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Sample records for hall effect characterization

  1. Characterization of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors with flame visualization.

    PubMed

    Langendorf, S; Walker, M L R

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the characterization and qualification of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors is presented. A quantitative measurement of the azimuthal number density uniformity, a metric which impacts propellant utilization, is obtained from photographs of a premixed flame anchored on the exit plane of the propellant distributor. The technique is demonstrated for three propellant distributors using a propane-air mixture at reservoir pressure of 40 psi (gauge) (377 kPa) exhausting to atmosphere, with volumetric flow rates ranging from 15-145 cfh (7.2-68 l/min) with equivalence ratios from 1.2 to 2.1. The visualization is compared with in-vacuum pressure measurements 1 mm downstream of the distributor exit plane (chamber pressure held below 2.7 × 10(-5) Torr-Xe at all flow rates). Both methods indicate a non-uniformity in line with the propellant inlet, supporting the validity of the technique of flow visualization with flame luminosity for propellant distributor characterization. The technique is applied to a propellant distributor with a manufacturing defect in a known location and is able to identify the defect and characterize its impact. The technique is also applied to a distributor with numerous small orifices at the exit plane and is able to resolve the resulting non-uniformity. Luminosity data are collected with a spatial resolution of 48.2-76.1 μm (pixel width). The azimuthal uniformity is characterized in the form of standard deviation of azimuthal luminosities, normalized by the mean azimuthal luminosity. The distributors investigated achieve standard deviations of 0.346 ± 0.0212, 0.108 ± 0.0178, and 0.708 ± 0.0230 mean-normalized luminosity units respectively, where a value of 0 corresponds to perfect uniformity and a value of 1 represents a standard deviation equivalent to the mean. PMID:23387637

  2. The Hall coefficient: a tool for characterizing graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrfritz, Peter; Seyller, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Graphene field effect transistors are considered as a candidate for future high-frequency applications. For their realization, the optimal combination of substrate, graphene preparation, and insulator deposition and composition is required. This optimization must be based on an in-depth characterization of the obtained graphene insulator metal (GIM) stack. Hall effect measurements are frequently employed to study such systems, thereby focussing primarily on the charge carrier mobility. In this work we show how an analysis of the sheet Hall coefficient can reveal further important properties of the GIM stack, like, e.g., the interface trap density and the spacial charge inhomogeneity. To that end, we provide an extensive description of the GIM diode, which leads to an accurate calculation of the sheet Hall coefficient dependent on temperature and gate voltage. The gate dependent inverse sheet Hall coefficient is discussed in detail before we introduce the concept of an equivalent temperature, which is a measure of the spacial charge inhomogeneity. In order to test the concept, we apply it to evaluate already measured Hall data taken from the literature. This evaluation allows us to determine the Drude mobility, even at the charge neutrality point, which is inaccessible with a simple one band Hall mobility analysis, and to shed light on the spacial charge inhomogeneity. The formalism is easily adaptable and provides experimentalists a powerful tool for the characterization of their graphene field effect devices.

  3. Characterization of partially ordered GaInP/GaAs heterointerfaces by the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazuo; Satoh, Kiwamu; Asano, Keita; Koizumi, Atsushi; Nozaki, Shinji

    2013-05-01

    The new approach to the characterization of semiconductor interfacial properties by the quantum Hall effect (QHE) and the scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) is demonstrated to the heterointerfaces of partially ordered GaInP/GaAs grown by low-pressure Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy. The Shubnikov de-Haas (SdH) oscillations and the Hall plateaus are observed in the heterointerfaces of both the less-ordered and more-ordered GaInP/GaAs samples with a large clover-shape, but these samples exhibit both 2D and 3D electron behaviors. In contrast to large clover-shaped samples, the distinct SdH oscillations and the Hall plateaus in the less-ordered sample, while the single SdH oscillation and the corresponding large plateau in the more-ordered small Hall-bar sample are observed. These results suggest that there may be many domains, each having a different carrier density and sizes in the less-ordered sample, while one or few large domains with uniform carrier concentration and sizes in the more-ordered sample. In SNOM measurements, PL intensity varies in the mapping of the more-ordered sample and it is concluded that the variation of the PL intensity may result from an inhomogeneous distribution of non-radiative recombination centers in the more-ordered sample.

  4. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  5. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  6. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis. PMID:27505654

  7. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  8. Hall Effect in a Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an apparatus and procedure for conducting an undergraduate laboratory experiment to quantitatively study the Hall effect in a plasma. Includes background information on the Hall effect and rationale for conducting the experiment. (JN)

  9. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  10. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  11. Performance and Thermal Characterization of the NASA-300MS 20 kW Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Soulas, George; Smith, Timothy; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is sponsoring the development of a high fidelity 15 kW-class long-life high performance Hall thruster for candidate NASA technology demonstration missions. An essential element of the development process is demonstration that incorporation of magnetic shielding on a 20 kW-class Hall thruster will yield significant improvements in the throughput capability of the thruster without any significant reduction in thruster performance. As such, NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory collaborated on modifying the NASA-300M 20 kW Hall thruster to improve its propellant throughput capability. JPL and NASA Glenn researchers performed plasma numerical simulations with JPL's Hall2De and a commercially available magnetic modeling code that indicated significant enhancement in the throughput capability of the NASA-300M can be attained by modifying the thruster's magnetic circuit. This led to modifying the NASA-300M magnetic topology to a magnetically shielded topology. This paper presents performance evaluation results of the two NASA-300M magnetically shielded thruster configurations, designated 300MS and 300MS-2. The 300MS and 300MS-2 were operated at power levels between 2.5 and 20 kW at discharge voltages between 200 and 700 V. Discharge channel deposition from back-sputtered facility wall flux, and plasma potential and electron temperature measurements made on the inner and outer discharge channel surfaces confirmed that magnetic shielding was achieved. Peak total thrust efficiency of 64% and total specific impulse of 3,050 sec were demonstrated with the 300MS-2 at 20 kW. Thermal characterization results indicate that the boron nitride discharge chamber walls temperatures are approximately 100 C lower for the 300MS when compared to the NASA- 300M at the same thruster operating discharge power.

  12. Relativistic Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2012-03-23

    We consider the relativistic deformation of quantum waves and mechanical bodies carrying intrinsic angular momentum (AM). When observed in a moving reference frame, the centroid of the object undergoes an AM-dependent transverse shift. This is the relativistic analogue of the spin-Hall effect, which occurs in free space without any external fields. Remarkably, the shifts of the geometric and energy centroids differ by a factor of 2, and both centroids are crucial for the Lorentz transformations of the AM tensor. We examine manifestations of the relativistic Hall effect in quantum vortices and mechanical flywheels and also discuss various fundamental aspects of this phenomenon. The perfect agreement of quantum and relativistic approaches allows applications at strikingly different scales, from elementary spinning particles, through classical light, to rotating black holes. PMID:22540559

  13. Hall Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin; Balaban, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new imaging method based on the classical Hall effect (HE), which describes the origin of a detectable voltage from a conductive object moving in a magnetic field. HE images are formed using ultrasound imaging techniques in a magnetic field. These images reflect the electrical properties of the sample. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method, images of plastic and biological samples are collected. The contrast mechanism and signal-to-noise issues are discussed. Since electrical parameters vary widely among tissue types and pathological states, HE imaging may be a useful tool for biological research and medical diagnosis. PMID:9444846

  14. A CMOS Hall-Effect Sensor for the Characterization and Detection of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul; Skucha, Karl; Megens, Mischa; Boser, Bernhard

    2011-10-01

    A CMOS Hall-effect sensor chip designed for the characterization and detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) achieves over three orders of magnitude better temporal resolution than prior solutions based on superconducting quantum interference devices and fluxgate sensors. The sensor relies on wires embedded in the chip to generate a local magnetizing field that is switched OFF rapidly to observe the relaxation field of the MNPs. The CMOS sensor chip, with integrated high-speed readout electronics, occupies 6.25 mm(2). It can be easily integrated with microfluidics and is suitable for lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care applications. PMID:25308989

  15. A CMOS Hall-Effect Sensor for the Characterization and Detection of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul; Skucha, Karl; Megens, Mischa; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A CMOS Hall-effect sensor chip designed for the characterization and detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) achieves over three orders of magnitude better temporal resolution than prior solutions based on superconducting quantum interference devices and fluxgate sensors. The sensor relies on wires embedded in the chip to generate a local magnetizing field that is switched OFF rapidly to observe the relaxation field of the MNPs. The CMOS sensor chip, with integrated high-speed readout electronics, occupies 6.25 mm2. It can be easily integrated with microfluidics and is suitable for lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care applications. PMID:25308989

  16. Design and Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect-Based Soft Skin Sensor.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tito Pradhono; Somlor, Sophon; Schmitz, Alexander; Jamone, Lorenzo; Huang, Weijie; Kristanto, Harris; Sugano, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an easy means to produce a 3-axis Hall effect-based skin sensor for robotic applications. It uses an off-the-shelf chip and is physically small and provides digital output. Furthermore, the sensor has a soft exterior for safe interactions with the environment; in particular it uses soft silicone with about an 8 mm thickness. Tests were performed to evaluate the drift due to temperature changes, and a compensation using the integral temperature sensor was implemented. Furthermore, the hysteresis and the crosstalk between the 3-axis measurements were evaluated. The sensor is able to detect minimal forces of about 1 gf. The sensor was calibrated and results with total forces up to 1450 gf in the normal and tangential directions of the sensor are presented. The test revealed that the sensor is able to measure the different components of the force vector. PMID:27070604

  17. Hall-effect characterization of the metamagnetic transition in FeRh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, M. A.; Loving, M.; Mihai, A. P.; Lewis, L. H.; Heiman, D.; Marrows, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    The antiferromagnetic ground state and the metamagnetic transition to the ferromagnetic state of CsCl-ordered FeRh epilayers have been characterized using Hall and magnetoresistance measurements. On cooling into the ground state, the metamagnetic transition is found to coincide with a suppression in carrier density of at least an order of magnitude below the typical metallic level that is shown by the ferromagnetic state. The carrier density in the antiferromagnetic state is limited by intrinsic doping from Fe/Rh substitution defects, with approximately two electrons per pair of atoms swapped, showing that the decrease in carrier density could be even larger in more perfect specimens. The surprisingly large change in carrier density is a clear quantitative indication of the extent of change at the Fermi surface at the metamagnetic transition, confirming that entropy release at the transition is of electronic origin, and hence that an electronic transition underlies the metamagnetic transition. Regarding the nature of this electronic transition, it is suggested that an orbital selective Mott transition, selective to strongly-correlated Fe 3d electrons, could cause the reduction in the Fermi surface and change in sign of the magnetic exchange from FM to AF on cooling.

  18. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  19. Hall effect magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Beale, H. A.; Spain, I. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A magnetometer which uses a single crystal of bismuth selenide is described. The rhombohedral crystal structure of the sensing element is analyzed. The method of construction of the magnetometer is discussed. It is stated that the sensing crystal has a positive or negative Hall coefficient and a carrier concentration of about 10 to the 18th power to 10 to the 20th power per cubic centimeter.

  20. Multilayer thin film Hall effect device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, R. Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Hall effect device and a method of obtaining a magnetic field map of a magnetic body with the Hall effect device are presented. The device comprises: (1) a substrate, (2) a first layer having a first Hall coefficient deposited over the substrate, and (3) a second layer having a second Hall coefficient deposited over the first layer, the first and second layers cooperating to create, in the Hall effect device, a third Hall coefficient different from the first and second Hall coefficients. Creation of the third Hall coefficient by cooperation of the first and second layers allows use of materials for the first and second layers that were previously unavailable for Hall effect devices due to their relatively weak Hall coefficient.

  1. Design and Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect-Based Soft Skin Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tomo, Tito Pradhono; Somlor, Sophon; Schmitz, Alexander; Jamone, Lorenzo; Huang, Weijie; Kristanto, Harris; Sugano, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an easy means to produce a 3-axis Hall effect–based skin sensor for robotic applications. It uses an off-the-shelf chip and is physically small and provides digital output. Furthermore, the sensor has a soft exterior for safe interactions with the environment; in particular it uses soft silicone with about an 8 mm thickness. Tests were performed to evaluate the drift due to temperature changes, and a compensation using the integral temperature sensor was implemented. Furthermore, the hysteresis and the crosstalk between the 3-axis measurements were evaluated. The sensor is able to detect minimal forces of about 1 gf. The sensor was calibrated and results with total forces up to 1450 gf in the normal and tangential directions of the sensor are presented. The test revealed that the sensor is able to measure the different components of the force vector. PMID:27070604

  2. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A. D.; Dalslet, B. T.; Skieller, D. H.; Lee, K. H.; Okkels, F.; Hansen, M. F.

    2010-07-05

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can be significantly enhanced by a geometric factor. For the samples in the present study, we demonstrate an enhancement of the sensor output by a factor of about 100 compared to cross-shaped sensors. The presented construction opens a new design and application area of the planar Hall effect, which we term planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

  3. Hyperbolic supersymmetric quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hasebe, Kazuki

    2008-12-15

    Developing a noncompact version of the supersymmetric Hopf map, we formulate the quantum Hall effect on a superhyperboloid. Based on OSp(1|2) group theoretical methods, we first analyze the one-particle Landau problem, and successively explore the many-body problem where the Laughlin wave function, hard-core pseudopotential Hamiltonian, and topological excitations are derived. It is also shown that the fuzzy superhyperboloid emerges at the lowest Landau level.

  4. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance…

  5. Fractional quantum Hall effect revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, J.; Łydżba, P.; Jacak, L.

    2015-10-01

    The topology-based explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is summarized. The cyclotron braid subgroups crucial for this approach are introduced in order to identify the origin of the Laughlin correlations in 2D (two-dimensional) Hall systems. Flux-tubes and vortices for composite fermions in their standard constructions are explained in terms of cyclotron braids. The derivation of the hierarchy of the FQHE is proposed by mapping onto the integer effect within the topology-based approach. The experimental observations of the FQHE supporting the cyclotron braid picture are reviewed with a special attention paid to recent experiments with a suspended graphene. The triggering role of a carrier mobility for organization of the fractional state in Hall configuration is emphasized. The prerequisites for the FQHE are indicated including topological conditions substantially increasing the previously accepted set of physical necessities. The explanation of numerical studies by exact diagonalizations of the fractional Chern insulator states is formulated in terms of the topology condition applied to the Berry field flux quantization. Some new ideas withz regard to the synthetic fractional states in the optical lattices are also formulated.

  6. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-09-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance Requirements was contentious and his involvement in launching College Board Physics, what we call the "other Hall effect," has largely been overlooked. This article details Hall's role in the development of College Board Physics.

  7. Quantum Hall effects in a non-Abelian honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Hao, Ningning; Liu, Guocai; Bai, Zhiming; Li, Zai-Dong; Chen, Shu; Liu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the tunable quantum Hall effects in a non-Abelian honeycomb optical lattice which is a multi-Dirac-point system. We find that the quantum Hall effects present different features with the change in relative strengths of several perturbations. Namely, the quantum spin Hall effect can be induced by gauge-field-dressed next-nearest-neighbor hopping, which, together with a Zeeman field, can induce the quantum anomalous Hall effect characterized by different Chern numbers. Furthermore, we find that the edge states of the multi-Dirac-point system represent very different features for different boundary geometries, in contrast with the generic two-Dirac-point system. Our study extends the borders of the field of quantum Hall effects in a honeycomb optical lattice with multivalley degrees of freedom.

  8. Performance and Facility Background Pressure Characterization Tests of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Myers, James; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis; Sekerak, Michael; Polk, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP/TDM) project is funding the development of a 12.5-kW Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. The thruster designated Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) is a 12.5-kW Hall thruster with magnetic shielding incorporating a centrally mounted cathode. HERMeS was designed and modeled by a NASA GRC and JPL team and was fabricated and tested in vacuum facility 5 (VF5) at NASA GRC. Tests at NASA GRC were performed with the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1) thruster. TDU1's magnetic shielding topology was confirmed by measurement of anode potential and low electron temperature along the discharge chamber walls. Thermal characterization tests indicated that during full power thruster operation at peak magnetic field strength, the various thruster component temperatures were below prescribed maximum allowable limits. Performance characterization tests demonstrated the thruster's wide throttling range and found that the thruster can achieve a peak thruster efficiency of 63% at 12.5 kW 500 V and can attain a specific impulse of 3,000 s at 12.5 kW and a discharge voltage of 800 V. Facility background pressure variation tests revealed that the performance, operational characteristics, and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the TDU1 design were mostly insensitive to increases in background pressure.

  9. Combinatorial measurements of Hall effect and resistivity in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Clayhold, J A; Kerns, B M; Schroer, M D; Rench, D W; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Bozovic, I

    2008-03-01

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of the Hall effect in 31 different locations as well as the measurement of the resistivity in 30 different locations on a single oxide thin film grown with a composition gradient is described. Considerations for designing and operating a high-throughput system for characterizing highly conductive oxides with Hall coefficients as small as 10(-10) m3/C are discussed. Results from measurements on films grown using combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy show the usefulness of characterizing combinatorial libraries via both the resistivity and the Hall effect. PMID:18377026

  10. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  11. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  12. Characterization of photo-induced anomalous Hall effect in the two-dimensional MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingzi; Chen, Ji; Song, Yang; Li, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    We report the observation of a small but finite valley Hall effect (VHE) signal in two-dimensional MoS2 channels which is grown on SiO2/Si substrates under the circularly polarized light. And the angular dependence of VHE in two-dimensional MoS2 is studied. The VHE signal is a periodic function (period π) but with a phase shift, which confirms the presence of strong coupling between spin and valley. Furthermore, using a weak measurement under the condition of the optical circular dichroism, we find resembling beating phenomena, which suggests that a static electric field can induce oscillations. It is interesting that the interval time of the peak starts from an certain value, which is related to carrier densities. We suppose that this certain value is explained by a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas model, which is based on the Hall conductance quantized value of e2/h. To our knowledge, it is the first experiment that realizes such quantized values.

