein PLK1 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: RO3280, a Novel PLK1 Inhibitor, Induces Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, He; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Fang, Fang; Su, Guang-Hao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Gang; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Hui-Ting; Wu, Yi; Jin, Mei-Fang; Liu, Lin; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan; Zhu, Xue-Ming; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is highly expressed in many cancers and therefore a biomarker of transformation and potential target for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RO3280 was recently identified as a novel PLK1 inhibitor; however its therapeutic effects in leukemia treatment are still unknown. We found that the PLK1 protein was highly expressed in leukemia cell lines as well as 73.3% (11/15) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. PLK1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AML samples compared with control samples (82.95 ± 110.28 vs. 6.36 ± 6.35; p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that shorter survival time correlated with high tumor PLK1 expression (p = 0.002). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RO3280 for acute leukemia cells was between 74 and 797 nM. The IC50 of RO3280 in primary acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and AML cells was between 35.49 and 110.76 nM and 52.80 and 147.50 nM, respectively. RO3280 induced apoptosis and cell cycle disorder in leukemia cells. RO3280 treatment regulated several apoptosis-associated genes. The regulation of DCC, CDKN1A, BTK, and SOCS2 was verified by western blot. These results provide insights into the potential use of RO3280 for AML therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. PMID:25574601

  16. The Multiple Mechanisms of Cell Death Triggered by Resveratrol in Lymphoma and Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Frazzi, Raffaele; Tigano, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma and leukemia represent a serious threat to human health and life expectancy. Resveratrol is, among the natural-derived chemopreventive molecules, one of the most effective and better studied. In this paper the main mechanisms of cell death triggered by- or linked to- resveratrol are reviewed and discussed. The main focus is on lymphoma and leukemia experimental models where resveratrol has been tested and investigated at the cellular, molecular or physiological levels. The most relevant in vivo challenges involving resveratrol are also reported and analyzed in order to define the key features of this polyphenol and the potential for the treatment of hematologic tumors. PMID:24658441

  17. Celastrol and an EGCG pro-drug exhibit potent chemosensitizing activity in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew; Frezza, Michael; Shen, Min; Ge, Yubin; Huo, Congde; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2010-03-01

    Chemotherapy remains the staple of treatment for many types of leukemia. Despite the positive impact on extending overall survival in patients with hematological malignancies, new treatment strategies are needed to reduce the nonspecific toxicity and improve the efficacy of treatment. Celastrol, derived from the 'Thunder God Vine' and Pro-EGCG, a pre-drug version of green tea polyphenol EGCG have shown potent biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Whether these natural products augment the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in the treatment of leukemia cells has yet to be demonstrated. Here we demonstrate that these natural products could sensitize the effect of chemotherapy in both K-562 and Jurkat T human leukemia cells. Accordingly, this potent biological activity was associated with increased levels of leukemia cell killing, caspase 3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Furthermore, the higher levels of apoptotic indices were associated with decreased levels of Bcr-Abl oncoprotein in K-562 cells. Taken together, our findings present a compelling rationale for the development of combination strategies using natural products in the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:20127053

  18. Cryptococcal osteomyelitis in an adolescent survivor of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Madhusoodhan, P Pallavi; Springer, Deborah J; Inglima, Kenneth; Chaudhri, Ali A; Heitman, Joseph; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Khaitan, Alka; Rigaud, Mona

    2015-06-01

    Cryptococcosis is infrequent in children, and isolated cryptococcal osteomyelitis is rarely encountered. Here, we describe a 14-year-old patient in remission from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with osteomyelitis because of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii. The patient was effectively treated with antifungal therapy. PMID:25806844

  19. Hypercalcemia associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL).

    PubMed Central

    Peter, S. A.; Cervantes, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I infection is endemic in the Caribbean, Japan, Melanesia, and Africa. This article presents two cases of ATL to increase awareness of the disease by primary care physicians. The management of hypercalcemia is discussed. PMID:7473848

  20. Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal

    PubMed Central

    Valent, P.; Sotlar, K.; Sperr, W. R.; Escribano, L.; Yavuz, S.; Reiter, A.; George, T. I.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Hermine, O.; Butterfield, J. H.; Hägglund, H.; Ustun, C.; Hornick, J. L.; Triggiani, M.; Radia, D.; Akin, C.; Hartmann, K.; Gotlib, J.; Schwartz, L. B.; Verstovsek, S.; Orfao, A.; Metcalfe, D. D.; Arock, M.; Horny, H.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL), the leukemic manifestation of systemic mastocytosis (SM), is characterized by leukemic expansion of immature mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and other internal organs; and a poor prognosis. In a subset of patients, circulating MCs are detectable. A major differential diagnosis to MCL is myelomastocytic leukemia (MML). Although criteria for both MCL and MML have been published, several questions remain concerning terminologies and subvariants. To discuss open issues, the EU/US-consensus group and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) launched a series of meetings and workshops in 2011–2013. Resulting discussions and outcomes are provided in this article. The group recommends that MML be recognized as a distinct condition defined by mastocytic differentiation in advanced myeloid neoplasms without evidence of SM. The group also proposes that MCL be divided into acute MCL and chronic MCL, based on the presence or absence of C-Findings. In addition, a primary (de novo) form of MCL should be separated from secondary MCL that typically develops in the presence of a known antecedent MC neoplasm, usually aggressive SM (ASM) or MC sarcoma. For MCL, an imminent prephase is also proposed. This prephase represents ASM with rapid progression and 5%–19% MCs in BM smears, which is generally accepted to be of prognostic significance. We recommend that this condition be termed ASM in transformation to MCL (ASM-t). The refined classification of MCL fits within and extends the current WHO classification; and should improve prognostication and patient selection in practice as well as in clinical trials. PMID:24675021

  1. Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal.

    PubMed

    Valent, P; Sotlar, K; Sperr, W R; Escribano, L; Yavuz, S; Reiter, A; George, T I; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Hermine, O; Butterfield, J H; Hägglund, H; Ustun, C; Hornick, J L; Triggiani, M; Radia, D; Akin, C; Hartmann, K; Gotlib, J; Schwartz, L B; Verstovsek, S; Orfao, A; Metcalfe, D D; Arock, M; Horny, H-P

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL), the leukemic manifestation of systemic mastocytosis (SM), is characterized by leukemic expansion of immature mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and other internal organs; and a poor prognosis. In a subset of patients, circulating MCs are detectable. A major differential diagnosis to MCL is myelomastocytic leukemia (MML). Although criteria for both MCL and MML have been published, several questions remain concerning terminologies and subvariants. To discuss open issues, the EU/US-consensus group and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) launched a series of meetings and workshops in 2011-2013. Resulting discussions and outcomes are provided in this article. The group recommends that MML be recognized as a distinct condition defined by mastocytic differentiation in advanced myeloid neoplasms without evidence of SM. The group also proposes that MCL be divided into acute MCL and chronic MCL, based on the presence or absence of C-Findings. In addition, a primary (de novo) form of MCL should be separated from secondary MCL that typically develops in the presence of a known antecedent MC neoplasm, usually aggressive SM (ASM) or MC sarcoma. For MCL, an imminent prephase is also proposed. This prephase represents ASM with rapid progression and 5%-19% MCs in BM smears, which is generally accepted to be of prognostic significance. We recommend that this condition be termed ASM in transformation to MCL (ASM-t). The refined classification of MCL fits within and extends the current WHO classification; and should improve prognostication and patient selection in practice as well as in clinical trials. PMID:24675021

  2. Elicitation Approaches for Withanolide Production in Hairy Root Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is a versatile medicinal plant extensively utilized for production of phytochemical drug preparations. The roots and whole plants are traditionally used in Ayurveda, Unani, and Siddha medicines, as well as in homeopathy. Several studies provide evidence for an array of pharmaceutical properties due to the presence of steroidal lactones named "withanolides." A number of research groups have focused their attention on the effects of biotic and abiotic elicitors on withanolide production using cultures of adventitious roots, cell suspensions, shoot suspensions, and hairy roots in large-scale bioreactor for producing withanolides. This chapter explains the detailed procedures for induction and establishment of hairy roots from leaf explants of W. somnifera, proliferation and multiplication of hairy root cultures, estimation of withanolide productivity upon elicitation with salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, and quantification of major withanolides by HPLC. The protocol herein described could be implemented for large-scale cultivation of hairy root biomass to improve withanolide production. PMID:26843160

  3. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans.

  4. [Aleukemic mast cell leukemia (formerly: "malignant mastocytosis"): an extremely rare form of leukemia. A case report and simultaneously a contribution to revised classification of mastocytosis].

