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Sample records for hand eye coordination

  1. Coordinated Flexibility: How Initial Gaze Position Modulates Eye-Hand Coordination and Reaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Jos J.; Buetti, Simona; Kerzel, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Reaching to targets in space requires the coordination of eye and hand movements. In two experiments, we recorded eye and hand kinematics to examine the role of gaze position at target onset on eye-hand coordination and reaching performance. Experiment 1 showed that with eyes and hand aligned on the same peripheral start location, time lags…

  2. Eye Hand Coordination in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Sandra; Joshi, Aditi; Woollacott, Marjorie; van Donkelaar, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Reaching to grasp an object of interest requires complex sensorimotor coordination involving eye, head, hand and trunk. While numerous studies have demonstrated deficits in each of these systems individually, little is known about how children with cerebral palsy (CP) coordinate multiple motor systems for functional tasks. Here we used kinematics, remote eye tracking and a trunk support device to examine the functional coupling of the eye, head and hand and the extent to which it was constrained by trunk postural control in 10 children with CP (6–16 years). Eye movements in children with CP were similar to typically developing (TD) peers, while hand movements were significantly slower. Postural support influenced initiation of hand movements in the youngest children (TD & CP) and execution of hand movements in children with CP differentially depending on diagnosis. Across all diagnostic categories, the most robust distinction between TD children and children with CP was in their ability to isolate eye, head and hand movements. Results of this study suggest that deficits in motor coordination for accurate reaching in children with CP may reflect coupled eye, head, and hand movements. We have previously suggested that coupled activation of effectors may be the default output for the CNS during early development. PMID:18830589

  3. Hand-eye coordination with an active camera head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishay, Magued; Peters, R. Alan; Wilkes, Don M.; Kawamura, Kazuhiko

    1997-09-01

    Hand-eye coordination is the coupling between vision and manipulation. Visual servoing is the term applied to hand-eye coordination in robots. In recent years, research has demonstrated that active vision -- active control of camera position and camera parameters -- facilitates a robot's interaction with the world. One aspect of active vision is centering an object in an image. This is known as gaze stabilization or fixation. This paper presents a new algorithm that applies target fixation to image-based visual servoing. This algorithm, called fixation point servoing (FPS), uses target fixation to eliminate the need for Jacobian computation Additionally, FPS reburies only the rotation relationship between the camera head and the gripper frames and does not require accurate tracking of the gripper. FPS was tested on a robotics system called ISAC and experimental results are shown. FPS was also compared to a classical Jacobian-based technique using simulations of both algorithms.

  4. Drawing from memory: hand-eye coordination at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Huette, Stephanie; Kello, Christopher T; Rhodes, Theo; Spivey, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Eyes move to gather visual information for the purpose of guiding behavior. This guidance takes the form of perceptual-motor interactions on short timescales for behaviors like locomotion and hand-eye coordination. More complex behaviors require perceptual-motor interactions on longer timescales mediated by memory, such as navigation, or designing and building artifacts. In the present study, the task of sketching images of natural scenes from memory was used to examine and compare perceptual-motor interactions on shorter and longer timescales. Eye and pen trajectories were found to be coordinated in time on shorter timescales during drawing, and also on longer timescales spanning study and drawing periods. The latter type of coordination was found by developing a purely spatial analysis that yielded measures of similarity between images, eye trajectories, and pen trajectories. These results challenge the notion that coordination only unfolds on short timescales. Rather, the task of drawing from memory evokes perceptual-motor encodings of visual images that preserve coarse-grained spatial information over relatively long timescales as well. PMID:23554894

  5. Drawing from Memory: Hand-Eye Coordination at Multiple Scales

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Eyes move to gather visual information for the purpose of guiding behavior. This guidance takes the form of perceptual-motor interactions on short timescales for behaviors like locomotion and hand-eye coordination. More complex behaviors require perceptual-motor interactions on longer timescales mediated by memory, such as navigation, or designing and building artifacts. In the present study, the task of sketching images of natural scenes from memory was used to examine and compare perceptual-motor interactions on shorter and longer timescales. Eye and pen trajectories were found to be coordinated in time on shorter timescales during drawing, and also on longer timescales spanning study and drawing periods. The latter type of coordination was found by developing a purely spatial analysis that yielded measures of similarity between images, eye trajectories, and pen trajectories. These results challenge the notion that coordination only unfolds on short timescales. Rather, the task of drawing from memory evokes perceptual-motor encodings of visual images that preserve coarse-grained spatial information over relatively long timescales as well. PMID:23554894

  6. Coordinated flexibility: how initial gaze position modulates eye-hand coordination and reaching.

    PubMed

    Adam, Jos J; Buetti, Simona; Kerzel, Dirk

    2012-08-01

    Reaching to targets in space requires the coordination of eye and hand movements. In two experiments, we recorded eye and hand kinematics to examine the role of gaze position at target onset on eye-hand coordination and reaching performance. Experiment 1 showed that with eyes and hand aligned on the same peripheral start location, time lags between eye and hand onsets were small and initiation times were substantially correlated, suggesting simultaneous control and tight eye-hand coupling. With eyes and hand departing from different start locations (gaze aligned with the center of the range of possible target positions), time lags between eye and hand onsets were large and initiation times were largely uncorrelated, suggesting independent control and decoupling of eye and hand movements. Furthermore, initial gaze position strongly mediated manual reaching performance indexed by increments in movement time as a function of target distance. Experiment 2 confirmed the impact of target foveation in modulating the effect of target distance on movement time. Our findings reveal the operation of an overarching, flexible neural control system that tunes the operation and cooperation of saccadic and manual control systems depending on where the eyes look at target onset. PMID:22390297

  7. Acquisition of Eye-hand Coordination Skills for Videoendoscopic Surgery

    PubMed

    Tsai; Heinrichs

    1994-08-01

    Evaluation of eye-hand coordination skills in relation to experiential human factors may lead to improved instruction for videoendoscopic surgical skills acquisition. Twenty-nine subjects (medical students or residents in surgical specialties) volunteered to perform three exercises of increasing complexity in an "inanimate" trainer system that simulated the eye-hand coordination tasks inherent in a laboratory videoendoscopic surgical environment. Fourteen subjects participated in a biweekly practice program of 4 weeks duration using an inanimate trainer. Fifteen subjects had no practice on the laparoscopic trainer during the 4 weeks. Both groups were tested after demonstration on three exercises at the beginning and end of a 4 week period and all performed the procedures in solitude. Both groups of subjects increased performance levels (time and accuracy) over the four weeks, but improvement was significantly greater for the practicing subjects. After eight sessions, convergence of performance levels was observed, but plateauing of performance levels was not evident, even with the simple paradigms evaluated. To investigate what factors contribute to learning, subjects were assessed with respect to their surgical experiences, personality, and self-evaluated motor skills. Subjects with prior endoscopic surgical experience, interest in mechanical activities (as measured by the Strong Interest Inventory), or regular engagement in video game play tended to be more skillful initially, but demonstrated less improvement in performance levels after practice than subjects who had lower levels of experience, interest, or video game play. Manual dexterity (as measured by the Purdue Pegboard Manual Dexterity Test) was positively related to the degree of observed improvement. We conclude that "inanimate" videoendoscopic paradigms offer relatively inexpensive and useful training exercises for acquiring basic eye-hand coordination skills. Relevance for animate laboratory skills

  8. RECOGNIZING BEHAVIOR IN HAND-EYE COORDINATION PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Weilie; Ballard, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Modeling human behavior is important for the design of robots as well as human-computer interfaces that use humanoid avatars. Constructive models have been built, but they have not captured all of the detailed structure of human behavior such as the moment-to-moment deployment and coordination of hand, head and eye gaze used in complex tasks. We show how this data from human subjects performing a task can be used to program a dynamic Bayes network (DBN) which in turn can be used to recognize new performance instances. As a specific demonstration we show that the steps in a complex activity such as sandwich making can be recognized by a DBN in real time. PMID:20862267

  9. RECOGNIZING BEHAVIOR IN HAND-EYE COORDINATION PATTERNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Weilie; Ballard, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Modeling human behavior is important for the design of robots as well as human-computer interfaces that use humanoid avatars. Constructive models have been built, but they have not captured all of the detailed structure of human behavior such as the moment-to-moment deployment and coordination of hand, head and eye gaze used in complex tasks. We show how this data from human subjects performing a task can be used to program a dynamic Bayes network (DBN) which in turn can be used to recognize new performance instances. As a specific demonstration we show that the steps in a complex activity such as sandwich making can be recognized by a DBN in real time. PMID:20862267

  10. Hand/Eye Coordination For Fine Robotic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, Anatole M.

    1992-01-01

    Fine motions of robotic manipulator controlled with help of visual feedback by new method reducing position errors by order of magnitude. Robotic vision subsystem includes five cameras: three stationary ones providing wide-angle views of workspace and two mounted on wrist of auxiliary robot arm. Stereoscopic cameras on arm give close-up views of object and end effector. Cameras measure errors between commanded and actual positions and/or provide data for mapping between visual and manipulator-joint-angle coordinates.

  11. Effect of Participation in a Cup Stacking Unit on Hand-Eye Coordination of Elementary Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Melanie A.; Smith, Lori A.; DeChant-Bruennig, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically examine the influence of a cup stacking instructional unit on the hand-eye coordination of children. Participants (N = 104) consisted of three grade level groups (first/second, third and fourth). Within each grade level participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group.…

  12. The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The primate visual system has a uniquely high proportion of ipsilateral retinal projections, retinal ganglial cells that do not cross the midline in the optic chiasm. The general assumption is that this developed due to the selective advantage of accurate depth perception through stereopsis. Here, the hypothesis that the need for accurate eye-forelimb coordination substantially influenced the evolution of the primate visual system is presented. Evolutionary processes may change the direction of retinal ganglial cells. Crossing, or non-crossing, in the optic chiasm determines which hemisphere receives visual feedback in reaching tasks. Each hemisphere receives little tactile and proprioceptive information about the ipsilateral hand. The eye-forelimb hypothesis proposes that abundant ipsilateral retinal projections developed in the primate brain to synthesize, in a single hemisphere, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, and motor information about a given hand, and that this improved eye-hand coordination and optimized the size of the brain. If accurate eye-hand coordination was a major factor in the evolution of stereopsis, stereopsis is likely to be highly developed for activity in the area where the hands most often operate. The primate visual system is ideally suited for tasks within arm’s length and in the inferior visual field, where most manual activity takes place. Altering of ocular dominance in reaching tasks, reduced cross-modal cuing effects when arms are crossed, response of neurons in the primary motor cortex to viewed actions of a hand, multimodal neuron response to tactile as well as visual events, and extensive use of multimodal sensory information in reaching maneuvers support the premise that benefits of accurate limb control influenced the evolution of the primate visual system. The eye-forelimb hypothesis implies that evolutionary change toward hemidecussation in the optic chiasm provided parsimonious neural pathways in animals developing frontal

  13. Influence of cup stacking on hand-eye coordination and reaction time of second-grade students.

    PubMed

    Udermann, Brian E; Murray, Steven R; Mayer, John M; Sagendorf, Kenneth

    2004-04-01

    Cup stacking has been adopted recently by many physical education programs to enhance rudimentary motor skills such as hand-eye coordination and ambidexterity as well as quickness and concentration; however, no empirical evidence has been published to support these claims. We examined the influence of cup stacking on hand-eye coordination and reaction time of 24 boys and 18 girls in second grade as measured by the Soda Pop and Yardstick tests, respectively. Two physical education classes were randomly assigned as treatment and control groups and were pre- and posttested for hand-eye coordination and reaction time. The treatment group participated in a 5-wk. cup-stacking program. Significant improvements were noted for both hand-eye coordination and reaction time between the pre- and posttest scores for this group but not for the control group. Therefore, cup stacking is indeed effective in enhancing hand-eye coordination and reaction time. PMID:15141904

  14. Eye-hand coordination in children with high functioning autism and Asperger's disorder using a gap-overlap paradigm.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Alessandro; Forti, Sara; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    We investigated eye-hand coordination in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in comparison with age-matched normally developing peers. The eye-hand correlation was measured by putting fixation latencies in relation with pointing and key pressing responses in visual detection tasks where a gap-overlap paradigm was used and compared to fixation latencies in absence of manual response. ASD patients showed less efficient eye-hand coordination, which was particularly evident when pointing towards a target was being fixated. The data of normally developing participants confirmed that manual gap effects are more likely for more complex hand movements. An important discrepancy was discovered in participants with ASD: beside normal eye gap effects, they showed no concurrent hand gap effects when pointing to targets. This result has been interpreted as a further sign of inefficient eye-hand coordination in this patient population. PMID:22865152

  15. Eye-Hand Coordination in Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder Using a Gap-Overlap Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippa, Alessandro; Forti, Sara; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated eye-hand coordination in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in comparison with age-matched normally developing peers. The eye-hand correlation was measured by putting fixation latencies in relation with pointing and key pressing responses in visual detection tasks where a gap-overlap paradigm was used and compared to…

  16. A common control signal and a ballistic stage can explain the control of coordinated eye-hand movements.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Atul; Murthy, Aditya

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control has been extensively studied in the context of eye and hand movements made in isolation, yet little is known about the nature of control during eye-hand coordination. We probed this with a redirect task. Here subjects had to make reaching/pointing movements accompanied by coordinated eye movements but had to change their plans when the target occasionally changed its position during some trials. Using a race model framework, we found that separate effector-specific mechanisms may be recruited to control eye and hand movements when executed in isolation but when the same effectors are coordinated a unitary mechanism to control coordinated eye-hand movements is employed. Specifically, we found that performance curves were distinct for the eye and hand when these movements were executed in isolation but were comparable when they were executed together. Second, the time to switch motor plans, called the target step reaction time, was different in the eye-alone and hand-alone conditions but was similar in the coordinated condition under assumption of a ballistic stage of ∼40 ms, on average. Interestingly, the existence of this ballistic stage could predict the extent of eye-hand dissociations seen in individual subjects. Finally, when subjects were explicitly instructed to control specifically a single effector (eye or hand), redirecting one effector had a strong effect on the performance of the other effector. Taken together, these results suggest that a common control signal and a ballistic stage are recruited when coordinated eye-hand movement plans require alteration. PMID:26888104

  17. Learning robotic eye-arm-hand coordination from human demonstration: a coupled dynamical systems approach.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Luka; Santos-Victor, José; Billard, Aude

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the role of obstacle avoidance in visually guided reaching and grasping movements. We report on a human study in which subjects performed prehensile motion with obstacle avoidance where the position of the obstacle was systematically varied across trials. These experiments suggest that reaching with obstacle avoidance is organized in a sequential manner, where the obstacle acts as an intermediary target. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the notion of workspace travelled by the hand is embedded explicitly in a forward planning scheme, which is actively involved in detecting obstacles on the way when performing reaching. We find that the gaze proactively coordinates the pattern of eye-arm motion during obstacle avoidance. This study provides also a quantitative assessment of the coupling between the eye-arm-hand motion. We show that the coupling follows regular phase dependencies and is unaltered during obstacle avoidance. These observations provide a basis for the design of a computational model. Our controller extends the coupled dynamical systems framework and provides fast and synchronous control of the eyes, the arm and the hand within a single and compact framework, mimicking similar control system found in humans. We validate our model for visuomotor control of a humanoid robot. PMID:24570352

  18. Vision and "Hand-Eye" Coordination for the Fujitsu HOAP-2 Humanoid Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    Software was developed for a Fujitsu HOAP-2 humanoid robot to demonstrate that such "human form" robots can be used to perform useful tasks in an unknown environment; specifically, that they can operate with or in the place of humans to carry out construction operations necessary for space exploration, such as building or maintaining planetary surface habitats for humans. This paper describes the autonomous vision and hand-eye coordination software that enables the HOAP-2 to locate and manipulate objects. Simple vision and pattern detection algorithms including color filtering, noise filtering, image segmentation, orientation filters, and a feedback controlled tracking system enable the robot to locate marked building materials in the workspace. Experimentally determined spatial mappings associate locations in the visual field with the arm joint angles and trajectories necessary to reach these locations, allowing the robot to reach for and manipulate the building materials. These capabilities, when combined with locomotion capabilities, enable the robot to operate autonomously in an unknown workspace.

  19. Playing checkers: detection and eye hand coordination in simulated prosthetic vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnelie, Gislin; Walter, Matthias; Yang, Liancheng

    2006-09-01

    In order to assess the potential for visual inspection and eye hand coordination without tactile feedback under conditions that may be available to future retinal prosthesis wearers, we studied the ability of sighted individuals to act upon pixelized visual information at very low resolution, equivalent to 20/2400 visual acuity. Live images from a head-mounted camera were low-pass filtered and presented in a raster of 6 × 10 circular Gaussian dots. Subjects could either freely move their gaze across the raster (free-viewing condition) or the raster position was locked to the subject's gaze by means of video-based pupil tracking (gaze-locked condition). Four normally sighted and one severely visually impaired subject with moderate nystagmus participated in a series of four experiments. Subjects' task was to count 1 to 16 white fields randomly distributed across an otherwise black checkerboard (counting task) or to place a black checker on each of the white fields (placing task). We found that all subjects were capable of learning both tasks after varying amounts of practice, both in the free-viewing and in the gaze-locked conditions. Normally sighted subjects all reached very similar performance levels independent of the condition. The practiced performance level of the visually impaired subject in the free-viewing condition was indistinguishable from that of the normally sighted subjects, but required approximately twice the amount of time to place checkers in the gaze-locked condition; this difference is most likely attributable to this subject's nystagmus. Thus, if early retinal prosthesis wearers can achieve crude form vision, then on the basis of these results they too should be able to perform simple eye hand coordination tasks without tactile feedback.