  13. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems. PMID:26274432

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  15. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  16. Metal-Film Hall-Effect Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.

    1994-01-01

    Large positive and negative Hall coefficients achievable. Family of Hall-effect devices made from multilayer metal films instead of semiconductor materials. Metal films easier to fabricate; formed by deposition on variety of substrates, and leads readily attached to them. Fabricated with larger areas, potentially more reliable, and less affected by impurities. Also used to measure magnetic fields. Devices especially useful at low temperatures.

  17. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-03-15

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted.

  18. The Design and Fabrication of Bismuth Hall Effect Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigillito, A. J.; Rudolph, M.; Soghomonian, V.; Heremans, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    Because of their high sensitivity, accuracy, and low cost, the use of Hall biosensors promises to be an effective diagnostic technique that may aid in the early diagnosis of diseases. In this research, Hall sensors were fabricated from thermally evaporated bismuth thin films. The bismuth films were deposited under high vacuum onto heated Si/ Si O2 substrates using a two layer deposition technique. The films varied in thickness from 60 nm to 75 nm and were etched into Hall bar geometries using photolithography and wet chemical etching. Magnetoresistance and Hall measurements were taken from 4 K to 300 K. The data indicate that the sensors may be characterized using a two carrier model with high mobility, low density holes and low mobility, high density electrons. Additionally, the sensors were exposed to magnetite nanoparticles and characterized using atomic force microscopy. The results will be reported. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant DMR-0851662).

  19. The Design and Fabrication of Bismuth Hall Effect Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigillito, Anthony; Rudolph, Martin; Soghomonian, Vicki; Heremans, J. J.

    2010-10-01

    Because of their high sensitivity, accuracy, and low cost, the use of Hall biosensors promises to be an effective diagnostic technique that may aid in the early diagnosis of diseases. In this research, Hall sensors were fabricated from thermally evaporated bismuth thin films. The bismuth films were deposited under high vacuum onto heated Si/SiO2 substrates using a two layer deposition technique. The films varied in thickness from 60 nm to 75 nm and were etched into Hall bar geometries using photolithography and wet chemical etching. Magnetoresistance and Hall measurements were taken from 4 K to 300 K. The data indicate that the sensors may be characterized using a two carrier model with high mobility, low density holes and low mobility, high density electrons. Additionally, the sensors were exposed to magnetite nanoparticles and characterized using atomic force microscopy. The results will be reported. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant DMR-0851662).

  20. Experimental realization of quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880. In this talk, we report the experimental observation of the quantized version of AHE, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance exhibits a quantized value of h /e2 accompanied by a significant drop of the longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal resistance vanishes under a strong magnetic field whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of QAHE paves a way for developing low-power-consumption electronics. Implications on observing Majorana fermions and other exotic phenomena in magnetic topological insulators will also be discussed. The work was collaborated with Ke He, Yayu Wang, Xucun Ma, Xi Chen, Li Lv, Dai Xi, Zhong Fang and Shoucheng Zhang.

  1. Observation of spin Hall effective field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xin; Wu, Jun; Chen, Yunpeng; Jerry, Matthew; Zhang, Huaiwu; Xiao, John

    2013-03-01

    Recent development in spin Hall driven spin transfer torque has attracted intensive interests1. Liu et. al. has shown that the spin transfer torque induced by the spin Hall effect in a normal metal-ferromagnetic metal bilayer can switch the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer, which may be a potential candidate for magnetic random access memory2. The switching of the magnetization was primarily attributed to the Slonczewski torque3. We show that besides the Slonczewski torque, the spin Hall effect also produces an effective field that can also facilitate the magnetization reversal. This effective field persists even with a Cu spacer layer, and reduces quickly with the increase of the ferromagnetic layer thickness. The observation of the spin Hall effective field shall have ramification on the understanding of both spin transfer torque and spin Hall effect. 1. K. Ando et. al., Electric manipulation of spin relaxation using the spin Hall effect, Physical Review Letters, 101, 036601 (2008). 2. L. Liu et. al., Spin-Torque Switching with the Giant Spin Hall Effect of Tantalum. Science 336, 555-558 (2012). 3. J. Slonczewski, Current-driven excitation of magnetic multilayers. Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, 159, L1-L7 (1996).

  2. Geometric Hall effects in topological insulator heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Wakatsuki, R.; Morimoto, T.; Yoshimi, R.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Ezawa, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Geometry, both in momentum and in real space, plays an important role in the electronic dynamics of condensed matter systems. Among them, the Berry phase associated with nontrivial geometry can be an origin of the transverse motion of electrons, giving rise to various geometric effects such as the anomalous, spin and topological Hall effects. Here, we report two unconventional manifestations of Hall physics: a sign-reversal of the anomalous Hall effect, and the emergence of a topological Hall effect in magnetic/non-magnetic topological insulator heterostructures, Crx(Bi1-ySby)2-xTe3/(Bi1-ySby)2Te3. The sign-reversal in the anomalous Hall effect is driven by a Rashba splitting at the bulk bands, which is caused by the broken spatial inversion symmetry. Instead, the topological Hall effect arises in a wide temperature range below the Curie temperature, in a region where the magnetic-field dependence of the Hall resistance largely deviates from the magnetization. Its origin is assigned to the formation of a Néel-type skyrmion induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

  3. The quantum Hall effects: Philosophical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, P.

    2015-05-01

    The Quantum Hall Effects offer a rich variety of theoretical and experimental advances. They provide interesting insights on such topics as gauge invariance, strong interactions in Condensed Matter physics, emergence of new paradigms. This paper focuses on some related philosophical questions. Various brands of positivism or agnosticism are confronted with the physics of the Quantum Hall Effects. Hacking's views on Scientific Realism, Chalmers' on Non-Figurative Realism are discussed. It is argued that the difficulties with those versions of realism may be resolved within a dialectical materialist approach. The latter is argued to provide a rational approach to the phenomena, theory and ontology of the Quantum Hall Effects.

  4. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  5. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  6. Spin-Hall effects in metallic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    Materials possessing new parameters for efficient and tunable spin Hall effects are being explored, among which antiferromagnets have become one of the most promising candidates. Two distinct properties of antiferromagnets are the microscopic spin magnetic moment ordering and the intrinsic anisotropy. Thus the natural question arises whether these two unique features of antiferromagnets can become new degrees of freedom for tuning their spin Hall effects. We performed experimental studies using spin pumping and inverse spin Hall detection on prototypical CuAu-I-type metallic antiferromagnets, PtMn, IrMn, PdMn, and FeMn, in which we observed increasing spin Hall effects for the alloys with heavier elements included. In particular, PtMn shows a large spin Hall effect that is comparable to Pt. We also demonstrated that the spin transfer torques from the antiferromagnets are large enough to excite ferromagnetic resonance of an adjacent ferromagnetic layer. We conclude that the sign and magnitude of the spin Hall effects in these antiferromagnets are determined by the atomic spin-orbit coupling of the heavy elements (e.g. Pt and Ir) as well as the large spin magnetic moments of Mn. In addition, by using epitaxial growth, we investigated the influence of the different crystalline and magnetic orientations on the anisotropic spin Hall effects of these antiferromagnets. Most of the experimental results were further corroborated by first-principles calculations, which determine the intrinsic spin Hall effect contribution and suggest pronounced anisotropies. Thus metallic antiferromagnets may become an active component for manipulating spin dependent transport properties in spintronic concepts. Work at Argonne was supported by the U.S. DOE, OS, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. Work at Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by DOE, OS-BES (DE-AC02-06CH11357). Work at Julich was supported by SPP 1538 Programme of the DFG.

  7. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G

    2016-03-25

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry. PMID:27058090

  8. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-01

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry.

  9. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, [le][approximately][ovr J] [times] [approximately][ovr B][ge], has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  10. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, {le}{approximately}{ovr J} {times} {approximately}{ovr B}{ge}, has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  11. Extrinsic spin Hall effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoport, Tatiana

    The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in graphene is extremely weak, making it a promising spin conductor for spintronic devices. In addition, many applications also require the generation of spin currents in graphene. Theoretical predictions and recent experimental results suggest one can engineer the spin Hall effect in graphene by greatly enhancing the spin-orbit coupling in the vicinity of an impurity. The extrinsic spin Hall effect then results from the spin-dependent skew scattering of electrons by impurities in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. This effect can be used to efficiently convert charge currents into spin-polarized currents. I will discuss recent experimental results on spin Hall effect in graphene decorated with adatoms and metallic cluster and show that a large spin Hall effect can appear due to skew scattering. While this spin-orbit coupling is small if compared with what it is found in metals, the effect is strongly enhanced in the presence of resonant scattering, giving rise to robust spin Hall angles. I will present our single impurity scattering calculations done with exact partial-wave expansions and complement the analysis with numerical results from a novel real-space implementation of the Kubo formalism for tight-binding Hamiltonians. The author acknowledges the Brazilian agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPERJ and INCT de Nanoestruturas de Carbono for financial support.

  12. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor. PMID:27025354

  13. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  14. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yi, H T; Gartstein, Y N; Podzorov, V

    2016-01-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor. PMID:27025354

  15. Spin Hall Effect in Doped Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2006-03-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect based on the diagrammatic perturbation theory. Side-jump (SJ) and skew-scattering (SS) contributions are explicitly taken into account to calculate the spin Hall conductivity, and we show their effects scale as σxy^SJ/σxy^SS ˜(/τ)/ɛF, where τ being the transport relaxation time. Motivated by recent experimental work we apply our theory to n-doped and p-doped 3D and 2D GaAs structures, obtaining analytical formulas for the SJ and SS contributions. Moreover, the ratio of the spin Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity is found as σs/σc˜10-3-10-4, in reasonable agreement with the recent experimental results of Kato et al. [Science 306, 1910 (2004)] in n-doped 3D GaAs system.

  16. Spin Hall Effect in Doped Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Das Sarma, S.

    2006-02-01

    In this Letter we present a microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect based on the diagrammatic perturbation theory. Side-jump and skew-scattering contributions are explicitly taken into account to calculate the spin Hall conductivity, and we show that their effects scale as σxySJ/σxySS˜(ℏ/τ)/ɛF, with τ being the transport relaxation time. Motivated by recent experimental work we apply our theory to n- and p-doped 3D and 2D GaAs structures, obtaining σs/σc˜10-3-10-4, where σs(c) is the spin Hall (charge) conductivity, which is in reasonable agreement with the recent experimental results of Kato et al. [Science 306, 1910 (2004)]SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1105514 in n-doped 3D GaAs system.

  17. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K W; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  18. The fractional quantum hall effect (experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stormer, H. L.

    1984-11-01

    Quantization of the Hall resistance ϱ XY in two-dimensional electron systems and simultaneously vanishing resistivity ϱ XX have been observed at fractional filling ν of Landau levels, ν being close to various rational fractions of p/q with exclusively odd denominator. Where resolved, the Hall resistance is quantized to ϱ XY=h/νe 2 to high accuracy. While the normal quantized Hall effect at integer values of ν=i, (i=1,2,3...) reflects the Landau and spin gaps in the single particle density of states of electrons in a magnetic field, this new phenomena is believed to indicate the condensation of the carriers into a novel, highly-correlated electronic state best described as an electron quantum liquid.

  19. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  20. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  1. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  2. Fractional Quantization of the Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-02-27

    The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect is caused by the condensation of a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field into a new type of macroscopic ground state, the elementary excitations of which are fermions of charge 1/m, where m is an odd integer. A mathematical description is presented.

  3. The Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without an external magnetic field. The quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, the quantum anomalous Hall effect was proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimental developments in this field.

  4. Improved Hall-Effect Sensors For Magnetic Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.; Chen, Y. C.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    1993-01-01

    High-electron-mobility sensor films deposited on superlattice buffer (strain) layers. Improved Hall-effect sensors offer combination of adequate response and high speed needed for use in micromagnet/Hall-effect random-access memories. Hall-effect material chosen for use in sensors is InAs.

  5. Improved Readout For Micromagnet/Hall-Effect Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1993-01-01

    Two improved readout circuits for micromagnet/Hall-effect random-access memories designed to eliminate current shunts introducing errors into outputs of older readout circuits. Incorporate additional switching transistors to isolate Hall sensors as needed.

  6. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  7. High temperature Hall measurement setup for thin film characterization.

    PubMed

    Adnane, L; Gokirmak, A; Silva, H

    2016-07-01

    Hall measurement using the van der Pauw technique is a common characterization approach that does not require patterning of contacts. Measurements of the Hall voltage and electrical resistivity lead to the product of carrier mobility and carrier concentration (Hall coefficient) which can be decoupled through transport models. Based on the van der Paw method, we have developed an automated setup for Hall measurements from room temperature to ∼500 °C of semiconducting thin films of a wide resistivity range. The resistivity of the film and Hall coefficient is obtained from multiple current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed using a semiconductor parameter analyzer under applied constant "up," zero, and "down" magnetic field generated with two neodymium permanent magnets. The use of slopes obtained from multiple I-Vs for the three magnetic field conditions offer improved accuracy. Samples are preferred in square shape geometry and can range from 2 mm to 25 mm side length. Example measurements of single-crystal silicon with known doping concentration show the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. PMID:27475605

  8. High temperature Hall measurement setup for thin film characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnane, L.; Gokirmak, A.; Silva, H.

    2016-07-01

    Hall measurement using the van der Pauw technique is a common characterization approach that does not require patterning of contacts. Measurements of the Hall voltage and electrical resistivity lead to the product of carrier mobility and carrier concentration (Hall coefficient) which can be decoupled through transport models. Based on the van der Paw method, we have developed an automated setup for Hall measurements from room temperature to ˜500 °C of semiconducting thin films of a wide resistivity range. The resistivity of the film and Hall coefficient is obtained from multiple current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed using a semiconductor parameter analyzer under applied constant "up," zero, and "down" magnetic field generated with two neodymium permanent magnets. The use of slopes obtained from multiple I-Vs for the three magnetic field conditions offer improved accuracy. Samples are preferred in square shape geometry and can range from 2 mm to 25 mm side length. Example measurements of single-crystal silicon with known doping concentration show the accuracy and reliability of the measurement.

  9. Developments in the quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Klaus

    2005-09-15

    The most important applications of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) are in the field of metrology. The observed quantization of the resistance is primarily used for the reproduction of the SI unit ohm, but is also important for high precision measurements of both the fine structure constant and the Planck constant. Some current QHE research areas include the analysis of new electron-electron correlation phenomena and the development of a more complete microscopic picture of this quantum effect. Recently, scanning force microscopy (SFM) of the potential distribution in QHE devices has been used to enhance the microscopic understanding of current flow in quantum Hall systems. This confirms the importance of the theoretically predicted stripes of compressible and incompressible electronic states close to the boundary of the QHE devices. PMID:16147506

  10. Multipole expansion in the quantum hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Randellini, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The effective action for low-energy excitations of Laughlin's states is obtained by systematic expansion in inverse powers of the magnetic field. It is based on the W- infinity symmetry of quantum incompressible fluids and the associated higher-spin fields. Besides reproducing the Wen and Wen-Zee actions and the Hall viscosity, this approach further indicates that the low-energy excitations are extended objects with dipolar and multipolar moments.

  11. High temperature Hall-effect apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, A.; Chmielewski, A.; Parker, J.; Zoltan, A.

    1984-01-01

    A high-temperature Hall-effect apparatus is described which allows measurements up to temperatures greater than 1200 K using the van der Pauw method. The apparatus was designed for measurements on refractory materials having high charge carrier concentrations and generally low mobilities. Pressure contacts are applied to the samples. Consequently, special contacting methods, peculiar to a specific sample material, are not required. The apparatus has been semiautomated to facilitate measurements. Results are presented on n- and p-type silicon.

  12. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B) and electric (E) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ^{2} rather than κ. For E=0, SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ. In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems. PMID:27300880

  13. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B ) and electric (E ) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ2 rather than κ . For E =0 , SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ . In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems.

  14. Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A.; Burch, Kenneth S.; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    We examine theoretically the interplay between chiral photons and chiral electrons in Weyl semimetals. Owing to its monopole nature, a three-dimensional Weyl node is topologically-robust against a circularly polarized light. A driven Weyl system exhibits node shifts in the momentum space, in sharp contrast to the gap opening in a driven two-dimensional Dirac system. We show that the node shift leads to a change of the Chern vector which gives arise to a net photoinduced anomalous Hall conductivity, in the plane perpendicular to the light propagation. We shall describe the basic idea behind this generic photoinduced Hall effect, illustrate it with a concrete microscope model, and estimate its feasibility based on current optical experimental techniques.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in Weyl superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednik, G.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Burkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a topological Weyl superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. Specifically, we consider a ferromagnetic Weyl metal with two Weyl nodes of opposite chirality near the Fermi energy. In the presence of inversion symmetry, such a metal experiences a weak-coupling Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer instability, with pairing of parity-related eigenstates. Due to the nonzero topological charge, carried by the Weyl nodes, such a superconductor is necessarily topologically nontrivial, with Majorana surface states coexisting with the Fermi arcs of the normal Weyl metal. We demonstrate that, surprisingly, the anomalous Hall conductivity of such a superconducting Weyl metal coincides with that of a nonsuperconducting one, under certain conditions, in spite of the nonconservation of charge in a superconductor. We relate this to the existence of an extra (nearly) conserved quantity in a Weyl metal, the chiral charge.