    PubMed

    Horny, Hans-Peter; Krokowski, Manuela; Feller, Alfred C; Hintze, Gerhard; Sotlar, Karl; Valent, Peter

    2002-03-28

    The term mastocytosis denotes a heterogeneous group of rare hematological disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of mast cells. While cutaneous mastocytosis is relatively frequent mast cell leukemia belongs to the rarest forms of human leukemia. In the following we present the case of an aleukemic mast cell leukemia and shall discuss the revised classification of mastocytosis based on the "Year 2000 Working Conference on Mastocytosis" held in Vienna, Austria. A 48 year-old caucasian man presented with a four-week history of diarrhea, obstipation, vomiting, rash, and mild fever. Clinical inspection revealed a disseminated itching rash and a mild hepatomegaly. Red and white blood cell counts were within the normal range. Levels of the alkaline phosphatase and serum histamine were significantly increased. There was no splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Cytologic and histologic investigation of the bone marrow revealed a marked increase in atypical mast cells. Since only a few circulating mast cells could be detected in a cytospin preparation of the blood, the diagnosis of an aleukemic mast cell leukemia was established. About four weeks after the diagnosis had been established, the patient died with signs of a hemorrhagic shock due to a massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Autopsy revealed widespread mast cell infiltration of bone marrow, spleen, liver and lungs, but also a small, deeply penetrating, non-specific duodenal ulcer. In conclusion, despite of presentation with signs of a primary gastrointestinal disorder, the patient was found to suffer from an exceedingly rare aleukemic mast cell leukemia ("malignant mastocytosis") and died after a total duration of the disease of only about three months. PMID:12238313

  5. Systemic mastocytosis in a patient with ovarian germ cell carcinoma and mast cell leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Hajianpour, M.J.; Hajianpour, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    We report a 12-year-old female with a history of mixed germ cell carcinoma of the right ovary who developed a generalized skin rash after oophorectomy and chemotherapy. She also presented with periodic episodes of flushing, anemia, tachycardia, shortness of breath, high fever, hepatosplenomegaly, nausea, abdominal cramping with diarrhea, and a papuloerythematous skin rash. There was no evidence of secondary carcinoma. Skin biopsy revealed nonspecific inflammatory cells with negative staining for mast cells. Peripheral blood smear showed an increased number of mast cells, thrombocytopenia and normal white cells count. Bone marrow showed hypercellularity with 38% of the nucleated cells being mast cells. Bone marrow chromosome analysis revealed hyperdiploidy in 30% of the cells: 58-64,XX, +1, +2, +5, +6, +7, +8, +14, +16, +18, +19, +19, +20, +21, +22. She expired two months after the occurrence of systemic mastocytosis. Systemic mastocytosis has been reported in association with hematopoietic disorders and with germ cell tumors. The association between mediastinal germ cell tumors and hematological malignancies has also been observed. To our knowledge, combination of most cell leukemia, systemic mastocytosis, and ovarian germ cell carcinoma has not been observed. It is know that mutations at the locus of either proto-oncogene c-kit receptor or its ligand, mast/stem cell factor (SCF) may impair the development of three stem cell populations: hematopoietic stem cells, germ cells and melanoblasts. There have been also extensive investigations on the expression and modulation of the SCF/c-kit interaction in various malignancies. Further molecular studies in patients with germ cell tumor/hematopoietic malignancy syndrome are required to delineate underlying mechanisms.

  6. p53 causes butein?mediated apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang-Mi; Choi, Youn Kynug; Kim, Ah Jeong; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Progression of chronic myeloid leukemia, marked by the oncogenic Bcr?Abl mutation, is tightly associated with an alteration of the p53 pathway. It is known that butein extracted from various plants represses cancer growth. Although the anticancer effects of butein are widely accepted, the mechanisms by which butein induces apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that butein?induced apoptosis was mediated by p53. KBM5 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells expressing wild?type p53 were more sensitive to butein compared with p53?null K562 CML cells in terms of apoptotic cell death. In addition, butein arrested KBM5 cells at S?phase and altered the expression levels of certain cyclins and the p53?downstream targets, MDM2 and p21. In addition, while butein reduced the protein expression of MDM2 in the KBM5 and K562cells, it resulted in proteasome?independent MDM2 degradation in p53?expressing KBM5 cells, however, not in p53?null K562cells. Therefore, the present study suggested that p53causes the butein?mediated apoptosis of leukemic cells. PMID:26676515

  7. p53 causes butein-mediated apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    WOO, SANG-MI; CHOI, YOUN KYNUG; KIM, AH JEONG; CHO, SUNG-GOOK; KO, SEONG-GYU

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic myeloid leukemia, marked by the oncogenic Bcr-Abl mutation, is tightly associated with an alteration of the p53 pathway. It is known that butein extracted from various plants represses cancer growth. Although the anticancer effects of butein are widely accepted, the mechanisms by which butein induces apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that butein-induced apoptosis was mediated by p53. KBM5 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells expressing wild-type p53 were more sensitive to butein compared with p53-null K562 CML cells in terms of apoptotic cell death. In addition, butein arrested KBM5 cells at S-phase and altered the expression levels of certain cyclins and the p53-downstream targets, MDM2 and p21. In addition, while butein reduced the protein expression of MDM2 in the KBM5 and K562 cells, it resulted in proteasome-independent MDM2 degradation in p53-expressing KBM5 cells, however, not in p53-null K562 cells. Therefore, the present study suggested that p53 causes the butein-mediated apoptosis of leukemic cells. PMID:26676515

  8. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  9. A novel crosstalk between calcium/calmodulin kinases II and IV regulates cell proliferation in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Sara; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Maione, Angela S; Soprano, Maria; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Todd, Lance R; Campiglia, Pietro; Salzano, Salvatore; Pastore, Lucio; Leggiero, Eleonora; Wilkerson, Donald C; Rocco, Monia; Selleri, Carmine; Iaccarino, Guido; Sankar, Uma; Illario, Maddalena

    2015-02-01

    CaMKs link transient increases in intracellular Ca(2+) with biological processes. In myeloid leukemia cells, CaMKII, activated by the bcr-abl oncogene, promotes cell proliferation. Inhibition of CaMKII activity restricts cell proliferation, and correlates with growth arrest and differentiation. The mechanism by which the inhibition of CaMKII results in growth arrest and differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells is still unknown. We report that inhibition of CaMKII activity results in an upregulation of CaMKIV mRNA and protein in leukemia cell lines. Conversely, expression of CaMKIV inhibits autophosphorylation and activation of CaMKII, and elicits G0/G1cell cycle arrest,impairing cell proliferation. Furthermore, U937 cells expressing CaMKIV show elevated levels of Cdk inhibitors p27(kip1) and p16(ink4a) and reduced levels of cyclins A, B1 and D1. These findings were also confirmed in the K562 leukemic cell line. The relationship between CaMKII and CaMKIV is also observed in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, and it correlates with their immunophenotypic profile. Indeed, immature MO/M1 AML showed increased CaMKIV expression and decreased pCaMKII, whereas highly differentiated M4/M5 AML showed decreased CaMKIV expression and increased pCaMKII levels. Our data reveal a novel cross-talk between CaMKII and CaMKIV and suggest that CaMKII suppresses the expression of CaMKIV to promote leukemia cell proliferation. PMID:25446257

  10. Up-regulation of VEGF and its receptor in refractory leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Wenjun; Ding, Yi; Xiu, Bing; Li, Ping; Dong, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Liang, Aibin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causative mechanisms in refractory leukemia cells. Methods: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) blood plasma concentrations in 35 de novo, 6 relapse, 20 remission leukemia patients and 10 healthy kids were determined via ELISA analyses. Transcription levels of the VEGF receptors (VEGFR) Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (Flt-1) and kinase-domain insert containing receptor (KDR) were determined in participants’ leucocytes with RT-PCR. Apoptosis rates as well as Cyt-C and Caspase-3 expression was determined in Jurkat, JurkatBcl-2, healthy and recurrent leukemia leukocytes with and without VP-16 applications via flow cytometry. Total Akt (t-Akt) expression and its phosphorylation (p-AKT) status in leukocytes of the participants were analyzed with western blots. Results: Healthy children and the remission group had the lowest blood plasma VEGF concentrations (91.16 ± 41.34 vs. 135.80 ± 111.28 pg/ml), followed by de novo leukemia patients (362.49 ± 195.68 pg/ml-494.19 ± 186.23 pg/ml) and relapse patients (574.37 ± 278.45 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). The same trend was statistically significant visible for Flt-1 and KDR expressions in leukocytes of the participants. Stable Bcl-2 overexpression led to reduced apoptosis rates as well as Cyt-C and Caspase-3 expressions in Jurkat cells after VP-16 application, which was similar in leucocytes of remission patients. In contrast to no phosphorylation in healthy children, Akt was phosphorylated in 10% remission samples, 30% de novo leukemia samples and in 67% of recurrent leukemia leucocytes. Conclusion: High VEGF plus VEGFR expression and AKT phosphorylation are highest in leukocytes of remission patients, suggesting VEGF signaling as a cause of reduced apoptosis susceptibility upon treatments. PMID:26191229

  11. Leukemia Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori G; Danturty, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000) with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML–M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:23248383

  12. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Fo, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  13. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Giovanni F.; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S.; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Fo, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL+ blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL+ blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL+, are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  14. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  15. Vitamin D3 potentiates the antitumorigenic effects of arsenic trioxide in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a novel form of therapy that has been found to aid acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Our laboratory has demonstrated that ATO-induced cytotoxicity in human leukemia (HL-60) cells is mediated by oxidative stress. Pro-oxidants have been known to play a role in free radical-mediated oxidative stress. Vitamin D3, (Vit D3) an active metabolite of vitamin D has been reported to inhibit the growth of number neoplasms such as prostate, breast, colorectal, leukemia, and skin cancers. The goal of the present research was to use (HL-60) cells as an in vitro test model to evaluate whether low doses of Vit D3 potentiate the toxicity of ATO and whether this toxic action is mediated via apoptotic mechanisms. Method HL-60 cells were treated either with a pharmacologic dose of ATO alone and with several low doses of Vit D3. Cell survival was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was measured both by flow cytometry assessment, and DNA laddering assay. Results MTT assay indicated that Vit D3 co-treatment potentiates ATO toxicity in HL-60 cells in a dose dependent manner. A statistically significant and dose-dependent increase (p <0.05) was recorded in annexin V positive cells (apoptotic cells) with increasing doses of Vit D3 in ATO-treated cells. This finding was confirmed by the result of DNA laddering assay showing clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in vitamin and ATO co-treated cells. Conclusion The present study indicates that Vit D3 potentiates the antitumor effects of ATO. This potentiation is mediated at least in part, through induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings highlight the potential impact of Vit D3 in promoting the pharmacological effect of ATO, suggesting a possible future role of Vit D3/ATO combination therapy in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). PMID:24661615