  20. Coordination of hand shape.

    PubMed

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  1. Benefits of early development of eye-hand coordination: evidence from the LOOK longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Telford, R D; Cunningham, R B; Telford, R M; Olive, L S; Byrne, D G; Abhayaratna, W P

    2013-10-01

    We investigated longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between eye-hand coordination (EHC) and cardiorespiratory fitness (multistage run), physical activity (pedometers), percent body fat (%BF, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry), body image, and organized sport participation (questionnaires) in 406 boys and 384 girls at 8 and 10 years of age. EHC was measured by a throw and wall-rebound catch test involving 40 attempts of increasing difficulty. Median EHC improved during two years from 18 to 32 (boys) and 9 to 24 (girls), and gender differences and improvements were both significant (P < 0.001). Cross-sectional analyses showed that boys and girls with better EHC were fitter (P < 0.001), and a longitudinal relationship showed that girls who improved their EHC over the two years became fitter (P < 0.001). There was also evidence that children with better EHC possessed a more positive body image (P = 0.05 for combined sex data), but there was no evidence of any relationships between EHC and %BF or PA (both P > 0.3). Finally, even at age 8 years, boys and girls participating in organized sport possessed better EHC than non-participants. These data provide evidence for the premise that early acquisition of this single motor skill promotes the development of a child's fitness, body image, and participation in sport. PMID:23614667

  2. Neuronal activity related to eye-hand coordination in the primate premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Jouffrais, C; Boussaoud, D

    1999-09-01

    To test the functional implications of gaze signals that we previously reported in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), we trained two rhesus monkeys to point to visual targets presented on a touch screen while controlling their gaze orientation. Each monkey had to perform four different tasks. To initiate a trial, the monkey had to put his hand on a starting position at the center of the touch screen and fixate a fixation point. In one task, the animal had to make a reaching movement to a peripheral target randomly presented at one of eight possible locations on a circle while maintaining fixation at the center of this virtual circle (central fixation + reaching). In the second task, the monkey maintained fixation at the location of the upcoming peripheral target and, later, reached to that location. After a delay, the target was turned on and the monkey made a reaching arm movement (target fixation + reaching). In the third task, the monkey made a saccade to the target without any arm movement (saccade). Finally, in the fourth task, the monkey first made a saccade to the target, then reached to it after a delay (saccade + reaching). This design allowed us to examine the contribution of the oculomotor context to arm-related neuronal activity in PMd. We analyzed the effects of the task type on neuronal activity and found that many cells showed a task effect during the signal (26/60; 43%), set (16/49; 33%) and/or movement (15/54; 28%) epochs, depending on the oculomotor history. These findings, together with previously published data, suggest that PMd codes limb-movement direction in a gaze-dependent manner and may, thus, play an important role in the brain mechanisms of eye-hand coordination during visually guided reaching. PMID:10473760

  3. Eye-Hand Coordination: Dexterous Object Manipulation in New Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, J. L.; Smith, A.; Wing, A.; McIntyre, J.; Lefèvre, P.; White, O.; Augurelle, A. S.; Langlais, J. S.; Witney, A.; Blohm, G.; Penta, M.; Elmann-Larsen, B.; Bracewell, R. M.; Stramigioli, S.

    2005-06-01

    the effects of a change in gravity on the dynamics of prehension, on the kinematics of upper limb movements and on eye-hand coordination. This report describes the results of some experiments already performed and the scientific objectives of the experiments that will be carried out in the coming years.

  4. [The psychomotor test for research of eye-hand coordination at performance of monotonous activity on tracking target].

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, V B; Arsen'ev, G N; Tkachenko, O N; Zakharchenko, D V; Lavrova, T P; Dementienko, V V

    2011-01-01

    Visual-motor coordination is necessary for successful performance of everyday activities. Many tasks, such as driving or operating devices in the workplace, require a variety of coordination patterns with different levels of compatibility between the eyes and the hand. The psychomotor test was developed which makes it possible to analyze visual-motor coordination disorders caused by a decrease in the level of wakefulness. A small circular target (14 mm in diameter) was moving with a low constant velosity (12 mm/s) in a circular trajectory (80 mm in diameter) with a period of 20 s. Subjects were instructed to keep the mouse-driven cursor inside a target, overstepping the limits of the moving target was considered as an error. To test the attention level, an additional stimulus was introduced which appeared for 3 seconds with an interval of 15 to 40 s. When the stimulus appeared, it was required to touch it with the cursor and click the mouse button. Cursor trajectories have a temporal resolution of 120 Hz. Eye movements were recorded with a PC-based Eyegaze Development System (LC Technologies, USA) measuring corneal reflectance with a collection rate of 120 Hz. Monotonous character of the test performance induced drowsiness and led to errors 25-30 minutes after the beginning of the experiment. Changes in physiological vigilance level was evaluated with EEG recording. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of smooth and saccadic eye movements and hand movements showed their high sensitivity to a decrease in efficiency of operator's activity caused by a drop in the level of wakefulness. It is suggested that further development of this approach to measuring eye-hand coordination will promote working out a contactless method for the express diagnostics of the critical levels of drowsiness as well as for the definition of professional characteristics of an operator. PMID:21961322

  5. Gain-of-Function Mutations in the KATP Channel (KCNJ11) Impair Coordinated Hand-Eye Tracking

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, James S.; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Greeley, Siri A. W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gain-of-function mutations in the ATP-sensitive potassium channel can cause permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) or neonatal diabetes accompanied by a constellation of neurological symptoms (iDEND syndrome). Studies of a mouse model of iDEND syndrome revealed that cerebellar Purkinje cell electrical activity was impaired and that the mice exhibited poor motor coordination. In this study, we probed the hand-eye coordination of PNDM and iDEND patients using visual tracking tasks to see if poor motor coordination is also a feature of the human disease. Methods Control participants (n = 14), patients with iDEND syndrome (n = 6 or 7), and patients with PNDM (n = 7) completed three computer-based tasks in which a moving target was tracked with a joystick-controlled cursor. Patients with PNDM and iDEND were being treated with sulphonylurea drugs at the time of testing. Results No differences were seen between PNDM patients and controls. Patients with iDEND syndrome were significantly less accurate than controls in two of the three tasks. The greatest differences were seen when iDEND patients tracked blanked targets, i.e. when predictive tracking was required. In this task, iDEND patients incurred more discrepancy errors (p = 0.009) and more velocity errors (p  = 0.009) than controls. Conclusions These results identify impaired hand-eye coordination as a new clinical feature of iDEND. The aetiology of this feature is likely to involve cerebellar dysfunction. The data further suggest that sulphonylurea doses that control the diabetes of these patients may be insufficient to fully correct their neurological symptoms. PMID:23626843

  6. The role of the posterior parietal cortex in stereopsis and hand-eye coordination during motor task behaviours.

    PubMed

    Paggetti, Giulia; Leff, Daniel Richard; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Mylonas, George; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Menegaz, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    The field of 'Neuroergonomics' has the potential to improve safety in high-risk operative environments through a better appreciation of the way in which the brain responds during human-tool interactions. This is especially relevant to minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Amongst the many challenges imposed on the surgeon by traditional MIS (laparoscopy), arguably the greatest is the loss of depth perception. Robotic MIS platforms, on the other hand, provide the surgeon with a magnified three-dimensional view of the environment, and as a result may offload a degree of the cognitive burden. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) plays an integral role in human depth perception. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that differences in PPC activation between monoscopic and stereoscopic vision may be observed. In order to investigate this hypothesis, the current study explores disparities in PPC responses between monoscopic and stereoscopic visual perception to better de-couple the burden imposed by laparoscopy and robotic surgery on the operator's brain. Fourteen participants conducted tasks of depth perception and hand-eye coordination under both monoscopic and stereoscopic visual feedback. Cortical haemodynamic responses were monitored throughout using optical functional neuroimaging. Overall, recruitment of the bilateral superior parietal lobule was observed during both depth perception and hand-eye coordination tasks. This occurred contrary to our hypothesis, regardless of the mode of visual feedback. Operator technical performance was significantly different in two- and three-dimensional visual displays. These differences in technical performance do not appear to be explained by significant differences in parietal lobe processing. PMID:25394882

  7. Development of a model of machine hand eye coordination and program specifications for a topological machine vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A unified approach to computer vision and manipulation is developed which is called choreographic vision. In the model, objects to be viewed by a projected robot in the Viking missions to Mars are seen as objects to be manipulated within choreographic contexts controlled by a multimoded remote, supervisory control system on Earth. A new theory of context relations is introduced as a basis for choreographic programming languages. A topological vision model is developed for recognizing objects by shape and contour. This model is integrated with a projected vision system consisting of a multiaperture image dissector TV camera and a ranging laser system. System program specifications integrate eye-hand coordination and topological vision functions and an aerospace multiprocessor implementation is described.

  8. Adaptive Responses in Eye-Head-Hand Coordination Following Exposures to a Virtual Environment as a Possible Space Flight Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Taylor, L. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual environments (VE) offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Sensorimotor aftereffects of VEs are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. The purpose of this research was to compare disturbances in sensorimotor coordination produced by dome virtual environment display and to examine the effects of exposure duration, and repeated exposures to VR systems. The current study examined disturbances in eye-head-hand (EHH) and eye-head coordination. Preliminary results will be presented. Eleven subjects have participated in the study to date. One training session was completed in order to achieve stable performance on the EHH coordination and VE tasks. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. Subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in a dome immersive display VE for 30 or 60 min. The subjects were asked to move objects from one set of 15 pedestals to the other set across a virtual square room through a random pathway as quickly and accurately as possible. EHH coordination was measured before, immediately after, and at 1 hr, 2 hr, 4 hr and 6 hr following exposure to VR. EHH coordination was measured as position errors and reaction time in a pointing task that included multiple horizontal and vertical LED targets. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to analyze the data. In general, we observed significant increases in position errors for both horizontal and vertical targets. The largest decrements were observed immediately following exposure to VR and showed a fairly rapid recovery across test sessions, but not across days. Subjects generally showed faster RTs across days. Individuals recovered from the detrimental effects of exposure to the VE on position errors within 1-2 hours. The fact that subjects did not significantly improve across days

  9. Detection, eye-hand coordination and virtual mobility performance in simulated vision for a cortical visual prosthesis device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Nishant R.; Troyk, Philip R.; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2009-06-01

    In order to assess visual performance using a future cortical prosthesis device, the ability of normally sighted and low vision subjects to adapt to a dotted 'phosphene' image was studied. Similar studies have been conduced in the past and adaptation to phosphene maps has been shown but the phosphene maps used have been square or hexagonal in pattern. The phosphene map implemented for this testing is what is expected from a cortical implantation of the arrays of intracortical electrodes, generating multiple phosphenes. The dotted image created depends upon the surgical location of electrodes decided for implantation and the expected cortical response. The subjects under tests were required to perform tasks requiring visual inspection, eye-hand coordination and way finding. The subjects did not have any tactile feedback and the visual information provided was live dotted images captured by a camera on a head-mounted low vision enhancing system and processed through a filter generating images similar to the images we expect the blind persons to perceive. The images were locked to the subject's gaze by means of video-based pupil tracking. In the detection and visual inspection task, the subject scanned a modified checkerboard and counted the number of square white fields on a square checkerboard, in the eye-hand coordination task, the subject placed black checkers on the white fields of the checkerboard, and in the way-finding task, the subjects maneuvered themselves through a virtual maze using a game controller. The accuracy and the time to complete the task were used as the measured outcome. As per the surgical studies by this research group, it might be possible to implant up to 650 electrodes; hence, 650 dots were used to create images and performance studied under 0% dropout (650 dots), 25% dropout (488 dots) and 50% dropout (325 dots) conditions. It was observed that all the subjects under test were able to learn the given tasks and showed improvement in

  10. Effects of conventional neurological treatment and a virtual reality training program on eye-hand coordination in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-won; Song, Gui-bin; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of conventional neurological treatment and a virtual reality training program on eye-hand coordination in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] Sixteen children (9 males, 7 females) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy were recruited and randomly assigned to the conventional neurological physical therapy group (CG) and virtual reality training group (VRG). [Methods] Eight children in the control group performed 45 minutes of therapeutic exercise twice a week for eight weeks. In the experimental group, the other eight children performed 30 minutes of therapeutic exercise and 15 minutes of a training program using virtual reality twice a week during the experimental period. [Results] After eight weeks of the training program, there were significant differences in eye-hand coordination and visual motor speed in the comparison of the virtual reality training group with the conventional neurological physical therapy group. [Conclusion] We conclude that a well-designed training program using virtual reality can improve eye-hand coordination in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:26311943

  11. System for projection of a three-dimensional, moving virtual target for studies of eye-hand coordination.

    PubMed

    Schneider, W; Harris, T J; Feldberg, I E; Massey, J T; Georgopoulos, A P; Meyer, R A

    1995-11-01

    Eye-hand tracking of moving visual objects in three-dimensional (3D) space is common in the behavioral repertoire of primates. However, behavioral and/or neurophysiological studies of this function are lacking mainly because devices do not exist that allow its investigation. We describe a device by which a spot of light can be presented in the immediate extrapersonal space of a subject and can be moved in various trajectories in 3D space. The target is a real image of a circular aperture produced by a system consisting of a light source, aperture, filters, several lenses and fold mirrors, and a large concave mirror to focus the final real image. Rapid, computer-controlled movement of the image is obtained by tilting a gimbal-mounted guide mirror (for x and y motion) and by translating a lens (for motion in the z direction). A second configuration of the system allows movement of a 3D image in the 3D space. Hand motion is monitored by means of a sonic, 3D, position-measurement system. PMID:8750095

  12. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05). The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001). Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions) with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions). Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test. PMID:24465638

  13. Does an Eye-Hand Coordination Test Have Added Value as Part of Talent Identification in Table Tennis? A Validity and Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Irene R.; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7–12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. ‘Within session’ reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate ‘between sessions’ reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05). The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001). Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between −8 and +7 repetitions) with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between −3 and +3 repetitions). Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test. PMID:24465638

  14. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  15. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  16. Teaching Skills to Use a Computer Mouse in Preschoolers with Developmental Disabilities: Shaping Moving a Mouse and Eye-Hand Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Yoon, Soyoung; McDonough, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    We taught seven preschoolers with developmental disabilities to point-and-click with a computer mouse. The computer-based training program consisted of three parts, based on a task analysis of the behavioral prerequisites to point-and-click. Training 1 was designed to shape moving the mouse. Training 2 was designed to build eye-hand coordination…

  17. Hand-Eye Calibration of Robonaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickels, Kevin; Huber, Eric

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA's) performed by human astronauts. EVA is a high risk environment that requires extensive training and ground support. In collaboration with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), NASA is conducting a ground development project to produce a robotic astronaut's assistant, called Robonaut, that could help reduce human EVA time and workload. The project described in this paper designed and implemented a hand-eye calibration scheme for Robonaut, Unit A. The intent of this calibration scheme is to improve hand-eye coordination of the robot. The basic approach is to use kinematic and stereo vision measurements, namely the joint angles self-reported by the right arm and 3-D positions of a calibration fixture as measured by vision, to estimate the transformation from Robonaut's base coordinate system to its hand coordinate system and to its vision coordinate system. Two methods of gathering data sets have been developed, along with software to support each. In the first, the system observes the robotic arm and neck angles as the robot is operated under external control, and measures the 3-D position of a calibration fixture using Robonaut's stereo cameras, and logs these data. In the second, the system drives the arm and neck through a set of pre-recorded configurations, and data are again logged. Two variants of the calibration scheme have been developed. The full calibration scheme is a batch procedure that estimates all relevant kinematic parameters of the arm and neck of the robot The daily calibration scheme estimates only joint offsets for each rotational joint on the arm and neck, which are assumed to change from day to day. The schemes have been designed to be automatic and easy to use so that the robot can be fully recalibrated when needed such as after repair, upgrade, etc, and can be partially recalibrated after each power cycle. The scheme has been implemented on

  18. How your hand drives my eyes

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Cardellicchio, Pasquale; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    When viewing object-related hand actions people make proactive eye movements of the same kind as those made when performing such actions. Why is this so? It has been suggested that proactive gaze when viewing a given hand action depends on the recruitment of motor areas such as the ventral premotor (PMv) cortex that would be involved in the execution of that action. However, direct evidence for a distinctive role of the PMv cortex in driving gaze behavior is still lacking. We recorded eye moments while viewing hand actions before and immediately after delivering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left PMv and the posterior part of the left superior temporal sulcus, which is known to be involved in high-order visual action processing. Our results showed that rTMS-induced effects were selective with respect to the viewed actions following the virtual lesion of the left PMv only. This, for the first time, provides direct evidence that the PMv cortex might selectively contribute to driving the viewer’s gaze to the action’s target. When people view another’s action, their eyes may be driven by motor processes similar to those they would need to perform the action themselves. PMID:23559593

  19. Visuomotor impairment in early-stage Alzheimer's disease: changes in relative timing of eye and hand movements.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Simone; Muilwijk, Danya; Pel, Johan J M; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; van der Steen, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Although memory complaints are one of the first clinical symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), damage to the parietal lobe, a key structure in the visuomotor coordination network, was recently identified in early-stage AD. The aim of this study was to quantify visuomotor coordination in patients with probable AD and to compare their visuomotor performance with controls using five eye-hand coordination tasks of variable complexity. Eye and hand movements were measured in 16 AD patients and 18 controls. The measurement setup consisted of a touch screen, an eye-tracking device, and a motion capturing system. We investigated eye-hand coordination by quantifying absolute and relative latencies of eye and hand movements and by analyzing eye and hand kinematics. We found that AD patients need significantly more time to initiate and execute goal-directed hand movements. AD patients are also unable to suppress reflexive eye and, to a lesser extent, hand movements. Furthermore, AD patients use a stepwise approach of eye and hand movements to touch a sequence of stimuli, whereas controls more often show an anticipatory approach. The impairments in reflex suppression of eye and hand movements, and changes in relative timing of eye-hand coordination, in AD patients support the notion that cortical networks involving the posterior parietal cortex are affected at an early disease-stage. It also suggests that the problems of AD patients to perform daily activities that require eye-hand coordination are not only caused by cognitive decline, but also by degeneration of neural networks involved in visuomotor coordination. PMID:22377783

  20. Keep an Eye on the Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoller, Kendall

    2004-01-01

    Nonverbal communication--how we use our voices, breathing, bodies, and eyes--is as powerful as our words. As much as 82% of our message is conveyed through nonverbal strategies. Learning to use these cues can be key to improving our ability to facilitate or lead meetings.