  16. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  17. Spin Hall Effect in Disordered Organic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. G.

    2015-07-01

    We study the spin Hall effect (SHE) in disordered π -conjugated organic solids, where individual molecules are oriented randomly and electrical conduction is via carrier hopping. The SHE, which arises from interference between direct (i →j ) and indirect (i →k →j ) hoppings in a triad consisting of three molecules i , j , and k , is found to be proportional to λ (ni×nj+nj×nk+nk×ni), where λ is the spin admixture of π electrons due to the spin-orbit coupling and ni is the orientation vector of molecule i . Electrical conductivity σq q (q =x ,y ,z ) and spin Hall conductivity σsh are computed by numerically solving the master equations of a system containing 32 ×32 ×32 molecules and summing over contributions from all triads in the system. The obtained value of the spin Hall angle Θsh is consistent with experimental data in PEDOT:PSS, with a predicted temperature dependence of log Θsh˜T-1 /4 .

  18. A Magnetic Balance with Hall Effect Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hideo; Kunimasu, Tetsuya; Suda, Shinichi; Mizoguti, Yasushi; Okada, Takumi

    Magnetic force acting on a model fixed at the center of the JAXA 60cm MSBS was measured with an industry manufactured balance system when MSBS control coil currents were varied. At the same time, magnetic field intensity was also measured with 11 Hall sensors, which were arranged around the MSBS test section. From relations between coil currents and its corresponding controlled magnetic forces, regressive curves were given and maximum deviation from the curves was evaluated. From relations between Hall sensor outputs and the magnetic forces, regressive curves and deviation were also obtained. Obtained results show Hall sensor outputs are much better indexes of balance than the coil currents. The maximum deviations were reduced to a half or one-third times as much as those evaluated using the control coil currents. However, when couples acting on the model are controlled, they are not effective to reduce hysteresis phenomenon in the relation. The deviation can be reduced by decreasing the range of calibration. Then, the error of the balance of the MSBS was reduced to about 1% of the calibration range.

  19. Optical spin Hall effects in plasmonic chains.

    PubMed

    Shitrit, Nir; Bretner, Itay; Gorodetski, Yuri; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2011-05-11

    Observation of optical spin Hall effects (OSHEs) manifested by a spin-dependent momentum redirection is presented. The effect occurring solely as a result of the curvature of the coupled localized plasmonic chain is regarded as the locally isotropic OSHE, while the locally anisotropic OSHE arises from the interaction between the optical spin and the local anisotropy of the plasmonic mode rotating along the chain. A wavefront phase dislocation was observed in a circular curvature, in which the dislocation strength was enhanced by the locally anisotropic effect. PMID:21513279

  20. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Kim, Dong-Jun; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Byong-Guk; Park, Seung-Young

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE011 resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage VISHE for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure VISHE and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage VAHE utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θISH, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θISH values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable VISHE value in bilayer systems are large θISH and low resistivity.

  1. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  2. Volumetric Hall Effect Tomography – A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    Hall effect imaging is an ultrasound-based method of mapping spatial variations in the dielectric constants of an acoustically-uniform sample. This paper presents three-dimensional Hall effect images of phantoms obtained by scanning a single transducer across a two-dimensional grid, effectively simulating two-dimensional phased-array signal reception. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of volumetric Hall effect tomography and show the advantage of volumetric scans over planar scans. The images reflect several limitations of the current scanning method and point to directions for further hardware development. The inherent limitations of Hall effect imaging are also discussed in light of these results. PMID:10604800

  3. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  4. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    PubMed Central

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  5. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  6. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  7. Faster Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Johnson, Daniel D.; Walker, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Current-measuring circuit operates on Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling principles similar to those described in article, "Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit" (LEW-15023), but simpler and responds faster. Designed without feedback loop, and analog pulse-width-modulated output indicates measured current. Circuit measures current at frequency higher than bandwidth of its Hall-effect sensor.

  8. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force actingmore » on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Lastly, our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.« less

  9. Kinetic effects in a Hall thruster discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.

    2007-05-15

    Recent analytical studies and particle-in-cell simulations suggested that the electron velocity distribution function in ExB discharge of annular geometry Hall thrusters is non-Maxwellian and anisotropic. The average kinetic energy of electron motion in the direction parallel to the thruster channel walls (across the magnetic field) is several times larger than that in the direction normal to the walls. Electrons are stratified into several groups depending on their origin (e.g., plasma or channel walls) and confinement (e.g., lost on the walls or trapped in the plasma). Practical analytical formulas are derived for the plasma flux to the wall, secondary electron fluxes, plasma potential, and electron cross-field conductivity. Calculations based on these formulas fairly agree with the results of numerical simulations. The self-consistent analysis demonstrates that the elastic electron scattering in collisions with atoms and ions plays a key role in formation of the electron velocity distribution function and the plasma potential with respect to the walls. It is shown that the secondary electron emission from the walls may significantly enhance the electron conductivity across the magnetic field but only weakly affects the insulating properties of the near-wall sheath. Such self-consistent decoupling between the secondary electron emission effects on the electron energy losses and the electron cross-field transport is currently not captured by the existing fluid and hybrid models of Hall thrusters.

  10. Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, James; Johnson, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band waveguide tee, which lies in the center of an electromagnet, injecting power into the two opposing arms of the tee, and measuring the output at the third arm. Application of a magnetic field gives a Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. This method yields the semiconductor mobility, which we can compare for calibration purposes with mobility data from direct-current (Van der Pauw1) measurements. We are in the process of modeling the system using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation to better understand the behavior of the electric fields inside the sample. Resistivity data is obtained by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This talk presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. Measured mobilities ranged from 270-3000 cm2/V.s . 1L. J. van der Pauw, PhilipsResearchReports 13, 1 (1958)

  11. Topological honeycomb magnon Hall effect: A calculation of thermal Hall conductivity of magnetic spin excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Quite recently, the magnon Hall effect of spin excitations has been observed experimentally on the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. The thermal Hall conductivity κxy changes sign as a function of magnetic field or temperature on the kagome lattice, and κxy changes sign upon reversing the sign of the magnetic field on the pyrochlore lattice. Motivated by these recent exciting experimental observations, we theoretically propose a simple realization of the magnon Hall effect in a two-band model on the honeycomb lattice. The magnon Hall effect of spin excitations arises in the usual way via the breaking of inversion symmetry of the lattice, however, by a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We find that κxy has a fixed sign for all parameter regimes considered. These results are in contrast to the Lieb, kagome, and pyrochlore lattices. We further show that the low-temperature dependence on the magnon Hall conductivity follows a T2 law, as opposed to the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. These results suggest an experimental procedure to measure thermal Hall conductivity within a class of 2D honeycomb quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in a honeycomb optical lattice.

  12. Automated High-Temperature Hall-Effect Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, James B.; Zoltan, Leslie D.

    1992-01-01

    Automated apparatus takes Hall-effect measurements of specimens of thermoelectric materials at temperatures from ambient to 1,200 K using computer control to obtain better resolution of data and more data points about three times as fast as before. Four-probe electrical-resistance measurements taken in 12 electrical and 2 magnetic orientations to characterize specimens at each temperature. Computer acquires data, and controls apparatus via three feedback loops: one for temperature, one for magnetic field, and one for electrical-potential data.

  13. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of -, and Rashba heavy hole instead of -. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity.

  14. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of −, and Rashba heavy hole instead of −. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity. PMID:26689260

  15. Hall effect in a moving liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lieto, Alberto; Giuliano, Alessia; Maccarrone, Francesco; Paffuti, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment, suitable for performing in an undergraduate physics laboratory, illustrates electromagnetic induction through the water entering into a cylindrical rubber tube by detecting the voltage developed across the tube in the direction transverse both to the flow velocity and to the magnetic field. The apparatus is a very simple example of an electromagnetic flowmeter, a device which is commonly used both in industrial and physiological techniques. The phenomenology observed is similar to that of the Hall effect in the absence of an electric current in the direction of motion of the carriers. The experimental results show a dependence on the intensity of the magnetic field and on the carrier velocity, in good agreement with the theory. Discussion of the system, based on classical electromagnetism, indicates that the effect depends only on the flow rate, and is independent both of the velocity profile and of the electrical conductivity of the medium.

  16. Hall-Effect Thruster Utilizing Bismuth as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James; Gasdaska, Charles; Hruby, Vlad; Robin, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-model Hall-effect spacecraft thruster was developed that utilizes bismuth as the propellant. Xenon was used in most prior Hall-effect thrusters. Bismuth is an attractive alternative because it has a larger atomic mass, a larger electron-impact-ionization cross-section, and is cheaper and more plentiful.

  17. Magnonic Hall effect and topological magnonic crystals (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-09-01

    In electronic systems it is well established that when there is a magnetic field or spontaneous magnetization, the Hall effect, and in some cases the quantum Hall effect appears. We theoretically pursue analogs of these phenomena in magnons (spin waves) and plasmons. In the case of magnons in ferromagnets, the Hall effect or quantum Hall effect requires some kind of a spin-orbit coupling (similar to electronic systems), and we show that the dipolar interaction, as well as the Dyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, plays the role. By calculating the Berry curvature from the wavefunction, we can calculate thermal Hall effect for magnons in ferromagnets with dipolar interaction. We found that only the magnetostatic forward volume-wave mode exhibits the thermal Hall effect while the backward mode and the surface mode do not. In addition, by introducing some artificial spatial periodicity into the magnet, for example by fabricating nanostructures with two different magnets in a periodic structure or by making a periodic array of nanomagnets, we theoretically find appearance of quantum Hall effect in a certain range of the magnetic field. There appear chiral edge states which propagate along the edge of the magnet in one way. We call this a topological magnonic crystal. In the plasmon case, we should begin with constructing a fundamental band theory, and we theoretically show that on a metal surface with corrugations forming a triangular lattice under the magnetic field, the quantum Hall effect appears. It can be called a topological plasmonic crystal.

  18. Useful Pedagogical Applications of the Classical Hall Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    One of the most known phenomena in physics is the Hall effect. This is mainly due to its simplicity and to the wide range of its theoretical and practical applications. To complete the pedagogical utility of the Hall effect in physics teaching, I will apply it here to determine the Faraday constant as a fundamental physical number and the number…

  19. Mesoscopic spin Hall effect in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarbo, Liviu

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) is a name given to a collection of diverse phenomena which share two principal features: (i) longitudinal electric current flowing through a paramagnetic semiconductor or metallic sample leads to transverse spin current and spin accumulation of opposite sign at opposing lateral edges; (ii) SHE does not require externally applied magnetic field or magnetic ordering in the equilibrium state of the sample, instead it relies on the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings within the sample. This thesis elaborates on a new type of phenomenon within the SHE family, predicted in our recent studies [Phys. Rev. B 72, 075361 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 046601 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 72, 075335 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 73 , 075303 (2006); and Europhys. Lett. 77, 47004 (2007)], where pure spin current flows through the transverse electrodes attached to a clean finitesize two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) due to unpolarized charge current injected through its longitudinal leads. If transverse leads are removed, the effect manifests as nonequilibrium spin Hall accumulation at the lateral edges of 2DEG wires. The SO coupling driving this SHE effect is of the Rashba type, which arises due to structural inversion asymmetry of semiconductor heterostructure hosting the 2DEG. We term the effect "mesoscopic" because the spin Hall currents and accumulations reach optimal value in samples of the size of the spin precession length---the distance over which the spin of an electron precesses by an angle pi. In strongly SO-coupled structures this scale is of the order of ˜100 nm, and, therefore, mesoscopic in the sense of being much larger than the characteristic microscopic scales (such as the Fermi wavelength, screening length, or the mean free path in disordered systems), but still much smaller than the macroscopic ones. Although the first theoretical proposal for SHE, driven by asymmetry in SO-dependent scattering of spin-up and spin-down electrons off impurities

  20. Magnetic circuit for hall effect plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H. (Inventor); Jacobson, David T. (Inventor); Jankovsky, Robert S. (Inventor); Hofer, Richard (Inventor); Peterson, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A Hall effect plasma accelerator includes inner and outer electromagnets, circumferentially surrounding the inner electromagnet along a thruster centerline axis and separated therefrom, inner and outer magnetic conductors, in physical connection with their respective inner and outer electromagnets, with the inner magnetic conductor having a mostly circular shape and the outer magnetic conductor having a mostly annular shape, a discharge chamber, located between the inner and outer magnetic conductors, a magnetically conducting back plate, in magnetic contact with the inner and outer magnetic conductors, and a combined anode electrode/gaseous propellant distributor, located at a bottom portion of the discharge chamber. The inner and outer electromagnets, the inner and outer magnetic conductors and the magnetically conducting back plate form a magnetic circuit that produces a magnetic field that is largely axial and radially symmetric with respect to the thruster centerline.

  1. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  2. Cathode effects in cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E. M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-11-15

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  3. Radial spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Weixing; Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; Ling, Xiaohui; Luo, Hailu; Yin, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    We propose and realize a radial spin Hall effect (SHE) of light by using a dielectric metasurface. The metasurface with radially varying optical axes introduces a Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) geometrical phase to the incident light. The spatial gradient of PB phase accounts for a shift in the momentum space and thus leads the light to split radially into two concentric rays with opposite spin in the position space, which is called a radial SHE. Further experiments verify that the magnitude of the splitting increases with the rotation rate of the optical-axis orientation and the propagation distance, thereby allowing for macroscopic observation of the SHE. We also find that the phase of the incident light influences the profiles of the two split rays, while the polarization determines their intensities. The results provide methods to tune the SHE of light by engineering metasurfaces and modulating the incident light, and this radial SHE may be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  4. Quantum Numbers of Textured Hall Effect Quasiparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, C.; Wilczek, F.

    1996-11-01

    We propose a class of variational wave functions with slow variation in spin and charge density and simple vortex structure at infinity, which properly generalize both the Laughlin quasiparticles and baby Skyrmions. We argue, on the basis of these wave functions and a spin-statistics relation in the relevant effective field theory, that the spin of the corresponding quasiparticle has a fractional part related in a universal fashion to the properties of the bulk state. We propose a direct experimental test of this claim. We show that certain spin-singlet quantum Hall states can be understood as arising from primary polarized states by Skyrmion condensation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Formulation of the relativistic quantum Hall effect and parity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonaga, Kouki; Hasebe, Kazuki; Shibata, Naokazu

    2016-06-01

    We present a relativistic formulation of the quantum Hall effect on Haldane sphere. An explicit form of the pseudopotential is derived for the relativistic quantum Hall effect with/without mass term. We clarify particular features of the relativistic quantum Hall states with the use of the exact diagonalization study of the pseudopotential Hamiltonian. Physical effects of the mass term to the relativistic quantum Hall states are investigated in detail. The mass term acts as an interpolating parameter between the relativistic and nonrelativistic quantum Hall effects. It is pointed out that the mass term unevenly affects the many-body physics of the positive and negative Landau levels as a manifestation of the "parity anomaly." In particular, we explicitly demonstrate the instability of the Laughlin state of the positive first relativistic Landau level with the reduction of the charge gap.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  7. Asymmetric nonlinear response of the quantized Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, A.; Horas, J.; Kupidura, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Ludwig, S.

    2010-11-01

    An asymmetric breakdown of the integer quantized Hall effect (IQHE) is investigated. This rectification effect is observed as a function of the current value and its direction in conjunction with an asymmetric lateral confinement potential defining the Hall bar. Our electrostatic definition of the Hall bar via Schottky gates allows a systematic control of the steepness of the confinement potential at the edges of the Hall bar. A softer edge (flatter confinement potential) results in more stable Hall plateaus, i.e. a breakdown at a larger current density. For one soft and one hard edge, the breakdown current depends on its direction, resembling rectification. This nonlinear magneto-transport effect confirms the predictions of an emerging screening theory of the IQHE.

  8. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  9. High temperature hall effect measurement system design, measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Isil

    A reliable knowledge of the transport properties of semiconductor materials is essential for the development and understanding of a number of electronic devices. In this thesis, the work on developing a Hall Effect measurement system with software based data acqui- sition and control for a temperature range of 300K-700K will be described. A system was developed for high temperature measurements of materials including single crystal diamond, poly-crystalline diamond, and thermoelectric compounds. An added capability for monitor- ing the current versus voltage behavior of the contacts was used for studying the influence of ohmic and non-ohmic contacts on Hall Effect measurements. The system has been primar- ily used for testing the transport properties of boron-doped single crystal diamond (SCD) deposited in a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor [1]. Diamond has several outstanding properties that are of high interest for its development as an electronic material. These include a relatively wide band gap of 5.5 (eV), high thermal conductivity, high mobility, high saturation velocity, and a high breakdown voltage. For a temperature range of 300K-700K, IV curves, Hall mobilities and carrier concentrations are shown. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements have shown carrier concentrations from below 1017cm --3 to approximately 1021 cm--3 with mobilities ranging from 763( cm2/V s) to 0.15(cm 2/V s) respectively. Simulation results have shown the effects of single and mixed carrier models, activation energies, effective mass and doping concentrations. These studies have been helpful in the development of single crystal diamond for diode applications. Reference materials of Ge and GaAs were used to test the Hall Effect system. The system was also used to characterize polycrystalline diamond deposited on glass for electrochemical applications, and Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds which are promising candidates of low-cost, light weight and non

  10. Optical Emission Characterization of High-Power Hall Thruster Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    WIlliams, George J.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to correlate BN insulator erosion with high-power operation of the NASA 300M Hall-effect thruster. Actinometry leveraging excited xenon states is used to normalize the emission spectra of ground state boron as a function of thruster operating condition. Trends in the strength of the boron signal are correlated with thruster power, discharge voltage, discharge current and magnetic field strength. The boron signals are shown to trend with discharge current and show weak dependence on discharge voltage. The trends are consistent with data previously collected on the NASA 300M and NASA 457M thrusters but are different from conventional wisdom.