  16. A novel SAHA-bendamustine hybrid induces apoptosis of leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Qiu, Shaowei; Ge, Qiufu; Wang, Ying; Wei, Hui; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Shuying; Liu, Shuang; Li, Shouyun; Xing, Haiyan; Rao, Qing; Wang, Jianxiang; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid anticancer drugs are of great therapeutic interests as they can potentially overcome the deficiencies of conventional chemotherapy drugs and improve the efficacy. Many studies have revealed that the combination of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and alkylating agents have synergistic effects. We reported a novel hybrid NL-101, in which the side chain of bendamustine was replaced with the hydroxamic acid of HDACi vorinostat (SAHA). NL-101 exhibited efficient anti-proliferative activity on myeloid leukemia cells especially Kasumi-1 and NB4 cells, accompanied by S phase arrest and caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. Importantly, it presented both the properties of HDAC inhibition and DNA damaging, as assessed by the acetylation of histone H3 and DNA double-strand breaks marker γ-H2AX. NL-101 also down-regulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL which was involved in the mitochondrial death pathway. Meanwhile, NL-101 induced apoptosis and DNA damage in primary cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. NL-101 treatment could significantly prolong the survival time of t(8;21) leukemia mice with enhanced efficacy than bendamustine. These data demonstrate that NL-101 could be a potent and selective agent for leukemia treatment. PMID:26015396

  17. A preliminary study on epigenetic regulation of Acanthopanax senticosus in leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yuan; Zhong, Hua; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhang, Min-Yue; Cai, Jia-Yi; Zhong, Ji-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Conventional chemotherapy for leukemia inevitably causes systemic toxicity. Acanthopanax senticosus, a naturally occurring herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has been found to be a multipotent bioflavonoid with great potential in the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. However, the mechanism underlying the action of A. senticosus in epigenetic regulation is poorly understood. In the study described here, we focused on the efficacy of A. senticosus in inducing apoptosis of leukemia cells and a possible mechanism. By evaluating the inhibition ratio and morphologic changes, we found that A. senticosus can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of human leukemia HL-60 and HL60/ADM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, A. senticosus induced Fas ligand (FasL) expression and blocked the cell cycle in S phase. In addition, A. senticosus exhibited a potential for inhibition of histone deacetylase (HADC), which contributes to histone acetylation. It possibly resulted in the promotion of the expression of FasL. It is suggested that A. senticosus could be recognized as a new HDAC inhibitor which was able to reactivate aberrantly silenced genes. We discuss the clinical aspects of using A. senticosus for treatment of leukemia. PMID:26992299

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  19. Methylenedioxy flavonoids: assessment of cytotoxic and anti-cancer potential in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Orlikova, Barbora; Menezes, José C J M D S; Ji, Seungwon; Kamat, Shrivallabh P; Cavaleiro, José A S; Diederich, Marc

    2014-09-12

    A new series of chalcones, flavanones and flavones with methylenedioxy group at the 3',4' position in chalcone, 7,8 position in flavanones and flavones with mono-, di- and trimethoxy groups in the benzaldehyde ring have been assessed for their effect on proliferation, cytotoxic potential and apoptosis in human leukemia cells. Among the tested compounds, the chalcone series showed the best activity and chalcone 3 (mono methoxy group at the ortho position in A-ring) showed a significant effect on down-regulation of cancer cell proliferation and viability in three different leukemia cell lines (K562, Jurkat, U937). The executioner caspase cleavage analyses indicated that the cytotoxic effect mediated by chalcone 3 is due to induction of apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effect was cell type-specific and targeted preferentially cancer cells as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors were less affected by the treatment compared to K562, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cells. Altogether our results indicate a potential drug candidate with interesting differential toxicity obeying Lipinski's rule of five. PMID:25016375

  20. T-cell and natural killer cell therapies for hematologic malignancies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, C. Russell; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has revolutionized the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but infection, graft-versus-host disease and relapse are still important problems. Calcineurin inhibitors, T-cell depletion strategies, and immunomodulators have helped to prevent graft-versus-host disease, but have a negative impact on the graft-versus-leukemia effect. T cells and natural killer cells are both thought to be important in the graft-versus-leukemia effect, and both cell types are amenable to ex vivo manipulation and clinical manufacture, making them versatile immunotherapeutics. We provide an overview of these immunotherapeutic strategies following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with discussions centered on natural killer and T-cell biology. We discuss the contributions of each cell type to graft-versus-leukemia effects, as well as the current research directions in the field as related to adoptive cell therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26034113

  1. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Effects of anti-NKG2A antibody administration on leukemia and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Urbani, Elena; André, Pascale; Mancusi, Antonella; Tosti, Antonella; Topini, Fabiana; Bléry, Mathieu; Animobono, Lucia; Romagné, François; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Velardi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer cells are key cells of the innate immune system. Natural killer cell receptor repertoires are diversified by a stochastic expression of killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptors and lectin-like receptors such as NKG2 receptors. All individuals harbor a subset of natural killer cells expressing NKG2A, the inhibitory checkpoint receptor for HLA-E. Most neoplastic and normal hematopoietic cells express HLA-E, the inhibitory ligand of NKG2A. A novel anti-human NKG2A antibody induced tumor cell death, suggesting that the antibody could be useful in the treatment of cancers expressing HLA-E. We found that immunodeficient mice, co-infused with human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines and NKG2A(+) natural killer cells, pre-treated with anti-human NKG2A, were rescued from disease progression. Human NKG2A(+) natural killer cells reconstituted in immunodeficient mice after transplantation of human CD34(+) cells. These natural killer cells are able to kill engrafted human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines by lysis after intraperitoneal administration of anti-human NKG2A. Thus, this anti-NKG2A may exploit the anti-leukemic action of the wave of NKG2A(+) natural killer cells recovering after hematopoietic stem cell transplants or adoptive therapy with natural killer cell infusions from matched or mismatched family donors after chemotherapy for acute leukemia, without the need to search for a natural killer cell alloreactive donor. PMID:26721894

  3. Phospholipase A/sub 2/ stimulation during cell secretion in rat basophilic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gil, M.; Siraganian, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The bridging of IgE receptors on rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3) results in a number of biochemical events that accompany histamine secretion. Prominent among these is the release of arachidonic acid from cellular phospholipids, which could be due to the activation of phospholipase enzymes. In the present experiments they studied the intracellular activation of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) during histamine release. The enzyme in the homogenates was capable of cleaving arachidonic acid from different phospholipids. The production of lysophospholipids could play a critical role in histamine release from cells. These results demonstrate the activation of PLA/sub 2/ enzyme in cellular homogenates during the secretory process.

  4. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined. PMID:8656672

  5. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  7. Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches for Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Koji; Akashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATLL occurs in approximately 3%–5% of HTLV-1 carriers during their lifetime and follows a heterogeneous clinical course. The Shimoyama classification has been frequently used for treatment decisions in ATLL patients, and antiviral therapy has been reportedly promising, particularly in patients with indolent type ATLL; however, the prognosis continues to be dismal for patients with aggressive-type ATLL. Recent efforts to improve treatment outcomes have been focused on the development of prognostic stratification and improved dosage, timing, and combination of therapeutic modalities, such as antiviral therapy, chemotherapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and molecular targeted therapy. PMID:26694446

  8. Sensitization of K562 Leukemia Cells to Doxorubicin by the Viscum album Extract.

    PubMed

    Srdic-Rajic, Tatjana; Tisma-Miletic, Nevena; Cavic, Milena; Kanjer, Ksenija; Savikin, Katarina; Galun, Danijel; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Zoranovic, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Toxicity of conventional chemotherapeutics highlights the requirement for complementary or alternative medicines that would reduce side effects and improve their anticancer effectiveness. European mistletoe (Viscum album) has long been used as a complementary and alternative medicine supporting cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate synergistic antitumor action of V. album extract and doxorubicin during co-treatment of chemoresistant chronic myelogenic leukemia K562 cells. Combined treatment of leukemia cells led to inhibitory synergism at sub-apoptotic doxorubicin concentrations and multifold reduction of cytotoxic effects in healthy control cells. Prolonged co-treatment was associated with reduced G2/M accumulation and increased expression of early and late apoptotic markers. Our data indicate that V. album extract increases antileukemic effectiveness of doxorubicin against resistant K562 cells by preventing G2/M arrest and inducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26692465

  9. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  10. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2−/− mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  11. HIF-1α regulates the interaction of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Roberta; Coltella, Nadia; Belloni, Daniela; Ponente, Manfredi; Ten Hacken, Elisa; Scielzo, Cristina; Scarfò, Lydia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Brambilla, Paola; Lenti, Elisa; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Brendolan, Andrea; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Ferrarini, Marina; Ghia, Paolo; Tonon, Giovanni; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Bernardi, Rosa

    2016-04-21

    Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) regulate a wide array of adaptive responses to hypoxia and are often activated in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies due to intratumoral hypoxia and emerging new layers of regulation. We found that in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), HIF-1α is a novel regulator of the interaction of CLL cells with protective leukemia microenvironments and, in turn, is regulated by this interaction in a positive feedback loop that promotes leukemia survival and propagation. Through unbiased microarray analysis, we found that in CLL cells, HIF-1α regulates the expression of important chemokine receptors and cell adhesion molecules that control the interaction of leukemic cells with bone marrow and spleen microenvironments. Inactivation of HIF-1α impairs chemotaxis and cell adhesion to stroma, reduces bone marrow and spleen colonization in xenograft and allograft CLL mouse models, and prolongs survival in mice. Of interest, we found that in CLL cells, HIF-1α is transcriptionally regulated after coculture with stromal cells. Furthermore, HIF-1α messenger RNA levels vary significantly within CLL patients and correlate with the expression of HIF-1α target genes, including CXCR4, thus further emphasizing the relevance of HIF-1α expression to CLL pathogenesis. PMID:26825709