  1. Following and intercepting scribbles: interactions between eye and hand control

    PubMed Central

    Mrotek, Leigh Ann

    2013-01-01

    The smooth pursuit eye movement system appears to be importantly engaged during the planning and execution of interceptive hand movements. The present study sought to probe the interaction between eye and hand control systems by examining their responses during an interception task that included target speed perturbations. On 2/3 of trials the target increased or decreased speed at various times, ranging from about 300 ms before to 150 ms after the onset of a finger movement directed to intercept the target and was triggered by a GO signal. Additionally the same 2D sum-of-sines target trajectories were followed with the eyes without interception. The smooth pursuit system responded more quickly if the target speed perturbation occurred earlier during the reaction time (i.e., near the time of the GO signal). Similarly, the finger movement began more quickly if target speed was increased earlier during the reaction time. For early perturbation conditions, the initial direction of the finger movement matched the predicted target intercept using the new target speed. For perturbations occurring after finger movement onset initial direction of finger movement did not match target interception such that, the finger path began to curve toward the perturbed target after about 150–200 ms. The results support the idea of an active process of visual target path extrapolation simultaneously used to guide both the eye and hand. PMID:23552996

  2. Natural coordinates for specification of eye movements.

    PubMed

    Clement, R A

    1991-01-01

    Tweed and Vilis (Journal of Neurophysiology, 58, 832-849, 1987) have argued that quaternion algebra provides the most appropriate description of the rotations of the eye, and have derived a three-dimensional model of gaze control based on quaternion operations. Euler angles give a simpler description of the rotations of the eye, and can also be used to formulate an alternative version of the three-dimensional gaze control model. Comparison of the two versions of the model highlights the distinction between the functional predictions of the model, and the predictions which depend only on the choice of mathematical descriptions. PMID:1771787

  3. Effect of hand paddles and parachute on butterfly coordination.

    PubMed

    Telles, Thiago; Barroso, Renato; Barbosa, Augusto Carvalho; Salgueiro, Diego Fortes de Souza; Colantonio, Emilson; Andries Júnior, Orival

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hand paddles, parachute and hand paddles plus parachute on the inter-limb coordination of butterfly swimming. Thirteen male swimmers were evaluated in four random maximal intensity conditions: without equipment, with hand paddles, with parachute and with hand paddles + parachute. Arm and leg stroke phases were identified by 2D video analysis to calculate the total time gap (T1: time between hands' entry in the water and high break-even point of the first undulation; T2: time between the beginning of the hand's backward movement and low break-even point of the first undulation; T3: time between the hand's arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders and high break-even point of the second undulation; T4: time between the hand's release from the water and low break-even point of the second undulation). The swimming velocity was reduced and T1, T2 and T3 increased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. No changes were observed in T4. Total time gap decreased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. It is concluded that hand paddles do not influence the arm-to-leg coordination in butterfly, while parachute and hand paddles + parachute do change it, providing a greater propulsive continuity. PMID:25583184

  4. Prevention of coordinated eye movements and steering impairs driving performance.

    PubMed

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Chattington, M; Anglesea, M; Ashford, D G; Wilson, M; Keil, D

    2005-06-01

    When approaching a bend in the road, a driver looks across to the inside kerb before turning the steering wheel. Eye movements and steering are tightly linked, with the eyes leading, which means that the oculomotor controller can assist the neural centres controlling steering. This optimum coordination is observed for all drivers; but despite being the preferred solution to the motor-control problem of successfully steering along a winding road, the question remains as to how crucial such coordinated eye and steering movements are for driving performance. Twenty subjects repeatedly drove a simulated stage of the World Rally Championship, aiming to complete the course in the fastest possible time. For the first six repetitions they used the usual coordination of eye movements and steering; for drives 7--12 they were instructed to fixate on a small spot in the centre of the screen (centre gaze). Prevention of coordination in this way impaired their performance (drives 6 and 7 compared), dramatically increasing their time taken to complete the course, equivalent to slipping 19 places down the leader board in the actual rally stage. This indicates that the usual pattern of eye movements correlated with steering is crucial for driving performance. Further experiments are suggested to reveal whether any attentional demand associated with keeping the eyes still contributes to the loss in performance. PMID:15841399

  5. Automated tracking and grasping of a moving object with a robotic hand-eye system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.K.; Timcenko, A.; Yoshimi, B.; Michelman, P. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-04-01

    Most robotic grasping tasks assume a stationary or fixed object. In this paper, the authors explore the requirements for tracking and grasping a moving object. The focus of the work is to achieve a high level of interaction between a real-time vision system capable of tracking moving objects in 3-D and a robot arm with gripper that can be used to pick up a moving object. There is an interest in exploring the interplay of hand--eye coordination for dynamic grasping takes such as grasping of parts on a moving conveyor system, assembly of articulated parts, or for grasping from a mobile robotic system. Coordination between an organisms sensing modalities and motor control system is a hallmark of intelligent behavior, and they are pursuing the goal of building an integrated sensing and actuation system that can operate in dynamic as opposed to static environments. The system they have built addresses three distinct problems in robotic hand--eye coordination for grasping moving objects: fast computation of 3-D motion parameters from vision, predictive control of a moving robotic arm to track a moving object, and interception and grasping. The system is able to operate at approximately human arm movement rates, and experimental results in which a moving model train is tracked is presented, stably grasped, and picked up by the system. The algorithms they have developed that relate sensing to actuation are quite general and applicable to a variety of complex robotic tasks that require visual feedback for arm and hand control.

  6. Active head rotations and eye-head coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zangemeister, W. H.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that head movements play an important role in gaze. The interaction between eye and head movements involves both their shared role in directing gaze and the compensatory vestibular ocular reflex. The dynamics of head trajectories are discussed, taking into account the use of parameterization to obtain the peak velocity, peak accelerations, the times of these extrema, and the duration of the movement. Attention is given to the main sequence, neck muscle EMG and details of the head-movement trajectory, types of head model accelerations, the latency of eye and head movement in coordinated gaze, gaze latency as a function of various factors, and coordinated gaze types. Clinical examples of gaze-plane analysis are considered along with the instantaneous change of compensatory eye movement (CEM) gain, and aspects of variability.

  7. Processing Coordinate Structures in Chinese: Evidence from Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Qingrong, Chen; Yan, Huang

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the results of an eye-tracking experiment that investigated the processing of coordinate structures in Chinese sentence comprehension. The study tracked the eye movements of native Chinese readers as they read sentences consisting of two independent clauses connected by the word huo zhe. The data strongly confirmed readers' preference for an initial noun phrase (NP)-coordination parsing in Chinese coordination structure. When huo zhe was absent from the beginning of a sentence, we identified a cost associated with abandoning the NP-coordination analysis, which was evident with regard to the second NP when the coordination was unambiguous. Otherwise, this cost was evident with regard to the verb, the syntactically disambiguating region, when the coordination was ambiguous. However, the presence of a sentence-initial huo zhe reduced reading times and regressions in the huo zhe NP and the verb regions. We believe that the word huo zhe at the beginning of a sentence helps the reader predict that the sentence contains a parallel structure. Before the corresponding phrases appear, the readers can use the word huo zhe and the language structure thereafter to predicatively construct the syntactic structure. Such predictive capability can eliminate the reader's preference for NP-coordination analysis. Implications for top-down parsing theory and models of initial syntactic analysis and reanalysis are discussed. PMID:22558163

  8. Effects of eye dominance (left vs. right) and cannabis use on intermanual coordination and negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Gorynia, Inge; Schwaiger, Markus; Heinz, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Based on the previous findings, it has been assumed that in schizophrenia patients, eye dominance and cannabis use will affect negative symptoms and intermanual coordination (IMC), an index of interhemispheric communication. But eye dominance, specifically the clinical findings for it, has been neglected in schizophrenia research. We therefore investigated its effects in 52 right-handed (36 right-eyed and 16 left-eyed) and 51 left-handed (35 left-eyed and 16 right-eyed) schizophrenia in-patients without and with drug use. Eye dominance affected IMC in all schizophrenia patients. When comparing right- and left-handers, we found that this result was only significant in the right-handed patients and in the smaller subgroup without drug use. In the right-handers, left eye dominance-like left-handedness-was associated with higher values in IMC and less pronounced manifestation of negative symptoms, right eye dominance was not. Thus, left-eyed right-handers may be more closely related to left-handers than to right-handers. In accordance with the results from the literature, we suggest that these findings are due to better interhemispheric connections and less impairment of white matter structures, especially in right-hemispheric regions. Moreover, cannabis use was related to higher scores in IMC and less pronounced negative symptoms, but only in the right-eyed and not in the left-eyed right-handers or in the left-handers. Hence, differences in eye dominance and handedness may be partially responsible for different results in interhemispheric connections among cannabis users. In conclusion, both eye dominance and use of cannabis should be taken into account when assessing clinical symptoms in schizophrenia patients. PMID:24792218

  9. Automated cross-modal mapping in robotic eye/hand systems using plastic radial basis function networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinggang; Lee, M. H.

    2007-03-01

    Advanced autonomous artificial systems will need incremental learning and adaptive abilities similar to those seen in humans. Knowledge from biology, psychology and neuroscience is now inspiring new approaches for systems that have sensory-motor capabilities and operate in complex environments. Eye/hand coordination is an important cross-modal cognitive function, and is also typical of many of the other coordinations that must be involved in the control and operation of embodied intelligent systems. This paper examines a biologically inspired approach for incrementally constructing compact mapping networks for eye/hand coordination. We present a simplified node-decoupled extended Kalman filter for radial basis function networks, and compare this with other learning algorithms. An experimental system consisting of a robot arm and a pan-and-tilt head with a colour camera is used to produce results and test the algorithms in this paper. We also present three approaches for adapting to structural changes during eye/hand coordination tasks, and the robustness of the algorithms under noise are investigated. The learning and adaptation approaches in this paper have similarities with current ideas about neural growth in the brains of humans and animals during tool-use, and infants during early cognitive development.

  10. Parameterizations for reducing camera reprojection error for robot-world hand-eye calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate robot-world, hand-eye calibration is crucial to automation tasks. In this paper, we discuss the robot-world, hand-eye calibration problem which has been modeled as the linear relationship AX equals ZB, where X and Z are the unknown calibration matrices composed of rotation and translation ...

  11. Corticospinal Excitability in the Hand Muscles is Decreased During Eye Movement with Visual Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Yuta; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles decreases during smooth pursuit eye movement. The present study tested a hypothesis that the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles at rest during eye movement is not caused by visual feedback but caused by motor commands to the eye muscles. Healthy men (M age = 28.4 yr., SD = 5.2) moved their eyes to the right with visual occlusion (dark goggles) while their arms and hands remained at rest. The motor-evoked potential in the hand muscles was suppressed by 19% in the third quarter of the eye-movement period, supporting a view that motor commands to the eye muscles are the cause of the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles. The amount of the suppression was not significantly different among the muscles, indicating that modulation of corticospinal excitability in one muscle induced by eye movement is not dependent on whether eye movement direction and the direction of finger movement when the muscle contracts are identical. Thus, the finding failed to support a hypothetical view that motor commands to the eye muscles concomittantly produce motor commands to the hand muscles. Moreover, the amount of the suppression was not significantly different between the forearm positions, indicating that the suppression was not affected by proprioception of the forearm muscles when visual feedback is absent. PMID:27420319

  12. Eye Selector Logic for a Coordinated Cell Cycle Exit

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla S.; Casares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Organ-selector transcription factors control simultaneously cell differentiation and proliferation, ensuring the development of functional organs and their homeostasis. How this is achieved at the molecular level is still unclear. Here we have investigated how the transcriptional pulse of string/cdc25 (stg), the universal mitotic trigger, is regulated during Drosophila retina development as an example of coordinated deployment of differentiation and proliferation programs. We identify the eye specific stg enhancer, stg-FMW, and show that Pax6 selector genes, in cooperation with Eya and So, two members of the retinal determination network, activate stg-FMW, establishing a positive feed-forward loop. This loop is negatively modulated by the Meis1 protein, Hth. This regulatory logic is reminiscent of that controlling the expression of differentiation transcription factors. Our work shows that subjecting transcription factors and key cell cycle regulators to the same regulatory logic ensures the coupling between differentiation and proliferation programs during organ development. PMID:25695251

  13. Specific eye-head coordination enhances vision in progressive lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Katharina; Wahl, Siegfried

    2016-09-01

    In uncorrected vision all combinations of eye and head positions are visually equivalent; thus, there is no need for a specific modification of eye-head coordination in young healthy observers. In contrast, the quality of visual input indeed strongly depends on eye position in the majority of healthy elderly drivers, namely in progressive additional lens (PALs) wearers. For a given distance, only specific combinations of eye and head position provide clear vision in a progressive lens wearer. However, although head movements are an integral part of gaze behavior, it is not known if eye-head coordination takes part in the enhancement of visual input in healthy individuals. In the current study we determined changes in eye-head coordination in progressive lens wearers in challenging tasks with high cognitive load, in the situation of driving. During a real-world drive on an urban round track in Stuttgart, gaze movements and head movements were measured in 17 PAL wearers and eye-head coordination was compared to 27 controls with unrestricted vision. Head movement behavior, specific to progressive lens wearers, was determined in head gain and temporal properties of head movements. Furthermore, vertical eye-head coordination was consistent only among PAL wearers. The observed differences in eye-head coordination clearly demonstrate a contribution of head movements in the enhancement of visual input in the healthy human visual system. PMID:27604068

  14. An Eye in the Palm of Your Hand: Alterations in Visual Processing Near the Hand, a Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Perry, Carolyn J; Amarasooriya, Prakash; Fallah, Mazyar

    2016-01-01

    Feedback within the oculomotor system improves visual processing at eye movement end points, also termed a visual grasp. We do not just view the world around us however, we also reach out and grab things with our hands. A growing body of literature suggests that visual processing in near-hand space is altered. The control systems for moving either the eyes or the hands rely on parallel networks of fronto-parietal regions, which have feedback connections to visual areas. Since the oculomotor system effects on visual processing occur through feedback, both through the motor plan and the motor efference copy, a parallel system where reaching and/or grasping motor-related activity also affects visual processing is likely. Areas in the posterior parietal cortex, for example, receive proprioceptive and visual information used to guide actions, as well as motor efference signals. This trio of information channels is all that would be necessary to produce spatial allocation of reach-related visual attention. We review evidence from behavioral and neurophysiological studies that support the hypothesis that feedback from the reaching and/or grasping motor control networks affects visual processing while noting ways in which it differs from that seen within the oculomotor system. We also suggest that object affordances may represent the neural mechanism through which certain object features are selected for preferential processing when stimuli are near the hand. Finally, we summarize the two effector-based feedback systems and discuss how having separate but parallel effector systems allows for efficient decoupling of eye and hand movements. PMID:27148034

  15. An Eye in the Palm of Your Hand: Alterations in Visual Processing Near the Hand, a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Carolyn J.; Amarasooriya, Prakash; Fallah, Mazyar

    2016-01-01

    Feedback within the oculomotor system improves visual processing at eye movement end points, also termed a visual grasp. We do not just view the world around us however, we also reach out and grab things with our hands. A growing body of literature suggests that visual processing in near-hand space is altered. The control systems for moving either the eyes or the hands rely on parallel networks of fronto-parietal regions, which have feedback connections to visual areas. Since the oculomotor system effects on visual processing occur through feedback, both through the motor plan and the motor efference copy, a parallel system where reaching and/or grasping motor-related activity also affects visual processing is likely. Areas in the posterior parietal cortex, for example, receive proprioceptive and visual information used to guide actions, as well as motor efference signals. This trio of information channels is all that would be necessary to produce spatial allocation of reach-related visual attention. We review evidence from behavioral and neurophysiological studies that support the hypothesis that feedback from the reaching and/or grasping motor control networks affects visual processing while noting ways in which it differs from that seen within the oculomotor system. We also suggest that object affordances may represent the neural mechanism through which certain object features are selected for preferential processing when stimuli are near the hand. Finally, we summarize the two effector-based feedback systems and discuss how having separate but parallel effector systems allows for efficient decoupling of eye and hand movements. PMID:27148034

  16. Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Jin; Xiong, Cai-Hua; Xiong, Le; Huang, Xiao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hand coordination can allow humans to have dexterous control with many degrees of freedom to perform various tasks in daily living. An important contributing factor to this important ability is the complex biomechanical architecture of the human hand. However, drawing a clear functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination is challenging. It is not understood which biomechanical characteristics are responsible for hand coordination and what specific effect each biomechanical characteristic has. To explore this link, we first inspected the characteristics of hand coordination during daily tasks through a statistical analysis of the kinematic data, which were collected from thirty right-handed subjects during a multitude of grasping tasks. Then, the functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination was drawn by establishing the clear corresponding causality between the tendinous connective characteristics of the human hand and the coordinated characteristics during daily grasping activities. The explicit functional link indicates that the biomechanical characteristic of tendinous connective architecture between muscles and articulations is the proper design by the Creator to perform a multitude of daily tasks in a comfortable way. The clear link between the structure and the function of the human hand also suggests that the design of a multifunctional robotic hand should be able to better imitate such basic architecture. PMID:26730579

  17. Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jin; Xiong, Cai-Hua; Xiong, Le; Huang, Xiao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hand coordination can allow humans to have dexterous control with many degrees of freedom to perform various tasks in daily living. An important contributing factor to this important ability is the complex biomechanical architecture of the human hand. However, drawing a clear functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination is challenging. It is not understood which biomechanical characteristics are responsible for hand coordination and what specific effect each biomechanical characteristic has. To explore this link, we first inspected the characteristics of hand coordination during daily tasks through a statistical analysis of the kinematic data, which were collected from thirty right-handed subjects during a multitude of grasping tasks. Then, the functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination was drawn by establishing the clear corresponding causality between the tendinous connective characteristics of the human hand and the coordinated characteristics during daily grasping activities. The explicit functional link indicates that the biomechanical characteristic of tendinous connective architecture between muscles and articulations is the proper design by the Creator to perform a multitude of daily tasks in a comfortable way. The clear link between the structure and the function of the human hand also suggests that the design of a multifunctional robotic hand should be able to better imitate such basic architecture. PMID:26730579

  18. Research on acquisition of 3D information using eye-in-hand robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Wang, Pengfei

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, a PUMA562 robot, a micro CCD camera and an image acquisition card, along with IBM/PC 586 host computer, formed eye-in-hand visual servoing experimental system of an intelligent space robot. A novel robot visual servo control method is adopted, based on FMF neural network. Computer simulation and many experiments of object tracking with the capture of floating object were carried out in this eye-in- hand visual servoing system. It is an important reference to further research in the future.

  19. Eye-head coordination during large gaze shifts.

    PubMed

    Tweed, D; Glenn, B; Vilis, T

    1995-02-01

    1. Three-dimensional (3D) eye and head rotations were measured with the use of the magnetic search coil technique in six healthy human subjects as they made large gaze shifts. The aims of this study were 1) to see whether the kinematic rules that constrain eye and head orientations to two degrees of freedom between saccades also hold during movements; 2) to chart the curvature and looping in eye and head trajectories; and 3) to assess whether the timing and paths of eye and head movements are more compatible with a single gaze error command driving both movements, or with two different feedback loops. 2. Static orientations of the eye and head relative to space are known to resemble the distribution that would be generated by a Fick gimbal (a horizontal axis moving on a fixed vertical axis). We show that gaze point trajectories during eye-head gaze shifts fit the Fick gimbal pattern, with horizontal movements following straight "line of latitude" paths and vertical movements curving like lines of longitude. However, horizontal (and to a lesser extent vertical) movements showed direction-dependent looping, with rightward and leftward (and up and down) saccades tracing slightly different paths. Plots of facing direction (the analogue of gaze direction for the head) also showed the latitude/longitude pattern, without looping. In radial saccades, the gaze point initially moved more vertically than the target direction and then curved; head trajectories were straight. 3. The eye and head components of randomly sequenced gaze shifts were not time locked to one another. The head could start moving at any time from slightly before the eye until 200 ms after, and the standard deviation of this interval could be as large as 80 ms. The head continued moving for a long (up to 400 ms) and highly variable time after the gaze error had fallen to zero. For repeated saccades between the same targets, peak eye and head velocities were directly, but very weakly, correlated; fast eye

  20. Dynamic Assessment of Binocular Eye Movement Coordination: Norms and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Viirre, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Alignment of the two eyes is controlled by a finely tuned, fast acting system with components within the brain. Assessment of binocular alignment has classically been done statically. Eye positions are assessed in primary position and at eccentric angles to interpret the functional status of the oculomotor nerves and muscles. However, assessment of dynamic eye alignment, the coordination of the eyes during eye movements, has been less commonly carried out and has not been formalized with population norms. Clinicians are aware of slow eye movement dynamic alignment changes, such as that clinically observed in Intranuclear Ophthalmoplegia. But assessment of eye alignment during rapid eye movements, such as saccade or pursuit has not been part of neuro-ophthalmologic assessment. With the advent of inexpensive, high resolution recording systems, both eyes can be simultaneously recorded and their coordination during movement compared. Thus, we now have an opportunity to provide a laboratory based objective measurement of a gamut of binocular coordination systems. Recent research in humans has demonstrated increased variability of binocular coordination during divided attention. Variability is an interesting statistic that can be sensitively assessed in the velocity domain without extensive gaze position recalibration procedures during recording over long intervals. Variability can thus be used as a robust, long-term eye movement parameter with minimal intrusiveness to the subject. It is proposed that population studies of binocular coordination during eye movements be carried out to determine neurologic norms so that conditions such as brain injury and others can be assessed with a functional tool with objective parameters. PMID:24804278

  1. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  2. Eye-head coordination during optokinetic stimulation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, T.; Igarashi, M.; Jensen, D. W.; Homick, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Head and eye movements in the yaw plane were recorded during and after optokinetic stimulation in squirrel monkeys. 1) Phasic or tonic head deviations to the side of the ocular quick phase occurred in 94% of total recordings (n = 50) during the perstimulus period, and in 75% of recordings (n = 49) during the poststimulus period. Magnitude of mean head deviation was significantly different between perstimulus and poststimulus periods. 2) Head nystagmus associated with eye nystagmus was consistently observed in seven of nine squirrel monkeys during optokinetic stimulation. Squirrel monkeys are thereby less prone to display head nystagmus than either guinea pigs, pigeons or chickens. 3) Slow phase speeds of coupled head and eye nystagmus were subjected to statistical analysis. A highly significant negative correlation was found between slow phase head and eye speeds. The correlation coefficient was - 0.81 at 60 degrees / sec stimulus (n = 119) and -0.72 at 100 degrees / sec stimulus (n = 131). The gaze speed, calculated by summing the head and eye speeds, was 59.1 plus or minus 6.8 / sec at 60 degrees / sec and 92.2 plus or minus 11.4 at 100 degrees / sec stimulus. There was no significant difference between the gaze speed in a free head condition and the eye speed when the head was fixed.