  11. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Tahir, M; Vasilopoulos, P; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-09-28

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the light's polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity [Formula: see text] at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with [Formula: see text]. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at [Formula: see text]. PMID:27460419

  12. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-09-01

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the light’s polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity {σyx}=0 at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with {σyx}={{e}2}/2h . These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at (+/- 1/2,+/- 3/2,+/- 5/2,...){{e}2}/h .

  13. Topological insulator in junction with ferromagnets: Quantum Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.; Kagalovsky, V.

    2015-06-01

    The ferromagnet-topological insulator-ferromagnet (FM-TI-FM) junction exhibits thermal and electrical quantum Hall effects. The generated Hall voltage and transverse temperature gradient can be controlled by the directions of magnetizations in the FM leads, which inspires the use of FM-TI-FM junctions as electrical and as heat switches in spintronic devices. Thermal and electrical Hall coefficients are calculated as functions of the magnetization directions in ferromagnets and the spin-relaxation time in TI. Both the Hall voltage and the transverse temperature gradient decrease but are not completely suppressed even at very short spin-relaxation times. The Hall coefficients turn out to be independent of the spin-relaxation time for symmetric configuration of FM leads.

  14. Fractional quantum Hall effect in a tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papić, Z.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the orbital effect of a tilted magnetic field on the quantum Hall effect in parabolic quantum wells. Many-body states realized at the fractional (1)/(3) and (1)/(2) filling of the second electronic subband are studied using finite-size exact diagonalization. In both cases, we obtain the phase diagram consisting of a fractional quantum Hall fluid phase that persists for moderate tilts, and eventually undergoes a direct transition to the stripe phase. It is shown that tilting of the field probes the geometrical degree of freedom of fractional quantum Hall fluids, and can be partly related to the effect of band-mass anisotropy.

  15. Magnet/Hall-Effect Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed magnet/Hall-effect random-access memory (MHRAM), bits of data stored magnetically in Perm-alloy (or equivalent)-film memory elements and read out by using Hall-effect sensors to detect magnetization. Value of each bit represented by polarity of magnetization. Retains data for indefinite time or until data rewritten. Speed of Hall-effect sensors in MHRAM results in readout times of about 100 nanoseconds. Other characteristics include high immunity to ionizing radiation and storage densities of order 10(Sup6)bits/cm(Sup 2) or more.

  16. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B A; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be [formula in text] instead of [formula in text], and Rashba heavy hole [formula in text] instead of [formula in text]. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity. PMID:26689260

  17. Giant Room Temperature Interface Spin Hall and Inverse Spin Hall Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wesselink, R. J. H.; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Zhe; Xia, Ke; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-05-01

    The spin Hall angle (SHA) is a measure of the efficiency with which a transverse spin current is generated from a charge current by the spin-orbit coupling and disorder in the spin Hall effect (SHE). In a study of the SHE for a Pt |Py (Py =Ni80Fe20 ) bilayer using a first-principles scattering approach, we find a SHA that increases monotonically with temperature and is proportional to the resistivity for bulk Pt. By decomposing the room temperature SHE and inverse SHE currents into bulk and interface terms, we discover a giant interface SHA that dominates the total inverse SHE current with potentially major consequences for applications.

  18. Observing the Quantum Spin Hall Effect with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishnav, J. Y.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Clark, Charles W.; Galitski, Victor

    2009-03-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically nontrivial state of matter proposed to exist in certain 2-D systems with spin-orbit coupling. While the electronic states of a QSH insulator are gapped in the bulk, a QSH insulator is characterized by gapless edge states of different spins which counterpropagate at a given edge; the spin is correlated with the direction of propagation. Recent proposals ootnotetextT. D. Stanescu, C. Zhang, V. Galitski, Physical Review Letters 99, 110403 (2007), J. Y. Vaishnav, Charles W. Clark, Physical Review Letters 100, 153002 (2008). suggest that synthetic spin-orbit couplings can be created for cold atoms moving in spatially varying light fields. Here, we identify an optical lattice setup which generates an effective QSH effect for cold, multilevel atoms. We also discuss methods for experimental detection of the atomic QSH effect.

  19. Hall Effect and Magneto Optical MFL Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouli, Wissem

    The need for a reliable sensing tool has stimulated countless researchers to develop techniques trying to extract maximum information. In the field of nondestructive testing (NDT), various sensors have been established to fulfill that function. Examples include the ultrasonic, eddy current, and magnetic flux leakage (MFL) based techniques. Because they are extremely reliable, MFL based techniques represent one of the best inspection technologies. These technologies have numerous applications in diverse domains, including petroleum pipeline and tank inspections, airplane inspections, and production quality control. In this work, we will present two technologies based on MFL technique. The first is the Hall Effect sensor. This device has been extensively developed during the last century, especially after the use of integrated circuit technology. Its reliable results even under extreme conditions made it an extremely useful tool. The second technology is Magneto Optical Imaging. This technique rose very recently, and scientists hold high expectations about its performance once proper techniques are developed. The study of these two sensing devices gives a better understanding of the MFL technique by allowing us to investigate the potential of each technology, experience each in studied conditions to derive its characteristics, and discuss its performance.

  20. A non-invasive Hall current distribution measurement system for Hall Effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Carl Raymond

    A direct, accurate method to measure thrust produced by a Hall Effect thruster on orbit does not currently exist. The ability to calculate produced thrust will enable timely and precise maneuvering of spacecraft---a capability particularly important to satellite formation flying. The means to determine thrust directly is achievable by remotely measuring the magnetic field of the thruster and solving the inverse magnetostatic problem for the Hall current density distribution. For this thesis, the magnetic field was measured by employing an array of eight tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensors capable of milligauss sensitivity when placed in a high background field. The array was positioned outside the channel of a 1.5 kW Colorado State University Hall thruster equipped with a center-mounted electride cathode. In this location, the static magnetic field is approximately 30 Gauss, which is within the linear operating range of the TMR sensors. Furthermore, the induced field at this distance is greater than tens of milligauss, which is within the sensitivity range of the TMR sensors. Due to the nature of the inverse problem, the induced-field measurements do not provide the Hall current density by a simple inversion; however, a Tikhonov regularization of the induced field along with a non-negativity constraint and a zero boundary condition provides current density distributions. Our system measures the sensor outputs at 2 MHz allowing the determination of the Hall current density distribution as a function of time. These data are shown in contour plots in sequential frames. The measured ratios between the average Hall current and the discharge current ranged from 0.1 to 10 over a range of operating conditions from 1.3 kW to 2.2 kW. The temporal inverse solution at 2.0 kW exhibited a breathing mode of 37 kHz, which was in agreement with temporal measurements of the discharge current.

  1. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  2. Emergence of integer quantum Hall effect from chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chushun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Jiao

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytic microscopic theory showing that in a large class of spin-1/2 quasiperiodic quantum kicked rotors, a dynamical analog of the integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) emerges from an intrinsic chaotic structure. Specifically, the inverse of the Planck's quantum (he) and the rotor's energy growth rate mimic the "filling fraction" and the "longitudinal conductivity" in conventional IQHE, respectively, and a hidden quantum number is found to mimic the "quantized Hall conductivity." We show that for an infinite discrete set of critical values of he, the long-time energy growth rate is universal and of order of unity ("metallic" phase), but otherwise vanishes ("insulating" phase). Moreover, the rotor insulating phases are topological, each of which is characterized by a hidden quantum number. This number exhibits universal behavior for small he, i.e., it jumps by unity whenever he decreases, passing through each critical value. This intriguing phenomenon is not triggered by the likes of Landau band filling, well known to be the mechanism for conventional IQHE, and far beyond the canonical Thouless-Kohmoto-Nightingale-Nijs paradigm for quantum Hall transitions. Instead, this dynamical phenomenon is of strong chaos origin; it does not occur when the dynamics is (partially) regular. More precisely, we find that a topological object, similar to the topological theta angle in quantum chromodynamics, emerges from strongly chaotic motion at microscopic scales, and its renormalization gives the hidden quantum number. Our analytic results are confirmed by numerical simulations. Our findings indicate that rich topological quantum phenomena can emerge from chaos and might point to a new direction of study in the interdisciplinary area straddling chaotic dynamics and condensed matter physics. This work is a substantial extension of a short paper published earlier by two of us [Y. Chen and C. Tian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 216802 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.216802].

  3. Enigmatic 12/5 fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakrouski, Kiryl; Troyer, Matthias; Wu, Yang-Le; Das Sarma, Sankar; Peterson, Michael R.

    2016-08-01

    We numerically study the fractional quantum Hall effect at filling factors ν =12 /5 and 13/5 (the particle-hole conjugate of 12/5) in high-quality two-dimensional GaAs heterostructures via exact diagonalization including finite well width and Landau-level mixing. We find that Landau-level mixing suppresses the ν =13 /5 fractional quantum Hall effect relative to ν =12 /5 . By contrast, we find both ν =2 /5 and (its particle-hole conjugate) ν =3 /5 fractional quantum Hall effects in the lowest Landau level to be robust under Landau-level mixing and finite well-width corrections. Our results provide a possible explanation for the experimental absence of the 13/5 fractional quantum Hall state as caused by Landau-level mixing effects.

  4. The Hall effect in ballistic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. J. B.; Washburn, S.; Büttiker, M.; Knoedler, C. M.; Hong, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    In narrow high-mobility conductors the predominant source of scattering is reflection of carriers off the confining potential. We demonstrate that by changing the geometry of the intersection of the Hall probes with the conductor, the Hall resistance can be quenched, negative or enhanced. More complex junction geometries can lead to one of these phenomena for one field polarity and to another for the other field polarity. At liquid helium temperatures these results can be explained by following trajectories. In the milli-Kelvin range fluctuations are superimposed. At high fields strong resonant depressions of the Hall resistance are found which may be associated with bound states in the region of the cross.

  5. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  6. Hall-Petch effect: Another manifestation of size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dunstan, David; Bushby, Andy

    In the 1950s, Hall and Petch first established a quantitative relationship, expressed by the famous Hall-Petch equation: σd =σ0 +kHP/√{ d} There is a very large body of experimental data in the literature reinforcing this dependence in a very wide range of metals. Recently, we presented some of the classic data sets which have been considered to confirm the Hall-Petch equation and showed they are equally well consistent with the equation ɛel (d) =ɛ0 +kln/(d) d Eq. 2 is based on critical thickness theory. Fitting to Eq.1 with the exponent 0.5 replaced by the free fitting parameter x, the confidence interval for the exponent is 0.5 Hall-Petch dependence of the strength on grain size, if it obeys Eq.2, is another manifestation of the size effect.

  7. Is the quantum Hall effect influenced by the gravitational field?

    PubMed

    Hehl, Friedrich W; Obukhov, Yuri N; Rosenow, Bernd

    2004-08-27

    Most of the experiments on the quantum Hall effect (QHE) were made at approximately the same height above sea level. A future international comparison will determine whether the gravitational field g(x) influences the QHE. In the realm of (1+2)-dimensional phenomenological macroscopic electrodynamics, the Ohm-Hall law is metric independent ("topological"). This suggests that it does not couple to g(x). We corroborate this result by a microscopic calculation of the Hall conductance in the presence of a post-Newtonian gravitational field. PMID:15447125

  8. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  9. Linear Magnetization Dependence of the Intrinsic Anomalous Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.; Yao, Y.; Niu, Q.; Weitering, Harm H

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about -240 K (0.8T{sub c}).

  10. Modulation of effective damping constant using spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Shinya Kondou, Kouta; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Otani, Yoshichika

    2014-03-03

    We have investigated modulation of the effective damping constant α{sub eff} via spin currents through the spin Hall effect for Permalloy/Pt bilayer films with various thicknesses. The observed linear and sinusoidal dependences of current density and field direction on α{sub eff} are in agreement with the analytical model. By comparing the thickness dependence of spin Hall angle obtained from the damping modulation with that previously obtained by spin-torque-induced ferromagnetic resonance, we show that there is no clear extrinsic contribution in the present method. We also show the large modulation of the effective damping constant (down to ∼20%) in the high-current-density region.

  11. Detection of a History Dependent Topological Hall Effect Due to Skyrmion Formation in FeGe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, James; Page, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Brangham, Jack; Meng, Keng Yuan; Esser, Bryan; Wang, Hailong; McComb, Dave; Hammel, Chris; Yang, Fengyuan

    B20 phase crystal structures, such as FeGe and MnSi, have been of interest because they enable magnetic skyrmion phases, which can potentially lead to low energy cost spintronic device applications. We report the synthesis of pure phase FeGe epitaxial thin films grown on Si (111) substrates by ultra-high vacuum off-axis magnetron sputtering. The FeGe films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Hall effect measurements. The topological Hall effect (THE) signals were extracted by subtracting out the anomalous Hall effect and ordinary Hall effect, demonstrating the existence of the skyrmion phase in FeGe films between 5 and 275 K. Topological hall effect was observed at zero field at all temperatures below the Curie temperature, showing the possibility of metastable skymion particles at zero field and high temperatures. We will also discuss the study of dynamics of the ferromagnetic phases using ferromagnetic resonance.

  12. Quantum Hall effect in bilayer system with array of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnossin, I. R.; Gusev, G. M.; Sotomayor, N. M.; Seabra, A. C.; Quivy, A. A.; Lamas, T. E.; Portal, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    We have studied the Quantum Hall effect in a bilayer system modulated by gate-controlled antidot lattice potential. The Hall resistance shows plateaus which are quantized to anomalous multiplies of h/e2. We suggest that this complex behavior is due to the nature of the edge-states in double quantum well (DQW) structures coupled to an array of antidots: these plateaus may be originated from the coexistence of normal and counter-rotating edge-states in different layers.

  13. Giant Room Temperature Interface Spin Hall and Inverse Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wesselink, R J H; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Zhe; Xia, Ke; Kelly, Paul J

    2016-05-13

    The spin Hall angle (SHA) is a measure of the efficiency with which a transverse spin current is generated from a charge current by the spin-orbit coupling and disorder in the spin Hall effect (SHE). In a study of the SHE for a Pt|Py (Py=Ni_{80}Fe_{20}) bilayer using a first-principles scattering approach, we find a SHA that increases monotonically with temperature and is proportional to the resistivity for bulk Pt. By decomposing the room temperature SHE and inverse SHE currents into bulk and interface terms, we discover a giant interface SHA that dominates the total inverse SHE current with potentially major consequences for applications. PMID:27232030

  14. New Method for Studying Localization effects in Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. N.; Geraedts, Scott

    Disorder is central to the study of the fractional quantum Hall effect. It is responsible for the finite width of the quantum Hall plateaus, and it is of course present in experiment. Numerical studies of the disordered fractional quantum Hall effect are nonetheless very difficult, because the lack of symmetry present in clean systems limits the size of systems that can be studied. We introduce a new method for studying the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect in the presence of disorder that allows larger system sizes to be studied. The method relies on truncating the single particle Hilbert space, which leads to an exponential reduction in the Hilbert space of the many-particle system while preserving the essential topological nature of the state. We apply the model to the study of disorder transitions in the quantum Hall effect, both for the ground state and excited states. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, through Grant DE-SC0002140.

  15. Spin Hall magnetoresistance induced by a nonequilibrium proximity effect.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, H; Althammer, M; Chen, Y-T; Uchida, K; Kajiwara, Y; Kikuchi, D; Ohtani, T; Geprägs, S; Opel, M; Takahashi, S; Gross, R; Bauer, G E W; Goennenwein, S T B; Saitoh, E

    2013-05-17

    We report anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt|Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) bilayers. In spite of Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) being a very good electrical insulator, the resistance of the Pt layer reflects its magnetization direction. The effect persists even when a Cu layer is inserted between Pt and Y(3)Fe(5)O(12), excluding the contribution of induced equilibrium magnetization at the interface. Instead, we show that the effect originates from concerted actions of the direct and inverse spin Hall effects and therefore call it "spin Hall magnetoresistance." PMID:25167435

  16. Proximity-Induced Anomalous Hall Effect in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Tang, Chi; Sachs, Raymond; Barlas, Yafis; Shi, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Pre-patterned graphene devices are transferred from SiO2/Si to atomically flat magnetic insulator thin films, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxial system on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrate. Room temperature Raman spectroscopy reveals both single-layer graphene and YIG characteristic peaks. In addition to the ordinary Hall effect, there is a clear non-linear Hall component correlated with the magnetization of the YIG films, which we attribute to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The magnitude of AHE in graphene/YIG devices decreases as temperature increases. With device-to-device variations, in some devices, AHE persists to room temperature, indicating a strong proximity-induced exchange interaction. By sweeping top gate voltages, one can tune the carrier density across the Dirac point. We also find that the carrier mobility is not significantly different in graphene/YIG. As the graphene is tuned from the electron- to hole-type, the ordinary Hall changes the sign as expected, but the sign of the AHE contribution remains the same. It suggests that AHE does not simply originate from the carrier density change which is responsible for the ordinary Hall effect, but is related to the spin-orbit interaction in the system. This work was supported in part by DOE and NSF.

  17. Anomalous cross field electron transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, C.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Gawron, D.; Mazouffre, S.

    2006-10-16

    The origin of anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field in the channel of a Hall effect thruster has been the subject of controversy, and the relative importance of electron-wall collisions and plasma turbulence on anomalous transport is not clear. From comparisons between Fabry-Perot measurements and hybrid model calculations of the ion velocity profile in a 5 kW Hall effect thruster, we deduce that one and the same mechanism is responsible for anomalous electron transport inside and outside the Hall effect thruster channel. This suggests that the previous assumption that Bohm anomalous conductivity is dominant outside the thruster channel whereas electron-wall conductivity prevails inside the channel is not valid.

