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Sample records for halpha luminosity function

  1. EVOLUTION OF THE Halpha LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, Eduard; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a window on the star formation history over the last 4 Gyr. SHELS is a spectroscopically complete survey for R{sub tot} < 20.3 over 4 square{sup 0}. We use the 10k spectra to select a sample of pure star-forming galaxies based on their Halpha emission line. We use the spectroscopy to determine extinction corrections for individual galaxies and to remove active galaxies in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. We use the large volume of SHELS with the depth of a narrowband survey for Halpha galaxies at z approx 0.24 to make a combined determination of the Halpha luminosity function at z approx 0.24. The large area covered by SHELS yields a survey volume big enough to determine the bright end of the Halpha luminosity function from redshift 0.100 to 0.377 for an assumed fixed faint-end slope alpha = -1.20. The bright end evolves: the characteristic luminosity L* increases by 0.84 dex over this redshift range. Similarly, the star formation density increases by 0.11 dex. The fraction of galaxies with a close neighbor increases by a factor of 2-5 for L{sub Ha}lpha approx> L* in each of the redshift bins. We conclude that triggered star formation is an important influence for star-forming galaxies with Halpha emission.

  2. Predicting the Redshift 2 H-Alpha Luminosity Function Using [OIII] Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James W.; Dai, Y. S.; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Rafelski, Marc; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; Bagley, Micaela; Beck, Melanie; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Rutkowski, Michael; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Upcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA plan to measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) in order to study dark energy. These surveys will use IR slitless grism spectroscopy to measure redshifts of a large number of galaxies over a significant redshift range. In this paper, we use the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) to estimate the expected number of H-alpha emitters observable by these future surveys. WISP is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope slitless spectroscopic survey, covering the 0.8 - 1.65 micrometers wavelength range and allowing the detection of H-alpha emitters up to z approximately equal to 1.5 and [OIII] emitters to z approximately equal to 2.3. We derive the H-alpha-[OIII] bivariate line luminosity function for WISP galaxies at z approximately equal to 1 using a maximum likelihood estimator that properly accounts for uncertainties in line luminosity measurement, and demonstrate how it can be used to derive the H-alpha luminosity function from exclusively fitting [OIII] data. Using the z approximately equal to 2 [OIII] line luminosity function, and assuming that the relation between H-alpha and [OIII] luminosity does not change significantly over the redshift range, we predict the H-alpha number counts at z approximately equal to 2 - the upper end of the redshift range of interest for the future surveys. For the redshift range 0.7 less than z less than 2, we expect approximately 3000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of 3 x 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the proposed depth of Euclid galaxy redshift survey) and approximately 20,000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of approximately 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the baseline depth of WFIRST galaxy redshift survey).

  3. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  4. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  5. Luminosity Functions for Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Fabio; Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Italo

    1998-12-01

    We present theoretical mass-luminosity relations and luminosity functions (LFs) for globular cluster stars, from luminosities above the horizontal branch down to the minimum luminosity of hydrogen-burning stars. The LFs are available for metal mass fraction Z from Z = 10-4 to Z = 4 × 10-3, in the Johnson V band and in the Bessell-Cousins I band, and are based on tracks especially computed for this program, with the input physics of the models developed recently by D'Antona et al., Mazzitelli et al., and D'Antona & Mazzitelli. Two typical comparisons with observations are presented and discussed: (1) comparisons and statistical analysis with the LFs of the lower giant branch, turnoff region, and upper main sequence of several globular clusters from low to high metallicity, (2) derivation of the initial mass function (IMF) for the stars below the turnoff for several globular clusters for which Hubble Space Telescope data are available. In the first analysis we find that, for relatively large metallicities (Z >= 10-3) a good fit between theoretical and observed LFs can be found, although a simple χ2 statistical analysis shows that it is not possible to derive a strongly preferred age (or, equivalently, distance modulus) from the LF comparison. The fit with lower metallicity [Z ~ (1-2) × 10-4] LFs is less good but statistically acceptable. The main result is that the difference between observed and theoretical LFs of low-metallicity clusters reported by VandenBerg, Bolte, & Stetson appears to be much reduced in present models, and we give the possible reason why this happens and its consequences for the important parameter of the helium core mass at the flash. In the second application, we explore the effect of varying age and distance modulus on the mass function derived for a globular cluster. Distance moduli corresponding to the ``long'' distance scale (and relatively low ages) seem to be preferred based on these comparisons. The resulting index of the IMF is

  6. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  7. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  8. A deep luminosity function for 47 Tucanae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.

    CCD photometry in B and V reaching B(lim) ≅ 25 has been employed to obtain the luminosity function and color-magnitude diagram for the main sequence of 47 Tuc. For 5 < Mv < 10 the authors find that its LF is essentially flat (Δlog n/Δm ≡ 0). The CMD is successfully matched by isochrones with [Fe/H] = -0.5 and t ≅ 15×109y.

  9. Luminosity Function Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Kao, K. C.; Hu, J. Y.

    The luminosity function of a star cluster evolves markedly during the pre-main sequence phase. With an assumed initial mass function (Miller & Scalo, 1979) and pre-main sequence tracks (D'Antona & Mazzitelli, 1994), we calculate a set of monochromatic luminosity functions which, when compared with observations, can be used to infer the age and star formation history (coeval versus intermittent) of a star cluster. Applied to the Trapezium cluster (2.2 micron imaging data by Zinncker et al 1993), our model suggests an age close to 10^6 years, whereas in IC 348 (2 micron data from Lada & Lada, 1995) the age estimate yields 4--6 times 10^6 years and continual bursts of star formation seem to have occurred in this cluster. CCD imaging observations at optical-infrared I band are presented for NGC 663, for which an age of 1--3 times 10^7 years is inferred. The initial mass function for NGC 663 in the range 2--7.1 {Modot} has a slope of -0.77 plus or minus 0.20, much shallower than that for the solar neighborhood field stars. We interpret this being due to the mass segregation in the cluster.

  10. Probing the Luminosity Function of Young Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Glikman, E.; Lacy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last year, we have been using the Triple Spec Near-Infrared spectrograph on the Palomar Observatory to identify candidate dust-reddened quasars using the FIRST radio survey, the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and the SDSS optical survey. A previous campaign using the shallow near-infrared 2MASS survey, was very successful in finding dust obscured quasars by finding very red (R-K > 4, J-K > 1.7) radio sources (Glikman et al. 2007). Among them are many young, interacting galaxies (Urrutia, Lacy & Becker 2008) and a large fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (Urrutia et al. 2009), implying that the red quasar population probes a young phase in the lifetime of an AGN. By using the same color criteria on the deeper UKIDSS survey, we are able to probe into higher redshifts and lower luminosity red quasars. This is a first step to build a luminosity function for dust-obscured quasars. We then will be able to answer the question if young quasars are more generally more luminous as their older counterparts, perhaps because of higher accretion efficiency.

  11. Anchoring the AGN X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, John

    2003-09-01

    Knowledge of the AGN LF over a range of luminosities and redshifts is crucial to understanding the accretion history of supermassive blackholes. Much of the CXRB has been resolved and spectroscopic follow-up has revealed a mixed bag of object types at moderate to high redshifts. For the deep Chandra survey results to be useful in studying the evolution of the XLF, a representative sample of local AGNs of various types with known X-ray luminosities is needed. The new KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) provides the best available sample of H-alpha selected Type 1 and 2 AGNs to serve as the baseline for XLF evolution studies. We propose to observe a volume-limited sample of 28 KISS AGNs to assess their X-ray emission characteristics and establish the local AGN XLF.

  12. The X-ray luminosity function of very rich clusters and the luminosity-richness relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltan, A.; Henry, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    For a sample of galactic clusters that includes richness class three, four, and five clusters, the significance of the luminosity-richness relation is estimated using nonparametric methods which are valid for any luminosity function. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to determine the significance at which the X-ray luminosities of clusters in one richness class are statistically equal to those in another. The a priori expectation that the high richness clusters are more luminous on average than lower richness objects is confirmed, but it is found that the luminosity function for clusters of richness class three or higher turns over for luminosities less than about 3 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s, while that for lower richness classes extends to at least an order of magnitude lower luminosity.

  13. Luminosity enhancement in relativistic jets and altered luminosity functions for beamed objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Due to relativistic effects, the observed emission from relativistic jets is quite different from the rest frame emission. Systematic differences between the observed and intrinsic intensities of sources in which jet phenomena are occurring are discussed. Assuming that jets have a power law luminosity function of a slope B, the observed luminosity distribution as a function of the velocity of the jet, the spectral index of the rest frame emission, and the range of angles of the jets relative to our line of sight are calculated. The results is well-approximated by two power laws, the higher luminosity end having the original power law index X and the lower luminosity end having a flattened exponent independent of B and only slightly greater than 1. A model consisting of beamed emission from a jet and unbeamed emission from a stationary central component is investigated. The luminosity functions for these two-component sources are calculated for two ranges of angles. For sources in which beaming is important, the luminosity function is much flatter. Because of this, the relative numbers of ""beamed'' and ""unbeamed'' sources detected on the sky depend strongly on the luminosity at which the comparison is made.

  14. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  15. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  16. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  17. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  18. Deriving an X-ray luminosity function of dwarf novae

    SciTech Connect

    Byckling, Kristiina; Osborne, Julian; Mukai, Koji

    2010-07-15

    Current measurements of X-ray luminosity functions of dwarf novae contain biases due to high X-ray flux sources. We have obtained Suzaku, XMM-Newton and ASCA observations of nearby DNe which have parallax-based distance measurements, and carried out X-ray spectral analysis for these sources. Our primary goal is to derive a reliable X-ray luminosity function for this sample, and to compare it with existing X-ray luminosity functions. We briefly introduce the source sample and preliminary results.

  19. H II REGION LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY M51

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Narae E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2011-07-10

    We present a study of H II regions in M51 using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images taken as part of the Hubble Heritage Program. We have cataloged about 19,600 H II regions in M51 with H{alpha} luminosity in the range of L = 10{sup 35.5}-10{sup 39.0} erg s{sup -1}. The H{alpha} luminosity function of H II regions (H II LF) in M51 is well represented by a double power law with its index {alpha} = -2.25 {+-} 0.02 for the bright part and {alpha} = -1.42 {+-} 0.01 for the faint part, separated at a break point L = 10{sup 37.1} erg s{sup -1}. This break was not found in previous studies of M51 H II regions. Comparison with simulated H II LFs suggests that this break is caused by the transition of H II region ionizing sources, from low-mass clusters (with {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun}, including several OB stars) to more massive clusters (including several tens of OB stars). The H II LFs with L < 10{sup 37.1} erg s{sup -1}are found to have different slopes for different parts in M51: the H II LF for the interarm region is steeper than those for the arm and the nuclear regions. This observed difference in H II LFs can be explained by evolutionary effects: H II regions in the interarm region are relatively older than those in the other parts of M51.

  20. A bimodal model for the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The galaxy luminosity function in the Virgo cluster has been recently found to show a clear separation between bright galaxies and dwarf galaxies. Here, consideration is given to the effect on the luminosity function of galaxy binding energy which allows gas to be retained and star formation to proceed over about 1 Gyr in massive galaxies, but implies wind-driven mass loss and inefficient star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  1. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  2. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  3. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  4. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  5. MAGNITUDE GAP STATISTICS AND THE CONDITIONAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2012-12-20

    In a recent preprint, Hearin et al. (H12) suggest that the halo mass-richness calibration of clusters can be improved by using the difference in the magnitude of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy (magnitude gap) as an additional observable. They claim that their results are at odds with the results from Paranjape and Sheth (PS12) who show that the magnitude distribution of the brightest and second brightest galaxies can be explained based on order statistics of luminosities randomly sampled from the total galaxy luminosity function. We find that a conditional luminosity function (CLF) for galaxies which varies with halo mass, in a manner which is consistent with existing observations, naturally leads to a magnitude gap distribution which changes as a function of halo mass at fixed richness, in qualitative agreement with H12. We show that, in general, the luminosity distribution of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy depends upon whether the luminosities of galaxies are drawn from the CLF or the global luminosity function. However, we also show that the difference between the two cases is small enough to evade detection in the small sample investigated by PS12. This shows that the luminosity distribution is not the appropriate statistic to distinguish between the two cases, given the small sample size. We argue in favor of the CLF (and therefore H12) based upon its consistency with other independent observations, such as the kinematics of satellite galaxies, the abundance and clustering of galaxies, and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  6. The faintest stars - From Schmidt plates to luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Reid, I. N.; Mould, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the construction of a photometric catalog from scans of IIIaF and IVN plate material in 11 fields of the UKSRC and POSSII surveys. The procedures used and quality checks applied are described in detail, and should be considered as illustrative for those planning scientific programs with the forthcoming scans of these surveys. We find our plate material is complete to I of about 18 and R of about 20.5 with photometric uncertainties of +/- 0.20 and +/- 0.25 magnitudes (respectively) at those limits. These data are used to construct luminosity functions for stars within 150 pc of the sun in four distinct directions. We find no significant evidence for variations in the form of the luminosity function in different locations within the Galactic disk. Approximately 10-20 percent variations are seen in the normalization of the luminosity function.

  7. The luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; De Carvalho, R. R.; Zepf, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We use counts of faint galaxies in the regions of compact groups to extend the study of the luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups to absolute magnitudes as faint as M(sub B) = -14.5 + 5 log h. We find a slope of the faint end of the luminosity function of approximately alpha = -0.8, with a formal uncertainty of 0.15. This slope is not significantly different from that found for galaxies in other environments. Our results do not support previous suggestions of a dramatic underabundance of intrinsically faint galaxies in compact groups, which were based on extrapolations from fits at brighter magnitudes. The normal faint-end slope of the luminosity function in compact groups is in agreement with previous evidence that most galaxies in compact groups have not been dramatically affected by recent merging.

  8. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  9. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  10. Planetary Nebulae in the Solar Neighbourhood: Statistics, Distance Scale and Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.

    2008-07-01

    An accurate census of the nearest planetary nebulae (PNe) is needed for calculations of the total number, space density, scale height, and birth rate of PNe in the Galaxy, to understand the dynamics of an evolving nebula and its relationship to the cooling history of the central star, and also to provide an unbiased sample to investigate the frequency of binary central stars and their role in the formation and shaping of these objects. This study presents the most refined volume-limited survey of PNe known to date. Integrated H-alpha fluxes for over 400 mostly evolved PNe are presented, based primarily on data from the Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) and the Virginia Tech Spectral-Line Survey (VTSS). Aperture photometry on the digital images was performed to extract H-alpha+[NII] fluxes. The [NII] contribution was then de-convolved using literature data, new data from slit spectra, or spectrophotometric data from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) also obtained as part of this project. Comparison with previous work shows that the flux scale presented here has no significant zero-point error. The H-alpha fluxes are used to determine new Zanstra temperatures for those PNe with accurate central star photometry, calculating surface-brightness distances for each PN in the sample, and in conjunction with accurate [OIII] fluxes, new absolute PN magnitudes for delineating the faint end of the PN luminosity function. A spectroscopic survey of a range of MASH PNe is also presented. New emission-line intensities for 60 PNe are given, including a preliminary discussion of the chemical abundances of this sample. New distances have been determined for a large number of PNe, by either critically examining the literature, or by deriving new extinction and kinematic distances where suitable. For all PNe not amenable to these approaches, distances were estimated from a new H-alpha surface brightness-radius (SB-r) relation. The Hα SB-r relation covers >6 dex in SB, and

  11. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  12. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  13. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DURING THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, M.; Shull, J. M.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2010-05-10

    The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z = 6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function (LF) measured at z = 5 and z = 4. We then predict the LF at z {>=} 7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z {approx_gt} 7 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the LF: {alpha}(z {approx_gt} 8) {approx_lt} -1.9 compared to {alpha} = -1.74 at z = 6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L {sub *} {approx_gt} 10{sup -4}) might provide {approx_gt}75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f {sub esc} {approx} 0.2, clumping factor C {approx} 5, top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z {approx_gt} 8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z {approx_gt} 6, but a smaller C/f {sub esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L {sub *} galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z {>=} 6 than today.

  14. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Marshall, P. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Busha, Michael T.

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  15. On Schmidt's Vm estimator and other estimators of luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Schmidt's (1968) estimator, sometimes used to calculate the luminosity function from a complete sample of observed objects, can be generalized naively to the case in which the maximum distance for detection is a function of the direction. Though unbiased, this estimator then does not have minimum variance and, in some cases, is inferior to the classical estimator. The classical estimator, however, is biased when the magnitude boxes are not infinitesimal. A generalization of Schmidt's estimator is proposed which is unbiased and usually superior to both Schmidt's and the classical estimator. Variance formulas and numerical examples are given. The results can be used in combining several catalogs.

  16. Generalized Continuity Equation Solutions for the QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caditz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized continuity equation that describes the relationship between the statistical and physical evolution of populations of astronomical objects. This equation allows us to parameterize the luminosity function (LF) in terms of physically meaningful quantities, such as creation timescale, τs, object evolutionary timescale, τg, and lifetime, am. The shape and evolution of the LF are shown to be sensitive to these physical parameters, with large regions of the parameter space producing relatively simple evolutionary scenarios such as density evolution (DE) or luminosity evolution (LE). Regions of parameter space where τs ≲ 0.3tH and τg ≲ 0.5tH, where tH is the Hubble time, may be characterized by more complex evolution including the natural formation of a double power-law shape and mixed density and luminosity evolution (ME). This result has important consequences for the interpretation of the quasi-stellar object (QSO) LF, implying that the timescales for creation and physical evolution may fall near the above range. A fit to QSO survey data for redshifts 0.68 < z < 4 implies that τs ∼ 0.2tH and τg ∼ 0.05tH with QSOs having a maximum lifetime of am ∼ 0.25tH.

  17. Gamma-ray luminosity function of BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) of BL Lac objects is constructed by using a sample of BL Lac objects with redshifts selected from the Second LAT AGN catalog. The GLFs of BL Lacs in the frame of the pure density evolution (PDE), the pure luminosity evolution (PLE), and the luminosity-dependent density (LDDE) models are determined by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, respectively. Our results suggest that the PDE model can give best description for BL Lac GLF based on the combination of constraints of model parameters and good fits to the observed data of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) BL Lacs, but other two models (PLE and LDDE) cannot be excluded. Based on our constructed GLFs, the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) from BL Lacs is estimated, and ˜1-5 per cent of the EGRB in the 0.1-100 GeV band is found to come from unresolved BL Lacs (including the cascade emission). In addition, it is found that the BL Lac GLF is very different from flat spectrum radio quasar GLF and then the contribution of blazars to the EGRB should be estimated separately.

  18. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  19. z ~ 1 Lyα Emitters. I. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ~ 1 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Lyα luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ~ 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ~1.5 from z ~ 0.3 to z ~ 1 and ~20 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 2. We find a z ~ 1 volumetric Lyα escape fraction of 0.7% ± 0.4%. Based in part on data obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX09AF08G and by other grants and contracts. Based in part on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839.

  20. Revisiting the luminosity function of single halo white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Ruxandra; Torres, Santiago; Althaus, Leandro G.; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Context. White dwarfs are the fossils left by the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, and have very long evolutionary timescales. This allows us to use them to explore the properties of old populations, like the Galactic halo. Aims: We present a population synthesis study of the luminosity function of halo white dwarfs, aimed at investigating which information can be derived from the currently available observed data. Methods: We employ an up-to-date population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences for metal-poor progenitors as well as an accurate modeling of the observational biases. Results: We find that because the observed sample of halo white dwarfs is restricted to the brightest stars, only the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function can be used for these purposes, and that its shape function is almost insensitive to the most relevant inputs, such as the adopted cooling sequences, the initial mass function, the density profile of the stellar spheroid, or the adopted fraction of unresolved binaries. Moreover, since the cutoff of the observed luminosity has not yet been determined only the lower limits to the age of the halo population can be placed. Conclusions: We conclude that the current observed sample of the halo white dwarf population is still too small to obtain definite conclusions about the properties of the stellar halo, and the recently computed white dwarf cooling sequences, which incorporate residual hydrogen burning, should be assessed using metal-poor globular clusters.

  1. The luminosity function of the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, R. O.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We use the CfA Reshift Survey of galaxies with m(sub z) less than or equal to 15.5 to calculate the galaxy luminosity function over the range -13 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -22. The sample includes 9063 galaxies distributed over 2.1 sr. For galaxies with velocities cz greater or equal to 2500 km per sec, where the effects of peculiar velocities are small, the luminosity function is well represented by a Schechter function with parameters phi(sub star) = 0.04 +/- 0.01 per cu Mpc, M(sub star) = -18.8 +/- 0.3, and alpha = -1.0 +/- 0.2. When we include all galaxies with cz greater or equal to 500 km per sec, the number of galaxies in the range -16 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -13 exceeds the extrapolation of the Schechter function by a factor of 3.1 +/- 0.5. This faint-end excess is not caused by the local peculiar velocity field but may be partially explained by small scale errors in the Zwicky magnitudes. Even with a scale error as large as 0.2 mag per mag, which is unlikely, the excess is still a factor of 1.8 +/- 0.3. If real, this excess affects the interpretation of deep counts of field galaxies.

  2. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  3. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  4. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  5. A two-mode planetary nebula luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Stasińska, G.; Peña, M.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. We propose a new planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) that includes two populations in the distribution. Our PNLF is a direct extension of the canonical function proposed by Jacoby et al. (1987), in order to avoid problems related with the histogram construction, it is cast in terms of cumulative functions. Aims: We are interested in recovering the shape of the faint part of the PNLF in a consistent manner, for galaxies with and without a dip in their PNLFs. Methods: The parameters for the two-mode PNLF are obtained with a genetic algorithm, which obtains a best fit to the PNLF varying all of the parameters simultaneously in a broad parameter space. Results: We explore a sample of nine galaxies with various Hubble types and construct their PNLF. All of the irregular galaxies, except one, are found to be consistent with a two-mode population, while the situation is less clear for ellipticals and spirals.For the case of NGC 6822, we show that the two-mode PNLF is consistent with previous studies of the star formation history within that galaxy. Our results support two episodes of star formation, in which the second episode is significantly stronger.

  6. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-22

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6{+-}0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  7. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  8. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  9. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of \

  10. The luminosity function for the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for two complete slices of the extension of the CfA redshift survey is calculated. The nonparametric technique of Lynden-Bell (1971) and Turner (1979) is used to determine the shape for the luminosity function of the 12 deg slice of the redshift survey. The amplitude of the luminosity function is determined, taking large-scale inhomogeneities into account. The effects of the Malmquist bias on a magnitude-limited redshift survey are examined, showing that the random errors in the magnitudes for the 12 deg slice affect both the determination of the luminosity function and the spatial density constrast of large scale structures.

  11. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  12. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  13. The Luminosity Function of OB Associations in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    1997-02-01

    OB associations ionize the interstellar medium, producing both localized H II regions and diffuse ionized gas. The supernovae resulting from these associations pressurize and stir the interstellar medium. Using Smith, Biermann, & Mezger's compilation of radio H II regions in the Galaxy, and Kennicutt, Edgar, & Hodge's optical study of H II regions in nearby galaxies, we show that the luminosity distribution of giant OB associations in the Galaxy can be fit by a truncated power law of the form \\Nscra(>S)=\\Nscrau[(Su/S)-1], where S is the ionizing photon luminosity, \\Nscra(>S) is the number of associations with a luminosity of at least S, and Su is the upper limit to the distribution. The coefficient \\Nscrau is the number of the most luminous associations, with a luminosity between 0.5Su and Su. For the Galaxy, \\Nscrau=6.1 the fact that the number of the most luminous associations is significantly larger than unity indicates that there is a physical limit to the maximum size of H II regions in the Galaxy. To extend the luminosity distribution to small H II regions, we assume that the birthrate of associations, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*), is also a truncated power law, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*)~[(\\Nscr*u/\\Nscr*)-1], where \\Nscr* is the number of stars in the association. For large associations, the ionizing luminosity is proportional to the number of stars, S~\\Nscr* for smaller associations, we use both an analytic and a Monte Carlo approach to find the resulting luminosity distribution \\Nscra(>S). H II regions are generally centrally concentrated, with only the dense central regions being bright enough to appear in radio catalogs. Anantharamaiah postulated that radio H II regions have extended envelopes in order to account for diffuse radio recombination line emission in the Galaxy. Some of these envelopes are visible as the ionized ``worms'' discussed by Heiles and coworkers. We estimate that on the average the envelopes of radio H II regions absorb about twice

  14. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artifact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  15. Galaxy luminosity function and Tully-Fisher relation: reconciled through rotation-curve studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Salucci, Paolo; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2014-03-10

    The relation between galaxy luminosity L and halo virial velocity v {sub vir} required to fit the galaxy luminosity function differs from the observed Tully-Fisher relation between L and disk speed v {sub rot}. Because of this, the problem of reproducing the galaxy luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation simultaneously has plagued semianalytic models since their inception. Here we study the relation between v {sub rot} and v {sub vir} by fitting observational average rotation curves of disk galaxies binned in luminosity. We show that the v {sub rot}-v {sub vir} relation that we obtain in this way can fully account for this seeming inconsistency. Therefore, the reconciliation of the luminosity function with the Tully-Fisher relation rests on the complex dependence of v {sub rot} on v {sub vir}, which arises because the ratio of stellar mass to dark matter mass is a strong function of halo mass.

  16. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  17. The galaxy luminosity function and the redshift-distance controversy (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, E. E.; Hoffman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The mean relation between distance and redshift for galaxies is reviewed as an observational question. The luminosity function for galaxies is an important ingredient and is given explicitly. We discuss various observational selection effects that are important for comparison of the linear and quadratic distance-redshift laws. Several lines of evidence are reviewed, including the distribution of galaxy luminosities in various redshift ranges, the luminosities of brightest galaxies in groups and clusters at various redshifts, and the Tully-Fisher correlation between neutral hydrogen velocity widths and luminosity. All of these strongly favor the linear law over the quadratic. PMID:16593693

  18. Two views of the Andromeda Galaxy H-alpha and far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas A.; Price, Rob; Wells, Lisa A.; Duric, Neb

    1994-01-01

    A complete H-alpha image of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is presented allowing the first direct measurement of the total H-alpha luminosity which is (7.3 +/- 2.4) x 10(exp 6) solar luminosity. The H-alpha emission is associated with three morphologically distinct components; a large scale star-forming ring, approximately 1.65 deg in diameter, contributing 66% of the total H-alpha emission, a bright nucleus contributing 6% of the total H-alpha emission with the remaining 28% contributed by a previously unidentified component of extended and filamentary H-alpha emission interior to the star forming ring. The correspondence between the H-alpha image and the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) far-infrared high resolution image is striking when both are convolved to a common resolution of 105 arcsec. The close correspondence between the far-infrared and H-alpha images suggests a common origin for the two emissions. The star-forming ring contributes 70% of the far-infrared luminosity of M31. Evidence that the ring emission is energized by high mass stars includes the fact that peaks in the far-infrared emission coincide identically with H II regions in the H-alpha image. In addition, the far-infrared to H-alpha luminosity ratio within the star-forming ring is similar to what one would expect for H II regions powered by stars of spectral types ranging between O9 and B0. The origin of the filamentary H-alpha and far-infrared luminosity interior to the star-forming ring is less clear, but it is almost certainly not produced by high mass stars.

  19. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Luminosity Function in the ECO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Hayley; Andreas A. Berlind, Victor Calderon, Kathleen D. Eckert, Sheila J. Kannappan, Amanda J. Moffett, David V. Stark

    2016-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy luminosity function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy luminosity distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that luminous galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low luminosity galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the correlation of galaxy luminosity and dark matter halo mass combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the luminosity of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo's larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign luminosities to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect luminosity to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO luminosity function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. Though our mock catalog luminosity functions display similar qualitative trends as those from the ECO data, the trends are not in agreement quantitatively. Our results thus suggest that the simple models used to build the mocks are incomplete and that galaxy luminosity is possibly correlated with the larger scale density field.

  20. The luminosity functions of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers are presented and used to derive luminosity functions for the 288 Perseids and 56 Orionids detected. Visual counts were performed under very good to excellent seeing conditions at the times of peak activities, and the brightnesses of the meteors were estimated to the nearest magnitude by comparison with the magnitudes of known objects. Maximum likelihood estimates of the power law index of the luminosity function of 1.56 + or - 0.06 for the Perseids and of 1.85 + or - 0.1 for the Orionids are obtained which are lower than the values found by other investigators. Under the assumption that the luminosity of visual meteors is proportional to their mass, the luminosity function power law may also be used to characterize the mass function.

  1. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James; Williams, Kurtis A.; von Hippel, Ted; Levine, Stephen E.; Monet, David G.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Nitta, Atsuko; Winget, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka; Knapp, G. R.; Lupton, Robert H.; Smith, J. Allyn; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of white dwarfs is selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 using their reduced proper motions, based on improved proper motions from combined SDSS and USNO-B data. Numerous SDSS and follow-up spectra (Kilic and coworkers) are used to quantify completeness and contamination of the sample; kinematics models are used to understand and correct for velocity-dependent selection biases. A luminosity function is constructed covering the range 7luminosity function based on 6000 stars is remarkably smooth and rises nearly monotonically to Mbol=15.3. It then drops abruptly, although the small number of low-luminosity stars in the sample and their unknown atmospheric composition prevent quantitative conclusions about this decline. Stars are identified that may have high tangential velocities, and a preliminary luminosity function is constructed for them.

  2. Sub-mm Emission Line Deep Fields: CO and [CII] Luminosity Functions out to z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-06-01

    Now that ALMA is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J=1-0 out to CO J=6-5 and [CII] at redshifts z=0-6. We find that: 1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [CII] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z ≤ 2.75; 2) we find that the CO and [CII] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [CII] are found at z ˜ 2; 3) the CO J=3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; 4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; 5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [CII] luminosity function of galaxies at z ≥ 1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  3. z {approx} 4 H{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: TRACING THE DOMINANT MODE FOR GROWTH OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark; Lin Lihwai; Yan, Chi-Hung; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We present evidence for strong H{alpha} emission in galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 3.8 < z < 5.0 over the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. Among 74 galaxies detected in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, more than 70% of the galaxies show clear excess at 3.6 {mu}m compared to the expected flux density from stellar continuum only. We provide evidence that this 3.6 {mu}m excess is due to H{alpha} emission redshifted into the 3.6 {mu}m band, and classify these 3.6 {mu}m excess galaxies to be H{alpha} emitter (HAE) candidates. The selection of HAE candidates using an excess in broadband filters is sensitive to objects whose rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) is larger than 350 A. The H{alpha} inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of the HAEs range between 20 and 500 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and are a factor of {approx}6 larger than SFRs inferred from the UV continuum. The ratio between the H{alpha} luminosity and UV luminosity of HAEs is also on average larger than that of local starbursts. Possible reasons for such strong H{alpha} emission in these galaxies include different dust extinction properties, young stellar population ages, extended star formation histories, low metallicity, and a top-heavy stellar initial mass function. Although the correlation between UV slope {beta} and L{sub H{alpha}}/L{sub UV} raises the possibility that HAEs prefer a dust extinction curve which is steeper in the UV, the most dominant factor that results in strong H{alpha} emission appears to be star formation history. The H{alpha} EWs of HAEs are large despite their relatively old stellar population ages constrained by spectral energy distribution fitting, suggesting that at least 60% of HAEs produce stars at a constant rate. Under the assumption that the gas supply is sustained, HAEs are able to produce {approx}> 50% of the stellar mass density that is encompassed in massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies at z {approx} 3

  4. The faintest stars - The luminosity and mass functions at the bottom of the main sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    We present IR K-band photometry of complete samples of VLM candidates constructed from IIIaF and IVN plates in 10 fields taken as part of the POSSII and UKSRC surveys. Using the I-K colors constructed for these stars we estimate a bolometric luminosity function which extends to M(Bol) = 13.75. We find significant evidence for a luminosity function decreasing toward these luminosities. We also find that our results are consistent with those of studies based on the Nearby Star sample, when those data are presented as a bolometric luminosity function. We convert our observed luminosity function into a mass function, which extends with reasonable statistics to 0.08 solar masses - the H-burning minimum mass. We find significant evidence for features in the mass function at these masses. Specifically, the mass function 'turns over' at 0.25 solar mass, goes through a local minimum at about 0.15 solar mass, and may increase again below 0.1 solar mass - none of these features are predicted by any of the current theories of star formation. Lastly, the mass density we observe just above the H-burning minimum mass makes it difficult to envisage brown dwarfs contributing significant quantities of missing mass without invoking either a mass function in this region significantly steeper than that seen for main-sequence stars, or an extremely low cutoff mass to the mass function.

  5. Testing Fundamental Particle Physics with the Galactic White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Melendez, B. E.; Althaus, L. G.; Isern, J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent determinations of the white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) from very large surveys have extended our knowledge of the WDLF to very high luminosities. It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to test the possible properties and existence of fundamental weakly interacting subelectronvolt particles. This, together with the availability of new full evolutionary white dwarf models that are reliable at high luminosities, have opened the possibility of testing particle emission in the core of very hot white dwarfs. We use the available WDLFs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey to constrain the values of the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μν) and the axion-electron coupling constant (gae) of DFSZ-axions.

  6. Dust Attenuation and H(alpha) Star Formation Rates of Z Approx. 0.5 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ota, Kazuaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Iye, Masanori; Currie, Thayne

    2012-01-01

    Using deep narrow-band and broad-band imaging, we identify 401 z approximately 0.40 and 249 z approximately 0.49 H-alpha line-emitting galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field. Compared to other H-alpha surveys at similar redshifts, our samples are unique since they probe lower H-alpha luminosities, are augmented with multi-wavelength (rest-frame 1000AA--1.5 microns) coverage, and a large fraction (20%) of our samples has already been spectroscopically confirmed. Our spectra allow us to measure the Balmer decrement for nearly 60 galaxies with H-beta detected above 5-sigma. The Balmer decrements indicate an average extinction of A(H-alpha)=0.7(uparrow){+1.4}_{-0.7} mag. We find that the Balmer decrement systematically increases with higher H-alpha luminosities and with larger stellar masses, in agreement with previous studies with sparser samples. We find that the SFRs estimated from modeling the spectral energy distribution (SED) is reliable---we derived an "intrinsic" H-alpha luminosity which is then reddened assuming the color excess from SED modeling. The SED-predicted H-alpha luminosity agrees with H-alpha narrow-band measurements over 3 dex (rms of 0.25 dex). We then use the SED SFRs to test different statistically-based dust corrections for H-alpha and find that adopting one magnitude of extinction is inappropriate: galaxies with lower luminosities are less reddened. We find that the luminosity-dependent dust correction of Hopkins et al. yields consistent results over 3 dex (rms of 0.3 dex). Our comparisons are only possible by assuming that stellar reddening is roughly half of nebular reddening. The strong correspondence argue that with SED modeling, we can derive reliable intrinsic SFRs even in the absence of H-alpha measurements at z approximately 0.5.

  7. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  8. Luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degioia-Eastwood, K.; Meyers, R. P.; Jones, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    Using the point spread function photometry program DAOPHOT, we have used UBV CCD photometry to construct color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions for three OB associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The region LH 76 appears to be completely coeval; the region LH 13 shows some evidence for noncoevality which will need to be checked with spectra of the stars in question. The region LH 105, which lies on the southern edge of 30 Doradus, shows significant contamination by an underlying older population, possibly from previous star forming events. The luminosity functions, which serve as the first step toward determining the initial mass function in these regions, are calculated.

  9. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: The Faint End of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions at z≳ 6. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at {M}{{cut}}˜ -13 provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut {M}{{cut}} is found to vary between ‑12 and ‑14 with a mild redshift dependence. An analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.

  10. Cosmic reionization on computers: The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical cosmological simulations completed under the “Cosmic Reionization On Computers” project, I explore theoretical predictions for the faint end of the galaxy UV luminosity functions atmore » $$z\\gtrsim 6$$. A commonly used Schechter function approximation with the magnitude cut at $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}\\sim -13$$ provides a reasonable fit to the actual luminosity function of simulated galaxies. When the Schechter functional form is forced on the luminosity functions from the simulations, the magnitude cut $${M}_{{\\rm{cut}}}$$ is found to vary between -12 and -14 with a mild redshift dependence. Here, an analytical model of reionization from Madau et al., as used by Robertson et al., provides a good description of the simulated results, which can be improved even further by adding two physically motivated modifications to the original Madau et al. equation.« less

  11. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  12. SHORT-TERM Halpha VARIABILITY IN M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Knapp, Gillian R.; Berger, Edo E-mail: eberger@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-01-10

    We spectroscopically study the variability of Halpha emission in mid- to late-M dwarfs on timescales of approx0.1-1 hr as a proxy for magnetic variability. About 80% of our sample exhibits statistically significant variability on the full range of timescales probed by the observations, and with amplitude ratios in the range of approx1.2-4. No events with an order of magnitude increase in Halpha luminosity were detected, indicating that their rate is approx<0.05 hr{sup -1} (95% confidence level). We find a clear increase in variability with later spectral type, despite an overall decrease in Halpha 'activity' (i.e., L{sub Ha}lpha/L{sub bol}). For the ensemble of Halpha variability events, we find a nearly order of magnitude increase in the number of events from timescales of about 10-30 minutes, followed by a roughly uniform distribution at longer durations. The event amplitudes follow an exponential distribution with a characteristic scale of Max(EW)/Min(EW) - 1 approx 0.7. This distribution predicts a low rate of approx10{sup -6} hr{sup -1} for events with Max(EW)/Min(EW) approx> 10, but serendipitous detections of such events in the past suggest that they represent a different distribution. Finally, we find a possible decline in the amplitude of events with durations of approx>0.5 hr, which may point to a typical energy release in Halpha events for each spectral type (E{sub Ha}lpha approx L{sub Ha}lpha x t approx const). Longer observations of individual active objects are required to further investigate this possibility. Similarly, a larger sample may shed light on whether Halpha variability correlates with properties such as age or rotation velocity.

  13. Luminosity function and cosmological evolution of X-ray selected quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of a complete sample of 55 X-ray sources is presented as part of the Medium Sensitivity Survey of the Einstein Observatory. A pure luminosity evolutionary law is derived in order to determine the uniform distribution of the sources and the rates of evolution for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) observed by X-ray and optical techniques are compared. A nonparametric representation of the luminosity function is fitted to the observational data. On the basis of the reduced data, it is determined that: (1) AGNs evolve cosmologically; (2) less evolution is required to explain the X-ray data than the optical data; (3) the high-luminosity portion of the X-ray luminosity can be described by a power-law with a slope of gamma = 3.6; and (4) the X-ray luminosity function flattens at low luminosities. Some of the implications of the results for conventional theoretical models of the evolution of quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed.

  14. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  15. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Eric; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  16. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-03-20

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z){sup (0.54{+-}0.64)} for red galaxies and (1 + z){sup (1.64{+-}0.39)} for blue galaxies.

  17. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  18. Analysis of H-alpha flare spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulander, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Spectrographs of the H-alpha line taken at 15 second intervals from the event of 5 Sept. 1973 were interpreted by comparison with synthetic profiles. A sequence of 27 high resolution H alpha profiles was obtained from the second brightest flare kernel. The profiles were generally self reversed with a maximum peak intensity of 1.16 x continuum and a maximum central intensity of .91 x continuum. The line characteristics such as red and violet peak intensities and positions, center shifts and wing intensities were tabulated. Synthetic H-alpha profiles were generated from a finite layer assuming simple parameteric forms for the source function and velocity field. The velocity chosen always decreased with optical depth and had the same sign. For absorption profiles, bisector shifts were calculated for a variety of velocities. The velocity field and source function were derived as a function of optical depth and time.

  19. The white dwarf luminosity function - A possible probe of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamanaha, Christopher M.; Silk, Joseph; Wood, M. A.; Winget, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamically inferred dark halo mass density, amounting to above 0.01 solar masses/cu pc at the sun's Galactocentric radius, can be composed of faint white dwarfs provided that the halo formed in a sufficiently early burst of star formation. The model is constrained by the observed disk white dwarf luminosity function which falls off below log (L/solar L) = -4.4, due to the onset of star formation in the disk. By using a narrow range for the initial mass function and an exponentially decaying halo star formation rate with an e-folding time equal to the free-fall time, all the halo dark matter is allowed to be in cool white dwarfs which lie beyond the falloff in the disk luminosity function. Although it is unlikely that all the dark matter is in these dim white dwarfs, a definite signature in the low-luminosity end of the white dwarf luminosity function is predicted even if they comprise only 1 percent of the dark matter. Current CCD surveys should answer the question of the existence of this population within the next few years.

  20. Evolution of the Blue and Far-Infrared Galaxy Luminosity Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Chokshi, Arati

    1993-01-01

    The space density of blue-selected galaxies at moderate redshifts is determined here directly by deriving the luminosity function. Evidence is found for density evolution for moderate luminosity galaxies at a rate of (1+z) exp delta, with a best fit of delta + 4 +/- 2, between the current epoch and Z greater than about 0.1. At M(b) less than -22 evidence is found for about 0.5-1.5 mag of luminosity evolution in addition to the density evolution, corresponding to an evolutionary rate of about (1+z) exp gamma, with gamma = 0.5-2.5, but a redshift of about 0.4. Assuming a steeper faint end slope of alpha = -1.3 similar to that observed in the Virgo cluster, could explain the data with a luminosity evolution rate of gamma = 1-2, without need for any density evolution. Acceptable fits are found by comparing composite density and luminosity evolution models to faint IRAS 60 micron source counts, implying that the blue and far-IR evolutionary rates may be similar.

  1. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  2. ACCESS: NIR luminosity function and stellar mass function of galaxies in the Shapley supercluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merluzzi, P.; Mercurio, A.; Haines, C. P.; Smith, R. J.; Busarello, G.; Lucey, J. R.

    2010-02-01

    We present the near-infrared luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) of galaxies in the core of the Shapley supercluster at z = 0.048, based on new K-band observations carried out at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope with the Wide Field Infrared Camera in conjunction with B- and R-band photometry from the Shapley Optical Survey, and including a subsample (~650 galaxies) of spectroscopically confirmed supercluster members. These data sets allow us to investigate the supercluster galaxy population down to M*K + 6 and . For the overall 3deg2 field, the K-band luminosity function (LF) is described by a Schechter function with M*K = -24.96 +/- 0.10 and α = -1.42 +/- 0.03, a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that observed in field regions. We investigate the effect of environment by deriving the LF in three regions selected according to the local galaxy density and observe a significant (2σ) increase in the faint-end slope going from high-density (α = -1.33) to low-density (α = -1.49) environments, while a faint-end upturn at MK > -21 becomes increasingly apparent in the lower density regions. The galaxy SMF is fitted well by a Schechter function with and α = -1.20 +/- 0.02. The SMF of supercluster galaxies is also characterized by an excess of massive galaxies that are associated with the brightest cluster galaxies. While the value of depends on the environment, increasing by 0.2dex from low- to high-density regions, the slope of the galaxy SMF does not vary with the environment. By comparing our findings with cosmological simulations, we conclude that the environmental dependences of the LF are not primarily due to variations in the merging histories, but to processes which are not treated in the semi-analytical models, such as tidal stripping or harassment. In field regions, the SMF shows a sharp upturn below , close to our mass limit, suggesting that the upturns seen in our K-band LFs, but not in the SMF, are due to this dwarf population. The

  3. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  4. Selection of High-z Radio-Loud Quasars, and Their Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, D.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Benn, C. R.

    We present the selection techniques based on the use of Neural Networks and on the cross match between FIRST and SDSS that lead to the spectroscopic identification of 15 new Radio Loud QSOs in the redshift range 3. 6 ≤ z ≤ 4. 4. These QSOs did not have previous spectroscopical identification in SDSS or other works. Our selection method is highly complete (97 %) and it allows the estimation of the binned luminosity function of radio-loud quasar at z ˜ 4 with unprecedented accuracy. Our luminosity function is compared with the results of other samples of RL QSOs in similar ranges of redshift and with the whole population of QSOs (RL+RQ). The evolution of the luminosity function with redshift was for many years interpreted as a flattening of the bright end slope, but has recently been re-interpreted as strong evolution of the break luminosity for high-z QSOs and our results, for the radio-loud population, are consistent with this. We also find indications of a constant radio-loud fraction for QSOs at high z. Our next investigation will select RL QSOs candidates in the range of redshift 4. 4 ≤ z ≤ 5. 7, and will make use of data in the radio (FIRST), in the optical (SDSS DR10) and in the infrared (UKIDSS Large Area Survey DR10, and WISE).

  5. Constraining the rate and luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Coward, D. M.; Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Zhou, H.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the intrinsic isotropic peak luminosity function (LF) and formation rate of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a novel approach. We complement a standard log N-log P brightness distribution and Vmax estimations with two observation-time relations: a redshift-observation-time relation (log z-log T) and a new luminosity-observation-time relation (log L-log T). We show that this approach reduces degeneracies that exist between the rate and LF of a brightness distribution. To account for the complex triggering algorithm employed by Swift, we use recent results of Lien et al. (2014) to produce a suite of efficiency functions. Using these functions with the above methods, we show that a log L-log T method can provide good constraints on the form of the LF, particularly the high end. Using a sample of 175 peak luminosities determined from redshifts with well-defined selection criteria, our results suggest that LGRBs occur at a local rate (without beaming corrections) of [0.7 < ρ0 < 0.8] Gpc-3 yr-1. Within this range, assuming a broken power-law LF, we find best estimates for the low- and high-energy indices of -0.95 ± 0.09 and -2.59 ± 0.93, respectively, separated by a break luminosity 0.80 ± 0.43 × 1052 erg s-1.

  6. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-10-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~5x10^4^h^-3^Mpc^3^ at the sensitivity peak (z~0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function (with α=-1.22, M^*^_bJ_=-19.61+5logh and φ^*^=0.020h^3^/Mpc^3^) is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh), our data suggest the presence of a steepening of the luminosity function for M_bJ_>=-17+5logh. Such a steepening at the faint end of the luminosity function, well fitted by a power law with slope β~-1.6, is almost completely due to galaxies with emission lines: in fact, dividing our galaxies into two samples, i.e. galaxies with and without emission lines, we find significant differences in their luminosity functions. In particular, galaxies with emission lines show a significantly steeper slope and a fainter M^*^. The amplitude and the α and M^*^ parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Vice-versa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~1.6 at M~M^*^, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. The galaxy number density for M_bJ_<=-16+5logh is well determined (n{bar}=0.08+/-0.015h^3^/Mpc^3^). Its estimate for M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh is more uncertain, ranging from n{bar}=0.28h

  7. Constructing a bivariate distribution function with given marginals and correlation: application to the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2010-08-01

    We provide an analytic method to construct a bivariate distribution function (DF) with given marginal distributions and correlation coefficient. We introduce a convenient mathematical tool, called a copula, to connect two DFs with any prescribed dependence structure. If the correlation of two variables is weak (Pearson's correlation coefficient |ρ| < 1/3), the Farlie-Gumbel-Morgenstern (FGM) copula provides an intuitive and natural way to construct such a bivariate DF. When the linear correlation is stronger, the FGM copula cannot work anymore. In this case, we propose using a Gaussian copula, which connects two given marginals and is directly related to the linear correlation coefficient between two variables. Using the copulas, we construct the bivariate luminosity function (BLF) and discuss its statistical properties. We focus especially on the far-infrared-far-ulatraviolet (FUV-FIR) BLF, since these two wavelength regions are related to star-formation (SF) activity. Though both the FUV and FIR are related to SF activity, the univariate LFs have a very different functional form: the former is well described by the Schechter function whilst the latter has a much more extended power-law-like luminous end. We construct the FUV-FIR BLFs using the FGM and Gaussian copulas with different strengths of correlation, and examine their statistical properties. We then discuss some further possible applications of the BLF: the problem of a multiband flux-limited sample selection, the construction of the star-formation rate (SFR) function, and the construction of the stellar mass of galaxies (M*)-specific SFR (SFR/M*) relation. The copulas turn out to be a very useful tool to investigate all these issues, especially for including complicated selection effects.

  8. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  9. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc‑3 yr‑1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s‑1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s‑1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s‑1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s‑1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s‑1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s‑1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of ‑1.6.

  10. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William E.; O'Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  11. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies: A Near-universal Luminosity Function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Morningstar, Warren; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; O'Halloran, Heather; Blakeslee, John P.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Côté, Patrick; Geisler, Douglas; Peng, Eric W.; Bailin, Jeremy; Rothberg, Barry; Cockcroft, Robert; Barber DeGraaff, Regina

    2014-12-01

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L >~ 107 L ⊙), we find small numbers of "superluminous" objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R >~ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L 0 ~ R -0.2, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  12. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  13. The luminosity function for different morphological types in the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, Ronald O.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the luminosity function for different morphological types in the original CfA Redshift Survey (CfA1) and in the first two slices of the CfA Redshift Survey Extension (CfA2). CfA1 is a complete sample containing 2397 galaxies distributed over 2.7 steradians with m(sub z) less than or equal 14.5. The first two complete slices of CfA2 contain 1862 galaxies distributed over 0.42 steradians with m(sub z)=15.5. The shapes of the E-S0 and spiral luminosity functions (LF) are indistinguishable. We do not confirm the steeply decreasing faint end in the E-S0 luminosity function found by Loveday et al. for an independent sample in the southern hemisphere. We demonstrate that incomplete classification in deep redshift surveys can lead to underestimates of the faint end of the elliptical luminosity function and could be partially responsible for the difference between the CfA survey and other local field surveys. The faint end of the LF for the Magellanic spirals and irregulars is very steep. The Sm-Im luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function with M*=-18.79, alpha=-1.87, and phi*=0.6x10(exp -3) for M(sub z) less than or equal to -13. These galaxies are largely responsible for the excess at the faint end of the general CfA luminosity function. The abundance of intrinsically faint, blue galaxies nearby affects the interpretation of deep number counts. The dwarf population increases the expected counts at B=25 in a no-evolution, q(sub 0)=0.05 model by a factor of two over standard no-evolution estimates. These dwarfs change the expected median redshift in deep redshift surveys by less than 10 percent . Thus the steep Sm-Im LF may contribute to the reconciliation of deep number counts with deep redshift surveys.

  14. Pleiades luminosity function: fine structure and new Pre-MS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. N.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.

    In order to study a model-dependence of the results achieved in the previous investigations of the Pleiades luminosity function using D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1994) evolutionary tracks, we repeated the computations with the new track system by D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997). T h e following main conclusions can be drawn: the new models agree better with observations; the helium abundance needed to fit the Hipparcos distance modulus is reduced to a more reasonable value of Y=0.31; the cluster age becomes slightly higher and the slope of the initial mass function somewhat lower. The conclusions on the fine structure of the luminosity function do not change significantly due to the application of the new models.

  15. DETERMINING THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH PSEUDO-REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weiwei; Yu Yunwei; Cao Xiaofeng

    2013-07-20

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is an important role for the cosmological applications of the GRBs, which, however, is seriously hindered by some selection effects due to redshift measurements. In order to avoid these selection effects, we suggest calculating pseudo-redshifts for Swift GRBs according to the empirical L-E{sub p} relationship. Here, such a L-E{sub p} relationship is determined by reconciling the distributions of pseudo- and real redshifts of redshift-known GRBs. The values of E{sub p} taken from Butler's GRB catalog are estimated with Bayesian statistics rather than observed. Using the GRB sample with pseudo-redshifts of a relatively large number, we fit the redshift-resolved luminosity distributions of the GRBs with a broken-power-law LF. The fitting results suggest that the LF could evolve with redshift by a redshift-dependent break luminosity, e.g., L{sub b} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51}(1 + z){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The low- and high-luminosity indices are constrained to 0.8 and 2.0, respectively. It is found that the proportional coefficient between the GRB event rate and the star formation rate should correspondingly decrease with increasing redshifts.