  3. The relative timing between eye and hand in rapid sequential pointing is affected by time pressure, but not by advance knowledge.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, F J A; van Polanen, V; Savelsbergh, G J P; Bennett, S J

    2011-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of timing constraints and advance knowledge on eye-hand coordination strategy in a sequential pointing task. Participants were required to point at two successively appearing targets on a screen while the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and the trial order were manipulated, such that timing constraints were high (ISI = 300 ms) or low (ISI = 450 ms) and advance knowledge of the target location was present (fixed order) or absent (random order). Analysis of eye and finger onset and completion times per segment of the sequence indicated that oculo-manual behaviour was in general characterized by eye movements preceding the finger, as well as 'gaze anchoring' (i.e. eye fixation of the first target until completion of the finger movement towards that target). Advance knowledge of future target locations lead to shorter latency times of eye and hand, and smaller eye-hand lead times, which in combination resulted in shorter total movement times. There was, however, no effect of advance knowledge on the duration of gaze anchoring. In contrast, gaze anchoring did change as a function of the interval between successive stimuli and was shorter with a 300 ms ISI versus 450 ms ISI. Further correlation analysis provided some indication that shorter residual latency is associated with shorter pointing duration, without affecting accuracy. These results are consistent with a neural mechanism governing the coupling of eye and arm movements, which has been suggested to reside in the superior colliculus. The temporal coordination resulting from this coupling is a function of the time pressure on the visuo-manual system resulting from the appearance of external stimuli. PMID:21744087

  4. The Effect of Intensive Bimanual Training on Coordination of the Hands in Children with Congenital Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ya-Ching; Casertano, Lorenzo; Hillman, Andrew; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested efficacy of intensive bimanual training in improving the quality and quantity of affected hand use in children with hemiplegia. However, it is not known whether such training affects the coordination of the two hands. In the present study, 20 children with congenital hemiplegia (age 4-10 years; MACS levels I-II) were…

  5. Radiation exposure of eyes, thyroid gland and hands in orthopaedic staff: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Various procedures, especially minimal invasive techniques using fluoroscopy, pose a risk of radiation exposure to orthopaedic staff. Anatomical sites such as the eyes, thyroid glands and hands are more vulnerable to radiation considering the limited use of personal protective devices in the workplace. The objective of the study is to assess the annual mean cumulative and per procedure radiation dose received at anatomical locations like eyes, thyroid glands and hands in orthopaedic staff using systematic review. Methods The review of literature was conducted using systematic search of the database sources like PUBMED and EMBASE using appropriate keywords. The eligibility criteria and the data extraction of literature were based on study design (cohort or cross-sectional study), study population (orthopaedic surgeons or their assistants), exposure (doses of workplace radiation exposure at hands/fingers, eye/forehead, neck/thyroid), language (German and English). The literature search was conducted using a PRISMA checklist and flow chart. Results Forty-two articles were found eligible and included for the review. The results show that radiation doses for the anatomical locations of eye, thyroid gland and hands were lower than the dose levels recommended. But there is a considerable variation of radiation dose received at all three anatomical locations mainly due to different situations including procedures (open and minimally invasive), work experience (junior and senior surgeons),distance from the primary and secondary radiation, and use of personal protective equipments (PPEs). The surgeons receive higher radiation dose during minimally invasive procedures compared to open procedures. Junior surgeons are at higher risk of radiation exposure compared to seniors. PPEs play a significant role in reduction of radiation dose. Conclusions Although the current radiation precautions appear to be adequate based on the low dose radiation, more in-depth studies

  6. The effects of skill on the eye-hand span during musical sight-reading.

    PubMed

    Furneaux, S; Land, M F

    1999-12-01

    The eye-hand span (EHS) is the separation between eye position and hand position when sight-reading music. It can be measured in two ways: in notes (the number of notes between hand and eye; the 'note index'), or in time (the length of time between fixation and performance; the 'time index'). The EHSs of amateur and professional pianists were compared while they sight-read music. The professionals showed significantly larger note indexes than the amateurs (approximately four notes, compared to two notes), and all subjects showed similar variability in the note index. Surprisingly, the different groups of pianists showed almost identical mean time indexes (ca. 1 s), with no significant differences between any of the skill levels. However, professionals did show significantly less variation than the amateurs. The time index was significantly affected by the performance tempo: when fast tempos were imposed on performance, all subjects showed a reduction in the time index (to ca. 0.7 s), and slow tempos increased the time index (to ca. 1.3 s). This means that the length of time that information is stored in the buffer is related to performance tempo rather than ability, but that professionals can fit more information into their buffers. PMID:10643087

  7. Head-Torso-Hand Coordination in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elders, Vera; Sheehan, Sinead; Wilson, Andrew D.; Levesley, Martin; Bhakta, Bipin; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the nature of coordination and control problems in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Method: Seven adults (two males, five females, age range 20-28y; mean 23y, SD 2y 8mo) and eight children with DCD (six males, two females, age range 7-9y; mean 8y, SD 8mo), and 10 without DCD (seven males, three…

  8. Impact of a lead glass screen on scatter radiation to eyes and hands in interventional cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Micha; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans Peter; Wolber, Thomas; Ammann, Peter; Roelli, Hans; Rohner, Franziska; Rickli, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a transparent lead glass screen (TLGS) on scatter radiation to the eyes and the hands in interventional cardiologists and to compare the results to the recommended annual threshold values of 150 and 500 mSv, respectively. Local radiation doses to the left eye and the ring finger of the left hand of three operators (A, B, C) were assessed by thermoluminiscence dosimeters during 813 coronary angiographies (CAs), including 190 ad hoc percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) either with a TLGS placed between patient and operator [615 CAs including 138 ad hoc PCIs; dose-area product (DAP) = 84.9 +/- 71.3 Gy x cm(2)], or without (198 CAs including 52 PCIs; DAP = 85.7 +/- 61.5 Gy x cm(2)). To determine the efficacy of the TLGS, average DAP-normalized local doses were calculated. Using a TLGS, operator A, B, and C performed 259 (in 9 months), 211 (in 8 months), and 145 CAs (in 8 months) with TLGS and acquired cumulative eye lens doses of 5.5, 1.5, and 1.0 mSv corresponding to extrapolated annual doses of 7.3, 2.3, and 1.5 mSv. The cumulative finger doses were 9.6, 10.3, and 6.4 mSv, resulting in extrapolated annual doses of 12.8, 15.5, and 9.6 mSv. Compared to 139 (in 5 months), 36 (in 2 months), and 23 CAs (in 2 months) without TLGS, the use of a TLGS reduced the DAP-normalized eye dose by a factor of 19 (with TLGS 0.153 vs. without TLGS 2.924 microSv/Gy x cm(2)), whereas only a weak effect on the dose to the hands was observed (with TLGS 0.504 vs. without TLGS 0.578 microSv/Gy x cm(2)). The consequent use of a TLGS efficiently reduces scatter radiation to the operator's eyes in daily practice, but has only minimal effects on the dose to the hands. PMID:16273590

  9. Meis1 coordinates a network of genes implicated in eye development and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Séverine; González-Lázaro, Monica; Beccari, Leonardo; Carramolino, Laura; Martin-Bermejo, Maria Jesus; Amarie, Oana; Mateos-San Martín, Daniel; Torroja, Carlos; Bogdanović, Ozren; Doohan, Roisin; Puk, Oliver; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Graw, Jochen; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Casares, Fernando; Torres, Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Microphthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by reduced eye size and visual deficits of variable degree. Sporadic and hereditary microphthalmos have been associated with heterozygous mutations in genes fundamental for eye development. Yet, many cases are idiopathic or await the identification of molecular causes. Here we show that haploinsufficiency of Meis1, which encodes a transcription factor with evolutionarily conserved expression in the embryonic trunk, brain and sensory organs, including the eye, causes microphthalmic traits and visual impairment in adult mice. By combining analysis of Meis1 loss-of-function and conditional Meis1 functional rescue with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq approaches we show that, in contrast to its preferential association with Hox-Pbx BSs in the trunk, Meis1 binds to Hox/Pbx-independent sites during optic cup development. In the eye primordium, Meis1 coordinates, in a dose-dependent manner, retinal proliferation and differentiation by regulating genes responsible for human microphthalmia and components of the Notch signaling pathway. In addition, Meis1 is required for eye patterning by controlling a set of eye territory-specific transcription factors, so that in Meis1(-/-) embryos boundaries among the different eye territories are shifted or blurred. We propose that Meis1 is at the core of a genetic network implicated in eye patterning/microphthalmia, and represents an additional candidate for syndromic cases of these ocular malformations. PMID:26253404

  10. Target modality determines eye-head coordination in nonhuman primates: implications for gaze control

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Abigail Z.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied eye-head coordination in nonhuman primates with acoustic targets after finding that they are unable to make accurate saccadic eye movements to targets of this type with the head restrained. Three male macaque monkeys with experience in localizing sounds for rewards by pointing their gaze to the perceived location of sources served as subjects. Visual targets were used as controls. The experimental sessions were configured to minimize the chances that the subject would be able to predict the modality of the target as well as its location and time of presentation. The data show that eye and head movements are coordinated differently to generate gaze shifts to acoustic targets. Chiefly, the head invariably started to move before the eye and contributed more to the gaze shift. These differences were more striking for gaze shifts of <20–25° in amplitude, to which the head contributes very little or not at all when the target is visual. Thus acoustic and visual targets trigger gaze shifts with different eye-head coordination. This, coupled to the fact that anatomic evidence involves the superior colliculus as the link between auditory spatial processing and the motor system, suggests that separate signals are likely generated within this midbrain structure. PMID:21795625

  11. Adaptation of eye and hand movements to target displacements of different size.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Gerd; Bock, Otmar; Grigorova, Valentina; Ilieva, Milena

    2010-06-01

    Previous work has documented that the direction of eye and hand movements can be adaptively modified using the double-step paradigm. Here we report that both motor systems adapt not only to small direction steps (5 degrees gaze angle) but also to large ones (28 degrees gaze angle). However, the magnitude of adaptation did not increase with step size, and the relative magnitude of adaptation therefore decreased from 67% with small steps to 15% with large steps. This decreasing efficiency of adaptation may reflect the participation of directionally selective neural circuits in double-step adaptation. PMID:20424831

  12. Three-dimensional eye-head coordination is implemented downstream from the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Klier, Eliana M; Wang, Hongying; Crawford, J Douglas

    2003-05-01

    How the brain transforms two-dimensional visual signals into multi-dimensional motor commands, and subsequently how it constrains the redundant degrees of freedom, are fundamental problems in sensorimotor control. During fixations between gaze shifts, the redundant torsional degree of freedom is determined by various neural constraints. For example, the eye- and head-in-space are constrained by Donders' law, whereas the eye-in-head obeys Listing's law. However, where and how the brain implements these laws is not yet known. In this study, we show that eye and head movements, elicited by unilateral microstimulations of the superior colliculus (SC) in head-free monkeys, obey the same Donders' strategies observed in normal behavior (i.e., Listing's law for final eye positions and the Fick strategy for the head). Moreover, these evoked movements showed a pattern of three-dimensional eye-head coordination, consistent with normal behavior, where the eye is driven purposely out of Listing's plane during the saccade portion of the gaze shift in opposition to a subsequent torsional vestibuloocular reflex slow phase, such that the final net torsion at the end of each head-free gaze shift is zero. The required amount of saccade-related torsion was highly variable, depending on the initial position of the eye and head prior to a gaze shift and the size of the gaze shift, pointing to a neural basis of torsional control. Because these variable, context-appropriate torsional saccades were correctly elicited by fixed SC commands during head-free stimulations, this shows that the SC only encodes the horizontal and vertical components of gaze, leaving the complexity of torsional organization to downstream control systems. Thus we conclude that Listing's and Donders' laws of the eyes and head, and their three-dimensional coordination mechanisms, must be implemented after the SC. PMID:12740415

  13. Muscular coordination of biceps brachii and brachioradialis in elbow flexion with respect to hand position

    PubMed Central

    Kleiber, Tim; Kunz, Leo; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Contribution of synergistic muscles toward specific movements over multi joint systems may change with varying position of distal or proximal joints. Purpose of this study is to reveal the relationship of muscular coordination of brachioradialis and biceps brachii during elbow flexion with respect to hand position and biomechanical advantages and disadvantages of biceps brachii. A group of 16 healthy subjects has been advised to perform 20 repetitions of single elbow flexion movements in different hand positions (pronated, neutral, and supinated). With a speed of 20°/s, simultaneously sEMG of biceps brachii and brachioradialis and kinematics of the movement were recorded in a motion analysis laboratory. Normalized to MVC the sEMG amplitudes of both muscles contributing to elbow flexion movements were compared in pronated, supinated, and neutral hand position over elbow joint angle. Significant differences in the contribution of brachioradialis were found in pronated hand position compared to supinated and neutral hand position while the muscular activity of biceps brachii shows no significant changes in any hand position. In conclusion, a statistical significant dependency of the inter-muscular coordination between biceps brachii and brachioradialis during elbow flexion with respect to hand position has been observed depending on a biomechanical disadvantage of biceps brachii. PMID:26300781

  14. Integration of Hand and Finger Location in External Spatial Coordinates for Tactile Localization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heed, Tobias; Backhaus, Jenny; Roder, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Tactile stimulus location is automatically transformed from somatotopic into external spatial coordinates, rendering information about the location of touch in three-dimensional space. This process is referred to as tactile remapping. Whereas remapping seems to occur automatically for the hands and feet, the fingers may constitute an exception in…

  15. The eye in hand: predicting others' behavior by integrating multiple sources of information.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Costantini, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    The ability to predict the outcome of other beings' actions confers significant adaptive advantages. Experiments have assessed that human action observation can use multiple information sources, but it is currently unknown how they are integrated and how conflicts between them are resolved. To address this issue, we designed an action observation paradigm requiring the integration of multiple, potentially conflicting sources of evidence about the action target: the actor's gaze direction, hand preshape, and arm trajectory, and their availability and relative uncertainty in time. In two experiments, we analyzed participants' action prediction ability by using eye tracking and behavioral measures. The results show that the information provided by the actor's gaze affected participants' explicit predictions. However, results also show that gaze information was disregarded as soon as information on the actor's hand preshape was available, and this latter information source had widespread effects on participants' prediction ability. Furthermore, as the action unfolded in time, participants relied increasingly more on the arm movement source, showing sensitivity to its increasing informativeness. Therefore, the results suggest that the brain forms a robust estimate of the actor's motor intention by integrating multiple sources of information. However, when informative motor cues such as a preshaped hand with a given grip are available and might help in selecting action targets, people tend to capitalize on such motor cues, thus turning out to be more accurate and fast in inferring the object to be manipulated by the other's hand. PMID:25568158

  16. The eye in hand: predicting others' behavior by integrating multiple sources of information

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Costantini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the outcome of other beings' actions confers significant adaptive advantages. Experiments have assessed that human action observation can use multiple information sources, but it is currently unknown how they are integrated and how conflicts between them are resolved. To address this issue, we designed an action observation paradigm requiring the integration of multiple, potentially conflicting sources of evidence about the action target: the actor's gaze direction, hand preshape, and arm trajectory, and their availability and relative uncertainty in time. In two experiments, we analyzed participants' action prediction ability by using eye tracking and behavioral measures. The results show that the information provided by the actor's gaze affected participants' explicit predictions. However, results also show that gaze information was disregarded as soon as information on the actor's hand preshape was available, and this latter information source had widespread effects on participants' prediction ability. Furthermore, as the action unfolded in time, participants relied increasingly more on the arm movement source, showing sensitivity to its increasing informativeness. Therefore, the results suggest that the brain forms a robust estimate of the actor's motor intention by integrating multiple sources of information. However, when informative motor cues such as a preshaped hand with a given grip are available and might help in selecting action targets, people tend to capitalize on such motor cues, thus turning out to be more accurate and fast in inferring the object to be manipulated by the other's hand. PMID:25568158

  17. Grammatical number processing and anticipatory eye movements are not tightly coordinated in English spoken language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Brian; Dye, Melody; Jones, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of eye movements in world-situated language comprehension have demonstrated that rapid processing of morphosyntactic information – e.g., grammatical gender and number marking – can produce anticipatory eye movements to referents in the visual scene. We investigated how type of morphosyntactic information and the goals of language users in comprehension affected eye movements, focusing on the processing of grammatical number morphology in English-speaking adults. Participants’ eye movements were recorded as they listened to simple English declarative (There are the lions.) and interrogative (Where are the lions?) sentences. In Experiment 1, no differences were observed in speed to fixate target referents when grammatical number information was informative relative to when it was not. The same result was obtained in a speeded task (Experiment 2) and in a task using mixed sentence types (Experiment 3). We conclude that grammatical number processing in English and eye movements to potential referents are not tightly coordinated. These results suggest limits on the role of predictive eye movements in concurrent linguistic and scene processing. We discuss how these results can inform and constrain predictive approaches to language processing. PMID:25999900