  12. Polydatin-induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are potentiated by Janus kinase 2 inhibition in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei-Jie; Wu, Ke; Wang, Chong; Wan, Ding-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Polydatin (PD), a natural precursor of resveratrol, has a variety of biological activities, including anti‑tumor effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of PD has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that PD significantly inhibited the proliferation of the MOLT-4 leukemia cell line in a dose‑ and time-dependent manner by using Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay. PD also dose-dependently increased the apoptotic rate and caused cell cycle arrest in S phase in MOLT‑4 cells, as revealed by flow cytometry. In addition, PD dose-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and led to the generation of reactive oxygen species in MOLT-4 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of anti‑apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was decreased, whereas that of pro‑apoptotic protein Bcl‑2‑associated X was increased by PD. Furthermore, the expression of two cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, was suppressed by PD. Of note, the pro‑apoptotic and cell cycle‑inhibitory effects of PD were potentiated by Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibition. In conclusion, the results of the present study strongly suggested that PD is a promising therapeutic compound for the treatment of leukemia, particularly in combination with JAK inhibitors. PMID:26934953

  13. Prevalence and Characterization of Murine Leukemia Virus Contamination in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Uphoff, Cord C.; Lange, Sandra; Denkmann, Sabine A.; Garritsen, Henk S. P.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    Contaminations of cell cultures with microbiological organisms are well documented and can be managed in cell culture laboratories applying reliable detection, elimination and prevention strategies. However, the presence of viral contaminations in cell cultures is still a matter of debate and cannot be determined with general detection methods. In the present study we screened 577 human cell lines for the presence of murine leukemia viruses (MLV). Nineteen cell lines were found to be contaminated with MLV, including 22RV1 which is contaminated with the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus variant of MLV. Of these, 17 cell lines were shown to produce active retroviruses determined by product enhanced reverse transcriptase PCR assay for reverse transcriptase activity. The contaminated cell lines derive from various solid tumor types as well as from leukemia and lymphoma types. A contamination of primary human cells from healthy volunteers could not be substantiated. Sequence analyses of 17 MLV PCR products and five complete MLV genomes of different infected cell lines revealed at least three groups of related MLV genotypes. The viruses harvested from the supernatants of infected cell cultures were infectious to uninfected cell cultures. In the course of the study we found that contamination of human genomic DNA preparations with murine DNA can lead to false-positive results. Presumably, xenotransplantations of the human tumor cells into immune-deficient mice to determine the tumorigenicity of the cells are mainly responsible for the MLV contaminations. Furthermore, the use of murine feeder layer cells during the establishment of human cell lines and a cross-contamination with MLV from infected cultures might be sources of infection. A screening of cell cultures for MLV contamination is recommended given a contamination rate of 3.3%. PMID:25927683

  14. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brandao, L N; Winges, A; Christoph, S; Sather, S; Migdall-Wilson, J; Schlegel, J; McGranahan, A; Gao, D; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities. PMID:23353780

  15. Biological activity of cytotoxic dendritic cells cocultured with cytokine-induced killer cells and their effect on acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X Y; Li, J L

    2015-01-01

    We cocultured cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells with dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and investigated their proliferation, immunophenotype changes, secretory cytokine levels, and their antitumor effects on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. DCs and CIK cells were acquired from healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cocultured as an experimental group, while CIK cells were cultured alone as a control group. Cell numbers were counted by trypan blue staining, cytotoxic activity was measured by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell phenotypes were detected by flow cytometry, and secreted levels of INF-γ and IL-12 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proliferation activity in the experimental group was noticeably higher than in the control group (P < 0.05). Under the same conditions, the ratio of CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) double-positive CIK cells was significantly elevated when cocultured with DCs (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, the experimental group had significantly higher levels of secreted INF-γ and IL-12 in the supernatants after 3 days (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). The antitumor effect of DC-CIK cells against leukemia cells was much higher than that of CIK cells at an effector-target ratio ranging from 2.5:1 to 20:1 (P < 0.05), and this effect was positively related to the effector-target ratio. The proliferation activity, level of secretory cytokines, and antitumor effect against AML cells of DC-CIK cells were significantly higher than in CIK cells. This study provides a theoretical and experimental basis for clinical immunotherapy using DC-CIK cells. PMID:26535634

  16. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E.; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician’s experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  17. Deep sequencing reveals abundant noncanonical retroviral microRNAs in B-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rosewick, Nicolas; Momont, Mélanie; Durkin, Keith; Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Cleuter, Yvette; Vernin, Céline; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Burny, Arsène; Georges, Michel; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Viral tumor models have significantly contributed to our understanding of oncogenic mechanisms. How transforming delta-retroviruses induce malignancy, however, remains poorly understood, especially as viral mRNA/protein are tightly silenced in tumors. Here, using deep sequencing of broad windows of small RNA sizes in the bovine leukemia virus ovine model of leukemia/lymphoma, we provide in vivo evidence of the production of noncanonical RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-transcribed viral microRNAs in leukemic B cells in the complete absence of Pol II 5'-LTR-driven transcriptional activity. Processed from a cluster of five independent self-sufficient transcriptional units located in a proviral region dispensable for in vivo infectivity, bovine leukemia virus microRNAs represent ∼40% of all microRNAs in both experimental and natural malignancy. They are subject to strong purifying selection and associate with Argonautes, consistent with a critical function in silencing of important cellular and/or viral targets. Bovine leukemia virus microRNAs are strongly expressed in preleukemic and malignant cells in which structural and regulatory gene expression is repressed, suggesting a key role in tumor onset and progression. Understanding how Pol III-dependent microRNAs subvert cellular and viral pathways will contribute to deciphering the intricate perturbations that underlie malignant transformation. PMID:23345446

  18. Deep sequencing reveals abundant noncanonical retroviral microRNAs in B-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rosewick, Nicolas; Momont, Mélanie; Durkin, Keith; Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Cleuter, Yvette; Vernin, Céline; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Burny, Arsène; Georges, Michel; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Viral tumor models have significantly contributed to our understanding of oncogenic mechanisms. How transforming delta-retroviruses induce malignancy, however, remains poorly understood, especially as viral mRNA/protein are tightly silenced in tumors. Here, using deep sequencing of broad windows of small RNA sizes in the bovine leukemia virus ovine model of leukemia/lymphoma, we provide in vivo evidence of the production of noncanonical RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-transcribed viral microRNAs in leukemic B cells in the complete absence of Pol II 5′-LTR–driven transcriptional activity. Processed from a cluster of five independent self-sufficient transcriptional units located in a proviral region dispensable for in vivo infectivity, bovine leukemia virus microRNAs represent ∼40% of all microRNAs in both experimental and natural malignancy. They are subject to strong purifying selection and associate with Argonautes, consistent with a critical function in silencing of important cellular and/or viral targets. Bovine leukemia virus microRNAs are strongly expressed in preleukemic and malignant cells in which structural and regulatory gene expression is repressed, suggesting a key role in tumor onset and progression. Understanding how Pol III-dependent microRNAs subvert cellular and viral pathways will contribute to deciphering the intricate perturbations that underlie malignant transformation. PMID:23345446

  19. High CD33 expression levels in acute myeloid leukemia cells carrying the nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutation

    PubMed Central

    De Propris, Maria Stefania; Raponi, Sara; Diverio, Daniela; Milani, Maria Laura; Meloni, Giovanna; Falini, Brunangelo; Foà, Robin; Guarini, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The CD33 antigen is expressed on the blast cells of most cases of acute myeloid leukemia and represents a suitable tumor-associated target antigen for antibody-based therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the CD33 levels quantified by mean fluorescence intensity and antibody binding capacity, and the presence/absence of NPM1 and FLT3 gene mutations in 99 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia cases. The CD33 intensity evaluated as mean fluorescence intensity and antibody binding capacity was significantly higher in the NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia cases compared to the NPM1-unmutated cases (P=0.0001 and P=0.0088, respectively). On the contrary, FLT3 gene mutations did not influence the levels of CD33 expression on the leukemic cells. These results establish a rational basis for the therapeutic use of anti-CD33 antibodies in NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:21791474

  20. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  2. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Seiichi Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance.