  16. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  17. The bright end of the luminosity function of red sequence galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yeong-Shang; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-02-01

    We study the bright end of the luminosity distribution of galaxies in fields with luminous red galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099deg2 of SDSS imaging data, we search for luminous (>~L*) early-type galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc of a volume-limited sample of 12608 spectroscopic LRG in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. Most of these objects lie in rich environments, with the LRG being the brightest object within 1.0h-1Mpc. The luminosity gap, M12, between the first- and second-ranked galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc is large (~0.8 mag), substantially larger than can be explained with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of galaxies. The brightest member is less luminous (by 0.1-0.2 mag) and shows a larger gap in LRG selected groups than in cluster-like environments. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshift to z= 0.4, ruling out the scenario that these LRG selected brightest cluster or group galaxies grow by recent cannibalism of cluster members.

  18. Binary Aggregations in Hierarchical Galaxy Formation: The Evolution of the Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Cavaliere, A.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Poli, F.

    2002-08-01

    We develop a semianalytic model of hierarchical galaxy formation with an improved treatment of the evolution of galaxies inside dark matter halos. We take into account not only dynamical friction processes building up the central dominant galaxy but also binary aggregations of satellite galaxies inside a common halo. These deplete small to intermediate mass objects, affecting the slope of the luminosity function at its faint end, with significant observable consequences. We model the effect of two-body aggregations using the kinetic Smoluchowski equation. This flattens the mass function by an amount that depends on the histories of the host halos as they grow by hierarchical clustering. The description of gas cooling, star formation and evolution, and supernova feedback follows the standard prescriptions widely used in semianalytic modeling. We find that binary aggregations are effective in depleting the number of small/intermediate mass galaxies over the redshift range 1luminosity function at the faint end. At z~0 the flattening occurs for -20-16. We compare our predicted luminosity functions with those obtained from deep multicolor surveys in the Hubble Deep Field-North, Hubble Deep Field-South, and New Technology Telescope Deep Field in the rest-frame B and UV bands for the redshift ranges 01 and even more at z~3 by the effect of the binary aggregations. The predictions from our dynamical model are discussed and compared with the effects of complementary processes (additional starburst recipes, alternative sources of feedback, different mass distribution of the dark matter halos) that may conspire in affecting the shape of the luminosity function.

  19. The X-ray Luminosity Function for Poor Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Ledlow, M.; Loken, C.; Klypin, A.; Voges, W.; White, R. A.; Bryan, G.; Norman, M.

    1995-12-01

    We will present the first X-ray Luminosity Function for poor clusters of galaxies. Using a percolation algorithm, White et al. (1996) has compiled a catalog of 600 optically selected groups composed of Zwicky galaxies. This catalog includes MKW and AWM groups (with cD galaxies), many Hickson compact groups, as well as many more loose condensations. We selected a complete,volume-limited subsample of these poor clusters which have at least 4 Zwicky galaxies, b>30deg , a surface density enhancement of ~50, and z <= 0.03. We then cross-correlated this sample with the ROSAT all-sky X-ray survey. About 50% of this sample of 50 clusters was detected with 0.5-2.0 keV X-ray luminosities >4 x 10(41) h75(-2) ergs/sec. These are the X-ray brightest groups in the northern sky. From this sample, we constructed an X-ray Luminosity Function. We find that this poor cluster luminosity function matches well with that derived for Abell clusters by Briel & Henry (1993). It appears that these groups are low mass extensions of rich clusters. We have also derived a mass function for these groups assuming that the X-ray emission is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the clusters. We will compare this mass function with those expected from different cosmological models with different values of Omega . This research was funded by NSF grant AST93-17596 and NASA grant NAGW-3152.

  20. Neural network method for galaxy classification: the luminosity function of E/S0 in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Smareglia, Riccardo

    1998-02-01

    We present a method based on the non-linear behaviour of neural network for the identification of the early-type population in the cores of galaxy clusters. A Kohonen Self Organising Map applied on a three-colour photometric catalogue of objects enabled us to select in each passband the elliptical galaxies. We measured in this way the luminosity function of the E/S0 galaxies selected in this way. Such luminosity functions show peculiarities which disfavour the hypothesis of its universality often claimed for rich clusters and that can be related to the past dynamical history of the cluster as a whole. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, Chile

  1. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF FERMI-DETECTED FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M. S.; Romani, R. W.; Costamante, L.; Reimer, A.; Dermer, C. D.; King, O. G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Richards, J. L.; Stevenson, M. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.edu

    2012-06-01

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray-selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similar to that of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. Also, using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs in the 10 keV-300 GeV band and show that there is no correlation between the luminosity at the peak of the {gamma}-ray emission component and its peak frequency. Using this luminosity-independent SED with the derived LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sup +1.6}{sub -1.0}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100 GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sup +3.3}{sub -2.2}, that most are seen within 5 Degree-Sign of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  2. SurveySim: a new MCMC code to explore the evolution of the IR luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Matteo; Kurinsky, Noah; Sajina, Anna; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Silva, Andrea; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel and Spitzer space telescopes have been crucial in furthering our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. However key questions, such as the role of SF and AGN in powering the IR output of galaxies remain unanswered. The large numbers of high redshift galaxies detected by recent IR surveys make individual spectroscopic follow-up impractical. However statistical trends in SED and luminosity function evolution in an entire population can be realized. We present a new open source Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code, SurveySim. It is built to constrain the spectral energy distribution and luminosity function evolution required to produce a given multi-wavelength survey. Its very general design allow us to use a wide range of different dusty galaxy populations (including SFGs, AGNs and Composites), luminosity function forms and SED templates. The code employs a multidimensional color-color diagnostic to determine goodness of fit. It simulates observational errors and takes into account incompleteness. Here, dusty high-z galaxies at different parts of the IR SED have been considered to analyze the relative selection biases.

  3. The Seven Sisters DANCe. I. Empirical isochrones, luminosity, and mass functions of the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Sarro, L. M.; Barrado, D.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Berihuete, A.; Olivares, J.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The DANCe survey provides photometric and astrometric (position and proper motion) measurements for approximately 2 million unique sources in a region encompassing ~80 deg2 centered on the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at deriving a complete census of the Pleiades and measure the mass and luminosity functions of the cluster. Methods: Using the probabilistic selection method previously described, we identified high probability members in the DANCe (i ≥ 14 mag) and Tycho-2 (V ≲ 12 mag) catalogues and studied the properties of the cluster over the corresponding luminosity range. Results: We find a total of 2109 high-probability members, of which 812 are new, making it the most extensive and complete census of the cluster to date. The luminosity and mass functions of the cluster are computed from the most massive members down to ~0.025 M⊙. The size, sensitivity, and quality of the sample result in the most precise luminosity and mass functions observed to date for a cluster. Conclusions: Our census supersedes previous studies of the Pleiades cluster populations, in terms of both sensitivity and accuracy. Based on service observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Table 1 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgDANCe catalogs (Tables 6 and 7) and full Tables 2-5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A148

  4. The K20 survey. V. The evolution of the near-IR Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Daddi, E.; Menci, N.; Fontana, A.; Renzini, A.; Mignoli, M.; Poli, F.; Saracco, P.; Broadhurst, T.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Giallongo, E.; Gilmozzi, R.

    2003-05-01

    We present the galaxy rest-frame near-IR Luminosity Function (LF) and its cosmic evolution to z ~ 1.5 based on a spectroscopic survey of a magnitude limited sample of galaxies with Ks<20 (the K20 survey, Cimatti et al. \\cite{Cimatti2002b}). The LFs have been derived in the rest-frame J and Ks bands. Their evolution is traced using three different redshift bins (zmean =~ 0.5, 1, 1.5) and comparing them to the Local near-IR Luminosity Function. The luminosity functions at different redshifts are fairly well fitted by Schechter functions at z<1.3. The faint-end of the LFs (Lluminosity function is not well sampled by our data. Viceversa, the density of luminous galaxies (MK_s-5 log h70<-25.5) is higher than locally at all redshifts and relatively constant or mildly increasing with redshift within our sample. The data are consistent with a mild luminosity evolution both in the J- and Ks-band up to z =~ 1.5, with an amplitude of about Delta MJ =~ -0.69+/-0.12 and Delta MK =~ -0.54+/-0.12 at z ~ 1. Pure density evolution is not consistent with the observed LF at zle1 . Moreover, we find that red and early-type galaxies dominate the bright-end of the LF, and that their number density shows at most a small decrease (<30%) up to z =~ 1, thus suggesting that massive elliptical galaxies were already in place at z =~ 1 and they should have formed their stars and assembled their mass at higher redshift. There appears to be a correlation of the optical/near-IR colors with near-IR luminosities, the most luminous/massive galaxies being red/old, the low-luminous galaxies being instead dominated by blue young stellar populations. We also investigate the evolution of the near-IR comoving luminosity density to z =~ 1.5, finding a slow evolution with redshift (rholambda (z)= rholambda (z=0) (1+z)beta (lambda ) with beta (J

  5. COMPARISON OF THE DIFFUSE H{alpha} AND FUV CONTINUUM BACKGROUNDS: ON THE ORIGINS OF THE DIFFUSE H{alpha} BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Il-Joong; Shinn, Jong-Ho; Han, Wonyong; Witt, Adolf; Edelstein, Jerry; Min, Kyoung-Wook

    2011-12-20

    We compare the diffuse H{alpha} map of our Galaxy with the FUV (1370-1710 A) continuum map. The H{alpha} intensity correlates well with the FUV intensity. The H{alpha}/FUV intensity ratio increases in general with the H{alpha} intensity and the FUV hardness ratio (1370-1520 A to 1560-1710 A), implying that late OB stars may be the main source of the H{alpha} recombination line at high latitudes. The variation of the H{alpha} intensity as a function of the Galactic latitude is also very similar to that of the FUV intensity. The results likely suggest that not only the original radiation sources of the H{alpha} and FUV backgrounds but also the radiative transfer mechanisms responsible for the diffuse backgrounds are largely common. Therefore, we propose a scenario wherein the H{alpha} background at high latitudes is mostly composed of two components, H{alpha} photons produced by in situ recombination at the ionized regions around late OB stars and dust-scattered light of the H{alpha} photons originating from late OB stars.

  6. The Bivariate Luminosity--HI Mass Distribution Function of Galaxies based on the NIBLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Zhon; Schneider, Stephen E.; van Driel, Wim; Lehnert, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We use 21cm HI line observations for 2610 galaxies from the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) to derive a bivariate luminosity--HI mass distribution function. Our HI survey was selected to randomly probe the local (900 < cz < 12,000 km/s) galaxy population in each 0.5 mag wide bin for the absolute z-band magnitude range of -13.5 < Mz < -24 without regard to morphology or color. This targeted survey allowed more on-source integration time for weak and non-detected sources, enabling us to probe lower HI mass fractions and apply lower upper limits for non-detections than would be possible with the larger blind HI surveys. Additionally, we obtained a factor of four higher sensitivity follow-up observations at Arecibo of 90 galaxies from our non-detected and marginally detected categories to quantify the underlying HI distribution of sources not detected at Nançay. Using the optical luminosity function and our higher sensitivity follow up observations as priors, we use a 2D stepwise maximum likelihood technique to derive the two dimensional volume density distribution of luminosity and HI mass in each SDSS band.

  7. The Near-ultraviolet Luminosity Function of Young, Early M-type Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lépine & Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 Å) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5σ) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these "false positives" (FPs) as ~16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  8. THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF YOUNG, EARLY M-TYPE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ansdell, Megan; Baranec, Christoph; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lépine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lépine and Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 Å) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5σ) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these ''false positives'' (FPs) as ∼16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  9. CO luminosity function from Herschel-selected galaxies and the contribution of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions [i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)] starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate LCO-LIR conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at z ≈ 0 and 2. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at z ≈ 0, at z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 2, the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous active galactic nucleus (LX > 1044 erg s- 1) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO LF at z ≈ 2.

  10. Local Luminosity Function at 15 micro m and Galaxy Evolution Seen by ISOCAM 15 micro m Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.

    2000-01-01

    A local luminosity function at 15 micro m is derived using the bivariate (15 micro m vs. 60 micro m luminosities) method, based on the newly published ISOCAM LW3-band (15 micro m) survey of the very deep IRAS 60 micro m sample in the north ecliptic pole region (NEPR).

  11. PRIMUS: Galaxy Clustering as a Function of Luminosity and Color at 0.2 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(rp , π) and wp (rp ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ~130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg2 of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h -1 < rp < 1 Mpc h -1) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b gal ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ~ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that "cosmic variance" can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  12. Modeling the Redshift Evolution of the Normal Galaxy X-Ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremmel, M.; Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Farr, W. M.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales (approximately 10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to approximately 20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris & Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 41)) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10(exp 40) and 10(exp 41) erg s(exp -1).

  13. The luminosity function at z ∼ 8 from 97 Y-band dropouts: Inferences about reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Treu, Tommaso; Kelly, Brandon C.; Trenti, Michele; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Oesch, Pascal A.; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the largest search to date for Y-band dropout galaxies (z ∼ 8 Lyman break galaxies, LBGs) based on 350 arcmin{sup 2} of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the V, Y, J, and H bands from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. In addition to previously published data, the BoRG13 data set presented here includes approximately 50 arcmin{sup 2} of new data and deeper observations of two previous BoRG pointings, from which we present 9 new z ∼ 8 LBG candidates, bringing the total number of BoRG Y-band dropouts to 38 with 25.5 ≤ m{sub J} ≤ 27.6 (AB system). We introduce a new Bayesian formalism for estimating the galaxy luminosity function, which does not require binning (and thus smearing) of the data and includes a likelihood based on the formally correct binomial distribution as opposed to the often-used approximate Poisson distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the new method on a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts that combines the bright BoRG galaxies with the fainter sources published in Bouwens et al. from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Early Release Science programs. We show that the z ∼ 8 luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function over its full dynamic range with a characteristic magnitude M{sup ⋆}=−20.15{sub −0.38}{sup +0.29}, a faint-end slope of α=−1.87{sub −0.26}{sup +0.26}, and a number density of log{sub 10} ϕ{sup ⋆}[Mpc{sup −3}]=−3.24{sub −0.24}{sup +0.25}. Integrated down to M = –17.7, this luminosity function yields a luminosity density log{sub 10} ϵ[erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3}]=25.52{sub −0.05}{sup +0.05}. Our luminosity function analysis is consistent with previously published determinations within 1σ. The error analysis suggests that uncertainties on the faint-end slope are still too large to draw a firm conclusion about its evolution with redshift. We use our statistical framework to discuss the implication of our study for the physics of

  14. A study of the luminosity function for field galaxies. [non-rich-cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nine determinations of the luminosity function (LF) for field galaxies are analyzed and compared. Corrections for differences in Hubble constants, magnitude systems, galactic absorption functions, and definitions of the LF are necessary prior to comparison. Errors in previous comparisons are pointed out. After these corrections, eight of the nine determinations are in fairly good agreement. The discrepancy in the ninth appears to be mainly an incompleteness effect. The LF data suggest that there is little if any distinction between field galaxies and those in small groups.

  15. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTENDED H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOLING FLOW CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: mcdonald@astro.umd.ed

    2010-10-01

    We present a high spatial resolution H{alpha} survey of 23 cooling flow clusters using the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter, covering 1-2 orders of magnitude in cooling rate, dM/dt, temperature, and entropy. We find that 8/23 (35%) of our clusters have complex, filamentary morphologies at H{alpha}, while an additional 7/23 (30%) have marginally extended or nuclear H{alpha} emission, in general agreement with previous studies of line emission in cooling flow cluster brightest cluster galaxies. A weak correlation between the integrated near-UV luminosity and the H{alpha} luminosity is also found for our complete sample with a large amount of scatter about the expected relation for photoionization by young stars. We detect H{alpha} emission out to the X-ray cooling radius, but no further, in several clusters and find a strong correlation between the H{alpha} luminosity contained in filaments and the X-ray cooling flow rate of the cluster, suggesting that the warm ionized gas is linked to the cooling flow. Furthermore, we detect a strong enhancement in the cooling properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) coincident with the H{alpha} emission, compared to the surrounding ICM at the same radius. While the filaments in a few clusters may be entrained by buoyant radio bubbles, in general, the radially infalling cooling flow model provides a better explanation for the observed trends. The correlation of the H{alpha} and X-ray properties suggests that conduction may be important in keeping the filaments ionized. The thinness of the filaments suggests that magnetic fields are an important part of channeling the gas and shielding it from the surrounding hot ICM.

  16. Differential Density Statistics of the Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, V. V. L.; Iribarrem, A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number density statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro, namely, the differential density γ and the integral differential density γ*. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro & Stoeger, which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts dN/dz are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both γ and γ* with various cosmological distance definitions, namely, area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance, and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey, and γ and γ* are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an Ωm0=0.3, ΩΛ0=0.7 standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in Ribeiro, as well as showing that plots of γ and γ* against the luminosity and redshift distances indicate that the CNOC2 galaxy distribution follows a power-law pattern for redshifts higher than 0.1. These findings support Ribeiro's theoretical proposition that using different cosmological distance measures in statistical analyses of galaxy surveys can lead to significant ambiguity in drawing conclusions about the behavior of the observed large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  17. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  18. The Galaxy Luminosity Function at Redshifts 7 < z < 9 from the Hubble Ultradeep Field 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Matthew; McLure, R.; Ono, Y.; Ellis, R. S.; Dunlop, J.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Robertson, B. E.; UDF12 Team

    2013-01-01

    The UV-selected galaxy luminosity function at z > 6 provides a crucial observational constraint on the earliest phases of galaxy evolution and the likely role galaxies play in cosmic reionization. Within this context, we present new results on the galaxy luminosity function at redshifts 7 < z < 9 arising from the unprecedented deep near-IR imaging data provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12) program undertaken with the near-infrared arm of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR). Compared to previous data in the UDF, the new UDF12 program quadruples the integration time in the vital Y-band filter (F105W), reaching a 5-sigma detection limit of 30.0 AB, and provides the first ultra-deep imaging (5-sigma limit=29.8 AB) in the previously unused J-band/F140W filter. Using a combination of traditional drop-out selection and photometric redshift techniques we have assembled a well defined sample of over 200 galaxies at z>6.5, drawn from UDF12 and wider field HST imaging sampling a total area of 300 square arcmin. Our combined analyses provide the most accurate measures to data of the faint end of the luminosity function at z=7 and z=8, and the first census of the population at z=9. High redshift galaxy samples derived from the UDF12 program will provide a premier resource for studying high-redshift galaxy evolution in the era prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  19. The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution: A comparison of optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    The luminosity function of quasars and its evolution are discussed, based on comparison of available data on optically selected quasars and quasars found in radio catalogs. It is assumed that the red shift of quasars is cosmological and the results are expressed in the framework of the Lambda = 0, Q sub Q = 1 cosmological model. The predictions of various density evolution laws are compared with observations of an optically selected sample of quasars and quasar samples from radio catalogs. The differences between the optical luminosity functions, the red shift distributions and the radio to optical luminosity ratios of optically selected quasars and radio quasars rule out luminosity functions where there is complete absence of correlation between radio and optical luminosities. These differences also imply that Schmidt's (1970) luminosity function, where there exists a statistical correlation between radio and optical luminosities, although may be correct for high red shift objects, disagrees with observation at low red shifts. These differences can be accounted for by postulating existence of two classes (1 and 2) of objects.

  20. The Rest-Frame Optical Luminosity Functions of Galaxies at 2<=z<=3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, D.; van Dokkum, P.; Quadri, R.; Rudnick, G.; Franx, M.; Lira, P.; Wuyts, S.; Gawiser, E.; Christlein, D.; Toft, S.

    2007-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical (B, V, and R band) luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 2<=z<=3.5, measured from a K-selected sample constructed from the deep NIR MUSYC, the ultradeep FIRES, and the GOODS-CDFS. This sample is unique for its combination of area and range of luminosities. The faint-end slopes of the LFs at z>2 are consistent with those at z~0. The characteristic magnitudes are significantly brighter than the local values (e.g., ~1.2 mag in the R band), while the measured values for Φ* are typically ~5 times smaller. The B-band luminosity density at z~2.3 is similar to the local value, and in the R band it is ~2 times smaller than the local value. We present the LF of distant red galaxies (DRGs), which we compare to that of non-DRGs. While DRGs and non-DRGs are characterized by similar LFs at the bright end, the faint-end slope of the non-DRG LF is much steeper than that of DRGs. The contribution of DRGs to the global densities down to the faintest probed luminosities is 14%-25% in number and 22%-33% in luminosity. From the derived rest-frame U-V colors and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate the mass-to-light ratios (M/L) of the different subsamples. The M/L ratios of DRGs are ~5 times higher (in the R and V bands) than those of non-DRGs. The global stellar mass density at 2<=z<=3.5 appears to be dominated by DRGs, whose contribution is of order ~60%-80% of the global value. Qualitatively similar results are obtained when the population is split by rest-frame U-V color instead of observed J-K color. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatories on Paranal, Chile as part of the ESO program 164.O-0612.

  1. Differential evolution of the UV luminosity function of Lyman break galaxies from z ~ 5 to 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Akiyama, M.; Aoki, K.; Ando, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    We report the ultraviolet luminosity function (UVLF) of Lyman break galaxies at z ~ 5 derived from a deep and wide survey using the prime focus camera of the 8.2 m Subaru telescope (Suprime-Cam). Target fields consist of two blank regions of the sky, namely, the region including the Hubble Deep Field-North and the J0053+1234 region, and the total effective surveyed area is 1290 arcmin2. Applications of carefully determined colour selection criteria in V - Ic and Ic - z' yield a detection of 853 z ~ 5 candidates with z'AB < 26.5 mag. The UVLF at z ~ 5 based on this sample shows no significant change in the number density of bright (L >~ L*z=3) LBGs from that at z ~ 3, while there is a significant decline in the LF's faint end with increasing look-back time. This result means that the evolution of the number densities is differential with UV luminosity: the number density of UV luminous objects remains almost constant from z ~ 5 to 3 (the cosmic age is about 1.2 to 2.1 Gyr) while the number density of fainter objects gradually increases with cosmic time. This trend becomes apparent thanks to the small uncertainties in number densities both in the bright and faint parts of LFs at different epochs that are made possible by the deep and wide surveys we use. We discuss the origins of this differential evolution of the UVLF along the cosmic time and suggest that our observational findings are consistent with the biased galaxy evolution scenario: a galaxy population hosted by massive dark haloes starts active star formation preferentially at early cosmic time, while less massive galaxies increase their number density later. We also calculated the UV luminosity density by integrating the UVLF and at z ~ 5 found it to be 38.8+6.7-4.1 per cent of that at z ~ 3 for the luminosity range L > 0.1L*z=3. By combining our results with those from the literature, we find that the cosmic UV luminosity density marks its peak at and then slowly declines towards higher redshift. Based on

  2. Tidally triggered galaxy formation. I - Evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Cedric; Silk, Joseph

    1991-11-01

    Motivated by accumulating evidence that large-scale galactic star formation is initiated and sustained by tidal interactions, a phenomenological model is developed for the galaxy luminosity function, commencing from a galaxy mass function that is predicted by a hierarchical model of structure formation such as the cold dark matter dominated cosmology. The epoch of luminous galaxy formation and the galactic star-formation rate are determined by the environment. Gas cooling and star-formation feedback are incorporated; the present epoch luminosity function of bright galaxies and the distribution of galaxy colors are well reproduced. Biasing, via the preferential formation of luminous galaxies in denser regions associated with groups of clusters, is a natural outcome of this tidally triggered star-formation model. A large frequency is inferred of 'failed' galaxies, prematurely stripped by supernova-driven winds, that populate groups and clusters in the form of low surface brightness gas-poor dwarfs, and of 'retarded' galaxies, below the threshold for effective star formation, in the field, detectable as gas-rich, extremely low surface brightness objects. Predictions are presented for the evolution with redshift of the distribution of characteristic star formation timescales, galaxy ages, and colors. Estimates are also made of galaxy number counts, and it is suggested that dwarf galaxies undergoing bursts of star formation at z of about 1 may dominate the counts at the faintest magnitudes.

  3. H-alpha Imaging Survey of Low-Redshift Cluster Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhouse, Wayne; Kalawila, Sandanuwan; Rude, Cody; Sultanova, Madina; Archer, Haylee Nichole; Foote, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    We describe our on-going H-alpha imaging survey to measure the star formation activity of dwarf galaxies selected from a sample of low-redshift (0.02 < z< 0.15) galaxy clusters using the KPNO 4-meter telescope+Mosaic camera. H-alpha observations are obtained using the narrow-band BATC filters centered on the redshifted H-alpha emission line. The continuum-subtracted H-alpha images allow us to constrain star formation rates via the correlation between star formation and H-alpha luminosity and equivalent width. The impact of the cluster environment can be quantified using radial-dependent measures of the star formation rate within individual clusters, and by comparing clusters within our sample on a cluster-to-cluster basis. Comparison of our H-alpha measurements to CFHT u-band imaging data of our cluster sample, permits us to explore the correlation between the UV continuum and H-alpha emission of the dwarf galaxy population. The goal of our survey is to further understand the mechanism that is responsible for the enhancement/quenching of star formation as dwarf galaxies fall into the galaxy cluster environment.

  4. The gravity dependence of the H-alpha width in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical gravity-scaling law for the H-alpha absorption width in late-type stars is developed. The derivation is based upon (1) the hydrostatic thickening of stellar chromospheres with decreasing surface gravity, and (2) a dependence of the H-alpha width upon opacity and Doppler width in a region subject to a chromospheric temperature rise. The scaling relation is approximately consistent with the mean gravity dependence deduced from the empirical correlation between H-alpha and Ca II K Wilson-Bappu widths. The calculations suggest that gravity variations in chromospheric-mass column density may, in addition to Doppler velocity enhancements, control the width-luminosity broadening of the H-alpha profile in late-type stars.

  5. COSMOLOGICAL DEPENDENCE OF THE MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, PROJECTED CLUSTERING AND GALAXY-GALAXY LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2013-11-10

    Observables such as the galaxy luminosity function, Φ(M), projected galaxy clustering, w {sub p}(r {sub p}), and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal, ΔΣ(r {sub p}), are often measured from galaxy redshift surveys assuming a fiducial cosmological model for calculating distances to, and between galaxies. There are a growing number of studies that perform joint analyses of these measurements and constrain cosmological parameters. We quantify the amount by which such measurements systematically vary as the fiducial cosmology used for the measurements is changed, and show that these effects can be significant at high redshifts (z ∼ 0.5). Cosmological analyses (or halo occupation distribution analyses) that use the luminosity function, clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal but ignore such systematic effects may bias the inference of the parameters. We present a simple way to account for the differences in the cosmological model used for the measurements and those used for the prediction of observables, thus allowing a fair comparison between models and data.

  6. Constraints on the CO Luminosity Function at z˜1 Using ALMA Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kohno, K.; Tamura, Y.; Matsuda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We report the constraints on the CO luminosity function using ALMA Cycle 0 archival data. We use band 6 data taken toward a z=0.1832 lensing cluster, Abell 1689 (4.7 arcmin2), to produce a 3-dimensional cube with a 30-km s-1 resolution and to search for millimeter emission line galaxies using CLUMPFIND. We do not detect any emitters above 5σ (σ = 2.5 mJy beam-1). However, this result provides upper limits to the CO luminosity function down to φ<3.3×10-2 Mpc-3 dex-1 at LVCO˜ 1.0×108 Jy kms-1 Mpc2. We also detect a 4σ candidate line emitter with SΔ V=0.894 Jy km s-1 and FWHM = 138 km s-1 at 241.03 GHz. The photometric redshift is z=0.853, which is estimated from optical/near-infrared data, suggesting the line may be 12CO(4-3) at z=0.913. The estimated molecular gas mass of this candidate indicates this candidate is extremely gas rich.

  7. PRIMUS: Galaxy clustering as a function of luminosity and color at 0.2 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Cool, Richard J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(r{sub p} , π) and w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ∼130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg{sup 2} of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h {sup –1} < r{sub p} < 1 Mpc h {sup –1}) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b {sub gal} ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ∼ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  8. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  9. Sub-mm emission line deep fields: CO and [C II] luminosity functions out to z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-09-01

    Now that Atacama Large (Sub)Millimeter Array is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J =1-0 out to CO J = 6-5 and [C II] at redshifts z= 0-6. We find that (1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [C II] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z ≤ 2.75; (2) we find that the CO and [C II] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [C II] are found at z ˜ 2; (3) the CO J = 3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; (4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; (5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [C II] luminosity function of galaxies at z ≥ 1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  10. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF X-RAY SOURCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, A. H.; Primini, F.; McDowell, J. C.; Zezas, A.; Kilgard, R. E.

    2009-11-10

    X-ray sources in spiral galaxies can be approximately classified into bulge and disk populations. The bulge (or hard) sources have X-ray colors which are consistent with low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) but the disk sources have softer colors suggesting a different type of source. In this paper, we further study the properties of hard and soft sources by constructing color-segregated X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for these two populations. Since the number of sources in any given galaxy is small, we co-added sources from a sample of nearby, face-on spiral galaxies observed by Chandra as a Large Project in Cycle 2. We use simulations to carefully correct the XLF for completeness. The composite hard source XLF is not consistent with a single-power-law fit. At luminosities L{sub x} > 3 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, it is well fitted by a power law with a slope that is consistent with that found for sources in elliptical galaxies by Kim and Fabbiano. This supports the suggestion that the hard sources are dominated by LMXBs. In contrast, the high-luminosity XLF of soft sources has a slope similar to the 'universal' high-mass X-ray binary XLF. Some of these sources are stellar-mass black hole binaries accreting at high rates in a thermal/steep power-law state. The softest sources have inferred disk temperatures that are considerably lower than found in galactic black holes binaries. These sources are not well understood, but some may be super-soft ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a quiescent state as suggested by Soria and Ghosh.

  11. AN EXPONENTIAL DECLINE AT THE BRIGHT END OF THE z = 6 GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; McLure, Ross J.; Bruce, Victoria A.; Hibon, Pascale; McCracken, Henry J.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier; Bonfield, David G.; Jarvis, Matt J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for the most luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 6 based on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data. We identify a sample of 40 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) brighter than magnitude z' = 25.3 across an area of almost 4 deg{sup 2}. Sensitive spectroscopic observations of seven galaxies provide redshifts for four, of which only two have moderate to strong Ly{alpha} emission lines. All four have clear continuum breaks in their spectra. Approximately half of the LBGs are spatially resolved in 0.7 arcsec seeing images, indicating larger sizes than lower luminosity galaxies discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope, possibly due to ongoing mergers. The stacked optical and infrared photometry is consistent with a galaxy model with stellar mass {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. There is strong evidence for substantial dust reddening with a best-fit A{sub V} = 0.75 and A{sub V} > 0.48 at 2{sigma} confidence, in contrast to the typical dust-free galaxies of lower luminosity at this epoch. The spatial extent and spectral energy distribution suggest that the most luminous z Almost-Equal-To 6 galaxies are undergoing merger-induced starbursts. The luminosity function of z = 5.9 star-forming galaxies is derived. This agrees well with previous work and shows strong evidence for an exponential decline at the bright end, indicating that the feedback processes that govern the shape of the bright end are occurring effectively at this epoch.

  12. Constraints on the age and evolution of the Galaxy from the white dwarf luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The white dwarf disk luminosity function is explored using observational results of Liebert et al. (1988, 1989) as a template for comparison, and the cooling curves of Wood (1990, 1991) as the input basis functions for the integration. The star formation rate over the history of the Galaxy is found to be constant to within an order of magnitude, and the disk age lies in the range 6-13.5 Gyr, where roughly 40 percent of the uncertainty is due to the observational uncertainties. Using the best current estimates as inputs to the integration, the disk ages range from 7.5 to 11 Gyr, i.e., they are substantially younger than most estimates for the halo globular clusters but in reasonable agreement with those for the disk globular clusters and open clusters. The ages of these differing populations, taken together, are consistent with the pressure-supported collapse models of early spiral Galactic evolution.

  13. The luminosity function of cluster galaxies: relations among M_1_, M^*^ and the morphological type.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Cirimele, G.; Appodia, B.

    1996-11-01

    A study of the luminosity function of 36 Abell clusters of galaxies has been carried out using photographic plates obtained with the Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt telescope. The relation between the magnitude M_1_ of the brightest cluster member and the Schechter function parameter M^*^ has been analyzed. A positive correlation between M^*^ and M_1_ is found. However clusters appear segregated in the M_1_-M^*^ plane according to their Rood & Sastry class in such a way that on average M_1_ becomes brighter while M^*^ becomes fainter going from late to early Rood & Sastry and also Bautz & Morgan classes. Also a partial correlation analysis involving the magnitude M_10_ of the 10th brightest galaxy, shows a negative intrinsic correlation between M_1_ and M^*^. These results agree with the cannibalism model for the formation of brightest cluster members, and provide new constraints for theories of cluster formation and evolution.

  14. The luminosity function of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Madore, B. F.; Neugebauer, G.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Rice, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a study of the far infrared properties of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey are described. There is a correlation between the infrared luminosity and the infrared to optical luminosity ratio and between the infrared luminosity and the far infrared color temperature in these galaxies. The infrared bright galaxies represent a significant component of extragalactic objects in the local universe, being comparable in space density to the Seyferts, optically identified starburst galaxies, and more numerous than quasars at the same bolometric luminosity. The far infrared luminosity in the local universe is approximately 25% of the starlight output in the same volume.

  15. Looking below the floor: constraints on the AGN radio luminosity functions at low power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capetti, Alessandro; Raiteri, Claudia M.

    2015-04-01

    We constrain the behaviour of the radio luminosity function (RLF) of two classes of active galactic nuclei (AGN) namely AGN of low radio power (LRP) and BL Lac objects. The extrapolation of the observed steep RLFs to low power predicts a space density of such objects that exceeds that of the sources that can harbour them and this requires a break to a shallower slope. For LRP AGN, we obtain Pbr, LRP ≳ 1020.5 W Hz- 1 at 1.4 GHz to limit their density to be smaller than that of elliptical galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107.5 M⊙. By combining this value with the limit derived by the observations the break must occur at Pbr, LRP ˜ 1020.5-1021.5 W Hz- 1. For BL Lacs, we find Pbr, BLLAC ≳ 1023.3 W Hz- 1 otherwise they would outnumber the density of weak-lined and compact radio sources, while the observations indicate Pbr, BLLAC ≲ 1024.5 W Hz- 1. In the framework of the AGN unified model, a low luminosity break in the RLF of LRP AGN must correspond to a break in the RLF of BL Lacs. The ratio between Pbr, LRP and Pbr, BLLAC is ˜103, as expected for a jet Doppler factor of ˜10.

  16. Effects of variability of X-ray binaries on the X-ray luminosity functions of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray luminosity functions of galaxies have become a useful tool for population studies of X-ray binaries in them. The availability of long term light-curves of X-ray binaries with the All Sky X-ray Monitors opens up the possibility of constructing X-ray luminosity functions, by also including the intensity variation effects of the galactic X-ray binaries. We have constructed multiple realizations of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of Milky Way, using the long term light-curves of sources obtained in the 2-10 keV energy band with the RXTE-ASM. The observed spread seen in the value of slope of both HMXB and LMXB XLFs are due to inclusion of variable luminosities of X-ray binaries in construction of these XLFs as well as finite sample effects. XLFs constructed for galactic HMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec is described by a power-law model with a mean power-law index of -0.48 and a spread due to variability of HMXBs as 0.19. XLFs constructed for galactic LMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec has a shape of cut-off power-law with mean power-law index of -0.31 and a spread due to variability of LMXBs as 0.07.

  17. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. V. Integrated JHKS magnitudes and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we determine absolute integrated magnitudes in the J,H,KS passbands for Galactic star clusters from the Milky Way Star Clusters survey. In the wide solar neighbourhood, we derive the open cluster luminosity function (CLF) for different cluster ages. Methods: The integrated magnitudes are based on uniform cluster membership derived from the 2MAst catalogue (a merger of the PPMXL and 2MASS) and are computed by summing up the individual luminosities of the most reliable cluster members. We discuss two different techniques of constructing the CLF, a magnitude-limited and a distance-limited approach. Results: Absolute J,H,KS integrated magnitudes are obtained for 3061 open clusters, and 147 globular clusters. The integrated magnitudes and colours are accurate to about 0.8 and 0.2 mag, respectively. Based on the sample of open clusters we construct the general cluster luminosity function in the solar neighbourhood in the three passbands. In each passband the CLF shows a linear part covering a range of 6 to 7 mag at the bright end. The CLFs reach their maxima at an absolute magnitude of -2 mag, then drop by one order of magnitude. During cluster evolution, the CLF changes its slope within tight, but well-defined limits. The CLF of the youngest clusters has a steep slope of about 0.4 at bright magnitudes and a quasi-flat portion for faint clusters. For the oldest population, we find a flatter function with a slope of about 0.2. The CLFs at Galactocentric radii smaller than that of the solar circle differ from those in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. The CLF in the inner area is flatter and the cluster surface density higher than the local one. In contrast, the CLF is somewhat steeper than the local one in the outer disk, and the surface density is lower. The corresponding catalogue of integrated magnitudes is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. The Luminosity Function and Radial Profile of the Stellar Population in the Core of 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paresce, F.; de Marchi, G.; Jedrzejewski, R.; Gilliland, R.; Stratta, M. G.

    1994-12-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae was observed by the Faint Object Camera on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope for the first time through narrow band F253M and F346M filters centered at 253 nm and 346 nm. A total of 511 stars down to the detection limit at m346 =~ 24 in the 7('') times 7('') field were accurately placed on a m346 vs m253-m346 color magnitude diagram to characterize the stellar populations in the core. Approximately 100 objects above and to the right of the main sequence turn-off are the same as those classified earlier with the aberrated HST but the rest below it are new objects seen now for the first time thanks to the substantial improvement in sensitivity. The new objects form a well defined main sequence whose luminosity function turns over dramatically at m346 =~ 20 well before the completeness limit and well before the end of the slowly increasing luminosity function for the outer fields measured from the ground by Hesser et al. (1987). We interpret this premature drop in the number of stars below ~ 0.7 M_sun in the core as the effect of mass segregation due to two body relaxation. The position of 9 objects in the range 20< m346<24 and -1.5luminosity function. We have also analyzed very deep frames of the core of 47 Tuc obtained with the WFPC1 before refurbishment in the U band to study with the highest possible accuracy the radial profile of stellar density around the geometrical center of the cluster. This data set fully confirms and extends further the results published by Calzetti et al. (1993) that showed that the radial density profile of 47 Tuc is not consistent with a King model of core radius 25('') extending all the way to the center but requires a central density enhancement of radius ~ 8('') = 0.02 parsec superimposed on the former. This result provides fresh evidence that this cluster may have suffered

  19. The WARPS Survey - VIII. Evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, L. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Jones, L. R.; Ebeling, H.; Horner, D. J.; Perlman, E. S.; Phillipps, S.; Scharf, C. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy cluster X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) from the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS) and quantify its evolution. WARPS is a serendipitous survey of the central region of ROSAT pointed observations and was carried out in two phases (WARPS-I and WARPS-II). The results here are based on a final sample of 124 clusters, complete above a flux limit of 6.5 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, with members out to redshift z ˜ 1.05, and a sky coverage of 70.9 deg2. We find significant evidence for negative evolution of the XLF, which complements the majority of X-ray cluster surveys. To quantify the suggested evolution, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis and conclude that the evolution is driven by a decreasing number density of high-luminosity clusters with redshift, while the bulk of the cluster population remains nearly unchanged out to redshift z ≈ 1.1, as expected in a low-density universe. The results are found to be insensitive to a variety of sources of systematic uncertainty that affect the measurement of the XLF and determination of the survey selection function. We perform a Bayesian analysis of the XLF to fully account for uncertainties in the local XLF on the measured evolution, and find that the detected evolution remains significant at the 95 per cent level. We observe a significant excess of clusters in the WARPS at 0.1 < z < 0.3 and LX ≈ 2 × 1043 erg s-1 compared with the reference low-redshift XLF, or our Bayesian fit to the WARPS data. We find that the excess cannot be explained by sample variance, or Eddington bias, and is unlikely to be due to problems with the survey selection function.

  20. The galaxy UV luminosity function at z ≃ 2-4; new results on faint-end slope and the evolution of luminosity density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Mortlock, Alice

    2016-03-01

    We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilize the unparalleled multifrequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ≃ 2, 3, 4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes (M1500) from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M1500 ≃ -22 (AB mag) down to M1500 = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ≃ 2, 3 and 4, respectively (thus, reaching ≃ 3-4 mag fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ≃ 2,3). At z ≃ 2, 3, we find a much shallower faint-end slope (α = -1.32 ± 0.03) than reported in some previous studies (α ≃ -1.7), and demonstrate that this new measurement is robust. By z ≃ 4, the faint-end slope has steepened slightly, to α = -1.43 ± 0.04, and we show that these measurements are consistent with the overall evolutionary trend from z = 0 to 8. Finally, we find that while characteristic number density (φ*) drops from z ≃ 2 to z ≃ 4, characteristic luminosity (M*) brightens by ≃ 1 mag. This, combined with the new flatter faint-end slopes, has the consequence that UV luminosity density (and hence unobscured star formation density) peaks at z ≃ 2.5-3, when the Universe was ≃ 2.5 Gyr old.

  1. The Radio luminosity Function of Radio-Loud Quasars from the 7C Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    1998-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 24 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) from the new 7C Redshift Survey. Every quasar with a low-frequency (151 MHz) radio flux-density S(sub 151) > 0.5 Jy in two regions of the sky covering 0.013 sr is included; 23 of these have sufficient extended flux to meet the selection criteria, 18 of these have steep radio spectra (hereafter denoted as SSQs). The key advantage of this sample over most samples of RLQs is the lack of an optical magnitude limit. By combining the 7C and 3CRR samples, we have investigated the properties of RLQs as a function of redshift z and radio luminosity L(sub 151). We derive the radio luminosity function (RLF) of RLQs and find that the data are well fitted by a single power-law with slope alpha(sub 1) = 1.9 +/- 0.1 (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s.Mpc, OMEGA(sub M) = 1, OMEGA(sub DELTA) = 0). We find that there must be a break in the RLQ RLF at log(sub 10)(L(sub 151)/W Hz.sr) approximately < or = 27, in order for the models to be consistent with the 7C and 6C source counts. The z-dependence of the RLF follows a one-tailed gaussian which peaks at z = 1.7 +/- 0.2. We find no evidence for a decline in the co-moving space density of RLQs at higher redshifts. A positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities of SSQs is observed, confirming a result of Serjeant. We are able to rule out this correlation being due to selection effects or biases in our combined sample. The radio-optical correlation and best-fit model RLF enable us to estimate the distribution of optical magnitudes of quasars in samples selected at low radio frequencies, We con- clude that for samples with S(sub 151) approximately < or = 1 Jy one must use optical data significantly deeper than the POSS-I limit (R approximately equal 20), in order to avoid severe incompleteness.

  2. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability selection and quasar luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Magneville, Ch.; Yèche, Ch.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Burtin, E.; Dawson, K.; McGreer, I.; Myers, A. D.; Rossi, G.; Schlegel, D.; Schneider, D.; Streblyanska, A.; Tinker, J.

    2016-03-01

    The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, which are unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when z = 2.7-3.5 quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at z< 0.9. We present the variability selection of quasars in eBOSS, focusing on a specific program that led to a sample of 13 876 quasars to gdered = 22.5 over a 94.5 deg2 region in Stripe 82, which has an areal density 1.5 times higher than over the rest of the eBOSS footprint. We use these variability-selected data to provide a new measurement of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) in the redshift range of 0.68 luminosity-function evolution (PLE) with bright-end and faint-end slopes allowed to be different on either side of z = 2.2. The other is a simple PLE at z< 2.2, combined with a model that comprises both luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) at z> 2.2. Both models are constrained to be continuous at z = 2.2. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at high redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3% (resp., 1.1%) to g< 22.5 (resp., g< 23). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.

  3. The HerMES submillimetre local and low-redshift luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, L.; Vaccari, M.; Franceschini, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Feltre, A.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-02-01

    We used wide-area surveys over 39 deg2 by the HerMES (Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey) collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multiwavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, 0.02 < z < 0.5, monochromatic luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500 μm. Within this redshift interval, we detected 7087 sources in five independent sky areas, ˜40 per cent of which have spectroscopic redshifts, while for the remaining objects photometric redshifts were used. The SPIRE LFs in different fields did not show any field-to-field variations beyond the small differences to be expected from cosmic variance. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multiwavelength archival data to perform a complete spectral energy distribution fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (IR; 8-1000 μm) LFs and their low-z evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The LFs show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, 0.02 < z < 0.2, with L_{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{6.0± 0.4} and Φ _{IR}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-2.1± 0.4}, L_{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{5.3± 0.2} and Φ _{250}^{*} ∝ (1+z)^{-0.6± 0.4} estimated using the IR bolometric and the 250 μm LFs, respectively. Converting our IR LD estimate into an SFRD assuming a standard Salpeter initial mass function and including the unobscured contribution based on the UV dust-uncorrected emission from local galaxies, we estimate an SFRD scaling of SFRD0 + 0.08z, where SFRD0 ≃ (1.9 ± 0.03) × 10-2 [M⊙ Mpc-3] is our total SFRD estimate at z ˜ 0.02.

  4. High-Redshift QSOs in the SWIRE Survey and the z~3 QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siana, Brian; Polletta, Maria del Carmen; Smith, Harding E.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Farrah, Duncan; Babbedge, Tom S. R.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David; Fang, Fan; Franceschini, Alberto; Oliver, Seb

    2008-03-01

    We use a simple optical/infrared (IR) photometric selection of high-redshift QSOs that identifies a Lyman break in the optical photometry and requires a red IR color to distinguish QSOs from common interlopers. The search yields 100 z ~ 3 (U-dropout) QSO candidates with 19 < r' < 22 over 11.7 deg2 in the ELAIS-N1 (EN1) and ELAIS-N2 (EN2) fields of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Legacy Survey. The z ~ 3 selection is reliable, with spectroscopic follow-up of 10 candidates confirming that they are all QSOs at 2.83 < z < 3.44. We find that our z ~ 4 (g'-dropout) sample suffers from both unreliability and incompleteness but present seven previously unidentified QSOs at 3.50 < z < 3.89. Detailed simulations show our z ~ 3 completeness to be ~80%-90% from 3.0 < z < 3.5, significantly better than the ~30%-80% completeness of the SDSS at these redshifts. The resulting luminosity function extends 2 mag fainter than SDSS and has a faint-end slope of β = - 1.42 +/- 0.15, consistent with values measured at lower redshift. Therefore, we see no evidence for evolution of the faint-end slope of the QSO luminosity function. Including the SDSS QSO sample, we have now directly measured the space density of QSOs responsible for ~70% of the QSO UV luminosity density at z ~ 3. We derive a maximum rate of H I photoionization from QSOs at z ~ 3.2, Γ = 4.8 × 10-13 s-1, about half of the total rate inferred through studies of the Lyα forest. Therefore, star-forming galaxies and QSOs must contribute comparably to the photoionization of H I in the intergalactic medium at z ~ 3. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. The Faint End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ~ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat; Bogosavljević, Milan; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Mahabal, Ashish

    2010-02-01

    The evolution of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) is one of the basic cosmological measures providing insight into structure formation and mass assembly in the universe. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey to find faint quasars (-26.0 < M 1450 < -22.0) at redshifts z = 3.8-5.2 in order to measure the faint end of the QLF at these early times. Using available optical imaging data from portions of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and the Deep Lens Survey, we have color-selected quasar candidates in a total area of 3.76 deg2. Thirty candidates have R <= 23 mag. We conducted spectroscopic follow-up for 28 of our candidates and found 23 QSOs, 21 of which are reported here for the first time, in the 3.74 < z < 5.06 redshift range. We estimate our survey completeness through detailed Monte Carlo simulations and derive the first measurement of the density of quasars in this magnitude and redshift interval. We find that the binned luminosity function (LF) is somewhat affected by the K-correction used to compute the rest-frame absolute magnitude at 1450 Å. Considering only our R <= 23 sample, the best-fit single power law (Φ vprop L β) gives a faint-end slope β = -1.6 ± 0.2. If we consider our larger, but highly incomplete sample going 1 mag fainter, we measure a steeper faint-end slope -2 < β < -2.5. In all cases, we consistently find faint-end slopes that are steeper than expected based on measurements at z ~ 3. We combine our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to derive parameters for a double-power-law LF. Our best fit finds a bright-end slope, α = -2.4 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = -2.3 ± 0.2, without a well-constrained break luminosity. This is effectively a single power law, with β = -2.7 ± 0.1. We use these results to place limits on the amount of ultraviolet radiation produced by quasars and find that quasars are able to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts. The data presented herein were obtained at the

  6. Characterizing the Properties of Clusters of Galaxies As a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, K.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.; Goobar, A.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC

    2009-02-24

    We report the application of the new Monte Carlo method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI, described in a pair of companion papers), towards analysis and interpretation of X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our sample consists of publicly available well-exposed observations of clusters at redshifts z > 0.069, totaling 101 objects. We determine the luminosity and temperature structure of the X-ray emitting gas, with the goal to quantify the scatter and the evolution of the L{sub X} - T relation, as well as to investigate the dependence on cluster substructure with redshift. This work is important for the establishment of the potential robustness of mass estimates from X-ray data which in turn is essential towards the use of clusters for measurements of cosmological parameters. We use the luminosity and temperature maps derived via the SPI technique to determine the presence of cooling cores, via measurements of luminosity and temperature contrast. The L{sub X}-T relation is investigated, and we confirm that L{sub X} {proportional_to} T{sup 3}. We find a weak redshift dependence ({proportional_to} (1 + z){sup {beta}{sub LT}}, {beta}{sub LT} = 0.50 {+-} 0.34), in contrast to some Chandra results. The level of dynamical activity is established using the 'power ratios' method, and we compare our results to previous application of this method to Chandra data for clusters. We find signs of evolution in the P{sub 3}/P{sub 0} power ratio. A new method, the 'temperature two-point correlation function', is proposed. This method is used to determine the 'power spectrum' of temperature fluctuations in the X-ray emitting gas as a function of spatial scale. We show how this method can be fruitfully used to identify cooling core clusters as well as those with disturbed structures, presumably due to on-going or recent merger activity.

  7. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrained by PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Stellar population models are the tool to derive the properties of real galaxies, or predict them via galaxy formation models. A constructive approach is to use nearby stellar systems to calibrate uncertain quantities in stellar evolution. These checks and comparisons are particulary needed for evolved and short stellar phases such as the Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic giant branch, after whcih intermediate-mass stars evolve through the planetary nebula stage. Given the stellar mass range for which the fuel consumption along the TP-AGB is larger, high-redshift galaxies are the best probes of our modelling. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescription for the treatment of this stellar phase affects the integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function and stellar remnants stemming from the various assumptions.