  18. Study of correlations in fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuntai

    Bulk two-dimensional electron systems in a strong perpendicular magnetic field exhibit the fascinating phenomenon of fractional quantum Hall effect. Composite fermion theory was developed in the process of understanding the fractional quantum Hall effect and was proven to work successfully for the FQHE and even beyond. In this dissertation, we explore the effect of the strong correlation between electrons in several cases. All of them belong to the category of 2DES in strong perpendicular magnetic field and they are listed below: (i) A fractional quantum Hall island surrounded by a bulk fractional quantum Hall state with a different filling factor. Specifically, we study the resonant tunneling composite fermions through their quasibound states around the island. A rich set of possible transitions are found and the possible relevance to an interesting experiment is discussed. Also, we discuss the subtlety of separating the effect of fractional braiding statistics from other factors. (ii) Correlated states of a quantum dot, at high magnetic fields, assuming four electrons with two components. Such a dot can be realized by reducing the two lateral dimensions of a 2DES tremendously. Both the liquid states and crystallites (the latter occurring at large angular momenta) of four electrons in terms of composite fermions are considered. Residual interaction between composite fermions is shown to leads to complex spin correlations. (iii) Bilayer quantum Hall effect at total filling nuT = 5. This can accommodate an excitonic superfluid state at small layer separations just like at nuT = 1. At large layer separations, however, nuT = 5 state evolves into uncorrelated nu = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall states in both layers, in contrast to uncorrelated composite Fermi sea in nu T = 1 case. We focus on finding the critical layer separation at which the correlation between electrons on different layers are destroyed. Effects due to the finite width of the layers are also considered.

  19. Spin Hall and spin Nernst effects: temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrdal, Anna; Barnas, Jozef; Dugaev, Vitalii

    We have considered temperature dependence of spin Hall and spin Nernst effect in two-dimensional electron gas with spin-orbit interaction of Rashba type [arXiv:1510.03080]. In our considerations we have employed the approach based on the Matsubara Green functions. The formalism used in the case of electric field as a driving force was subsequently adopted to the situation of a spin current driven by a temperature gradient. To achieve this, we have used the concept of an auxiliary vector field. Such a description gives the possibility to consider all mechanisms leading to the spin Hall and spin Nernst effect on equal footing and also their behavior at finite temperatures. Both spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities were calculated in the approximation including the vertex correction. The total spin Hall conductivity, including vertex correction, has been shown to vanish exactly in the whole temperature range. Thus, our results extend the earlier ones to an arbitrary temperatures. In turn, the total spin Nernst conductivity remains finite when the vertex corrections are included. Using the Ioffe-Regel localization criterion, we have also estimated the range of parameters where the calculated results for the spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities are applicable.

  20. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  1. Shielding of Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Probes in Hall Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Bennett, Eric; Wiesler, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses significant sources of electromagnetic noise in Hall effect imaging. Hall effect imaging employs large electrical pulses for signal generation and high sensitivity ultrasonic probes for signal reception. Coherent noise arises through various coupling mechanisms between the excitation pulse and the probe. In this paper, the coupling mechanisms are experimentally isolated and theoretically analyzed. Several methods of shielding the probe from electromagnetic interference are devised and tested. These methods are able to reduce the noise to levels below the random thermal noise, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio in HEI by two orders of magnitude. PMID:9921620

  2. Spin-Drag Hall Effect in a Rotating Bose Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Driel, H. J. van; Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2010-10-08

    We show that in a rotating two-component Bose mixture, the spin drag between the two different spin species shows a Hall effect. This spin-drag Hall effect can be observed experimentally by studying the out-of-phase dipole mode of the mixture. We determine the damping of this mode due to spin drag as a function of temperature. We find that due to Bose stimulation there is a strong enhancement of the damping for temperatures close to the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of magnetization dynamics excited by spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of exciting self-oscillation in a perpendicular ferromagnet by the spin Hall effect on the basis of a nonlinear analysis of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. In the self-oscillation state, the energy supplied by the spin torque during a precession on a constant energy curve should equal the dissipation due to damping. Also, the current to balance the spin torque and the damping torque in the self-oscillation state should be larger than the critical current to destabilize the initial state. We find that these conditions in the spin Hall system are not satisfied by deriving analytical solutions of the energy supplied by the spin transfer effect and the dissipation due to the damping from the nonlinear LLG equation. This indicates that the self-oscillation of a perpendicular ferromagnet cannot be excited solely by the spin Hall torque.

  4. Thermal Hall Effect of Spin Excitations in a Kagome Magnet.

    PubMed

    Hirschberger, Max; Chisnell, Robin; Lee, Young S; Ong, N P

    2015-09-01

    At low temperatures, the thermal conductivity of spin excitations in a magnetic insulator can exceed that of phonons. However, because they are charge neutral, the spin waves are not expected to display a thermal Hall effect. However, in the kagome lattice, theory predicts that the Berry curvature leads to a thermal Hall conductivity κ(xy). Here we report observation of a large κ(xy) in the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) which orders magnetically at 1.8 K. The observed κ(xy) undergoes a remarkable sign reversal with changes in temperature or magnetic field, associated with sign alternation of the Chern flux between magnon bands. The close correlation between κ(xy) and κ(xx) firmly precludes a phonon origin for the thermal Hall effect. PMID:26382691

  5. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given.

  6. Hall viscosity and momentum transport in lattice and continuum models of the integer quantum Hall effect in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuegel, Thomas I.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2015-10-01

    The Hall viscosity describes a nondissipative response to strain in systems with broken time-reversal symmetry. We develop a method for computing the Hall viscosity of lattice systems in strong magnetic fields based on momentum transport, which we compare to the method of momentum polarization used by Tu et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 195412 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.195412] and Zaletel et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 236801 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.236801] for noninteracting systems. We compare the Hall viscosity of square-lattice tight-binding models in magnetic field to the continuum integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) showing agreement when the magnetic length is much larger than the lattice constant, but deviation as the magnetic field strength increases. We also relate the Hall viscosity of relativistic electrons in magnetic field (the Dirac IQHE) to the conventional IQHE. The Hall viscosity of the lattice Dirac model in magnetic field agrees with the continuum Dirac Hall viscosity when the magnetic length is much larger than the lattice constant. We also show that the Hall viscosity of the lattice model deviates further from the continuum model if the C4 symmetry of the square lattice is broken to C2, but the deviation is again minimized as the magnetic length increases.

  7. Depletion effect of oxide semiconductor analyzed by Hall effects.

    PubMed

    Oh, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    This letter discusses the tunneling behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) analyzed through the observation of its Hall effects. The properties of the a-IGZO changed from those of a majority carrier to those of a minority carrier after the annealing process as a result of the electron-hole recombination due to the thermal activation energy and the formation of a depletion layer with a high-potential Schottky barrier. Therefore, the diffusion current of these minority charge carriers caused ambipolar transfer characteristics, a tunneling behavior, in the metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistor. PMID:25971008

  8. Band Collapse and the Quantum Hall Effect in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Hughes, Taylor L.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Chen, Han-Dong; Wu, Congjun; /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2010-03-16

    The recent Quantum Hall experiments in graphene have confirmed the theoretically well-understood picture of the quantum Hall (QH) conductance in fermion systems with continuum Dirac spectrum. In this paper we take into account the lattice, and perform an exact diagonalization of the Landau problem on the hexagonal lattice. At very large magnetic fields the Dirac argument fails completely and the Hall conductance, given by the number of edge states present in the gaps of the spectrum, is dominated by lattice effects. As the field is lowered, the experimentally observed situation is recovered through a phenomenon which we call band collapse. As a corollary, for low magnetic field, graphene will exhibit two qualitatively different QHE's: at low filling, the QHE will be dominated by the 'relativistic' Dirac spectrum and the Hall conductance will be odd-integer; above a certain filling, the QHE will be dominated by a non-relativistic spectrum, and the Hall conductance will span all integers, even and odd.

  9. Quantum spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Smirnova, Daria; Nori, Franco

    2015-06-01

    Maxwell’s equations, formulated 150 years ago, ultimately describe properties of light, from classical electromagnetism to quantum and relativistic aspects. The latter ones result in remarkable geometric and topological phenomena related to the spin-1 massless nature of photons. By analyzing fundamental spin properties of Maxwell waves, we show that free-space light exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall effect—surface modes with strong spin-momentum locking. These modes are evanescent waves that form, for example, surface plasmon-polaritons at vacuum-metal interfaces. Our findings illuminate the unusual transverse spin in evanescent waves and explain recent experiments that have demonstrated the transverse spin-direction locking in the excitation of surface optical modes. This deepens our understanding of Maxwell’s theory, reveals analogies with topological insulators for electrons, and offers applications for robust spin-directional optical interfaces.

  10. OPTICS. Quantum spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Smirnova, Daria; Nori, Franco

    2015-06-26

    Maxwell's equations, formulated 150 years ago, ultimately describe properties of light, from classical electromagnetism to quantum and relativistic aspects. The latter ones result in remarkable geometric and topological phenomena related to the spin-1 massless nature of photons. By analyzing fundamental spin properties of Maxwell waves, we show that free-space light exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall effect—surface modes with strong spin-momentum locking. These modes are evanescent waves that form, for example, surface plasmon-polaritons at vacuum-metal interfaces. Our findings illuminate the unusual transverse spin in evanescent waves and explain recent experiments that have demonstrated the transverse spin-direction locking in the excitation of surface optical modes. This deepens our understanding of Maxwell's theory, reveals analogies with topological insulators for electrons, and offers applications for robust spin-directional optical interfaces. PMID:26113717

  11. Planar Hall effect bridge geometries optimized for magnetic bead detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2014-05-01

    Novel designs of planar Hall effect bridge sensors optimized for magnetic bead detection are presented and characterized. By constructing the sensor geometries appropriately, the sensors can be tailored to be sensitive to an external magnetic field, the magnetic field due to beads being magnetized by the sensor self-field or a combination thereof. The sensors can be made nominally insensitive to small external magnetic fields, while being maximally sensitive to magnetic beads, magnetized by the sensor self-field. Thus, the sensor designs can be tailored towards specific applications with minimal influence of external variables. Three different sensor designs are analyzed theoretically. To experimentally validate the theoretical signals, two sets of measurements are performed. First, the sensor signals are characterized as function of an externally applied magnetic field. Then, measurements of the dynamic magnetic response of suspensions of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are performed. Furthermore, a method to amplify the signal by appropriate combinations of multiple sensor segments is demonstrated.

  12. Study of the effects of guide field on Hall reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Tharp, T. D.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Lawrence, E.; Dorfman, S.; Myers, C.; Yoo, J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-15

    The results from guide field studies on the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are compared with results from Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) reconnection simulation with guide field. The quadrupole field, a signature of two-fluid reconnection at zero guide field, is modified by the presence of a finite guide field in a manner consistent with HMHD simulation. The modified Hall current profile contains reduced electron flows in the reconnection plane, which quantitatively explains the observed reduction of the reconnection rate. The present results are consistent with the hypothesis that the local reconnection dynamics is dominated by Hall effects in the collisionless regime of the MRX plasmas. While very good agreement is seen between experiment and simulations, we note that an important global feature of the experiments, a compression of the guide field by the reconnecting plasma, is not represented in the simulations.

  13. Effect of Anode Dielectric Coating on Hall Thruster Operation

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch; V. Semenov

    2003-10-20

    An interesting phenomenon observed in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which is produced on the anode surface during the normal course of Hall thruster operation. The anode fall might affect the thruster lifetime and acceleration efficiency. The effect of the anode coating on the anode fall is studied experimentally using both biased and emissive probes. Measurements of discharge current oscillations indicate that thruster operation is more stable with the coated anode.

  14. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Ado, I A; Dmitriev, I A; Ostrovsky, P M; Titov, M

    2016-07-22

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength. PMID:27494487

  15. Sign change of the flux flow Hall effect in HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel`man, M.V.; Geshkenbein, V.B.; Larkin, A.I.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1996-11-01

    A novel mechanism for the sign change of the Hall effect in the flux flow region is proposed. The difference {delta}{ital n} between the electron density at the center of the vortex core and that far outside the vortex causes the additional contribution to the Hall conductivity {delta}{sigma}{sub xy} = -{delta}{ital nec}/{ital B}. This contribution can be larger than the conventional one in the dirty case {Delta}{ital T}{tau} {lt} 1. If the electron density inside the core exceeds the electron density far outside, a double sign change may occur as a function of temperature.

  16. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  17. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  18. Inverse spin Hall effect in a closed loop circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Y.; Auvray, F.; Wakamura, T.; Niimi, Y.; Fert, A.

    2014-06-16

    We present measurements of inverse spin Hall effects (ISHEs), in which the conversion of a spin current into a charge current via the ISHE is detected not as a voltage in a standard open circuit but directly as the charge current generated in a closed loop. The method is applied to the ISHEs of Bi-doped Cu and Pt. The derived expression of ISHE for the loop structure can relate the charge current flowing into the loop to the spin Hall angle of the SHE material and the resistance of the loop.

  19. Interaction-Driven Spontaneous Quantum Hall Effect on a Kagome Lattice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Gong, Shou-Shu; Zeng, Tian-Sheng; Fu, Liang; Sheng, D N

    2016-08-26

    Topological states of matter have been widely studied as being driven by an external magnetic field, intrinsic spin-orbital coupling, or magnetic doping. Here, we unveil an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum Hall effect (a Chern insulator) emerging in an extended fermion-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, based on a state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group on cylinder geometry and an exact diagonalization in torus geometry. We first demonstrate that the proposed model exhibits an incompressible liquid phase with doublet degenerate ground states as time-reversal partners. The explicit spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking is determined by emergent uniform circulating loop currents between nearest neighbors. Importantly, the fingerprint topological nature of the ground state is characterized by quantized Hall conductance. Thus, we identify the liquid phase as a quantum Hall phase, which provides a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of the interaction-driven topological phase in a topologically trivial noninteracting band. PMID:27610866

  20. Valley Hall Effect in Two-Dimensional Hexagonal Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Michihisa; Shimazaki, Yuya; Borzenets, Ivan V.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-12-01

    Valley is a quantum number defined for energetically degenerate but nonequivalent structures in energy bands of a crystalline material. Recent discoveries of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have shed light on the potential use of this degree of freedom for information carriers because the valley can now be potentially manipulated in integrated 2D architectures. The valleys separated by a long distance in a momentum space are robust against external disturbance and the flow of the valley, the valley current, is nondissipative because it carries no net electronic current. Among the various 2D valley materials, graphene has by far the highest crystal quality, leading to an extremely long valley relaxation length in the bulk. In this review, we first describe the theoretical background of the valley Hall effect, which converts an electric field into a valley current. We then describe the first observation of the valley Hall effect in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we describe experiments on the generation and detection of the pure valley current in monolayer and bilayer graphene, achieved recently using the valley Hall effect and inverse valley Hall effect. While we show unambiguous evidence of a pure valley current flowing in graphene, we emphasize that the field of "valleytronics" is still in its infancy and that further theoretical and experimental investigations are necessary.

  1. Characterization of power law exponent when tunneling into the edge of the fractional quantum Hall effect around ν = 1/3 and 2/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, M.; Tsui, D. C.; Chang, A. M.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    We study current vs. voltage when tunneling into the edge of the FQHE around ν = 1/3 and 2/5 for samples of differing mobility. For voltages above the thermal voltage the device manifests the previously observed power law I-V behavior (A.M. Chang, L.N. Pfeiffer, K. West, Phys. Rev. Lett, 77, 2538 (1996)) which eventually saturates to the linear Hall conductance. The high mobility samples yield a power law exponent of α = 2.70 +/- 0.05 at ν = 1/3. Near ν = 1/3, the exponent varies roughly as σ_xy-1. The highest mobility sample fits a universal curve over 6 orders of magnitude in voltage scaled by the Kondo temperature. (C. Chamon, E. Fradkin, private communication) This characteristic covers the entire range from weak to strong coupling beyond the weak coupling scaling regime of Kane and Fisher. In contrast, samples with lower mobililty break off from this universal curve to a weaker power law, suggesting that another relevant energy scale comes into play. In addition, we will report observation of a resonance at ν = 1/3 which appears to exhibit an anomalous lineshape.