  3. Asparaginase induces apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Ye, Li; Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Zhang, Guoping; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-02-28

    The antitumor enzyme asparaginase, which targets essential amino acid L-asparagine and catalyzes it to L-aspartic acid and ammonia, has been used for years in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), subtypes of myeloid leukemia and T-cell lymphomas, whereas the anti-chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) effect of asparaginase and its underlying mechanism has not been completely elucidated. We have shown here that asparaginase induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in K562 and KU812 cells. Apart from induction of apoptosis, we reported for the first time that asparaginase induced autophagic response in K562 and KU812 cells as evidenced by the formation of autophagosome, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-positive autophagy-like vacuoles, and the upregulation of LC3-II. Further study suggested that the Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and Erk (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway were involved in asparaginase-induced autophagy in K562 cells. Moreover, blocking autophagy using pharmacological inhibitors LY294002, chloroquine (CQ) and quinacrine (QN) enhanced asparaginase-induced cell death and apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in asparaginase-treated K562 and KU812 cells. Together, these findings provide a rationale that combination of asparaginase anticancer activity and autophagic inhibition might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for CML. PMID:25738356

  4. Antitumor effects with apoptotic death in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and suppression of leukemia xenograft tumor growth by irinotecan HCl.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Liang; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan HCl (CPT-11) is an anticancer prodrug, but there is no available information addressing CPT-11-inhibited leukemia cells in in vitro and in vivo studies. Therefore, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 in promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and in vivo and tumor growth in a leukemia xenograft model. Effects of CPT-11 on HL-60 cells were determined using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, comet assay, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. CPT-11 demonstrated a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, and cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in HL-60 cells. CPT-11 promoted the release of AIF from mitochondria and its translocation to the nucleus. Bid, Bax, Apaf-1, caspase-9, AIF, Endo G, caspase-12, ATF-6b, Grp78, CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D were all significantly upregulated and Bcl-2 was down-regulated by CPT-11 in HL-60 cells. Induction of cell-cycle arrest by CPT-11 was associated with changes in expression of key cell-cycle regulators such as CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D in HL-60 cells. To test whether CPT-11 could augment antitumor activity in vivo, athymic BALB/c(nu/nu) nude mice were inoculated with HL-60 cells, followed by treatment with either CPT-11. The treatments significantly inhibited tumor growth and reduced tumor weight and volume in the HL-60 xenograft mice. The present study demonstrates the schedule-dependent antileukemia effect of CPT-11 using both in vitro and in vivo models. CPT-11 could potentially be a promising agent for the treatment of promyelocytic leukemia and requires further investigation. PMID:24474168

  5. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. PMID:26774386

  6. PCFT/SLC46A1 promoter methylation and restoration of gene expression in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gonen, Nitzan; Bram, Eran E.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2008-11-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) displays optimal and prominent folate and antifolate transport activity at acidic pH in human carcinoma cells but poor activity in leukemia cells. Consistently herein, human leukemia cell lines expressed poor PCFT transcript levels, whereas various carcinoma cell lines showed substantial PCFT gene expression. We identified a CpG island with high density at nucleotides -200 through +100 and explored its role in PCFT promoter silencing. Leukemia cells with barely detectable PCFT transcripts consistently harbored 85-100% methylation of this CpG island, whereas no methylation was found in carcinoma cells. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine which induced demethylation but not with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, restored 50-fold PCFT expression only in leukemia cells. These findings constitute the first demonstration of the dominant epigenetic silencing of the PCFT gene in leukemia cells. The potential translational implications of the restoration of PCFT expression in chemotherapy of leukemia are discussed.

  7. CD34⁺/CD38⁻ acute myelogenous leukemia cells aberrantly express CD82 which regulates adhesion and survival of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Chie; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Furihata, Mutsuo; Yang, Jing; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Kataoka, Sayo; Tsuda, Masayuki; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-05-01

    To identify molecular targets in leukemia stem cells (LSCs), this study compared the protein expression profile of freshly isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells with that of CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts from individuals with acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 2, AML) using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). A total of 98 proteins were overexpressed, while six proteins were underexpressed in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells compared with their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts. Proteins overexpressed in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells included a number of proteins involved in DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, gland differentiation, antiapoptosis, adhesion, and drug resistance. Aberrant expression of CD82, a family of adhesion molecules, in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells was noted in additional clinical samples (n = 12) by flow cytometry. Importantly, down-regulation of CD82 in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells by a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited adhesion to fibronectin via up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and colony forming ability of these cells as assessed by transwell assay, real-time RT-PCR, and colony forming assay, respectively. Moreover, we found that down-regulation of CD82 in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells by an shRNA significantly impaired engraftment of these cells in severely immunocompromised mice. Taken together, aberrant expression of CD82 might play a role in adhesion of LSCs to bone marrow microenvironment and survival of LSCs. CD82 could be an attractive molecular target to eradicate LSCs. PMID:23055153

  8. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  9. Gene expression profiles of giant hairy naevi

    PubMed Central

    Dasu, M R K; Barrow, R E; Hawkins, H K; McCauley, R L

    2004-01-01

    Background: Congenital neomelanocytic naevi appear in nearly 1% of newborns. Giant hairy naevi (GHN) are uncommon lesions covering large areas of the body. They are of concern because they have the potential to transform into malignant melanomas. Aims: To describe gene expression profiles of GHN and nearby normal skin from patients with GHN and normal control skin (from patients with cleft lip/palate). Methods: Tissues from three patients with GHN and two normal controls were studied for differences in gene expression profiles. Total RNA was isolated from normal skin near the hairy naevus, GHN, and skin from normal controls. The RNA samples were subjected to probe labelling, hybridisation to chips, and image acquisition according to the standard Affymetrix protocol. Results: There were 227 genes affected across all samples, as determined by DNA microarray analysis. There was increased expression of 22 genes in GHN compared with nearby normal skin. Decreased expression was noted in 73 genes. In addition, there was increased expression of 36 genes in normal skin near GHN compared with normal control skin, and decreased expression of five genes. Categories of genes affected were those encoding structural proteins, proteins related to developmental processes, cell death associated proteins, transcription factors, growth factors, stress response modulators, and collagen associated proteins. Changes in mRNA expression were checked by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: Genetic profiles of GHN may provide insight into their pathogenesis, including their potential for malignant transformation. Such information may be useful in improving the understanding and management of these lesions. PMID:15280407

  10. Alternative TEL-JAK2 fusions associated with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia dissected in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Onnebo, Sara M. N.; Rasighaemi, Parisa; Kumar, Janani; Liongue, Clifford; Ward, Alister C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosomal translocations resulting in alternative fusions of the human TEL (ETV6) and JAK2 genes have been observed in cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia, but a full understanding of their role in disease etiology has remained elusive. In this study potential differences between these alternative TEL-JAK2 fusions, including their lineage specificity, were investigated. Design and Methods TEL-JAK2 fusion types derived from both T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia were generated using the corresponding zebrafish tel and jak2a genes and placed under the control of either the white blood cell-specific spi1 promoter or the ubiquitously-expressed cytomegalovirus promoter. These constructs were injected into zebrafish embryos and their effects on hematopoiesis examined using a range of molecular approaches. In addition, the functional properties of the alternative fusions were investigated in vitro. Results Injection of the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived tel-jak2a significantly perturbed lymphopoiesis with a lesser effect on myelopoiesis in zebrafish embryos. In contrast, injection of the atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia-derived tel-jak2a resulted in significant perturbation of the myeloid compartment. These phenotypes were observed regardless of whether expressed in a white blood cell-specific or ubiquitous manner, with no overt cellular proliferation outside of the hematopoietic cells. Functional studies revealed subtle differences between the alternative forms, with the acute lymphoblastic leukemia variant showing higher activity, but reduced downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription activation and decreased sensitivity to JAK2 inhibition. JAK2 activity was required to mediate the effects of both variants on zebrafish hematopoiesis. Conclusions This study indicates that the molecular structure of alternative TEL-JAK2 fusions likely contributes to the etiology of disease. The data further suggest that this class of oncogene exerts its effects in a cell lineage-specific manner, which may be due to differences in downstream signaling. PMID:22733019

  11. Upsides and downsides to polarity and asymmetric cell division in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, E D; Russell, S M

    2008-11-24

    The notion that polarity regulators can act as tumor suppressors in epithelial cells is now well accepted. The function of these proteins in lymphocytes is less well explored, and their possible function as suppressors of leukemia has had little attention so far. We review the literature on lymphocyte polarity and the growing recognition that polarity proteins have an important function in lymphocyte function. We then describe molecular relationships between the polarity network and signaling pathways that have been implicated in leukemogenesis, which suggest mechanisms by which the polarity network might impact on leukemogenesis. We particularly focus on the possibility that disruption of polarity might alter asymmetric cell division (ACD), and that this might be a leukemia-initiating event. We also explore the converse possibility that leukemic stem cells might be produced or maintained by ACD, and therefore that Dlg, Scribble and Lgl might be important regulators of this process. PMID:19029941

  12. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  13. Inhibition of Murine Leukemia Virus Production in Chronically Infected AKR Cells: A Novel Effect of Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Ramseur, Janet M.

    1974-01-01

    Treatment of AKR cells that had spontaneously become procedures of a murine leukemia virus with a partially purified mouse interferon (> 5 × 107 international mouse reference units per mg of protein) inhibited endogenous virus production. This inhibitory effect decreased over a 72-hr period in a manner similar to interferon-induced antiviral activity directed against vesicular stomatitis virus in AKR cells. Despite the inhibitory effect of interferon on infectious murine leukemia virus and viral reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA polymerase) titers in the culture fluids, intracellular levels of viral groups-specific antigens were significantly increased. These results suggest that interferon treatment in AKR cells inhibited the assembly or release of the virus. PMID:4139716

  14. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 regulates the cell growth and predicts prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Sik; Park, Young-Lan; Kim, Nuri; Oh, Hyung-Hoon; Son, Dong-Jun; Kim, Mi-Young; Oak, Chan-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Joo, Young-Eun