  8. Luminosity function of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, KwangHo; Khandai, Nishikanta; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu

    2015-09-18

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII]) = 1043.0 erg s–1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excessmore » in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII]) = 1041.6 erg s–1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from –3 to –2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)–1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ~3(z + 1)–1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. As a result, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.« less

  9. Luminosity function of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-11-01

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [O II] emission line luminosity L([O II]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [O II] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([O II]) = 1043.0 erg s-1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [O II] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([O II]) = 1041.6 erg s-1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [O II] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [O II] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)-1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ˜3(z + 1)-1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [O III] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [O II] and [O III] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  10. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  11. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project. II. Global Properties and the Luminosity Function of Field Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2005-09-01

    We discuss a 175 deg2 spectroscopic survey for blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the Galactic halo. We use the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to select BHB candidates, and we find that the 2MASS and SDSS color selection is 38% and 50% efficient, respectively, for BHB stars. Our samples include one likely runaway B7 star 6 kpc below the Galactic plane. The global properties of the BHB samples are consistent with membership in the halo population: the median metallicity is [Fe/H]=-1.7, the velocity dispersion is 108 km s-1, and the mean Galactic rotation of the BHB stars 3 kpc<|z|<15 kpc is -4+/-30 km s-1. We discuss the theoretical basis of the Preston, Shectman, and Beers MV-color relation for BHB stars and conclude that the intrinsic shape of the BHB MV-color relation results from the physics of stars on the horizontal branch. We calculate the luminosity function for the field BHB star samples using the maximum likelihood method of Efstathiou and coworkers, which is unbiased by density variations. The field BHB luminosity function exhibits a steep rise at bright luminosities, a peak between 0.8luminosities. We compare the field BHB luminosity functions with the luminosity functions derived from 16 different globular cluster BHBs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests suggest that field BHB stars and BHB stars in globular clusters share a common distribution of luminosities, with the exception of globular clusters with extended BHBs.

  12. The local stellar luminosity function and mass-to-light ratio in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Fuchs, B.; Jahreiß, H.; Flynn, C.; Dettbarn, C.; Rybizki, J.

    2015-07-01

    A new sample of stars, representative of the solar neighbourhood luminosity function (LF), is constructed from the Hipparcos catalogue and the Fifth Catalogue of Nearby Stars. We have cross-matched to sources in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalogue so that for all stars individually determined near-infrared (NIR) photometry is available on a homogeneous system (typically Ks). The spatial completeness of the sample has been carefully determined by statistical methods, and the NIR LF of the stars has been derived by direct star counts. We find a local volume luminosity of 0.121 ± 0.004 LK⊙ pc-3, corresponding to a volumetric mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of M/L_K = 0.31 ± 0.02 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}, where giants contribute 80 per cent to the light but less than 2 per cent to the stellar mass. We derive the surface brightness of the solar cylinder with the help of a vertical disc model. We find a surface brightness of 99 LK⊙ pc-2 with an uncertainty of approximately 10 per cent. This corresponds to an M/L for the solar cylinder of M/L_K = 0.34 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}. The M/L for the solar cylinder is only 10 per cent larger than the local value despite the fact that the local population has a much larger contribution of young stars. It turns out that the effective scaleheights of the lower main sequence carrying most of the mass is similar to that of the giants, which are dominating the NIR light. The corresponding colour for the solar cylinder is V - K = 2.89 mag compared to the local value of V - K = 2.46 mag. An extrapolation of the local surface brightness to the whole Milky Way yields a total luminosity of MK = -24.2 mag. The Milky Way falls in the range of K band Tully-Fisher relations from the literature.

  13. A MULTIVARIATE FIT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND WORLD MODEL FOR LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    It is proposed that the luminosity function, the rest-frame spectral correlations, and distributions of cosmological long-duration (Type-II) gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may be very well described as a multivariate log-normal distribution. This result is based on careful selection, analysis, and modeling of LGRBs' temporal and spectral variables in the largest catalog of GRBs available to date: 2130 BATSE GRBs, while taking into account the detection threshold and possible selection effects. Constraints on the joint rest-frame distribution of the isotropic peak luminosity (L{sub iso}), total isotropic emission (E{sub iso}), the time-integrated spectral peak energy (E{sub p,z}), and duration (T{sub 90,z}) of LGRBs are derived. The presented analysis provides evidence for a relatively large fraction of LGRBs that have been missed by the BATSE detector with E{sub iso} extending down to {approx}10{sup 49} erg and observed spectral peak energies (E{sub p} ) as low as {approx}5 keV. LGRBs with rest-frame duration T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 1 s or observer-frame duration T{sub 90} {approx}< 2 s appear to be rare events ({approx}< 0.1% chance of occurrence). The model predicts a fairly strong but highly significant correlation ({rho} = 0.58 {+-} 0.04) between E{sub iso} and E{sub p,z} of LGRBs. Also predicted are strong correlations of L{sub iso} and E{sub iso} with T{sub 90,z} and moderate correlation between L{sub iso} and E{sub p,z}. The strength and significance of the correlations found encourage the search for underlying mechanisms, though undermine their capabilities as probes of dark energy's equation of state at high redshifts. The presented analysis favors-but does not necessitate-a cosmic rate for BATSE LGRBs tracing metallicity evolution consistent with a cutoff Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.2-0.5, assuming no luminosity-redshift evolution.

  14. Photometric Properties and Luminosity Function of Nearby Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. Q.; Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Mao, S.; Li, Cheng

    2013-08-01

    We perform photometric analyses of a bright early-type galaxy sample with 2949 galaxies (Mr < -22.5 mag) in the redshift range of 0.05-0.15, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with morphological classification from Galaxy Zoo 1. We measure the Petrosian and isophotal magnitudes, as well as the corresponding half-light radius for each galaxy. We find that for the brightest galaxies (Mr < -23 mag), our Petrosian magnitudes and isophotal magnitudes to 25 mag arcsec-2 and 1% of the sky brightness are on average 0.16 mag, 0.20 mag, and 0.26 mag brighter than the SDSS Petrosian values, respectively. In the first case, the underestimations are caused by overestimations in the sky background by the SDSS PHOTO algorithm, while the latter two are also due to deeper photometry. Similarly, the typical half-light radii (r 50) measured by the SDSS algorithm are smaller than our measurements. As a result, the bright end of the r-band luminosity function is found to decline more slowly than previous works. Our measured luminosity densities at the bright end are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of Blanton et al., and the stellar mass densities at M * ~ 5 × 1011 M ⊙ and M * ~ 1012 M ⊙ are a few tenths and a factor of a few higher than those of Bernardi et al. These results may significantly alleviate the tension in the assembly of massive galaxies between observations and predictions of the hierarchical structure formation model.

  15. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF NEARBY MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. Q.; Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C. N.; Jing, Y. P.; Mao, S.; Li, Cheng

    2013-08-10

    We perform photometric analyses of a bright early-type galaxy sample with 2949 galaxies (M{sub r} < -22.5 mag) in the redshift range of 0.05-0.15, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with morphological classification from Galaxy Zoo 1. We measure the Petrosian and isophotal magnitudes, as well as the corresponding half-light radius for each galaxy. We find that for the brightest galaxies (M{sub r} < -23 mag), our Petrosian magnitudes and isophotal magnitudes to 25 mag arcsec{sup -2} and 1% of the sky brightness are on average 0.16 mag, 0.20 mag, and 0.26 mag brighter than the SDSS Petrosian values, respectively. In the first case, the underestimations are caused by overestimations in the sky background by the SDSS PHOTO algorithm, while the latter two are also due to deeper photometry. Similarly, the typical half-light radii (r{sub 50}) measured by the SDSS algorithm are smaller than our measurements. As a result, the bright end of the r-band luminosity function is found to decline more slowly than previous works. Our measured luminosity densities at the bright end are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of Blanton et al., and the stellar mass densities at M{sub *} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} and M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are a few tenths and a factor of a few higher than those of Bernardi et al. These results may significantly alleviate the tension in the assembly of massive galaxies between observations and predictions of the hierarchical structure formation model.

  16. The SDSS u-band Galaxy Survey: Luminosity functions and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baldry, Ivan K.; Glazebrook, K.; Budavari, T.; Eisenstein, D.J.; Annis, J.; Bahcall, N.A.; Blanton, M.R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, I.; Heckman, T.M.; Lin, H.; Loveday, J.; Nichol, R.C.; Schneider, D.P.; /Johns Hopkins U. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Princeton U. /CCPP, New York /Apache Point Observ. /Eotvos U. /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Portsmouth U., ICG /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2005-01-01

    We construct and analyze a u-band selected galaxy sample from the SDSS Southern Survey, which covers 275 deg{sup 2}. The sample includes 43223 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.005 < z < 0.3 and with 14.5 < u < 20.5. The S/N in the u-band Petrosian aperture is improved by coadding multiple epochs of imaging data and by including sky-subtraction corrections. Luminosity functions for the near-UV {sup 0.1}u band ({lambda} {approx} 322 {+-} 26 nm) are determined in redshift slices of width 0.02, which show a highly significant evolution in M* of -0.8 {+-} 0.1 mag between z = 0 and 0.3; with M* - 5 log h{sub 70} = -18.84 {+-} 0.05 (AB mag), log {phi}* = -2.06 {+-} 0.03 (h{sub 70}{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}) and log {rho}{sub L} = 19.11 {+-} 0.02 (h{sub 70} W Hz{sup -1}Mpc{sup -3}) at z = 0.1. The faint-end slope determined for z < 0.06 is given by {alpha} = -1.05 {+-} 0.08. This is in agreement with recent determinations from GALEX at shorter wavelengths. Comparing our z < 0.3 luminosity density measurements with 0.2 < z < 1.2 from COMBO-17, we find that the 280-nm density evolves as {rho}{sub L} {proportional_to} (1+z){sup {beta}} with {beta} = 2.1 {+-} 0.2; and find no evidence for any change in slope over this redshift range. By comparing with other measurements of cosmic star formation history, we estimate that the effective dust attenuation at 280 nm has increased by 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mag between z = 0 and 1.

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 5 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Enoki, M.; Capak, P.; Masters, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Civano, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-09-10

    We present the result of our low-luminosity quasar survey in the redshift range of 4.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5 in the COSMOS field. Using the COSMOS photometric catalog, we selected 15 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 5 that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the same redshift range. We obtained optical spectra for 14 of the 15 candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope and did not identify any low-luminosity type-1 quasars at z {approx} 5, while a low-luminosity type-2 quasar at z {approx} 5.07 was discovered. In order to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5, we calculated the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density of type-1 quasars. As a result, the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits on the quasar space density are {Phi} < 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -24.52 < M{sub 1450} < -23.52 and {Phi} < 2.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -23.52 < M{sub 1450} < -22.52. The inferred 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density are then used to provide constraints on the faint-end slope and the break absolute magnitude of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5. We find that the quasar space density decreases gradually as a function of redshift at low luminosity (M{sub 1450} {approx} -23), being similar to the trend found for quasars with high luminosity (M{sub 1450} < -26). This result is consistent with the so-called downsizing evolution of quasars seen at lower redshifts.

  18. New Insights on the White Dwarf Luminosity and Mass Functions from the LSS-GAC Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto; Liu, Xiaowei; Cojocaru, Ruxandra; Torres, Santiago; García–Berro, Enrique; Yuan, Haibo; Huang, Yang; Xiang, Maosheng

    2015-06-01

    The white dwarf (WD) population observed in magnitude-limited surveys can be used to derive the luminosity function (LF) and mass function (MF), once the corresponding volume corrections are employed. However, the WD samples from which the observational LFs and MFs are built are the result of complicated target selection algorithms. Thus, it is difficult to quantify the effects of the observational biases on the observed functions. The LAMOST (Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) spectroscopic survey of the Galactic anti-center (LSS-GAC) has well-defined selection criteria. This is a noticeable advantage over previous surveys. Here we derive the WD LF and MF of the LSS-GAC, and use a Monte Carlo code to simulate the WD population in the Galactic anti-center. We apply the well-defined LSS-GAC selection criteria to the simulated populations, taking into account all observational biases, and perform the first meaningful comparison between the simulated WD LFs and MFs and the observed ones.

  19. Exploring the Quasar Luminosity Function with Quasars Selected by both Color and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christina M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Using a Bayesian selection algorithm, we determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. The color analysis is based on SDSS photometry, and the variability parameters are calculated from power-law fits to the structure functions. Simultaneous color and variability classification improves classification over either color or variability selection alone, with particular improvement in the selection of quasars with colors similar to stars. This method identifies 22,867 new type 1 quasar candidates in SDSS Stripe 82, which can be combined with the WISE and SDSS photometric quasar candidate catalogs. The redshifts of the candidate quasars were estimated using all available bands, weighting each band by smoothing the PDF. We show how to correct the candidate quasar luminosity function (QLF) for the completeness fraction and systematic errors in redshifts. The corrected QLF is comparable to those determined by spectroscopic investigations, suggesting that LSST and other next-generation surveys will be able to accurately determine the QLF in the absence of spectra. Finally, the quasars are divided into high and low Eddington fractions, using delta(g-i) and CIV blueshift as proxies. The candidate QLFs for the two populations are compared to look for changes as a function of redshift. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1411773.

  20. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  1. The luminosity function of galactic X-ray sources - A cutoff and a 'standard candle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the 2- to 10-kev luminosity distribution of 36 X-ray sources in the Local Group having known or estimated distances, showing that there exists a luminosity cutoff of approximately 10 to the 37.7th ergs/sec in agreement with the theoretical (Eddington) limit for the luminosity of an approximately 1 solar mass star. Furthermore, among the complete sample of high-luminosity sources, there appears to be a statistically significant group of X-ray 'standard candles' at (within less than 0.8 mag) the critical luminosity. This finding (which is in agreement with the self-consistent mass flow accretion models) presents the possibility that X-ray sources may be used as extragalactic distance indicators in the next generation of X-ray astronomy experiments.

  2. Optical Variability of Quasars as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kwon, T.-Y.; Liang, Y.; Scott, J. H.; Wysota, A.

    1987-09-01

    Various models of the "central engine" in quasars make different predictions of how the degree of variability and its timescale vary with luminosity. In the past there have been conflicting claims about the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar variability. We have examined the photographic light curves obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory (U. of Florida) and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux) for over a hundred quasars (both radio-loud and radio-quiet). We demonstrate how the previously-reported redshift dependence is a consequence of time dilation, and find that, after allowance for this, there is no luminosity dependence in the amplitude of variability. High-luminosity quasars are not less variable than their low-luminosity counterparts. This creates major difficulties for some classes of quasar model with discrete accretion events (e.g., gas cloud or disrupted stars being "swallowed" directly).

  3. Dwarf Galaxies in the Leo I Group: the Group Luminosity Function beyond the Local Group (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, K.; Bolte, M.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    We present first results of a survey of the Leo I group at 10 Mpc for M_R < -10 dwarf galaxies. This is part of a larger program to measure the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in nearby poor groups. Our method is optimized to find Local-Group-like dwarfs down to dwarf spheroidal surface brightnesses, but we also find very large LSB dwarfs in Leo I with no Local Group counterpart. A preliminary measurement of the luminosity function yields a slope consistent with that measured in the Local Group.

  4. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  5. The 5-10 keV AGN luminosity function at 0.01 < z < 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Buchner, J.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Georgakakis, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Ranalli, P.; Hsu, L. T.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Miyaji, T.; Nandra, K.; Aird, J.; Paltani, S.

    2016-03-01

    The active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function traces actively accreting supermassive black holes and is essential for the study of the properties of the AGN population, black hole evolution, and galaxy-black hole coevolution. Up to now, the AGN luminosity function has been estimated several times in soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard X-rays (2-10 keV). AGN selection in these energy ranges often suffers from identification and redshift incompleteness and, at the same time, photoelectric absorption can obscure a significant amount of the X-ray radiation. We estimate the evolution of the luminosity function in the 5-10 keV band, where we effectively avoid the absorbed part of the spectrum, rendering absorption corrections unnecessary up to NH ~ 1023 cm-2. Our dataset is a compilation of six wide, and deep fields: MAXI, HBSS, XMM-COSMOS, Lockman Hole, XMM-CDFS, AEGIS-XD, Chandra-COSMOS, and Chandra-CDFS. This extensive sample of ~1110 AGN (0.01 < z < 4.0, 41 < log Lx < 46) is 98% redshift complete with 68% spectroscopic redshifts. For sources lacking a spectroscopic redshift estimation we use the probability distribution function of photometric redshift estimation specifically tuned for AGN, and a flat probability distribution function for sources with no redshift information. We use Bayesian analysis to select the best parametric model from simple pure luminosity and pure density evolution to more complicated luminosity and density evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). We estimate the model parameters that describe best our dataset separately for each survey and for the combined sample. We show that, according to Bayesian model selection, the preferred model for our dataset is the LDDE. Our estimation of the AGN luminosity function does not require any assumption on the AGN absorption and is in good agreement with previous works in the 2-10 keV energy band based on X-ray hardness ratios to model the absorption in AGN up to redshift three

  6. STOCHASTIC STAR FORMATION AND A (NEARLY) UNIFORM STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Michele; Krumholz, Mark R.; Da Silva, Robert L.

    2011-11-10

    Recent observations indicate a lower H{alpha} to FUV ratio in dwarf galaxies than in brighter systems, a trend that could be explained by a truncated and/or steeper initial mass function (IMF) in small galaxies. However, at low star formation rates (SFRs), the H{alpha} to FUV ratio can vary due to stochastic sampling even for a universal IMF, a hypothesis that has, prior to this work, received limited investigation. Using SLUG, a fully stochastic code for synthetic photometry in star clusters and galaxies, we compare the H{alpha} and FUV luminosity in a sample of {approx}450 nearby galaxies with models drawn from a universal Kroupa IMF and a modified IMF, the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF). Once random sampling and time evolution are included, a Kroupa IMF convolved with the cluster mass function (CMF) reproduces the observed H{alpha} distribution at all FUV luminosities, while a truncated IMF as implemented in current IGIMF models underpredicts the H{alpha} luminosity by more than an order of magnitude at the lowest SFRs. We conclude that the observed luminosity is the result of the joint probability distribution function of the SFR, CMF, and a universal IMF, consistent with parts of the IGIMF theory, but that a truncation in the IMF in clusters is inconsistent with the observations. Future work will examine stochastic star formation and its time dependence in detail to study whether random sampling can explain other observations that suggest a varying IMF.

  7. The optical luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts deduced from ROTSE-III observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; McKay, T. A.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A. E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: fang.yuan@anu.edu.au E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-11-10

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  8. The Main Sequence Luminosity Function of Low-Mass Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme

    2009-07-01

    Theoretical work indicates that the dynamical evolution of globular clusters of low mass and low central concentration is strongly determined by mass-loss processes, such as stellar evaporation and tidal stripping, that can eventually lead to cluster dissolution. In fact, mass loss and cluster disruption is now considered to be a viable explanation for the form of the faint end of the Milky Way globular cluster luminosity function. A clear observational demonstration of the prevalence of cluster mass-loss would have ramifications not only for the dynamical evolution of individual globular clusters and their internal stellar mass distributions, but also for the relationships between halo field and cluster stars and the properties of globular cluster systems in galaxies. Our previous WFPC2 imaging of the low-mass diffuse halo cluster Palomar 5 revealed a main sequence deficient in stars compared to other low-concentration globular clusters of much higher mass, consistent with there having been a considerable loss of stars from this system. But is Pal 5 typical of low-mass, low-concentration halo clusters? We propose to place the mass-loss scenario on a firm observational footing {or otherwise} by using WFC3 imaging to measure the main-sequence stellar mass functions of two of the lowest-mass lowest-concentration globular clusters in the Milky Way, AM-4 and Palomar 13, in order to search for analogous evidence of stellar depletion.

  9. Luminosity function of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, KwangHo; Khandai, Nishikanta; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu

    2015-09-18

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII]) = 1043.0 erg s–1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII]) = 1041.6 erg s–1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from –3 to –2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)–1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ~3(z + 1)–1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. As a result, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  10. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r∼ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color–magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r∼ 18.5 mag ({M}r∼ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  11. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  12. Correcting the z ˜ 8 Galaxy Luminosity Function for Gravitational Lensing Magnification Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Treu, Tommaso; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Collett, Thomas E.; Trenti, Michele; Marshall, Philip J.; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Wyithe, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    We present a Bayesian framework to account for the magnification bias from both strong and weak gravitational lensing in estimates of high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We illustrate our method by estimating the z ˜ 8 UV LF using a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts (Lyman break galaxies) found in the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey and from the literature. We find the LF is well described by a Schechter function with characteristic magnitude of {{M}\\star }=-19.85-0.35+0.30, faint-end slope of α =-1.72-0.29+0.30, and number density of {{log }10}{{{\\Psi }}\\star }(Mp{{c}-3})=-3.00-0.31+0.23. These parameters are consistent within the uncertainties with those inferred from the same sample without accounting for the magnification bias, demonstrating that the effect is small for current surveys at z ˜ 8, and cannot account for the apparent overdensity of bright galaxies compared to a Schechter function found recently by Bowler et al. and Finkelstein et al. We estimate that the probability of finding a strongly lensed z ˜ 8 source in our sample is in the range ˜3-15% depending on limiting magnitude. We identify one strongly lensed candidate and three cases of intermediate lensing in BoRG (estimated magnification μ > 1.4) in addition to the previously known candidate group-scale strong lens. Using a range of theoretical LFs we conclude that magnification bias will dominate wide field surveys—such as those planned for the Euclid and WFIRST missions—especially at z > 10. Magnification bias will need to be accounted for in order to derive accurate estimates of high-redshift LFs in these surveys and to distinguish between galaxy formation models.

  13. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  14. Measuring the GC luminosity function up to z ~ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J.

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are stellar systems (~106 M⊙) with very regular symmetry, single age, and single metallicity. Spectroscopic studies have revealed very old ages, suggesting that GCs were formed in the earliest stages of galaxy formation and assembly. The aim of this work is to find out how far we can measure the GC luminosity function, specific frequency, and radial distribution, applying the surface-brightness-fluctuations (SBF) technique to deep ACS images. To this end, we apply the effects caused by higher redshift to HST/ACS images (in two optical bands, F606W and F814W) of M87, an elliptical galaxy with a very well-studied GC system. The effects involved are: (i) evolution, (ii) inverse k correction, (iii) binning of the image to smaller angular size, (iv) cosmological dimming of surface brightness, and (v) noise addition to account for different exposure times. After processing the images we detect the brightest GCs through direct photometry (e.g., with SExtractor), whereas the unresolved clusters are measured through SBFs. The above treatment is repeated for z=0.05, 0.1, 0.14, and 0.18, and the results are compared to the measurements at z=0 to estimate biases and incompleteness.

  15. Infrared luminosity functions for the young stellar population associated with the L1641 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Karen M.; Strom, Stephen E.; Merrill, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported of a deep near-IR imaging survey which samples 0.77 sq deg of the L1641 star-forming complex and reaches 5 sigma limits at J (1.25 micron,), H (1.65 micron), and K (2.2 microns) of 16.8, 15.8, and 14.7 mag, respectively. A population of about 1500 stars spread throughout the cloud, seven small aggregates comprised of 10-50 stars whose typical projected surface densities exceed that of the distributed population by factors of 4-10, and a heretofore unknown, partially embedded dense cluster comprised of about 150 stars are identified. Analysis of the distribution of (J-H), (H-K), and (R-I) colors for these groups suggest that, in all cases, the stellar populations are dominated by solar-type PMS stars which appear to contain a mix of objects analogous to weak-line T Tauri stars. The present observed luminosity functions are based on reddening-corrected J-band magnitude.

  16. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no

  17. Revisiting the axion bounds from the Galactic white dwarf luminosity function

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, M.M. Miller; Melendez, B.E.; Althaus, L.G.

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to check for the possible existence of DFSZ-axions, a proposed but not yet detected type of weakly interacting particles. With the aim of deriving new constraints on the axion mass, we compute in this paper new theoretical WDLFs on the basis of WD evolving models that incorporate the feedback of axions on the thermal structure of the white dwarf. We find that the impact of the axion emission into the neutrino emission can not be neglected at high luminosities M{sub  Bol}∼< 8) and that the axion emission needs to be incorporated self-consistently into the evolution of the white dwarfs when dealing with axion masses larger than m{sub a} cos {sup 2}β∼> 5 meV (i.e. axion-electron coupling constant g{sub ae}∼> 1.4× 10{sup -13}). We went beyond previous works by including 5 different derivations of the WDLF in our analysis. Then we have performed χ{sup 2}-tests to have a quantitative measure of the agreement between the theoretical WDLFs — computed under the assumptions of different axion masses and normalization methods --- and the observed WDLFs of the Galactic disk. While all the WDLF studied in this work disfavour axion masses in the range suggested by asteroseismology m{sub a} cos {sup 2}β∼> 10 meV; g{sub ae}∼> 2.8× 10{sup -13}) lower axion masses can not be discarded from our current knowledge of the WDLF of the Galactic Disk. A larger set of completely independent derivations of the WDLF of the galactic disk as well as a detailed study of the uncertainties of the theoretical WDLFs is needed before quantitative constraints on the axion-electron coupling constant can be made.

  18. Connecting faint-end slopes of the Lyman α emitter and Lyman-break galaxy luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, M.; Dijkstra, M.; Trenti, M.; Wyithe, S.

    2015-05-01

    We predict Lyman α (Lyα) luminosity functions (LFs) of Lyα-selected galaxies (Lyα emitters, or LAEs) at z = 3-6 using the phenomenological model. This model combines observed UV-LFs of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs, or drop-out galaxies), with constraints on their distribution of Lyα line strengths as a function of UV-luminosity and redshift. Our analysis shows that while Lyα LFs of LAEs are generally not Schechter functions, these provide a good description over the luminosity range of log10(Lα/erg s-1) = 41-44. Motivated by this result, we predict Schechter function parameters at z = 3-6. Our analysis further shows that (i) the faint-end slope of the Lyα LF is steeper than that of the UV-LF of LBGs, (with a median αLyα < -2.0 at z ≳ 4), and (ii) a turnover in the Lyα LF of LAEs at Lyα luminosities 1040 ≲ Lα ≲ 1041 erg s-1 may signal a flattening of UV-LF of LBGs at -12 > MUV > -14. We discuss the implications of these results - which can be tested directly with upcoming surveys - for the Epoch of Reionization.

  19. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  20. The Luminosity and Stellar Mass Functions of Red W1-W2 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. A.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of nearby galaxies as a function of their [3.4]-[4.6] colour. Galaxies that are red in their [3.4]-[4.6] colour contain heated dust and the reddest systems ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.5) are classified as AGN by some selection criteria. The sample discussed here includes nearby galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that are also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogue. We calculate the number density of galaxies, in the form of the luminosity and mass functions, using the V/Vmax method and a Stepwise Maximum Likelihood method that has been modified to account for the additional colour selection. The reddest galaxies which have [3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8 and are sometimes classified as AGN by their colour, make up 0.2% of nearby galaxies. However, the reddest galaxies are a rising fraction of the low mass galaxy population. Identifying the lowest mass (M < 108M⊙) red ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8) galaxies as AGN is surprising given that none are optical AGN or composites, in contrast with their more massive (M > 1010M⊙) red galaxy counterparts that are dominated by optical AGN and composites (86.4%). We also show that these low mass red galaxies are associated with higher specific star formation rates than their bluer counterparts. While the properties of this relatively rare segment of nearby low-mass galaxies are intriguing, particularly if they are associated with AGN activity, there is not yet enough evidence to determine whether it is AGN or unusual star formation that is driving red colours in these systems.

  1. The Optical Luminosity Function of Void Galaxies in the SDSS and ALFALFA Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal M.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Hoyle, Fiona; Pan, Danny C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    We measure the r-band galaxy luminosity function (LF) across environments over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.107 using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We divide our sample into galaxies residing in large-scale voids (void galaxies) and those residing in denser regions (wall galaxies). The best-fitting Schechter parameters for void galaxies are {log}{{{Φ }}}*=-3.40+/- 0.03 log(Mpc-3), {M}* = -19.88 ± 0.05, and α = -1.20 ± 0.02. For wall galaxies, the best-fitting parameters are {log}{{{Φ }}}*=-2.86+/- 0.02 log(Mpc-3), {M}* = -20.80 ± 0.03, and α = -1.16 ± 0.01. We find a shift in the characteristic magnitude, {M}*, toward fainter magnitudes for void galaxies and find no significant difference between the faint-end slopes of the void and wall galaxy LFs. We investigate how low-surface-brightness selection effects can affect the galaxy LF. To attempt to examine a sample of galaxies that is relatively free of surface-brightness selection effects, we compute the optical galaxy LF of galaxies detected by the blind H i survey Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA). We find that the global LF of the ALFALFA sample is not well fit by a Schechter function because of the presence of a wide dip in the LF around Mr = -18 and an upturn at fainter magnitudes (α ˜ -1.47). We compare the H i selected r-band LF to various LFs of optically selected populations to determine where the H i selected optical LF obtains its shape. We find that sample selection plays a large role in determining the shape of the LF.

  2. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    We present a physical model for the evolution of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies, taking into account in a self-consistent way their chemical evolution and the associated evolution of dust extinction. Dust extinction is found to increase fast with halo mass. A strong correlation between dust attenuation and halo/stellar mass for UV selected high-z galaxies is thus predicted. The model yields good fits of the UV and Lyman-α (Lyα) line luminosity functions at all redshifts at which they have been measured. The weak observed evolution of both luminosity functions between z = 2 and z = 6 is explained as the combined effect of the negative evolution of the halo mass function; of the increase with redshift of the star formation efficiency due to the faster gas cooling; and of dust extinction, differential with halo mass. The slope of the faint end of the UV luminosity function is found to steepen with increasing redshift, implying that low luminosity galaxies increasingly dominate the contribution to the UV background at higher and higher redshifts. The observed range of the UV luminosities at high z implies a minimum halo mass capable of hosting active star formation M {sub crit} ≲ 10{sup 9.8} M {sub ☉}, which is consistent with the constraints from hydrodynamical simulations. From fits of Lyα line luminosity functions, plus data on the luminosity dependence of extinction, and from the measured ratios of non-ionizing UV to Lyman-continuum flux density for samples of z ≅ 3 Lyman break galaxies and Lyα emitters, we derive a simple relationship between the escape fraction of ionizing photons and the star formation rate. It implies that the escape fraction is larger for low-mass galaxies, which are almost dust-free and have lower gas column densities. Galaxies already represented in the UV luminosity function (M {sub UV} ≲ –18) can keep the universe fully ionized up to z ≅ 6. This is consistent with (uncertain) data

  3. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. The Luminosity Function of Globular Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; McLaughlin, Dean E.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Peng, Eric W.; Mei, Simona; Villegas, Daniela; Merritt, David; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the luminosity function of the globular clusters (GCs) belonging to the early-type galaxies observed in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We have obtained maximum likelihood estimates for a Gaussian representation of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) for 89 galaxies. We have also fit the luminosity functions with an ``evolved Schechter function'', which is meant to reflect the preferential depletion of low-mass GCs, primarily by evaporation due to two-body relaxation, from an initial Schechter mass function similar to that of young massive clusters in local starbursts and mergers. We find a highly significant trend of the GCLF dispersion σ with galaxy luminosity, in the sense that the GC systems in smaller galaxies have narrower luminosity functions. The GCLF dispersions of our Galaxy and M31 are quantitatively in keeping with this trend, and thus the correlation between σ and galaxy luminosity would seem more fundamental than older notions that the GCLF dispersion depends on Hubble type. We show that this narrowing of the GCLF in a Gaussian description is driven by a steepening of the cluster mass function above the classic turnover mass, as one moves to lower luminosity host galaxies. In a Schechter function description, this is reflected by a steady decrease in the value of the exponential cutoff mass scale. We argue that this behavior at the high-mass end of the GC mass function is most likely a consequence of systematic variations of the initial cluster mass function rather than long-term dynamical evolution. The GCLF turnover mass MTO is roughly constant, at MTO~=(2.2+/-0.4)×105 Msolar in bright galaxies, but it decreases slightly (by ~35% on average, with significant scatter) in dwarf galaxies with MB,gal>~-18. It could be important to allow for this effect when using the GCLF as a distance indicator. We show that part, although perhaps not all, of the variation could arise from the shorter dynamical friction timescales in less

  4. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  5. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Luminosity Function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, zlower.5ex buildrel> over ˜ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass halos can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically-motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parameterization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in halos with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age - UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  6. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT REDSHIFT z = 7.7

    SciTech Connect

    Tilvi, Vithal; Rhoads, James E.; Hibon, Pascale; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wang Junxian; Veilleux, Sylvain; Swaters, Rob; Krug, Hannah; Probst, Ron; Dickinson, Mark; Finkelstein, Steven L.

    2010-10-01

    Ly{alpha} emission lines should be attenuated in a neutral intergalactic medium. Therefore, the visibility of Ly{alpha} emitters at high redshifts can serve as a valuable probe of reionization at about the 50% level. We present an imaging search for z = 7.7 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies using an ultra-narrowband filter (filter width = 9 A) on the NEWFIRM imager at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We found four candidate Ly{alpha} emitters in a survey volume of 1.4x10{sup 4} Mpc{sup 3}, with a line flux brighter than 6 x 10{sup -18} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (5{sigma} in 2'' aperture). We also performed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation incorporating the instrumental effects to estimate the expected number of Ly{alpha} emitters in our survey and found that we should expect to detect one Ly{alpha} emitter, assuming a non-evolving Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) between z = 6.5 and z = 7.7. Even if one of the present candidates is spectroscopically confirmed as a z {approx} 8 Ly{alpha} emitter, it would indicate that there is no significant evolution of the Ly{alpha} LF from z = 3.1 to z {approx} 8. While firm conclusions would need both spectroscopic confirmations and larger surveys to boost the number counts of galaxies, we successfully demonstrate the feasibility of sensitive near-infrared (1.06 {mu}m) narrowband searches using custom filters designed to avoid the OH emission lines that make up most of the sky background.

  7. Properties of galaxies at the faint end of the Hα luminosity function at z ~ 0.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Context. Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function, and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at 0.5 < z < 0.8 in Hα-based studies. Aims: Our main goal is to study the properties of a sample of faint Hα emitters at z ~ 0.62. We focus on their contribution to the faint end of the luminosity function and derived star formation rate density, characterising their morphologies and basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. Methods: We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centred at 1.06 μm. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. In addition to our survey, we mainly make use of ancillary data coming from the CANDELS and Rainbow Cosmological Surveys Database, from the 3D-HST for comparison, and also spectra from the literature. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. In order to obtain the luminosity function, we apply a traditional V/Vmax method and perform individual extinction corrections for each object to accurately trace the shape of the function. Results: Our 28 Hα-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function α = - 1.46-0.08+0.16 . The derived star formation rate density at z ~ 0.62 is ρSFR = 0.036-0.008+0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 . The sample is mainly composed of disks, but an important contribution of compact galaxies with Sérsic indexes n ~ 2 display the highest specific star formation rates. Conclusions: The luminosity function at z ~ 0.62 from our ultra-deep data points towards a steeper α when an individual extinction correction for each object is applied. Compact galaxies are low-mass, low-luminosity, and starburst-dominated objects with a light profile in an intermediate stage from early to late types. Based on observations

  8. Hard X-ray luminosity function of tidal disruption events: First results from the MAXI extragalactic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Hori, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Mihara, Tatehiro

    2016-08-01

    We derive the first hard X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), which gives an occurrence rate of TDEs per unit volume as a function of peak luminosity and redshift, utilizing an unbiased sample observed by the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). On the basis of the light curves characterized by a power-law decay with an index of -5/3, a systematic search using the MAXI data detected four TDEs in the first 37 months of observations, all of which have been found in the literature. To formulate the TDE XLF, we consider the mass function of SMBHs, that of disrupted stars, the specific TDE rate as a function of SMBH mass, and the fraction of TDEs with relativistic jets. We perform an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the MAXI TDE list and check the consistency with the observed TDE rate in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The results suggest that the intrinsic fraction of the jet-accompanying events is 0.0007%-34%. We confirm that at z ≲ 1.5 the contamination of the hard X-ray luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei by TDEs is not significant and hence that their contribution to the growth of SMBHs is negligible at the redshifts.

  9. Hard X-ray luminosity function of tidal disruption events: First results from the MAXI extragalactic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Hori, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Mihara, Tatehiro

    2016-06-01

    We derive the first hard X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), which gives an occurrence rate of TDEs per unit volume as a function of peak luminosity and redshift, utilizing an unbiased sample observed by the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). On the basis of the light curves characterized by a power-law decay with an index of -5/3, a systematic search using the MAXI data detected four TDEs in the first 37 months of observations, all of which have been found in the literature. To formulate the TDE XLF, we consider the mass function of SMBHs, that of disrupted stars, the specific TDE rate as a function of SMBH mass, and the fraction of TDEs with relativistic jets. We perform an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the MAXI TDE list and check the consistency with the observed TDE rate in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The results suggest that the intrinsic fraction of the jet-accompanying events is 0.0007%-34%. We confirm that at z ≲ 1.5 the contamination of the hard X-ray luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei by TDEs is not significant and hence that their contribution to the growth of SMBHs is negligible at the redshifts.

  10. THE FAINT-END SLOPE OF THE REDSHIFT 5.7 Ly{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick; Sawicki, Marcin

    2012-01-10

    Using new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy, we examine the origin of the steep number counts of ultra-faint emission-line galaxies recently reported by Dressler et al. We confirm six Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs), three of which have significant asymmetric line profiles with prominent wings extending 300-400 km s{sup -1} redward of the peak emission. With these six LAEs, we revise our previous estimate of the number of faint LAEs in the Dressler et al. survey. Combining these data with the density of bright LAEs in the Cosmic Evolution Survey and Subaru Deep Field provides the best constraints to date on the redshift 5.7 LAE luminosity function (LF). Schechter function parameters, {phi}* = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, L* = 9.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, and {alpha} = -1.70, are estimated using a maximum likelihood technique with a model for slit-losses. To place this result in the context of the UV-selected galaxy population, we investigate how various parameterizations of the Ly{alpha} equivalent width distribution, along with the measured UV-continuum LF, affect shape and normalization of the Ly{alpha} LF. The nominal model, which uses z {approx} 6 equivalent widths from the literature, falls short of the observed space density of LAEs at the bright end, possibly indicating a need for higher equivalent widths. This parameterization of the equivalent width distribution implies that as many as 50% of our faintest LAEs should have M{sub UV} > -18.0, rendering them undetectable in even the deepest Hubble Space Telescope surveys at this redshift. Hence, ultra-deep emission-line surveys find some of the faintest galaxies ever observed at the end of the reionization epoch. Such faint galaxies likely enrich the intergalactic medium with metals and maintain its ionized state in the post-reionization era. Observations of these objects provide a glimpse of the building blocks of present-day galaxies at an early time.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE BULLET CLUSTER. I. THE INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE ,

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mi Chung; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Markevitch, Maxim; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-12-20

    The Bullet Cluster is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.297 undergoing a major supersonic (Mach 3) merger event. Using data from Spitzer MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera, optical imaging, and optical spectroscopy, we present the global star formation rate (SFR) of this unique cluster. Using a 90% spectroscopically complete sample of 37 star-forming MIPS confirmed cluster members out to R < 1.7 Mpc, and the Rieke et al. relation to convert from 24 {mu}m flux to SFR, we calculate an integrated obscured SFR of 267 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of 28 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} per 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. The cluster mass normalized integrated SFR of the Bullet Cluster is among the highest in a sample of eight other clusters and cluster mergers from the literature. Five LIRGs and one ULIRG contribute 30% and 40% of the total SFR of the cluster, respectively. To investigate the origin of the elevated specific SFR, we compare the infrared luminosity function (IR LF) of the Bullet Cluster to those of Coma (evolved to z = 0.297) and CL1358+62. The Bullet Cluster IR LF exhibits an excess of sources compared to the IR LFs of the other massive clusters. A Schechter function fit of the Bullet Cluster IR LF yields L* = 44.68 {+-} 0.11 erg s{sup -1}, which is {approx}0.25 and 0.35 dex brighter than L* of evolved Coma and CL1358+62, respectively. The elevated IR LF of the Bullet Cluster relative to other clusters can be explained if we attribute the 'excess' star-forming IR galaxies to a population associated with the infalling group that has not yet been transformed into quiescent galaxies. In this case, the timescale required for quenching star formation in the cluster environment must be longer than the timescale since the group's accretion-a few hundred million years. We suggest that 'strangulation' is likely to be an important process in the evolution of star formation in clusters.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2-10keV luminosity function of AGN (Ranalli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-02-01

    The XMM-LSS, XMM-CDFS, and XMM-COSMOS are three surveys with complementary properties in terms of luminosity and redshift coverage. We used these three surveys to derive Bayesian estimates of the unabsorbed luminosity function (LF) of AGN in the 2-10keV band. The LF estimates are presented as a set of samples from the posterior probability distribution of the LF parameters. The LF is parameterised as a double power-law, with either the luminosity and density evolution (LADE) model, or the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model. The double power-law is described by Eq.(10) in the paper. The LADE and LDDE models are described by Eqs.(11-14) and Eqs.(15-17), respectively. A Fortran 2008 implementation of these models can be found in file src2/lumf_funcs.f90 of the LFTools package, in the classes doublepowerlaw, ladevol, and lddevol (see the paper). (8 data files).

  13. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  14. The Evolution of the Galaxy Rest-frame Ultraviolet Luminosity Function over the First Two Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Papovich, Casey; Dickinson, Mark; Song, Mimi; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Salmon, Brett; Giavalisco, Mauro; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Behroozi, Peter; Castellano, Marco; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Jaacks, Jason; Kocevski, Dale D.; Livermore, Rachael; McLure, Ross J.; Merlin, Emiliano; Mobasher, Bahram; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rafelski, Marc; Tilvi, Vithal; Willner, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions at z = 4-8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and the Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations near the Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1-2403 clusters. The combination of these surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 × 106 Mpc3 over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for faint ({M}{UV}=-18) and bright (M{}{UV}\\lt -21) high-redshift galaxies. We select candidate galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 candidate galaxies at 3.5 \\lt z \\lt 8.5, with >1000 galaxies at z ≈ 6-8. We measure both a stepwise luminosity function for candidate galaxies in our redshift samples, and a Schechter function, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end, our UV luminosity functions agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright candidate galaxies at z ≥slant 6. Our best-fit value of the characteristic magnitude {M}{UV}* is consistent with -21 at z ≥slant 5, which is different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift, and brighter at ˜2σ significance than previous measures at z = 6 and 7. At z = 8, a single power law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z = 6 and 7 an exponential cutoff at the bright end is moderately preferred. We compare our luminosity functions to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in {M}{UV}* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift, although a decreasing impact of feedback may also be possible. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) density by

  15. The Evolution of the Galaxy Rest-Frame Ultraviolet Luminosity Function Over the First Two Billion Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Papovich, Casey; Dickinson, Mark; Song, Mimi; Somerville, Rachel; Ferguson, Henry C.; Salmon, Brett; Giavalisco, Mauro; Koekomoer, Anton M.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Behroozi, Peter; Castellano, Marco; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Jaacks, Jason; Kocevski, Dale D.; Livermore, Rachael; McLure, Ross J.; Merlin, Emiliano; Rafelski, Marc Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function at z = 4 to 8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the CANDELS/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations near the Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1- 2403 clusters. The combination of these surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 ×10(exp 6) Mpc(exp 3) over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for bright (M(sub UV) less than -21) and faint (M(sub UV) = -18) galaxies. We select galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 galaxies at 3.5 less than z less than 8.5, with more than 1000 galaxies at z of approximately 6 - 8. We measure both a stepwise luminosity function for galaxies in our redshift samples, as well as a Schechter function, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end our UV luminosity functions agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright galaxies at z of greater than or equal to 6. Our bestfit value of the characteristic magnitude M* is consistent with -21 at z of greater than or equal to 5, different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift. At z = 8, a single power-law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z = 6 and 7, an exponential cutoff at the bright-end is moderately preferred. We compare our luminosity functions to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in M* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright-end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift, though a decreasing impact of feedback may also be possible. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) density by integrating our observed luminosity functions to M(sub UV) = -17, correcting for dust attenuation, and find that

  16. The 2-10 keV unabsorbed luminosity function of AGN from the LSS, CDFS, and COSMOS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-05-01

    The XMM-Large scale structure (XMM-LSS), XMM-Cosmological evolution survey (XMM-COSMOS), and XMM-Chandra deep field south (XMM-CDFS) surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and point spread function. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 1042-1046 erg s-1 and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, which is improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power law with luminosity and density evolution (LADE) or luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE), are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the recently proposed 15-parameter extended LDDE model and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides unabsorbed, non-parametric estimates, credible intervals for luminosity function parameters, and a model choice based on predictive power for future data. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA.Tables with the samples of the posterior probability distributions

  17. The gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars and implications for the GeV excess

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-03-29

    It has been proposed that a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs) could potentially account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma-rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. The viability of this scenario depends critically on the gamma-ray luminosity function of this source population, which determines how many MSPs Fermi should have already detected as resolved point sources. In this paper, we revisit the gamma-ray luminosity function of MSPs, without relying on uncertain distance measurements. Our determination, based on a comparison of models with the observed characteristics of the MSP population, suggests that Fermi should have already detectedmore » a significant number of sources associated with such a hypothesized Inner Galaxy population. As a result, we cannot rule out a scenario in which the MSPs residing near the Galactic Center are systematically less luminous than those present in the Galactic Plane or within globular clusters.« less

  18. The gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars and implications for the GeV excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs) could potentially account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma-rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. The viability of this scenario depends critically on the gamma-ray luminosity function of this source population, which determines how many MSPs Fermi should have already detected as resolved point sources. In this paper, we revisit the gamma-ray luminosity function of MSPs, without relying on uncertain distance measurements. Our determination, based on a comparison of models with the observed characteristics of the MSP population, suggests that Fermi should have already detected a significant number of sources associated with such a hypothesized Inner Galaxy population. We cannot rule out a scenario in which the MSPs residing near the Galactic Center are systematically less luminous than those present in the Galactic Plane or within globular clusters.

  19. Erratum: The Evolution of the Luminosity Function in Deep Fields: A Comparison with Cold Dark Matter Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, F.; Menci, N.; Giallongo, E.; Fontana, A.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.

    2001-06-01

    In the Letter ``The Evolution of the Luminosity Function in Deep Fields: A Comparison with Cold Dark Matter Models'' by F. Poli, N. Menci, E. Giallongo, A. Fontana, S. Cristiani, and S. D'Odorico (ApJ, 551, L45 [2001]), the magnitudes at 1700 Å in Figure 2 were incorrect. The correct figure is shown below. The corresponding best-fit parameter M* of the Schechter fit to the observed luminosity function at z=2.5-3.5 shown in the last row of Table 1 should read M*=-20.72 and M*=-20.84 for the ΩM=1, ΩΛ=0 and ΩM=0.3, ΩΛ=0.7 cosmologies, respectively.

  20. H-alpha LEGUS: Unveiling the Interplay Between Stars, Star Clusters, and Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali

    2014-10-01

    We propose to obtain narrow-band, H-alpha observations for a significant subset of the star-forming, nearby galaxies recently targeted by the LEGUS treasury program (GO-13364). LEGUS is observing these galaxies in five broad-band filters: NUV, U, B, V, and I. The new H-alpha observations will reveal thousands of previously undetected HII regions, including those ionized by stellar clusters and single massive stars, allow us to measure their luminosities and sizes, and to separate discrete sources from diffuse ionized gas. We will use our narrow-band imaging survey to: (1) establish the connection between star and cluster formation, and determine the prevelance with which isolated massive stars form in different galaxies; (2) determine whether the initial cluster mass function is universal; (3) investigate the size evolution of ionized gas bubbles, and how this depends on cluster age and mass, as well as on local galactic conditions; and (4) place stringent limits on the leakage of ionizing photons from HII regions, and better understand how the interplay between properties of the ionizing source and the morphology of the HII region impacts leakage. The broad goal of this study is to better understand how feedback from massive stars affects the surrounding medium. Ultimately, the interplay between feedback and the ISM on these scales will enable a better understanding of galaxy-scale outflows in the early universe, a process critical to galaxy evolution. This program naturally lends itself to an improvement of the scientific output by involving the general public via an already established Citizen Science program.

  1. The K-Band Quasar Luminosity Function from an SDSS and UKIDSS Matched Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Michael; Ross, N. P.; Schneider, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We match the 1,015,082 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) DR3 to produce a catalog of 130,827 objects with optical (ugriz) and infrared (YJHK) measurements over an area of 1,200 sq. deg. A matching radius of 1'’ is used; the positional standard deviations of SDSS DR6 quasars and UKIDSS LAS is δRA = 0.137'’ and δDec = 0.131''. The catalog contains 74,351 K-band detections and 42,133 objects have coverage in all four NIR bands. In addition to the catalog, we present optical and NIR color-redshift and color-color plots. The photometric vs. spectroscopic redshift plots demonstrate how unreliable high reported photometric redshifts can be. This forces us to focus on z4.6 quasars are compared to our highest redshift objects. The giK color-color plot demonstrates that stellar contamination only affects a small sample of the objects. Distributions for Y,J,H,K and i-bands reveal insights into the flux limits in each magnitude. We investigate the distribution of redshifts from different data sets and investigate the legitimacy of certain measured photometric redshift regions. For in-depth analysis, we focus on the 300 sq. deg area equatorial SDSS region designated as Stripe 82. We measure the observed K-band quasar luminosity function (QLF) for a subset of 9,872, z<2.2 objects. We find the shape of the K-band QLF is very similar to that of the optical QLF, over the considered redshift ranges. Our calculated K-Band QLFs broadly match previous optical QLFs calculated from the SDSS and 2SLAQ QSO surveys and should provide important constraints linking unobscured optical quasars to Mid-Infrared detected, dusty and obscured AGNs at high-redshift.

  2. Confirmation of a Steep Luminosity Function for Ly alpha Emitters at z 5.7: a Major Component of Reionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Sawicki, Marcin; McCarthy, Patrick; Villaneuva, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct and robust measurement of the faint-end slope of the Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) luminosity function at z = 5.7. Candidate LAEs from a low-spectral-resolution blind search with IMACS on Magellan- Baade were targeted at higher resolution to distinguish high redshift LAEs from foreground galaxies. All but 2 of our 42 single-emission-line systems are fainter than F = 2.0×10(exp-17) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2), making these the faintest emission-lines observed for a z = 5.7 sample with known completeness, an essential property for determining the faint end slope of the LAE luminosity function. We find 13 LAEs as compared to 29 foreground galaxies, in very good agreement with the modeled foreground counts predicted in Dressler et al. (2011a) that had been used to estimate a faint-end slope of alpha = -2.0 for the LAE luminosity function. A 32% LAE fraction, LAE/(LAE+foreground) within the flux interval F = 2-20 × 10(exp-18) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2) constrains the faint end slope of the luminosity function to -1.95 greater than alpha greater than -2.35 (1 delta). We show how this steep LF should provide, to the limit of our observations, more than 20% of the flux necessary to maintain ionization at z = 5.7, with a factor-of-ten extrapolation in flux reaching more than 55%. We suggest that this bodes well for a comparable contribution by similar, low-mass star forming galaxies at higher-redshift - within the reionization epoch at z greater than approximately 7, only 250 Myr earlier - and that such systems provide a substantial, if not dominant, contribution to the late-stage reionization of the IGM.