  2. The integer quantum hall effect revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakis, Spyridon; Hastings, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    For T - L x L a finite subset of Z{sup 2}, let H{sub o} denote a Hamiltonian on T with periodic boundary conditions and finite range, finite strength intetactions and a unique ground state with a nonvanishing spectral gap. For S {element_of} T, let q{sub s} denote the charge at site s and assume that the total charge Q = {Sigma}{sub s {element_of} T} q{sub s} is conserved. Using the local charge operators q{sub s}, we introduce a boundary magnetic flux in the horizontal and vertical direction and allow the ground state to evolve quasiadiabatically around a square of size one magnetic flux, in flux space. At the end of the evolution we obtain a trivial Berry phase, which we compare, via a method reminiscent of Stokes Theorem. to the Berry phase obtained from an evolution around an exponentially small loop near the origin. As a result, we show, without any averaging assumption, that the Hall conductance is quantized in integer multiples of e{sup 2}/h up to exponentially small corrections of order e{sup -L/{zeta}}, where {zeta}, is a correlation length that depends only on the gap and the range and strength of the interactions.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics. PMID:26819223

  4. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics. PMID:26819223

  6. Plasma Oscillations and Operational Modes in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall effect thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. In this study, mode transitions in HETs are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with high-speed probes and ultra-fast imaging. Two primary oscillatory modes were identified and extensively characterized called global oscillation mode and local oscillation mode. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of spokes. These spokes are localized oscillations in discharge current density propagating in the E x B direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean discharge current density value. The spoke velocity is determined from high-speed image analysis using three methods yielding values between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of magnetic field settings. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. It is proposed that mode transitions represent de-stabilization of the ionization front similar to excitation of the well-studied Hall thruster breathing mode, which is supported by time-resolved simulations of the discharge channel plasma. The thrust is approximately constant in both modes, but the thrust-to-power and anode efficiency decrease in global mode

  7. SO(5) symmetry in the quantum Hall effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fengcheng; Sodemann, Inti; Araki, Yasufumi; MacDonald, Allan H.; Jolicoeur, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    Electrons in graphene have four flavors associated with low-energy spin and valley degrees of freedom. The fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene is dominated by long-range Coulomb interactions, which are invariant under rotations in spin-valley space. This SU(4) symmetry is spontaneously broken at most filling factors, and also weakly broken by atomic scale valley-dependent and valley-exchange interactions with coupling constants gz and g⊥. In this paper, we demonstrate that when gz=-g⊥ , an exact SO(5) symmetry survives which unifies the Néel spin order parameter of the antiferromagnetic state and the X Y valley order parameter of the Kekulé distortion state into a single five-component order parameter. The proximity of the highly insulating quantum Hall state observed in graphene at ν =0 to an ideal SO(5) symmetric quantum Hall state remains an open experimental question. We illustrate the physics associated with this SO(5) symmetry by studying the multiplet structure and collective dynamics of filling factor ν =0 quantum Hall states based on exact-diagonalization and low-energy effective theory approaches. This allows to illustrate how manifestations of the SO(5) symmetry would survive even when it is weakly broken.

  8. 4.5-kW Hall Effect Thruster Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2000-01-01

    As part of an Interagency Agreement with the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), a space simulation test of a Russian SPT 140 Hall Effect Thruster was completed in September 1999 at Vacuum Facility 6 at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The thruster was subjected to a three-part test sequence that included thrust and performance characterization, electromagnetic interference, and plume contamination. SPT 140 is a 4.5-kW thruster developed under a joint agreement between AFRL, Atlantic Research Corp, and Space Systems/Loral, and was manufactured by the Fakal Experimental Design Bureau of Russia. All objectives were satisfied, and the thruster performed exceptionally well during the 120-hr test program, which comprised 33 engine firings. The Glenn testing provided a critical contribution to the thruster development effort, and the large volume and high pumping speed of this vacuum facility was key to the test s success. The low background pressure (1 10 6 torr) provided a more accurate representation of space vacuum than is possible in most vacuum chambers. The facility had been upgraded recently with new cryogenic pumps and sputter shielding to support the active electric propulsion program at Glenn. The Glenn test team was responsible for all test support equipment, including the thrust stand, power supplies, data acquisition, electromagnetic interference measurement equipment, and the contamination measurement system.

  9. Quantum Hall effect in polycrystalline CVD graphene: grain boundaries impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Lafont, Fabien; Schopfer, Felicien; Poirier, Wilfrid; Bouchiat, Vincent; Han, Zhen; Cresti, Alessandro; Cummings, Aron; Roche, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    It was demonstrated by Janssen et al. (New J. Phys. 2011) that graphene could surpass GaAs for quantum Hall resistance standards with an accuracy better than 10-10. Graphene should render possible the realization of a standard operating at T > 4 K and B < 4 T, easing its dissemination towards industry. To materialize this goal scalable graphene with outstanding electronic transport properties is required. We present measurements performed in large area Hall bars made of polycrystalline CVD graphene on Si/SiO2, with a carrier mobility of 0.6 T-1. Even at 20.2 T and 300 mK, the Hall resistance plateaus are insufficiently quantized at ν = +/- 2 and +/- 6 . This is due to a high dissipation manifested by a longitudinal resistance which does not drop to zero. We pointed out unusual power-law temperature dependencies of Rxx and an exponential magnetic field dependence. We do not observe the common thermally activated or VRH behaviors. This can be attributed to the grain boundaries in the sample that short-circuit the edge states, as supported by our numerical simulations. This reveals new and peculiar aspects of the quantum Hall effect in polycrystalline systems. Another unexpected feature is the observation of the ν = 0 and 1 states in such low mobility systems.

  10. Anomalous Hall effect in Cr doped FeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadam, Sankararao; Lakhani, Archana; Singh, Durgesh; Prasad, Rudra; Ganesan, V.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of economically affordable bulk materials for the spin based electronics are in huge demand. In this direction, electrical and Hall transport properties of the polycrystalline Cr doped Kondo insulator FeSi, i.e Fe0.975Cr0.025Si is reported. Well agreement between temperature dependence of the Hall and linear resistivity are observed. The observed minimum at ~19K in the resistivity is attributed to the ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC). Anomalous Hall resistivity is seen in the itinerant ferromagnet, Fe0.975Cr0.025Si well below the TC. The obtained Hall resistivity is comparable with that of the spintronic material Fe0.9Co0.1Si. The present study proves that the electrical transport properties of bulk materials made by low cost elements such as Fe, Cr and Si exhibits large magnetic field effects and are useful for the spintronics applications, unlike spintronics material (Ga, Mn)As that demand higher costs.

  11. Low-field Hall effect near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marianer, S.; Bergman, D. J.

    1989-06-01

    We use a random-resistor-network model to study the critical behavior of the low-field Hall constant in a three-dimensional (3D) metal-insulator composite near the percolation threshold. The transfer-matrix method, which was originally introduced for calculating conductivity, is generalized to be applicable to the calculation of the Hall constant and the magnetoresistance as well. We then use this generalized method to perform a renormalization-group calculation for a cubic random resistor network and two simulations of random resistor networks at the percolation threshold: one of cubes and the other of long (3D) strips. Fitting an expression RH~(p-pc)-g to the effective Hall constant RH of the network, we find a divergent Hall constant both from the renormalization-group calculation (g=0.625) and from the simulation of cubes (g=0.25), while the long-strips simulation yields one that is concentration independent, i.e., g=0.

  12. Far-infrared Hall Effect in YBCO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, M.; Rigal, L.; Cerne, J.; Schmadel, D. C.; Drew, H. D.; Kung, P.-J.

    2001-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the so-called "anomalous Hall effect" in Hi Tc superconductors(T.R. Chien, D.A. Brawner, Z.Z. Wang, and N.P. Ong, PRB 43, 6242(1991).) we explore Hall measurements at far-infrared (FIR) frequencies and study the temperature dependence. We separately measure the real and imaginary parts of the magneto-optical response of YBCO thin films to polarized FIR light (15-250 cm-1). The induced rotation of linearly polarized light tells us the real part of the Faraday angle, Re[θ_F(ω)], and the induced dichroism of circularly polarized light tells us Im[θ_F(ω)]. We can then deduce the complex Hall angle without resorting to Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis. Since both the Hall angle and the Faraday angle obey sum rules, we can compare to higher frequencies(Cerne, et al., invited talk) and determine additional information about the spectral response at intermediate frequencies. The consistency of these results is verified with K-K analysis.

  13. Strong spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet PtMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yongxi; Shi, Shengjie; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2016-06-01

    Effectively manipulating magnetism in ferromagnet (FM) thin-film nanostructures with an in-plane current has become feasible since the determination of a "giant" spin Hall effect (SHE) in certain heavy metal/FM systems. Recently, both theoretical and experimental reports indicate that metallic antiferromagnet materials can have both a large anomalous Hall effect and a strong SHE. Here we report a systematic study of the SHE in PtMn with several PtMn/FM systems. By using interface engineering to reduce the "spin memory loss" we obtain, in the best instance, a spin-torque efficiency ξDLPtMn≡TintθSHPtMn≃0.24 , where Tint is the effective interface spin transparency. This is more than twice the previously reported spin-torque efficiency for PtMn. We also find that the apparent spin diffusion length in PtMn is surprisingly long, λsPtMn≈2.3 nm .

  14. Vortices in superconducting films: Statistics and fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarmaga, J.

    1996-03-01

    We present a derivation of the Berry phase picked up during exchange of parallel vortices. This derivation is based on the Bogolubov{endash}de Gennes formalism. The origin of the Magnus force is also critically reanalyzed. The Magnus force can be interpreted as an interaction with the effective magnetic field. The effective magnetic field may be even of the order 10{sup 6}{ital T}/A. We discuss a possibility of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in vortex systems. As the real magnetic field is varied to drive changes in vortex density, the vortex density will prefer to stay at some quantized values. The mere existence of the FQHE does not depend on vortex quantum statistics, although the pattern of the plateaux does. We also discuss how the density of anyonic vortices can lower the effective strengh of the Magnus force, what might be observable in measurements of Hall resistivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  16. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg ; Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2013-12-02

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  17. Generalized Hall-effect measurement geometries and limitations of van der Pauw-type Hall-effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boerger, D.M.; Kramer, J.J.; Partain, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous derivation is given to generalize the allowed, Hall effect, sample shapes from the restrictive, rectangular parallelepiped configurations to a much more general class of geometries characterized by mirror symmetry for materials whose mobile carriers have surfaces of constant energy in k-bar space that are well described by ellipsoids. However, this mirror symmetry condition is more restrictive than the almost arbitrary sample shapes proposed with the van der Pauw technique for thin films. Experimental data taken on n-type CdS at liquid-nitrogen temperatures in magnetic field strengths of 8 and 145 kG show that errors ranging from 1 to 600% can result from van der Pauw-type geometries depending on how much the sample shape and/or contact arrangement differs from the mirror symmetry. An empirically derived averaging technique is described that reduces the observed errors to less than 13% even with van der Pauw-type shapes that do not meet the mirror symmetry conditions.

  18. Quantum spin Hall effect in inverted type-II semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoxing; Hughes, Taylor L; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2008-06-13

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically nontrivial state of quantum matter which preserves time-reversal symmetry; it has an energy gap in the bulk, but topologically robust gapless states at the edge. Recently, this novel effect has been predicted and observed in HgTe quantum wells and in this Letter we predict a similar effect arising in Type-II semiconductor quantum wells made from InAs/GaSb/AlSb. The quantum well exhibits an "inverted" phase similar to HgTe/CdTe quantum wells, which is a QSH state when the Fermi level lies inside the gap. Due to the asymmetric structure of this quantum well, the effects of inversion symmetry breaking are essential. Remarkably, the topological quantum phase transition between the conventional insulating state and the quantum spin Hall state can be continuously tuned by the gate voltage, enabling quantitative investigation of this novel phase transition. PMID:18643529

  19. A silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor Hall bar for scanning Hall probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Saito, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Miyajima, Hideki; Matsumoto, Satoru; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate successful operation of a scanning Hall probe microscope with a few micron-size resolution by using a silicon metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (Si-MOSFET) Hall bar, which is designed to improve not only the mechanical strength but also the temperature stability. The Si-MOSFET micro-Hall probe is cheaper than the current micro-Hall probes and is found to be as sensitive as a micro-Hall probe with GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure or an epitaxial InSb two-dimensional electron gas. This was used to magnetically image the surface of a Sm(2)Co(17) permanent magnet during the magnetization reversal process as a function of an external magnetic field below 1.5 T. This revealed firm evidence of the presence of the inverse magnetic seed as theoretically predicted earlier. Magnetically pinned centers, with a typical size 80 mum, are observed to persist even under a high magnetic field, clearly indicating the robustness of the Si Hall probe against the field application as well as the repetition of the measurement. PMID:19044353

  20. Kinetic Analysis of Pasma Transport in a Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, O.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the plasma transport and oscillation phenomena in the Xe-gas discharge of the SPT and TAL Hall effect thruster were subject of many theoretical-numerical and experimental studies [1-4]. Despite this fact, the origin of a so-called anomalous transport is not understood to this date. As a result, in the theoretical and numerical models [5-6] researches assume ad-hoc cross-field diffusion coefficients, which may differ by several times from the classical Bohm result. To study the transport phenomenon we develop a specialized kinetic model. Our model is 2-dimensional in space (for axial and azimuthal directions), but 3-dimensional in velocity. A similar geometry was adopted in references [1,3]. However, we try to push the simulation to the realistic scale (several centimeters), while keeping the minimum spatial resolution on the order of the local Debye length. New transport results will be compared to the results from the 2D3V axisymmetrical model [6], which is a further development of the fully kinetic model for plasma and neutral gas [5]. The PIC [7] code is applied to the realistic SPT thruster geometry. We add new elementary plasma-chemistry reaction and modify boundary conditions to capture self-consistent dynamics of high ionization states of xenon atoms. It is hoped that the numerical results will provide a better understanding of the anomalous transport in a Hall effect thruster due to the collective modes, and shed light on the nature of the experimentally observed high-frequency oscillations. [1] M.Hirakawa and Y.Arakawa, Particle simulation of plasma phenomena in Hall thrusters, IEPC-95-164 technical paper, 1995. [2] V. I. Baranov et al, "New Conceptions of Oscillation Mechanisms in the Accelerator with Closed Drift of Electrons". IEPC-95-44, 24thInternational Electric Propulsion Conference, Moscow, 1995. [3] M.Hirakawa, Electron transport mechanism in a Hall thruster, IEPC-97-021 technical paper, 1997. [4] N.B.Meerzan, W.A.Hargus, M

  1. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state. PMID:27044081

  2. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ˜ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ˜ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps, Δx ˜ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  3. Design and construction of a Hall Effect Measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, Ethan; Little, Travis; Requena, Sebastian; Sauncy, Toni

    2010-10-01

    We have constructed a Hall Effect sample holder that facilitates quick sample change and insures that the sample is uniformly located for each measurement. The 4 point off-the-shelf sample card was integrated into an existing floor magnet with custom designed and constructed mounts. The sample holder is well suited for these measurements, allowing for adjustments in all three of the coordinate axes directions so that even small samples can be accurately positioned for measurement between the poles of the magnet. The sample holder is interfaced and controlled with LABView software. The measurements are made using a suite of Keithley instruments. The design and construction will be discussed and preliminary calibration of the Hall Effect system will be presented.

  4. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  5. Quasiparticle Aggregation in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-10-10

    Quasiparticles in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect behave qualitatively like electrons confined to the lowest landau level, and can do everything electrons can do, including condense into second generation Fractional Quantum Hall ground states. I review in this paper the reasoning leading to variational wavefunctions for ground state and quasiparticles in the 1/3 effect. I then show how two-quasiparticle eigenstates are uniquely determined from symmetry, and how this leads in a natural way to variational wavefunctions for composite states which have the correct densities (2/5, 2/7, ...). I show in the process that the boson, anyon and fermion representations for the quasiparticles used by Haldane, Halperin, and me are all equivalent. I demonstrate a simple way to derive Halperin`s multiple-valued quasiparticle wavefunction from the correct single-valued electron wavefunction. (auth)

  6. Critical current destabilizing perpendicular magnetization by the spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2015-07-01

    The critical current needed to destabilize the magnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet via the spin Hall effect is studied. Both the dampinglike and fieldlike torques associated with the spin current generated by the spin Hall effect are included in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to model the system. In the absence of the fieldlike torque, the critical current is independent of the damping constant and is much larger than that of conventional spin torque switching of collinear magnetic systems, as in magnetic tunnel junctions. With the fieldlike torque included, we find that the critical current scales with the damping constant as α0 (i.e., damping independent), α , and α1 /2 depending on the sign of the fieldlike torque and other parameters such as the external field. Numerical and analytical results show that the critical current can be significantly reduced when the fieldlike torque possesses the appropriate sign, i.e., when the effective field associated with the fieldlike torque is pointing opposite to the spin direction of the incoming electrons. These results provide a pathway to reducing the current needed to switch magnetization using the spin Hall effect.

  7. Quantum Hall effect and semiconductor-to-semimetal transition in biased black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shengjun; van Veen, Edo; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Roldán, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum Hall effect of two-dimensional electron gas in black phosphorus in the presence of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields. In the absence of a bias voltage, the external magnetic field leads to a quantization of the energy spectrum into equidistant Landau levels, with different cyclotron frequencies for the electron and hole bands. The applied voltage reduces the band gap, and eventually a semiconductor-to-semimetal transition takes place. This nontrivial phase is characterized by the emergence of a pair of Dirac points in the spectrum. As a consequence, the Landau levels are not equidistant anymore but follow the ɛn∝√{n B } characteristic of Dirac crystals as graphene. By using the Kubo-Bastin formula in the context of the kernel polynomial method, we compute the Hall conductivity of the system. We obtain a σx y∝2 n quantization of the Hall conductivity in the gapped phase (standard quantum Hall effect regime) and a σx y∝4 (n +1 /2 ) quantization in the semimetallic phase, characteristic of Dirac systems with nontrivial topology.

  8. Effects of Segmented Electrode in Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; M. Keidar; D. Staack; N.J. Fisch

    2001-12-03

    Segmented electrodes with a low secondary electron emission are shown to alter significantly plasma flow in the ceramic channel of the Hall thruster. The location of the axial acceleration region relative to the magnetic field can be moved. The radial potential distribution can also be altered near the channel walls. A hydrodynamic model shows that these effects are consistent with a lower secondary electron emission of the segmented electrode as compared to ceramic channel walls.

  9. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  10. Simulation of the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yang, Xu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to simulate the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect with ultra-cold bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We first show that the required model Hamiltonian of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with an effective magnetic field and tunable parameters can be realized in this system. For dynamical response to ramping the external fields, the quantized plateaus emerge in the Berry curvature of the interacting atomic spin chain as a function of the effective spin-exchange interaction. The quantization of this response in the parameter space with the interaction-induced topological transition characterizes the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be observed in practical cold atom experiments with numerical simulations.