    2015-05-01

    The expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl‑1), a member of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family, has been associated with tumor progression and adverse patient outcome. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether Mcl-1 affects the survival or death of gastric cancer cells, and to investigate the prognostic value of its expression in gastric cancer. PcDNA3.1-Mcl-1 expression and Mcl-1 siRNA vectors were used to overexpress and silence Mcl-1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines including SNU638 and TMK1, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of Mcl-1 in gastric cancer tissues. Apoptosis was determined by the TUNEL assay, and cell proliferation was determined by immunostaining with a Ki-67 antibody. Mcl-1 knockdown induced apoptosis through the upregulation of caspase-3, and -7, and PARP activity, and the release of Smac/DIABLO and Omi/HtrA2 into the cytoplasm. Additionally, cell cycle arrest occurred due to decrease of cyclin D1, cell division cycle gene 2 (cdc2), and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6. In contrast, overexpression of Mcl-1 inhibited apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mcl-1 knockdown did not suppress tumor cell proliferation in gastric cancer cells, whereas overexpression of Mcl-1 enhanced tumor cell proliferation. The JAK2 and STAT3 signaling cascades were significantly blocked by Mcl-1 knockdown. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (KI) value of Mcl-1 positive tumors was significantly lower than that of Mcl-1 negative tumors. However, there was no significant difference between Mcl-1 expression and the apoptotic index (AI). Mcl-1 expression was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa tissues, and was associated with age, tumor size, stage, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. Our study showed that Mcl-1 regulates the cell growth and might be a potential prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25672320

  15. Acadesine Kills Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cells through PKC-Dependent Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Guillaume; Ben Sahra, Issam; Puissant, Alexandre; Colosetti, Pascal; Belhacene, Nathalie; Gounon, Pierre; Hofman, Paul; Bost, Fréderic; Cassuto, Jill-Patrice; Auberger, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11) translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside) a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL) was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients. PMID:19924252

  16. Variant Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1c and Adult T-cell Leukemia, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Olivier; Bardy, Peter; Kearney, Daniel; Gessain, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is endemic to central Australia among Indigenous Australians. However, virologic and clinical aspects of infection remain poorly understood. No attempt has been made to control transmission to indigenous children. We report 3 fatal cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Australo-Melanesian subtype c. PMID:24047544

  17. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  18. Metabolic adaptation to chronic inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Jhas, Bozhena; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Skrtic, Marko; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Voisin, Veronique; Jitkova, Yulia; Gronda, Marcela; Hurren, Rose; Laister, Rob C; Bader, Gary D; Minden, Mark D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the anti-bacterial agent tigecycline preferentially induces death in leukemia cells through the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline by establishing a leukemia cell line resistant to the drug. TEX leukemia cells were treated with increasing concentrations of tigecycline over 4 months and a population of cells resistant to tigecycline (RTEX+TIG) was selected. Compared to wild type cells, RTEX+TIG cells had undetectable levels of mitochondrially translated proteins Cox-1 and Cox-2, reduced oxygen consumption and increased rates of glycolysis. Moreover, RTEX+TIG cells were more sensitive to inhibitors of glycolysis and more resistant to hypoxia. By electron microscopy, RTEX+TIG cells had abnormally swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structures. RNA sequencing demonstrated a significant over-representation of genes with binding sites for the HIF1α:HIF1β transcription factor complex in their promoters. Upregulation of HIF1α mRNA and protein in RTEX+TIG cells was confirmed by Q-RTPCR and immunoblotting. Strikingly, upon removal of tigecycline from RTEX+TIG cells, the cells re-established aerobic metabolism. Levels of Cox-1 and Cox-2, oxygen consumption, glycolysis, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential returned to wild type levels, but HIF1α remained elevated. However, upon re-treatment with tigecycline for 72 hours, the glycolytic phenotype was re-established. Thus, we have generated cells with a reversible metabolic phenotype by chronic treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. These cells will provide insight into cellular adaptations used to cope with metabolic stress. PMID:23520503

  19. Fucoidan Suppresses the Growth of Human Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Atashrazm, Farzaneh; Lowenthal, Ray M; Woods, Gregory M; Holloway, Adele F; Karpiniec, Samuel S; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Fucoidan, a natural component of seaweeds, is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underpinning these activities remain poorly understood. In this study, the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activities of fucoidan were investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The human AML cell lines NB4, KG1a, HL60, and K562 were treated with fucoidan and cell cycle, cell proliferation, and expression of apoptotic pathways molecules were analyzed. Fucoidan suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines NB4 and HL60, but not in KG1a and K562 cells. In NB4 cells, apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor. P21/WAF1/CIP1 was significantly up-regulated leading to cell cycle arrest. Fucoidan decreased the activation of ERK1/2 and down-regulated the activation of AKT through hypo-phosphorylation of Thr(308) residue but not Ser(473). In vivo, a xenograft model using the NB4 cells was employed. Mice were fed with fucoidan and tumor growth was measured following inoculation with NB4 cells. Subsequently, splenic natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity was also examined. Oral doses of fucoidan significantly delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model and increased cytolytic activity of NK cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the selective inhibitory effect of fucoidan on APL cells and its protective effect against APL development in mice warrant further investigation of fucoidan as a useful agent in treatment of certain types of leukemia. PMID:26241708

  20. Curcumin enhances the cytogenotoxic effect of etoposide in leukemia cells through induction of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Papież, Monika A; Krzyściak, Wirginia; Szade, Krzysztof; Bukowska-Straková, Karolina; Kozakowska, Magdalena; Hajduk, Karolina; Bystrowska, Beata; Dulak, Jozef; Jozkowicz, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin may exert a more selective cytotoxic effect in tumor cells with elevated levels of free radicals. Here, we investigated whether curcumin can modulate etoposide action in myeloid leukemia cells and in normal cells of hematopoietic origin. HL-60 cell line, normal myeloid progenitor cluster of differentiation (CD)-34+ cells, and granulocytes were incubated for 4 or 24 hours at different concentrations of curcumin and/or etoposide. Brown Norway rats with acute myeloid leukemia (BNML) were used to prove the influence of curcumin on etoposide action in vivo. Rats were treated with curcumin for 23 days and etoposide was administered for the final 3 days of the experiment. Curcumin synergistically potentiated the cytotoxic effect of etoposide, and it intensified apoptosis and phosphorylation of the histone H2AX induced by this cytostatic drug in leukemic HL-60 cells. In contrast, curcumin did not significantly modify etoposide-induced cytotoxicity and H2AX phosphorylation in normal CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Curcumin modified the cytotoxic action of etoposide in HL-60 cells through intensification of free radical production because preincubation with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) significantly reduced the cytotoxic effect of curcumin itself and a combination of two compounds. In contrast, NAC did not decrease the cytotoxic effect of etoposide. Thus, oxidative stress plays a greater role in the cytotoxic effect of curcumin than that of etoposide in HL-60 cells. In vitro results were confirmed in a BNML model. Pretreatment with curcumin enhanced the antileukemic activity of etoposide in BNML rats (1.57-fold tumor reduction versus etoposide alone; P<0.05) and induced apoptosis of BNML cells more efficiently than etoposide alone (1.54-fold change versus etoposide alone; P<0.05), but this treatment protected nonleukemic B-cells from apoptosis. Thus, curcumin can increase the antileukemic effect of etoposide through reactive oxygen species in sensitive myeloid leukemia cells, and it is harmless to normal human cells. PMID:26893544

  1. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and cell surface antigen expression in acute lymphocytic leukemias of T cell and B cell precursor origins.

    PubMed

    Korsmeyer, S J; Arnold, A; Bakhshi, A; Ravetch, J V; Siebenlist, U; Hieter, P A; Sharrow, S O; LeBien, T W; Kersey, J H; Poplack, D G; Leder, P; Waldmann, T A

    1983-02-01

    We have explored the relationship among immunoglobulin gene rearrangement, cytoplasmic immunoglobulin production, and cell surface antigen expression within 37 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia. All 12 cases of the T cell type had germ-line kappa and lambda genes and 11 of 12 had germ-line heavy chain genes. In contrast, all 25 cases of the "non-T, non-B" classification, which lacked both definitive T cell markers and surface immunoglobulin, had rearranged immunoglobulin genes, indicating that they represent precursor cells already committed to the B cell lineage at the gene level. 14 had rearranged heavy chain genes, yet retained germ-line light chain genes, whereas 11 cases had both heavy and light chain gene reorganizations. All patterns of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement predicted by a model that proceeds from heavy chain gene recombination to light chain genes were observed. Despite the uniform presence of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, only five cases produced cytoplasmic mu-chain, one exceptional case produced gamma-chain, and another produced only lambda-chain. The cases of B cell precursor type that do not produce immunoglobulin may represent cells that frequently possess ineffectively rearranged immunoglobulin genes. Included in this group may be a set of cells trapped within the B cell precursor series because their ineffective rearrangements have eliminated certain gene subsegments necessary for the assemblage of an effective heavy chain gene. All seven cases of the non-T, non-B subgroup that bore HLA-DR but lacked CALLA (the common acute lymphocytic leukemia-associated antigen) represented the earliest recognizable stage of B cell precursors with rearranged heavy chain genes but germ-line light chain genes. Correlations here suggest that cells entering B cell development express HLA-DR and rearrange heavy chain genes before the expression of a B cell-associated antigen recognized by the antibody BA-1, the antigen CALLA, and any subsequent light chain gene rearrangements. PMID:6401769

  2. Bruceine D induces apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ye; Lin, Min-Ting; Tung, Ho-Yi; Tang, Si-Li; Yi, Tao; Zhang, Ya-Zhou; Tang, Yi-Na; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), an acquired malignant myeloproliferative disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, is one of the three most common forms of leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of bruceine D, which have been isolated from Brucea javanica (L.) Merr. on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell growth inhibition. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Western blot was applied to detect expression of cytochrome c, caspases-9, -3, PARP and other proteins. Bruceine D exhibited potent cytotoxicity to K562 cells with IC50 of 6.37 ± 0.39 μM. It led to loss of ΔΨm, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of PARP, which suggested that bruceine D induced apoptosis of K562 cells through mitochondrial pathway. In addition, bruceine D inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. It’s indicative that the potent anticancer activity of bruceine D be related to MAPK and PI3K pathways. PMID:27186433

  3. Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Guilan; Shen, Min; Vermeulen, Roel; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Linet, Martha S.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens. PMID:22643707