  3. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, A. C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, X-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the X-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  4. Evidence for evolution of the luminosity function of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, Alastair C.; Stewart, G. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    From an all sky, x-ray flux limited sample of clusters of galaxies evidence for a significant deficit in the number of high luminosity clusters is found in the redshift range z approximately 0.1 to 0.2 compared with numbers of nearby clusters. This indicates that the x-ray luminous clusters are undergoing strong evolution. The strength of the effect is consistent with hierarchical merging models. The implications of such strong evolution for clusters are discussed.

  5. FAR-IR/SUBMILLIMETER SPECTROSCOPIC COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS: PREDICTIONS OF INFRARED LINE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS FOR z < 4 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Dasyra, Kalliopi M.; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Valiante, Elisabetta; Isaak, Kate

    2012-02-01

    Star formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies are the two most energetic processes in the universe, producing the bulk of the observed emission throughout its history. We simulated the luminosity functions of star-forming and active galaxies for spectral lines that are thought to be good spectroscopic tracers of either phenomenon, as a function of redshift. We focused on the infrared (IR) and submillimeter domains, where the effects of dust obscuration are minimal. Using three different and independent theoretical models for galaxy formation and evolution, constrained by multi-wavelength luminosity functions, we computed the number of star-forming and active galaxies per IR luminosity and redshift bin. We converted the continuum luminosity counts into spectral line counts using relationships that we calibrated on mid- and far-IR spectroscopic surveys of galaxies in the local universe. Our results demonstrate that future facilities optimized for survey-mode observations, i.e., the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope, will be able to observe thousands of z > 1 galaxies in key fine-structure lines, e.g., [Si II], [O I], [O III], [C II], in a half-square-degree survey, with 1 hr integration time per field of view. Fainter lines such as [O IV], [Ne V], and H{sub 2} (0-0)S1 will be observed in several tens of bright galaxies at 1 < z < 2, while diagnostic diagrams of active nucleus versus star formation activity will be feasible even for normal z {approx} 1 galaxies. We discuss the new parameter space that these future telescopes will cover and that strongly motivates their construction.

  6. The Properties of Poor Groups of Galaxies. III. The Galaxy Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabludoff, Ann I.; Mulchaey, John S.

    2000-08-01

    The form of the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) in poor groups-regions of intermediate galaxy density that are common environments for galaxies-is not well understood. Multiobject spectroscopy and wide-field CCD imaging now allow us to measure the GLF of bound group members directly (i.e., without statistical background subtraction) and to compare the group GLF with the GLFs of the field and of rich clusters. We use R-band images in 1.5×1.5 degree2 mosaics to obtain photometry for galaxies in the fields of six nearby (2800function with M*R=-21.6+/-0.4+5log h and α=-1.3+/-0.1. We also find that (1) the ratio of dwarfs (-17+5logh>=MR>-19+5logh) to giants (MR<=-19+5logh) is significantly larger for the five groups with luminous X-ray halos than for the one marginally X-ray-detected group; (2) the composite GLF for the luminous X-ray groups is consistent in shape with two measures of the composite R-band GLF for rich clusters (Trentham; Driver et al.) and flatter at the faint end than another (α~-1.5 Smith et al.); (3) the composite group GLF rises more steeply at the faint end than the R-band GLF of the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS; α=-0.7 from Lin et al.), a large volume survey dominated by galaxies in environments more rarefied than luminous X-ray groups; (4) the shape difference between the LCRS field and composite group GLFs results mostly from the population of non-emission line galaxies (EW [O II]<5 Å), whose dwarf-to-giant ratio is larger in the denser group environment than in the field (cf. Ferguson & Sandage; Bromley et al.); and (5) the non-emission line dwarfs are more concentrated about the group center than the non

  7. Our 3 Million Nearest Neighbors: The Field Luminosity and Mass Functions of M Dwarfs from Matched SDSS & 2MASS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, S. L.; Covey, K. R.; Reid, N.; West, A. A.; SDSS Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation into the field luminosity and mass functions of M dwarfs. We have assembled a database of matched SDSS and 2MASS observations of 3 million low-mass stars, two orders of magnitude larger than any previous study on this topic. The observations span the entire SDSS footprint, about 8,400 square degrees. Using this 8-color photometry and improved color-absolute magnitude relations, we derive luminosities and masses for each star in our sample. We quantify the uncertainties in our analysis using results from a calibration region of 30 square degrees, where we have spectroscopic observations of several thousand stars. Additionally, we measure the structure of the local Milky Way, determining the density profiles of the thin and thick disks. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF grant AST06-07644 and NASA ADP grant NAG5-13111.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF RED SPIRAL GALAXIES ON THE SHAPE OF THE LOCAL K-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bonne, Nicolas J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, Heath; Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2015-02-01

    We have determined K-band luminosity functions for 13,325 local universe galaxies as a function of morphology and color (for K {sub tot} ≤ 10.75). Our sample is drawn from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog, with all sample galaxies having measured morphologies and distances (including 4219 archival redshift-independent distances). The luminosity function for our total sample is in good agreement with previous works, but is relatively smooth at faint magnitudes (due to bulk flow distance corrections). We investigated the differences due to morphological and color selection using 5417 sample galaxies with NASA Sloan Atlas optical colors and find that red spirals comprise 20%-50% of all spirals with –25 ≤ M{sub K}  < –20. Fainter than M{sub K} = –24, red spirals are as common as early types, explaining the different faint end slopes (α = –0.87 and –1.00 for red and early-types, respectively). While we find red spirals comprise more than 50% of all M{sub K}  < –25 spiral galaxies, they do not dominate the bright end of the overall red galaxy luminosity function, which is dominated by early-type galaxies. The brightest red spirals have ongoing star formation and those without are frequently misclassified as early-types. The faintest ones have an appearance and Sérsic indices consistent with faded disks, rather than true bulge-dominated galaxies.

  9. Effects of Galaxy collisions on the structure and evolution of Galaxy clusters. I. Mass and luminosity functions and background light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.E.

    1983-05-15

    The role of galaxy collisions in controlling the form of the galaxy mass and luminosity functions and in creating a diffuse background light is investigated by means of a direct computer simulation. Galaxy collisions are treated in a realistic manner, including both galaxy mergers and tidal encounters. A large number of theoretical studies of a galaxy collisions were consulted to formulate the basic input physics of collision cross sections. Despite this large number of studies, there remains considerable uncertainty in the effects of a collision on a galaxy due mainly to our lack of knowledge of the orbital distribution of matter in galaxies. To improve this situation, some methods of semiempirical calibration are suggested: for example, a survey of background light in clusters of different richness and morphological classes. If real galaxies are represented by galaxy models where the bulk of the matter is on radial, rather than circular, orbits, then tidal collisions are more damaging and there are a number of interesting effects: Repeated tidal encounters lead to galaxy mass and luminosity functions which are largely independent of model parameters and the initial galaxy mass function. It appears unlikely that the form of the average present-day luminosity function characteristic of both field and cluster galaxies is due to collisions, but certain observed deviations from the average found by Heiligman and Turner and by Dressler may be a signature of collisions, in particular a flat faint-end slope. The amount of luminous matter stripped from the galaxies in the simulations agrees with the amount of diffuse background light seen in the Coma Cluster.

  10. Evolution of the dusty infrared luminosity function from z = 0 to z = 2.3 using observations from Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelli, B.; Elbaz, D.; Chary, R. R.; Dickinson, M.; Le Borgne, D.; Frayer, D. T.; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: We derive the evolution of the infrared luminosity function (LF) over the last 4/5ths of cosmic time using deep 24 and 70 μm imaging of the GOODS North and South fields. Methods: We use an extraction technique based on prior source positions at shorter wavelengths to build the 24 and 70 μm source catalogs. The majority (93%) of the sources have a spectroscopic (39%) or a photometric redshift (54%) and, in our redshift range of interest (i.e., 1.3 < z < 2.3) s20% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. To extend our study to lower 70 μm luminosities we perform a stacking analysis and we characterize the observed L24/(1 + z) vs. L70/(1 + z) correlation. Using spectral energy distribution (SED) templates which best fit this correlation, we derive the infrared luminosity of individual sources from their 24 and 70 μm luminosities. We then compute the infrared LF at zs1.55 ± 0.25 and zs2.05 ± 0.25. Results: We observe the break in the infrared LF up to zs2.3. The redshift evolution of the infrared LF from z = 1.3 to z = 2.3 is consistent with a luminosity evolution proportional to (1 + z)1.0 ± 0.9 combined with a density evolution proportional to (1 + z)-1.1 ± 1.5. At zs2, luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs: 1011L⊙ < LIR < 1012 L⊙) are still the main contributors to the total comoving infrared luminosity density of the Universe. At zs2, LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs: 1012L⊙ < LIR) account for s49% and s17% respectively of the total comoving infrared luminosity density of the Universe. Combined with previous results using the same strategy for galaxies at z < 1.3 and assuming a constant conversion between the infrared luminosity and star-formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy, we study the evolution of the SFR density of the Universe from z = 0 to z = 2.3. We find that the SFR density of the Universe strongly increased with redshift from z = 0 to z = 1.3, but is nearly constant at higher redshift out to z = 2.3. As part of the

  11. Mid- and far-infrared luminosity functions and galaxy evolution from multiwavelength Spitzer observations up to z ~ 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodighiero, G.; Vaccari, M.; Franceschini, A.; Tresse, L.; Le Fevre, O.; Le Brun, V.; Mancini, C.; Matute, I.; Cimatti, A.; Marchetti, L.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Shupe, D.; Surace, J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Bondi, M.; de la Torre, S.; Vergani, D.; Santini, P.; Grazian, A.; Fontana, A.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Studies of the infrared (IR) emission of cosmic sources have proven essential to constraining the evolutionary history of cosmic star formation and the gravitational accretion of nuclear black holes, because many of these events occur inside heavily dust-extinguished environments. Aims: The Spitzer Space Telescope has provided a large amount of data to constrain the nature and cosmological evolution of infrared source populations. In the present paper we exploit a large homogeneous dataset to derive a self-consistent picture of IR emission based on the time-dependent λ_eff = 24, 15, 12, and 8 μm monochromatic and bolometric IR luminosity functions (LF) over the full 0 < z < 2.5 redshift range. Methods: Our present analysis is based on a combination of data from deep Spitzer surveys of the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS-SWIRE) and GOODS fields. To our limiting flux of S24 = 400 μJy, our sample derived from VVDS-SWIRE includes 1494 sources, and 666 and 904 sources brighter than S24 = 80 μJy are catalogued in GOODS-S and GOODS-N, respectively, for a total area of ~0.9 square degrees. Apart from a few galaxies, we obtain reliable optical identifications and redshifts for all these sources, providing a rich and robust dataset for our luminosity function determination. The final combined reliable sample includes 3029 sources, the fraction with photometric redshifts being 72% over all redshifts and almost all galaxies at z > 1.5. Based on the multiwavelength information available in these areas, we constrain the LFs at 8, 12, 15, and 24 μm. We also infer the total IR luminosities from our best-fit model of the observed SEDs of each source, and use this to derive the bolometric (8-1000 μm) LF and comoving volume emissivity to z ~ 2.5. Results: In the redshift interval 0 < z < 1, the bolometric IR luminosity density evolves as (1 + z)3.8±0.4. Although it is more uncertain at higher-z, our results show a flattening in the IR luminosity density at z > 1. The mean

  12. Optical and Radio Properties of QSOS as a Function of Absolute Luminosity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Andrew Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Photometric data for nearly 250 quasars, BL Lacertids, and active galaxies have been obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory during a continuous 13-year monitoring program. Long-term optical records for 130 of these sources are employed in an effort to assess the physical and cosmological properties of quasi-stellar objects. Photographic P and B magnitudes were obtained with the 76- and 46-cm telescopes at Rosemary Hill. Corrections for galactic absorption, emission lines, and the K-term are applied to the raw data yielding monochromatic flux densities at a standard emitted wavelength of 2500 (ANGSTROM). Long -term light curves are compiled for all objects and 3 levels of activity are determined for each individual source. The MEAN, BASE, and MAX brightness levels are then used to study QSOs in their average, quiescent, and active phases, respectively. Absolute intrinsic luminosities of all sources in the sample are computed from the monochromatic flux densities based on relativistic cosmological models. Radio -emitting quasars, radio-quiet QSOs, and active galaxies fall into 3 distinct groups and are examined separately. The cosmological properties of QSOs are studied by plotting apparent magnitude vs. redshift, the so-called Hubble diagram. Scatter in the diagram due to variability is substantially reduced by plotting log z vs. the MEAN, BASE, and MAX flux densities. The brightest QSOs at each redshift are then chosen as "standard candles" in an effort to determine if quasars obey Hubble's law for expanding universe. It is found that they fit the Hubble relation quite well if certain selection effects are accounted for. Other evidence for the cosmological origin of QSOs is briefly discussed. Variability provides a test as to whether individual quasars are essentially multiple in nature (the "Christmas Tree" model), or are single coherent sources (such as a massive black hole). The amplitude of variability vs. absolute luminosity relation is used to discriminate

  13. Luminosity functions of YSO clusters in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Devendra; Tamura, Motohide

    We have conducted deep near-infrared surveys of the Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 massive star forming regions using simultaneous observations of the JHKs-band with the near-infrared camera SIRIUS on the UH 88-inch telescope and with SUBARU. The near-infrared surveys cover a total area of ~72 square arcmin of three regions with 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of ~19.5, 18.4 and 17.3 in J, H and Ks-band, respectively. Based on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams and their clustering properties, the candidate young stellar objects are identified and their luminosity functions are constructed in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538. A large number of previously unreported red sources (H-K > 2) have also been detected around these regions. We argue that these red stars are most probably pre-main sequence stars with intrinsic color excesses. The detected young stellar objects show a clear clustering pattern in each region: the Class I-like sources are mostly clustered in molecular cloud region, while the Class II-like sources in or around more evolved optical HII regions. We find that the slopes of the Ks-band luminosity functions of Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 are lower than the typical values reported for the young embedded clusters and their stellar populations are primarily composed of low mass pre-main sequence stars. From the slopes of the Ks-band luminosity functions, we infer that Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions are rather young (age <=1 Myr).

  14. Luminosity functions of YSO clusters in Sh-2 255, W3 main and NGC 7538 star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Devendra; Tamura, Motohide; Sirius Team

    2006-03-01

    We have conducted deep near-infrared surveys of the Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 massive star forming regions using simultaneous observations of the JHKs -band with the near-infrared camera SIRIUS on the UH 88-inch telescope. The near-infrared surveys cover a total area of ~72 square arcmin of three regions with 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of ~19.5, 18.4 and 17.3 in J, H and Ks-band, respectively. Based on the colour-colour and colour- magnitude diagrams and their clustering properties, the candidate young stellar objects are identified and their luminosity functions are constructed in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538. A large number of previously unreported red sources (H - K > 2) have also been detected around these regions. We argue that these red stars are most probably pre-main sequence stars with intrinsic colour excesses. The detected young stellar objects show a clear clustering pattern in each region: the Class I-like sources are mostly clustered in molecular cloud region, while the Class II-like sources in or around more evolved optical H II regions. We find that the slopes of the Ks -band luminosity functions of Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 are lower than the typical values reported for the young embedded clusters and their stellar populations are primarily composed of low mass pre-main sequence stars. From the slopes of the Ks -band luminosity functions, we infer that Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions are rather young (age 1 Myr).

  15. H-alpha Observations of MKW10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Harold; Coble, Kimberly A.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project looking at clusters and groups of galaxies to investigate the effects of environment on star formation, we analyzed H-alpha and R-band observations of the group MKW10 from the WIYN 0.9-m telescope with MOSAIC camera at Kitt Peak. We continuum-subtract the H-alpha images by scaling and subtracting the broadband R images. This process includes: determining the seeing of each image by calculating the FWHM values of several stars in the image; convolving all images to the worst seeing; stacking images for each filter; subtracting sky background; scaling the R image to H-alpha; and subtracting the scaled R from H-alpha. We then use the H-alpha-continuum-subtracted image to perform surface photometry of individual galaxies in MKW10. The data will be used to determine star formation rates and distributions of galaxies in this group environment and will be compared to results for galaxies in other UAT group and cluster environments. Analysis is ongoing.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and the Illinois Space Grant Consortium.

  16. THE VERY FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OVER COSMIC TIME: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE LOCAL GROUP FOSSIL RECORD

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-10-10

    We present a new technique to estimate the evolution of the very faint end of the UV luminosity function (LF) out to z ∼ 5. Measured star formation histories (SFHs) from the fossil record of Local Group (LG) galaxies are used to reconstruct the LF down to M {sub UV} ∼–5 at z ∼ 5 and M {sub UV} ∼–1.5 at z < 1. Such faint limits are well beyond the current observational limits and are likely to remain beyond the limits of next-generation facilities. The reconstructed LFs, when combined with direct measurements of the LFs at higher luminosity, are well-fit by a standard Schechter function with no evidence of a break to the faintest limits probed by this technique. The derived faint-end slope, α, steepens from ≈ – 1.2 at z < 1 to ≈ – 1.6 at 4 < z < 5. We test the effects of burstiness in the SFHs and find the recovered LFs to be only modestly affected. Incompleteness corrections for the faintest LG galaxies and the (unlikely) possibility of significant luminosity-dependent destruction of dwarf galaxies between high redshift and the present epoch are important uncertainties. These and other uncertainties can be mitigated with more detailed modeling and future observations. The reconstructed faint end LF from the fossil record can therefore be a powerful and complementary probe of the high-redshift faint galaxies believed to play a key role in the reionization of the universe.

  17. A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 8 REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY AND STELLAR MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tacchella, Sandro; Carollo, C. Marcella; Trenti, Michele

    2013-05-10

    We present a model to understand the redshift evolution of the UV luminosity and stellar mass functions of Lyman break galaxies. Our approach is based on the assumption that the luminosity and stellar mass of a galaxy is related to its dark-matter (DM) halo assembly and gas infall rate. Specifically, galaxies experience a burst of star formation at the halo assembly time, followed by a constant star formation rate, representing a secular star formation activity sustained by steady gas accretion. Star formation from steady gas accretion is the dominant contribution to the galaxy UV luminosity at all redshifts. The model is calibrated by constructing a galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation at z = 4 via abundance matching. After this luminosity calibration, the model naturally fits the z = 4 stellar mass function, and correctly predicts the evolution of both luminosity and stellar mass functions from z = 0 to z = 8. While the details of star formation efficiency and feedback are hidden within our calibrated luminosity versus halo mass relation, our study highlights that the primary driver of galaxy evolution across cosmic time is the buildup of DM halos, without the need to invoke a redshift-dependent efficiency in converting gas into stars.

  18. THE LUMINOSITY AND MASS FUNCTIONS OF LOW-MASS STARS IN THE GALACTIC DISK. II. THE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Covey, Kevin R.; West, Andrew A.; Reid, I. Neill; Golimowski, David A.

    2010-06-15

    We report on new measurements of the luminosity function (LF) and mass function (MF) of field low-mass dwarfs derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 photometry. The analysis incorporates {approx}15 million low-mass stars (0.1 M{sub sun}< M < 0.8 M{sub sun}), spread over 8400 deg{sup 2}. Stellar distances are estimated using new photometric parallax relations, constructed from ugriz photometry of nearby low-mass stars with trigonometric parallaxes. We use a technique that simultaneously measures Galactic structure and the stellar LF from 7 < M{sub r} < 16. We compare the LF to previous studies and convert to an MF using the mass-luminosity relations of Delfosse et al. The system MF, measured over -1.0< log M/M{sub sun} <-0.1, is well described by a lognormal distribution with M{sub o} = 0.25 M{sub sun}. We stress that our results should not be extrapolated to other mass regimes. Our work generally agrees with prior low-mass stellar MFs and places strong constraints on future theoretical star formation studies.

  19. Constraining the Warm Dark Matter Particle Mass through Ultra-deep UV Luminosity Functions at z=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Sanchez, N. G.; Castellano, M.; Grazian, A.

    2016-02-01

    We compute the mass function of galactic dark matter halos for different values of the warm dark matter (WDM) particle mass mX and compare it with the number density of ultra-faint galaxies derived from the deepest UV luminosity function available so far at redshift z ≈ 2. The magnitude limit MUV = -13 reached by such observations allows us to probe the WDM mass functions down to scales close to or smaller than the half-mass mode mass scale ˜109 M⊙. This allowed for an efficient discrimination among predictions for different mX which turn out to be in practice independent of the star formation efficiency η adopted to associate the observed UV luminosities of galaxies to the corresponding dark matter halo masses. Adopting a conservative approach to take into account the existing theoretical uncertainties in the galaxy halo mass function, we obtain a robust limit mX ≥ 1.8 keV for the mass of thermal relic WDM particles when comparing with the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies, while mX ≥ 1.5 keV is obtained when we compare with the Schechter fit to the observed luminosity function. The corresponding lower limit for sterile neutrinos depends on the modeling of the production mechanism; for instance msterile ≳ 4 keV holds for the Shi-Fuller mechanism. We discuss the impact of observational uncertainties on the above bound on mX. In the cold dark matter (CDM) limit {m}X\\gg 1 {{keV}} we recover the generic CDM result that very inefficient star formation efficiency is required to match the observed galaxy abundances. As a baseline for comparison with forthcoming observational results from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field project, we provide predictions for the number density of faint galaxies with MUV = -13 for different values of the WDM particle mass and of the star formation efficiency η, which are valid up to z ≈ 4.

  20. The Herschel PEP/HerMES luminosity function - I. Probing the evolution of PACS selected Galaxies to z ≃ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G.; Andreani, P.; Cimatti, A.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Marchetti, L.; Monaco, P.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Popesso, P.; Riguccini, L.; Roseboom, I.; Rosario, D. J.; Sargent, M.; Vaccari, M.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Daddi, E.; Domínguez-Sánchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Förster Schreiber, N.; Genzel, R.; Iribarrem, A.; Magliocchetti, M.; Maiolino, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Pérez García, A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Valtchanov, I.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Bethermin, M.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Franceschini, A.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Isaak, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Mainetti, G.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Page, M. J.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Stevens, J. A.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Tugwell, K. E.; Vigroux, L.; Wang, L.; Wright, G.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.; Bardelli, S.; Carollo, M.; Contini, T.; Le Févre, O.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Zucca, E.

    2013-06-01

    We exploit the deep and extended far-IR data sets (at 70, 100 and 160 μm) of the Herschel Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) Survey, in combination with the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data at 250, 350 and 500 μm, to derive the evolution of the rest-frame 35-, 60-, 90- and total infrared (IR) luminosity functions (LFs) up to z ˜ 4. We detect very strong luminosity evolution for the total IR LF (LIR ∝ (1 + z)3.55 ± 0.10 up to z ˜ 2, and ∝ (1 + z)1.62 ± 0.51 at 2 < z ≲ 4) combined with a density evolution (∝(1 + z)-0.57 ± 0.22 up to z ˜ 1 and ∝ (1 + z)-3.92 ± 0.34 at 1 < z ≲ 4). In agreement with previous findings, the IR luminosity density (ρIR) increases steeply to z ˜ 1, then flattens between z ˜ 1 and z ˜ 3 to decrease at z ≳ 3. Galaxies with different spectral energy distributions, masses and specific star formation rates (SFRs) evolve in very different ways and this large and deep statistical sample is the first one allowing us to separately study the different evolutionary behaviours of the individual IR populations contributing to ρIR. Galaxies occupying the well-established SFR-stellar mass main sequence (MS) are found to dominate both the total IR LF and ρIR at all redshifts, with the contribution from off-MS sources (≥0.6 dex above MS) being nearly constant (˜20 per cent of the total ρIR) and showing no significant signs of increase with increasing z over the whole 0.8 < z < 2.2 range. Sources with mass in the range 10 ≤ log(M/M⊙) ≤ 11 are found to dominate the total IR LF, with more massive galaxies prevailing at the bright end of the high-z (≳2) LF. A two-fold evolutionary scheme for IR galaxies is envisaged: on the one hand, a starburst-dominated phase in which the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH) grows and is obscured by dust (possibly triggered by a major merging event), is followed by an AGN-dominated phase, then evolving towards a local elliptical. On the other hand

  1. Luminosity Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    In a symmetric or 'energy transparent' relativistic collider, the luminosity is given by L = N{sup 2}f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y} where N is the number of electrons or positrons per bunch, {sigma}*{sub x} ({sigma}*{sub y}) is the horizontal (vertical) rms beam size at the interaction point (IP), and f{sub c} is the collision frequency. If the beam sizes remain constant as the luminosity decreases, then the time dependence of luminosity is contained entirely in the time dependence of the beam currents, i.e., N O N(t), and we can rewrite the equation as L(t) = N{sup 2}(t)f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y}. There are two distinct categories for luminosity loss. In the first category are loss processes due to collisions between the two beams, that is, processes associated directly with the luminosity. In the second category (see below) are single-beam loss processes. The processes in the first category relevant to a high-energy collider are Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}) and 'radiative' Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}). In the first process, a beam particle is lost if its angular deflection is beyond the ring's transverse acceptance; in the second process, loss occurs if the beam particle's momentum change is outside the longitudinal acceptance of the ring (typically determined by the RF bucket height).

  2. M dwarfs in the Local Milky Way: The Field Low-Mass Stellar Luminosity and Mass Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J., Jr.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-06-01

    Modern sky surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, have revolutionized how Astronomy is done. With millions of photometric and spectroscopic observations, global observational properties can be studied with unprecedented statistical significance. Low-mass stars dominate the local Milky Way, with tens of millions observed by SDSS within a few kpc. Thus, they make ideal tracers of the Galactic potential, and the thin and thick disks. In this thesis dissertation, I present my efforts to characterize the local low-mass stellar population, using a collection of observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). First, low-mass stellar template spectra were constructed from the co-addition of thousands of SDSS spectroscopic observations. These template spectra were used to quantify the observable changes introduced by chromospheric activity and metallicity. Furthermore, the average ugriz colors were measured as a function of spectral type. Next, the local kinematic structure of the Milky Way was quantified, using a special set of SDSS spectroscopic observations. Combining proper motions and radial velocities (measured using the spectral templates), along with distances, the full UVW space motions of over 7000 low-mass stars along one line of sight were computed. These stars were also separated kinematically to investigate other observational differences between the thin and thick disks. Finally, this dissertation details a project designed to measure the luminosity and mass functions of low-mass stars. Using a new technique optimized for large surveys, the field luminosity function (LF) and local stellar density profile are measured simultaneously. The sample size used to estimate the LF is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than any previous study, offering a definitive measurement of this quantity. The observed LF is transformed into a mass function (MF) and compared to previous studies.

  3. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Nava, L.; Flores, H.; Piranomonte, S.

    2012-04-10

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity ({delta}{sub l} = 2.3 {+-} 0.6) or in density ({delta}{sub d} = 1.7 {+-} 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  4. Millisecond pulsars and the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess: the importance of luminosity function and secondary emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Jovana; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2015-02-01

    Several groups of authors have analyzed Fermi LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center finding an unaccounted gamma-ray excess over diffuse backgrounds in the GeV energy range. It has been argued that it is difficult or even impossible to explain this diffuse emission by the leading astrophysical candidates—millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Here we provide a new estimate of the contribution to the excess by a population of yet unresolved MSP located in the bulge of the Milky Way. We simulate this population with the GALPLOT package by adopting a parametric approach, with the range of free parameters gauged on the MSP characteristics reported by the second pulsar catalogue (2PC). We find that the conclusions strongly depend on the details of the MSP luminosity function (in particular, its high luminosity end) and other explicit or tacit assumptions on the MSP statistical properties, which we discuss. Notably, for the first time we study the importance of the possible secondary emission of the MSPs in the Galactic Center, i.e. the emission via inverse Compton losses of electrons injected in the interstellar medium. Differently from a majority of other authors, we find that within current uncertainties a large if not dominant contribution of MSPs to the excess cannot be excluded. We also show that the sensitivities of future instruments or possibly already of the latest LAT data analysis (Pass 8) provide good perspectives to test this scenario by resolving a significant number of MSPs.

  5. PROBING THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z{approx} 4 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.; Comastri, A.; Enoki, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Murayama, T.; Saito, T.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-02-20

    We searched for quasars that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF). Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope and identified eight low-luminosity quasars at z {approx} 4. In order to derive the QLF based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z {approx} 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope ({beta} = -1.67{sup +0.11}{sub -0.17}) than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  6. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  7. DA white dwarfs from the LSS-GAC survey DR1: the preliminary luminosity and mass functions and formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Liu, X.-W.; Cojocaru, R.; Yuan, H.-B.; Torres, S.; García-Berro, E.; Xiang, M.-X.; Huang, Y.; Koester, D.; Hou, Y.; Li, G.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Modern large-scale surveys have allowed the identification of large numbers of white dwarfs. However, these surveys are subject to complicated target selection algorithms, which make it almost impossible to quantify to what extent the observational biases affect the observed populations. The LAMOST (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anticentre (LSS-GAC) follows a well-defined set of criteria for selecting targets for observations. This advantage over previous surveys has been fully exploited here to identify a small yet well-characterized magnitude-limited sample of hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs. We derive preliminary LSS-GAC DA white dwarf luminosity and mass functions. The space density and average formation rate of DA white dwarfs we derive are 0.83 ± 0.16 × 10-3 pc-3 and 5.42 ± 0.08 × 10-13 pc-3 yr-1, respectively. Additionally, using an existing Monte Carlo population synthesis code we simulate the population of single DA white dwarfs in the Galactic anticentre, under various assumptions. The synthetic populations are passed through the LSS-GAC selection criteria, taking into account all possible observational biases. This allows us to perform a meaningful comparison of the observed and simulated distributions. We find that the LSS-GAC set of criteria is highly efficient in selecting white dwarfs for spectroscopic observations (80-85 per cent) and that, overall, our simulations reproduce well the observed luminosity function. However, they fail at reproducing an excess of massive white dwarfs present in the observed mass function. A plausible explanation for this is that a sizable fraction of massive white dwarfs in the Galaxy are the product of white dwarf-white dwarf mergers.

  8. A MUSE View of the HUDF: The Lyα Luminosity Function out to z ˜ 6.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryony Drake, Alyssa

    2015-08-01

    I will present first results on the Lyα luminosity function in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), using a large, homogeneous, sample of LAEs selected through blind spectroscopy from MUSE. The unprecedented detection power of MUSE gives us the sensitivity to study the progenitors of L∗ galaxies when the Universe was just ˜ 2 Gyr old. These data therefore probe further down the Lyα LF than ever before, allowing us to reliably constrain the faint end slope, α, at high redshift, as well as assessing the evolution of the Lyα LF between z ˜ 3.0 and z ˜ 6.5. Finally I will show the first assessment from MUSE of the contribution of LAEs to the cosmic SFRD across this redshift range, and discuss the implications of our results on models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  9. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  10. THE UDF05 FOLLOW-UP OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD. III. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su Jian; Stiavelli, Massimo; Bergeron, Eddie; Bradley, Larry; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Lucas, Ray A.; Panagia, Nino; Pavlovsky, Cheryl; Oesch, Pascal; Carollo, Marcella; Lilly, Simon; Trenti, Michele; Giavalisco, Mauro; Mobasher, Bahram

    2011-09-10

    In this paper, we present a derivation of the rest-frame 1400 A luminosity function (LF) at redshift six from a new application of the maximum likelihood method by exploring the five deepest Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) fields, i.e., the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, two UDF05 fields, and two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. We work on the latest improved data products, which makes our results more robust than those of previous studies. We use unbinned data and thereby make optimal use of the information contained in the data set. We focus on the analysis to a magnitude limit where the completeness is larger than 50% to avoid possibly large errors in the faint end slope that are difficult to quantify. We also take into account scattering in and out of the dropout sample due to photometric errors by defining for each object a probability that it belongs to the dropout sample. We find the best-fit Schechter parameters to the z {approx} 6 LF are {alpha} = 1.87 {+-} 0.14, M{sub *} = -20.25 {+-} 0.23, and {phi}{sub *} = 1.77{sup +0.62}{sub -0.49} x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Such a steep slope suggests that galaxies, especially the faint ones, are possibly the main sources of ionizing photons in the universe at redshift six. We also combine results from all studies at z {approx} 6 to reach an agreement in the 95% confidence level that -20.45 < M{sub *} < -20.05 and -1.90 < {alpha} < -1.55. The luminosity density has been found not to evolve significantly between z {approx} 6 and z {approx} 5, but considerable evolution is detected from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 3.

  11. THE TAIWAN ECDFS NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY: VERY BRIGHT END OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z > 7

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Lin, Lihwai; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P.; Yan, Haojing; Karoji, Hiroshi; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2012-04-10

    The primary goal of the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) is to find well-screened galaxy candidates at z > 7 (z' dropout) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS). To this end, TENIS provides relatively deep J and K{sub s} data ({approx}25.3 ABmag, 5{sigma}) for an area of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 deg. Leveraged with existing data at mid-infrared to optical wavelengths, this allows us to screen for the most luminous high-z objects, which are rare and thus require a survey over a large field to be found. We introduce new color selection criteria to select a z > 7 sample with minimal contaminations from low-z galaxies and Galactic cool stars; to reduce confusion in the relatively low angular resolution Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images, we introduce a novel deconvolution method to measure the IRAC fluxes of individual sources. Illustrating perhaps the effectiveness at which we screen out interlopers, we find only one z > 7 candidate, TENIS-ZD1. The candidate has a weighted z{sub phot} of 7.8, and its colors and luminosity indicate a young (45M years old) starburst galaxy with a stellar mass of 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. The result matches with the observational luminosity function analysis and the semianalytic simulation result based on the Millennium Simulations, which may over predict the volume density for high-z massive galaxies. The existence of TENIS-ZD1, if confirmed spectroscopically to be at z > 7, therefore poses a challenge to current theoretical models for how so much mass can accumulate in a galaxy at such a high redshift.

  12. The Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey: Very Bright End of the Luminosity Function at z > 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Wang, Wei-Hao; Yan, Haojing; Lin, Lihwai; Karoji, Hiroshi; Lim, Jeremy; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The primary goal of the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) is to find well-screened galaxy candidates at z > 7 (z' dropout) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS). To this end, TENIS provides relatively deep J and Ks data (~25.3 ABmag, 5σ) for an area of 0.5 × 0.5 deg. Leveraged with existing data at mid-infrared to optical wavelengths, this allows us to screen for the most luminous high-z objects, which are rare and thus require a survey over a large field to be found. We introduce new color selection criteria to select a z > 7 sample with minimal contaminations from low-z galaxies and Galactic cool stars; to reduce confusion in the relatively low angular resolution Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images, we introduce a novel deconvolution method to measure the IRAC fluxes of individual sources. Illustrating perhaps the effectiveness at which we screen out interlopers, we find only one z > 7 candidate, TENIS-ZD1. The candidate has a weighted z phot of 7.8, and its colors and luminosity indicate a young (45M years old) starburst galaxy with a stellar mass of 3.2 × 1010 M ⊙. The result matches with the observational luminosity function analysis and the semianalytic simulation result based on the Millennium Simulations, which may over predict the volume density for high-z massive galaxies. The existence of TENIS-ZD1, if confirmed spectroscopically to be at z > 7, therefore poses a challenge to current theoretical models for how so much mass can accumulate in a galaxy at such a high redshift.

  13. Linking X-ray AGN with dark matter halos: a model compatible with AGN luminosity function and large-scale clustering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert; Gilfanov, Marat; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to find a minimalistic model that describes the luminosity function and large-scale clustering bias of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei in the general framework of the concordance ΛCDM model. Methods: We assume that a simple population-averaged scaling relation between the AGN X-ray luminosity LX and the host dark matter halo mass Mh exists. With such a relation, the AGN X-ray luminosity function can be computed from the halo mass function. Using the concordance ΛCDM halo mass function for the latter, we obtain the Mh - LX relation required to match the redshift-dependent AGN X-ray luminosity function known from X-ray observations. Results: We find that with a simple power-law-scaling Mh ∝ LΓ(z), our model can successfully reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity function. Furthermore, we automatically obtain predictions for the large-scale AGN clustering amplitudes and their dependence on the luminosity and redshift, which seem to be compatible with AGN clustering measurements. Our model also includes the redshift-dependent AGN duty cycle, which peaks at the redshift z ≃ 1, and its peak value is consistent with unity, suggesting that on average there is no more than one AGN per dark matter halo. For a typical X-ray-selected AGN at z ~ 1, our best-fit Mh - LX scaling implies low Eddington ratio LX/LEdd ~ 10-4 - 10-3 (2-10 keV band, no bolometric correction applied) and correspondingly high mass-growth e-folding times, suggesting that typical X-ray AGN are dominantly fueled via relatively inefficient "hot-halo" accretion mode.

  14. The luminosity function at the end of the main sequence: Results of a deep, large-area, CCD survey for cool dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Mcgraw, John T.; Hess, Thomas R.; Liebert, James; Mccarthy, Donald W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The luminosity function at the end of the main sequence is determined from V, R, and I data taken by the charge coupled devices (CCD)/Transit Instrument, a dedicated telescope surveying an 8.25 min wide strip of sky centered at delta = +28 deg, thus sampling Galactic latitudes of +90 deg down to -35 deg. A selection of 133 objects chosen via R - I and V - I colors has been observed spectroscopically at the 4.5 m Multiple Mirror Telescope to assess contributions by giants and subdwarfs and to verify that the reddest targets are objects of extremely late spectral class. Eighteen dwarfs of type M6 or later have been discovered, with the latest being of type M8.5. Data used for the determination of the luminosity function cover 27.3 sq. deg down to a completeness limit of R = 19.0. This luminosity function, computed at V, I, and bolometric magnitudes, shows an increase at the lowest luminosities, corresponding to spectral types later than M6- an effect suggested in earlier work by Reid & Gilmore and Legget & Hawkins. When the luminosity function is segregated into north Galactic and south Galactic portions, it is found that the upturn at faint magnitudes exists only in the southern sample. In fact, no dwarfs with M(sub I) is greater than or equal to 12.0 are found within the limiting volume of the 19.4 sq deg northern sample, in stark contrast to the smaller 7.9 sq deg area at southerly latitudes where seven such dwarfs are found. This fact, combined with the fact that the Sun is located approximately 10-40 pc north of the midplane, suggests that the latest dwarfs are part of a young population with a scale height much smaller than the 350 pc value generally adopted for other M dwarfs. These objects comprise a young population either because the lower metallicities prevelant at earlier epochs inhibited the formation of late M dwarfs or because the older counterparts of this population have cooled beyond current detection limits. The latter scenario would hold if these

  15. THE MID-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z < 0.3 FROM 5MUSES: UNDERSTANDING THE STAR FORMATION/ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS BALANCE FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC VIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanling; Shi Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A.; Papovich, Casey; Rahman, Nurur; Dasyra, Kalliopi E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present rest-frame 15 and 24 {mu}m luminosity functions (LFs) and the corresponding star-forming LFs at z < 0.3 derived from the 5MUSES sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for {approx}98% of the objects and the median redshift is {approx}0.12. The 5-35 {mu}m Infrared Spectrograph spectra allow us to estimate accurately the luminosities and build the LFs. Using a combination of starburst and quasar templates, we quantify the star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributions in the mid-IR spectral energy distribution. We then compute the SF LFs at 15 and 24 {mu}m, and compare with the total 15 and 24 {mu}m LFs. When we remove the contribution of AGNs, the bright end of the LF exhibits a strong decline, consistent with the exponential cutoff of a Schechter function. Integrating the differential LF, we find that the fractional contribution by SF to the energy density is 58% at 15 {mu}m and 78% at 24 {mu}m, while it goes up to {approx}86% when we extrapolate our mid-IR results to the total IR luminosity density. We confirm that the AGNs play more important roles energetically at high luminosities. Finally, we compare our results with work at z {approx} 0.7 and confirm that evolution on both luminosity and density is required to explain the difference in the LFs at different redshifts.

  16. The Trivariate / Radio Optical X-Ray / Luminosity Function CD Galaxies - Part Two - the Fuelling of Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Bijleveld, W.

    1983-09-01

    In order to the test the hypothesis that radio sources in elliptical galaxies are fuelled by a fraction of accreted X-ray gas, a sample of 81 cD galaxies in clusters and 23 cD galaxies in poor groups is studied. Various subsamples have been defined (reviewed in Table t) according to the origin of the cD galaxy classification (optically, radio or X-ray selected). A catalogue is presented, listing the measured optical, radio and X-ray luminosities from various origins, but all transformed to a uniform and homogeneous system: optical Mv (38 kpc metric diameter), radio P1.4 (1.4 GHz monochromatic total radio power) and Lx (1 Mpc metric diameter 0.5-3.0 keV X-ray band). The three luminosity parameters are investigated for cross- correlations by studying power-power plots and by analysing how the integral radio luminosity function, expressed in fractions of radio detections (F(> P1.4)), depend on Mv and Lx. All three parameters are found to correlate with each other. F(> P1.4) increases with both increasing Lx and brighter Mv and Lx also increases with brighter Mv. The determinations of the different regression relations are internally consistent. The empirical conclusions from the analysis are: (i) The mean Mv of poor group cDs is 0.m4 fainter than the mean Mv of cluster cDs. (ii) The bivariate radio luminosity functions of both samples confirm, both in shape and in their dependence on Mv, those of normal and giant ellipticals. (iii) cD galaxies have an increasing probability to contain a central (≲ 28 kpc) radio source when the X-ray luminosity of their halo (˜1 Mpc diameter) increases. 50 ± 9% of Lx ≧ 1044 erg s-1 cDs have a central radio source with P1.4 ≧ 1024WHz-1, while 12+l2-5% of Lx < 1043 ergs-1 cDs have a radio source of that power. This important conclusion is summarised in Fig. 5. (iv) Comparing rich cluster cDs and poor group cDs a relation between Mv and Lx is found. This relation holds among the rich cluster cDs as well. The physical origins of

  17. Ultra-faint ultraviolet galaxies at z ∼ 2 behind the lensing cluster A1689: The luminosity function, dust extinction, and star formation rate density

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto; Richard, Johan; Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant; Scarlata, Claudia; Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Kewley, Lisa

    2014-01-10

    We have obtained deep ultraviolet imaging of the lensing cluster A1689 with the WFC3/UVIS camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the F275W (30 orbits) and F336W (4 orbits) filters. These images are used to identify z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies via their Lyman break, in the same manner that galaxies are typically selected at z ≥ 3. Because of the unprecedented depth of the images and the large magnification provided by the lensing cluster, we detect galaxies 100× fainter than previous surveys at this redshift. After removing all multiple images, we have 58 galaxies in our sample in the range –19.5 < M {sub 1500} < –13 AB mag. Because the mass distribution of A1689 is well constrained, we are able to calculate the intrinsic sensitivity of the observations as a function of source plane position, allowing for accurate determinations of effective volume as a function of luminosity. We fit the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be α = –1.74 ± 0.08, which is consistent with the values obtained for 2.5 < z < 6. Notably, there is no turnover in the luminosity function down to M {sub 1500} = –13 AB mag. We fit the UV spectral slopes with photometry from existing Hubble optical imaging. The observed trend of increasingly redder slopes with luminosity at higher redshifts is observed in our sample, but with redder slopes at all luminosities and average reddening of (E(B – V)) = 0.15 mag. We assume the stars in these galaxies are metal poor (0.2 Z {sub ☉}) compared to their brighter counterparts (Z {sub ☉}), resulting in bluer assumed intrinsic UV slopes and larger derived values for dust extinction. The total UV luminosity density at z ∼ 2 is 4.31{sub −0.60}{sup +0.68}×10{sup 26} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, more than 70% of which is emitted by galaxies in the luminosity range of our sample. Finally, we determine the global star formation rate density from UV-selected galaxies at z ∼ 2 (assuming a constant dust

  18. A study of the discrepant QSO X-ray luminosity function from the HEAO-2 data archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.

    1984-01-01

    An in-progress investigation aimed at characterizing the X-ray luminosity of very faint QSOs is described. More than 100 faint, previously uncataloged QSOs which lie in areas imaged in X rays at very high sensitivity were discovered.

  19. Common envelope mechanisms: constraints from the X-ray luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We use the measured X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in nearby star-forming galaxies to constrain the common envelope (CE) mechanisms, which play a key role in governing the binary evolution. We find that the XLF can be reproduced quite closely under both CE mechanisms usually adopted, i.e., the α{sub CE} formalism and the γ algorithm, with a reasonable range of parameters considered. Provided that the parameter combination is the same, the γ algorithm is likely to produce more HMXBs than the α{sub CE} formalism, by a factor of up to ∼10. In the framework of the α{sub CE} formalism, a high value of α{sub CE} is required to fit the observed XLF, though it does not significantly affect the global number of the HMXB populations. We present the detailed components of the HMXB populations under the γ algorithm and compare them with those in Zuo et al. and observations. We suggest the distinct observational properties, as well as period distributions of HMXBs, may provide further clues to discriminate between these two types of CE mechanisms.

  20. LOW-MASS SUPPRESSION OF THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DUE TO THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-COLD-DARK-MATTER RELATIVE VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Dvorkin, Cora

    2013-05-01

    We study the effect of the supersonic baryon-cold-dark-matter (CDM) flow, which has recently been shown to have a large effect on structure formation during the dark ages 10 {approx}< z {approx}< 1000, on the abundance of luminous, low-mass satellite galaxies around galaxies like the Milky Way. As the supersonic baryon-CDM flow significantly suppresses both the number of halos formed and the amount of baryons accreted onto such halos of masses 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 8} at z {approx}> 10, a large effect results on the stellar luminosity function before reionization. As halos of these masses are believed to have very little star formation after reionization due to the effects of photoheating by the ultraviolet background, this effect persists to the present day. We calculate that the number of low-mass 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} halos that host luminous satellite galaxies today is typically suppressed by 50%, with values ranging up to 90% in regions where the initial supersonic velocity is high. We show that this previously ignored cosmological effect resolves some of the tension between the observed and predicted number of low-mass satellites in the Milky Way, reducing the need for other mass-dependent star-formation suppression before reionization.

  1. Galaxies in Filaments have More Satellites: The Influence of the Cosmic Web on the Satellite Luminosity Function in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quan; Tempel, E.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. < M prim. + 2.0) by a factor of ~2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  2. RECONSTRUCTING THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS FROM KNOWN GALAXY POPULATIONS USING MULTIBAND MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Helgason, Kari; Ricotti, Massimo; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-06-20

    We model fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background (CIB) arising from known galaxy populations using 233 measured UV, optical, and near-IR luminosity functions (LFs) from a variety of surveys spanning a wide range of redshifts. We compare best-fit Schechter parameters across the literature and find clear indication of evolution with redshift. Providing fitting formulae for the multi-band evolution of the LFs out to z {approx} 5, we calculate the total emission redshifted into the near-IR bands in the observer frame and recover the observed optical and near-IR galaxy counts to good accuracy. Our empirical approach, in conjunction with a halo model describing the clustering of galaxies, allows us to compute the fluctuations of the unresolved CIB and compare the models to current measurements. We find that fluctuations from known galaxy populations are unable to account for the large-scale CIB clustering signal seen by Spitzer/IRAC and AKARI/IRC and continue to diverge out to larger angular scales. This holds true even if the LFs are extrapolated out to faint magnitudes with a steep faint-end slope all the way to z = 8. We also show that removing resolved sources to progressively fainter magnitude limits isolates CIB fluctuations to increasingly higher redshifts. Our empirical approach suggests that known galaxy populations are not responsible for the bulk of the fluctuation signal seen in the measurements and favors a very faint population of highly clustered sources.

  3. C-M diagram and luminosity function of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 7099. I. Photographic photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Piotto, G.; Rosino, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Ortolani, S.; Alcaino, G.

    1987-08-01

    New photographic photometry of about 4400 stars in the field of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 7099 = M30 is presented. A C-M diagram and a luminosity function are obtained from this photometry. The distance modulus is estimated at 14.5 + or - 0.5 assuming V(HB) = 15.11 + or - 0.10 and E(B-V) = 0.03 + or - 0.03. The metallicity is (Fe/H) = 1.9 + or - 0.3 based on the dereddened color index (B-V)0,g = 0.71 + or - 0.03. The theoretical isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985) give a better fit to the observations assuming (Fe/H) = -1.8, (m-M)V = 14.6, and E(B-V) = 0.02. A fair fit is also obtained using isochrones of low iron content with an oxygen enhancement of 0.7. From the fit, an age of 17 + or - 4 Gyr is deduced. 41 references.

  4. A revisit of gamma-ray luminosity function and contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background for Fermi FSRQs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2013-05-01

    A clean sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) has been provided by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in two years of operation. Based on this sample, we reconstruct the gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) in the framework of the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model, and obtain the best-fitting GLF by comparing the distributions of observed redshifts, luminosities, indexes and source counts with the predicted distribution of the GLF through the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method which constrains the model parameters in an efficient way. Using the best-fitting GLF, we estimate the contribution of Fermi-undetected FSRQs to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB), and find that the contribution of unresolved FSRQs to the EGRB is 10.1 ± 4.7 per cent in the 0.1-100 GeV band. We also study the influence of different bins of redshifts, luminosities and spectral indices on the contribution to EGRB from the unresolved FSRQs, and find that the contributions of unresolved FSRQs in the redshift range of z = 0.0-2.0 and in the gamma-ray luminosity range of 1044-1048 erg s-1 are ˜90 per cent, respectively.

  5. The role of cluster mergers and travelling shocks in shaping the Hα luminosity function at z ˜ 0.2: `sausage' and `toothbrush' clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; van Weeren, Reinout J.

    2014-02-01

    The most extreme cluster mergers can lead to massive cluster-wide travelling shock waves. The CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`toothbrush') clusters (z ˜ 0.2) host enormous radio-emitting shocks with simple geometry. We investigate the role of mergers and shocks in shaping the Hα luminosity function, using custom-made narrow-band filters matching the cluster redshifts mounted on the Isaac Newton Telescope. We surveyed ˜0.28 deg2 for each cluster and found 181 line emitters in the `sausage' (volume of 3.371 × 103 Mpc3 for Hα at z = 0.1945) and 141 in the `toothbrush' (4.546 × 103 Mpc3 for Hα at z = 0.225), out of which 49 (`sausage') and 30 (`toothbrush') are expected to be Hα. We build luminosity functions for the field-of-view down to an average limiting star formation rate of 0.14 M⊙ yr-1, find good agreement with field luminosity functions at z = 0.2, but significant differences between the shapes of the luminosity functions for the two clusters. We discover extended, tens-of-kpc-wide Hα haloes in galaxies neighbouring relics, which were possibly disrupted by the passage of the shock wave. By comparing the `sausage' cluster with blank fields and other clusters, we also uncover an order of magnitude boost (at 9σ level) in the normalization φ* of the luminosity function in the relic areas. Our results suggest that cluster mergers may play an important role in the evolution of cluster galaxies through shock-induced star formation.