  18. Generalization of motor resonance during the observation of hand, mouth, and eye movements.

    PubMed

    Finisguerra, Alessandra; Maffongelli, Laura; Bassolino, Michela; Jacono, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex shows that hand action observation (AO) modulates corticospinal excitability (CSE). CSE modulation alternatively maps low-level kinematic characteristics or higher-level features, like object-directed action goals. However, action execution is achieved through the control of muscle synergies, consisting of coordinated patterns of muscular activity during natural movements, rather than single muscles or object-directed goals. This synergistic organization of action execution also underlies the ability to produce the same functional output (i.e., grasping an object) using different effectors. We hypothesize that motor system activation during AO may rely on similar principles. To investigate this issue, we recorded both hand CSE and TMS-evoked finger movements which provide a much more complete description of coordinated patterns of muscular activity. Subjects passively watched hand, mouth and eyelid opening or closing, which are performing non-object-directed (intransitive) actions. Hand and mouth share the same potential to grasp objects, whereas eyelid does not allow object-directed (transitive) actions. Hand CSE modulation generalized to all effectors, while TMS evoked finger movements only to mouth AO. Such dissociation suggests that the two techniques may have different sensitivities to fine motor modulations induced by AO. Differently from evoked movements, which are sensitive to the possibility to achieve object-directed action, CSE is generically modulated by "opening" vs. "closing" movements, independently of which effector was observed. We propose that motor activities during AO might exploit the same synergistic mechanisms shown for the neural control of movement and organized around a limited set of motor primitives. PMID:26289463

  19. The effects of eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training on the thickness of the cervical flexors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Jang, Jun-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the thicknesses of the cervical flexors according to eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty normal adults were randomly selected, and during their deep cervical flexor training and eye tracking, the thicknesses of the longus colli and the sternocleidomastoid were measured using ultrasonic waves. [Results] The thickness of the longus colli statistically significantly increased when deep cervical flexor training and eye coordination were performed simultaneously. However, the thickness of the sternocleidomastoid did not show statistically significant differences according to eye coordination. [Conclusion] Eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training is likely to increase the thickness of the longus colli selectively. PMID:26834355

  20. Age- and Stereovision-Dependent Eye–Hand Coordination Deficits in Children With Amblyopia and Abnormal Binocularity

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Simon; Suttle, Catherine; Melmoth, Dean R.; Conway, Miriam L.; Sloper, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To examine factors contributing to eye–hand coordination deficits in children with amblyopia and impaired stereovision. Methods. Participants were 55 anisometropic or strabismic children aged 5.0 to 9.25 years with different degrees of amblyopia and abnormal binocularity, along with 28 age-matched visually-normal controls. Pilot data were obtained from four additional patients studied longitudinally at different treatment stages. Movements of the preferred hand were recorded using a 3D motion-capture system while subjects reached-to-precision grasp objects (two sizes, three locations) under binocular, dominant eye, and amblyopic/nonsighting eye conditions. Kinematic and “error” performance measures were quantified and compared by viewing condition and subject group using ANOVA, stepwise regression, and correlation analyses. Results. Movements of the younger amblyopes (age 5–6 years; n = 30) were much slower, particularly in the final approach to the objects, and contained more spatial errors in reaching (∼×1.25–1.75) and grasping (∼×1.75–2.25) under all three views (P < 0.05) than their age-matched controls (n = 13). Amblyopia severity was the main contributor to their slower movements with absent stereovision a secondary factor and the unique determinant of their increased error-rates. Older amblyopes (age 7–9 years; n = 25) spent longer contacting the objects before lifting them (P = 0.015) compared with their matched controls (n = 15), with absence of stereovision still solely related to increases in reach and grasp errors, although these occurred less frequently than in younger patients. Pilot prospective data supported these findings by showing positive treatment-related associations between improved stereovision and reach-to-grasp performance. Conclusions. Strategies that children with amblyopia and abnormal binocularity use for reach-to-precision grasping change with age, from emphasis on visual feedback during the

  1. An improved robust hand-eye calibration for endoscopy navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Kang, Kumsok; Li, Yanfang; Shi, Weili; Miao, Yu; He, Fei; Yan, Fei; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopy is widely used in clinical application, and surgical navigation system is an extremely important way to enhance the safety of endoscopy. The key to improve the accuracy of the navigation system is to solve the positional relationship between camera and tracking marker precisely. The problem can be solved by the hand-eye calibration method based on dual quaternions. However, because of the tracking error and the limited motion of the endoscope, the sample motions may contain some incomplete motion samples. Those motions will cause the algorithm unstable and inaccurate. An advanced selection rule for sample motions is proposed in this paper to improve the stability and accuracy of the methods based on dual quaternion. By setting the motion filter to filter out the incomplete motion samples, finally, high precision and robust result is achieved. The experimental results show that the accuracy and stability of camera registration have been effectively improved by selecting sample motion data automatically.

  2. The hand grasps the center, while the eyes saccade to the top of novel objects

    PubMed Central

    Juravle, Georgiana; Velasco, Carlos; Salgado-Montejo, Alejandro; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether indenting the sides of novel objects (e.g., product packaging) would influence where people grasp, and hence focus their gaze, under the assumption that gaze precedes grasping. In Experiment 1, the participants grasped a selection of custom-made objects designed to resemble typical packaging forms with an indentation in the upper, middle, or lower part. In Experiment 2, eye movements were recorded while the participants viewed differently-sized (small, medium, and large) objects with the same three indentation positions tested in Experiment 1, together with a control object lacking any indentation. The results revealed that irrespective of the location of the indentation, the participants tended to grasp the mid-region of the object, with their index finger always positioned slightly above its midpoint. Importantly, the first visual fixation tended to fall in the cap region of the novel object. The participants also fixated for longer in this region. Furthermore, participants saccaded more often, as well saccading more rapidly when directing their gaze to the upper region of the objects that they were required to inspect visually. Taken together, these results therefore suggest that different spatial locations on target objects are of interest to our eyes and hands. PMID:26052291

  3. Do bimanual coordination, tool use, and body posture contribute equally to hand preferences in bonobos?

    PubMed

    Bardo, Ameline; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Meunier, Hélène

    2015-05-01

    Approximately 90% of the human population is right-handed. The emergence of this hand preference in humans is thought to be linked to the ability to execute complex tasks and habitual bipedalism. In order to test these hypotheses, the present study explored, for the first time, hand preference in relation to both body posture (seated and bipedal) and task complexity (bimanual coordination and two tool use tasks of different complexity) in bonobos (Pan paniscus). Few studies have explored the effects of both posture and task complexity on handedness, and investigations with bonobos are scarce, particularly studies on tool use. Our study aims to overcome such a gap by addressing two main questions: 1) Does a bipedal posture increase the strength of hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? 2) Independent of body posture, does task complexity increase the strength of the hand preference and/or create a directional bias to the use of the right hand? Our results show that independent of body posture, the more complex the task, the more lateralization occurred. Moreover, subjects tended to be right-handed for tasks involving tool use. However, posture had no significant effect on hand preference in the tasks tested here. Therefore, for a given task, bonobos were not more lateralized in a bipedal posture than in a seated one. Task complexity might thus have contributed more than bipedal posture to the emergence of human lateralization and the preponderance of right-handedness, although a larger sample size and more data are needed to be conclusive. PMID:25870160

  4. Three-dimensional eye-head coordination during gaze saccades in the primate.

    PubMed

    Crawford, J D; Ceylan, M Z; Klier, E M; Guitton, D

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the neural constraints on three-dimensional (3-D) orientations of the eye in space (Es), head in space (Hs), and eye in head (Eh) during visual fixations in the monkey and the control strategies used to implement these constraints during head-free gaze saccades. Dual scleral search coil signals were used to compute 3-D orientation quaternions, two-dimensional (2-D) direction vectors, and 3-D angular velocity vectors for both the eye and head in three monkeys during the following visual tasks: radial to/from center, repetitive horizontal, nonrepetitive oblique, random (wide 2-D range), and random with pin-hole goggles. Although 2-D gaze direction (of Es) was controlled more tightly than the contributing 2-D Hs and Eh components, the torsional standard deviation of Es was greater (mean 3.55 degrees ) than Hs (3.10 degrees ), which in turn was greater than Eh (1.87 degrees ) during random fixations. Thus the 3-D Es range appeared to be the byproduct of Hs and Eh constraints, resulting in a pseudoplanar Es range that was twisted (in orthogonal coordinates) like the zero torsion range of Fick coordinates. The Hs fixation range was similarly Fick-like, whereas the Eh fixation range was quasiplanar. The latter Eh range was maintained through exquisite saccade/slow phase coordination, i.e., during each head movement, multiple anticipatory saccades drove the eye torsionally out of the planar range such that subsequent slow phases drove the eye back toward the fixation range. The Fick-like Hs constraint was maintained by the following strategies: first, during purely vertical/horizontal movements, the head rotated about constantly oriented axes that closely resembled physical Fick gimbals, i.e., about head-fixed horizontal axes and space-fixed vertical axes, respectively (although in 1 animal, the latter constraint was relaxed during repetitive horizontal movements, allowing for trajectory optimization). However, during large

  5. Moving a hand-held object: Reconstruction of referent coordinate and apparent stiffness trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Ambike, Satyajit; Zhou, Tao; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    This study used the framework of the referent configuration hypothesis and slow changes in the external conditions during vertical oscillation of a hand-held object to infer the characteristics of hypothetical control variables. The study had two main objectives: (1) to show that hypothetical control variables, namely, referent coordinates and apparent stiffness of vertical hand position and grip force can be measured in an experiment; and (2) to establish relation(s) between these control variables that yield the classic grip-force-load-force coupling. Healthy subjects gripped a handle and performed vertical oscillations between visual targets at one of five metronome-prescribed frequencies. A Hapticmaster robot was used to induce slow changes in the vertical force applied to the handle, while the size of the handle was changed slowly leading to changes in the grip aperture. The subjects were instructed not to react to possible changes in the external forces. A linear, second-order model was used to reconstruct the referent coordinate and apparent stiffness values for each phase of the vertical oscillation cycle using across-cycle regressions. The reconstructed time profiles of the referent coordinates and apparent stiffness showed consistent trends across subjects and movement frequencies. To validate the method, these values were used to predict the vertical force and the grip force applied to the handle for movement cycles that were not utilized in the reconstruction process. Analysis of the coupling between the four variables, two referent coordinates and two apparent stiffness values, revealed a single strong constraint reflecting the coupling between the grip force and vertical force. We view these data as providing experimental support for the idea of controlling natural, multi-muscle actions with shifts in a low-dimensional set of referent coordinates. PMID:25896800

  6. Moving a hand-held object: Reconstruction of referent coordinate and apparent stiffness trajectories.

    PubMed

    Ambike, S; Zhou, T; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2015-07-01

    This study used the framework of the referent configuration hypothesis and slow changes in the external conditions during vertical oscillation of a hand-held object to infer the characteristics of hypothetical control variables. The study had two main objectives: (1) to show that hypothetical control variables, namely, referent coordinates and apparent stiffness of vertical hand position and grip force can be measured in an experiment; and (2) to establish relation(s) between these control variables that yield the classic grip-force-load-force coupling. Healthy subjects gripped a handle and performed vertical oscillations between visual targets at one of five metronome-prescribed frequencies. A HapticMaster robot was used to induce slow changes in the vertical force applied to the handle, while the size of the handle was changed slowly leading to changes in the grip aperture. The subjects were instructed not to react to possible changes in the external forces. A linear, second-order model was used to reconstruct the referent coordinate and apparent stiffness values for each phase of the vertical oscillation cycle using across-cycle regressions. The reconstructed time profiles of the referent coordinates and apparent stiffness showed consistent trends across subjects and movement frequencies. To validate the method, these values were used to predict the vertical force and the grip force applied to the handle for movement cycles that were not utilized in the reconstruction process. Analysis of the coupling between the four variables, two referent coordinates and two apparent stiffness values, revealed a single strong constraint reflecting the coupling between the grip force and vertical force. We view these data as providing experimental support for the idea of controlling natural, multi-muscle actions with shifts in a low-dimensional set of referent coordinates. PMID:25896800

  7. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus facilitates coordination of hand preshaping in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schettino, L F; Van Erp, E; Hening, W; Lessig, S; Song, D; Barba, D; Poizner, H

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found that Parkinson's disease (PD) disrupts the organization of complex motor sequences regardless of the influence of parkinsonian medications. A clear candidate for the neural bases of such deficits, which we term "coordinative," is the failure to integrate propioceptive and visual information by cortico-striatal circuits in a timed fashion. Recent reports, however, have indicated that deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) may result in an improvement in coordinative deficits beyond the amelioration of "intensive deficits" such as bradykinesia and scaling errors. The present study examined the spatio-temporal organization underlying the shaping of the hand during reaching to grasp objects differing in shape. Six PD patients ON and OFF their STN DBS when OFF their concomitant medications and six age-matched controls participated in this study. STN DBS improved the coordination involved in preshaping the hand while grasping. We discuss these results in light of our earlier work with PD patients on and off dopamine replacement therapy. PMID:19922392

  8. Effect of terminal accuracy requirements on temporal gaze-hand coordination during fast discrete and reciprocal pointings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid discrete goal-directed movements are characterized by a well known coordination pattern between the gaze and the hand displacements. The gaze always starts prior to the hand movement and reaches the target before hand velocity peak. Surprisingly, the effect of the target size on the temporal gaze-hand coordination has not been directly investigated. Moreover, goal-directed movements are often produced in a reciprocal rather than in a discrete manner. The objectives of this work were to assess the effect of the target size on temporal gaze-hand coordination during fast 1) discrete and 2) reciprocal pointings. Methods Subjects performed fast discrete (experiment 1) and reciprocal (experiment 2) pointings with an amplitude of 50 cm and four target diameters (7.6, 3.8, 1.9 and 0.95 cm) leading to indexes of difficulty (ID = log2[2A/D]) of 3.7, 4.7, 5.7 and 6.7 bits. Gaze and hand displacements were synchronously recorded. Temporal gaze-hand coordination parameters were compared between experiments (discrete and reciprocal pointings) and IDs using analyses of variance (ANOVAs). Results Data showed that the magnitude of the gaze-hand lead pattern was much higher for discrete than for reciprocal pointings. Moreover, while it was constant for discrete pointings, it decreased systematically with an increasing ID for reciprocal pointings because of the longer duration of gaze anchoring on target. Conclusion Overall, the temporal gaze-hand coordination analysis revealed that even for high IDs, fast reciprocal pointings could not be considered as a concatenation of discrete units. Moreover, our data clearly illustrate the smooth adaptation of temporal gaze-hand coordination to terminal accuracy requirements during fast reciprocal pointings. It will be interesting for further researches to investigate if the methodology used in the experiment 2 allows assessing the effect of sensori-motor deficits on gaze-hand coordination. PMID:21320315

  9. Hand-Arm Coordinated Manipulation Using Active Body-Environment Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaiwa, Taisuke; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Shigeki

    Human-symbiotic humanoid robots that can perform tasks dexterously with their hands are needed in our homes, welfare facilities, and other places. To improve their performance of tasks, we propose a scheme of controlling motion aimed at appropriately coordinated hand and arm motions. By observing human manual tasks, we identify an active body-environment contact as a kind of human manual skills and devise a motion control scheme based on it. We also analyze the effectiveness of the combination of the active body-environment contact and our proposed scheme in example tasks of the adding/removing constraint task. We validate our motion control scheme through actual tests on a prototype human-symbiotic humanoid robot.

  10. "Alien hand" and loss of bimanual coordination after dominant anterior cerebral artery territory infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McNabb, A W; Carroll, W M; Mastaglia, F L

    1988-01-01

    Three patients with dominant anterior cerebral artery territory infarction demonstrated a severe disturbance of upper limb motor control with impaired bimanual coordination, the "alien hand" sign, and intermanual conflict, in addition to signs of callosal interruption and a transcortical motor aphasia. Recordings of movement-related potentials in one patient showed an attenuated Bereitschaftspotential and a greater asymmetry of the NS' component of the premotor negativity with left finger than with right finger movement. The impairment of bimanual motor control and associated abnormal motor behaviour of the right hand in these cases are postulated to be due to involvement of the supplementary motor area and related areas of the medial frontal cortex. Images PMID:3346686

  11. Long-Latency Feedback Coordinates Upper-Limb and Hand Muscles during Object Manipulation Tasks123

    PubMed Central

    Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Scott, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Suppose that someone bumps into your arm at a party while you are holding a glass of wine. Motion of the disturbed arm will engage rapid and goal-directed feedback responses in the upper-limb. Although such responses can rapidly counter the perturbation, it is also clearly desirable not to destabilize your grasp and/or spill the wine. Here we investigated how healthy humans maintain a stable grasp following perturbations by using a paradigm that requires spatial tuning of the motor response dependent on the location of a virtual target. Our results highlight a synchronized expression of target-directed feedback in shoulder and hand muscles occurring at ∼60 ms. Considering that conduction delays are longer for the more distal hand muscles, these results suggest that target-directed responses in hand muscles were initiated before those for the shoulder muscles. These results show that long-latency feedback can coordinate upper limb and hand muscles during object manipulation tasks. PMID:27022624

  12. Pilot Study: The Role of the Hemispheric Lateralization in Mental Disorders by Use of the Limb (Eye, Hand, Foot) Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Naser; Dabbaghi, Parviz; Valipour, Habib; Vafadari, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Based on the previous studies, we know that the hemispheric lateralization defects, increase the probability of psychological disorders. We also know that dominant limb is controlled by dominant hemisphere and limb preference is used as an indicator for hemisphere dominance. In this study we attempted to explore the hemispheric dominance by the use of three limbs (hand, foot and eye). Methods: We performed this survey on two samples, psychiatric patients compared with normal population. For this purpose, knowing that the organ dominance is stabilized in adolescence, and age has no effect on the people above 15, we used 48 high school girls and 65 boys as the final samples of normal population. The patient group included 57 male and 26 female who were chronic psychiatric patients. Results: The result shows that left-eye dominance is more in patients than the normal group (P=0.000) but the handedness and footedness differences are not significance. In psychotic, bipolar and depressive disorders, eye dominance had significant difference (P=0.018). But this is not true about hand and foot dominance. Discussion: Our findings proved that generally in psychiatric patients, left-eye dominance is more common, left-eye dominance is also more in psychotic and depressive disorders. It is less common in bipolar disorders. PMID:27307954

  13. Hand Washing Induces a Clean Slate Effect in Moral Judgments: A Pupillometry and Eye-Tracking Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Kai; Krapp, Vanessa; König, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physical cleansing is commonly understood to protect us against physical contamination. However, recent studies showed additional effects on moral judgments. Under the heading of the “Macbeth effect” direct links between bodily cleansing and one’s own moral purity have been demonstrated. Here we investigate (1) how moral judgments develop over time and how they are altered by hand washing, (2) whether changes in moral judgments can be explained by altered information sampling from the environment, and (3) whether hand washing affects emotional arousal. Using a pre-post control group design, we found that morality ratings of morally good and bad scenes acquired more extreme values in the control group over time, an effect that was fully counteracted by intermediate hand washing. This result supports the notion of a clean slate effect by hand washing. Thereby, eye-tracking data did not uncover differences in eye movement behavior that may explain differences in moral judgments. Thus, the clean slate effect is not due to altered information sampling from the environment. Finally, compared to the control group, pupil diameter decreased after hand washing, thus demonstrating a direct physiological effect. The results shed light on the physiological mechanisms behind this type of embodiment phenomenon. PMID:25994083