  11. Interaction and multiband effects in the intrinsic spin-Hall effect of an interacting multiorbital metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    The spin-Hall effect is a spin-current version of the usual-Hall effect, and its potential for application may be great. For the efficient application utilizing the spin-Hall effect, an understanding of interaction effects may be helpful because the interaction effects sometimes become remarkable in transport phenomena (e.g., fractional-quantum-Hall effect). However, a lot of theoretical studies neglected the interaction effects, and the interaction effects in the spin-Hall effect had been little understood. To improve this situation, I developed a general formalism for the intrinsic spin-Hall effect including the interaction effects and multiband effects by using the linear-response theory with approximations appropriate for an interacting multiorbital metal (see arXiv:1510.03988). In this talk, I explain how the electron-electron interaction modifies the spin-Hall conductivity and show several new and remarkable interactions effects, new mechanisms of the damping dependence and a crossover of the damping dependence in a clean system and a temperature-dependent correction due to the spin-Coulomb drag. I also show guidelines useful for general formulations of other transport phenomena including the interaction effects and multiband effects.

  12. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Gritsev, V.; Polkovnikov, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect. PMID:22493228

  13. Spin Hall effect of light in inhomogeneous nonlinear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hehe; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spin Hall effect of a polarized Gaussian beam (GB) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic and nonlinear medium using the method of the eikonal-based complex geometrical optics which describes the phase front and cross-section of a light beam using the quadratic expansion of a complex-valued eikonal. The linear complex-valued eikonal terms are introduced to describe the polarization-dependent transverse shifts of the beam in inhomogeneous nonlinear medium which is called the spin Hall effect of beam. We know that the spin Hall effect of beam is affected by the nonlinearity of medium and include two parts, one originates from the coupling between the spin angular momentum and the extrinsic orbital angular momentum due to the curve trajectory of the center of gravity of the polarized GB and the other from the coupling between the spin angular momentum and the intrinsic orbital angular momentum due to the rotation of the beam with respect to the central ray.

  14. Current contacts and the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Son, P. C.; Kruithof, G. H.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1990-12-01

    The nonlinearities in the I-V characteristics have been studied of high-mobility Si metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors in the quantum Hall regime. The breakdown curves were measured with different sets of voltage contacts and for different directions of magnetic field and current. Comparison of these curves shows that the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in these samples is an intrinsic effect that starts at the current contact where the electrons are injected into the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). This fundamental asymmetry and the crucial role of the current contact are explained using the Büttiker-Landauer approach to the QHE and its recent extension to the nonlinear regime. The electron-injection process contains two mechanisms that lead to breakdown voltages in the 2DEG. We have identified both experimentally by comparing the critical currents of different configurations of current and voltage contacts. In one of the mechanisms, the nonequilibrium distribution of electrons that is injected into the 2DEG extends to the voltage contacts. This means that the equilibration length of the 2D electrons is at least of the order of 100 μm. For currents far beyond breakdown and for voltage contacts that are further from the electron-injection contact, the breakdown characteristics are harder to understand. The variation of the electron density of the 2DEG due to the large Hall voltage has to be taken into account as well as the equilibration induced by additional voltage contacts.

  15. The plasmoid instability and Hall effect during chromospheric magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Lukin, Vyacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous process in the partially ionized solar chromosphere. Recent two-dimensional simulations have shown that the plasmoid instability onsets during partially ionized reconnection [1-4]. We use the plasma-neutral module of the HiFi framework to simulate the nonlinear evolution of the plasmoid instability during symmetric and asymmetric reconnection. These simulations model the plasma and neutrals as separate fluids and include ionization, recombination, charge exchange, thermal conduction, and the Hall effect. The Hall effect leads to the development of significant out-of-plane magnetic fields in the current sheet region in the laminar phase, but we do not observe shortening of the current sheet or significant acceleration of the reconnection rate as a result. After the onset of the plasmoid instability, structure develops on scales comparable to the ion inertial length. We compare simulations of the plasmoid instability with and without the Hall effect to determine its impact on the reconnection process. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to connect these simulations with solar observations and laboratory experiments.[1] Leake et al. 2012, ApJ, 760, 109 [2] Leake et al. 2013, PhPl, 20, 062102 [3] Ni et al. 2015, ApJ, 799, 79 [4] Murphy & Lukin 2015, ApJ, 805, 134

  16. Enhancement of the anomalous Hall effect in ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Katarina; Hönemann, Albert; Fedorov, Dmitry V.; Gradhand, Martin; Mertig, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    We consider ternary alloys of the composition Cu(Mn 1 -wTw) , where T corresponds to different nonmagnetic impurities. As was discovered by Fert et al. [J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 24, 231 (1981)], 10.1016/0304-8853(81)90079-2, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the binary Cu(Mn) alloy can be significantly enhanced by means of codoping using 5 d impurities. Moreover, they attempted to quantify the spin Hall effect (SHE) in Cu (T ) binary alloys via the AHE measured in the related ternary alloys. Here, we present a theoretical study serving as a detailed background of the experimental findings by clarifying the conditions required for a maximal enhancement of the AHE as well as the relations between both Hall effects. Based on the proposed approach, we perform first-principles calculations for several Cu(Mn 1 -wTw)[T = Au, Bi, Ir, Lu, Sb, or Ta] alloys, which are underpinned by theoretical investigations via Matthiessen's rule.

  17. Development and Characterization of High-Efficiency, High-Specific Impulse Xenon Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation presents research aimed at extending the efficient operation of 1600 s specific impulse Hall thruster technology to the 2000 to 3000 s range. Motivated by previous industry efforts and mission studies, the aim of this research was to develop and characterize xenon Hall thrusters capable of both high-specific impulse and high-efficiency operation. During the development phase, the laboratory-model NASA 173M Hall thrusters were designed and their performance and plasma characteristics were evaluated. Experiments with the NASA-173M version 1 (v1) validated the plasma lens magnetic field design. Experiments with the NASA 173M version 2 (v2) showed there was a minimum current density and optimum magnetic field topography at which efficiency monotonically increased with voltage. Comparison of the thrusters showed that efficiency can be optimized for specific impulse by varying the plasma lens. During the characterization phase, additional plasma properties of the NASA 173Mv2 were measured and a performance model was derived. Results from the model and experimental data showed how efficient operation at high-specific impulse was enabled through regulation of the electron current with the magnetic field. The electron Hall parameter was approximately constant with voltage, which confirmed efficient operation can be realized only over a limited range of Hall parameters.

  18. Effects of enhanced cathode electron emission on Hall thruster operation

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-05-15

    Interesting discharge phenomena are observed that have to do with the interaction between the magnetized Hall thruster plasma and the neutralizing cathode. The steady-state parameters of a highly ionized thruster discharge are strongly influenced by the electron supply from the cathode. The enhancement of the cathode electron emission above its self-sustained level affects the discharge current and leads to a dramatic reduction in the plasma divergence and a suppression of large amplitude, low frequency discharge current oscillations usually related to an ionization instability. These effects correlate strongly with the reduction in the voltage drop in the region with the fringing magnetic field between the thruster channel and the cathode. The measured changes in the plasma properties suggest that the electron emission affects the electron cross-field transport in the thruster discharge. These trends are generalized for Hall thrusters of various configurations.

  19. Effects of Enhanced Eathode Electron Emission on Hall Thruster Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses, A. Smirnov and N. J. Fisch

    2009-04-24

    Interesting discharge phenomena are observed that have to do with the interaction between the magnetized Hall thruster plasma and the neutralizing cathode. The steadystate parameters of a highly ionized thruster discharge are strongly influenced by the electron supply from the cathode. The enhancement of the cathode electron emission above its self-sustained level affects the discharge current and leads to a dramatic reduction of the plasma divergence and a suppression of large amplitude, low frequency discharge current oscillations usually related to an ionization instability. These effects correlate strongly with the reduction of the voltage drop in the region with the fringing magnetic field between the thruster channel and the cathode. The measured changes of the plasma properties suggest that the electron emission affects the electron cross-field transport in the thruster discharge. These trends are generalized for Hall thrusters of various configurations.

  20. Influences of a topological defect on the spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-hua; Ma, Kai; Li, Kang

    2013-03-01

    We study the influence of topological defects on the spin current as well as the spin Hall effect. We find that the nontrivial deformation of the space time due to topological defects can generate a spin-dependent current which then induces an imbalanced accumulation of spin states on the edges of the sample. The corresponding spin Hall conductivity has also been calculated for the topological defect of a cosmic string. Compared to the ordinary value, a correction which is linear with mass density of the cosmic string appears. Our approach to the dynamics of nonrelativistic spinors in the presence of a topological defect is based on the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The spin current is obtained by using the extended Drude model, which is independent of the scattering mechanism.

  1. Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkang; Li, H.; Dai, Y. M.; Miao, H.; Shi, Y. G.; Ding, H.; Taylor, A. J.; Yarotski, D. A.; Prasankumar, R. P.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    We systematically measured the Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe2. By carefully fitting the Hall resistivity to a two-band model, the temperature dependencies of the carrier density and mobility for both electron- and hole-type carriers were determined. We observed a sudden increase in the hole density below ˜160 K, which is likely associated with the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition reported by a previous photoemission study. In addition, a more pronounced reduction in electron density occurs below 50 K, giving rise to comparable electron and hole densities at low temperature. Our observations indicate a possible electronic structure change below 50 K, which might be the direct driving force of the electron-hole "compensation" and the extremely large magnetoresistance as well. Numerical simulations imply that this material is unlikely to be a perfectly compensated system.

  2. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  3. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  4. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  5. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  6. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  7. Scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in lower conductivity regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, J.; Bordel, C.; Bouma, D. S.; de Lorimier-Farmer, A.; Lee, H. J.; Hellman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was investigated using amorphous and epitaxial Fe x Si1‑x (0.43 < x < 0.71) magnetic thin films by varying the longitudinal conductivity (σxx) using two different approaches: modifying the carrier mean free path (l) with chemical or structural disorder while holding the carrier concentration (nh) constant or varying n h and keeping l constant. The anomalous Hall conductivity (σxy) , when suitably normalized by magnetization and n h , is shown to be independent of σxx for all samples. This observation suggests a primary dependence on an intrinsic mechanism, unsurprising for the epitaxial high conductivity films where the Berry phase curvature mechanism is expected, but remarkable for the amorphous samples. That the amorphous samples show this scaling indicates a local atomic level description of a Berry phase, resulting in an intrinsic AHE in a system that lacks lattice periodicity.

  8. Hall effect analysis in irradiated silicon samples with different resistivities

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S. |; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Lazanu, S.

    1999-08-01

    The changes induced by neutron irradiation in n- and p-type silicon samples with starting resistivities from 10 {Omega}-cm up to 30 K{Omega}-cm, grown using different techniques, as Float-Zone (FZ), Czochralski (CZ) and epitaxial, have been analyzed by Van der Pauw and Hall effect measurements. Increasing the fluence, each set of samples evolved toward a quasi-intrinsic p-type material. This behavior has been explained in the frame of a two-level model, that considers the introduction during irradiation of mainly two defects. A deep acceptor and a deep donor, probably related to the divacancy and to the C{sub i}O{sub i} complex, are placed in the upper and lower half of the forbidden gap, respectively. This simple model explains quantitatively the data on resistivity and Hall coefficient of each set of samples up to the fluence of {approx} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}.

  9. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  10. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-04-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers.

  11. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Sanchez, Juan-Carlos; Vergnaud, C.; Vila, L.; Attane, J.-P.; Marty, A.; Jaffres, Henri; Jamet, Matthieu; George, Jean-Marie

    2014-03-01

    We have measured the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in n-Ge at room temperature. The spin current in germanium was generated by spin pumping from a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction in order to prevent the impedance mismatch issue. A clear electromotive force was measured in Ge at the ferromagnetic resonance of CFB. The same study was then carried out on several test samples, in particular, we have investigated the influence of the MgO tunnel barrier and sample annealing on the ISHE signal. The reference CFB/MgO bilayer grown on SiO2 exhibits a clear electromotive force due to anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect, which is dominated by an asymmetric contribution with respect to the resonance field. We also found that the MgO tunnel barrier is essential to observe ISHE in Ge and that sample annealing systematically leads to an increase of the signal. We propose a theoretical model based on the presence of localized states at the interface to account for these observations. Finally, all of our results are fully consistent with the observation of ISHE in heavily doped n-Ge with a spin Hall angle around 0.001. JCRS acknowledges the Eurotalent CEA program.

  12. Effects of wall electrodes on Hall effect thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Langendorf, S. Walker, M.; Xu, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper investigates the physical mechanisms that cause beneficial and detrimental performance effect observed to date in Hall effect thrusters with wall electrodes. It is determined that the wall electrode sheath can reduce ion losses to the wall if positioned near the anode (outside the dense region of the plasma) such that an ion-repelling sheath is able to form. The ability of the wall electrode to form an ion-repelling sheath is inversely proportional to the current drawn—if the wall electrode becomes the dominant sink for the thruster discharge current, increases in wall electrode bias result in increased local plasma potential rather than an ion-repelling sheath. A single-fluid electron flow model gives results that mimic the observed potential structures and the current-sharing fractions between the anode and wall electrodes, showing that potential gradients in the presheath and bulk plasma come at the expense of current draw to the wall electrodes. Secondary electron emission from the wall electrodes (or lack thereof) is inferred to have a larger effect if the electrodes are positioned near the exit plane than if positioned near the anode, due to the difference in energy deposition from the plasma.

  13. Effects of wall electrodes on Hall effect thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, S.; Xu, K.; Walker, M.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the physical mechanisms that cause beneficial and detrimental performance effect observed to date in Hall effect thrusters with wall electrodes. It is determined that the wall electrode sheath can reduce ion losses to the wall if positioned near the anode (outside the dense region of the plasma) such that an ion-repelling sheath is able to form. The ability of the wall electrode to form an ion-repelling sheath is inversely proportional to the current drawn—if the wall electrode becomes the dominant sink for the thruster discharge current, increases in wall electrode bias result in increased local plasma potential rather than an ion-repelling sheath. A single-fluid electron flow model gives results that mimic the observed potential structures and the current-sharing fractions between the anode and wall electrodes, showing that potential gradients in the presheath and bulk plasma come at the expense of current draw to the wall electrodes. Secondary electron emission from the wall electrodes (or lack thereof) is inferred to have a larger effect if the electrodes are positioned near the exit plane than if positioned near the anode, due to the difference in energy deposition from the plasma.

  14. Diagnostic Setup for Characterization of Near-Anode Processes in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2003-09-08

    A diagnostic setup for characterization of near-anode processes in Hall-current plasma thrusters consisting of biased and emissive electrostatic probes, high-precision positioning system and low-noise electronic circuitry was developed and tested. Experimental results show that radial probe insertion does not cause perturbations to the discharge and therefore can be used for accurate near-anode measurements.

  15. Diagnostic Setup for Characterization of Near-Anode Processes in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; Y. Raitses; N. J. Fisch

    2003-05-29

    A diagnostic setup for characterization of the near-anode processes in Hall thrusters was designed and assembled. Experimental results with a single floating probe show that radial probe insertion does not cause perturbations to the discharge and therefore can be used for near-anode measurements.

  16. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  17. Hall effect in a strong magnetic field: Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2010-11-15

    In this work we numerically test a model of Hall magnetohydrodynamics in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field: the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic model (RHMHD) derived by [Gomez et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102303 (2008)] with the addition of weak compressible effects. The main advantage of this model lies in the reduction of computational cost. Nevertheless, up until now the degree of agreement with the original Hall MHD system and the range of validity in a regime of turbulence were not established. In this work direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional Hall MHD turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of the weak compressible RHMHD model. The results show that the degree of agreement is very high (when the different assumptions of RHMHD, such as spectral anisotropy, are satisfied). Nevertheless, when the initial conditions are isotropic but the mean magnetic field is maintained strong, the results differ at the beginning but asymptotically reach a good agreement at relatively short times. We also found evidence that the compressibility still plays a role in the dynamics of these systems, and the weak compressible RHMHD model is able to capture these effects. In conclusion the weak compressible RHMHD model is a valid approximation of the Hall MHD turbulence in the relevant physical context.

  18. The Microwave Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William; Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, J. Robert

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. This technique does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing a semiconductor wafer into a slot in an X-band (8 - 12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the wafer and produces a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d. c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. We determine a calibration constant as a function of the ratio of thickness to skin depth for two and three inch silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2 / (Vsec)

  19. The microwave Hall effect measured using a waveguide tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, J. E.; Anderson, J. R.; Johnson, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band (8-12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the wafer gives a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d.c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This paper presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2/(V s).

  20. Application of the quantum Hall effect to resistance metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Wilfrid; Schopfer, Félicien; Guignard, Jérémie; Thévenot, Olivier; Gournay, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    The quantum Hall effect (QHE) discovery has revolutionized metrology by providing with a representation of the unit of resistance, R, that can be reproduced within a relative uncertainty of one part in 10 9 and is theoretically only linked to Planck's constant h and the electron charge e. This breakthrough also results from the development of resistance comparison bridges using cryogenic current comparator (CCC). The QHE experimental know-how now allows the realization of perfectly quantized Quantum Hall Array Resistance Standards (QHARS) by combining a large number of single Hall bars. In the context of an evolution of the Système International (SI) of units by fixing some fundamental constants of physics, the determination of the von Klitzing constant R through the use of the so-called Thompson-Lampard calculable capacitor and the realization of refined universality tests of the QHE are of prime importance. Finally, the fascinating graphene material might be a new turning point in resistance metrology.