  6. The massive end of the luminosity and stellar mass functions and clustering from CMASS to SDSS: evidence for and against passive evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, M.; Meert, A.; Sheth, R. K.; Huertas-Company, M.; Maraston, C.; Shankar, F.; Vikram, V.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the luminosity function, based on Sérsic fits to the light profiles, of CMASS galaxies at z ˜ 0.55. Compared to previous estimates, our Sérsic-based reductions imply more luminous, massive galaxies, consistent with the effects of Sérsic- rather than Petrosian or de Vaucouleur-based photometry on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample at z ˜ 0.1. This implies a significant revision of the high-mass end of the correlation between stellar and halo mass. Inferences about the evolution of the luminosity and stellar mass functions depend strongly on the assumed, and uncertain, k + e corrections. In turn, these depend on the assumed age of the population. Applying k + e corrections taken from fitting the models of Maraston et al. to the colours of both SDSS and CMASS galaxies, the evolution of the luminosity and stellar mass functions appears impressively passive, provided that the fits are required to return old ages. However, when matched in comoving number- or luminosity-density, the SDSS galaxies are less strongly clustered compared to their counterparts in CMASS. This rules out the passive evolution scenario, and, indeed, any minor merger scenarios which preserve the rank ordering in stellar mass of the population. Potential incompletenesses in the CMASS sample would further enhance this mismatch. Our analysis highlights the virtue of combining clustering measurements with number counts.

  7. AN H{alpha} NUCLEAR SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN THE E0 ACTIVE GALAXY Arp 102B

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Axon, David J.; Kharb, Preeti; Robinson, Andrew; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Marconi, Alessandro; Maciejewski, Witold; Capetti, Alessandro E-mail: djasps@rit.edu E-mail: pxksps@cis.rit.edu E-mail: marconi@arcetri.astro.it E-mail: capetti@to.astro.it

    2011-08-01

    We report the discovery of a two-armed mini-spiral structure within the inner kiloparsec of the E0 LINER/Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 102B. The arms are observed in H{alpha} emission and located east and west of the nucleus, extending up to {approx}1 kpc from it. We use narrow-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, in combination with archival Very Large Array radio images at 3.6 and 6 cm to investigate the origin of the nuclear spiral. From the H{alpha} luminosity of the spiral, we obtain an ionized gas mass of the order of 10{sup 6} solar masses. One possibility is that the nuclear spiral represents a gas inflow triggered by a recent accretion event which has replenished the accretion disk, giving rise to the double-peaked emission-line profiles characteristic of Arp 102B. However, the radio images show a one-sided curved jet which correlates with the eastern spiral arm observed in the H{alpha} image. A published milliarcsecond radio image also shows a one-sided structure at position angle {approx}40{sup 0}, approximately aligned with the inner part of the eastern spiral arm. The absence of a radio counterpart to the western spiral arm is tentatively interpreted as indicating that the jet is relativistic, with an estimated speed of 0.45c. Estimates of the jet kinetic energy and the ionizing luminosity of the active nucleus indicate that both are capable of ionizing the gas along the spiral arms. We conclude that, although the gas in the nuclear region may have originated in an accretion event, the mini spiral is most likely the result of a jet-cloud interaction rather than an inflowing stream.

  8. The Faint End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ~ 4: Implications for Ionization of the Intergalactic Medium and Cosmic Downsizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    We present an updated determination of the z ~ 4 QSO luminosity function (QLF), improving the quality of the determination of the faint end of the QLF presented by Glikman et al. (2010). We have observed an additional 43 candidates from our survey sample, yielding one additional QSO at z = 4.23 and increasing the completeness of our spectroscopic follow-up to 48% for candidates brighter than R = 24 over our survey area of 3.76 deg2. We study the effect of using K-corrections to compute the rest-frame absolute magnitude at 1450 Å compared with measuring M 1450 directly from the object spectra. We find a luminosity-dependent bias: template-based K-corrections overestimate the luminosity of low-luminosity QSOs, likely due to their reliance on templates derived from higher luminosity QSOs. Combining our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and using spectrum-based M 1450 for all the quasars, we fit a double power law to the binned QLF. Our best fit has a bright-end slope, α = 3.3 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = 1.6+0.8 -0.6. Our new data revise the faint-end slope of the QLF down to flatter values similar to those measured at z ~ 3. The break luminosity, though poorly constrained, is at M* = -24.1+0.7 -1.9, approximately 1-1.5 mag fainter than at z ~ 3. This QLF implies that QSOs account for about half the radiation needed to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Two epochs of globular cluster formation from deep field luminosity functions: implications for reionization and the Milky Way satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Harley; Ricotti, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    The ages of globular clusters in our own Milky Way are known with precision of about ±1 Gyr, hence their formation history at redshifts z ≳ 3 and their role in hierarchical cosmology and the reionization of the intergalactic medium remain relatively undetermined. Here we analyse the effect of globular cluster formation on the observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions (LFs) and UV continuum slopes of high-redshift galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Fields. We find that the majority of present-day globular clusters have formed during two distinct epochs: at redshifts z ˜ 2-3 and at redshifts z ≳ 6. The birth of proto-GC systems produces the steep, faint-end slopes of the galaxy LFs and, because the brightness of proto-GCs fades 5 Myr after their formation, their blue colours are in excellent agreement with observations. Our results suggest that: (i) the bulk of the old globular cluster population with estimated ages ≳12 Gyr (about 50 per cent of the total population) formed in the relatively massive dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ≳ 6; (ii) proto-GC formation was an important mode of star formation in those dwarf galaxies, and likely dominated the reionization process. Another consequence of this scenario is that some of the most massive Milky Way satellites may be faint and yet undiscovered because tidal stripping of a dominant GC population precedes significant stripping of the dark matter haloes of these satellites. This scenario may alleviate some remaining tensions between cold dark matter simulations and observations.

  10. ON THE ORIGINS OF THE DIFFUSE H{alpha} EMISSION: IONIZED GAS OR DUST-SCATTERED H{alpha} HALOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Witt, Adolf N.

    2012-10-20

    It is known that the diffuse H{alpha} emission outside of bright H II regions not only are very extended, but also can occur in distinct patches or filaments far from H II regions, and the line ratios of [S II] {lambda}6716/H{alpha} and [N II] {lambda}6583/H{alpha} observed far from bright H II regions are generally higher than those in the H II regions. These observations have been regarded as evidence against the dust-scattering origin of the diffuse H{alpha} emission (including other optical lines), and the effect of dust scattering has been neglected in studies on the diffuse H{alpha} emission. In this paper, we reexamine the arguments against dust scattering and find that the dust-scattering origin of the diffuse H{alpha} emission cannot be ruled out. As opposed to the previous contention, the expected dust-scattered H{alpha} halos surrounding H II regions are, in fact, in good agreement with the observed H{alpha} morphology. We calculate an extensive set of photoionization models by varying elemental abundances, ionizing stellar types, and clumpiness of the interstellar medium (ISM) and find that the observed line ratios of [S II]/H{alpha}, [N II]/H{alpha}, and He I {lambda}5876/H{alpha} in the diffuse ISM accord well with the dust-scattered halos around H II regions, which are photoionized by late O- and/or early B-type stars. We also demonstrate that the H{alpha} absorption feature in the underlying continuum from the dust-scattered starlight ({sup d}iffuse galactic light{sup )} and unresolved stars is able to substantially increase the [S II]/H{alpha} and [N II]/H{alpha} line ratios in the diffuse ISM.

  11. THE BRIGHTEST OF REIONIZING GALAXIES SURVEY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE BRIGHT END OF THE z {approx} 8 LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L. D.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; Trenti, M.; Oesch, P. A.; Bouwens, R. J.; Shull, J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    We report the discovery of 33 Lyman-break galaxy candidates at z {approx} 8 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging as part of the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) pure-parallel survey. The ongoing BoRG survey currently has the largest area (274 arcmin{sup 2}) with Y {sub 098} (or Y {sub 105}), J {sub 125}, and H {sub 160} band coverage needed to search for z {approx} 8 galaxies, about three times the current CANDELS area, and slightly larger than what will be the final CANDELS wide component with Y {sub 105} data (required to select z {approx} 8 sources). Our sample of 33 relatively bright Y {sub 098}-dropout galaxies have J {sub 125}-band magnitudes between 25.5 and 27.4 mag. This is the largest sample of bright (J {sub 125} {approx}< 27.4) z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates presented to date. Combining our data set with the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field data set, we constrain the rest-frame ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at z {approx} 8 over the widest dynamic range currently available. The combined data sets are well fitted by a Schechter function, i.e., {phi} (L) = {phi}{sub *} (L/L{sub *}){sup {alpha}} e{sup -(}L{sup /L{sub *})}, without evidence for an excess of sources at the bright end. At 68% confidence, for h = 0.7 we derive {phi}{sub *} = (4.3{sup +3.5} {sub -2.1}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, M {sub *} = -20.26{sup +0.29} {sub -0.34}, and a very steep faint-end slope {alpha} = -1.98{sup +0.23} {sub -0.22}. While the best-fit parameters still have a strong degeneracy, especially between {phi}{sub *} and M {sub *}, our improved coverage at the bright end has reduced the uncertainty of the faint-end power-law slope at z {approx} 8 compared to the best previous determination at {+-}0.4. With a future expansion of the BoRG survey, combined with planned ultradeep WFC3/IR observations, it will be possible to further reduce this uncertainty and clearly demonstrate the steepening of the faint-end slope compared

  12. A molecular line scan in the Hubble deep field north: Constraints on the co luminosity function and the cosmic H{sub 2} density

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.; Decarli, R.; Da Cunha, E.; Sargent, M.; Dickinson, M.; Daddi, E.; Riechers, D.; Ellis, R.; Stark, D.; Weiner, B.; Aravena, M.; Bell, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Cox, P.; Downes, D.; Neri, R.; Lentati, L.; Maiolino, R.; Menten, K. M.; and others

    2014-02-20

    We present direct constraints on the CO luminosity function at high redshift and the resulting cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density, ρ{sub H{sub 2}}(z), based on a blind molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our line scan of the entire 3 mm window (79-115 GHz) covers a cosmic volume of ∼7000 Mpc{sup 3}, and redshift ranges z < 0.45, 1.01 < z < 1.89 and z > 2. We use the rich multiwavelength and spectroscopic database of the HDF-N to derive some of the best constraints on CO luminosities in high redshift galaxies to date. We combine the blind CO detections in our molecular line scan (presented in a companion paper) with stacked CO limits from galaxies with available spectroscopic redshifts (slit or mask spectroscopy from Keck and grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope) to give first blind constraints on high-z CO luminosity functions and the cosmic evolution of the H{sub 2} mass density ρ{sub H{sub 2}}(z) out to redshifts z ∼ 3. A comparison to empirical predictions of ρ{sub H{sub 2}}(z) shows that the securely detected sources in our molecular line scan already provide significant contributions to the predicted ρ{sub H{sub 2}}(z) in the redshift bins (z) ∼ 1.5 and (z) ∼ 2.7. Accounting for galaxies with CO luminosities that are not probed by our observations results in cosmic molecular gas densities ρ{sub H{sub 2}}(z) that are higher than current predictions. We note, however, that the current uncertainties (in particular the luminosity limits, number of detections, as well as cosmic volume probed) are significant, a situation that is about to change with the emerging ALMA observatory.

  13. Understanding the observed evolution of the galaxy luminosity function from z = 6–10 in the context of hierarchical structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, Joseph A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent observations of the Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) luminosity function (LF) from z ≈ 6–10 show a steep decline in abundance with increasing redshift. However, the LF is a convolution of the mass function of dark matter halos (HMF) — which also declines sharply over this redshift range — and the galaxy-formation physics that maps halo mass to galaxy luminosity. We consider the strong observed evolution in the LF from z ≈ 6–10 in this context and determine whether it can be explained solely by the behavior of the HMF. From z ≈ 6–8, we find a residual change in the physics of galaxy formation corresponding to a ∼ 0.5 dex increase in the average luminosity of a halo of fixed mass. On the other hand, our analysis of recent LF measurements at z ≈ 10 shows that the paucity of detected galaxies is consistent with almost no change in the average luminosity at fixed halo mass from z ≈ 8. The LF slope also constrains the variation about this mean such that the luminosity of galaxies hosted by halos of the same mass are all within about an order-of-magnitude of each other. We show that these results are well-described by a simple model of galaxy formation in which cold-flow accretion is balanced by star formation and momentum-driven outflows. If galaxy formation proceeds in halos with masses down to 10{sup 8}M{sub s}un, then such a model predicts that LBGs at z ≈ 10 should be able to maintain an ionized intergalactic medium as long as the ratio of the clumping factor to the ionizing escape fraction is C/f{sub esc}∼<10.

  14. A Molecular Line Scan in the Hubble Deep Field North: Constraints on the CO Luminosity Function and the Cosmic H2 Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, F.; Decarli, R.; Sargent, M.; Carilli, C.; Dickinson, M.; Riechers, D.; Ellis, R.; Stark, D.; Weiner, B.; Aravena, M.; Bell, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Cox, P.; Da Cunha, E.; Daddi, E.; Downes, D.; Lentati, L.; Maiolino, R.; Menten, K. M.; Neri, R.; Rix, H.-W.; Weiss, A.

    2014-02-01

    We present direct constraints on the CO luminosity function at high redshift and the resulting cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density, \\rho _H_2(z), based on a blind molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our line scan of the entire 3 mm window (79-115 GHz) covers a cosmic volume of ~7000 Mpc3, and redshift ranges z < 0.45, 1.01 < z < 1.89 and z > 2. We use the rich multiwavelength and spectroscopic database of the HDF-N to derive some of the best constraints on CO luminosities in high redshift galaxies to date. We combine the blind CO detections in our molecular line scan (presented in a companion paper) with stacked CO limits from galaxies with available spectroscopic redshifts (slit or mask spectroscopy from Keck and grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope) to give first blind constraints on high-z CO luminosity functions and the cosmic evolution of the H2 mass density \\rho _H_2(z) out to redshifts z ~ 3. A comparison to empirical predictions of \\rho _H_2(z) shows that the securely detected sources in our molecular line scan already provide significant contributions to the predicted \\rho _H_2(z) in the redshift bins langzrang ~ 1.5 and langzrang ~ 2.7. Accounting for galaxies with CO luminosities that are not probed by our observations results in cosmic molecular gas densities \\rho _H_2(z) that are higher than current predictions. We note, however, that the current uncertainties (in particular the luminosity limits, number of detections, as well as cosmic volume probed) are significant, a situation that is about to change with the emerging ALMA observatory.

  15. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrow-band Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, M.; Kashikawa, N.; Shimasaku, K.; Doi, M.; Nagao, T.; Iye, M.; Kodama, T.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.

    2006-06-01

    Subaru Deep Field line-emitting galaxies in four narrow-band filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broad-band colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple narrow-band filters are used to distinguish Hα, [OII], and [OIII] emitters between redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 to construct their averaged rest-frame optical-to-UV SED and luminosity functions. These luminosity functions are derived down to faint magnitudes, which allows for a more accurate determination of the faint end slope. With a large (N 200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each luminosity function. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [OIII] and [OII] luminosity functions reported in this paper agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al (2003). The z=0.066-0.092 Hα LF agrees with those of Jones & Bland-Hawthorn (2001), but for z=0.24 and 0.40, their number density is higher by a factor of two or more. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches two orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al. (1995), is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1 than predicted. The faint end slope α and φ* show a strong evolution with redshift while L* show little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated star formation rate densities are derived via Hα for 0.07function of redshift, is seen for 0.4

  16. The bright end of the exo-Zodi luminosity function: Disk evolution and implications for exo-Earth detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution summarises the first characterisation of the 12 μm warm dust (``exo-Zodi'') luminosity function around Sun-like stars, focussing on the dustiest systems that can be identified by the WISE mission (Kennedy & Wyatt 2013). We use the sample of main-sequence stars observed by Hipparcos within 150pc as an unbiased sample, and report the detection of six new warm dust candidates. The ages of five of these new sources are unknown, meaning that they may be sites of terrestrial planet formation or rare analogues of other old warm dust systems. We show that the dustiest old (> Gyr) systems such as BD+20 307 are 1 in 10,000 occurrences. Bright warm dust is much more common around young (<120 Myr) systems, with a ~1% occurrence rate. We show that a two component in situ model where all stars have initially massive warm disks and in which warm debris is also generated at some random time along the stars' main-sequence lifetime, perhaps due to a collision, can explain the observations. However, if all stars only have initially massive warm disks these would not be visible at Gyr ages, and random collisions on the main-sequence are too infrequent to explain the high disk occurrence rate for young stars. That is, neither component can explain the observations on their own. Despite these conclusions, we cannot rule out an alternative dynamical model in which comets are scattered in from outer regions because the distribution of systems with the appropriate dynamics is unknown. Our in situ model predicts that the fraction of stars with exo-Zodi bright enough to cause problems for future exo-Earth imaging attempts is at least roughly 10%, and is higher for populations of stars younger than a few Gyr. This prediction of roughly 10% also applies to old stars because bright systems like BD+20 307 imply a population of fainter systems that were once bright, but are now decaying through fainter levels. Our prediction should be strongly tested by the Large Binocular

  17. The bright end of the exo-Zodi luminosity function: disc evolution and implications for exo-Earth detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2013-08-01

    We present the first characterisation of the 12 μm warm dust (`exo-Zodi') luminosity function around Sun-like stars, focusing on the dustiest systems that can be identified by the WISE mission. We use the sample of main-sequence stars observed by Hipparcos within 150 pc as an unbiased sample, and report the detection of six new warm dust candidates. The ages of five of these new sources are unknown, meaning that they may be sites of terrestrial planet formation or rare analogues of other old warm dust systems. We show that the dustiest old (>Gyr) systems such as BD+20 307 are 1 in 10 000 occurrences. Bright warm dust is much more common around young (<120 Myr) systems, with a ˜1 per cent occurrence rate. We show that a two component in situ model, where all stars have initially massive warm discs and in which warm debris is also generated at some random time along the stars' main-sequence lifetime, perhaps due to a collision, can explain the observations. However, if all stars have only initially massive warm discs, then these would not be visible at Gyr ages, and random collisions on the main sequence are too infrequent to explain the high disc occurrence rate for young stars. That is, neither of the components can explain the observations on their own. Despite these conclusions, we cannot rule out an alternative dynamical model in which comets are scattered in from outer regions because the distribution of systems with the appropriate dynamics is unknown. Our in situ model predicts that the fraction of stars with exo-Zodi bright enough to cause problems for future exo-Earth imaging attempts is at least roughly 10 per cent, and is higher for populations of stars younger than a few Gyr. This prediction of roughly 10 per cent also applies to old stars because bright systems like BD+20 307 imply a population of fainter systems that were once bright, but are now decaying through fainter levels. Our prediction should be strongly tested by the Large Binocular

  18. The bright end of the exo-Zodi luminosity function: Disk evolution and implications for exo-Earth detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Grant; Wyatt, Mark

    2013-07-01

    We present the first characterisation of the 12um warm dust (``exo-Zodi'') luminosity function around Sun-like stars, focussing on the dustiest systems that can be identified by the WISE mission. We use the sample of main-sequence stars observed by Hipparcos within 150pc as an unbiased sample, and report the detection of six new warm dust candidates. The ages of five of these new sources are unknown, meaning that they may be sites of terrestrial planet formation or rare analogues of other old warm dust systems. We show that the dustiest old (>Gyr) systems such as BD+20 307 are 1 in 10,000 occurrences. Bright warm dust is much more common around young (<120Myr) systems, with a ~1% occurrence rate. We show that a two component in situ model where all stars have initially massive warm disks and in which warm debris is also generated at some random time along the stars' main-sequence lifetime, perhaps due to a collision, can explain the observations. However, if all stars only have initially massive warm disks these would not be visible at Gyr ages, and random collisions on the main-sequence are too infrequent to explain the high disk occurrence rate for young stars. That is, neither component can explain the observations on their own. Despite these conclusions, we cannot rule out an alternative dynamical model in which comets are scattered in from outer regions because the distribution of systems with the appropriate dynamics is unknown. Our in situ model predicts that the fraction of stars with exo-Zodi bright enough to cause problems for future exo-Earth imaging attempts is at least roughly 10%, and is higher for populations of stars younger than a few Gyr. This prediction of roughly 10% also applies to old stars because bright systems like BD+20 307 imply a population of fainter systems that were once bright, but are now decaying through fainter levels. Our prediction should be strongly tested by the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer, which will provide

  19. The VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey. Galaxy luminosity function per morphological type up to z = 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Lauger, S.; Tresse, L.; Buat, V.; Arnouts, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Burgarella, D.; Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Zamorani, G.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J.-P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pello, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Ciliegi, P.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2006-07-01

    Aims.We have computed the evolution of the rest-frame B-band luminosity function (LF) for bulge and disk-dominated galaxies since z=1.2. Methods: .We use a sample of 605 spectroscopic redshifts with IAB≤ 24 in the Chandra Deep Field South from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey, 3555 galaxies with photometric redshifts from the COMBO-17 multi-color data, coupled with multi-color HST/ACS images from the Great Observatories Origin Deep Survey. We split the sample in bulge- and disk-dominated populations on the basis of asymmetry and concentration parameters measured in the rest-frame B-band. Results: .We find that at z=0.4-0.8, the LF slope is significantly steeper for the disk-dominated population (α=-1.19 ± 0.07) compared to the bulge-dominated population (α=-0.53 ± 0.13). The LF of the bulge-dominated population is composed of two distinct populations separated in rest-frame color: 68% of red (B-I)AB>0.9 and bright galaxies showing a strongly decreasing LF slope α=+0.55 ± 0.21, and 32% of blue (B-I)AB<0.9 and more compact galaxies which populate the LF faint-end. We observe that red bulge-dominated galaxies are already well in place at z≃1, but the volume density of this population is increasing by a factor 2.7 between z˜ 1 and z˜ 0.6. It may be related to the building-up of massive elliptical galaxies in the hierarchical scenario. In addition, we observe that the blue bulge-dominated population is dimming by 0.7 mag between z˜ 1 and z˜ 0.6. Galaxies in this faint and more compact population could possibly be the progenitors of the local dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  20. The luminosity function of star clusters in 20 star-forming galaxies based on Hubble legacy archive photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bowers, Ariel S.; Lindsay, Kevin; Ansari, Asna; Evans, Jessica; Chandar, Rupali; Larsen, Soeren

    2014-04-01

    Luminosity functions (LFs) have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4-30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on Advanced Camera for Surveys source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA). These cluster catalogs provide one of the largest sets of uniform, automatically generated cluster candidates available in the literature at present. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster LF can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL∝L {sup α}, with an average value for α of –2.37 and rms scatter = 0.18 when using the F814W ('I') band. A comparison of fitting results based on methods that use binned and unbinned data shows good agreement, although there may be a systematic tendency for the unbinned (maximum likelihood) method to give slightly more negative values of α for galaxies with steeper LFs. We find that galaxies with high rates of star formation (or equivalently, with the brightest or largest numbers of clusters) have a slight tendency to have shallower values of α. In particular, the Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39), a merging system with a relatively high star formation rate (SFR), has the second flattest LF in the sample. A tentative correlation may also be present between Hubble type and values of α, in the sense that later type galaxies (i.e., Sd and Sm) appear to have flatter LFs. Hence, while there do appear to be some weak correlations, the relative similarity in the values of α for a large number of star-forming galaxies suggests that, to first order, the LFs are fairly universal. We examine the bright end of the LFs and find evidence for a downturn, although it only pertains to about 1% of the clusters. Our uniform database results in a small scatter (≈0.4 to 0.5 mag) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster (M {sub brightest}) and log of the number

  1. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Software Package to Constrain the Evolution of Luminosity Functions, Test SED Models, and Simulate Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurinsky, Noah; Sajina, Anna

    2014-06-01

    We present a novel simulation and fitting program which employs MCMC to constrain the spectral energy distribution makeup and luminosity function evolution required to produce a given mutli-wavelength survey. This tool employs a multidimensional color-color diagnostic to determine goodness of fit, and simulates observational sources of error such as flux-limits and instrumental noise. Our goals in designing this tool were to a) use it to study Infrared surveys and test SED template models, and b) create it in such a way as to make it usable in any electromagnetic regime for any class of sources to which any luminosity functional form can be prescribed.I will discuss our specific use of the program to characterize a survey from the Herschel SPIRE HerMES catalog, including implications for our luminosity function and SED models. I will also briefly discuss the ways we envision using it for simulation and application to other surveys, and I will demonstrate the degree to which its reusability can serve to enrich a wide range of analyses.

  2. Ultra-faint Ultraviolet Galaxies at z ~ 2 behind the Lensing Cluster A1689: The Luminosity Function, Dust Extinction, and Star Formation Rate Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Richard, Johan; Stark, Daniel P.; Scarlata, Claudia; Teplitz, Harry I.; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto; Rafelski, Marc; Robertson, Brant; Kewley, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained deep ultraviolet imaging of the lensing cluster A1689 with the WFC3/UVIS camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the F275W (30 orbits) and F336W (4 orbits) filters. These images are used to identify z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies via their Lyman break, in the same manner that galaxies are typically selected at z >= 3. Because of the unprecedented depth of the images and the large magnification provided by the lensing cluster, we detect galaxies 100× fainter than previous surveys at this redshift. After removing all multiple images, we have 58 galaxies in our sample in the range -19.5 < M 1500 < -13 AB mag. Because the mass distribution of A1689 is well constrained, we are able to calculate the intrinsic sensitivity of the observations as a function of source plane position, allowing for accurate determinations of effective volume as a function of luminosity. We fit the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be α = -1.74 ± 0.08, which is consistent with the values obtained for 2.5 < z < 6. Notably, there is no turnover in the luminosity function down to M 1500 = -13 AB mag. We fit the UV spectral slopes with photometry from existing Hubble optical imaging. The observed trend of increasingly redder slopes with luminosity at higher redshifts is observed in our sample, but with redder slopes at all luminosities and average reddening of langE(B - V)rang = 0.15 mag. We assume the stars in these galaxies are metal poor (0.2 Z ⊙) compared to their brighter counterparts (Z ⊙), resulting in bluer assumed intrinsic UV slopes and larger derived values for dust extinction. The total UV luminosity density at z ~ 2 is 4.31^{+0.68}_{-0.60} \\times 10^{26} erg s-1 Hz-1 Mpc-3, more than 70% of which is emitted by galaxies in the luminosity range of our sample. Finally, we determine the global star formation rate density from UV-selected galaxies at z ~ 2 (assuming a constant dust extinction correction of 4.2 over all luminosities and a Kroupa initial

  3. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XIII. The Luminosity and Mass Function of Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster and the Contribution from Disrupted Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben; Roediger, Joel; McConnachie, Alan W.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Boissier, S.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Emsellem, Eric; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Mihos, J. Christopher; Navarro, Julio F.; Peng, Eric W.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, James E.; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg2 (0.3 Mpc2) area in the core of the Virgo Cluster, based on {u}\\ast griz data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample—which consists of 352 objects brighter than M g = ‑9.13 mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey—reaches 2.2 mag deeper than the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog and at least 1.2 mag deeper than any sample previously used to measure the luminosity function in Virgo. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint-end slope of α = ‑1.33 ± 0.02 for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function and the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs)—previously compiled by the NGVS in this region—to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, M g = ‑9.6 mag) increases dramatically, up to α = ‑1.60 ± 0.06 when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo owing to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ˜150 objects with M g ≲ ‑9.6 mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the Virgo core might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ˜40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group

  4. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XIII. The Luminosity and Mass Function of Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster and the Contribution from Disrupted Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben; Roediger, Joel; McConnachie, Alan W.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Boissier, S.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Emsellem, Eric; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Mihos, J. Christopher; Navarro, Julio F.; Peng, Eric W.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, James E.; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg2 (0.3 Mpc2) area in the core of the Virgo Cluster, based on {u}\\ast griz data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample—which consists of 352 objects brighter than M g = ‑9.13 mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey—reaches 2.2 mag deeper than the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog and at least 1.2 mag deeper than any sample previously used to measure the luminosity function in Virgo. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint-end slope of α = ‑1.33 ± 0.02 for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function and the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs)—previously compiled by the NGVS in this region—to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, M g = ‑9.6 mag) increases dramatically, up to α = ‑1.60 ± 0.06 when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo owing to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ∼150 objects with M g ≲ ‑9.6 mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the Virgo core might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ∼40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group

  5. The evolution of the near-infrared galaxy luminosity function and colour bimodality up to z ~= 2 from the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirasuolo, M.; McLure, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Almaini, O.; Foucaud, S.; Smail, Ian; Sekiguchi, K.; Simpson, C.; Eales, S.; Dye, S.; Watson, M. G.; Page, M. J.; Hirst, P.

    2007-09-01

    We present new results on the cosmological evolution of the near-infrared (near-IR) galaxy luminosity function (LF), derived from the analysis of a new sample of ~22000KAB <= 22.5 galaxies selected over an area of 0.6 deg2 from the Early Data Release of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). Our study has exploited the multiwavelength coverage of the UDS field provided by the new UKIDSS WFCAM K- and J-band imaging, the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey and the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey. The unique combination of large area and depth provided by this new survey minimizes the complicating effect of cosmic variance and has allowed us, for the first time, to trace the evolution of the brightest sources out to z ~= 2 with good statistical accuracy. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the characteristic luminosity of the near-IR LF brightens by ~=1 mag between z = 0 and z ~= 2, while the total density decreases by a factor of ~=2. Using the rest-frame (U - B) colour to split the sample into red and blue galaxies, we confirm the classic luminosity-dependent colour bimodality at z <~ 1. However, the strength of the colour bimodality is found to be a decreasing function of redshift, and seems to disappear by z >~ 1.5. Due to the large size of our sample, we are able to investigate the differing cosmological evolution of the red and blue galaxy populations. It is found that the space density of the brightest red galaxies (MK <= - 23) stays approximately constant with redshift, and that these sources dominate the bright end of the LF at redshifts z <~ 1. In contrast, the brightening of the characteristic luminosity and mild decrease in space density displayed by the blue galaxy population leads them to dominate the bright end of the LF at redshifts z >~ 1.

  6. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES OF MODERATE-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI USING SUBARU/FMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, K.; Silverman, J. D.; Schramm, M.; Steinhardt, C. L.; Nagao, T.; Kartaltepe, J.; Sanders, D. B.; Hasinger, G.; Treister, E.; Akiyama, M.; Ohta, K.; Ueda, Y.; Bongiorno, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Capak, P.; Comastri, A.; Lilly, S. J.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present an analysis of broad emission lines observed in moderate-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), typical of those found in X-ray surveys of deep fields, with the goal of testing the validity of single-epoch virial black hole mass estimates. We have acquired near-infrared spectra of AGNs up to z {approx} 1.8 in the COSMOS and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey, with the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru telescope. These near-infrared spectra provide a significant detection of the broad H{alpha} line, shown to be a reliable probe of black hole mass at low redshift. Our sample has existing optical spectroscopy that provides a detection of Mg II, typically used for black hole mass estimation at z {approx}> 1. We carry out a spectral-line fitting procedure using both H{alpha} and Mg II to determine the virial velocity of gas in the broad-line region, the continuum luminosity at 3000 A, and the total H{alpha} line luminosity. With a sample of 43 AGNs spanning a range of two decades in luminosity, we find a tight correlation between the ultraviolet and emission-line luminosity. There is also a close one-to-one relationship between the full width at half-maximum of H{alpha} and Mg II. Both of these then lead to there being very good agreement between H{alpha}- and Mg II-based masses over a wide range in black hole mass, i.e., M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 7-9} M{sub Sun }. In general, these results demonstrate that local scaling relations, using Mg II or H{alpha}, are applicable for AGNs at moderate luminosities and up to z {approx} 2.

  7. The z = 9-10 galaxy population in the Hubble Frontier Fields and CLASH surveys: the z = 9 luminosity function and further evidence for a smooth decline in ultraviolet luminosity density at z≥ 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, D. J.; McLure, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of a search for z = 9-10 galaxies within the first eight pointings of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) survey and 20 cluster fields from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) survey. Combined with our previous analysis of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, we have now completed a search for z = 9-10 galaxies over ≃ 130 arcmin2, spread across 29 Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3/IR pointings. We confine our primary search for high-redshift candidates in this imaging to the uniformly deep, relatively low magnification regions (i.e. σ160 > 30 AB mag for HFF and σ160 > 28.8 AB mag for CLASH in 0.5-arcsec apertures). We unveil a sample of 33 galaxy candidates at zphot ≥ 8.4, five of which have primary photometric redshift solutions in the range 9.6 < zphot < 11.2. The improved statistics and reduced cosmic variance provided by our new sample allows a more accurate determination of the ultraviolet (UV)-selected galaxy luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 9. Our new results strengthen our previous conclusion that the LF appears to evolve smoothly from z = 8 to 9, an evolution which can be equally well modelled by a factor of ≃ 2 drop in density, or a dimming of ≃ 0.5 mag in M⋆. Moreover, we are able to place initial constraints on the z = 10 LF, finding that the number density at M1500 ≃ -19.7 is log (φ ) = -4.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3}, a factor of ≃ 2 lower than at z = 9. Finally, we use our new results to revisit the issue of the decline in UV luminosity density (ρUV) at z ≥ 8. We conclude that the data continue to support a smooth decline in ρUV over the redshift interval 6 < z < 10, in agreement with simple models of early galaxy evolution driven by the growth in the underlying dark matter halo mass function.

  8. Mid-infrared luminosity function of local star-forming galaxies in the North Ecliptic Pole-Wide survey field of AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Goto, Tomotsugu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Im, Myungshin; Shim, Hyunjin; Kim, Min Gyu; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2015-12-01

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity functions (LFs) of local (z < 0.3) star-forming (SF) galaxies in the AKARI's North Ecliptic Pole (NEP)-Wide survey field. In order to derive more accurate LF, we used spectroscopic sample only. Based on the NEP-Wide point source catalogue containing a large number of infrared (IR) sources distributed over the wide (5.4 deg2) field, we incorporated the spectroscopic redshift (z) data for ˜1790 selected targets obtained by optical follow-up surveys with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra. The AKARI's continuous 2-24 μm wavelength coverage as well as photometric data from optical u* band to near-infrared H band with the spectroscopic redshifts for our sample galaxies enable us to derive accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the MIR. We carried out SED fit analysis and employed 1/Vmax method to derive the MIR (e.g. 8, 12, and 15 μm rest-frame) LFs. We fit our 8 μm LFs to the double power-law with the power index of α = 1.53 and β = 2.85 at the break luminosity 4.95 × 109 L⊙. We made extensive comparisons with various MIR LFs from several literatures. Our results for local galaxies from the NEP region are generally consistent with other works for different fields over wide luminosity ranges. The comparisons with the results from the NEP-Deep data as well as other LFs imply the luminosity evolution from higher redshifts towards the present epoch.

  9. H-alpha and H-beta emission in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D. A.; Mongillo, M.

    1979-01-01

    High-resolution H-alpha and H-beta line profiles in a number of quiescent prominences were measured at positions of weak to moderate brightness (for H-alpha integrated intensity of not less than 1.35 x 10 to the 5th ergs/sq cm/s/sr). Those profiles that appear to originate primarily in a single physical element can be accurately fitted with a two-component model, each component being characterized by a temperature, a Gaussian microturbulence distribution, and a constant source function. The various values of integrated intensity, optical thickness, and Doppler width are compared with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations; several discrepancies are noted and discussed.

  10. Stellar Populations in the Central 0.5 pc of the Galaxy. I. A New Method for Constructing Luminosity Functions and Surface-density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T.; Lu, J. R.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Martinez, G. D.; Wright, S. A.; Matthews, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present new high angular resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the nuclear star cluster surrounding the Milky Way's central supermassive black hole. Using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser-guide-star adaptive optics system, this spectroscopic survey enables us to separate early-type (young, 4-6 Myr) and late-type (old, >1 Gyr) stars with a completeness of 50% down to K' = 15.5 mag, which corresponds to ~10 M ⊙ for the early-type stars. This work increases the radial extent of reported OSIRIS/Keck measurements by more than a factor of three from 4'' to 14'' (0.16 to 0.56 pc), along the projected disk of young stars. For our analysis, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of star-planting simulations and Bayesian inference. We assign probabilities for the spectral type of every source detected in deep imaging down to K' = 15.5 mag using information from spectra, simulations, number counts, and the distribution of stars. The inferred radial surface-density profiles, Σ(R)vpropR -Γ, for the young stars and late-type giants are consistent with earlier results (Γearly = 0.93 ± 0.09, Γlate = 0.16 ± 0.07). The late-type surface-density profile is approximately flat out to the edge of the survey. While the late-type stellar luminosity function is consistent with the Galactic bulge, the completeness-corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars has significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared with previous surveys with similar depth. This luminosity function indicates that the corresponding mass function of the young stars is likely less top-heavy than that inferred from previous surveys.

  11. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE CENTRAL 0.5 pc OF THE GALAXY. I. A NEW METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTING LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND SURFACE-DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Lu, J. R.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Wright, S. A.; Matthews, K.

    2013-02-20

    We present new high angular resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the nuclear star cluster surrounding the Milky Way's central supermassive black hole. Using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser-guide-star adaptive optics system, this spectroscopic survey enables us to separate early-type (young, 4-6 Myr) and late-type (old, >1 Gyr) stars with a completeness of 50% down to K' = 15.5 mag, which corresponds to {approx}10 M {sub Sun} for the early-type stars. This work increases the radial extent of reported OSIRIS/Keck measurements by more than a factor of three from 4'' to 14'' (0.16 to 0.56 pc), along the projected disk of young stars. For our analysis, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of star-planting simulations and Bayesian inference. We assign probabilities for the spectral type of every source detected in deep imaging down to K' = 15.5 mag using information from spectra, simulations, number counts, and the distribution of stars. The inferred radial surface-density profiles, {Sigma}(R){proportional_to}R {sup -{Gamma}}, for the young stars and late-type giants are consistent with earlier results ({Gamma}{sub early} = 0.93 {+-} 0.09, {Gamma}{sub late} = 0.16 {+-} 0.07). The late-type surface-density profile is approximately flat out to the edge of the survey. While the late-type stellar luminosity function is consistent with the Galactic bulge, the completeness-corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars has significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared with previous surveys with similar depth. This luminosity function indicates that the corresponding mass function of the young stars is likely less top-heavy than that inferred from previous surveys.

  12. A Luminosity Function of Ly(alpha)-Emitting Galaxies at Z [Approx. Equal to] 4.5(Sup 1),(Sup 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Steve; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel; Wang, JunXian; Dey, Arjun; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)-emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed in a campaign of Keck DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Are (LALA) narrowband imaging survey.We targeted 97 candidates for spectroscopic follow-up; by accounting for the variety of conditions under which we performed spectroscopy, we estimate a selection reliability of approx.76%. Together with our previous sample of Keck LRIS confirmations, the 59 sources confirmed herein bring the total catalog to 73 spectroscopically confirmed z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)- emitting galaxies in the [approx. equal to] 0.7 deg(exp 2) covered by the LALA imaging. As with the Keck LRIS sample, we find that a nonnegligible fraction of the co rest-frame equivalent widths (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) that exceed the maximum predicted for normal stellar populations: 17%-31%(93%confidence) of the detected galaxies show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) 12%-27% (90% confidence) show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) > 240 A. We construct a luminosity function of z [approx. equal to] 4.5 Ly(alpha) emission lines for comparison to Ly(alpha) luminosity function < 6.6. We find no significant evidence for Ly(alpha) luminosity function evolution from z [approx. equal to] 3 to z [approx. equal to] 6. This result supports the conclusion that the intergalactic me largely reionized from the local universe out to z [approx. equal to] 6.5. It is somewhat at odds with the pronounced drop in the cosmic star formation rate density recently measured between z approx. 3 an z approx. 6 in continuum-selected Lyman-break galaxies, and therefore potentially sheds light on the relationship between the two populations.

  13. IMPACT OF H{sub 2}-BASED STAR FORMATION MODEL ON THE z {>=} 6 LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND THE IONIZING PHOTON BUDGET FOR REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jaacks, Jason; Thompson, Robert; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical study examining the effect of an H{sub 2}-based star formation (SF) model on the rest-frame UV luminosity function and star formation rate function (SFRF) of z {>=} 6 galaxies, and the implications for reionization. Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations outfitted with an H{sub 2}-SF model, we find good agreement with our previous results (non-H{sub 2} SF model) and observations at M{sub uv} {<=} -18. However, at M{sub uv} > -18, we find that the LF deviates from both our previous work and current observational extrapolations, producing significantly fewer low-luminosity galaxies and exhibiting additional turnover at the faint end. We constrain the redshift evolution of this turnover point using a modified Schechter function that includes additional terms to quantify the turnover magnitude (M{sub uv}{sup t}) and subsequent slope ({beta}). We find that M{sub uv}{sup t} evolves from M{sub uv}{sup t}=-17.33 (at z = 8) to -15.38 (z = 6), while {beta} becomes shallower by {Delta}{beta} = 0.22 during the same epoch. This occurs in an M{sub uv} range that will be observable by James Webb Space Telescope. By integrating the SFRF, we determine that even though the H{sub 2}-SF model significantly reduces the number density of low-luminosity galaxies at M{sub uv} > -18, it does not suppress the total SFR density enough to affect the capability of SF to maintain reionization.

  14. Evolution of the observed Lyα luminosity function from z = 6.5 to z = 7.7: evidence for the epoch of reionization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, B.; Cuby, J.-G.; Courbin, F.; Fontana, A.; Freudling, W.; Fynbo, J.; Gallego, J.; Hibon, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Moller, P.; Moorwood, A.; Nilsson, K. K.; Pentericci, L.; Venemans, B.; Villar, V.; Willis, J.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Lyα emitters (LAEs) can be detected out to very high redshifts during the epoch of reionization. The evolution of the LAE luminosity function with redshift is a direct probe of the Lyα transmission of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and therefore of the IGM neutral-hydrogen fraction. Measuring the Lyα luminosity function (LF) of Lyα emitters at redshift z = 7.7 therefore allows us to constrain the ionizing state of the Universe at this redshift. Methods: We observed three 7'.5 × 7'.5 fields with the HAWK-I instrument at the VLT with a narrow band filter centred at 1.06 μm and targeting Lyα emitters at redshift z ~ 7.7. The fields were chosen for the availability of multiwavelength data. One field is a galaxy cluster, the Bullet Cluster, which allowed us to use gravitational amplification to probe luminosities that are fainter than in the field. The two other fields are subareas of the GOODS Chandra Deep Field South and CFHTLS-D4 deep field. We selected z = 7.7 LAE candidates from a variety of colour criteria, in particular from the absence of detection in the optical bands. Results: We do not find any LAE candidates at z = 7.7 in ~2.4 × 104 Mpc3 down to a narrow band AB magnitude of ~26, which allows us to infer robust constraints on the Lyα LAE luminosity function at this redshift. Conclusions: The predicted mean number of objects at z = 6.5, derived from somewhat different luminosity functions of Hu et al. (2010, ApJ, 725, 394), Ouchi et al. (2010, ApJ, 723, 869), and Kashikawa et al. (2011, ApJ, 734, 119) are 2.5, 13.7, and 11.6, respectively. Depending on which of these luminosity functions we refer to, we exclude a scenario with no evolution from z = 6.5 to z = 7.7 at 85% confidence without requiring a strong change in the IGM Lyα transmission, or at 99% confidence with a significant quenching of the IGM Lyα transmission, possibly from a strong increase in the high neutral-hydrogen fraction between these two redshifts. Based on observations

  15. An ACS H-alpha Survey of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2004-07-01

    We propose an H-alpha ACS imaging survey covering 540 square arcminutes of the Carina Nebula, including an unbiased survey of the bright core, and several prominent dust pillars in the rich southern region of the nebula. Carina provides an important link between well-studied nearby H II regions like Orion, and more distant mini-starbusts like 30 Doradus. CVZ orbits will allow extremely efficient use of HST to map a large area of this complex and important region - more than 95 percent of the proposed survey will be observed by HST for the first time. This survey will provide a complete census of microjets, proplyds, and silhouette disks with diameters as small as 200 AU, enough to spatially resolve disks like those in Orion, and will provide the first catalog of outflows {jets} from embedded low-mass stars, thin filamentary shocks, and wind-wind collisions in Carina. An accurate census of these phenomena is needed to characterize the star formation activity and gas dynamics as a function of position in the nebula, and to determine if models for protoplanetary disk evaporation from Orion are applicable in more extreme regions. Our previous ground-based optical and IR surveys have already revealed dozens of candidates for this type of activity - but this is just the tip of the iceberg. Our proposed HST/ACS survey promises to be a bonanza for understanding ongoing low-mass star formation influenced by extremely high-mass stars.

  16. An ACS H-alpha Survey of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2005-07-01

    We propose an H-alpha ACS imaging survey covering 540 square arcminutes of the Carina Nebula, including an unbiased survey of the bright core, and several prominent dust pillars in the rich southern region of the nebula. Carina provides an important link between well-studied nearby H II regions like Orion, and more distant mini-starbusts like 30 Doradus. CVZ orbits will allow extremely efficient use of HST to map a large area of this complex and important region - more than 95 percent of the proposed survey will be observed by HST for the first time. This survey will provide a complete census of microjets, proplyds, and silhouette disks with diameters as small as 200 AU, enough to spatially resolve disks like those in Orion, and will provide the first catalog of outflows {jets} from embedded low-mass stars, thin filamentary shocks, and wind-wind collisions in Carina. An accurate census of these phenomena is needed to characterize the star formation activity and gas dynamics as a function of position in the nebula, and to determine if models for protoplanetary disk evaporation from Orion are applicable in more extreme regions. Our previous ground-based optical and IR surveys have already revealed dozens of candidates for this type of activity - but this is just the tip of the iceberg. Our proposed HST/ACS survey promises to be a bonanza for understanding ongoing low-mass star formation influenced by extremely high-mass stars.

  17. A large narrow-band Hα survey at z˜ 0.2: the bright end of the luminosity function, cosmic variance and clustering across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David

    2015-10-01

    We have carried out the largest (>3.5 × 105 Mpc3, 26 deg2) Hα narrow-band survey to date at z ˜ 0.2 in the SA22, W2 and XMMLSS extragalactic fields. Our survey covers a large enough volume to overcome cosmic variance and to sample bright and rare Hα emitters up to an observed luminosity of ˜1042.4 erg s-1, equivalent to ˜11 M⊙ yr-1. Using our sample of 220 sources brighter than >1041.4 erg s-1 (>1 M⊙ yr-1), we derive Hα luminosity functions, which are well described by a Schechter function with φ★ = 10-2.85 ± 0.03 Mpc-3 and L^*_Hα = 10^{41.71± 0.02} erg s-1 (with a fixed faint end slope α = -1.35). We find that surveys probing smaller volumes (˜3 × 104 Mpc3) are heavily affected by cosmic variance, which can lead to errors of over 100 per cent in the characteristic density and luminosity of the Hα luminosity function. We derive a star formation rate density of ρSFRD = 0.0094 ± 0.0008 M⊙ yr-1, in agreement with the redshift-dependent Hα parametrization from Sobral et al. The two-point correlation function is described by a single power law ω(θ) = (0.159 ± 0.012)θ(-0.75 ± 0.05), corresponding to a clustering length of r0 = 3.3 ± 0.8 Mpc h-1. We find that the most luminous Hα emitters at z ˜ 0.2 are more strongly clustered than the relatively fainter ones. The L^*_Hα Hα emitters at z ˜ 0.2 in our sample reside in ˜1012.5-13.5 M⊙ dark matter haloes. This implies that the most star-forming galaxies always reside in relatively massive haloes or group-like environments and that the typical host halo mass of star-forming galaxies is independent of redshift if scaled by L_Hα /L^*_Hα (z), as proposed by Sobral et al.

  18. A multi-coloured survey of NGC253 with XMM-Newton: testing the methods used for creating luminosity functions from low-count data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.; Greening, L. Shaw; Kolb, U.

    2008-08-01

    NGC253 is a local, starbursting spiral galaxy with strong X-ray emission from hot gas, as well as many point sources. We have conducted a spectral survey of the X-ray population of NGC253 using a deep XMM-Newton observation. NGC253 only accounts for ~20 per cent of the XMM-Newton EPIC field of view, allowing us to identify ~100 X-ray sources that are unlikely to be associated with NGC253. Hence, we were able to make a direct estimate of contamination from, for example, foreground stars and background galaxies. X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of galaxy populations are often used to characterize their properties. There are several methods for estimating the luminosities of X-ray sources with few photons. We have obtained spectral fits for the brightest 140 sources in the 2003 XMM-Newton observation of NGC253, and compare the best-fitting luminosities of those 69 non-nuclear sources associated with NGC253 with luminosities derived using other methods. We find the luminosities obtained from these various methods to vary systematically by a factor of up to 3 for the same data; this is largely due to differences in absorption. We therefore conclude that assuming Galactic absorption is probably unwise; rather, one should measure the absorption for the population. A remarkable correlation has been reported between the XLFs of galaxies and their star formation rates. However, the XLFs used in that study were obtained using several different methods. If the sample galaxies were revisited and a single method were applied, then this correlation may become stronger still. In addition, we find that standard estimations of the background contribution to the X-ray sources in the field are insufficient. We find that the background active galactic nuclei (AGN) may be systematically more luminous than previously expected. However, the excess in our measured AGN XLF with respect to the expected XLF may be due to an as yet unrecognized population associated with NGC253.

  19. The Most Luminous z ~ 9-10 Galaxy Candidates Yet Found: The Luminosity Function, Cosmic Star-formation Rate, and the First Mass Density Estimate at 500 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesch, P. A.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Labbé, I.; Smit, R.; Franx, M.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Momcheva, I.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Brammer, G. B.; Skelton, R. E.; Spitler, L. R.

    2014-05-01

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H 160 ~ 26-27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z ~ 9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z ~ 10 galaxy candidates that are known, just ~500 Myr after the big bang. Two similarly bright sources are also detected in a reanalysis of the GOODS-S data set. Three of the four galaxies in GOODS-N are significantly detected at 4.5σ-6.2σ in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm data, as is one of the GOODS-S candidates. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z = 10.2 ± 0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 μm (6.9σ), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope β = -2.0 ± 0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. Thorough testing and use of grism data excludes known low-redshift contamination at high significance, including single emission-line sources, but as-yet unknown low redshift sources could provide an alternative solution given the surprising luminosity of these candidates. Finding such bright galaxies at z ~ 9-10 suggests that the luminosity function for luminous galaxies might evolve in a complex way at z > 8. The cosmic star formation rate density still shows, however, an order-of-magnitude increase from z ~ 10 to z ~ 8 since the dominant contribution comes from low-luminosity sources. Based on the IRAC detections, we derive galaxy stellar masses at z ~ 10, finding that these luminous objects are typically 109 M ⊙. This allows for a first estimate of the cosmic stellar mass density at z ~ 10 resulting in log _{10}\\rho _{*} = 4.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8} M ⊙ Mpc-3 for galaxies brighter than M UV ~ -18. The remarkable brightness, and hence luminosity, of these z ~ 9-10 candidates will enable deep spectroscopy to determine their redshift and nature, and highlights the opportunity for the James Webb Space Telescope to map the buildup of galaxies at redshifts much earlier than z ~ 10. Based on data obtained with the

  20. Halpha LEGUS: An Halpha Imaging Survey of Nearby Galaxies with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Janice C.; Chandar, Rupali; Krumholz, Mark R.; Thilker, David A.; Bright, Stacey N.; Halpha LEGUS

    2016-06-01

    We present first results from the Halpha LEGUS program, an HST narrowband survey of 30 nearby galaxies aimed at probing the relationship between young stars and the warm ionized interstellar medium (ISM). The superb resolution of HST enables the study of HII regions on the parsec scales where feedback from massive stellar populations is injected into the ISM. The span of the sample, which covers a large range in morphology, star formation rate, stellar mass, metallicity, and interaction state, allows for exploration of the possible dependencies of HII region evolution on galactic environment. We give an overview of the sample, observations, and initial characterization of HII region properties, all of which build on the foundation of HST NUV, U, B, V, I imaging obtained by the parent Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey.