  14. Hand washing induces a clean slate effect in moral judgments: a pupillometry and eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kai; Krapp, Vanessa; König, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physical cleansing is commonly understood to protect us against physical contamination. However, recent studies showed additional effects on moral judgments. Under the heading of the "Macbeth effect" direct links between bodily cleansing and one's own moral purity have been demonstrated. Here we investigate (1) how moral judgments develop over time and how they are altered by hand washing, (2) whether changes in moral judgments can be explained by altered information sampling from the environment, and (3) whether hand washing affects emotional arousal. Using a pre-post control group design, we found that morality ratings of morally good and bad scenes acquired more extreme values in the control group over time, an effect that was fully counteracted by intermediate hand washing. This result supports the notion of a clean slate effect by hand washing. Thereby, eye-tracking data did not uncover differences in eye movement behavior that may explain differences in moral judgments. Thus, the clean slate effect is not due to altered information sampling from the environment. Finally, compared to the control group, pupil diameter decreased after hand washing, thus demonstrating a direct physiological effect. The results shed light on the physiological mechanisms behind this type of embodiment phenomenon. PMID:25994083

  15. Gaze Behavior in One-Handed Catching and Its Relation with Interceptive Performance: What the Eyes Can't Tell

    PubMed Central

    Cesqui, Benedetta; Mezzetti, Maura; Lacquaniti, Francesco; d'Avella, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In ball sports, it is usually acknowledged that expert athletes track the ball more accurately than novices. However, there is also evidence that keeping the eyes on the ball is not always necessary for interception. Here we aimed at gaining new insights on the extent to which ocular pursuit performance is related to catching performance. To this end, we analyzed eye and head movements of nine subjects catching a ball projected by an actuated launching apparatus. Four different ball flight durations and two different ball arrival heights were tested and the quality of ocular pursuit was characterized by means of several timing and accuracy parameters. Catching performance differed across subjects and depended on ball flight characteristics. All subjects showed a similar sequence of eye movement events and a similar modulation of the timing of these events in relation to the characteristics of the ball trajectory. On a trial-by-trial basis there was a significant relationship only between pursuit duration and catching performance, confirming that keeping the eyes on the ball longer increases catching success probability. Ocular pursuit parameters values and their dependence on flight conditions as well as the eye and head contributions to gaze shift differed across subjects. However, the observed average individual ocular behavior and the eye-head coordination patterns were not directly related to the individual catching performance. These results suggest that several oculomotor strategies may be used to gather information on ball motion, and that factors unrelated to eye movements may underlie the observed differences in interceptive performance. PMID:25793989

  16. HotEye (tm) Based Coordinate Measuring Machine for Forging Industry

    SciTech Connect

    OG Technologies

    2003-06-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a 3 dimensional measurement system for the domestic forging industry based on HotEye{trademark}. This technology will allow high definition camera to accurately image a red hot object. The project marries conventional Coordinate Measurement Machine ''CMM'' technology to HotEye{trademark} technology to permit the accurate measurement of forged parts while they are at high temperature. Being able to take such measurements will dramatically reduce the amount of scrap produced by the domestic forging industry. This industry wastes a significant amount of energy because of the high rate of scrap it produces. OGT will: (1) Develop a 3D measurement sensor head that will work on a part at a temperature up to 1,450 C with an accuracy of 0.1mm or better and with a scanning speed of less than 10 seconds for an area of 100mm x 100mm. (2) Develop a Virtual-Fixturing software package to alleviate the need of precise hard fixturing. (3) Integrate the 3D measurement sensor head and the Virtual-Fixturing software into a standard CMM, both hardware (replacing the probes) and software (data format and user interface match) so that the system can automatically perform a complete preprogrammed measurement of a hot product. (4) Test and evaluate the system in a forging facility.

  17. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  18. Eye movements are coordinated with pectoral fin beats during locomotion in a marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Mandecki, Joanna L; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-04-15

    Animals must simultaneously engage multiple functional systems in order to navigate, feed and survive in complex environments. Nearly all vertebrates perform rapid gaze-shifting eye movements called saccades, but we know little about the behaviour of saccades during rhythmic locomotion. This study examined how saccades are coordinated with locomotor movements in a pectoral-fin-propelled teleost fish, Cymatogaster aggregata, the shiner surfperch. Individual fish were filmed swimming in a flow tank at 10 cm s(-1), and timing data were analysed using circular statistics. The results reveal that C. aggregata generates saccades non-uniformly throughout the pectoral fin cycle. Saccades primarily occur during fin abduction, when a large amount of thrust is produced, and rarely occur during the thrust-free refractory phase. Because vision is known to be impaired during saccades, we hypothesize that C. aggregata synchronizes saccades with periods of high acceleration in order to stabilize retinal images during low-acceleration phases, which are nearly saccade-free. PMID:25714565

  19. What the hand can't tell the eye: illusion of space constancy during accurate pointing.

    PubMed

    Chua, Romeo; Enns, James T

    2005-03-01

    When we press an elevator button or pick up a coffee cup, different visual information is used to guide our reach and to form our conscious experience of these objects. But can the information guiding our hand be brought into awareness? The fact that we can see and feel our own hand in action suggests that it might be possible. However, the dual visual systems theory claims that on-line control of movement is governed by the dorsal stream of visual processing, which is largely unconscious. Two experiments are presented as strong tests of the hypothesis that the visual information guiding on-line pointing in healthy human adults is inaccessible for conscious report. Results show that participants are incapable of consciously accessing the information used in pointing, even though they can see and feel their hands in action and accurate performance depends on it. PMID:15551080

  20. Early Stages of Zebrafish Eye Formation Require the Coordinated Activity of Wnt11, Fz5, and the Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cavodeassi, Florencia; Carreira-Barbosa, Filipa; Young, Rodrigo M.; Concha, Miguel L.; Allende, Miguel L.; Houart, Corinne; Tada, Masazumi; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary During regional patterning of the anterior neural plate, a medially positioned domain of cells is specified to adopt retinal identity. These eye field cells remain coherent as they undergo morphogenetic events distinct from other prospective forebrain domains. We show that two branches of the Wnt signaling pathway coordinate cell fate determination with cell behavior during eye field formation. Wnt/β-catenin signaling antagonizes eye specification through the activity of Wnt8b and Fz8a. In contrast, Wnt11 and Fz5 promote eye field development, at least in part, through local antagonism of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Additionally, Wnt11 regulates the behavior of eye field cells, promoting their cohesion. Together, these results allow us to postulate a model in which Wnt11 and Fz5 signaling promotes early eye development through the coordinated antagonism of signals that suppress retinal identity and promotion of coherence of eye field cells. PMID:15996547

  1. Hand-Camera Coordination Varies over Time in Users of the Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Michael P.; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2016-01-01

    multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA)), up to 21–29° within subjects over the observed period. Across subjects, optimal CAPs showed an average rate of change of 0.39°/day (SD 0.36°/day). Conclusions: Optimal CAPs varied dramatically over time for all subjects. Subjects displayed no adaptation to misaligned CAPs without feedback. Regular recalibration of CAPs may be required to maintain hand-camera coordination. PMID:27199689

  2. Carrying a rifle with both hands affects upper body transverse plane kinematics and pelvis-trunk coordination.

    PubMed

    Seay, Joseph F; Hasselquist, Leif; Bensel, Carolyn K

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how carrying a rifle in both hands affects upper body motion and coordination during locomotion. In total, 11 male soldiers walked (1.34 m/s) and ran (2.46 m/s) with a weapon (M4 condition) and without a weapon (NW condition) while kinematic pelvis and trunk data were collected. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare segmental ranges of motion (ROM), pelvis-trunk coordination (continuous relative phase) and coordination variability between gait mode and weapon combinations. Carrying a weapon decreased sagittal plane trunk ROM at both speeds and increased trunk rotation during running. Mean (±SD) transverse plane coordination was more in-phase while carrying a weapon (M4 = 83°±31, NW = 60°±36, p = 0.027) and transverse plane coordination variability decreased (M4 = 23°±3.6, NW = 15°±4.4, p = 0.043). Coordination differences between M4 and NW were similar to differences reported in the literature between individuals with and without back pain. Long-term injury implications due to decreased coordination variability are discussed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Knowledge of the effects of rifle carriage on pelvis-trunk coordination may provide insight into short-term protective strategies and long-term injury mechanisms. These should be considered in occupations requiring individuals to carry torso loads in combination with holding an object in both hands that restricts arm swing. PMID:21294016

  3. Movement Coordination in Psychotherapy: Synchrony of Hand Movements is Associated with Session Outcome. A Single-Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that nonverbal behavior was associated with both session-level outcome and global outcome in psychotherapy. Nonverbal synchrony - here the coordination between patient's and psychotherapist's movement behavior - is a facet of nonverbal behavior that has recently been studied with video-based motion energy analysis (MEA). The present study aimed to replicate and extend these findings by using direct acquisition of movement data. In a single-case analysis, we monitored patient's and therapist's hand movements with a high-resolution accelerometric measurement system (Vitaport (r)). In addition to these behavioral data, both patient and therapist provided session-level ratings of various factors relevant to the psychotherapy process, which were assessed with post-session questionnaires. The patient-therapist coordination of hand movements, i.e. nonverbal synchrony, in (N = 27) sessions of this dyadic psychotherapy was positively associated with progress reported in post-session questionnaires. Sessions with good evaluations concerning the quality of therapeutic alliance were characterized by high movement coordination. Thus, accelerometric data of this therapy dyad confirmed previous findings gained through video analyses: The coordination of nonverbal behavior shown by patient and therapist was an indicator of beneficial processes occurring within sessions. This replication study showed that nonverbal synchrony embodies important aspects of the alliance. Its assessment and quantification may provide therapists important additional information on processes that usually occur outside conscious awareness, but that nevertheless influence core aspects of the therapy. PMID:27033131

  4. Control Model for Dampening Hand Vibrations Using Information of Internal and External Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Togo, Shunta; Kagawa, Takahiro; Uno, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate a control mechanism that dampens hand vibrations. Here, we propose a control method with two components to suppress hand vibrations. The first is a passive suppression method that lowers the joint stiffness to passively dampen the hand vibrations. The second is an active suppression method that adjusts an equilibrium point based on skyhook control to actively dampen the hand vibrations. In a simulation experiment, we applied these two methods to dampen hand vibrations during the shoulder’s horizontal oscillation. We also conducted a measurement experiment wherein a subject’s shoulder was sinusoidally oscillated by a platform that generated horizontal oscillations. The results of the measurement experiments showed that the jerk of each part of the arm in a task using a cup filled with water was smaller than the shoulder jerk and that in a task with a cup filled with stones was larger than the shoulder jerk. Moreover, the amplitude of the hand trajectory in both horizontal and vertical directions was smaller in a task using a cup filled with water than in a task using a cup filled with stones. The results of the measurement experiments were accurately reproduced by the active suppression method based on skyhook control. These results suggest that humans dampen hand vibrations by controlling the equilibrium point through the information of the external workspace and the internal body state rather than by lowering joint stiffness only by using internal information. PMID:25876037

  5. Head-Eye Coordination Increases with Age and Varies across Countries

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Frédéric J.A.M.; Giraudet, Guillaume; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Head movements in older people may contribute to their dizziness and equilibrium problems. Head gain is the ratio of head movement to total movement (head + eye) when executing a saccade to an eccentric target. Two studies have investigated the relationship between head gain and age but have provided conflicting results. Methods We report head gain data collected from research laboratories and optician stores. Our sample sizes are much larger (n = 657 for laboratory, n = 64,458 for optician stores), permitting more detailed analyses. Results The head-eye coefficient, expressed as 100 times the square root of head gain, was bimodal with one mode of primarily eye movers and one mode of eye-and-head movers. Head-eye coefficient increased with age and was invariant with eye correction and gender. We also found an effect of nation that seemed associated with gross domestic product or by latitude (in the northern hemisphere) and log population density. Discussion Assuming that head movements and visual distortions contribute to dizziness and equilibrium problems, our study suggests that customizing eyewear based on age and country may help in reducing the prevalence of problems associated with head and/or eye movements. PMID:26421683

  6. Auditory signals evolve from hybrid- to eye-centered coordinates in the primate superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungah; Groh, Jennifer M

    2012-07-01

    Visual and auditory spatial signals initially arise in different reference frames. It has been postulated that auditory signals are translated from a head-centered to an eye-centered frame of reference compatible with the visual spatial maps, but, to date, only various forms of hybrid reference frames for sound have been identified. Here, we show that the auditory representation of space in the superior colliculus involves a hybrid reference frame immediately after the sound onset but evolves to become predominantly eye centered, and more similar to the visual representation, by the time of a saccade to that sound. Specifically, during the first 500 ms after the sound onset, auditory response patterns (N = 103) were usually neither head nor eye centered: 64% of neurons showed such a hybrid pattern, whereas 29% were more eye centered and 8% were more head centered. This differed from the pattern observed for visual targets (N = 156): 86% were eye centered, <1% were head centered, and only 13% exhibited a hybrid of both reference frames. For auditory-evoked activity observed within 20 ms of the saccade (N = 154), the proportion of eye-centered response patterns increased to 69%, whereas the hybrid and head-centered response patterns dropped to 30% and <1%, respectively. This pattern approached, although did not quite reach, that observed for saccade-related activity for visual targets: 89% were eye centered, 11% were hybrid, and <1% were head centered (N = 162). The plainly eye-centered visual response patterns and predominantly eye-centered auditory motor response patterns lie in marked contrast to our previous study of the intraparietal cortex, where both visual and auditory sensory and motor-related activity used a predominantly hybrid reference frame (Mullette-Gillman et al. 2005, 2009). Our present findings indicate that auditory signals are ultimately translated into a reference frame roughly similar to that used for vision, but suggest that such signals might

  7. Visuomotor processing and hand force coordination in dyslexic children during a visually guided manipulation task.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Paulo B; Pedão, Sabrina T; Barela, Jose A

    2014-10-01

    Developmental Dyslexia negatively affects children's reading and writing ability and, in most cases, performance in sensorimotor tasks. These deficits have been associated with structural and functional alterations in the cerebellum and the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Both neural structures are active during visually guided force control and in the coordination of load force (LF) and grip force (GF) during manipulation tasks. Surprisingly, both phenomena have not been investigated in dyslexic children. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare dyslexic and non-dyslexic children regarding their visuomotor processing ability and GF-LF coordination during a static manipulation task. Thirteen dyslexic (8-14 YO) and 13 age- and sex-matched non-dyslexic (control) children participated in the study. They were asked to grasp a fixed instrumented handle using the tip of all digits and pull the handle upward exerting isometric force to match a ramp-and-hold force profile displayed in a computer monitor. Task performance (i.e., visuomotor coordination) was assessed by RMSE calculated in both ramp and hold phases. GF-LF coordination was assessed by the ratio between GF and LF (GF/LF) calculated at both phases and the maximum value of a cross-correlation function (rmax) and its respective time lag calculated at ramp phase. The results revealed that the RMSE at both phases was larger in dyslexic than in control children. However, we found that GF/LF, rmax, and time lags were similar between groups. Those findings indicate that dyslexic children have a mild deficit in visuomotor processing but preserved GF-LF coordination. Altogether, these findings suggested that dyslexic children could present mild structural and functional alterations in specific PPC or cerebellum areas that are directly related to visuomotor processing. PMID:24960554

  8. The Effects of Hunger on Hand-Mouth Coordination in Newborn Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Adina R.; Butterworth, George

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects of hunger on the hand-mouth (HM) behavior of a group of newborn infants. Found that significantly more mouth opening before contacts to the mouth than those to the face occurred before but not after feeding, suggesting some link between HM behavior and hunger state. (MDM)

  9. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Performing Eye-Hand Integration Tasks: Four Preliminary Studies with Children Showing Low-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panerai, Simonetta; Tasca, Domenica; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Trubia, Grazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Musso, Sabrina; Alagona, Giovanna; Di Guardo, Giuseppe; Barone, Concetta; Gaglione, Maria P.; Elia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    This report, based on four studies with children with low-functioning autism, aimed at evaluating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered on the left and right premotor cortices on eye-hand integration tasks; defining the long-lasting effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; and…

  10. Target Selection by the Frontal Cortex during Coordinated Saccadic and Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srihasam, Krishna; Bullock, Daniel; Grossberg, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oculomotor tracking of moving objects is an important component of visually based cognition and planning. Such tracking is achieved by a combination of saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements. In particular, the saccadic and smooth-pursuit systems interact to often choose the same target, and to maximize its visibility through time. How do…

  11. The Coordinated Interplay of Scene, Utterance, and World Knowledge: Evidence from Eye Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoeferle, Pia; Crocker, Matthew W.

    2006-01-01

    Two studies investigated the interaction between utterance and scene processing by monitoring eye movements in agent-action-patient events, while participants listened to related utterances. The aim of Experiment 1 was to determine if and when depicted events are used for thematic role assignment and structural disambiguation of temporarily…

  12. Can discrete joint action be synergistic? Studying the stabilization of interpersonal hand coordination.

    PubMed

    Romero, Veronica; Kallen, Rachel; Riley, Michael A; Richardson, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    The human perceptual-motor system is tightly coupled to the physical and informational dynamics of a task environment. These dynamics operate to constrain the high-dimensional order of the human movement system into low-dimensional, task-specific synergies-functional groupings of structural elements that are temporarily constrained to act as a single coordinated unit. The aim of the current study was to determine whether synergistic processes operate when coacting individuals coordinate to perform a discrete joint-action task. Pairs of participants sat next to each other and each used 1 arm to complete a pointer-to-target task. Using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis for the first time in a discrete joint action, the structure of joint-angle variance was examined to determine whether there was synergistic organization of the degrees of freedom employed at the interpersonal or intrapersonal levels. The results revealed that the motor actions performed by coactors were synergistically organized at both the interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. More importantly, however, the interpersonal synergy was found to be significantly stronger than the intrapersonal synergies. Accordingly, the results provide clear evidence that coacting individuals can become temporarily organized to form single synergistic 2-person systems during performance of a discrete joint action. PMID:26052696

  13. Can Discrete Joint Action Be Synergistic? Studying the Stabilization of Interpersonal Hand Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Veronica; Kallen, Rachel; Riley, Michael A.; Richardson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The human perceptual-motor system is tightly coupled to the physical and informational dynamics of a task environment. These dynamics operate to constrain the high-dimensional order of the human movement system into low-dimensional, task-specific synergies—functional groupings of structural elements that are temporarily constrained to act as a single coordinated unit. The aim of the current study was to determine whether synergistic processes operate when coacting individuals coordinate to perform a discrete joint-action task. Pairs of participants sat next to each other and each used 1 arm to complete a pointer-to-target task. Using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis for the first time in a discrete joint action, the structure of joint-angle variance was examined to determine whether there was synergistic organization of the degrees of freedom employed at the interpersonal or intrapersonal levels. The results revealed that the motor actions performed by coactors were synergistically organized at both the interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. More importantly, however, the interpersonal synergy was found to be significantly stronger than the intrapersonal synergies. Accordingly, the results provide clear evidence that coacting individuals can become temporarily organized to form single synergistic 2-person systems during performance of a discrete joint action. PMID:26052696

  14. Predictable Vertical Targets Acquisition - The Eye-Head Coordination and the Triggering Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Reschke, Millard F.