  4. Polyphenols are responsible for the proapoptotic properties of pomegranate juice on leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dahlawi, Haytham; Jordan-Mahy, Nicola; Clench, Malcolm; McDougall, Gordon J; Maitre, Christine Lyn

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates have shown great promise as anti-cancer agents in a number of cancers including clinical trials in prostate cancer. We have previously shown pomegranate juice (PGJ) induced apoptosis and preferentially alters the cell cycle in leukemia cell lines compared with nontumor control cells. However, the agents responsible have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of four leukemia cell lines with five fractions obtained from PGJ by solid phase extraction demonstrated that only the acetonitrile fractions decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in all leukemia cell lines. Acetonitrile fractions also significantly activated caspase-3 and induced nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis. S phase arrest was induced by acetonitrile fractions which matched S phase arrest seen previously following whole PGJ treatments. The acetonitrile fractions contained higher phenol content than whole PGJ whereas only low levels of phenols were seen in any other fraction. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) analysis demonstrated that acetonitrile fractions were enriched in ellagitannins, ellagic acid, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives but depleted in anthocyanins. Individual treatments with identified compounds demonstrated that the ellagitannin: punicalagin was the most active and mimicked the responses seen following acetonitrile fraction treatment. Bioactive components within pomegranate were confined to the acetonitrile fraction of PGJ. The enrichment in ellagitannins and hydroxycinnamic acids suggest these may provide the majority of the bioactivities of PGJ. Individual treatments with compounds identified demonstrated that the ellagitannin: punicalagin was the most active agent, highlighting this compound as a key bioactive agent in PGJ. PMID:24804028

  5. Targeting the leukemic stem cell: the Holy Grail of leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Misaghian, N; Ligresti, G; Steelman, LS; Bertrand, FE; Bäsecke, J; Libra, M; Nicoletti, F; Stivala, F; Milella, M; Tafuri, A; Cervello, M; Martelli, AM

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) over a decade ago, many of their critical biological properties have been elucidated, including their distinct replicative properties, cell surface phenotypes, their increased resistance to chemo-therapeutic drugs and the involvement of growth-promoting chromosomal translocations. Of particular importance is their ability to transfer malignancy to non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia arises from mutations at the level of stem cell, and chronic myeloid leukemia is also a stem cell disease. In this review, we will evaluate the main characteristics of LSCs elucidated in several well-documented leukemias. In addition, we will discuss points of therapeutic intervention. Promising therapeutic approaches include the targeting of key signal transduction pathways (for example, PI3K, Rac and Wnt) with small-molecule inhibitors and specific cell surface molecules (for example, CD33, CD44 and CD123), with effective cytotoxic antibodies. Also, statins, which are already widely therapeutically used for a variety of diseases, show potential in targeting LSCs. In addition, drugs that inhibit ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are being extensively studied, as they are important in drug resistance—a frequent characteristic of LSCs. Although the specific targeting of LSCs is a relatively new field, it is a highly promising battleground that may reveal the Holy Grail of cancer therapy. PMID:18800146

  6. Hyaluronan oligomers sensitize chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines to the effect of Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Lompardía, Silvina Laura; Díaz, Mariángeles; Papademetrio, Daniela Laura; Mascaró, Marilina; Pibuel, Matías; Álvarez, Elida; Hajos, Silvia Elvira

    2016-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative syndrome characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), generated by a reciprocal translocation occurring between chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9;22)(q34;q11)]. As a consequence, a fusion gene (bcr-abl) encoding a constitutively active kinase is generated. The first-line treatment consists on BCR-ABL inhibitors such as Imatinib, Nilotinib and Dasatinib. Nevertheless, such treatment may lead to the selection of resistant cells. Therefore, finding molecules that enhance the anti-proliferative effect of first-line drugs is of value. Hyaluronan oligomers (oHA) are known to be able to sensitize several tumor cells to chemotherapy. We have previously demonstrated that oHA can revert Vincristine resistance in mouse lymphoma and human leukemia cell lines. However, little is known about the role of oHA in hematological malignancies. The aim of this work was to determine whether oHA are able to modulate the anti-proliferative effect of Imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines. The effect on apoptosis and senescence as well as the involvement of signaling pathways were also evaluated. For this purpose, the human CML cell lines K562 and Kv562 (resistant) were used. We demonstrated that oHA sensitized both cell lines to the anti-proliferative effect of Imatinib increasing apoptosis and senescence. Moreover, this effect would be accomplished through the down-regulation of the PI3K signaling pathway. These findings highlight the potential of oHA when used as a co-adjuvant therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:26582603

  7. Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-10

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Human NK Cells: From Surface Receptors to the Therapy of Leukemias and Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Pietra, Gabriella; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Pende, Daniela; Falco, Michela; Del Zotto, Genny; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are major effector cells of the innate immunity. The discovery, over two decades ago, of major histocompatibility complex-class I-specific inhibitory NK receptors and subsequently of activating receptors, recognizing ligands expressed by tumor or virus-infected cells, paved the way to our understanding of the mechanisms of selective recognition and killing of tumor cells. Although NK cells can efficiently kill tumor cells of different histotypes in vitro, their activity may be limited in vivo by their inefficient trafficking to tumor lesions and by the inhibition of their function induced by tumor cells themselves and by the tumor microenvironment. On the other hand, the important role of NK cells has been clearly demonstrated in the therapy of high risk leukemias in the haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation setting. NK cells derived from donor HSC kill leukemic cells residual after the conditioning regimen, thus preventing leukemia relapses. In addition, they also kill residual dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, thus preventing both GvH disease and graft rejection. PMID:24639677

  10. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  11. Impact of prior imatinib mesylate on the outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Manisha; Wang, Tao; Giralt, Sergio A.; Szer, Jeffrey; Arora, Mukta; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Cervantes, Francisco; Champlin, Richard E.; Gale, Robert Peter; Halter, Joerg; Keating, Armand; Marks, David I.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Olavarria, Eduardo; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Abecasis, Manuel; Gupta, Vikas; Khoury, H. Jean; George, Biju; Hale, Gregory A.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Rizzieri, David A.; Antin, Joseph H.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Carabasi, Matthew H.; Copelan, Edward; Ilhan, Osman; Litzow, Mark R.; Schouten, Harold C.; Zander, Axel R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Maziarz, Richard T.

    2008-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM, Gleevec) has largely supplanted allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as first line therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Nevertheless, many people with CML eventually undergo HCT, raising the question of whether prior IM therapy impacts HCT success. Data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research on 409 subjects treated with IM before HCT (IM+) and 900 subjects who did not receive IM before HCT (IM−) were analyzed. Among patients in first chronic phase, IM therapy before HCT was associated with better survival but no statistically significant differences in treatment-related mortality, relapse, and leukemia-free survival. Better HLA-matched donors, use of bone marrow, and transplantation within one year of diagnosis were also associated with better survival. A matched-pairs analysis was performed and confirmed a higher survival rate among first chronic phase patients receiving IM. Among patients transplanted with advanced CML, use of IM before HCT was not associated with treatment-related mortality, relapse, leukemia-free survival, or survival. Acute graft-versus-host disease rates were similar between IM+ and IM− groups regardless of leukemia phase. These results should be reassuring to patients receiving IM before HCT. PMID:18664621

  12. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma, Plasma Cell Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in a Single Patient Treated Simultaneously with Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, Dexamethasone and Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Ali, Naveed; Pickens, Peter V; Auerbach, Herbert E

    2016-03-17

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD) MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive. PMID:27103978

  13. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma, Plasma Cell Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in a Single Patient Treated Simultaneously with Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, Dexamethasone and Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Peter V.; Auerbach, Herbert E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD) MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive. PMID:27103978

  14. MicroRNA-128-3p is a novel oncomiR targeting PHF6 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mets, Evelien; Van Peer, Gert; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Taghon, Tom; Goossens, Steven; Mestdagh, Pieter; Benoit, Yves; De Moerloose, Barbara; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Vandesompele, Jo; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Rondou, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arises from the leukemic transformation of developing thymocytes and results from cooperative genetic lesions. Inactivation of the PHF6 gene is frequently observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting an important tumor suppressive role for PHF6 in the pathobiology of this leukemia. Although the precise function of PHF6 is still unknown, this gene is most likely involved in chromatin regulation, a strongly emerging theme in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this context, our previous description of a cooperative microRNA regulatory network controlling several well-known T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia tumor suppressor genes, including PHF6, is of great importance. Given the high frequency of PHF6 lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the integration of PHF6 in this microRNA regulatory network, we aimed to identify novel oncogenic microRNAs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which suppress PHF6. To this end, we performed an unbiased PHF6 3′UTR-microRNA library screen and combined the results with microRNA profiling data of samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal thymocyte subsets. We selected miR-128-3p as a candidate PHF6-targeting, oncogenic microRNA and demonstrated regulation of PHF6 expression upon modulation of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. In vivo evidence of an oncogenic role of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was obtained through accelerated leukemia onset in a NOTCH1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia mouse model upon miR-128-3p over-expression. We conclude that miR-128-3p is a strong novel candidate oncogenic microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which targets the PHF6 tumor suppressor gene. PMID:24895337

  15. Effect of adenosine on the growth of human T-lymphocyte leukemia cell line MOLT-4.

    PubMed

    Streitová, Denisa; Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Horváth, Viktor; Kozubík, Alois; Znojil, Vladimír