  1. RED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT AT z = 0.4 REVEALED BY PANORAMIC H{alpha} IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Yusei; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Nakata, Fumiaki

    2011-06-10

    We present a wide-field H{alpha} imaging survey of the rich cluster CL0939+4713 (A851) at z = 0.41 with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, using the narrow-band filter NB921. The survey is sensitive to active galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) down to {approx}0.3 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} throughout the 27' x 27' field. We identified 445 H{alpha} emitters along the large-scale structures around the cluster. Using this sample, we find that (1) the fraction of H{alpha} emitters is a strong function of environment and shows a clear decline toward the cluster central region, and (2) the color of H{alpha} emitters is clearly dependent on environment. The majority of the H{alpha} emitters have blue colors with B - I < 2, but we find H{alpha} emitters with red colors as well. Such red emitters are very rare in the cluster center or its immediate surrounding regions, while they are most frequently found in groups located far away from the cluster center. These groups coincide with the environment where a sharp transition in galaxy color distribution is seen. This may suggest that dusty star formation activity tends to be involved in galaxy truncation processes that are effective in groups, and that it is probably related to the 'pre-processing' that generates present-day cluster S0 galaxies. Finally, we confirm that (3) the mass-normalized integrated SFR in clusters (i.e., the total SFR within 0.5 x R{sub 200} from the cluster center divided by the cluster dynamical mass) rapidly increases with look-back time following approximately {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 6} and is also correlated with the cluster mass.

  2. The Lyα luminosity function at z = 5.7 - 6.6 and the steep drop of the faint end: implications for reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sérgio; Sobral, David; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-08-01

    We present new results from the widest narrow band survey search for Lyα emitters at z = 5.7, just after reionization. We survey a total of 7 deg2 spread over the COSMOS, UDS and SA22 fields. We find over 11,000 line emitters, out of which 514 are robust Lyα candidates at z = 5.7 within a volume of 6.3 × 106 Mpc3. Our Lyα emitters span a wide range in Lyα luminosities, from faint to bright (LLyα ˜ 1042.5 - 44 erg s-1) and rest-frame equivalent widths (EW0 ˜ 25 - 1000 Å) in a single, homogeneous data-set. By combining all our fields we find that the faint end slope of the z = 5.7 Lyα luminosity function is very steep, with α =-2.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}. We also present an updated z = 6.6 Lyα luminosity function, based on comparable volumes and obtained with the same methods, which we directly compare with that at z = 5.7. We find a significant decline of the number density of faint Lyα emitters from z = 5.7 to z = 6.6 (by 0.5 ± 0.1 dex), but no evolution at the bright end/no evolution in L★. Faint Lyα emitters at z = 6.6 show much more extended haloes than those at z = 5.7, suggesting that neutral Hydrogen plays an important role, increasing the scattering and leading to observations missing faint Lyα emission within the epoch of reionization. All together, our results suggest that we are observing patchy reionization which happens first around the brightest Lyα emitters, allowing the number densities of those sources to remain unaffected by the increase of neutral Hydrogen fraction from z ˜ 5 to z ˜ 7.

  3. The deepest Herschel-PACS far-infrared survey: number counts and infrared luminosity functions from combined PEP/GOODS-H observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Berta, S.; Pozzi, F.; Elbaz, D.; Lutz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Charmandaris, V.; Chary, R.-R.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Magdis, G.; Maiolino, R.; Murphy, E.; Nordon, R.; Pannella, M.; Pérez García, A.; Poglitsch, A.; Rosario, D.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Scott, D.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.

    2013-05-01

    We present results from the deepest Herschel-Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) far-infrared blank field extragalactic survey, obtained by combining observations of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and GOODS-Herschel key programmes. We describe data reduction and theconstruction of images and catalogues. In the deepest parts of the GOODS-S field, the catalogues reach 3σ depths of 0.9, 0.6 and 1.3 mJy at 70, 100 and 160 μm, respectively, and resolve ~75% of the cosmic infrared background at 100 μm and 160 μm into individually detected sources. We use these data to estimate the PACS confusion noise, to derive the PACS number counts down to unprecedented depths, and to determine the infrared luminosity function of galaxies down to LIR = 1011 L⊙ at z ~ 1 and LIR = 1012 L⊙ at z ~ 2, respectively. For the infrared luminosity function of galaxies, our deep Herschel far-infrared observations are fundamental because they provide more accurate infrared luminosity estimates than those previously obtained from mid-infrared observations. Maps and source catalogues (>3σ) are now publicly released. Combined with the large wealth of multi-wavelength data available for the GOODS fields, these data provide a powerful new tool for studying galaxy evolution over a broad range of redshifts. Based on observations carried out by the Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Cosmological model dependence of the galaxy luminosity function: far-infrared results in the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A.; Andreani, P.; Gruppioni, C.; February, S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Berta, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: This is the first paper of a series aiming at investigating galaxy formation and evolution in the giant-void class of the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models that best fits current cosmological observations. Here we investigate the luminosity function (LF) methodology, and how its estimates would be affected by a change on the cosmological model assumed in its computation. Are the current observational constraints on the allowed cosmology enough to yield robust LF results? Methods: We used the far-infrared source catalogues built on the observations performed with the Herschel/PACS instrument and selected as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) survey. Schechter profiles were obtained in redshift bins up to z ≈ 4, assuming comoving volumes in both the standard model, that is, the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric with a perfect fluid energy-momentum tensor, and non-homogeneous LTB dust models, parametrized to fit the current combination of results stemming from the observations of supernovae Ia, the cosmic microwave background, and baryonic acoustic oscillations. Results: We find that the luminosity functions computed assuming both the standard model and LTB void models show in general good agreement. However, the faint-end slope in the void models shows a significant departure from the standard model up to redshift 0.4. We demonstrate that this result is not artificially caused by the used LF estimator which turns out to be robust under the differences in matter-energy density profiles of the models. Conclusions: The differences found in the LF slopes at the faint end are due to variation in the luminosities of the sources that depend on the geometrical part of the model. It follows that either the standard model is over-estimating the number density of faint sources or the void models are under-estimating it.

  5. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy √s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for √s = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for √sNN = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at √s = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determines the luminosity with a precision of 1.16%. This represents the most precise luminosity measurement achieved so far at a bunched-beam hadron collider.

  6. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  7. H{alpha} ABSORPTION IN TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li Zhiyun E-mail: pla7y@virginia.edu

    2013-08-01

    Absorption of stellar H{alpha} by the upper atmosphere of the planet HD 189733b has recently been detected by Jensen et al. Motivated by this observation, we have developed a model for atomic hydrogen in the n = 2 state and compared the resulting H{alpha} line profile to the observations. The model atmosphere is in hydrostatic balance, as well as thermal and photoionization equilibrium. Collisional and radiative transitions are included in the determination of the n = 2 state level population. We find that H{alpha} absorption is dominated by an optical depth {tau} {approx} 1 shell, composed of hydrogen in the metastable 2s state that is located below the hydrogen ionization layer. The number density of the 2s state within the shell is found to vary slowly with radius, while that of the 1s state falls rapidly. Thus while the Ly{alpha} absorption, for a certain wavelength, occurs inside a relatively well defined impact parameter, the contribution to H{alpha} absorption is roughly uniform over the entire atomic hydrogen layer. The model can approximately reproduce the observed Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} integrated transit depths for HD 189733b by using an ionization rate enhanced over that expected for the star by an order of magnitude. For HD 209458b, we are unable to explain the asymmetric H{alpha} line profile observed by Jensen et al., as the model produces a symmetric line profile with transit depth comparable to that of HD 189733b. In an appendix, we study the effect of the stellar Ly{alpha} absorption on the net cooling rate.

  8. Morphology and Molecular Gas Fractions of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies as a Function of Infrared Luminosity and Merger Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, K. L.; Sanders, D. B.; Barnes, J. E.; Ishida, C. M.; Evans, A. S.; U, V.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Kim, D.-C.; Privon, G. C.; Mirabel, I. F.; Flewelling, H. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new, detailed analysis of the morphologies and molecular gas fractions (MGFs) for a complete sample of 65 local luminous infrared galaxies from Great Observatories All-Sky Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRG) Survey using high resolution I-band images from The Hubble Space Telescope, the University of Hawaii 2.2 m Telescope and the Pan-STARRS1 Survey. Our classification scheme includes single undisturbed galaxies, minor mergers, and major mergers, with the latter divided into five distinct stages from pre-first pericenter passage to final nuclear coalescence. We find that major mergers of molecular gas-rich spirals clearly play a major role for all sources with {L}{IR}\\gt {10}11.5{L}ȯ ; however, below this luminosity threshold, minor mergers and secular processes dominate. Additionally, galaxies do not reach {L}{IR}\\gt {10}12.0{L}ȯ until late in the merger process when both disks are near final coalescence. The mean MGF ({MGF} = {M}{{{H}}2}/({M}* +{M}{{{H}}2})) for non-interacting and early-stage major merger LIRGs is 18 ± 2%, which increases to 33 ± 3%, for intermediate stage major merger LIRGs, consistent with the hypothesis that, during the early-mid stages of major mergers, most of the initial large reservoir of atomic gas (HI) at large galactocentric radii is swept inward where it is converted into molecular gas (H2).

  9. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UV-CONTINUUM AND Ly{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z > 6

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Linhua; Egami, Eiichi; Walth, Gregory; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Matsuda, Yuichi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Tohru; Ota, Kazuaki; Ouchi, Masami

    2011-12-10

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations of z > 6 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The candidates were selected as i'-dropout objects down to z' = 27 AB magnitudes from an ultra-deep SDF z'-band image. With the Keck spectroscopy we identified 19 LBGs with prominent Ly{alpha} emission lines at 6 {<=} z {<=} 6.4. The median value of the Ly{alpha} rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) is {approx}50 A, with four EWs >100 A. This well-defined spectroscopic sample spans a UV-continuum luminosity range of -21.8 {<=} M{sub UV} {<=} -19.5 (0.6 {approx} 5 L*{sub UV}) and a Ly{alpha} luminosity range of (0.3-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-3 L*{sub Ly{alpha}}). We derive the UV and Ly{alpha} luminosity functions (LFs) from our sample at (z) {approx} 6.2 after we correct for sample incompleteness. We find that our measurement of the UV LF is consistent with the results of previous studies based on photometric LBG samples at 5 < z < 7. Our Ly{alpha} LF is also generally in agreement with the results of Ly{alpha}-emitter surveys at z {approx} 5.7 and 6.6. This study shows that deep spectroscopic observations of LBGs can provide unique constraints on both the UV and Ly{alpha} LFs at z > 6.

  10. The evolution of the [O II], H β and [O III] emission line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, Johan; Zhu, Guangtun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Norberg, Peder; Newman, Jeffrey; Tresse, Laurence; Richard, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Raichoor, Anand; Prada, Francisco; Maraston, Claudia; Yèche, Christophe; Delubac, Timothée; Jullo, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [O II}] (λ λ 3726,3729) (0.5 < z < 1.3), Hβ (λ4861) (0.3 < z < 0.8) and [O {III}] (λ 5007) (0.3 < z < 0.8). Our measurements are based on 35 639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of ˜107 Mpc3. We present the first measurement of the Hβ LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity (L*) and density (φ*) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [O {II}] emitters, the characteristic luminosity L*(z = 0.5) = 3.2 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.7 ± 0.2 from z = 0.5 to 1.3; for Hβ emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 1.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.0 ± 0.2 from z = 0.3 to 0.8; and for [O {III}] emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 7.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 from z = 0.3 to 0.8.

  11. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  12. The luminosity of galactic components and morphological segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Solanes, J. M.; Salvador-Sole, E.; Sanroma, M.; I.E.C., Barcelona )

    1989-09-01

    The luminosities of the bulge and disk components of disk galaxies are analyzed, and the possible correlation of these luminosities with morphological type and local density is explored. Galaxies of different types are found to be located in distinct bands in the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio vs total luminosity diagram, allowing the determination of the typical bulge luminosity function of disk galaxies of different types from their respective total luminosity functions, along with a better characterization of morphological segregation among disk galaxies. No evidence for any bulge luminosity segregation is found, and disks appear to be less luminous with increasing local density. 33 refs.

  13. The Herschel* PEP-HERMES Luminosity Function- I. Probing the Evolution of PACS Selected Galaxies to z approx. equal to 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruppioni, Carlotta; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G.; Andreani, P.; Cimatti, A.; Ilbert, O.; LeFloc'h, E.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Marchetti, L.; Monaco, P.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Popesso, P.; Riguccini, L.; Roseboom, I.; Rosario, D. J.; Sargent, M.; Vaccari, M.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Bock, J.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Nguyen, H. T.; Schulz, B.; Shupe, D. L.; Xu, C. K.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit the deep and extended far-IR data sets (at 70, 100 and 160 µm) of the Herschel Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) Survey, in combination with the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data at 250, 350 and 500 µm, to derive the evolution of the rest-frame 35-, 60-, 90- and total infrared (IR) luminosity functions (LFs) up to z 4.We detect very strong luminosity evolution for the total IR LF (LIR ? (1 + z)(sup 3.55 +/- 0.10) up to z 2, and ? (1 + z)(sup 1.62 +/- 0.51) at 2 less than z less than approximately 4) combined with a density evolution (? (1 + z)(sup -0.57 +/- 0.22) up to z 1 and ? (1 + z)(sup -3.92 +/- 0.34) at 1 less than z less than approximately 4). In agreement with previous findings, the IR luminosity density (?IR) increases steeply to z 1, then flattens between z 1 and z 3 to decrease at z greater than approximately 3. Galaxies with different spectral energy distributions, masses and specific star formation rates (SFRs) evolve in very different ways and this large and deep statistical sample is the first one allowing us to separately study the different evolutionary behaviours of the individual IR populations contributing to ?IR. Galaxies occupying the well-established SFR-stellar mass main sequence (MS) are found to dominate both the total IR LF and ?IR at all redshifts, with the contribution from off-MS sources (=0.6 dex above MS) being nearly constant (20 per cent of the total ?IR) and showing no significant signs of increase with increasing z over the whole 0.8 < z <2.2 range. Sources with mass in the range 10 = log(M/solar mass) = 11 are found to dominate the total IR LF, with more massive galaxies prevailing at the bright end of the high-z (greater than approximately 2) LF. A two-fold evolutionary scheme for IR galaxies is envisaged: on the one hand, a starburst-dominated phase in which the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH) grows and is obscured by dust (possibly triggered by a major merging event

  14. Measuring the stellar luminosity function and spatial density profile of the inner 0.5 pc of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan; Ghez, Andrea; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark R.; Yelda, Sylvana; Martinez, Gregory D.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Wright, Shelley; Bullock, James; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Matthews, K.

    2012-07-01

    We report on measurements of the luminosity function of early (young) and late-type (old) stars in the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster as well as the density profiles of both components. The young (~ 6 Myr) and old stars (> 1 Gyr) in this region provide different physical probes of the environment around a supermassive black hole; the luminosity function of the young stars offers us a way to measure the initial mass function from star formation in an extreme environment, while the density profile of the old stars offers us a probe of the dynamical interaction of a star cluster with a massive black hole. The two stellar populations are separated through a near-infrared spectroscopic survey using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser guide star adaptive optics system. This spectroscopic survey is able to separate early-type (young) and late-type (old) stars with a completeness of 50% at K' = 15.5. We describe our method of completeness correction using a combination of star planting simulations and Bayesian inference. The completeness corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars contains significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared to previous surveys with similar depth. In addition, by using proper motion and radial velocity measurements along with anisotropic spherical Jeans modeling of the cluster, it is possible to measure the spatial density profile of the old stars, which has been difficult to constrain with number counts alone. The most probable model shows that the spatial density profile, n(r) propto r-γ, to be shallow with γ = 0.4 ± 0.2, which is much flatter than the dynamically relaxed case of γ = 3/2 to 7/4, but does rule out a 'hole' in the distribution of old stars. We show, for the first time, that the spatial density profile, the black hole mass, and velocity anisotropy can be fit simultaneously to obtain a black hole mass that is consistent with that derived from

  15. LOWER-LUMINOSITY GALAXIES COULD REIONIZE THE UNIVERSE: VERY STEEP FAINT-END SLOPES TO THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z {>=} 5-8 FROM THE HUDF09 WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Labbe, I.; Franx, M.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P. A.; Magee, D.; Stiavelli, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Van Dokkum, P.

    2012-06-10

    The HUDF09 data are the deepest near-IR observations ever, reaching to 29.5 mag. Luminosity functions (LFs) from these new HUDF09 data for 132 z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies are combined with new LFs for z {approx} 5-6 galaxies and the earlier z {approx} 4 LF to reach to very faint limits (<0.05 L*{sub z=3}). The faint-end slopes {alpha} are steep: -1.79 {+-} 0.12 (z {approx} 5), -1.73 {+-} 0.20 (z {approx} 6), -2.01 {+-} 0.21 (z {approx} 7), and -1.91 {+-} 0.32 (z {approx} 8). Slopes {alpha} {approx}< -2 lead to formally divergent UV fluxes, though galaxies are not expected to form below {approx} - 10 AB mag. These results have important implications for reionization. The weighted mean slope at z {approx} 6-8 is -1.87 {+-} 0.13. For such steep slopes, and a faint-end limit of -10 AB mag, galaxies provide a very large UV ionizing photon flux. While current results show that galaxies can reionize the universe by z {approx} 6, matching the Thomson optical depths is more challenging. Extrapolating the current LF evolution to z > 8, taking {alpha} to be -1.87 {+-} 0.13 (the mean value at z {approx} 6-8), and adopting typical parameters, we derive Thomson optical depths of 0.061{sup +0.009}{sub -0.006}. However, this result will change if the faint-end slope {alpha} is not constant with redshift. We test this hypothesis and find a weak, though uncertain, trend to steeper slopes at earlier times (d{alpha}/dz {approx} -0.05 {+-} 0.04) that would increase the Thomson optical depths to 0.079{sup +0.063}{sub -0.017}, consistent with recent WMAP estimates ({tau} = 0.088 {+-} 0.015). It may thus not be necessary to resort to extreme assumptions about the escape fraction or clumping factor. Nevertheless, the uncertainties remain large. Deeper WFC3/IR+ACS observations can further constrain the UV ionizing flux from faint galaxies.

  16. CONSTRAINING THE EXOZODIACAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: COMPLETE RESULTS FROM THE KECK NULLER MID-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M.; Bryden, G.; Doré, O.; Traub, W.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Absil, O.; Wyatt, M.; Danchi, W.; Kuchner, M.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Defrère, D.; Hinz, P.; Ragland, S.; Scott, N.; Woillez, J.

    2014-12-20

    -infrared counterpart points to populations of very hot and small (submicron) grains piling up very close to the sublimation radius. For solar-type stars with no known infrared excess, likely to be the most relevant targets for a future exo-Earth direct imaging mission, we find that their median zodi level is 12 ± 24 zodis and lower than 60 (90) zodis with 95% (99%) confidence, if a lognormal zodi luminosity distribution is assumed.

  17. Constraining the Exozodiacal Luminosity Function of Main-sequence Stars: Complete Results from the Keck Nuller Mid-infrared Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M.; Absil, O.; Bryden, G.; Wyatt, M.; Danchi, W.; Defrère, D.; Doré, O.; Hinz, P.; Kuchner, M.; Ragland, S.; Scott, N.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Traub, W.; Woillez, J.

    2014-12-01

    -infrared counterpart points to populations of very hot and small (submicron) grains piling up very close to the sublimation radius. For solar-type stars with no known infrared excess, likely to be the most relevant targets for a future exo-Earth direct imaging mission, we find that their median zodi level is 12 ± 24 zodis and lower than 60 (90) zodis with 95% (99%) confidence, if a lognormal zodi luminosity distribution is assumed.

  18. H-alpha confirmation of novae in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharov, E.; Nikolov, G.; Kostov, A.; Bozhilov, V.; Minev, M.; Valcheva, A.; Nedialkov, P.

    2015-08-01

    We report H-alpha and BR-band photometry of three objects in M31, suspected as novae. The objects are: PNV J00420640+4108211 = 2015-03a? (ATel# 7189), 2015-07c? (ATel# 7795, ATel #7818) and TCP J00401150+4042199 = 2015-07e? (ATel #7834).

  19. Constraining the Infrared Luminosity and Star Formation Rate Function in the Local Universe: a benchmark for high-z galaxy evolution studies exploiting Spitzer and Herschel large-area surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Lucia; Vaccari, Mattia; Franceschini, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Infrared wavelengths contain fundamental information about the origin of galaxies and black holes and about the evolutionary history of star formation, metal production and gravitational accretion, and the luminosity function has effectively been used to quantify the statistical nature of the evolution of galaxies and black holes through their luminosity distribution as a function of redshift and environment. While the determination of high-redshift luminosity functions requires deep observations, local luminosity functions can be estimated from shallower and wider-area sky maps and are fundamental benchmarks for high-redshift galaxy formation and evolution studies as well as for models describing these processes. To this aim, large-area infrared surveys have been jointly carried out over the last few years with the Spitzer and Herschel satellites as e.g. part of the SWIRE and HerMES projects, and in our work we exploited these datasets as well as supporting multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy to provide the most accurate determination to date of the local (0Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Function. I will discuss these new constraints and how they compare with semi-analytic model predictions as well as other multi-wavelength estimates of the evolving star formation rate. Finally I will discuss the future development of these studies in the context of new facilities like SPICA and SKA.

  20. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  1. GAMA/WiggleZ: the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies and their redshift evolution to z = 0.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Michael B.; Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Couch, Warrick J.; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Prescott, M.; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David

    2016-07-01

    We present radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The radio AGN are separated into low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z < 0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as {˜ } (1+z)^{0.06^{+0.17}_{-0.18}} assuming pure density evolution or {˜ } (1+z)^{0.46^{+0.22}_{-0.24}} assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by {˜ } (1+z)^{2.93^{+0.46}_{-0.47}} assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed, the best-fitting HERG evolution is parametrized by {˜ } (1+z)^{7.41^{+0.79}_{-1.33}}. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (≳1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.

  2. THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES VIA DROPOUT SELECTION AT REDSHIFTS z {approx} 7 AND 8 FROM THE 2012 ULTRA DEEP FIELD CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Stark, Daniel P.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Rogers, Alexander B.; Cirasuolo, Michele; Koekemoer, Anton; Charlot, Stephane; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2013-05-10

    We present a catalog of high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected to lie within the redshift range z {approx_equal} 7-8 using the Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12), the deepest near-infrared (near-IR) exposures yet taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a result of the increased near-IR exposure time compared to previous HST imaging in this field, we probe {approx}0.65 (0.25) mag fainter in absolute UV magnitude, at z {approx} 7 (8), which increases confidence in a measurement of the faint end slope of the galaxy luminosity function. Through a 0.7 mag deeper limit in the key F105W filter that encompasses or lies just longward of the Lyman break, we also achieve a much-refined color-color selection that balances high redshift completeness and a low expected contamination fraction. We improve the number of dropout-selected UDF sources to 47 at z {approx} 7 and 27 at z {approx} 8. Incorporating brighter archival and ground-based samples, we measure the z {approx_equal} 7 UV luminosity function to an absolute magnitude limit of M{sub UV} = -17 and find a faint end Schechter slope of {alpha}=-1.87{sup +0.18}{sub -0.17}. Using a similar color-color selection at z {approx_equal} 8 that takes our newly added imaging in the F140W filter into account, and incorporating archival data from the HIPPIES and BoRG campaigns, we provide a robust estimate of the faint end slope at z {approx_equal} 8, {alpha}=-1.94{sup +0.21}{sub -0.24}. We briefly discuss our results in the context of earlier work and that derived using the same UDF12 data but with an independent photometric redshift technique.

  3. Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7 IN THE SUBARU/XMM-NEWTON DEEP SURVEY FIELD: PHOTOMETRIC CANDIDATES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Kazuaki; Ouchi, Masami; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Totani, Tomonori; Nagashima, Masahiro; Harayama, Atsushi; Kodaka, Natsuki; Tajitsu, Akito; Hattori, Takashi

    2010-10-10

    We conducted a deep narrowband NB973 (FWHM = 200 A centered at 9755 A) survey of z = 7 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field, using the fully depleted CCDs newly installed on the Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam, which is twice more sensitive to z = 7 Ly{alpha} at {approx}1 {mu}m than the previous CCDs. Reaching the depth 0.5 mag deeper than our previous survey in the Subaru Deep Field that led to the discovery of a z = 6.96 LAE, we detected three probable z = 7 LAE candidates. Even if all the candidates are real, the Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) at z = 7 shows a significant deficit from the LF at z = 5.7 determined by previous surveys. The LAE number and Ly{alpha} luminosity densities at z = 7 are {approx}7.7%-54% and {approx}5.5%-39%, respectively, of those at z = 5.7, to the Ly{alpha} line luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) {approx}> 9.2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. This could be due to evolution of the LAE population at these epochs as a recent galaxy evolution model predicts that the LAE modestly evolves from z = 5.7 to 7. However, even after correcting for this effect of galaxy evolution on the decrease in LAE number density, the z = 7 Ly{alpha} LF still shows a deficit from z = 5.7 LF. This might reflect the attenuation of Ly{alpha} emission by neutral hydrogen remaining at the epoch of reionization and suggests that reionization of the universe might not be complete yet at z = 7. If we attribute the density deficit to reionization, the intergalactic medium transmission for Ly{alpha} photons at z = 7 would be 0.4 {<=} T {sup IGM}{sub Ly{alpha} {<=}} 1, supporting the possible higher neutral fraction at the earlier epochs at z > 6 suggested by the previous surveys of z = 5.7-7 LAEs, z {approx} 6 quasars, and z > 6 gamma-ray bursts.

  4. A 10 deg2 Lyman α survey at z=8.8 with spectroscopic follow-up: strong constraints on the luminosity function and implications for other surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, Jorryt J. A.; Sobral, David; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Best, P. N.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Franx, Marijn; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Candidate galaxies at redshifts of z ˜ 10 are now being found in extremely deep surveys, probing very small areas. As a consequence, candidates are very faint, making spectroscopic confirmation practically impossible. In order to overcome such limitations, we have undertaken the CF-HiZELS survey, which is a large-area, medium-depth near-infrared narrow-band survey targeted at z = 8.8 Lyman α (Lyα) emitters (LAEs) and covering 10 deg2 in part of the SSA22 field with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). We surveyed a comoving volume of 4.7 × 106 Mpc3 to a Lyα luminosity limit of 6.3 × 1043 erg s-1. We look for Lyα candidates by applying the following criteria: (i) clear emission-line source, (ii) no optical detections (ugriz from CFHTLS), (iii) no visible detection in the optical stack (ugriz > 27), (iv) visually checked reliable NBJ and J detections and (v) J - K ≤ 0. We compute photometric redshifts and remove a significant amount of dusty lower redshift line-emitters at z ˜ 1.4 or 2.2. A total of 13 Lyα candidates were found, of which two are marked as strong candidates, but the majority have very weak constraints on their spectral energy distributions. Using follow-up observations with SINFONI/VLT, we are able to exclude the most robust candidates as LAEs. We put a strong constraint on the Lyα luminosity function at z ˜ 9 and make realistic predictions for ongoing and future surveys. Our results show that surveys for the highest redshift LAEs are susceptible of multiple contaminations and that spectroscopic follow-up is absolutely necessary.

  5. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrowband Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matt A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro

    2007-03-01

    SDF line-emitting galaxies in four narrowband filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broadband colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple NB filters are used to distinguish Hα, [O II], and [O III] emitters at z=0.07-1.47 to construct their LFs. These LFs are derived down to faint magnitudes, allowing for an accurate determination of the faint-end slope. With a large (N~200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each LF. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [O III] and [O II] LFs agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches 2 orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al., is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low-luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1. The faint-end slope α and φ* show a strong redshift evolution, while L* shows little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated SFR densities are derived via Hα, [O III], and [O II] for 0.07function of redshift, is seen for 0.41, the SFR densities are similar. The latter is consistent with previous UV and [O II] measurements. Below z<0.4, the SFR densities are consistent with several Hα, [O II], and UV measurements, but others are a factor of 2 higher. For example, the z=0.066-0.092 LF agrees with Jones & Bland-Hawthorn, but at z=0.24 and 0.40, their number densities are twice as high. This discrepancy can be explained by cosmic variance. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. The z > 1.2 Optical Luminosity Function from a Sample of 410,000 Galaxies in Boӧtes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beare, Richard; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Bian, Fuyan; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼410,000 galaxies to a depth of {I}{AB}=24 over 8.26 deg2 in the Boötes field (∼10 times larger than the z∼ 1 luminosity function (LF) studies in the prior literature), we have accurately measured the evolving B-band LF of red galaxies at z\\lt 1.2 and blue galaxies at z\\lt 1.0. In addition to the large sample size, we utilize photometry that accounts for the varying angular sizes of galaxies, photometric redshifts verified with spectroscopy, and absolute magnitudes that should have very small random and systematic errors. Our results are consistent with the migration of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence as they cease to form stars and with downsizing in which more massive and luminous blue galaxies cease star formation earlier than fainter less massive ones. Comparing the observed fading of red galaxies with that expected from passive evolution alone, we find that the stellar mass contained within the red galaxy population has increased by a factor of ∼3.6 from z∼ 1.1 to z∼ 0.1. The bright end of the red galaxy LF fades with decreasing redshift, with the rate of fading increasing from ∼0.2 mag per unit redshift at z = 1.0 to ∼0.8 at z = 0.2. The overall decrease in luminosity implies that the stellar mass in individual highly luminous red galaxies increased by a factor of ∼2.2 from z = 1.1 to z = 0.1.

  7. DISSECTION OF H{alpha} EMITTERS : LOW-z ANALOGS OF z > 4 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram

    2013-03-01

    Strong H{alpha} emitters (HAEs) dominate the z {approx} 4 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) population. We have identified local analogs of these HAEs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. At z < 0.4, only 0.04% of the galaxies are classified as HAEs with H{alpha} equivalent widths ({approx}> 500 A) comparable to that of z {approx} 4 HAEs. Local HAEs have lower stellar mass and lower ultraviolet (UV) luminosity than z {approx} 4 HAEs, yet the H{alpha}-to-UV luminosity ratio, as well as their specific star formation rate, is consistent with that of z {approx} 4 HAEs, indicating that they are scaled-down versions of high-z star-forming galaxies. Compared to the previously studied local analogs of LBGs selected using rest-frame UV properties, local HAEs show similar UV luminosity surface density, weaker D{sub n} (4000) break, lower metallicity, and lower stellar mass. This implies that the local HAEs are less evolved galaxies than the traditional Lyman break analogs. In the stacked spectrum, local HAEs show a significant He II {lambda}4686 emission line suggesting a population of hot, massive stars similar to that seen in some Wolf-Rayet galaxies. Low [N II]/[O III] line flux ratios imply that local HAEs are inconsistent with being systems that host bright active galactic nuclei. Instead, it is highly likely that local HAEs are galaxies with an elevated ionization parameter, either due to a high electron density or large escape fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons as in the case of Wolf-Rayet galaxies.

  8. A Subaru/Suprime-Cam wide-field survey of globular cluster populations around M87 - I. Observation, data analysis and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Naoyuki; Sharples, Ray M.; Arimoto, Nobuo; Onodera, Masato; Ohta, Kouji; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2006-12-01

    In this paper and a companion paper, we report on a wide-field imaging survey of the globular cluster (GC) populations around M87 carried out with Suprime-Cam on the 8.2-m Subaru telescope. Here, we describe the observations, data reduction and data analysis, and present luminosity functions of GC populations around M87 and NGC 4552, another luminous Virgo elliptical in our survey field. The imaging data were taken in the B, V and I bands with a sky coverage of extending from the M87 centre out to ~0.5 Mpc. GC candidates were selected by applying a colour criterion on the B - V and V - I diagram to unresolved objects, which greatly reduces contamination. The data from control fields taken with Subaru/Suprime-Cam were also analysed for subtraction of contamination in the GC sample. These control field data are compatible with those in the M87 field in terms of the filter set (BVI), limiting magnitudes and image quality, which minimize the possibility of introducing any systematic errors into the subtractive correction. We investigate GC luminosity functions (GCLFs) at distances <= 10 arcmin (<~45 kpc) from the host galaxy centre in detail. By fitting Gaussians to the GCLFs, the V-band turnover magnitude (VTO) is estimated to be 23.62 +/- 0.06 and 23.56 +/- 0.20 mag for the GC population in M87 and NGC 4552, respectively. The GCLF is found to be a function of GC colour; VTO of the red GC subpopulation (V - I > 1.1) is fainter than that of the blue GC subpopulation (V - I <= 1.1) in both M87 and NGC 4552, as expected if the colour differences are primarily due to a metallicity effect, and the mass functions of the two subpopulations are similar. The radial dependence of the GCLF is also investigated for the GC population in M87. The GCLF of each subpopulation at 1 <= R <= 5 arcmin is compared to that at 5 <= R <= 10arcmin, but no significant trend with distance is found in the shape of the GCLF. We also estimate GC-specific frequencies (SN) for M87 and NGC 4552. The

  9. A DETECTION OF H{alpha} IN AN EXOPLANETARY EXOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, Seth; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Koesterke, Lars; Barman, Travis E-mail: sredfield@wesleyan.edu E-mail: wdc@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: barman@lowell.edu

    2012-06-01

    We report on a search for H{alpha} absorption in four exoplanets. Strong features at H{alpha} are observed in the transmission spectra of both HD 189733b and HD 209458b. We attempt to characterize and remove the effects of stellar variability in HD 189733b, and along with an empirical Monte Carlo test the results imply a statistically significant transit-dependent feature of (- 8.72 {+-} 1.48) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} integrated over a 16 A band relative to the adjacent continuum. We interpret this as the first detection of this line in an exoplanetary atmosphere. A previous detection of Ly{alpha} in HD 189733b's atmosphere allows us to calculate an excitation temperature for hydrogen, T{sub exc} = 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K. This calculation depends significantly on certain simplifying assumptions. We explore these assumptions and argue that T{sub exc} is very likely much greater than the radiative equilibrium temperature (the temperature the planet is assumed to be at based on stellar radiation and the planetary distance) of HD 189733b. A large T{sub exc} implies a very low density that is not in thermodynamic equilibrium with the planet's lower atmosphere. We argue that the n = 2 hydrogen required to cause H{alpha} absorption in the atmosphere is created as a result of the greater UV flux at HD 189733b, which has the smallest orbit and most chromospherically active central star in our sample. Though the overall integration of HD 209458b's transmission spectrum over a wide band is consistent with zero, it contains a dramatic, statistically significant feature in the transmission spectrum with reflectional symmetry. We discuss possible physical processes that could cause this feature. Our remaining two targets (HD 147506b and HD 149026b) do not show any clear features, so we place upper limits on their H{alpha} absorption levels.

  10. Cloud modeling of a quiet solar region in Halpha .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostanci, Z. F.; Al Erdoğan, N.

    We present chromospheric cloud modeling on the basis of Halpha profile-sampling images taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). We choose the required reference background profile by using theoretical NLTE profile synthesis. The resulting cloud parameters are converted into estimates of physical parameters (temperature and various densities). Their mean values compare well with the VAL-C model.

  11. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  12. A complete X-ray sample of the high-latitude /absolute value of b greater than 20 deg/ sky from HEAO 1 A-2 - Log N-log S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An all-sky survey of X-ray sources was performed, complete to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x 10 to the -11 ergs/sq cm/s in the 2-10 keV band. The complete sample has allowed construction of luminosity functions based on a flux-limited sample for clusters of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Integration of the best-fit luminosity functions indicates that clusters of galaxies contribute about 4% of the 2-10 keV DXRB, and active galactic nuclei about 20%. It is predicted that many of the objects seen in the deep survey should be local, relatively low luminosity active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies.

  13. Effect of primordial non-Gaussianities on the far-UV luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies: implications for cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Silk, Joseph; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Habouzit, Melanie; Mamon, Gary A.; Peirani, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z ≳ 6 is one of the big challenges of current high-redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the cosmological model, and in particular in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations, affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run five different N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a phenomenological galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to MFUV = -14 at redshift 7 ≤ z ≤ 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on ≲ Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced (up to a factor of 3 at z = 14) in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such scale-dependent non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth τe. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of τe still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that τe could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties

  14. THE ACS FORNAX CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN VIRGO AND FORNAX EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AND ITS USE AS A DISTANCE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, Daniela; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Jordan, Andres; Infante, Leopoldo; Peng, Eric W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Mei, Simona; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2010-07-10

    We use a highly homogeneous set of data from 132 early-type galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax clusters in order to study the properties of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF). The globular cluster system of each galaxy was studied using a maximum likelihood approach to model the intrinsic GCLF after accounting for contamination and completeness effects. The results presented here update our Virgo measurements and confirm our previous results showing a tight correlation between the dispersion of the GCLF and the absolute magnitude of the parent galaxy. Regarding the use of the GCLF as a standard candle, we have found that the relative distance modulus between the Virgo and Fornax clusters is systematically lower than the one derived by other distance estimators, and in particular, it is 0.22 mag lower than the value derived from surface brightness fluctuation measurements performed on the same data. From numerical simulations aimed at reproducing the observed dispersion of the value of the turnover magnitude in each galaxy cluster we estimate an intrinsic dispersion on this parameter of 0.21 mag and 0.15 mag for Virgo and Fornax, respectively. All in all, our study shows that the GCLF properties vary systematically with galaxy mass showing no evidence for a dichotomy between giant and dwarf early-type galaxies. These properties may be influenced by the cluster environment as suggested by cosmological simulations.

  15. A statistical study of nearby galaxies. I. NIR growth curves and optical-to-NIR colors as a function of type, luminosity and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioc, Michel; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    1999-11-01

    Growth curves of the near-infrared (NIR) magnitude as a function of the aperture have been built and used to derive NIR total magnitudes from aperture data taken from the literature. By cross-correlating with optical and redshift data, absolute magnitudes and optical-to-NIR colors have been computed for some 1000 galaxies of different types. Significant color gradients are observed, underlining that small aperture colors may lead to a biased picture of the stellar populations of galaxies. A statistical analysis, using various estimators taking into account the intrinsic scatter, has been performed to establish relations between the colors, the morphological type, the inclination or the shape, and the intrinsic luminosity. The combination of the optical and the NIR should obviously improve our understanding of the evolution of galaxies. Despite the intrinsic scatter, especially among star-forming galaxies, optical-to-NIR colors show a very well defined sequence with type, blueing by 1.35 mag from ellipticals to irregulars. The colors of spiral galaxies strongly redden with increasing inclination and put new constraints on the modeling of the extinction. No such effect is observed for lenticular galaxies. We also find that rounder ellipticals tend to be redder. A color-absolute magnitude relation is observed inside each type, with a slope significantly steeper for early and intermediate spirals than for ellipticals or late spirals. This stresses the importance of considering both the mass and the type to study the star formation history of galaxies.

  16. New constraints on the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function from the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Civano, Francesca M.; Elvis, Martin; Urry, C. Megan; Comastri, Andrea; Chandra Cosmos Legacy Team

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, we present new results on number counts and luminosity function in the 0.5-2 and 2-10 keV bands, obtained in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey. The COSMOS field is the largest (2 deg2) field with a complete coverage at any wavelength, and the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey uniformly covers the 1.7 deg2 COSMOS/HST field to ~160 ksec depth, with a total of 2.8 Ms exposure time. This triples the area of the earlier deep C-COSMOS survey (limiting flux ~3e-16 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.5-2 keV band), and together these two projects cover a total area of 2.2 deg2, yielding a sample of ~4100 X-ray sources, ~2300 of which have been detected in the new observations. We describe how the survey improves our knowledge in the galaxy-super massive black hole co-evolution.

  17. New Constraints on the Faint End of the UV Luminosity Function at z ~ 7-8 Using the Gravitational Lensing of the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster A2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atek, Hakim; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde; Schaerer, Daniel; Clement, Benjamin; Limousin, Marceau; Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant universe far beyond the limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster A2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at z ~ 7 and eight candidates at z ~ 8 in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin2 in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function (LF) at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements reliably extend the z ~ 7 UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of M UV ~ -15.5. We find a characteristic magnitude of M\\star UV = -20.90+0.90-0.73 mag and a faint-end slope α =-2.01+0.20-0.28, close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01 L sstarf. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at z ~ 8 also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1 L sstarf. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at z > 7 that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide even better constraints on the buildup of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 13495, 11386, 13389, and 11689. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS

  18. The Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation of NGC 3115. III. Luminosity Functions of LMXBs and Dependence on Stellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Jennings, Zachary G.; Homan, Jeroen; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-07-01

    We studied the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115, using the Megasecond Chandra X-ray Visionary Project Observation. With a total exposure time of ˜1.1 Ms, we constructed the XLF down to a limiting luminosity of ˜1036 erg s-1, which is much deeper than that typically reached for other early-type galaxies. We found significant flattening of the overall LMXB XLF from dN/dL ∝ L-2.2±0.4 above 5.5 × 1037 erg s-1 to dN/dL ∝ L-1.0±0.1 below it, although we could not rule out a fit with a higher break at ˜1.6 × 1038 erg s-1. We also found evidence that the XLF of LMXBs in globular clusters (GCs) is overall flatter than that of field LMXBs. Thus, our results for this galaxy do not support the idea that all LMXBs are formed in GCs. The XLF of field LMXBs seems to show spatial variation, with the XLF in the inner region of the galaxy being flatter than that in the outer region, probably due to contamination of LMXBs from undetected and/or disrupted GCs in the inner region. The XLF in the outer region is probably the XLF of primordial field LMXBs, exhibiting dN/dL ∝ L-1.2±0.1 up to a break close to the Eddington limit of neutron star LMXBs (˜1.7 × 1038 erg s-1). The break of the GC LMXB XLF is lower, at ˜1.1 × 1037 erg s-1. We also confirm previous findings that the metal-rich/red GCs are more likely to host LMXBs than the metal-poor/blue GCs, which is more significant for more luminous LMXBs, and that more massive GCs are more likely to host LMXBs.

  19. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ∼ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ∼ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}∼ 7× {10}19 (z ∼ 0) to ∼1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ∼ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  20. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ˜ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ˜ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}˜ 7× {10}19 (z ˜ 0) to ˜1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ˜ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  1. The All-sky Kinematics of Diffuse Galactic H-alpha Emission from WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagon, Andrew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    WHAM-SS (Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper Sky Survey) is the first all-sky velocity-resolved survey of the faint optical emisison line radiation from the diffuse ionized gas of the Milky Way Galaxy. With an angular resolution of one degree, velocity resolution of 12 km/s, and velocity range of 200 km/s, it allows for the study of the kinematics of the ionized gas across the Galaxy. We present first results on the all-sky velocity distribution of this gas. We show the results of Gaussian decomposition of line profiles as well as first and second moment maps both in the disk and at high latitude, and compare our results with some simple models for the density and velocity field of this gas. As in Haffner et al. (2003), we find that the high-latitude sky is characterized by a low velocity "infall" (toward the plane) in H-alpha, although there are also regions of outflow. We also present the variation in line widths as a function of direction and show how these widths correlate with different structures in the warm ionized medium. This program was supported by NSF Award AST-1108911 (for WHAM) and NSF Award AST-1004881 for the Wisconsin REU program in Astrophysics.

  2. Study of H-alpha emission from solar limb prominences using Fabry-Perot interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, A. H.; Stapelberg, J.; Lategan, A. H.

    1981-02-01

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is an effective dispersing element for studying H-alpha emission from solar limb prominences. Having a reflecting coefficient in the range 0.85-0.95, the Fabry-Perot multiple beam interferometer behaves as an angular filter, forming circular interference fringes. Results from an investigation performed at the solar installation at Boyden Observatory in South Africa are presented, where a photographic Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to obtain fringes from the 656.3-nm H-alpha emission during April and May 1980. Successful scans were made with air admitted to the interferometer pressure chamber, and reduction of the data on photon count and chamber pressure was made by a UNIVAC 1108 computer. Sketches and profiles from the limb prominences are shown; a table of fringe half-widths, corrected for the instrumental width of the interferometer, were obtained by matching a Voigt function by a least-squares computer fit to the observed scanned Fabry-Perot fringe profiles.

  3. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. II. BLACK HOLE MASS AND EDDINGTON RATIO FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Shen, Yue

    2013-02-10

    We employ a flexible Bayesian technique to estimate the black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio functions for Type 1 (i.e., broad line) quasars from a uniformly selected data set of {approx}58, 000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. We find that the SDSS becomes significantly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} or L/L {sub Edd} {approx}< 0.07, and that the number densities of Type 1 quasars continue to increase down to these limits. Both the mass and Eddington ratio functions show evidence of downsizing, with the most massive and highest Eddington ratio BHs experiencing Type 1 quasar phases first, although the Eddington ratio number densities are flat at z < 2. We estimate the maximum Eddington ratio of Type 1 quasars in the observable universe to be L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 3. Consistent with our results in Shen and Kelly, we do not find statistical evidence for a so-called sub-Eddington boundary in the mass-luminosity plane of broad-line quasars, and demonstrate that such an apparent boundary in the observed distribution can be caused by selection effect and errors in virial BH mass estimates. Based on the typical Eddington ratio in a given mass bin, we estimate growth times for the BHs in Type 1 quasars and find that they are comparable to or longer than the age of the universe, implying an earlier phase of accelerated (i.e., with higher Eddington ratios) and possibly obscured growth. The large masses probed by our sample imply that most of our BHs reside in what are locally early-type galaxies, and we interpret our results within the context of models of self-regulated BH growth.

  4. Evolution of star formation in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field - I. Luminosity functions and cosmic star formation rate out to z = 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Alyssa B.; Simpson, Chris; Collins, Chris A.; James, Phil A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Ouchi, Masami; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, David G.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Best, Philip N.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Smith, Daniel J. B.

    2013-07-01

    We present new results on the cosmic star formation history in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS)-Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field out to z = 1.6. We compile narrow-band data from the Subaru Telescope and the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in conjunction with broad-band data from the SXDS and UDS, to make a selection of 5725 emission-line galaxies in 12 redshift slices, spanning 10 Gyr of cosmic time. We determine photometric redshifts for the sample using 11-band photometry, and use a spectroscopically confirmed subset to fine tune the resultant redshift distribution. We use the maximum-likelihood technique to determine luminosity functions in each redshift slice and model the selection effects inherent in any narrow-band selection statistically, to obviate the retrospective corrections ordinarily required. The deep narrow-band data are sensitive to very low star formation rates (SFRs), and allow an accurate evaluation of the faint end slope of the Schechter function, α. We find that α is particularly sensitive to the assumed faintest broad-band magnitude of a galaxy capable of hosting an emission line, and propose that this limit should be empirically motivated. For this analysis, we base our threshold on the limiting observed equivalent widths of emission lines in the local Universe. We compute the characteristic SFR of galaxies in each redshift slice, and the integrated SFR density, ρSFR. We find our results to be in good agreement with the literature and parametrize the evolution of the SFR density as ρSFR ∝ (1 + z)4.58 confirming a steep decline in star formation activity since z ˜ 1.6.

  5. The galaxy luminosity function at z ≃ 6 and evidence for rapid evolution in the bright end from z ≃ 7 to 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, R. A. A.; Dunlop, J. S.; McLure, R. J.; McCracken, H. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Furusawa, H.; Taniguchi, Y.; Le Fèvre, O.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jarvis, M. J.; Häußler, B.

    2015-09-01

    We present the results of a search for bright (-22.7 ≤ MUV ≤ -20.5) Lyman-break galaxies at z ≃ 6 within a total of 1.65 deg2 of imaging in the UltraVISTA/Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) and United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) fields. The deep near-infrared imaging available in the two independent fields, in addition to deep optical (including z'-band) data, enables the sample of z ≃ 6 star-forming galaxies to be securely detected longward of the break (in contrast to several previous studies). We show that the expected contamination rate of our initial sample by cool Galactic brown dwarfs is ≲3 per cent and demonstrate that they can be effectively removed by fitting brown dwarf spectral templates to the photometry. At z ≃ 6, the galaxy surface density in the UltraVISTA field exceeds that in the UDS by a factor of ≃ 1.8, indicating strong cosmic variance even between degree-scale fields at z > 5. We calculate the bright end of the rest-frame Ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 6. The galaxy number counts are a factor of ˜1.7 lower than predicted by the recent LF determination by Bouwens et al. In comparison to other smaller area studies, we find an evolution in the characteristic magnitude between z ≃ 5 and z ≃ 7 of ΔM* ˜ 0.4, and show that a double power law or a Schechter function can equally well describe the LF at z = 6. Furthermore, the bright end of the LF appears to steepen from z ≃ 7 to z ≃ 5, which could indicate the onset of mass quenching or the rise of dust obscuration, a conclusion supported by comparing the observed LFs to a range of theoretical model predictions.

  6. The high-mass end of the red sequence at z ˜ 0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS: completeness, bimodality and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Swanson, Molly; Dawson, Kyle; Prada, Francisco; Eisenstein, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; McBride, Cameron K.; Favole, Ginevra; Guo, Hong; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an analytical method based on forward-modelling techniques to characterize the high-mass end of the red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift z ˜ 0.55, from the DR10 BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) CMASS spectroscopic sample, which comprises ˜600 000 galaxies. The method, which follows an unbinned maximum likelihood approach, allows the deconvolution of the intrinsic CMASS colour-colour-magnitude distributions from photometric errors and selection effects. This procedure requires modelling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g - r colour and r - i colour using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. Our results indicate that the error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent, within the photometric uncertainties, with a single point (<0.05 mag) in the colour-colour plane at fixed magnitude, for a narrow redshift slice. We have computed the high-mass end (0.55Mi ≲ -22) of the 0.55i-band RS luminosity function (RS LF) in several redshift slices within the redshift range 0.52 < z < 0.63. In this narrow redshift range, the evolution of the RS LF is consistent, within the uncertainties in the modelling, with a passively evolving model with Φ* = (7.248 ± 0.204) × 10- 4 Mpc-3 mag-1, fading at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 mag per unit redshift. We report RS completeness as a function of magnitude and redshift in the CMASS sample, which will facilitate a variety of galaxy-evolution and clustering studies using BOSS. Our forward-modelling method lays the foundations for future studies using other dark-energy surveys like the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, which are affected by the same type of photometric blurring/selection effects.

  7. Full-disk Solar H-alpha Images From GONG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bolding, J.; Clark, R.; Hauth, D.; Hill, F.; Kroll, R.; Luis, G.; Mills, N.; Purdy, T.; Henney, C.; Holland, D.; Winter, J.