  1. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stable dumbbell stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-02-01

    Topological property of the dumbbell (DB) stanene, more stable than the stanene with a honeycomb lattice, is investigated by using ab initio methods. The magnetic DB stanene demonstrates an exotic quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect due to inversion of the Sn spin-up px,y and spin-down pz states. The QAH gap is found to be opened at Γ point rather than the usual K and K' points, beneficial to observe the effect in experiments. When a 3% tensile strain is applied, a large nontrivial gap (˜50 meV) is achieved. Our results provide another lighthouse for realizing QAH effects in two-dimensional systems.

  2. Interface engineering of quantum Hall effects in digital transition metal oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Di; Zhu, Wenguang; Ran, Ying; Nagaosa, Naoto; Okamoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are characterized by a non-trivial band topology driven by the spin-orbit coupling. To fully explore the fundamental science and application of TIs, material realization is indispensable. Here we predict, based on tight-binding modeling and first-principles calculations, that bilayers of perovskite-type transition-metal oxides grown along the [111] crystallographic axis are potential candidates for two-dimensional TIs. The topological band structure of these materials can be fine-tuned by changing dopant ions, substrates and external gate voltages. We predict that LaAuO$_3$ bilayers have a topologically non-trivial energy gap of about 0.15~eV, which is sufficiently large to realize the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. Intriguing phenomena, such as fractional quantum Hall effect, associated with the nearly flat topologically non-trivial bands found in $e_g$ systems are also discussed.

  3. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Myers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The thermal characterization test of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding has been completed. This thruster was developed to support a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of the preparation for this characterization test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure the temperature of various thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or plasma. An in-situ calibration array was incorporated into the setup to improve the accuracy of the temperature measurement. The key design parameters for the calibration array were determined in a separate pilot test. The raw data from the characterization test was analyzed though further work is needed to obtain accurate anode temperatures. Examination of the front pole and discharge channel temperatures showed that the thruster temperature was driven more by discharge voltage than by discharge power. Operation at lower discharge voltages also yielded more uniform temperature distributions than at higher discharge voltages. When operating at high discharge voltage, increasing the magnetic field strength appeared to have made the thermal loading azimuthally more uniform.

  4. Chirality-Dependent Hall Effect in Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan A; Pan, Hui; Zhang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    We generalize a semiclassical theory and use the argument of angular momentum conservation to examine the ballistic transport in lightly doped Weyl semimetals, taking into account various phase-space Berry curvatures. We predict universal transverse shifts of the wave-packet center in transmission and reflection, perpendicular to the direction in which the Fermi energy or velocities change adiabatically. The anomalous shifts are opposite for electrons with different chirality, and they can be made imbalanced by breaking inversion symmetry. We discuss how to utilize local gates, strain effects, and circularly polarized lights to generate and probe such a chirality-dependent Hall effect. PMID:26550743

  5. Chirality-dependent Hall Effect in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengyuan; Pan, Hui; Zhang, Fan

    We generalize a semiclassical theory and use the argument of angular momentum conservation to examine the ballistic transport in lightly-doped Weyl semimetals, taking into account various phase-space Berry curvatures. We predict universal transverse shifts of the wave-packet center in transmission and reflection, perpendicular to the direction in which the Fermi energy or velocities change adiabatically. The anomalous shifts are opposite for electrons with different chirality, and can be made imbalanced by breaking inversion symmetry. We discuss how to utilize local gates, strain effects, and circularly polarized lights to generate and probe such a chirality-dependent Hall effect. Journal Ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 , 156603 (2015).

  6. Orbitronics: the Intrinsic Orbital Hall Effect in p-Doped Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Hughes, Taylor L.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The spin Hall effect depends crucially on the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of the energy band. Because of the smaller spin-orbit coupling in silicon, the spin Hall effect is expected to be much reduced. We show that the electric field in p-doped silicon can induce a dissipationless orbital current in a fashion reminiscent of the spin Hall effect. The vertex correction due to impurity scattering vanishes and the effect is therefore robust against disorder. The orbital Hall effect can lead to the accumulation of local orbital momentum at the edge of the sample, and can be detected by the Kerr effect.

  7. Resonant spin Hall effect in two dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shun-Qing

    2005-03-01

    Remarkable phenomena have been observed in 2DEG over last two decades, most notably, the discovery of integer and fractional quantum Hall effect. The study of spin transport provides a good opportunity to explore spin physics in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with spin-orbit coupling and other interaction. It is already known that the spin-orbit coupling leads to a zero-field spin splitting, and competes with the Zeeman spin splitting if the system is subjected to a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of 2DEG. The result can be detected as beating of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation. Very recently the speaker and his collaborators studied transport properties of a two-dimensional electron system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a perpendicular magnetic field. The spin-orbit coupling competes with the Zeeman splitting to generate additional degeneracies between different Landau levels at certain magnetic fields. It is predicted theoretically that this degeneracy, if occurring at the Fermi level, gives rise to a resonant spin Hall conductance, whose height is divergent as 1/T and whose weight is divergent as -lnT at low temperatures. The charge Hall conductance changes by 2e^2/h instead of e^2/h as the magnetic field changes through the resonant point. The speaker will address the resonance condition, symmetries in the spin-orbit coupling, the singularity of magnetic susceptibility, nonlinear electric field effect, the edge effect and the disorder effect due to impurities. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong under Grant No.: HKU 7088/01P. *S. Q. Shen, M. Ma, X. C. Xie, and F. C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 256603 (2004) *S. Q. Shen, Y. J. Bao, M. Ma, X. C. Xie, and F. C. Zhang, cond-mat/0410169

  8. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. We discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We presentmore » the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.« less

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1‑x Gd x O integrated with Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, Oleg E.; Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm‑1 in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1-x Gd x O integrated with Si.

    PubMed

    Parfenov, Oleg E; Averyanov, Dmitry V; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Taldenkov, Alexander N; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm(-1) in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies. PMID:27165844

  13. Four-Dimensional Quantum Hall Effect with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, H. M.; Zilberberg, O.; Ozawa, T.; Carusotto, I.; Goldman, N.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a realistic scheme to detect the 4D quantum Hall effect using ultracold atoms. Based on contemporary technology, motion along a synthetic fourth dimension can be accomplished through controlled transitions between internal states of atoms arranged in a 3D optical lattice. From a semiclassical analysis, we identify the linear and nonlinear quantized current responses of our 4D model, relating these to the topology of the Bloch bands. We then propose experimental protocols, based on current or center-of-mass-drift measurements, to extract the topological second Chern number. Our proposal sets the stage for the exploration of novel topological phases in higher dimensions.

  14. Quantum Hall effect in supersymmetric Chern-Simons theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory whose low energy physics is that of the fractional quantum Hall effect. The supersymmetry allows us to solve the theory analytically. We quantize the vortices and, by relating their dynamics to a matrix model, show that their ground state wave function is in the same universality class as the Laughlin state. We further construct coherent state representations of the excitations of a finite number of vortices. These are quasiholes. By an explicit computation of the Berry phase, without resorting to a plasma analogy, we show that these excitations have fractional charge and spin.

  15. On the magnetic mirror effect in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, M.; Boyd, I.D.

    2005-09-19

    The magnetic mirror effect is studied in the channel of a Hall thruster. It is shown that gradients in magnetic field affect the presheath structure and electric potential distribution. The length of the radial presheath region decreases in the presence of a magnetic field gradient. The two-dimensional potential shape can be affected by proper choice of the magnetic mirror ratio. In particular, it is possible to obtain a concave shape of the potential profile in the channel even in the case of a primarily radial magnetic field. This, in turn, can be used to efficiently control the ion dynamics in the acceleration region.

  16. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Luciano

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  17. Redundant speed control for brushless Hall effect motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A speed control system for a brushless Hall effect device equipped direct current (D.C.) motor is described. Separate windings of the motor are powered by separate speed responsive power sources. A change in speed, upward or downward, because of the failure of a component of one of the power sources results in a corrective signal being generated in the other power source to supply an appropriate power level and polarity to one winding to cause the motor to be corrected in speed.

  18. Anomalous conductivity and secondary electron emission in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boniface, C.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2006-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the effects of electron-wall interactions on cross magnetic field electron momentum and energy losses in Hall effect thrusters. By coupling a semianalytical model of the wall sheath similar to models used by several authors in this context, with a two-dimensional hybrid simulation of a Hall effect thruster, we find that the cross magnetic field conductivity enhanced by electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission is not sufficient to explain the conductivity deduced from experiments. Calculated current-voltage curves including electron-wall collisions from a standard sheath model as the sole 'anomalous' conductivity mechanism do not reproduce the measurements, especially at high discharge voltages, and for various wall ceramics. Results also show that a one-dimensional description of electron-wall collisions with a constant radial plasma density profile as used by many authors leads to an overestimation of the contribution of electron-wall interactions to cross magnetic field conductivity.

  19. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  20. Plasma Characterization of Hall Thruster with Active and Passive Segmented Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-09-04

    Non-emissive electrodes and ceramic spacers placed along the Hall thruster channel are shown to affect the plasma potential distribution and the thruster operation. These effects are associated with physical properties of the electrode material and depend on the electrode configuration, geometry and the magnetic field distribution. An emissive segmented electrode was able to maintain thruster operation by supplying an additional electron flux to sustain the plasma discharge between the anode and cathode neutralizer. These results indicate the possibility of new configurations for segmented electrode Hall thruster.

  1. Spin Hall effects for cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Fu, Hao; Wu, C.-J.; Zhang, S.-C.; Duan, L.-M. /Michigan U., MCTP

    2010-03-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe spin Hall effects with cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential. Under an appropriate configuration, the cold atoms moving in a spatially varying laser field experience an effective spin-dependent gauge potential. Through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that such a gauge field leads to observable spin Hall currents under realistic conditions. We also discuss the quantum spin Hall state in an optical lattice.

  2. 2. QUANTUM HALL EFFECT: The problem of Coulomb interactions in the theory of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, M. A.; Pruisken, A. M. M.; Škoric, B.

    2001-10-01

    We summarize the main ingredients of a unifying theory for abelian quantum Hall states. This theory combines the Finkel'stein approach to localization and interaction effects with the topological concept of an instanton vacuum as well as Chern-Simons gauge theory. We elaborate on the meaning of a new symmetry (Script F invariance) for systems with an infinitely ranged interaction potential. We address the renormalization of the theory and present the main results in terms of a scaling diagram of the conductances.

  3. Anomalous Hall effect in NiPt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, T.; Rydh, A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the Hall effect in sputtered NixPt1-x thin films with different Ni concentrations. Temperature, magnetic field, and angular dependencies are analyzed and the phase diagram of NiPt thin films is obtained. It is found that films with sub-critical Ni concentration exhibit cluster-glass behavior at low temperatures with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy below the freezing temperature. Films with super-critical Ni concentration are ferromagnetic with parallel anisotropy. At the critical concentration the state of the film is strongly frustrated. Such films demonstrate canted magnetization with the easy axis rotating as a function of temperature. The magnetism appears via consecutive paramagnetic-cluster glass-ferromagnetic transitions, rather than a single second-order phase transition. But most remarkably, the extraordinary Hall effect changes sign at the critical concentration. We suggest that this is associated with a reconstruction of the electronic structure of the alloy at the normal metal-ferromagnet quantum phase transition.

  4. Strong Spin Hall effect in PtMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yongxi; Shi, Shengjie; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    Recent reports indicate that certain metallic antiferromagnets (AFM) can exhibit a significant spin Hall effect. Here we report a large damping-like spin torque efficiency (ξDL) in PtMn/ferromagnet(FM) bilayer structures, determined from both FM-thickness-dependent spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR), and harmonic response (HR) measurements of layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). We find that ξDL can vary from <0.1 to >0.15, depending on the thickness of PtMn, the stacking order of the samples, and the choice of the FM material. The field-like spin torque efficiency (ξFL) is also quite variable, 0<|ξFL|<0.5. The large broadening of the ST-FMR linewidth suggests extra spin attenuation at the AFM/FM interface that is possibly due to intermixing. The PtMn/FeCoB/MgO structures that exhibit PMA have a comparatively low switching current density and an unusual asymmetric switching phase diagram. These results indicate that AFM PtMn has significant potential both for advancing the understanding the physics of the spin Hall effect in Pt alloys, and for enabling new spintronics functionality.

  5. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bozovic, Ivan; Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-04

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ≈ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ≈ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,more » Δx ≈ 0.00008. Furthermore, we observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.« less

  6. Spin current swapping and spin hall effect in disordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed; Pauyac, Christian; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    The conversion of charge currents into spin currents via the spin Hall effect has attracted intense experimental and theoretical efforts lately, providing an efficient means to generate electric signals and manipulate the magnetization of single layers. More recently, it was proposed that spin-dependent scattering induced by spin-orbit coupled impurities also produces a so-called spin swapping, i.e. an exchange between the spin angular momentum and linear momentum of itinerant electrons. In this work, we investigate the nature of spin swapping and its interplay with extrinsic spin Hall effect and spin relaxation in finite size normal metals. We use two complementary methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The first method consists in rigorously deriving the drift-diffusion equation of the spin accumulation in the presence of spin-orbit coupled impurities from quantum kinetics using Wigner expansion. The second method is the real-space tight binding modeling of a finite system in the presence of spin-orbit coupled disorder.

  7. Characterization of Compounds Formed and added on surface of outdoor Seville city hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robador, Maria Dolores; Alcalde, Manuel; Arroyo, Fatima; Albardonedo, Antonio; Perez-Rodriguez, Jose Luis

    2013-04-01

    The building of the City Hall of Seville constitutes one of the samples more important of the architecture plateresque in Andalusia. For centuries the stone façade has suffered different stages of restoration. These treatments joined the effects of the environmental pollution are responsible for formation and deposition of different chemical compounds on the surface of the monuments. This study will supply information of the environmental effects on the rock, and the treatments that have been performed in previous interventions. The petrographic study showed the presence of a carbonate rock of thin grain constituted essentially by bioclastos and fine sand. The study by scanning electron microscopy showed a compact and continuous cover that suggested a polymer layer. The infrared spectroscopy study confirmed presence of acrylic resin. This resin covered sometimes a black crust constituted by alkanes characterized by mass spectrometry. In addition was found nodules constitutes by C, Ca, Fe, Si and Ca. These compounds appeared with gypsum and were attributed to environment contamination produced by combustion. Materials were observed that cover volumetric lagoons for losses of pieces or were used to fix fragments of stones that were free or displaced. The study by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of gypsum. Mortars constituted by calcite (60%) and inert material (40%; mainly quartz, feldspar and mica) were also characterized. In flute of the stone was found a black crust under which appeared a yellowish layer. The portable X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of gypsum produced by environmental contamination. Gypsum was also found in the interior of the stone confirming that this mineral has emigrated due the high porosity of the stone. In some zones of the façade was detected some possible wall paintings. Cross-sections were prepared and studied by optical and scanning electron microscopes. A layer of

  8. Spin polarized tunneling study on spin Hall effect metals and topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Luqiao

    2015-03-01

    Spin orbit interactions give rise to interesting physics phenomena in solid state materials such as the spin Hall effect (SHE) and topological insulator surface states. Those effects have been extensively studied using electrical detection techniques so far. However, to date most experiments focus only on characterizing electrons near Fermi surface, while the spin-orbit interaction is expected to be dependent on electrons' energies. Here we develop a tunneling spectroscopy technique to measure spin Hall materials and topological insulators under finite bias voltages. By electrically injecting spin polarized current into spin Hall metals or topological insulators through nonmagnetic material/oxide/ferromagnet (FM) junctions and measuring the induced transverse voltage, we are able to quantify the magnitude of the SHE in typical 5d transition metals and the spin momentum locking in topological insulators. The obtained spin Hall angles in Ta, Pt, W and Ir at zero bias are consistent with the results from spin torque experiments, verifying the SHE origin of those earlier observations. At finite biases, the transverse signals provide important information in determining the mechanisms of the observed effects, such as intrinsic vs extrinsic, surface vs bulk. Because of the impedance matching capability of tunnel junctions, the spin polarized tunneling spectroscopy technique is expected to be a powerful tool to measure a wide group of matters including the various newly discovered or proposed topological materials. with Ching-tzu Chen, Y. Zhu, J. Z. Sun, A. Richardella, N. Samarth and I. Garate. The work is partially supported by the DARPA MESO program (N66001-11-1-4110).

  9. Large extrinsic spin Hall effect in Au-Cu alloys by extensive atomic disorder scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Wang, S. H.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, J. R.; Cai, J. W.; Kang, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Spin Hall angle, which denotes the conversion efficiency between spin and charge current, is a key parameter in the pure spin current phenomenon. The search for materials with large spin Hall angle is indeed important for scientific interest and potential application in spintronics. Here the large enhanced spin Hall effect (SHE) of Au-Cu alloy is reported by investigating the spin Seebeck effect, spin Hall anomalous Hall effect, and spin Hall magnetoresistance of the Y3F e5O12 (YIG)/A uxC u1 -x hybrid structure over the full composition. At the near equiatomic Au-Cu composition with maximum atomic disorder scattering, the spin Hall angle of the Au-Cu alloy increases by two to three times together with a moderate spin diffusion length in comparison with Au. The longitudinal spin Seebeck voltage and the spin Hall magnetoresistance ratio also increase by two to three times. More importantly, no evidence of anomalous Hall effect is observed in all YIG/Au-Cu samples, in contrast to the cases of other giant SHE materials Pt(Pd), Ta, and W. This behavior makes Au-Cu free from any suspicion of the magnetic proximity effect involved in the hybrid structure, and thus the Au-Cu alloy can be an ideal material for pure spin current study.

  10. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.