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate target acquisition in the vertical plane with emphasis on establishing strategy differences associated with acquisition triggering methods. Eight subjects were tested. Measurements consisted of target acquisition time, eye-head latency differences, velocity of gaze, eyes and head, and head amplitude. Using three-way repeated measures ANOVA the results show that the strategy for acquisition of predictable visual targets in vertical plane with the head unrestrained significantly depended on: (i) the direction of the gaze motion with respect to the gravity vector (i.e. there is significant up-down asymmetry); (ii) the angular distance of the target and (iii) the method of triggering the command to acquire the target - external versus internal. The data also show that when vertical acquisition is compared with triggering methods in the horizontal plane there is a difference in overall strategy for the acquisition of targets with the same spatial distances from straight ahead gaze when both the eyes and head are used. Among the factors contributing to the difference in strategy for vertical target acquisition are: the gravitational vector, the relationship of target displacement and vestibular activation, biomechanical and neural control, asymmetries and the difference in the vertical field of view.

  15. Eye muscle repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ... The extraocular muscles of the eye (external to the eyeball) control the positioning of the eyes. They coordinate of the eye ...

  16. Dual logic and cerebral coordinates for reciprocal interaction in eye contact.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ray F

    2015-01-01

    In order to scientifically study the human brain's response to face-to-face social interaction, the scientific method itself needs to be reconsidered so that both quantitative observation and symbolic reasoning can be adapted to the situation where the observer is also observed. In light of the recent development of dyadic fMRI which can directly observe dyadic brain interacting in one MRI scanner, this paper aims to establish a new form of logic, dual logic, which provides a theoretical platform for deductive reasoning in a complementary dual system with emergence mechanism. Applying the dual logic in the dfMRI experimental design and data analysis, the exogenous and endogenous dual systems in the BOLD responses can be identified; the non-reciprocal responses in the dual system can be suppressed; a cerebral coordinate for reciprocal interaction can be generated. Elucidated by dual logic deductions, the cerebral coordinate for reciprocal interaction suggests: the exogenous and endogenous systems consist of the empathy network and the mentalization network respectively; the default-mode network emerges from the resting state to activation in the endogenous system during reciprocal interaction; the cingulate plays an essential role in the emergence from the exogenous system to the endogenous system. Overall, the dual logic deductions are supported by the dfMRI experimental results and are consistent with current literature. Both the theoretical framework and experimental method set the stage to formally apply the scientific method in studying complex social interaction. PMID:25885446

  17. Dual Logic and Cerebral Coordinates for Reciprocal Interaction in Eye Contact

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to scientifically study the human brain’s response to face-to-face social interaction, the scientific method itself needs to be reconsidered so that both quantitative observation and symbolic reasoning can be adapted to the situation where the observer is also observed. In light of the recent development of dyadic fMRI which can directly observe dyadic brain interacting in one MRI scanner, this paper aims to establish a new form of logic, dual logic, which provides a theoretical platform for deductive reasoning in a complementary dual system with emergence mechanism. Applying the dual logic in the dfMRI experimental design and data analysis, the exogenous and endogenous dual systems in the BOLD responses can be identified; the non-reciprocal responses in the dual system can be suppressed; a cerebral coordinate for reciprocal interaction can be generated. Elucidated by dual logic deductions, the cerebral coordinate for reciprocal interaction suggests: the exogenous and endogenous systems consist of the empathy network and the mentalization network respectively; the default-mode network emerges from the resting state to activation in the endogenous system during reciprocal interaction; the cingulate plays an essential role in the emergence from the exogenous system to the endogenous system. Overall, the dual logic deductions are supported by the dfMRI experimental results and are consistent with current literature. Both the theoretical framework and experimental method set the stage to formally apply the scientific method in studying complex social interaction. PMID:25885446

  18. Detection, eye–hand coordination and virtual mobility performance in simulated vision for a cortical visual prosthesis device

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nishant R; Troyk, Philip R; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess visual performance using a future cortical prosthesis device, the ability of normally sighted and low vision subjects to adapt to a dotted ‘phosphene’ image was studied. Similar studies have been conduced in the past and adaptation to phosphene maps has been shown but the phosphene maps used have been square or hexagonal in pattern. The phosphene map implemented for this testing is what is expected from a cortical implantation of the arrays of intracortical electrodes, generating multiple phosphenes. The dotted image created depends upon the surgical location of electrodes decided for implantation and the expected cortical response. The subjects under tests were required to perform tasks requiring visual inspection, eye–hand coordination and way finding. The subjects did not have any tactile feedback and the visual information provided was live dotted images captured by a camera on a head-mounted low vision enhancing system and processed through a filter generating images similar to the images we expect the blind persons to perceive. The images were locked to the subject’s gaze by means of video-based pupil tracking. In the detection and visual inspection task, the subject scanned a modified checkerboard and counted the number of square white fields on a square checkerboard, in the eye–hand coordination task, the subject placed black checkers on the white fields of the checkerboard, and in the way-finding task, the subjects maneuvered themselves through a virtual maze using a game controller. The accuracy and the time to complete the task were used as the measured outcome. As per the surgical studies by this research group, it might be possible to implant up to 650 electrodes; hence, 650 dots were used to create images and performance studied under 0% dropout (650 dots), 25% dropout (488 dots) and 50% dropout (325 dots) conditions. It was observed that all the subjects under test were able to learn the given tasks and showed improvement

  19. Manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Niehorster, Diederick C.; Siu, Wilfred W. F.; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements only when tracking a self-driven or a predictable moving target. Here, we used a control-theoretic approach to examine whether concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit of an unpredictable moving target. In the eye-hand tracking condition, participants used their eyes to track a Gaussian target that moved randomly along a horizontal axis. In the meantime, they used their dominant hand to move a mouse to control the horizontal movement of a Gaussian cursor to vertically align it with the target. In the eye-alone tracking condition, the target and cursor positions recorded in the eye-hand tracking condition were replayed, and participants only performed eye tracking of the target. Catch-up saccades were identified and removed from the recorded eye movements, allowing for a frequency-response analysis of the smooth pursuit response to unpredictable target motion. We found that the overall smooth pursuit gain was higher and the number of catch-up saccades made was less when eye tracking was accompanied by manual tracking than when not. We conclude that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit. This enhancement is a fundamental property of eye-hand coordination that occurs regardless of the predictability of the target motion. PMID:26605840

  20. Motor imagery is less efficient in adults with probable developmental coordination disorder: evidence from the hand rotation task.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Christian; Fuelscher, Ian; Buckthought, Karen; Enticott, Peter G; Gitay, Maria A; Williams, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to provide preliminary insight into the integrity of motor imagery (MI) in adults with probable developmental coordination disorder (pDCD). Based on a strong body of evidence indicating that paediatric samples of DCD often experience difficulties engaging MI, we hypothesised that young adults with pDCD would demonstrate similar difficulties. The performance of 12 young adults (19-35 years) with pDCD was compared to 47 age-matched controls on a traditional mental hand rotation task. Mean inverse efficiency scores were generated for each participant by dividing each participant's mean RT by their proportion of correct responses at each of the stimuli presentation conditions. Preliminary analysis revealed that the performance profiles of individuals with pDCD and age-matched controls showed evidence of being constrained by the biomechanical and postural constraints of real movement, suggesting that both groups engaged in an embodied (MI) strategy to complete the task. Despite engaging in a MI strategy, however, young adults with pDCD were nonetheless significantly less efficient when doing so, shown by significant main effects for group on all group efficiency comparisons. Based on the assumption that MI provides insight into the internal 'neural' action representation that precedes action, we argue that the less efficient MI performance demonstrated by young adults with pDCD may indicate inefficiencies engaging or implementing internal action representations. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25134075

  1. Black Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug 30, 2016 Toddlers Most at Risk of Chemical Burns to Eyes Aug 26, 2016 Firework Blinds Teenager, Severs Hand Jun 29, ... at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  2. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three latent domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Emily L.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Fassola, Isabella; Requejo, Philip; Leclercq, Caroline; Winstein, Carolee J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1 ± 11.6 years, range: 45–88 years) and 33 older adults (65.8 ± 9.7 years, 44–81 years, 51 hands) diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch), Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain. Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them. PMID:26097455

  3. From hand to eye: the role of literacy, familiarity, graspability, and vision-for-action on enantiomorphy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tânia; Kolinsky, Régine

    2013-01-01

    Literacy in a script with mirrored symbols boosts the ability to discriminate mirror images, i.e., enantiomorphy. In the present study we evaluated the impact of four factors on enantiomorphic abilities: (i) the degree of literacy of the participants; (ii) the familiarity of the material; (iii) the strength of the association between familiar objects and manipulation, i.e., graspability; and (iv) the involvement of vision-for-action in the task. Three groups of adults - unschooled illiterates, unschooled ex-illiterates, and schooled literates - participated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants performed a vision-for-perception task, i.e., an orientation-based same-different comparison task, on pictures of familiar objects and geometric shapes. Graspability of familiar objects and unfamiliarity of the stimuli facilitated orientation discrimination, but did not help illiterate participants to overcome their difficulties with enantiomorphy. Compared to a baseline, illiterate adults had the strongest performance drop for mirror images, whereas for plane rotations the performance drop was similar across groups. In Experiment 2, participants performed a vision-for-action task; they were asked to decide which hand they would use to grasp a familiar object according to its current position (e.g., indicating left-hand usage to grasp a cup with the handle on the left side, and right-hand usage for its mirror image). Illiterates were as skillful as literates to perform this task. The present study thus provided three important findings. First, once triggered by literacy, enantiomorphy generalizes to any visual object category, as part of vision-for-perception, i.e., in visual recognition and identification processes. Second, the impact of literacy is much stronger on enantiomorphy than on the processing of other orientation contrasts. Third, in vision-for-action tasks, illiterates are as sensitive as literates to enantiomorphic-related information. PMID:23232335

  4. Optimum ratio of upper to lower limb lengths in hand-carrying of a load under the assumption of frequency coordination.

    PubMed

    Wang, W J; Crompton, R H; Li, Y; Gunther, M M

    2003-02-01

    The ratio of the upper to lower limb lengths [or the intermembral index (IMI)] in the earliest human ancestors is closer to that of the living chimpanzees than to our own, although the former show undoubted adaptations to bipedality. What biomechanical factors could then have led to the phenomenon of genus Homo? This paper proposes and evaluates a relationship between IMI and hand-carrying. Assuming that coordination of limb swing frequencies of the upper and lower limbs would be the subject of positive selection, a mathematical expression was derived and can in part explain the changes in IMI. We found that AL-288-1 [3.6 million years old (MY)], the most complete skeleton of the early hominid Australopithecus afarensis, could only have carried loads equivalent to 15-50% of the upper limb weight while maintaining swing symmetry, but KNM WT-15000, Homo ergaster (1.8MY) and modern humans could both carry loads 3 times heavier than the upper limb while maintaining swing symmetry. The carrying ability of chimpanzees would be inferior to that of AL-288-1. The IMI of modern humans, at 68-70, is the smallest, and is optimal for hand-carrying under our criteria. Under reduced selection pressure for hand-carrying, but unreduced selection for mechanical effectiveness, we might expect humans to evolve a longer upper limb, to improve swing symmetry when unloaded. PMID:12547362

  5. Successes and Difficulties in the Individual Inclusion of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the Eyes of Their Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldar, Eitan; Talmor, Rachel; Wolf-Zukerman, Tali

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the inclusion of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in regular classes and analysed the factors related to its success and failure. Thirty-seven inclusion coordinators participated in the study and conveyed their view about their own experience. The qualitative methodology used in this study was comprised of regular…

  6. Dry eye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dry eyes include: Dry environment or workplace (wind, air conditioning) Sun exposure Smoking or second-hand ... NOT smoke and avoid second-hand smoke, direct wind, and air conditioning. Use a humidifier, especially in ...

  7. Synthesis, structure, and electrochemistry and magnetic properties of a novel 1D homochiral MnIII(5-Brsalen) coordination polymer with left-handed helical character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dapeng; Yu, Naisen; Zhao, Haiyan; Liu, Dedi; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhenghua; Liu, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    A novel homochiral manganese (III) Mn(5-Brsalen) coordination polymer with left-handed helical character by spontaneous resolution on crystallization by using Mn(5-Brsalen) and 4,4-bipyridine, [MnIII(5-Brsalen)(4,4-bipy)]·ClO4·CH3OH (1) (4,4-bipy = 4,4-bipyridine) has been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In compound 1, each manganese(III) anion is six-coordinate octahedral being bonded to four atoms of 5-Brsalen ligand in an equatorial plane and two nitrogen atoms from a 4,4-bipyridine ligand in axial positions. The structure of compound 1 can be described a supramolecular 2D-like structure which was formed by the intermolecular π-stacking interactions between the neighboring chains of the aromatic rings of 4,4-bipyridine and 5-Brsalen molecules. UV-vis absorption spectrum, electrochemistry and magnetic properties of the compound 1 have also been studied.

  8. Smoking and Eye Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health Apr. 14, 2014 Avoiding smoking and second hand smoke — or quitting if you are a smoker — are ... influence your eyes’ health. And tobacco smoke, including second-hand smoke, is an irritant that worsens dry eye , a ...

  9. On the origins of human handedness and language: a comparative review of hand preferences for bimanual coordinated actions and gestural communication in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques; Hopkins, William D

    2013-09-01

    Within the evolutionary framework about the origin of human handedness and hemispheric specialization for language, the question of expression of population-level manual biases in nonhuman primates and their potential continuities with humans remains controversial. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of evidence showing consistent population-level handedness particularly for complex manual behaviors in both monkeys and apes. In the present article, within a large comparative approach among primates, we will review our contribution to the field and the handedness literature related to two particular sophisticated manual behaviors regarding their potential and specific implications for the origins of hemispheric specialization in humans: bimanual coordinated actions and gestural communication. Whereas bimanual coordinated actions seem to elicit predominance of left-handedness in arboreal primates and of right-handedness in terrestrial primates, all handedness studies that have investigated gestural communication in several primate species have reported stronger degree of population-level right-handedness compared to noncommunicative actions. Communicative gestures and bimanual actions seem to affect differently manual asymmetries in both human and nonhuman primates and to be related to different lateralized brain substrates. We will discuss (1) how the data of hand preferences for bimanual coordinated actions highlight the role of ecological factors in the evolution of handedness and provide additional support the postural origin theory of handedness proposed by MacNeilage [MacNeilage [2007]. Present status of the postural origins theory. In W. D. Hopkins (Ed.), The evolution of hemispheric specialization in primates (pp. 59-91). London: Elsevier/Academic Press] and (2) the hypothesis that the emergence of gestural communication might have affected lateralization in our ancestor and may constitute the precursors of the hemispheric specialization for language. PMID

  10. Eye Movements of Flatfish for Different Gravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kaori; Takabayashi, Akira; Imada, Hideki; Miyachi, Ei-Ichi

    On Earth, gravity sensation plays a basic role for all of physiological phenomena in every creature. In microgravity, loss of gravity input causes many functional disorders in animals and humans. During adaptation to microgravity, otolith-mediated response such as eye movements would alter. Flatfish provide a natural model for the study of adaptive changes in the vestibuloocular reflex. During metamorphosis, vestibular and oculomotor coordinate of flatfish displaced 90 degrees about the longitudinal body axis. Therefore, it is expected that microgravity induce the sensory mismatch in adult flatfish. In this study, we analyzed the eye movements of normal and otolith removed flatfish for body tilting and the eye movements of normal flatfish during microgravity produced by parabolic aircraft flight. The fish was fixed on the tilting table controlled by computer. The eye movements for body tilting along the different body axis were video-recorded. The vertical and torsional eye rotations were analyzed frame by frame. In normal flatfish, torsional eye movements were larger for head up or head down tilting than leftward or rightward tilting. On the other hand, vertical eye movements were larger for leftward or rightward tilting than head up or head down tilting. After removal of left side utlicular otolith, the vertical eye movement for 180 degrees body tilting disappeared. For the changes of gravity, vertical eye movements were observed. These results suggested that eye movements of flatfish adapted to Earth's gravity condition and sacculus and lagena might play important role for otolith-ocular eye movements.

  11. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  12. An Eye for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostwald, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity as an excellent starting point for investigations related to the eye. Involves making a simple model of the vertebrate eye to illustrate the formation of an upside-down image on the retina by the lens. Links to investigations in numerous science disciplines including astronomy, genetics, biology, earth science, and…

  13. Design and evaluation of a computerized test for hand motor skills.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chiu, Ching-Tsun

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to design and develop a computerized test to measure junior high school students' motor skills, specifically their abilities in hand-eye motor coordination and hand motor skills, using the Wii Remote. The hand motor skills computerized test, which is based on the operational examinations in the General Aptitude Test Battery, examines hand and finger dexterity (i.e., motion, rotation, fabrication, and disassembly tests). 55 students participated in the experiment to assess the reliability and validity of the computerized test, which were supported. Information literacy and experience in the use of Wii devices did not affect the reliability. PMID:25068744

  14. From the Gleam in the Eye of an Engineer to a Dream Classroom: How Assistive Technology Products Move from Research and Development into the Hands of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de St. Aubin, Shawn-Laree

    2010-01-01

    This article explains how Asssistive Technology products move from research and development into the hands of children. The assistive technology (AT) industry is maturing, with many exciting new technologies under development in university settings, by individual inventors and engineers, and by leading AT and information technology (IT) companies.…

  15. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  16. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  17. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  18. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trauma A black eye is usually caused by direct trauma to the eye or face. The bruise ... can cause bruising around the eyes, even without direct injury to the eye. Sometimes, serious damage to ...

  19. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task

    PubMed Central

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A.; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M.; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D.

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  20. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task.

    PubMed

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  1. Project Hand-Up. Helping Adolescents Needing Direction-Unlimited Partnership (HAND-UP): Stimulating Coordination and Linkage between Occupational Work Adjustment Programs and the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Career Education.

    Project HAND-UP (Helping Adolescents Needing Direction-Unlimited Partnership) was a 2-year program to enhance dropout prevention services to at-risk youth by establishing a closer linkage between Job Training Partnership (JTPA)-Ohio and the Ohio Department of Education's Occupational Work Adjustment (OWA) programs. The project's major activities…

  2. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ...

  3. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  4. Eye Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of ... light-sensitive membrane in the back of the eye (the retina) from its supporting layers. It is ...

  5. Eye Wear

    MedlinePlus

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  6. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  7. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  8. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  9. Dextrous robot hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Editor); Iberall, Thea (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of human hand function and their implications for the design of robot hands are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include human grasp choice and robotic grasp analysis, opposition space and human prehension, coordination in normal and prosthetic reaching, and intelligent exploration by the human hand. Consideration is given to a task-oriented dextrous manipulation architecture, the control architecture for the Belgrade/USC hand, the analysis of multifingered grasping and manipulation, and tactile sensing for shape interpretation. Diagrams, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  10. Modeling the Scheduling of Eye Movements and Manual Responses in Performing a Sequence of Discrete Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shu-Chieh; Remington, Roger W.; Lewis, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Common tasks in daily life are often accomplished by a sequence of actions that interleave information acquisition through the eyes and action execution by the hands. How are eye movements coordinated with the release of manual responses and how may their coordination be represented at the level of component mental operations? We have previously presented data from a typing-like task requiring separate choice responses to a series of five stimuli. We found a consistent pattern of results in both motor and ocular timing, and hypothesized possible relationships among underlying components. Here we report a model of that task, which demonstrates how the observed timing of eye movements to successive stimuli could be accounted for by assuming systems: an open-loop system generating saccades at a periodic rate, and a closed-loop system commanding a saccade based on stimulus processing. We relate this model to models of reading and discuss the motivation for dual control.