    2011-05-01

    Since mid-2010 the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) has collected H-alpha images at six sites around the world. These images provide a near real-time solar activity patrol for use in space weather applications and also an archive for research purposes. Images are collected once per minute, dark, smear, and flat corrected, compressed and then sent via the Internet to a 'cloud' server where reduction is completed. Various reduced images are usually available within a minute after exposure. The H-alpha system is an add-on to the normal GONG helioseismology instrument and does not interfere with regular observations. A polarizing beamsplitter sends otherwise unused 656 nm light through two lenses to a Daystar 0.04 nm mica etalon filter. The filter is matched to an image of the GONG light feed entrance pupil and sees an image of the Sun at infinity. Two lenses behind the filter form the solar image on a DVC-4000 2k x 2k interline transfer CCD camera. Exposure times are automatically adjusted to maintain the quiet disk center at 20% of full dynamic range to avoid saturation by bright flares. Image resolution is limited by diffraction, seeing and some high-order wavefront errors in the filters. A unique dual-heater system was developed by Daystar to homogenize the passband characteristics of the mica etalons. The data are in regular use for space weather forecasting by the U.S. Air Force Weather Agency, which funded construction and installation of the instruments. Operational and reduction improvements are underway and archived data are already being used for research projects. The Web site URL is http://halpha.nso.edu.

  8. An H-alpha velocity study of S252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, W. F.; Gary, G. A.; Odell, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The H II region S252 (NGC 2175) was studied by means of H-alpha radial velocities and line widths. The velocity structure appears to be dominated by the western ionization front, abutting a dense neutral cloud which is a CO source, and by symmetry abut the ionizing star. This data, together with other studies of CO, H167-alpha, and the H II radio continuum, allow construction of a model of S252. The H II model is basically a double blister formed by a luminous hot star being located between two orthogonal, elongated neutral clouds.

  9. Morphology and evolution of a h-alpha eruptive prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okten, A.; Dermendjiev, V. N.; Petrov, N. I.; Ozisik, T.; Esenoglu, H. H.

    An eruptive prominence has been observed in H-alpha on 18 June 1989 at western solar limb (N10 degree;W90degree) in time interval 08:39-09:22 UT. The eruption started as expansion of the upper part of a filament channel crossing the equator. Several arches of erupting prominence material have been registered in more than 31 frames. All the frames have been processed and analyzed by means of microdensitometer and image processing technique for study the morphology of the eruptive event.

  10. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  11. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  12. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  13. A study of solar flare energy transport based on coordinated H-alpha and X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Zarro, Dominic M.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the ratio between H-alpha to nonthermal hard X-ray emission was investigated using coordinated H-alpha and hard- and soft-X-ray observations of five solar flares (on May 7, June 23, June 24, and June 25, 1980 and on April 30, 1985). These observations were used to estimate the emitted flare energy flux F(H-alpha) in H-alpha, the flux of F(2O) energy deposited by nonthermal electrons with energies above 20 keV, and the pressure p(c) of soft X-ray-emitting plasma as functions of time during the impulsive phase of each flare. It was found that the F(H-alpha)/F(2O) ratio shows a power-law dependence on F(2O), with a slope that differs slightly from that predicted by the static thick-target model of solar transport. Results also indicate that the power-law dependence is modified by hydrostatic pressure effects.

  14. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  15. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  16. Toward the Standard Population Synthesis Model of the X-Ray Background: Evolution of X-Ray Luminosity and Absorption Functions of Active Galactic Nuclei Including Compton-thick Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ~ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  17. Broad Halpha Wing Formation in the Planetary Nebula IC 4997.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hyung

    2000-02-10

    The young and compact planetary nebula IC 4997 is known to exhibit very broad wings with a width exceeding 5000 km s-1 around Halpha. We propose that the broad wings are formed through Rayleigh-Raman scattering that involves atomic hydrogen, by which Lybeta photons with a velocity width of a few 102 km s-1 are converted to optical photons and fill the Halpha broad wing region. The conversion efficiency reaches 0.6 near the line center, where the scattering optical depth is much larger than 1, and rapidly decreases in the far wings. Assuming that close to the central star there exists an unresolved inner compact core of high density, nH approximately 109-1010 cm-3, we use the photoionization code "CLOUDY" to show that sufficient Lybeta photons for scattering are produced. Using a top-hat-incident profile for the Lybeta flux and a scattering region with a H i column density NHi=2x1020 cm-2 and a substantial covering factor, we perform a profile-fitting analysis in order to obtain a satisfactory fit to the observed flux. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of the Rayleigh-Raman processes in planetary nebulae and other emission objects. PMID:10642203

  18. Observations of H-alpha Polarization in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickey, D. L.; Metcalf, T. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2000-05-01

    Max Millennium Coordinated Observing Plan #006 has as its goal the measurement of H-alpha linear polarization, a possible signature of low-energy proton beams in solar flares. Such observations have been attempted in the past, but the results were inconclusive. A campaign involving Mees Solar Observatory and Big Bear Solar Observatory, together with Yohkoh, SOHO and TRACE spacecraft, was carried out during the latter half of March 2000. We present preliminary results from the observations with the Imaging Vector Magnetograph at Mees Solar Observatory. The IVM was operated in a standard mode, except that the spectral scan was limited to one point in the core of H-alpha and one in the blue wing. This limited spectral sampling, together with a recently upgraded data acquisition system, permitted a complete measurement of Stokes vectors every 3.5 seconds. The field of view was 280 arc sec square, with one arc sec pixels. A second camera, exposed simultaneously but with a broad-band filter, provides images which allow compensation for relative image motion and stretch between exposures. Approximately two dozen flares were observed by the IVM during the campaign, including one X-class and one M-class flare. We present samples of the observations, including relevant spacecraft observations, and discuss the sensitivity of the IVM to linear polarization under these conditions. This work was supported in part by the SXT project at LMSAL (contract NAS5-38099) and by NASA grant NAG5-4941.

  19. THE BRIGHT END OF THE ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 8: NEW CONSTRAINTS FROM CANDELS DATA IN GOODS-SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Carollo, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    We present new z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates from a search over {approx}95 arcmin{sup 2} of WFC3/IR data, tripling the previous search area for bright z {approx} 8 galaxies. Our analysis uses newly acquired WFC3/IR imaging data from the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury program over the GOODS-South field. These new data are combined with existing deep optical Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging to search for relatively bright (M {sub UV} < -19.5 mag) z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates using the Lyman break technique. These new candidates are used to determine the bright end of the UV luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 7.2-8.7, i.e., a cosmic age of 600 {+-} 80 Myr. To minimize contamination from lower redshift galaxies, we make full use of all optical ACS data and impose strict non-detection criteria based on an optical {chi}{sup 2} {sub opt} flux measurement. In the whole search area, we identify 16 candidate z {approx} 8 galaxies, spanning a magnitude range H {sub 160,AB} = 25.7-27.9 mag. The new data show that the UV LF is a factor {approx}1.7 lower at M {sub UV} < -19.5 mag than determined from the HUDF09 and Early Release Science (ERS) data alone. Combining this new sample with the previous candidates from the HUDF09 and ERS data allows us to perform the most accurate measurement of the z {approx} 8 UV LF yet. Schechter function fits to the combined data result in a best-fit characteristic magnitude of M {sub *}(z = 8) = -20.04 {+-} 0.46 mag. The faint-end slope is very steep, though quite uncertain, with {alpha} = -2.06 {+-} 0.32. A combination of wide-area data with additional ultra-deep imaging will be required to significantly reduce the uncertainties on these parameters in the future.

  20. Fitting the luminosity decay in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.; Shiltsev, V.; Slaughter, A.J.; Xiao, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    This paper explores how to fit the decay of the luminosity in the Tevatron. The standard assumptions of a fixed-lifetime exponential decay are only appropriate for very short time intervals. A ''1/time'' functional form fits well, and is supported by analytical derivations. A more complex form, assuming a time-varying lifetime-like term, also produces good results. Changes in the luminosity can be factored into two phenomena: The luminosity burn-off rate, and the burn-off rate from non-luminosity effects. This is particularly relevant for the antiprotons in the Tevatron. The luminous and the non-luminous burn rate of the antiprotons are shown for Tevatron stores.

  1. Prominence and Cool Loop Energetics Measured in the UV, EUV, and H-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of moving features in a prominence jet, a approx. 10(exp 5)K loop near a prominence channel, and an erupting prominence. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands and with ground based H-alpha data to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us perform DEM analysis and to calculate limits on densities, pressures, and the thermal and kinetic energies of the moving sources.

  2. Hipparcos luminosities and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedding, Timothy R.

    Asteroseismology involves using the resonant frequencies of a star to infer details about its internal structure and evolutionary state. Large efforts have been made and continue to be made to measure oscillation frequencies with both ground- and space-based telescopes, with typical precisions of one part in 103-104. However, oscillation frequencies are most useful when accompanied by accurate measurements of the more traditional stellar parameters such as luminosity and effective temperature. The Hipparcos catalogue provides luminosities with precisions of a few percent or better for many oscillating stars. I briefly discuss the importance of Hipparcos measurements for interpreting asteroseismic data on three types of oscillating stars: δ Scuti variables, rapidly oscillating Ap stars and solar-like stars.

  3. THE INTERACTING GALAXY PAIR KPG 390: H{alpha} KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we present scanning Fabry-Perot (FP) H{alpha} observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/79 obtained with the PUMA FP interferometer. We derived velocity fields and rotation curves for both galaxies. For NGC 5278 we also obtained the residual velocity map to investigate the non-circular motions, and estimated its mass by fitting the rotation curve with disk+halo components. We test three different types of halos (pseudo-isothermal, Hernquist, and Navarro-Frenk-White) and obtain satisfactory fits to the rotation curve for all profiles. The amount of dark matter required by the pseudo-isothermal profile is about 10 times smaller than that for the other two halo distributions. Finally, our kinematical results together with the analysis of dust lane distribution and of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis allowed us to determine univocally that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  4. Pulsar H(alpha) Bowshocks probe Neutron Star Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a KOALA/AAOmega study of southern pulsar bow shocks. These rare, Balmer-dominated, non-radiative shocks provide an ideal laboratory to study the interaction of the relativistic pulsar wind with the ISM. We will cover H(alpha) at high spectral resolution to measure the kinematics of the upstream ISM and the post-shock flow, while the blue channel measures the Balmer decrement and probes for a faint cooling component. These data, with MHD models, allow us to extract the 3D flow geometry and the orientation and asymmetry of the pulsar wind. These data can also measure the pulsar spindown power, thus estimating the neutron star moment of inertia and effecting a fundamental test of dense matter physics.

  5. Searching for Non-Circular Motions in Halpha Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Wesley; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present Halpha velocity fields for four spiral galaxies: NGC 2654, NGC 2841, NGC 5746 and NGC 6674. These velocity fields were constructed from SparsePak IFU data taken on the WIYN telescope at KPNO. We use the DiskFit code to model the kinematics of these galaxies and to determine a rotation curve for each object. We find that two of these galaxies, NGC 2654 and NGC 5746, are nearly edge-on and display both photometric and kinematic evidence of a bar. NGC 6674 is closer to face-on and shows the signatures of a bar and ring. The velocity field of NGC 2841 does not show evidence for significant non-circular motions in the disk.

  6. NON-MAXWELLIAN Halpha PROFILES IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook E-mail: winkler@middlebury.ed E-mail: lee.j.joon@gmail.co

    2010-04-01

    The broad components of the Halpha lines in most non-radiative shocks can be fit with single-Gaussian components. We have obtained a high-quality spectrum of a position in Tycho's supernova remnant with the MMT and Blue Channel Spectrograph which shows, for the first time, that a single Gaussian does not provide an acceptable fit. This implies that a single temperature Maxwellian particle velocity distribution cannot produce the emission. Possible alternative explanations are explored, including multiple shocks along the line of sight, a pickup ion contribution, a non-thermal tail (Kappa distribution), emission from a precursor in a cosmic ray modified shock, or turbulence. An Hubble Space Telescope image shows a bright knot that might account for a low temperature contribution, and all the possibilities probably contribute at some level. We discuss the implications of each explanation for the shock parameters and physics of collisionless shocks, but cannot conclusively rule out any of them.

  7. Luminosity Distributions of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Thomas M.; Preece, Robert D.; Paciesas, William S.

    1996-05-01

    The intrinsic luminosities of gamma-ray bursts are found to be constrained by the BATSE/PVO combined intensity distribution, assuming that (1) bursts originate in {LAMBDA} = 0, {OMEGA} = 1 Friedmann cosmology with a nonevolving density distribution, (2) the nonevolving intrinsic luminosity function can be modeled as a truncated power law, and (3) burst spectra are modeled as power laws with identical spectral indices. These simplifying assumptions allow constraints to be placed on luminosity functions in cosmological gamma-ray burst scenarios and indicate that standard-candle sources are not favored. In general, either the minimum burst luminosity L_min_ or the maximum burst luminosity L_max_ are known, with the opposite end of the luminosity function unconstrained. Both L_max_ and L_min_ must be specified for luminosity power-law indices near 2. When these results are combined with other studies measuring other cosmological burst signatures, it is possible that the intrinsic luminosity function contains more low-luminosity bursts than high-luminosity ones.

  8. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. III. X-RAY, RADIO, AND Halpha ACTIVITY TRENDS IN M AND L DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Basri, G.; Fleming, T. A.; Liebert, J.; Giampapa, M. S.; Gizis, J. E.; MartIn, E.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2010-01-20

    As part of our on-going investigation into the magnetic field properties of ultracool dwarfs, we present simultaneous radio, X-ray, and Halpha observations of three M9.5-L2.5 dwarfs (BRI 0021-0214, LSR 060230.4+391059, and 2MASS J052338.2-140302). We do not detect X-ray or radio emission from any of the three sources, despite previous detections of radio emission from BRI 0021 and 2M0523-14. Steady and variable Halpha emission are detected from 2M0523-14 and BRI 0021, respectively, while no Halpha emission is detected from LSR 0602+39. Overall, our survey of nine M8-L5 dwarfs doubles the number of ultracool dwarfs observed in X-rays, and triples the number of L dwarfs, providing in addition the deepest limits to date, log(L{sub X}/L{sub bol}) approx< -5. With this larger sample we find the first clear evidence for a substantial reduction in X-ray activity, by about two orders of magnitude, from mid-M to mid-L dwarfs. We find that the decline in Halpha roughly follows L{sub Ha}lpha/L{sub bol} propor to 10{sup -0.4x(SP-6)} for SP >= 6, where SP = 0 for spectral type M0. In the radio band, however, the luminosity remains relatively unchanged from M0 to L4, leading to a substantial increase in L{sub rad}/L{sub bol}. Our survey also provides the first comprehensive set of simultaneous radio/X-ray/Halpha observations of ultracool dwarfs, and reveals a clear breakdown of the radio/X-ray correlation beyond spectral type M7, evolving smoothly from L{sub n}u{sub ,rad}/L{sub X} approx 10{sup -15.5} to approx10{sup -11.5} Hz{sup -1} over the narrow spectral-type range M7-M9. This breakdown reflects the substantial reduction in X-ray activity beyond M7, but its physical origin remains unclear since, as evidenced by the uniform radio emission, there is no drop in the field dissipation and particle acceleration efficiency. Based on the results of our survey, we conclude that a further investigation of magnetic activity in ultracool dwarfs will benefit from a two-pronged approach

  9. Star formation, extinction and metallicity at 0.7H-alpha fluxes and sizes from a grism survey of GOODS-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    The global star formation rate {SFR} is 10x higher at z=1 than today. This could be due to drastically elevated SFR in some fraction of galaxies, such as mergers with central bursts, or a higher SFR across the board. Either means that the conditions in z=1 star forming galaxies could be quite different from local objects. The next step beyond measuring the global SFR is to determine the dependence of SFR, obscuration, metallicity, and size of the star-forming region on galaxy mass and redshift. However, SFR indicators at z=1 typically apply local calibrations for UV, [O II] and far-IR, and do not agree with each other on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis. Extinction, metallicity, and dust properties cause uncontrolled offsets in SFR calibrations. The great missing link is Balmer H-alpha, the most sensitive probe of SFR. We propose a slitless WFC3/G141 IR grism survey of GOODS-N, at 2 orbits/pointing. It will detect Ha+[N II] emission from 0.7H-alpha fluxes and sizes for > 600 galaxies, and a small number of higher-redshift emitters. This will produce: an emission-line redshift survey unbiased by magnitude and color selection; star formation rates as a function of galaxy properties, e.g. stellar mass and morphology/mergers measured by ACS; comparisons of SFRs from H-alpha to UV and far-IR indicators; calibrations of line ratios of H-alpha to important nebular lines such as [O II] and H-beta, measuring variations in metallicity and extinction and their effect on SFR estimates; and the first measurement of scale lengths of the H-alpha emitting, star-forming region in a large sample of z 1 sources.

  10. Analysis of hydrogen H-alpha observations of the coma of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.; Scherb, Frank; Roesler, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Particle Trajectory Model of Combi and Smyth (1988) is used here to analyze observations of the H-alpha coma of Comet Halley. The solar excitation mechanism for the H-alpha emissions line is described. The H2O production rates derived for the H-alpha brightness measurements are shown to be very consistent with the H2O production rates determined from other Comet Halley observations of the H, O, and OH comae. Revised H2O production rates determined from 6300 A brightness measurements are presented.

  11. Search for rapid H-alpha variability studies in Be stars - 28 Eri, X Ophiuchi, 66 Ophiuchi and Pi Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, K. K.

    1988-10-01

    In order to search for rapid H&alpha; variability in Be stars, a series of H&alpha; profiles were observed on a time scale of few minutes for 28 Eri, X Oph, 66 Oph and π Aqr. In total, 95 and 54 H&alpha; profiles were obtained for the program Be stars and the standard stars respectively. The theoretical expression of Chalabaev and Maillard (1983) was used to estimate the uncertainty of the H&alpha; equivalent width measurements. It is found that rapid variations of continuum level and equivalent widths of H&alpha; line are absent.

  12. HIGHER LUMINOSITY B-FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, John T

    2002-08-20

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 3-4 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 4fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s{sup -1} appears possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  13. H-alpha Off-limb Carrington Synoptic Charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, L.; Hughes, A.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar prominences (and filaments) reveal complex structures, with significant differences inmorphology, lifetime, and complexity of their magnetic field environment. Studies of thesesolar features are important for understanding not only their origin but also their role as precursors ofenergetic events such as flares and coronal mass ejections.The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) operated by the National Solar Observatory provides, amongother products, high-cadence broad-band intensity measurements centered in the core ofH-alpha spectral line. Prominences and filaments are quite visible in these 2Kx2K images, that havebeen obtained since 2010. We recentlystarted a project to produce an archive of H-alpha off-limb Carrington Synoptic Charts to be usedfor systematic studies of prominences. Charts are produced to show both spatial and temporal variabilityof these features in four radius zones covering 1.01 to 1.11 solar radii. Here we describe the applied methodologyand show some preliminary results. Potential applications of interest to the solar and heliospheric communitiesare also briefly discussed.

  14. SOLAR H{alpha} OSCILLATIONS FROM INTENSITY AND DOPPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2013-03-01

    Chromospheric wave activity around flares and filaments has been a research focus for years, and could provide indirect measurements of local conditions that are not otherwise accessible. One interesting observed phenomenon is oscillations in filaments, activated by distant flares and the large-scale waves they produce. Characteristics of these oscillations, such as periods, amplitudes, and lifetimes, can provide unique information about the filament. We measure oscillation properties in flares and filaments from H{alpha} chromospheric data using a new method that provides important spatial and frequency content of the dynamics. We apply the method to two flare events where filaments are observed to oscillate and determine their properties. We find strong oscillatory signal in flaring active regions in the chromosphere over a range of frequencies. Two filaments are found to oscillate without any detectable chromospheric wave acting as an activation mechanism. We find that filaments oscillate with periods of tens of minutes, but variations are significant at small spatial scales along the filamentary region. The results suggest that there is a frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude, as well as a spatial dependence along single filaments that is more difficult to quantify. It also appears that the strength of the oscillations does not necessarily depend on the strength of the trigger, although there are other possible effects that make this conclusion preliminary. Applications of this technique to other events and different data sets will provide important new insights into the local energy densities and magnetic fields associated with dynamic chromospheric structures.

  15. A search for optical pulsations from GX 1+4 at H-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzeminski, W.; Priedhorsky, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    H-alpha observations of the binary-star candidate for the slowly pulsating hard X-ray source GX 1+4 are reported which were undertaken to search for pulsations in the H-alpha flux that are synchronous with the X-ray period of about 2 min. No significant periodic variation of the candidate star was detected in the frequency band searched. Three-sigma upper limits of 1.7% (sinusoidal pulse shape) and 0.7% (X-ray pulse shape) are set for the pulsed fraction of the H-alpha flux. It is noted that because of possible diffusion from a cloud that is optically thick to Balmer radiation, the observed lack of pulsations in the H-alpha flux need not compromise the identification of GX 1+4 with the candidate star.

  16. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  17. The X-ray luminosity functions of field low-mass X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies: Evidence for a stellar age dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.; Berkeley, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sivakoff, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span ≈3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background active galactic nuclei/galaxies. We find that the 'young' early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (≈2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L {sub X} ≳ (5-10) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) per unit K-band luminosity (L{sub K} ; a proxy for stellar mass) than the 'old' early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (≈8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of ≈2-3 excess of L {sub X}/L{sub K} for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  18. ON THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH-LATITUDE H{alpha} BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Adolf N.; Vijh, Uma P.; Gold, Benjamin; Barnes, Frank S.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Madsen, Gregory J.

    2010-12-01

    The diffuse high-latitude H{alpha} background is widely believed to be predominantly the result of in situ recombination of ionized hydrogen in the warm interstellar medium of the Galaxy. Instead, we show that both a substantial fraction of the diffuse high-latitude H{alpha} intensity in regions dominated by Galactic cirrus dust and much of the variance in the high-latitude H{alpha} background are the result of scattering by interstellar dust of H{alpha} photons originating elsewhere in the Galaxy. We provide an empirical relation, which relates the expected scattered H{alpha} intensity to the IRAS 100 {mu}m diffuse background intensity, applicable to about 81% of the entire sky. The assumption commonly made in reductions of cosmic microwave background observations, namely that the observed all-sky map of diffuse H{alpha} light is a suitable template for Galactic free-free foreground emission, is found to be in need of reexamination.

  19. The most luminous z ∼ 9-10 galaxy candidates yet found: The luminosity function, cosmic star-formation rate, and the first mass density estimate at 500 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Momcheva, I.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P.; Gonzalez, V.; Trenti, M.; Brammer, G. B.; Skelton, R. E.; Spitler, L. R.

    2014-05-10

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H {sub 160} ∼ 26-27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z ∼ 9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z ∼ 10 galaxy candidates that are known, just ∼500 Myr after the big bang. Two similarly bright sources are also detected in a reanalysis of the GOODS-S data set. Three of the four galaxies in GOODS-N are significantly detected at 4.5σ-6.2σ in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm data, as is one of the GOODS-S candidates. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z = 10.2 ± 0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 μm (6.9σ), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope β = –2.0 ± 0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. Thorough testing and use of grism data excludes known low-redshift contamination at high significance, including single emission-line sources, but as-yet unknown low redshift sources could provide an alternative solution given the surprising luminosity of these candidates. Finding such bright galaxies at z ∼ 9-10 suggests that the luminosity function for luminous galaxies might evolve in a complex way at z > 8. The cosmic star formation rate density still shows, however, an order-of-magnitude increase from z ∼ 10 to z ∼ 8 since the dominant contribution comes from low-luminosity sources. Based on the IRAC detections, we derive galaxy stellar masses at z ∼ 10, finding that these luminous objects are typically 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. This allows for a first estimate of the cosmic stellar mass density at z ∼ 10 resulting in log{sub 10} ρ{sub ∗}=4.7{sub −0.8}{sup +0.5} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} for galaxies brighter than M {sub UV} ∼ –18. The remarkable brightness, and hence luminosity, of these z ∼ 9-10 candidates will enable deep spectroscopy to determine their redshift and nature, and highlights the opportunity for the James Webb Space Telescope to map the buildup of

  20. The X-Ray Luminosity Function of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-type Galaxies, Their Metal-rich, and Metal-poor Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2016-02-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the globular clusters (GCs) and fields of seven early-type galaxies. These galaxies are selected to have both deep Chandra observations, which allow their LMXB populations to be observed to X-ray luminosities of 1037-1038 erg s-1, and Hubble Space Telescope optical mosaics that enable the X-ray sources to be separated into field LMXBs, GC LMXBs, and contaminating background and foreground sources. We find that at all luminosities the number of field LMXBs per stellar mass is similar in these galaxies. This suggests that the field LMXB populations in these galaxies are not effected by the GC specific frequency, and that properties such as binary fraction and the stellar initial mass function are either similar across the sample or change in a way that does not affect the number of LMXBs. We compare the XLF of the field LMXBs to that of the GC LMXBs and find that they are significantly different with a p-value of 3 × 10-6 (equivalent to 4.7σ for a normal distribution). The difference is such that the XLF of the GC LMXBs is flatter than that of the field LMXBs, with the GCs hosting relatively more bright sources and fewer faint sources. A comparison of the XLF of the metal-rich and metal-poor GCs hints that the metal-poor clusters may have more bright LMXBs, but the difference is not statistically significant.

  1. STS atmospheric luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the STS-8 space shuttle mission special photographic and TV operations were carried out to record the properties of the spacecraft induced luminosities. One of these luminous phenomena is the quiescent vehicle glow which was photographed during the STS-8 mission with an image intensified photographic camera, with and without an objective grating. During the latter part of the mission the altitude of the shuttle was relatively low (120 n.m. = 222 km) and unprecedentedly high intensity of the glow was observed. The crew reported that the glow was easily visible to the naked eye. The proper orientation of the shuttle with respect to the velocity vector and the objective grating permitted the exposure of good objective spectrum of the glow in the visible region. From the results it is clear that the spectrum appears to be a continuum as observed by the image intensifier objective grating camera. Qualitative examination of the data shows that there is very tail little glow ion the wavelength range of 4300 to about 5000 angstroms. Above 5000 angstroms the glow becomes stronger towards the red and then it falls off towards higher wavelength and of the spectrum presumably because of the responsivity of the device.

  2. The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. Matthew; Reynolds, Ronald J.; Babler, Brian L.; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen; Jaehnig, Kurt P.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Chopra, Nitish; Pingel, Nickolas; Reese, Daniel T.; Gostisha, Martin; Wunderlin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We present the first all-sky, kinematic survey of Hα from the Milky Way, combining survey observations taken with the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) from Kitt Peak (1997-2007) and Cerro Tololo (2009-present). The WHAM Sky Survey (WHAM-SS) reaches sensitivity levels of about 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 pc cm^-6) with emission detected toward every direction in the sky. Each pointing of the survey comprises a spatially integrated spectrum from a one-degree beam on the sky covering at least 200 km/s around the Local Standard of Rest with 12 km/s spectral resolution. WHAM was designed primarily to study the pervasive warm ionized medium (WIM) component of the interstellar medium (ISM) but also reveals many large-scale, locally-ionized regions throughout the Galaxy. The WIM is a diffuse but thick component of the ISM that extends several kiloparsecs into the Galactic halo with a kinematic signature that traces the gaseous spiral arms of the Galaxy. In addition to this fairly smooth global emission, the Hα sky contains many individual H II regions and supernova remnants, a few revealed in the WHAM-SS for the first time. Some locations are dominated by complex filamentary network of diffuse ionized gas where the ISM has been shaped by past winds and supernovae and is now powered by a new wave of star formation. At high latitudes, faint emission from intermediate-velocity clouds is also regularly present. The success of WHAM as a fully remote observing facility for nearly two decades is due in no small part to the excellent and responsive support staff at KPNO in Arizona and CTIO in Chile. WHAM has been designed, built, and operated primarily through support of the National Science Foundation. The current research presented here is funded by award AST-1108911.

  3. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  4. Luminosity determination at proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    2015-03-01

    Luminosity is a key parameter in any particle collider, and its precise determination has proven particularly challenging at hadron colliders. After introducing the concept of luminosity in its multiple incarnations and offering a brief survey of the pp and p p bar colliders built to date, this article outlines the various methods that have been developed for relative-luminosity monitoring, as well as the complementary approaches considered for establishing an absolute luminosity scale. This is followed by a survey, from both a historical and a technical perspective, of luminosity determination at the ISR, the S p p ¯ S, the Tevatron, RHIC and the LHC. For each of these, we first delineate the interplay between the experimental context, the specificities of the accelerator, and the precision targets suggested by the physics program. We then detail how the different methods were applied to specific experimental environments and how successfully they meet the precision goals.

  5. THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY. II. THE EVOLUTION OF THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET SLOPE AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF 1.9 < z < 3.8 LAEs

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Adams, Joshua J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hao Lei; Fry, Alexander B.; Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Kelzenberg, Ralf; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; MacQueen, Phillip; Roth, Martin M.

    2011-07-20

    We study the escape of Ly{alpha} photons from Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) and the overall galaxy population using a sample of 99 LAEs at 1.9 < z < 3.8 detected through integral-field spectroscopy of blank fields by The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Pilot Survey. For 89 LAEs with broadband counterparts we measure ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and UV slopes, and estimate E(B - V) under the assumption of a constant intrinsic UV slope for LAEs. These quantities are used to estimate dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Comparison between the observed Ly{alpha} luminosity and that predicted by the dust-corrected SFR yields the Ly{alpha} escape fraction. We also measure the Ly{alpha} luminosity function and luminosity density ({rho}{sub Ly{alpha}}) at 2 < z < 4. Using this and other measurements from the literature at 0.3 < z < 7.7 we trace the redshift evolution of {rho}{sub Ly{alpha}.} We compare it to the expectations from the star formation history of the universe and characterize the evolution of the Ly{alpha} escape fraction of galaxies. LAEs at 2 < z < 4 selected down to a luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) > (3-6) x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (0.25-0.5 L*), have a mean (E(B - V)) = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, implying an attenuation of {approx}70% in the UV. They show a median UV uncorrected SFR = 11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, dust-corrected SFR = 34 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and Ly{alpha} equivalent widths (EWs) which are consistent with normal stellar populations. We measure a median Ly{alpha} escape fraction of 29%, with a large scatter and values ranging from a few percent to 100%. The Ly{alpha} escape fraction in LAEs correlates with E(B - V) in a way that is expected if Ly{alpha} photons suffer from similar amounts of dust extinction as UV continuum photons. This result implies that a strong enhancement of the Ly{alpha} EW with dust, due to a clumpy multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), is not a common process in LAEs at these redshifts. It also

  6. THE FORMATION OF THE H{alpha} LINE IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2012-04-20

    We use state-of-the-art radiation-MHD simulations and three-dimensional (3D) non-LTE radiative transfer computations to investigate H{alpha} line formation in the solar chromosphere and apply the results of this investigation to develop the potential of H{alpha} as a diagnostic of the chromosphere. We show that one can accurately model H{alpha} line formation assuming statistical equilibrium and complete frequency redistribution provided the computation of the model atmosphere included non-equilibrium ionization of hydrogen and the Ly{alpha} and Ly{beta} line profiles are described by Doppler profiles. We find that 3D radiative transfer is essential in modeling hydrogen lines due to the low photon destruction probability in H{alpha}. The H{alpha} opacity in the upper chromosphere is mainly sensitive to the mass density and only weakly sensitive to the temperature. We find that the H{alpha} line-core intensity is correlated with the average formation height: The larger the average formation height is, the lower the intensity will be. The line-core width is a measure of the gas temperature in the line-forming region. The fibril-like dark structures seen in H{alpha} line-core images computed from our model atmosphere are tracing magnetic field lines. These structures are caused by field-aligned ridges of enhanced chromospheric mass density that raise their average formation height, and therefore make them appear dark against their deeper-formed surroundings. We compare with observations, and find that the simulated line-core widths are very similar to the observed ones, without the need for additional microturbulence.

  7. STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME GALAXIES VIA H{alpha} AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET FLUXES

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I. E-mail: kei@sao.ru

    2013-09-15

    A distance-limited sample of 869 objects from the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog is used to characterize the star formation status of the Local Volume population. We present a compiled list of 1217 star formation rate (SFR) estimates for 802 galaxies within 11 Mpc, derived from the H{alpha} imaging surveys and the GALEX far-ultraviolet survey. We briefly discuss some basic scaling relations between SFR and luminosity, morphology, H I mass, surface brightness, and the environment of the galaxies. About 3/4 of our sample consist of dwarf galaxies, for which we offer a more refined classification. We note that the specific SFR of nearly all luminous and dwarf galaxies does not exceed the maximum value: log (SFR/L{sub K} ) = -9.4 [yr{sup -1}]. Most spiral and blue dwarf galaxies have enough time to generate their stellar mass during the cosmological time, T{sub 0}, with the observed SFRs. They dispose of a sufficient amount of gas to support their present SFRs over the next T{sub 0} term. We note that only a small fraction of BCD, Im, and Ir galaxies (about 1/20) proceed in a mode of vigorous starburst activity. In general, the star formation history of spiral and blue dwarf galaxies is mainly driven by their internal processes. The present SFRs of E, S0, and dSph galaxies typically have 1/30-1/300 of their former activity.

  8. SHORT TIMESCALE VARIATIONS OF THE H{alpha} DOUBLE-PEAKED PROFILE OF THE NUCLEUS OF NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Winge, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    The broad (FWHM {approx} 10,000 km s{sup -1}) double-peaked H{alpha} profile from the LINER/Seyfert 1 nucleus of NGC 1097 was discovered in 1991 and monitored for the following 11 years. The profile showed variations attributed to the rotation of gas in a non-axisymmetric Keplerian accretion disk, ionized by a varying radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) located in the inner parts of the disk. We present and model 11 new spectroscopic observations of the double-peaked profile taken between 2010 March and 2011 March. This series of observations was motivated by the finding that in 2010 March the flux in the double-peaked line was again strong, indeed, in 2010 December, even stronger than in the observations of a decade ago. We also discovered shorter timescale variations than in the previous observations: (1) the first, of {approx}7 days, is interpreted as due to 'reverberation' of the variation of the ionizing source luminosity, and the timescale of 7 days as the light crossing time between the source and the accretion disk; this new timescale and its interpretation provides a distance between the emitting gas and the supermassive black hole and as such introduces a new constraint on its mass; (2) the second, of Almost-Equal-To 5 months, was attributed to the rotation of a spiral arm in the disk, which was found to occur on the dynamical timescale. We use two accretion disk models to fit theoretical profiles to the new data, both having non-axisymmetric emissivities produced by the presence of an one-armed spiral. Our modeling constrains the rotation period for the spiral to be Almost-Equal-To 18 months. This work supports our previous conclusion that the broad double-peaked Balmer emission lines in NGC 1097-and probably also in other low-luminosity active nuclei-originate from an accretion disk ionized by a central RIAF.

  9. THE LBT BOOeTES FIELD SURVEY. I. THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET AND NEAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CLUSTERING OF BRIGHT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dave, Romeel; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard F.; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U{sub spec}-band imaging survey (9 deg{sup 2}) covering the NOAO Booetes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by {>=}3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z {approx} 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z {approx} 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 {mu}m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity.

  10. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  11. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  12. Subaru Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Images of LkHalpha 234

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Eri; Fukagawa, Misato; Shibai, Hiroshi; Ito, Yusuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2009-08-05

    We present high-resolution (0''.2) near-infrared images of the Herbig Ae/Be star LkHalpha 234 taken with the stellar coronagraphic camera CIAO (Coronagraphic Imager with Adaptive Optics) on the Subaru Telescope. We have observed LkHalpha 234, located in the NGC 7129 star formation region at 1.25 kpc, using the adaptive optics and the coronagraph. Near-infrared (J, H, K, L' and M' bands) images obtained reveal detailed circumstellar structures around LkHalpha 234. Six young stellar object (YSO) candidates are detected at 2''-10'' from LkHalpha 234, and four out of six candidates are identified for the first time. Our high-resolution imaging reveals the complex morphology of the reflection nebula which is located at approximately 3'' from LkHalpha 234 and extended more than 10'' toward the west. The newly found object in H and K bands may be the source of the reflection nebula.

  13. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1Luminosity Function and the Dust Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.550%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  14. MONITORING H{alpha} EMISSION AND CONTINUUM OF UXORs: RR Tauri

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Megan; Villaume, Alexa; Weiss, Lauren; Sliski, David; Strelnitski, Vladimir; Walker, Gary; Williams, Jedediyah; Henden, Arne; Krajci, Tom

    2011-11-15

    The Maria Mitchell Observatory, in collaboration with the Astrokolkhoz Observatory, started a program of photometric monitoring of UX Ori-type stars (UXORs) with narrowband interference filters (IFs; augmented with the traditional broadband filters) aimed at separating the H{alpha} emission variations from those of the continuum. We present the method of separation and the first results for RR Tau obtained in two seasons, each roughly 100 days long (2010 Winter-Spring and 2010 Fall-2011 Spring). We confirm the conclusion from previous studies that the H{alpha} emission in this star is less variable than the continuum. Although some correlation between the two is not excluded, the amplitude of H{alpha} variations is much smaller (factors of 3-5) than that of the continuum. These results are compatible with Grinin's model of UXORs, which postulates the presence of small obscuring circumstellar clouds as the cause of the continuum fading, as well as the presence of a circumstellar reflection/emission nebula, larger than the star and the obscuring clouds, which is responsible for H{alpha} emission and the effect of the 'color reversal' in deep minima. However, the results of both our broadband and narrowband photometry indicate that the obscuration model may be insufficient to explain all of the observations. Disk accretion, the presence of stellar or (proto) planetary companion(s), as well as the intrinsic variations of the star, may contribute to the observed light variations. We argue, in particular, that the H{alpha} emission may be more closely correlated with the intrinsic variations of the star than with the much stronger observed variations caused by the cloud obscuration. If this hypothesis is correct, the close monitoring of H{alpha} emission with IFs, accessible to small-size telescopes, may become an important tool in studying the physical nature of the UXORs' central stars.

  15. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply

  16. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  17. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  18. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  19. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z ∼ 7-8 USING THE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING OF THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER A2744

    SciTech Connect

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Clement, Benjamin; Jauzac, Mathilde; Schaerer, Daniel; Limousin, Marceau; Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald

    2015-02-10

    Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant universe far beyond the limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster A2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at z ∼ 7 and eight candidates at z ∼ 8 in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin{sup 2} in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function (LF) at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements reliably extend the z ∼ 7 UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of M {sub UV} ∼ –15.5. We find a characteristic magnitude of M{sub UV}{sup ⋆}=−20.90{sub −0.73}{sup +0.90} mag and a faint-end slope α=−2.01{sub −0.28}{sup +0.20}, close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01 L {sup *}. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at z ∼ 8 also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1 L {sup *}. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at z > 7 that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide even better constraints on the buildup of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization.

  20. The VLA Survey of Chandra Deep Field South. V. Evolution and Luminosity Functions of Sub-millijansky Radio Sources and the Issue of Radio Emission in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 μJy at the field center and redshift ~5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P >~ 3 × 1024 W Hz-1) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for ~30% of the sample and ~60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at <~ 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  1. The CMS pixel luminosity telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a new complement to the CMS detector for the LHC Run II data taking period. It consists of eight 3-layer telescopes based on silicon pixel detectors that are placed around the beam pipe on each end of CMS viewing the interaction point at small angle. A fast 3-fold coincidence of the pixel planes in each telescope will provide a bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity. Particle tracking allows collision products to be distinguished from beam background, provides a self-alignment of the detectors, and a continuous in-time monitoring of the efficiency of each telescope plane. The PLT is an independent luminometer, essential to enhance the robustness on the measurement of the delivered luminosity and to reduce its systematic uncertainties. This will allow to determine production cross-sections, and hence couplings, with high precision and to set more stringent limits on new particle production.

  2. A long-term study of H(alpha) line variations in FK Comae Berenices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Iyengar, Mrinal; Nations, Harold L.; Buzasi, Derek L.

    1993-01-01

    We present observations of H(alpha) V/R ratio variations in FK Comae Berencies obtained during several observing seasons from 1981 to 1992. The raw H(alpha) emission profile is always observed to be double peaked due to the stellar-absorption component. During the most years the V/R ratio varies regularly with the period of the photometric light curve. The V/R periodicity is most obvious when time spans no longer than several stellar rotations are considered. We propose that the bulk of the emission component of the H(alpha) line arises in corotating circumstellar material that may be similar to that of a quiescent solar prominence. The lifetime of these structures appears to be on the order of weeks. A weak contribution from a circumstellar disk is evident and chromospheric emission may also be present. The appearance or disappearance of circumstellar structures over periods longer than a few weeks, or the total absence of such structures, blurs the more regular variations in H(alpha) seen over short time scales. Other more stochastic activity, such as flares, also clearly occurs. Phase shifts of the V/R ratio from year to year rule out the hypothesis that mass tranfer in a close binary system is responsible for the V/R variations.

  3. A DEEP, WIDE-FIELD H{alpha} SURVEY OF NEARBY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shoko; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Moss, Chris

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of a wide-field H{alpha} imaging survey of eight nearby (z = 0.02-0.03) Abell clusters. We have measured H{alpha} fluxes and equivalent widths for 465 galaxies, of which 360 are new detections. The survey was designed to obtain complete emission-line-selected inventories of star-forming galaxies in the inner regions of these clusters, extending to star formation rates below 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This paper describes the observations, data processing, and source identification procedures, and presents an H{alpha} and R-band catalog of detected cluster members and other candidates. Future papers in the series will use these data to study the completeness of spectroscopically based star formation surveys, and to quantify the effects of cluster environment on the present-day populations of star-forming galaxies. The data will also provide a valuable foundation for imaging surveys of redshifted H{alpha} emission in more distant clusters.

  4. Observations of Geocoronal H-alpha Emission Intensities Over Changing Solar Geophysical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Roesler, F. L.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Reynolds, R. J.; Bishop, J.; Madsen, G.

    2002-05-01

    We will present observations of thermospheric + exospheric hydrogen H-alpha emissions taken by the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper Fabry-Perot (WHAM) during the time period of 1997 through 2001. WHAM has acquired more than 37,000 spectra to date over about 100 nights. These observations span from near solar minimum through solar maximum conditions. The WHAM Fabry-Perot is located at the Kitt Peak Observatory near Tucson, Arizona and is remotely operable from Wisconsin. WHAM's resolving power is sufficient for the retrieval of the geocoronal H-alpha emission intensity, but not for the resolution of the line profile. The resolution, precision and high signal-to-noise of the WHAM Fabry-Perot facilitate the separation of the terrestrial emission from the galactic emission. Variability in the WHAM geocoronal H-alpha observations over the rise of the solar cycle is limited to within about 35% with higher emissions observed during solar maximum conditions. This result is consistent with observed limits to the variability over the past solar cycle made using similarly designed Fabry-Perot instruments, but with photomultiplier detection, from midlatitude Wisconsin and Haleakala observing sites. These data are also consistent with comparisons made between winter solstice zenith observations taken during the early 1990's from Wisconsin (NSF-CHARM campaign) and WHAM zenith observations.

  5. Evolutionary variations of solar luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    The Theoretical arguments for a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4.7 billion years are reviewed. A scaling argument shows that this increase can be predicted without detailed numerical calculations. The magnitude of the increase is independent of nuclear reaction rates, as long as conversion of hydrogen to helium provides the basic energy source of the Sun. The effect of the solar luminosity increase on the terrestrial climate is briefly considered. It appears unlikely that an enhanced greenhouse effect, due to reduced gases (NH3, CH4), can account for the long-term paleoclimatic trends.

  6. New Evidence for a Substellar Luminosity Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, M. C.; Ireland, M.

    2014-01-01

    HD 130948BC was the first field brown dwarf system to have both a dynamically measured mass and precise age constraint, from its solar-type host star, and it was unexpectedly ≈2× more luminous than predicted by substellar evolutionary models. However, because of the difficulty in determining accurate stellar ages, even in this nearly ideal case of a young star where numerous age indicators agree, it has been unclear if the apparent over-luminosity could be due to an erroneous age for this unique system. If such large systematic errors actually exist in substellar evolutionary models it could have wide-ranging implications, from determinations of the initial mass function to the masses estimated for directly imaged planets. We present here a new dynamical mass for a pair of brown dwarfs that also have a well-determined age from their young, solar-type star. This first check on the substellar "luminosity problem" reveals a nearly identical systematic error as was previously observed. We compare predictions from commonly used evolutionary models and present possible explanations for this problem. There are little appreciated, large differences (≈0.2 dex) in the predicted luminosity evolution of substellar objects which, along with the discrepancies of models compared to observations, currently limit our ability to characterize the fundamental properties of both brown dwarfs and directly imaged exoplanets.

  7. DISCOVERY OF AN H{alpha} EMITTING DISK AROUND THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2013-01-10

    Due to its proximity, the mass of the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the most massive black hole in the Local Group of galaxies, has been measured by several methods involving the kinematics of a stellar disk which surrounds it. We report here the discovery of an eccentric H{alpha} emitting disk around the black hole at the center of M31 and show how modeling this disk can provide an independent determination of the mass of the black hole. Our model implies a mass of 5.0{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} for the central black hole, consistent with the average of determinations by methods involving stellar dynamics, and compatible (at 1{sigma} level) with measurements obtained from the most detailed models of the stellar disk around the central black hole. This value is also consistent with the M-{sigma} relation. In order to make a comparison, we applied our simulation on the stellar kinematics in the nucleus of M31 and concluded that the parameters obtained for the stellar disk are not formally compatible with the parameters obtained for the H{alpha} emitting disk. This result suggests that the stellar and the H{alpha} emitting disks are intrinsically different from each other. A plausible explanation is that the H{alpha} emission is associated with a gaseous disk. This hypothesis is supported by the detection of traces of weaker nebular lines in the nuclear region of M31. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the H{alpha} emission is, at least partially, generated by stars.

  8. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    steady diet of hydrogen gas. Such planets should then be quite bright in Halpha accretion emission. The key point is that: instead of a steep drop off in the luminosity of the planet’s atmosphere, the accretion luminosity of these planets will just linearly decrease with decreasing mass. At an accretion rate=6e-10 Msun/yr we find low mass (~1 Mjup) accreting gap planets are much (50-1000x) brighter (for 0-3.4 mag of Halpha extinction) in Halpha than at H band. PROOF-OF_CONCEPT: A 3 hour MagAO observation at Halpha of a transitional disk in April 2013 was made. The resulting deep diffraction-limited images discovered (at 10.5 sigma) an Halpha source that was 295% above the continuum just 0.083” from the star (edge of the inner 10 AU disk gap). We also detected (at 5 sigma) an excellent (though much fainter) ~1 Mjup mass Halpha planet candidate located auspiciously at the outer edge (145 AU) of the gap. If confirmed by our “second epoch” follow-up as common proper motion then this would be the lowest mass (~1 Mjup) planet ever imaged. SURVEY: Scaling off of this exciting success we propose to deeply image (120 min) all 14 nearby (D<250pc), bright (R<11 mag) , not edge-on (i<80 deg) , young (~5 Myr) transitional disks with MagAO simultaneously at Halpha and L’. In addition, we will use BrGamma instead of Halpha for 8 additional fainter (11Halpha at, or past, 0.2” separations. Therefore, based on the theoretical prediction that the inner and outer gap planets should be >1 Mjup in mass, we integrate across our target list and find that, in the worst case of minimal masses (1+/-0.5 Mjup), and 3.4 mag extinction, at least seven ~1 Mjup planets should be discovered by this survey --meeting all three of our science goals above.

  9. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  10. CLOC: Cluster Luminosity Order-Statistic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Fumagalli, Michele; Fall, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    CLOC computes cluster order statistics, i.e. the luminosity distribution of the Nth most luminous cluster in a population. It is flexible and requires few assumptions, allowing for parametrized variations in the initial cluster mass function and its upper and lower cutoffs, variations in the cluster age distribution, stellar evolution and dust extinction, as well as observational uncertainties in both the properties of star clusters and their underlying host galaxies. It uses Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to search parameter space to find best-fitting values for the parameters describing cluster formation and disruption, and to obtain rigorous confidence intervals on the inferred values.

  11. THE H{alpha} DIAGNOSTIC OF ELECTRON HEATING: THE CASE OF DEM L71

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cara E.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Laming, J. Martin

    2009-05-10

    Recently, the mechanisms and extent of immediate postshock heating of electrons at collisionless shocks have been under intense investigation. Several recent studies have suggested that the ratio of electron to proton temperature at the shock front scales approximately as the inverse square of the shock velocity. A specific interpretation of this dependence was first introduced by Ghavamian et al., who suggested electron heating by lower-hybrid waves in a cosmic ray (CR) precursor as a possible mechanism behind such a relationship. The best line diagnostics for the electron to proton temperature ratio behind collisionless shocks in partially neutral gas are the combination of broad and narrow H{alpha} lines emitted in the immediate vicinity of the shock front. In this work, we present extensive long-slit spectroscopy of the H{alpha} emission in the blast wave shock of supernova remnant DEM L71. We chose this remnant for two main reasons. First, the shock velocities in DEM L71 span the range of speeds where the electron to proton temperature ratio varies most rapidly with shock speed. Second, previous Fabry-Perot scans of the H{alpha} line complex indicated broad-to-narrow flux ratios lower than existing models predicted, but the spectral coverage of those observations was not broad enough to reliably measure the background emission around the broad component H{alpha} line. Our new high-resolution (R {approx}> 1600) spectra of DEM L71 provide extensive coverage of the background near the H{alpha} line and confirm our earlier Fabry-Perot results of consistently low ({approx}<1) broad-to-narrow flux ratios. Here, we present results of these observations and also outline the first results from spectra of radiative portions of DEM L71. We compare our results to the latest models of H{alpha} profiles from collisionless shocks. We conclude that the most likely explanation for the low broad-to-narrow flux ratio is the ionization and excitation of neutrals by electrons

  12. The luminosity function for stars with minus 0.6 less than or equal to M (sub nu) less than or equal to 6.5 in the globular cluster M30: Is there a problem with stellar evolution models?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The V band luminosity function (LF) for stars ranging from the tip of the giant branch to approximately 2.5 mag fainter than the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) in M30 (=NGC 7099, GC 2137-234) is derived from CCD observations. Comparison with the theoretical LFs of Bergbusch & VandenBerg (1992) for (M/H) = -2, 16 Gyr models shows discrepancies which can be described either of two ways: (1) If the observations are normalized to the models over a few magnitudes fainter than the MSTO, then there is an excess (N (sub obs) greater than N(sub predicted)) of subgiant stars within 0.5 mag of the MSTO at the level of 4.8 sigma and an excess of stars (approximately 20%) compared to the models all along the giant branch. (2) If the normalization is made to match predicted and observed numbers of stars on the giant branch, then there is a discrepancy between models and observations in the sense that there is a broad depression in the observed LF fainter than the MSTO that is not present in the models. Consideration of LFs generated from 12 Gyr models or models adjusted to a shorter (m - M)(sub nu) = 14.5) distance modulus diminishes the magnitude of some of these discrepancies but introduces other mismatches between the observations and models. LFs constructed from stellar models that have 10% of the stellar mass in an isothermal core qualitatively match the observations better than the 'standard' models.