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine has been observed to suppress the growth of MOLT-4 human leukemia cells in vitro. Changes in the cell cycle, especially increased percentage of cells in S phase, prolonged generation time, and induction of apoptosis at higher adenosine concentrations have been found to be responsible for the growth suppression. Dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, reversed partially but significantly the adenosine-induced growth suppression. It follows from these results that the action of adenosine on the MOLT-4 cells comprises its cellular uptake and intracellular operation. These findings present new data on anticancer efficacy of adenosine. PMID:17882653

  16. Expression analysis of Foxp3 in T cells from bovine leukemia virus infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Saori; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Shirai, Tatsuya; Sunden, Yuji; Mingala, Claro N; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we monitored Foxp3(+) T cells in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle. By flow cytometric analysis, the proportion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) cells from persistent lymphocytotic cattle was significantly increased compared to control and AL cattle. Interestingly, the proportion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) cells correlated positively with the increased number of lymphocytes, virus titer and virus load, whereas it inversely correlated with IFN-γ mRNA expression, suggesting that Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells in cattle have a potentially immunosuppressive function. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the detailed mechanism behind the increased Treg during BLV infection. PMID:23945026

  17. Expression of mast cell tryptase by myeloblasts in a group of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sperr, W R; Jordan, J H; Baghestanian, M; Kiener, H P; Samorapoompichit, P; Semper, H; Hauswirth, A; Schernthaner, G H; Chott, A; Natter, S; Kraft, D; Valenta, R; Schwartz, L B; Geissler, K; Lechner, K; Valent, P

    2001-10-01

    alpha- and beta-tryptase genes encode serine proteases that are abundantly expressed by mast cells. Under physiologic conditions other myeloid cells are virtually tryptase negative. However, tryptases are also expressed in several myeloid leukemia cell lines. In this study, serum total tryptase levels were determined in 150 patients with acute leukemias (de novo acute myeloid leukemia [AML], n = 108; secondary AML, n = 25; acute lymphoid leukemia [ALL], n = 17) by fluoroenzyme immunoassay. In healthy subjects (n = 30), tryptase levels ranged between 2.0 and 12.6 ng/mL. Elevated tryptase levels (> 15) were detected in 42 (39%) of 108 patients with de novo AML and in 11 (44%) of 25 patients with secondary AML. No elevated tryptase levels were found in patients with ALL. In de novo AML, elevated tryptase levels were frequently detected in patients with French-American-British classification M0 (6 of 9), M2 (9 of 14), M3 (4 of 6), and M4eo (7 of 7), and less frequently in M1 (7 of 20), M4 (6 of 26), M5 (2 of 18), M6 (0 of 5), or M7 (1 of 3). The highest tryptase levels were found in M4eo. Immunohistochemical staining of bone marrow sections with anti-tryptase antibody as well as immunoelectron microscopy revealed tryptase expression in the cytoplasm of myeloblasts. As assessed by Northern blotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, AML cells expressed alpha-tryptase messenger RNA (mRNA) but little or no beta-tryptase mRNA. In AML patients with elevated serum tryptase before chemotherapy, who entered complete remission, tryptase levels returned to normal or near normal values. Blast cell persistence or regrowth was associated with a persistently elevated level or recurrent increase of tryptase. Together, tryptase is expressed in myeloblasts in a group of AML and may serve as a useful disease-related marker. PMID:11568008

  18. Abacavir, an anti–HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chromosomal DNA of ATL cells. DSBs persisted over time in ATL cells but not in other cell lines, suggesting impaired DNA repair. We found that the reduced expression of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a repair enzyme, is attributable to the cytotoxic effect of abacavir on ATL cells. We also showed that TDP1 removes abacavir from DNA ends in vitro. These results suggest a model in which ATL cells with reduced TDP1 expression are unable to excise abacavir incorporated into genomic DNA, leading to irreparable DSBs. On the basis of the above mechanism, we propose abacavir as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for ATL. PMID:26601161

  19. Good syndrome presenting with CD8⁺ T-Cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    PubMed

    Caperton, Caroline; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-11-01

    Good Syndrome is an adult-onset combined immunodeficiency defined by hypogammaglobulinemia, low or absent number of B cells, T cell deficiency and thymic tumor. We have characterized CD8+ T cells from a patient with Good syndrome that presented with CD8+T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL). Characterization of peripheral blood CD8+ T cells revealed that majority of CD8+ T cells were terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype (TEMRA; CD8+CCR7-CD45RA+), and were PD-1high (CD279), ICOSlow (CD278), and granzymehigh. Almost all CD8+ T cells were IFN-γ+. CD8 Treg (CD8+CD183+CCR7+CD45RA-) were decreased. TEMRA phenotype along with CD279high, demonstrates that these are exhausted CD8+ T cells. This phenotype along with CD278low may also explain severe T cell functional deficiency in our patient. In the present patient, T-LGL appears to be a clonal expansion of CD279+granzyme+IFN-γ+CD8+TEMRA cells. To best of our knowledge this is the first case of CD8+T-cell LGL leukemia associated with Good syndrome. PMID:26429871

  20. Constitutive activation of Pim1 kinase is a therapeutic target for adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Marcia; Lu, Ling; Nicot, Christophe

    2016-05-19

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated adult T-cell leukemia and T-cell lymphoma (ATL) are aggressive diseases with poor prognoses, limited therapeutic options, and no curative treatment. In this study, we used a mouse model of ATL and restored expression of the microRNA, miR-124a, to identify in vivo downstream effectors responsible for its tumor-suppressive functions in ATL cells. Our results revealed that STAT3, a direct target of miR-124a, is constitutively activated in HTLV-I-transformed cells and ATL cells, and activating STAT3 mutations were detected in 25.5% of primary ATL patients. Interestingly, we found that the STAT3 downstream kinase effector, Pim1, is constitutively activated in ATL cells. The dependence of ATL cells to Pim1 activity was demonstrated using 2 Pim1 small inhibitors, SMI-4a and AZD1208. These studies indicated that HTLV-I-transformed and ATL cells, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, are highly sensitive to AZD1208, and the inhibition of Pim1 signaling triggers an apoptotic signal in leukemic cells. Finally, preclinical testing of AZD1208 in a mouse model of ATL resulted in significant prevention of tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, our studies suggest that constitutive activation of the STAT3-Pim1 pathway represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ATL. PMID:26813676

  1. Good syndrome presenting with CD8+ T-Cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Caperton, Caroline; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Good Syndrome is an adult-onset combined immunodeficiency defined by hypogammaglobulinemia, low or absent number of B cells, T cell deficiency and thymic tumor. We have characterized CD8+ T cells from a patient with Good syndrome that presented with CD8+T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL). Characterization of peripheral blood CD8+ T cells revealed that majority of CD8+ T cells were terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype (TEMRA; CD8+CCR7-CD45RA+), and were PD-1high (CD279), ICOSlow (CD278), and granzymehigh. Almost all CD8+ T cells were IFN-γ+. CD8 Treg (CD8+CD183+CCR7+CD45RA-) were decreased. TEMRA phenotype along with CD279high, demonstrates that these are exhausted CD8+ T cells. This phenotype along with CD278low may also explain severe T cell functional deficiency in our patient. In the present patient, T-LGL appears to be a clonal expansion of CD279+granzyme+IFN-γ+CD8+TEMRA cells. To best of our knowledge this is the first case of CD8+T-cell LGL leukemia associated with Good syndrome. PMID:26429871

  2. Diversity and Complexity of Ceramide Generation After Exposure of Jurkat Leukemia Cells to Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ardail, Dominique Maalouf, Mira; Boivin, Anthony; Chapet, Olivier; Bodennec, Jacques; Rousson, Robert; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To define which intracellular pools of sphingomyelin and ceramide are involved in the triggering of apoptosis of Jurkat leukemia cells in response to {gamma}-ray exposure. Methods and Materials: We examined the kinetics of ceramide generation at the whole-cell level and in different subcellular compartments (plasma membrane rafts, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum) after irradiation with photons. Ceramide was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography or after pulse labeling experiments, and the presence of sphingomyelinase within mitochondria was assessed by electron microscopy. Results: Irradiation of Jurkat leukemia cells resulted in the sequential triggering of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, followed by de novo synthesis that led to a late ceramide response (from 24 h) correlated with the triggering of apoptosis. At the subcellular level, pulse-label experiments, using [{sup 3}H]-palmitate as a precursor, strengthened the involvement of the radiation-induced sphingomyelin breakdown and revealed a very early peak (15 min) of ceramide in plasma membrane rafts. A second peak in mitochondria was measured 4 h after irradiation, resulting from an increase of the sphingomyelin content relating to the targeting of acid sphingomyelinase toward this organelle. Conclusion: These data confirm that ceramide is a major determinant in the triggering of radiation-induced apoptosis and highlight the complexity of the sequential compartment-specific ceramide-mediated response of Jurkat leukemia cells to {gamma}-rays.

  3. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of proteasome inhibitors and their combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors on leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ota; Provaznikova, Dana; Marinov, Iuri; Kuzelova, Katerina; Spicka, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are still required to further optimise treatment of leukemia patients. Proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, PR-171 (carfilzomib) and NPI-0052 (salinosporamide A) has been successfully used for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and is considered also as novel treatment strategy in leukemia. Combination of proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and NPI-0052 induces synergistic anti-multiple myeloma activity both in vitro using multiple myeloma cells and in vivo in a human plasmacytoma xenograft mouse model. Cell death resulting from proteasome inhibition requires caspase activation and increased levels of reactive oxygen species. While bortezomib induces several caspases, NPI-0052 activates predominantly caspase-8-dependent pathway. We studied the effect of bortezomib (10 nM) on DNA synthesis and apoptosis in human acute myeloid cell lines KASUMI-1, ML-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells. Bortezomib was potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis in all four types of leukemia cells and induced apoptosis in KASUMI-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells but not in ML-1 cells. O