  13. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2012-04-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 {<=} z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z {approx} 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with {alpha} = -1.27 {+-} 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of {approx}8 from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z {approx} 4 to z {approx} 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of {approx}4 from z = 4.0 to z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of {approx}1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  14. Accelerated Evolution of the Lyα Luminosity Function at z >~ 7 Revealed by the Subaru Ultra-deep Survey for Lyα Emitters at z = 7.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Furusawa, Hisanori; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (~0.5 deg2) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Lyα) = 2.4 × 1042 erg s-1 (5σ) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z >~ 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Lyα luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ~65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Lyα LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Lyα LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Lyα LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L*{Lyα } = 2.7+8.0-1.2 × 1042 {erg} {s}-1 and φ * = 3.7+17.6-3.3 × 10-4 {Mpc}-3 for a fixed α = -1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Lyα LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ~ 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Lyα LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Lyα production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Lyα cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within cosmic ionized bubbles that are selectively absorbing Lyα and the large ionizing photon escape

  15. Properties of white light flares. I - Association with H-alpha flares and sudden frequency deviations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, P. S.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    All four large EUV bursts for which there were available concurrent white light observations of at least fair quality, were detected as white light flares. The rise times and maxima of the white light emissions coincided with rise times and maxima of the EUV bursts. The frequency of strong EUV bursts suggests that white light flares may occur at the rate of five or six per year near sunspot maximum. All of the white light flare areas coincided with intense bright areas of the H-alpha flares. These small areas appeared to be sources of high velocity ejecta in H-alpha. The white light flares occurred as several knots or patches of 2 to 15 arc-sec diameter, with bright cores perhaps less than 2 arc-sec diameter (1500 km). They preferred the outer penumbral borders of strong sunspots within 10 arc-sec of a longitudinal neutral line in the magnetic field.

  16. H-alpha scans of the intergalactic H I cloud in Leo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. J.; Magee, K.; Roesler, F. L.; Scherb, F.; Harlander, J.

    1986-01-01

    Scans of H-alpha were obtained for two fields within the large, intergalactic H I cloud in Leo. The data provide a conservative upper limit of 1.7 x 10 to the -7th ergs/sq cm/s/sr on the H-alpha surface brightness of the cloud. This limit corresponds to an emission measure of less than 2 cm exp -6 pc for gas at a temperature of 10,000 K and implies an ionized hydrogen mass of less than 9 x 10 to the 9th f exp 1/2 solar mass within the cloud, where f is the filling fraction of the gas. This intensity may have important implications for possible sources of the ionization.

  17. High resolution Halpha spectroscopy and R-band photometry of Swift J1357.2-0933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge; Torres, Manuel A. P.; Negueruela, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Carlos; Corral-Santana, Jesus M.; Zurita, Cristina; Llano, Sergio Rodriguez

    2011-03-01

    We report on high resolution Halpha spectroscopy and time-resolved photometry of the optical counterpart to the X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 in outburst (Krimm et al. ATEL #3138). SPECTROSCOPY: Six 30-33 min spectra were obtained on the nights of 2011 Feb 25-27 using the IDS Spectrograph on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos. The observations were performed with the H1800V grating and a slit width 1.6 arcsec to yield a spectral coverage of 6270-7000 Angs with a 30 km/s FWHM spectral resolution at Halpha..

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halpha images of NGC 6334 and NGC 6357 (Russeil+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russeil, D.; Tige, J.; Adami, C.; Anderson; L. D.; Schneider, N.; Zavagno, A.; Samal, M. R.; Amram, P.; Guennou, L.; Le Coarer, E.; Walsh, A.; Longmore, S. N.; Purcell, C.

    2016-03-01

    The FITS files contain the data cubes corresponding to the optical Halpha line, covering the regions NGC 6334 and NGC 6357. They were taken in 1994, using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer mounted on a 36cm telescope located at La Silla-ESO. The pixel size is 9.26-arcsec and the scanning step is 4.8km/s. The velocity are Vlsr velocities. (2 data files).

  19. H-alpha confirmation of two recent disc novae in M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Henze, M.; Pietsch, W.; Holmes, S.; Kolb, U.; Rodriguez, C. A. Haswell J.

    2011-07-01

    We obtained a set of 11x180s, 11x120s, and 11x60s dithered stacked CCD images of M 31, respectively, using Baader broad (7nm wide) H-alpha, Baader R and Baader clear (Cl) filters on 2011 July 5 with the Open University PIRATE Planewave CDK17 0.43m Dall-Kirkham f/6.7 telescope at the Observatorio Astronomico de Mallorca, Costitx, Spain, using an SBIG STX 16803 CCD Camera.

  20. Issues And Options For Mirrors Of CXRS And H-alpha ITER Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vukolov, K.; Medvedev, A.; Orlovskiy, I.

    2008-03-12

    The present status of investigations on the first mirror (FM) problem is discussed on the basis of the last experimental results obtained in modern tokamaks and laboratory devices. Engineering solutions that are necessary for protection of Fms for CXRS and H-alpha diagnostics are considered. Future plans for R and D that has yet to be done are presented. Results of neutron irradiation and heating tests of multilayered dielectric mirrors are given briefly.

  1. H-alpha images of early type galaxies with hot gas

    SciTech Connect

    Trinchieri, G.; Di serego alighieri, S. European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1991-05-01

    H-alpha imaging observations of 13 early type galaxies with known X-ray fluxes are presented from the Einstein Observatory data, and long-slit spectroscopy of nine of these. H-alpha emission is detected in the central regions of ten objects. The line emission appears extended over a radius of 5-10 kpc, is generally peaked on the nucleus with regular elliptical isophotes, similar to the red continuum, although with a steeper radial distribution. Low surface brightness filamentary structure is also seen in a few cases (NGC 4406 and NGC 5846). To study the different phases of the interstellar medium in early type galaxies, the emissions due to hot (X-ray) and warm (H-alpha) gas are compared. On average, galaxies with a larger content of hot gas also show a more powerful line emission. However, the scatter in the relation is significant, and suggests that other parameters must play a role. The depth of the gravitational potential and/or the shape of the objects are probably important in determining the amount of gas present in early type galaxies. 50 refs.

  2. The Pleiades Using Astronomical Spectroscopic Technique within the Range of H-{alpha} Region

    SciTech Connect

    Zambri Zainuddin, Mohd; Muhyidin, Meer Ashwinkumar; Ahmad, Nazhatulshima; Mohd Saadon, Mohd Hafiz

    2011-03-30

    The Pleiades is an open star cluster located in the constellation of Taurus, which mainly consists of hot and luminous B-type stars. Observations were conducted over five-day period in December 2009 at Langkawi National Observatory, Malaysia by using 20-inch telescope diameter of Ritchey-Chretien reflector telescope, together with SBIG Self Guided Spectrograph and SBIG ST-7 CCD camera. The spectra of seven main members of the cluster, namely Alcyone; Atlas; Celaeno; Electra; Maia; Merope and Taygeta; and of Alcyone B; a smaller component of Alcyone quadruple system, were obtained in the optical range of approximately 6300 A to 7100 A. This range was picked due to the vicinity of Balmer H-{alpha} spectral line at 6562.852 A. Alcyone, Electra and Merope were found to have H-{alpha} emissions possibly caused by the presence of equatorial circumstellar disks or envelopes made up of ejected matter. Electra and Merope in particular exhibited peculiar asymmetric double emission peaks, which could be evidence of one-armed density wave in each of their circumstellar disks. Atlas, Celaeno, Merope, Taygeta and Alcyone B showed strong H-{alpha} absorptions with broadening characteristic of high rotational velocities. As deduced from the spectra, the stars were found to have atmospheres with similar chemical content, with spectral lines characteristics of singly ionized silicon, singly ionized iron and singly ionized oxygen. The measured radial velocities of all eight stars also suggest that the cluster could someday disperse.

  3. MMTF-Halpha AND HST-FUV IMAGING OF THE FILAMENTARY COMPLEX IN ABELL 1795

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-10-01

    We have obtained deep, high spatial resolution images of the central region of Abell 1795 at Halpha and [N II] lambda6583 with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF), and in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys solar blind channel on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The superb image quality of the MMTF data has made it possible to resolve the known SE filament into a pair of thin, intertwined filaments extending for {approx}50 kpc, with a width <1 kpc. The presence of these thin, tangled strands is suggestive of a cooling wake where runaway cooling is taking place, perhaps aided by an enhanced magnetic field in this region. The HST data further resolve these strands into chains of FUV-bright stellar clusters, indicating that these filaments are indeed sites of ongoing star formation, but at a rate {approx}2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mass-deposition rates predicted from the X-ray data. The elevated [N II]/Halpha ratio and large spatial variations of the FUV/Halpha flux ratio across the filaments indicate that O-star photoionization is not solely responsible for the ionization. The data favor collisional heating by cosmic rays either produced in situ by magnetohydrodynamical processes or conducted from the surrounding intracluster medium.

  4. THE H{alpha} VARIATIONS OF {eta} CARINAE DURING THE 2009.0 SPECTROSCOPIC EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Fernandez-Lajus, E. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: eflajus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar

    2010-04-15

    We report on H{alpha} spectroscopy of the 2009.0 spectroscopic event of {eta} Carinae collected via SMARTS observations using the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory 1.5 m telescope and echelle spectrograph. Our observations were made almost every night over a two-month interval around the predicted minimum of {eta} Car. We observed a significant fading of the line emission that reached a minimum 7 days after the X-ray minimum. About 17 days prior to the H{alpha} flux minimum, the H{alpha} profile exhibited the emergence of a broad, P Cygni type, absorption component (near a Doppler shift of -500 km s{sup -1}) and a narrow absorption component (near -144 km s{sup -1} and probably associated with intervening gas from the Little Homunculus Nebula). All these features were observed during the last event in 2003.5 and are probably related to the close periastron passage of the companion. We argue that these variations are consistent with qualitative expectations about changes in the primary star's stellar wind that result from the wind-wind collision with a massive binary companion and from atmospheric eclipses of the companion.

  5. Observations of H-alpha and microwave brightening caused by a distant solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Bobrowsky, M.; Rust, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Synthesized maps with integration times of 10 and 30 sec, based on the observation of three subflares at 6 cm and H-alpha 6563 A, indicate that most of the 6 cm burst emission originated in 10-15 arcsec features coincident with, or adjacent to, H-alpha flare kernels. During the onset of one of the subflares, 6 cm emission was discovered in a loop stretching over 100,000 km from the primary flare site in association with H-alpha flare-like brightness at the remote footpoint of the loop. Assuming a primary flare site origin for the energy of the distant brightening, about 4 x 10 to the 24th ergs/sec propagated along the connecting magnetic loop at a velocity of more than 6000 km/sec. It is suggested that the energy may have been carried by electrons originating in the high energy tail of the electron thermal velocity distribution, escaping from the primary flare site.

  6. Impulsive H-alpha diagnostics of electron-beam-heated solar flare model chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Gayley, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Time-dependent H-alpha profiles were computed for the dynamic model atmospheres of Fisher, Canfield, and McClymont (1985) simulating the effects of an intense impulsively initiated power-law beam of electrons incident on the chromosphere. The temporal response of H-alpha arises from three separate physical mechanisms, whose relative importance varies over the line profile. The fastest variations (typically less than 0.1 s for the explosive heating discussed here) arise from energy imbalance; these are apparent on chromospheric heating and cooling time scales and have their greatest amplitude at line center. Slower variations arise from ionization imbalance and are most apparent in the blue wing. The slowest variations arise from hydrodynamic effects and are related to the formation of a chromospheric condensation; these are most apparent in the red wing. These results provide a basis for the design and analysis of observations of H-alpha, in coordination with hard X-rays or microwaves, to test mechanisms of energy transport in solar flares.

  7. Sprite Luminosity and Radio Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Evans, A.; Mezentsev, A.; van der Velde, O.; Soula, S.

    2013-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010) with diameters 50-100 m at 60-80 km height (Kanmae et al., 2012). The sprite luminosity coincides in time and space with extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation <3 kHz in excellent agreement with theory (Cummer and Fullekrug, 2001). This theory is based on current flowing in the body of sprites at 70-80 km height associated with large streamer densities (Pasko et al., 1998). A more detailed study shows specifically that the exponential growth and splitting of streamers at 70-80 km height results in an electron multiplication associated with the acceleration of electrons to a few eV. The accelerated electrons radiate a small amount of electromagnetic energy and the incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the observed electromagnetic radiation (Qin et al., 2012). It has been predicted that this newly recognized physical mechanism might also result in low frequency ( 30-300 kHz) electromagnetic radiation emanating from sprite streamers near 40 km height in the stratosphere, albeit with very small magnetic fields 10^{-17}-10^{-12} T from a single streamer (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this predicted radiation was promptly confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). Specifically, it was found that the sprite luminosity coincides with sudden enhancements of the radio noise. These initial observations are extended here with a more detailed analysis to study the spatial coherence of the radio noise recorded with a novel network of sensitive radio receivers deployed during field work in the summer 2013. This network of radio receivers is used to study the relationship between the radio noise and the sprite luminosity observed with video cameras. The sprite luminosity is inferred from video recordings by use of sophisticated image

  8. Unidentified IRAS sources: Ultrahigh luminosity galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Schneider, D. P.; Danielson, G. E.; Beichman, C. A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy measurements were obtained for six of the high galactic latitude infrared sources reported by Houck, et al. (1984) from the IRAS survey to have no obvious optical counterparts on the POSS prints. All are identified with visually faint galaxies that have total luminosities in the range 5 x 10 to the 11th power stellar luminosity to 5 x 10 to the 12th power stellar luminosity. This luminosity emerges virtually entirely in the infrared. The origin of the luminosity, which is one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, is not known at this time.

  9. The luminosities of the brightest cluster galaxies and brightest satellites in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-06-01

    We show that the distribution of luminosities of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based group catalogue suggests that BCG luminosities are just the statistical extremes of the group galaxy luminosity function. The latter happens to be very well approximated by the all-galaxy luminosity function (restricted to Mr < -19.9), provided one uses a parametrization of this function that is accurate at the bright end. A similar analysis of the luminosity distribution of the brightest satellite galaxies (BSGs) suggests that they are best thought of as being the second brightest pick from the same luminosity distribution of which BCGs are the brightest. That is, BSGs are not the brightest of some universal satellite luminosity functions, in contrast to what halo model analyses of the luminosity dependence of clustering suggest. However, we then use mark correlations to provide a novel test of these order statistics, showing that the hypothesis of a universal luminosity function (i.e. no halo mass dependence) from which the BCGs and BSGs are drawn is incompatible with the data, despite the fact that there was no hint of this in the BCG and BSG luminosity distributions themselves. We also discuss why, since extreme value statistics are explicitly a function of the number of draws, the consistency of BCG luminosities with extreme value statistics is most clearly seen if one is careful to perform the test at fixed group richness N. Tests at e.g. fixed total group luminosity Ltot will generally be biased and may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  10. Accelerated evolution of the Lyα luminosity function at z ≳ 7 revealed by the Subaru ultra-deep survey for Lyα emitters at z = 7.3

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Naito, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Yuma, Suraphong; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Iye, Masanori

    2014-12-10

    We present the ultra-deep Subaru narrowband imaging survey for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 7.3 in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields (∼0.5 deg{sup 2}) with a total integration time of 106 hr. Exploiting our new sharp bandwidth filter, NB101, installed on the Suprime-Cam, we have reached L(Lyα) = 2.4 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} (5σ) for z = 7.3 LAEs, about four times deeper than previous Subaru z ≳ 7 studies, which allows us to reliably investigate the evolution of the Lyα luminosity function (LF) for the first time down to the luminosity limit same as those of Subaru z = 3.1-6.6 LAE samples. Surprisingly, we only find three and four LAEs in the SXDS and COSMOS fields, respectively, while one expects a total of ∼65 LAEs by our survey in the case of no Lyα LF evolution from z = 6.6 to 7.3. We identify a decrease of the Lyα LF from z = 6.6 to 7.3 at the >90% confidence level from our z = 7.3 Lyα LF with the best-fit Schechter parameters of L{sub Lyα}{sup ∗}=2.7{sub −1.2}{sup +8.0}×10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} and ϕ{sup ∗}=3.7{sub −3.3}{sup +17.6}×10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −3} for a fixed α = –1.5. Moreover, the evolution of the Lyα LF is clearly accelerated at z > 6.6 beyond the measurement uncertainties including cosmic variance. Because no such accelerated evolution of the UV-continuum LF or the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) is found at z ∼ 7, but suggested only at z > 8, this accelerated Lyα LF evolution is explained by physical mechanisms different from a pure SFR decrease but related to the Lyα production and escape in the process of cosmic reionization. Because a simple accelerating increase of intergalactic medium neutral hydrogen absorbing Lyα cannot be reconciled with Thomson scattering of optical depth measurements from WMAP and Planck, our findings may support new physical pictures suggested by recent theoretical studies, such as the existence of HI clumpy clouds within

  11. The average 0.5-200 keV spectrum of local active galactic nuclei and a new determination of the 2-10 keV luminosity function at z ≈ 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The broad-band X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contains information about the nuclear environment from Schwarzschild radii scales (where the primary power law is generated in a corona) to distances of ˜1 pc (where the distant reflector may be located). In addition, the average shape of the X-ray spectrum is an important input into X-ray background synthesis models. Here, local (z ≈ 0) AGN luminosity functions (LFs) in five energy bands are used as a low-resolution, luminosity-dependent X-ray spectrometer in order to constrain the average AGN X-ray spectrum between 0.5 and 200 keV. The 15-55 keV LF measured by Swift-BAT is assumed to be the best determination of the local LF, and then a spectral model is varied to determine the best fit to the 0.5-2 keV, 2-10 keV, 3-20 keV and 14-195 keV LFs. The spectral model consists of a Gaussian distribution of power laws with a mean photon-index <Γ> and cutoff energy Ecut, as well as contributions from distant and disc reflection. The reflection strength is parametrized by varying the Fe abundance relative to solar, AFe, and requiring a specific Fe Kα equivalent width (EW). In this way, the presence of the X-ray Baldwin effect can be tested. The spectral model that best fits the four LFs has <Γ> = 1.85 ± 0.15, E_{cut}=270^{+170}_{-80} keV, A_{Fe}=0.3^{+0.3}_{-0.15}. The sub-solar AFe is unlikely to be a true measure of the gas-phase metallicity, but indicates the presence of strong reflection given the assumed Fe Kα EW. Indeed, parametrizing the reflection strength with the R parameter gives R=1.7^{+1.7}_{-0.85}. There is moderate evidence for no X-ray Baldwin effect. Accretion disc reflection is included in the best-fitting model, but it is relatively weak (broad iron Kα EW < 100 eV) and does not significantly affect any of the conclusions. A critical result of our procedure is that the shape of the local 2-10 keV LF measured by HEAO-1 and MAXI is incompatible with the LFs measured in the hard X

  12. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  13. ON THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.

    2011-12-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux-limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multi-variate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities. With this correlation, whether intrinsic or observationally induced accounted for, we find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio-loud (R > 10) and radio-quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution for the range of R values considered. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio-quiet and very radio-loud quasars, but rather a

  14. Extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Jackson, D. P.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration for a two-dimensional (2D) imaging x-ray spectrograph based on a conically bent crystal is introduced: extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph (ELICS). The ELICS configuration has important advantages over spectrographs that are based on cylindrically and spherically bent crystals. The main advantages are that a wide variety of large-aperture crystals can be used, and any desired magnification in the spatial direction (the direction orthogonal to spectral dispersion) can be achieved by the use of different experimental arrangements. The ELICS can be set up so that the detector plane is almost perpendicular to the incident rays, a good configuration for time-resolved spectroscopy. ELICSs with mica crystals of 45x90 mm{sup 2} aperture have been successfully used for imaging on the XP and COBRA pulsed power generators, yielding spectra with spatial resolution in 2D of Z pinches and X pinches.

  15. A synoptic of H-alpha line profile in the T Tauri star SU Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.; Basri, Gibor S.; Johns, Christopher M.; Imhoff, Catherine

    1993-01-01

    We present a catalog of 106 high spectral resolution observations of the H-alpha line profile in the T Tauri star SU Aurigae, obtained during the period from 1986 October through 1990 November. The spectra were acquired during joint synoptic programs to observe selected T Tauri stars using the Hamilton Echelle Spectrometer of the Lick Observatory and the solar-stellar spectrograph at the McMath telescope of the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. A restricted set of Mg II h and k line profiles was also obtained in a coordinated program involving the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite observatory and the McMath solar-stellar facility. Striking variability is evident on a nightly basis. A key result is that the relative intensity in the blue wing of H-alpha spanning a range of velocities bear -150 km/s is modulated at a period of 2.98 +/- 0.4 days. We identify the 2.98 day period with the rotation period of the star. We also find that the occurrence of the periodic modulation of the mass outflow is episodic and most evident during a 2 week sequence of nightly observations. We find two other intervals where the periodic spectroscopic variability is likely present, although at a lower level of significance at a lower level of significance. The variability is otherwise stochastic in nature. The Mg II resonance lines exhibit clear variability that is most pronounced in the blue wing of the k line. A comparison of the Mg II k line profile with H-alpha profiles obtained nearly simultaneous yields no apparent correlation between the variable features in each line. The profile shapes of the Mg II h and k lines are generally indicative of formation in a wind. An analysis of the principal features that appear in the H-alpha profile set suggests that the line is composed of contributions from an enhanced chromosphere; a relatively slow moving, dense, optically thick component of a stellar wind formed relatively close to the star; and an optically thin, high

  16. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  17. Standard Stars for the BYU H-alpha Photometric System (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M.; Hintz, E.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We present primary standard stars for the BYU H-alpha photometric system. This system is similar to the H-beta photometric system that is often used with the intermediate band uvby system. Both systems use the difference between magnitudes measured in a wide (15-20-nm) and narrow (3-nm) bandpass centered on one of the strong Balmer lines of hydrogen to establish a color index. Line indices formed in this manner are independent of atmospheric extinction and interstellar reddening. These indices provide intrinsic measures of effective temperature for stars with spectral types between B and G. The present primary standard stars for the BYU system as established using spectroscopic observations that cover the region between the H-alpha and H-beta lines. The indices were formed using synthetic photometry reductions to convolve ideal filter profiles with the observed spectra. The number of observations per star is generally in excess of 25. Some stars have been observed more than 100 times over a period of 7 years. The typical error per observation for these stars is on the order of 1-3 mmag. In addition to the standard field stars, we present H-alpha and H-beta observations of individual stars that are members of selected open clusters. These include the Hyades, Pleiades, Coma, and NGC 752 clusters. Additional stars that exhibit varying degrees of hydrogen emission are easily distinguished in a plot of the alpha-beta plane. We have found that candidates for emission line objects, high mass x-ray binaries, and young stellar objects are readily identified in our alpha-beta plots. We acknowledge continued support from the BYU College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as support from NSF Grant AST #0618209. We also thank the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory for continued allocation of robotic observing time for spectroscopy on the 1.2-m telescope.

  18. Environmental quantification and Halpha characterisation of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, Simon

    2005-12-01

    The role of the environment on galaxy evolution is still not fully understood. In order to quantify and set limits on the role of nurture one must identify and study a sample of isolated galaxies. The AMIGA project "Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies" is doing a multi-wavelength study of a large sample of isolated galaxies in order to examine their interstellar medium and star formation activity. We processed 950 galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (Karachentseva, 1973) and evaluated their isolation using an automated star-galaxy classification procedure (down to M_B = 17.5) on large digitised POSS-I fields surrounding each isolated galaxy. We defined, compared and discussed various criteria to quantify the degree of isolation for these galaxies: e.g. Karachentseva's revised criterion, local surface density computations, estimation of the external tidal force affecting each isolated galaxy. We find galaxies violating Karachentseva's original criterion, and we define various subsamples of galaxies according to their degree of isolation. Additionally, we sought for the redshifts of the primary and companion galaxies to access the radial dimension and have an accurate three dimensional picture of the surroundings. Finally, we applied our pipeline to triplets, compact groups and clusters and interpret the isolated galaxy population in light of these control samples. The star formation is known to be affected by the local environment of the galaxies, but the star formation rate also highly depends on the intrinsic interstellar medium features. Disentangling these two effects is still a challenging subject. To address this issue, we observed and gathered photometric data (Halpha narrow- & r Gunn broad-band filters) for 200 spiral galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies which are, by definition, in low-density regions. We subsequently studied the Halpha morphological aspect of the 45 biggest and less inclined galaxies. Using

  19. CHROMOSPHERIC VARIABILITY IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY M DWARFS. II. SHORT-TIMESCALE H{alpha} VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, E. A.; Berger, E.; Laskar, T.; Knapp, G. R.; Gunn, J. E.; Loomis, C. P.; Lupton, R. H.; Schlegel, D. J.

    2010-10-20

    We present the first comprehensive study of short-timescale chromospheric H{alpha} variability in M dwarfs using the individual 15 minute spectroscopic exposures for 52, 392 objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample contains about 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} objects per spectral type bin in the range M0-M9, with a typical number of three exposures per object (ranging up to a maximum of 30 exposures). Using this extensive data set, we find that about 16% of the sources exhibit H{alpha} emission in at least one exposure, and of those about 45% exhibit H{alpha} emission in all of the available exposures. As in previous studies of H{alpha} activity (L{sub H{alpha}/}L{sub bol}), we find a rapid increase in the fraction of active objects from M0-M6. However, we find a subsequent decline in later spectral types that we attribute to our use of the individual spectra. Similarly, we find saturated activity at a level of L{sub H{alpha}/}L{sub bol} {approx} 10{sup -3.6} for spectral types M0-M5 followed by a decline to about 10{sup -4.3} in the range M7-M9. Within the sample of objects with H{alpha} emission, only 26% are consistent with non-variable emission, independent of spectral type. The H{alpha} variability, quantified in terms of the ratio of maximum to minimum H{alpha} equivalent width (R{sub EW}), exhibits a rapid rise from M0 to M5, followed by a plateau and a possible decline in M9 objects. In particular, variability with R{sub EW} {approx}> 10 is only observed in objects later than M5, and survival analysis indicates a probability of {approx}<0.1% that the R{sub EW} values for M0-M4 and M5-M9 are drawn from the same distribution. We further find that for an exponential distribution, the R{sub EW} values follow N(R{sub EW}) {proportional_to} exp[ - (R{sub EW} - 1)/2.3] for M0-M4 and {proportional_to}exp[ - (R{sub EW} - 1)/2.9] for M5-M9. Finally, comparing objects with persistent and intermittent H{alpha} emission, we find that the latter exhibit greater

  20. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  1. AN INITIAL MASS FUNCTION STUDY OF THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 4214

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Calzetti, D.; Chandar, R.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Kissel, J. S.; Da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; O'Connell, R. W.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Kim, Hwihyun E-mail: callzetti@astro.umass.edu

    2013-04-10

    The production rate of ionizing photons in young ({<=}8 Myr), unresolved stellar clusters in the nearby irregular galaxy NGC 4214 is probed using multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data. We normalize the ionizing photon rate by the cluster mass to investigate the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). We have found that within the uncertainties the upper end of the stellar IMF appears to be universal in this galaxy, and that deviations from a universal IMF can be attributed to stochastic sampling of stars in clusters with masses {approx}<10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. Furthermore, we have found that there does not seem to be a dependence of the maximum stellar mass on the cluster mass. We have also found that for massive clusters, feedback may cause an underrepresentation in H{alpha} luminosities, which needs to be taken into account when conducting this type of analysis.

  2. The microwave and H-alpha sources of the 1992 January 13 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H.; Gary, D. E.; Zirin, H.; Kosugi, T.; Schwartz, R. A.; Linford, G.

    1995-01-01

    We compare X-ray, microwave and H-alpha observations for the 1992 January 13 limb flare. The soft and hard X-ray images of the flare have been studied thoroughly by Masuda et al. (1994) with Yohkoh SXT and HXT images. We find that during the hard X-ray emission peak there is no H-alpha brightening on the disk nor at the limb, so the main ribbons of this flare must be beyond the limb. The microwave source maintains a fixed distance about 10 arcsecs from the optical limb in the frequency range 2.8-14.0 GHz. We interpret this limit in source position as due to the presence of a microwave limb that extends higher than the white-light limb -- to a height of 7300 +/- 1500 km. We believe that the high-frequency microwave emissions are occulted by this extended limb, while the soft and hard X-ray emissions are able to pass through largely unaffected. We also believe, however, that the hard X-ray footpoints are also partially occulted by the photospheric limb, despite the appearance of 'footpoint sources' in HXT data shown by Masuda et al. The smooth X-ray and microwave time profiles, microwave-rich emission relative to hard X-rays, and progressive hard X-ray spectral hardening through the flare peak are all characteristics that we interpret as being a direct result of the occultation of footpoint emission.

  3. Analysis of EUV, UV, and H-alpha Emission from Two Very Different Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, T.; Landi, E.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a pair of prominences observed the UV and EUV in April 2004. One was a generally quiet prominence which exhibited a period of activation. Another was a large "coronal cloud" type prominence. Both were observed by SOHO/SUMER, TRACE, and in H$\\alpha$ by BBSO and MLSO. The quiet prominence was also observed by the SOHO/CDS instrument. TRACE and H$\\alpha$ data provide 2D images on with time cadences on the order of 1 minute. The SUMER data was taken from a single slit location with a 90 second cadence and included a number of lines spanning the temperature range 80,000 to 1.6 million K. This observing program was designed to allow us to study prominence dynamics . CDS raster data was taken with a slower cadence, in lines formed at temperatures from 20,000 - 1 million K. We combine these different data sets to analyze the thermal properties, including differential emission measures (DEMs), of these very different prominences, and compare the results to those of prominences previously analyzed by ourselves and others.

  4. Detection and Characterisation of H-{alpha} Emission Lines from Gaia BP/RP Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenes, Juergen; Laur, Sven; Kolka, Indrek

    2008-12-05

    The Gaia probe, set to launch in 2011, will measure an estimated billion astronomical objects, producing an enormous amount of data. One of the data analysis tasks will be the identification and classification of measured objects. A vast majority of them will be 'ordinary' stars from our Galaxy but a certain percentage will belong to 'peculiar' objects. We are interested in detecting emission line stars (ELS). The characteristic feature of most ELS is the presence of a H-{alpha} emission line in their spectra. In the case of Gaia measurements, the influence of this line could be detected in low resolution prismatic spectra which will be recorded both in blue (BP) and red (RP) spectral region. In this work, we compare different algorithms for detecting and characterising H-{alpha} lines in Gaia spectra. These include a simple, integrated flux ratio-based algorithm and several machine learning algorithms, such as neural networks, support vector machines and support vector regression. We study line detection both from single-transit and over-sampled end-of-mission data.

  5. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE FORMATION OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS AND COOL CORES IN GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-04-10

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and H{alpha} study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of H{alpha} filaments in groups versus clusters over the mass range 10{sup 13} < M{sub 500} < 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. The detection frequency of H{alpha} emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of H{alpha} filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) intracluster medium (ICM) entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The H{alpha} filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The H{alpha} filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather than radio bubbles. The ICM cooling efficiency, defined as the X-ray cooling rate per unit gas mass, is shown to correlate with the total system mass, indicating that groups are more efficient at cooling than clusters. This result implies that, in systems with cool cores, active galactic nucleus feedback scales with the total mass of the system, in agreement with earlier suggestions.

  6. Very low luminosity active galaxies and the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Soltan, A.; Keel, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of very low luminosity active galactic nuclei are not well studied, and, in particular, their possible contribution to the diffuse X-ray background is not known. In the present investigation, an X-ray luminosity function for the range from 10 to the 39th to 10 to the 42.5th ergs/s is constructed. The obtained X-ray luminosity function is integrated to estimate the contribution of these very low luminosity active galaxies to the diffuse X-ray background. The construction of the X-ray luminosity function is based on data obtained by Keel (1983) and some simple assumptions about optical and X-ray properties.

  7. MODELING THE RED SEQUENCE: HIERARCHICAL GROWTH YET SLOW LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the effects of mergers on the evolution of massive early-type galaxies by modeling the evolution of their stellar populations in a hierarchical context. We investigate how a realistic red sequence population set up by z {approx} 1 evolves under different assumptions for the merger and star formation histories, comparing changes in color, luminosity, and mass. The purely passive fading of existing red sequence galaxies, with no further mergers or star formation, results in dramatic changes at the bright end of the luminosity function and color-magnitude relation. Without mergers there is too much evolution in luminosity at a fixed space density compared to observations. The change in color and magnitude at a fixed mass resembles that of a passively evolving population that formed relatively recently, at z {approx} 2. Mergers among the red sequence population ('dry mergers') occurring after z = 1 build up mass, counteracting the fading of the existing stellar populations to give smaller changes in both color and luminosity for massive galaxies. By allowing some galaxies to migrate from the blue cloud onto the red sequence after z = 1 through gas-rich mergers, younger stellar populations are added to the red sequence. This manifestation of the progenitor bias increases the scatter in age and results in even smaller changes in color and luminosity between z = 1 and z = 0 at a fixed mass. The resultant evolution appears much slower, resembling the passive evolution of a population that formed at high redshift (z {approx} 3-5), and is in closer agreement with observations. We conclude that measurements of the luminosity and color evolution alone are not sufficient to distinguish between the purely passive evolution of an old population and cosmologically motivated hierarchical growth, although these scenarios have very different implications for the mass growth of early-type galaxies over the last half of cosmic history.

  8. Luminosity monitoring in ATLAS with MPX detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopczak, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at √s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions.

  9. Luminosity Monitoring in ATLAS with MPX Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbah, Nedaa

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at √ s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions.

  10. Perspectives on Higher Luminosity B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J

    2004-04-22

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 4-6 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 4 x 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} may be possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this new accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF A COMPLETE 160 {mu}m FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF INFRARED GALAXIES IN THE ISO LOCKMAN HOLE 1 deg{sup 2} DEEP FIELDS: SOURCE PROPERTIES AND EVIDENCE FOR STRONG EVOLUTION IN THE FIR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FOR ULIRGs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Rupke, D. S. N. E-mail: sanders@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2011-04-15

    We have identified a complete, flux-limited (S{sub 160}>120 mJy) sample of 160 {mu}m selected sources from Spitzer observations of the 1 deg{sup 2} Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Deep Field region in the Lockman Hole (LH). Ground-based UV, optical, and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and optical spectroscopy have been used to determine colors, redshifts, and masses for the complete sample of 40 galaxies. Spitzer-IRAC+MIPS photometry, supplemented by ISOPHOT data at 90 {mu}m and 170 {mu}m, has been used to calculate accurate total infrared luminosities, L{sub IR}(8-1000 {mu}m), and to determine the IR luminosity function (LF) of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). The maximum observed redshift is z {approx} 0.80 and the maximum total infrared luminosity is log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun}) = 12.74. Over the luminosity range log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun}) = 10-12, the LF for LIRGs in the LH Deep Field is similar to that found previously for local sources at similar infrared luminosities. The mean host galaxy mass, log (M/M{sub sun}) = 10.7, and dominance of H II-region spectral types, is also similar to what has been found for local LIRGs, suggesting that intense starbursts likely power the bulk of the infrared luminosity for sources in this range of L{sub IR}. However for the most luminous sources, log (L{sub IR}/L{sub sun})>12.0, we find evidence for strong evolution in the LF {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 6{+-}1}, assuming pure number density evolution. These ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) have a larger mean host mass, log (M/M{sub sun}) = 11.0, and exhibit disturbed morphologies consistent with strong interactions/mergers, and they are also more likely to be characterized by starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) composite or AGN spectral types.

  12. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  13. Large-scale solar magnetic fields and H-alpha patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields computed from measurements of large-scale photospheric magnetic fields suffer from interruptions in day-to-day observations and the limitation of using only measurements made near the solar central meridian. Procedures were devised for inferring the lines of polarity reversal from H-alpha solar patrol photographs that map the same large-scale features found on Mt. Wilson magnetograms. These features may be monitored without interruption by combining observations from the global network of observatories associated with NOAA's Space Environment Services Center. The patterns of inferred magnetic fields may be followed accurately as far as 60 deg from central meridian. Such patterns will be used to improve predictions of coronal features during the next solar eclipse.

  14. A Calibrated H-alpha Index to Monitor Emission Line Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, M. D.

    2013-06-01

    Over an 8 year period we have developed a calibrated H-alpha index, similar to the more traditional H-beta index, based on spectrophotometric observations (Joner & Hintz, 2013) from the DAO 1.2-m Telescope. While developing the calibration for this filter set we also obtained spectra of a number of emission line systems such as high mass x-ray binaries (HMXB), Be stars, and young stellar objects. From this work we find that the main sequence stars fill a very tight relation in the H-alpha/H-beta plane and that the emission line objects are easily detected. We will present the overall location of these emission line objects. We will also present the changes experiences by these objects over the course of the years of the project.

  15. Development of the prototype data management system of the solar H-alpha full disk observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ka-Ning; Zhao, Shi-Qing; Li, Qiong-Ying; Chen, Dong

    2004-06-01

    The Solar Chromospheric Telescope in Yunnan Observatory generates about 2G bytes fits format data per day. Huge amounts of data will bring inconvenience for people to use. Hence, data searching and sharing are important at present. Data searching, on-line browsing, remote accesses and download are developed with a prototype data management system of the solar H-alpha full disk observation, and improved by the working flow technology. Based on Windows XP operating system and MySQL data management system, a prototype system of browse/server model is developed by JAVA and JSP. Data compression, searching, browsing, deletion need authority and download in real-time have been achieved.

  16. Luminosity Variations Along Bunch Trains in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Boyes, M.; Colocho, W.S.; Novokhatski, A.; Sullivan, M.K.; Turner, J.L.; Weathersby, S.P.; Wienands, U.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    In the spring of 2005 after a long shut-down, the luminosity of the B-Factory PEP-II decreased along the bunch trains by about 25-30%. There were many reasons studied which could have caused this performance degradation, like a bigger phase transient due to an additional RF station in the Low-Energy-Ring (LER), bad initial vacuum, electron cloud, chromaticity, steering, dispersion in cavities, beam optics, etc. The initial specific luminosity of 4.2 sloped down to 3.2 and even 2.8 for a long train (typical: 130 of 144), later in the run with higher currents and shorter trains (65 of 72) the numbers were more like 3.2 down to 2.6. Finally after steering the interaction region for an unrelated reason (overheated BPM buttons) and the consequential lower luminosity for two weeks, the luminosity slope problem was mysteriously gone. Several parameters got changed and there is still some discussion about which one finally fixed the problem. Among others, likely candidates are: the LER betatron function in x at the interaction point got reduced, making the LER x stronger, dispersion reduction in the cavities, and finding and fixing a partially shorted magnet.

  17. Strong H-alpha Emission Detected in the M33 Nova Candidate PNV J01340288+3035111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Vaduvescu, O.; Tudor, V.

    2014-07-01

    We obtained four 240-s narrow-band H-alpha and four 120-s R-band CCD frames of M33 on 2014 July 29.206 and 29.222 UT, respectively, with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma under ~1.1" seeing.

  18. Discovery of an Apparent Nova in M81 and H-alpha Confirmation of Three M81 Nova Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Vaduvescu, O.; Tudor, V.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of an apparent nova in M81 on a co-added 2000-s narrow-band H-alpha CCD image taken with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma under ~1.6" seeing on 2014 Jun. ...

  19. Hydrogen spectrum in magnetic white dwarfs - H-alpha, H-beta and H-gamma transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. J. W.; Oconnell, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Using the results of an accurate variational calculation, a graphical display of the wavelengths of the H-alpha H-beta, and H-gamma lines of hydrogen for magnetic field values ranging from 0 to 560 megagauss, which is believed to cover the range of fields found in magnetic white dwarfs. This is the first complete detailed compilation of such results.

  20. THE LUMINOSITY, MASS, AND AGE DISTRIBUTIONS OF COMPACT STAR CLUSTERS IN M83 BASED ON HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe

    2010-08-10

    The newly installed Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain multi-band images of the nearby spiral galaxy M83. These new observations are the deepest and highest resolution images ever taken of a grand-design spiral, particularly in the near-ultraviolet, and allow us to better differentiate compact star clusters from individual stars and to measure the luminosities of even faint clusters in the U band. We find that the luminosity function (LF) for clusters outside of the very crowded starburst nucleus can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL {proportional_to} L {sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} = -2.04 {+-} 0.08, down to M{sub V} {approx} -5.5. We test the sensitivity of the LF to different selection techniques, filters, binning, and aperture correction determinations, and find that none of these contribute significantly to uncertainties in {alpha}. We estimate ages and masses for the clusters by comparing their measured UBVI, H{alpha} colors with predictions from single stellar population models. The age distribution of the clusters can be approximated by a power law, dN/d{tau} {proportional_to} {tau}{sup {gamma}}, with {gamma} = -0.9 {+-} 0.2, for M {approx}> few x 10{sup 3} M {sub sun} and {tau} {approx}< 4 x 10{sup 8} yr. This indicates that clusters are disrupted quickly, with {approx}80%-90% disrupted each decade in age over this time. The mass function of clusters over the same M-{tau} range is a power law, dN/dM {proportional_to} M {sup {beta}}, with {beta} = -1.94 {+-} 0.16, and does not have bends or show curvature at either high or low masses. Therefore, we do not find evidence for a physical upper mass limit, M{sub C} , or for the earlier disruption of lower mass clusters when compared with higher mass clusters, i.e., mass-dependent disruption. We briefly discuss these implications for the formation and disruption of the clusters.

  1. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  2. The Magnetic Structure of H-Alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakuri, T.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic flux of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of H-alpha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar-coronal holes in 6 days of image-processed full-disk H-alpha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single-column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events, and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions and corona are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  3. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-03-20

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing /beta/ function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Kinematics of the Halpha Nuclear Disk in M81: A Search for a MBH in the Nearest LINER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Holland

    1997-07-01

    As the nearest example of an AGN with a directly observable nucleus, M81 is important and merits intense scrutiny. Because HST's exquisite angular resolution is fixed, the minimum detectable mass of a massive black hole {M_BH} and the minimum detectable radius of influence of the M_BH scale with distance. Consequently, M81, with a minimum detectable M_BH 10^6 M_sun, and M31 are our best bests for pinning down the lower end of the M_BH mass function in luminous galaxies. And, if we can show unambiguously that M81 hosts a M_BH, as appears will be the case in the Milky Way, M31, and M32, we will have evidence that M_BHs are commonly, and perhaps always, found in nucleated galaxies. Our WFPC2 Halpha images show that there is a small {r 70 pc} disk of ionized gas in the center of M81. The disk has nearly the same size as the nuclear disks in M87 and NGC 4261, and shows many of the same morphological features {eg spiral arms and eccentricity}. We propose to take STIS 0.1" long-slit spectra with the G750M grating to measure the kinematics in the nuclear disk. Our goals are: 1} Measure and characterize the kinematics and turbulence in the disk, and investigate the variability of the broad line region. 2}Use the kinematics and our HST images to measure the central mass-to-light ratio and the mass of the unresolved {r <= 0.8 pc} Seyfert-like nucleus. This ``knocking on the door'' of M81 for the M_BH census will yield an important datum in the new field of black hole demographics.

  5. Flame luminosity and unburned hydrocarbon measurements in swirling combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanetti, A.J.; Hoult, D.P.; Keck, J.C.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1980-07-01

    The relationship between flame luminosity and unburned hydrocarbon concentration was studied using an atmospheric, tubular burner. Spectroscopic studies were conducted for different fuels, including kerosene, nitrogen-doped kerosene, and shale oil. Independent exhaust gas analyses were performed on shale oil and nitrogen-doped kerosene. At a particular fuel equivalence ratio, measurements showed flame luminosity to be a function of unburned hydrocarbons. Unburned hydrocarbons were found to become significant prior to an equivalence ratio corresponding to the flame's change from blue to yellow. This critical condition is a function of fuel-air mixing and inlet air preheat temperature. Spectroscopic work revealed presence of strong carbon, hydrocarbon, amine, and cyanide band spectra for the nitrogen-containing fuels. Exhaust gas analyses for shale oil and a comparable nitrogen-doped kerosene were similar.

  6. Results From the DAFNE High Luminosity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    The DAPHNE collider, based on a new collision scheme including Large Piwinsky angle and Crab-Waist, has been successfully commissioned and is presently delivering luminosity to the SIDDHARTA detector. Large crossing angle and Crab-Waist scheme proved to be effective in: (1) Increasing luminosity, now a factor 2.7 higher than in the past; and (2) controlling transverse beam blow-up due to the beam-beam. Work is in progress to reach the ultimate design luminosity goal 5.0 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The new collision scheme is the main design concept for a new project aimed at building a Super-B factory that is expected to achieve a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and it has been also taken into account to upgrade one of the LHC interaction regions.

  7. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  8. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Can-Min; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 Swift/BAT GRBs. By describing the peak luminosity evolution of individual GRBs as {L}{{p}}\\propto \\text{}{(1+z)}k, we get k=1.49+/- 0.19 using the nonparametric τ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power law with a break that evolves as {L}{{b}}\\propto {(1+z)}{k{{b}}}, we obtain {k}{{b}}={1.14}-0.47+0.99 through simulations based on the assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate incorporating the cosmic metallicity history. The derived k and kb values are systematically smaller than those reported in previous papers. By removing the observational biases of the GRB trigger and redshift measurement based on our simulation analysis, we generate mock complete samples of 258 and 1000 GRBs to examine how these biases affect the τ statistics method. We get k=0.94+/- 0.14 and k=0.80+/- 0.09 for the two samples, indicating that these observational biases may lead to overestimating the k value. With the large uncertainty of kb derived from our simulation analysis, one cannot even convincingly argue for a robust evolution feature of the GRB luminosity.

  9. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  10. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  11. Mass-luminosity relation of low mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Piskunov, A. E.; Shpil'Kina, D. A.

    1997-04-01

    The data on dynamic masses and multicolor photometry of 56 M-type components of binary/multiple systems was collected. Critical evaluation of late type stars bolometric correction scales have been performed. Our refined and reduced data is compared with published empirical and theoretical mass-luminosity relations. Our data does not exclude the existence of a step-like feature at M_V_=12mag. The best agreement between observations and theoretical models is found for recent calculations of D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D) with Alexander opacities. We conclude that present-day knowledge of the mass-luminosity relation at faintest magnitudes is not sufficient for making definite conclusions on the initial mass function of low mass stars.

  12. A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01

    In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

  13. Luminosities of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guandalini, R.; Cristallo, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Stars evolving along the asymptotic giant branch can become carbon-rich in the final part of their evolution. They replenish the inter-stellar medium with nuclear processed material via strong radiative stellar winds. The determination of the luminosity function of these stars, even if far from being conclusive, is extremely important for testing the reliability of theoretical models. In particular, strong constraints on the mixing treatment and the mass-loss rate can be derived. Aims: We present an updated luminosity function of Galactic carbon stars (LFGCS) obtained from a re-analysis of available data already published in previous papers. Methods: Starting from available near- and mid-infrared photometric data, we re-determined the selection criteria. Moreover, we took advantage of updated distance estimates and period-luminosity relations and we adopted a new formulation for the computation of bolometric corrections (BCs). This led us to collect an improved sample of carbon-rich sources from which we constructed an updated luminosity function. Results: The LFGCS peaks at magnitudes around -4.9, confirming the results obtained in a previous work. Nevertheless, the luminosity function presents two symmetrical tails instead of the larger high-luminosity tail characterizing the former luminosity function. Conclusions: The derived LFCGS matches the indications from recent theoretical evolutionary asymptotic giant branch models, thus confirming the validity of the choices of mixing treatment and mass-loss history. Moreover, we compare our new luminosity function with its counterpart in the Large Magellanic Cloud finding that the two distributions are very similar for dust-enshrouded sources, as expected from stellar evolutionary models. Finally, we derive a new fitting formula aimed to better determine BCs for C-stars. Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Stellar luminosity variations and global warming.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that variation in the sun's luminosity is less than that observed in many other stars of similar magnetic activity. Current findings also indicate that in more active stars, the attenuation by faculae of sunspot luminosity modulation is less effective than in the sun at present. The sun could thus become photometrically more variable (and dimmer) if its magnetic activity exceeded present levels. But the levels of solar activity required for this to occur are not observed in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records over the past several millennia, which indicates that such an increase in amplitude of surface magnetism-driven variations in solar luminosity is unlikely in the present epoch. PMID:17749020

  15. Luminosity and Color Dependence in Galaxy Cross-Correlations since z = 1 in PRIMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron; Blanton, M. R.; Coil, A. L.; Cool, R. J.; Eisenstein, D.; Moustakas, J.; Skibba, R. A.; Zhu, G.

    2014-01-01

    I present small-scale galaxy cross-correlation measurements from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) as a function of color, luminosity, and redshift. We measure the real-space clustering of ~50,000 galaxies from PRIMUS, over a redshift range 0.2 < z < 1, by cross-correlating spectroscopic PRIMUS galaxies with a tracer population of galaxies selected from imaging catalogs. In agreement with previous work, we find strong clustering differences between blue and red galaxy populations. Our results indicate luminosity-dependent clustering, but this luminosity dependence further varies depending on color and physical scale. We interpret our results using a halo abundance model.

  16. Redshift Dependent Lag-Luminosity Relation in 565 BASTE Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Tanabe, Sachiko; Kodama, Yoshiki

    2008-05-01

    We compared redshifts zY measured from Yonetoku relation and zlag from the lag-luminosity relation for 565 BASTE GRBs and were surprised to find that the correlation between these two redshifts is very low. Assuming that the luminosity is a function of both zY and the intrinsic spectral lag τlag, we found a new redshift dependent lag-luminosity relation as L = 7.5×1050 erg/s(1+z)2.53τlag-0.282 with the correlation coefficient of 0.77.

  17. Free-space quantum cryptography in the H-alpha Fraunhofer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. J.; Bienfang, J. C.; Mink, A.; Hershman, B. J.; Nakassis, A.; Tang, X.; Ma, L.; Su, D. H.; Williams, Carl J.; Clark, Charles W.

    2006-08-01

    Free-space Quantum key distribution (QKD) has shown the potential for the practical production of cryptographic key for ultra-secure communications. The performance of any QKD system is ultimately limited by the signal to noise ratio on the single-photon channel, and over most useful communications links the resulting key rates are impractical for performing continuous one-time-pad encryption of today's broadband communications. We have adapted clock and data recovery techniques from modern telecommunications practice, combined with a synchronous classical free-space optical communications link operating in parallel, to increase the repetition rate of a free-space QKD system by roughly 2 orders of magnitude over previous demonstrations. We have also designed the system to operate in the H-alpha Fraunhofer window at 656.28 nm, where the solar background is reduced by roughly 7 dB. This system takes advantage of high efficiency silicon single-photon avalanche photodiodes with <50ps timing resolution that are expected to enable operation at a repetition rate of 2.5 GHz. We have identified scalable solutions for delivering sustained one-time-pad encryption at 10 Mbps, thus making it possible to integrate quantum cryptography into first-generation Ethernet protocols.

  18. High-Cadence and High-Resolution Halpha Imaging Spectroscopy of a Circular Flare's Remote Ribbon with IBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Tritschler, A.; Jing, J.; Chen, X.; Liu, C.; Reardon, K. P.; Denker, C.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an unprecedented high-resolution halpha imaging spectroscopic observation of a C4.1 flare taken with IBIS on 2011 October 22. The flare consists of a main circular ribbon that occurred in a parasitic magnetic configuration and a remote ribbon that was observed by the IBIS. Such a circular-ribbon flare with a remote brightening is predic