  11. Tie My Hands, Tie My Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Sinigaglia, Corrado; Costantini, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that motor abilities allow us not only to execute our own actions and to predict their consequences, but also to predict others' actions and their consequences. But just how deeply are motor abilities implicated in action observation? If an observer is prevented from acting while witnessing others' actions, will…

  12. A novel 3D Cu(I) coordination polymer based on Cu6Br2 and Cu2(CN)2 SBUs: in situ ligand formation and use as a naked-eye colorimetric sensor for NB and 2-NT.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Yang; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Hu, Tuo-Ping; Wen, Yan-Liang; Shao, Jia; Cui, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-14

    A novel coordination polymer with the chemical formula [Cu4Br(CN)(mtz)2]n (mtz = 5-methyl tetrazole) (), has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Interestingly, the Cu(i), CN(-) and mtz(-) in compound are all generated from an in situ translation of the original precursors: Cu(2+), acetonitrile and 1-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole (Hmnt). The in situ ring-to-ring conversion of Hmnt into mtz(-) was found for the first time. Structural analysis reveals that compound is a novel 3D tetrazole-based Cu(i) coordination polymer, containing both metal halide cluster Cu6Br2 and metal pseudohalide cluster Cu2(CN)2 secondary building units (SBUs), which shows an unprecedented (3,6,10)-connected topology. Notably, a pseudo-porphyrin structure with 16-membered rings constructed by four mtz(-) anions and four copper(i) ions was observed in compound . The fluorescence properties of compound were investigated in the solid state and in various solvent emulsions, the results show that compound is a highly sensitive naked-eye colorimetric sensor for NB and 2-NT (NB = nitrobenzene and 2-NT = 2-nitrotoluene). PMID:26600452

  13. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in the cells of the retina. ... from other parts of the body. Treatment for eye cancer varies by the type and by how advanced ...

  14. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking good care of ... are qualified to perform eye exams. Aging and Vision Changes As you age, it is normal to ...

  15. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  16. Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye and keeps it healthy. previous continue Light, Lens, Action These next parts are really cool, ... the eye. previous continue Rods and Cones Process Light The retina uses special cells called rods and ...

  17. Eye floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... eyes are not on the surface of your eyes, but inside them. These floaters are bits of cell debris that drift around ... is the layer in the back of the eye.) If you notice a sudden increase in floaters or if you see floaters along with flashes ...

  18. Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do you have diabetes, and have you noticed any changes in your vision? Yes Over time, too much glucose (sugar) in the ... eye pink, red or irritated, and are there any secretions or mucus from the eye? Yes CONJUNCTIVITIS, also called "PINK EYE," can be caused ...

  19. Eye preferences in captive chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Braccini, Stephanie N; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2012-09-01

    Over the last century, the issue of brain lateralization in primates has been extensively investigated and debated, yet no previous study has reported eye preference in great apes. This study examined eye preference in 45 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in response to various stimuli. Eye preference was assessed when animals looked through a hole that only accommodated one eye at an empty box, a mirror, a picture of a dog, a rubber snake, food biscuits, bananas, a rubber duck, and a video camera. Main effects of stimulus type were found for direction of eye preference, number of looks, and looking duration, but not for strength of eye preference. A left-eye bias was found for viewing the rubber snake and a right-eye bias was found for viewing the bananas, supporting theories that emotional valence may affect lateralized behaviors. In addition, a significant shift in eye preference took place from the initial look to subsequent looks when viewing the snake. These results are not consistent with previous reports of human eye preference and may reflect lateralization differences for emotional processing. No relationship between eye preference and previously recorded hand preference was found. PMID:22733385

  20. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Fetting, Jennifer L; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-10-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90 degrees rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echinoid (Fred) act throughout ommatidial rotation to modulate the degree of ommatidial precursor movement. We propose that differential levels of Ed and Fred between stationary and rotating cells at the initiation of rotation create a permissive environment for cell movement, and that uniform levels in these two populations later contribute to stopping the movement. Based on genetic data, we propose that ed and fred impart a second, independent, ;brake-like' contribution to this process via Egfr signaling. Ed and Fred are localized in largely distinct and dynamic patterns throughout rotation. However, ed and fred are required in only a subset of cells - photoreceptors R1, R7 and R6 - for normal rotation, cells that have only recently been linked to a role in planar cell polarity (PCP). This work also provides the first demonstration of a requirement for cone cells in the ommatidial rotation aspect of PCP. ed and fred also genetically interact with the PCP genes, but affect only the degree-of-rotation aspect of the PCP phenotype. Significantly, we demonstrate that at least one PCP protein, Stbm, is required in R7 to control the degree of ommatidial rotation. PMID:19736327

  1. Eye development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-06-15

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This article provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens. PMID:24784530

  2. EYE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicholas E.; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This chapter provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens. PMID:24784530

  3. Hand washing.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    A surgery matron has writt en a hand hygiene promotional video rap to encourage staff, patients and visitors to wash their hands. Vicky Cartwright from University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust rewrote the lyrics to 1990s hit rap, Ice Ice Baby. PMID:27380706

  4. Hand Washing

    MedlinePlus

    ... dirty little secrets: Students don't wash their hands often or well. In one study, only 58% of female and 48% of male middle- and high-school students washed their hands after using the bathroom. Yuck! previous continue How ...

  5. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  6. Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  7. Eye Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cornea, which focuses light while protecting the eye. After light passes through the cornea, it travels through a ... and have them progress faster. With cataracts, the eye's clear lens clouds, blocking light. To help deal with mild cataracts, you may ...

  8. Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, called punctal cautery, is recommended to permanently close the drainage holes. The procedure helps keep the limited volume of tears on the eye for a longer period of time. In some patients with dry eye, supplements or dietary sources (such as tuna fish) of omega-3 fatty ...

  9. Hand Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Uma Shankar; Besarwal, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rahul; Agarwal, Puneet; Napalia, Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients. PMID:24891648

  10. What Happened to Service Coordination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Comments on an article by Dunst and Bruder. Service coordination was supposed to be one of the major jewels in the legislative crown for young children with disabilities and their families. The authors have cast their experienced eyes on the heart of the matter, which is the models of service coordination that sprang to life almost immediately…

  11. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  12. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs Training and Jobs Home > Healthy Eyes Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... seeing your best. Read more. What are common vision problems? Some of the most common vision problems ...

  13. Eye Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD Mar. 01, 2015 Eye allergies, called allergic conjunctivitis , are a common condition that occurs when the ... with tearing and burning. Unlike bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis is not spread from person to ...

  14. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... and there is a good chance of recovery. Alkaline substances -- such as lime, lye, drain cleaners, and ... at high speed by machining, grinding, or hammering metal have the highest risk of injuring the eye. ...

  15. Aging and Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Eyes Heath and Aging Aging and Your Eyes Steps to Protect Your Eyesight Common Eye Problems ... weight can also help protect your vision. Common Eye Problems The following common eye problems can be ...

  16. 33 CFR 401.42 - Passing hand lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... downbound vessel shall use its own hand lines, secured to the eye at the end of the mooring lines, by means... behind the splice of the eye; (3) At Iroquois Lock and Lock 8, Welland Canal, both upbound and downbound... to the eye of the No. 1 mooring wire by means of a bowline. (b) Mooring lines shall not be...

  17. Occupational eye injuries in Finland.

    PubMed

    Saari, K M; Parvi, V

    1984-01-01

    In Finland 11.9% of all industrial accidents in 1973 were eye injuries including superficial eye injuries (79.2%), ultraviolet burns of the cornea (3.9%), eye burns (3.6%), blunt ocular trauma (2,5%), wounds (2.4%), and post-traumatic infections (5.8%). Eye injuries constituted 34.3% of all industrial accidents which needed only ambulatory treatment and 17.5% of all industrial accidents causing an absence for 1-2 days. In 1981 2.1% of all compensated industrial accidents (incapacity for work 3 days or more) were eye injuries. Most compensated eye injuries occurred in manufacturing and in construction work (80.4%) and 8.5% occurred in agriculture. The annual incidence rates of compensated accidents to the eyes (accidents X 1 000/number of employees) were highest in several branches of metal industry (4.96-6.88), excavating and foundation work (6.88), and in logging (5.64). Compensated eye injuries were caused by machines (32.8%), hand tools (25.6%), other equipment and constructions (4.8%), work environment (23.6%), chemical substances (10.8%), and other accidents (2.3%). PMID:6328849

  18. Eye point-of-regard system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    System measures intersection of line of sight and eye point of regard /EPR/ for a human operator in visual scanning system. Device measures two head to reference angles with EPR system and adds them with eye to head angles, yielding a dc signal proportional to picture plane coordinates.

  19. Eye tracker.

    PubMed

    Pruehsner, W; Enderle, J D

    1999-01-01

    A device that records saccadic eye movements, the Eye Tracker, is presented in this paper. The Eye Tracker utilizes infra-red technology mounted on fully adjustable goggles to follow eye movements targeted by either a goggles mounted HUD type display or a wall mounted light bank. Output from the goggles is remotely sent to a PC type computer, which leads to device portability. The goggles can also maintain output data in an internal memory for latter download. The user interface is Windows based with the output from the goggles represented as a trace map or plotted points. This output can also be saved or printed for future reference. The user interface can be used on any PC type computer. The device is designed with reference to standard ISO design methodology. Safety in design and final product usage has also been addressed with reference to standard ISO type procedures. Device accuracy is maintained by precise construction of the IR units in the goggles and tight control of cross talk between each IR device plus filtering of ambient light signals. Also, a reset feature is included to maintain equal baseline control. An automatic switching device is included in the goggles to allow the Eye Tracker to "warm up," assuring that equal IR power is delivered for each subject tested. The IR units in the goggles are also modular in case replacement is required. PMID:11143354

  20. Computing three-dimensional eye position quaternions and eye velocity from search coil signals.

    PubMed

    Tweed, D; Cadera, W; Vilis, T

    1990-01-01

    The four-component rotational operators called quaternions, which represent eye rotations in terms of their axes and angles, have several advantages over other representations of eye position (such as Fick coordinates): they provide easy computations, symmetry, a simple form for Listing's law, and useful three-dimensional plots of eye movements. In this paper we present algorithms for computing eye position quaternions and eye angular velocity (not the derivative of position in three dimensions) from two search coils (not necessarily orthogonal) on one eye in two or three magnetic fields, and for locating primary position using quaternions. We show how differentiation of eye position signals yields poor estimates of all three components of eye velocity. PMID:2321369

  1. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  2. Hand rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Farhaad R; Ozog, David

    2015-09-01

    Aging of the hands results from both natural processes and chronic ultraviolet light exposure. Together, these cause textural and pigmentary changes, excess skin laxity, rhytides, and soft tissue atrophy that presents as prominent bones and tendons with easily visible veins. Many options are available for the reversal of these changes. Photoaging can be improved with chemical peels and light-based treatments (such as Q-switched lasers), resurfacing lasers, intense pulsed light, and photodynamic therapy. Soft tissue atrophy can be corrected with autologous fat, nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and poly-L lactic acid injections. The literature shows that these treatments have favorable outcomes for most patients; but in order to reduce known complications, it is important to understand the proper use and limitations of each modality. PMID:26566571

  3. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  4. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  5. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  6. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  7. Tracking with the mind's eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauzlis, R. J.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    The two components of voluntary tracking eye-movements in primates, pursuit and saccades, are generally viewed as relatively independent oculomotor subsystems that move the eyes in different ways using independent visual information. Although saccades have long been known to be guided by visual processes related to perception and cognition, only recently have psychophysical and physiological studies provided compelling evidence that pursuit is also guided by such higher-order visual processes, rather than by the raw retinal stimulus. Pursuit and saccades also do not appear to be entirely independent anatomical systems, but involve overlapping neural mechanisms that might be important for coordinating these two types of eye movement during the tracking of a selected visual object. Given that the recovery of objects from real-world images is inherently ambiguous, guiding both pursuit and saccades with perception could represent an explicit strategy for ensuring that these two motor actions are driven by a single visual interpretation.

  8. Novel automatic eye detection and tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Kamarul Hawari; Jadin, Mohd Shawal; Jie, Ma; Xiao, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The eye is not only one of the most complex but also the most important sensory organ of the human body. Eye detection and eye tracking are basement and hot issue in image processing. A non-invasive eye location and eye tracking is promising for hands-off gaze-based human-computer interface, fatigue detection, instrument control by paraplegic patients and so on. For this purpose, an innovation work frame is proposed to detect and tracking eye in video sequence in this paper. The contributions of this work can be divided into two parts. The first contribution is that eye filters were trained which can detect eye location efficiently and accurately without constraints on the background and skin colour. The second contribution is that a framework of tracker based on sparse representation and LK optic tracker were built which can track eye without constraint on eye status. The experimental results demonstrate the accuracy aspects and the real-time applicability of the proposed approach.

  9. Integrated and Independent Learning of Hand-Related Constituent Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berner, Michael P.; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In almost all daily activities fingers of both hands are used in coordinated succession. The present experiments explored whether learning in such tasks pertains not only to the overall sequence spanning both hands but also to the constituent sequences of each hand. In a serial reaction time task, 2 repeating hand-related sequences were…

  10. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... catch problems early if you get regular eye exams. ... diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam every 1 to 2 years by an eye ... problems with your vision. Many can do screening exams for damage from diabetes. Once you have eye ...

  11. The role of action prediction and inhibitory control for joint action coordination in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Haartsen, R; Stapel, J C; Hunnius, S

    2015-11-01

    From early in life, young children eagerly engage in social interactions. Yet, they still have difficulties in performing well-coordinated joint actions with others. Adult literature suggests that two processes are important for smooth joint action coordination: action prediction and inhibitory control. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the potential role of these processes in the early development of joint action coordination. Using a simple turn-taking game, we assessed 2½-year-old toddlers' joint action coordination, focusing on timing variability and turn-taking accuracy. In two additional tasks, we examined their action prediction capabilities with an eye-tracking paradigm and examined their inhibitory control capabilities with a classic executive functioning task (gift delay task). We found that individual differences in action prediction and inhibitory action control were distinctly related to the two aspects of joint action coordination. Toddlers who showed more precision in their action predictions were less variable in their action timing during the joint play. Furthermore, toddlers who showed more inhibitory control in an individual context were more accurate in their turn-taking performance during the joint action. On the other hand, no relation between timing variability and inhibitory control or between turn-taking accuracy and action prediction was found. The current results highlight the distinct role of action prediction and inhibitory action control for the quality of joint action coordination in toddlers. Underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and implications for processes involved in joint action coordination in general are discussed. PMID:26150055

  12. Hand lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hand lotion poisoning occurs when someone swallows hand lotion or hand cream. This article is for information only. DO ... These ingredients in hand lotion or cream can be harmful if swallowed: Dimethicone Mineral oil Paraffins (waxes) Petrolatum Various alcohols

  13. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  14. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  15. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  16. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  17. Development of hand surgery: education of hand surgeons.

    PubMed

    Omer, G E

    2000-07-01

    An organized experience in the care of hand injuries and infections was not available until World War II, when military hand centers were established. Dr Sterling Bunnell was designated as a special civilian consultant to the Secretary of War. The surgeons in the military services during World War II became the nucleus of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH). Following World War II and the Korean War there was a major shift toward medical subspecialization, and the growth of surgery of the hand as a subspecialty parallels that trend. The ASSH initiated a coordinated effort to improve the educational experience, and in 1967 the ASSH Resident Training Committee was evaluating hand training programs. The ASSH developed a comprehensive program in continuing medical education, and received full accreditation from the American Medical Association Council on Medical Education. The American Medical Association has included hand surgery on its list of designated specialties since 1975. In 1973, the bylaws of the American Board of Medical Specialties were revised to provide special certification. The ASSH developed a proposal for a certificate of added qualification in surgery of the hand that was presented to the three primary boards (orthopaedic, plastic, surgery) and the ad hoc joint Committee on Surgery of the Hand was organized in 1982. An application for a certificate of added qualification in surgery was developed by the Joint Committee on Surgery of the Hand and approved by all three boards in 1985 and the ABMS in 1986. The first examination for the certificate of added qualification in surgery was held in 1989. PMID:10913201

  18. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Asushi; Kurosaka, Daijiro; Yoshida, Aktoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques. Methods Eighty-eight eyes of 44 patients with no ocular disease other than cataract, who underwent cataract surgery by a single surgeon, were selected for this study. Cataract surgery was performed by coaxial phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation via a 2.4 mm transconjunctival single-plane sclerocorneal incision at the 12 o’clock position. In each patient, one eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a one-handed technique while the fellow eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a two-handed technique. For the two-handed technique, a corneal side port was created at the 2 o’clock position. The appropriate incision meridian was identified by a preoperative axis mark. SIA was calculated using the Alpins method. Results Mean SIA was 0.40 ± 0.28 diopters (D) in the one-handed technique group and 0.39 ± 0.25 D in the two-handed technique group. No statistically significant difference was found in the mean SIA score. The mean torque value was −0.05 ± 0.26 D in the one-handed technique group and 0.11 ± 0.37 D in the two-handed technique group. Mean torque was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the one-handed technique group than in the two-handed technique group. Conclusion The results indicate that the corneal side port in two-handed cataract surgery has a rotating effect on the axis of astigmatism. PMID:24124349

  19. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views. PMID:27253452

  20. Eyeing Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter casts a baleful eye toward the moon Ganymede in this enhanced-contrast image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    Jupiter's 'eye', the Great Red Spot, was captured just before disappearing around the eastern edge of the planet. The furrowed eyebrow above and to the left of the spot is a turbulent wake region caused by westward flow that has been deflected to the north and around the Red Spot. The smallest features visible are about 240 kilometers (150 miles) across.

    Within the band south of the Red Spot are a trio of white ovals, high pressure counterclockwise-rotating regions that are dynamically similar to the Red Spot. The dark filamentary features interspersed between white ovals are probably cyclonic circulations and, unlike the ovals, are rotating clockwise.

    Jupiter's equatorial zone stretching across the planet north of the Spot appears bright white, with gigantic plume clouds spreading out from the equator both to the northeast and to the southeast in a chevron pattern. This zone looks distinctly different than it did during the Voyager flyby 21 years ago. Then, its color was predominantly brown and the only white plumes conspicuous against the darker material beneath them were oriented southwest-to-northeast.

    Ganymede is Jupiter's largest moon, about 50 percent larger than our own Moon and larger than the planet Mercury. The visible details in this image are different geological terrains. Dark areas tend to be older and heavily cratered; brighter areas are younger and less cratered. Cassini images of Ganymede and Jupiter's other large moons taken near closest approach on Dec. 30 will have resolutions about four times better than that seen here.

    This image is a color composite of ones taken with different filters by Cassini's narrow-angle camera on Nov. 18, 2000, processed to enhance contrast. Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of

  1. Design of a computer game using an eye-tracking device for eye's activity rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Huan, Chia-Chin; Chan, Chao-Ning; Yeh, Mau-Shiun; Chiu, Chuang-Chien

    2004-07-01

    An eye mouse interface that can be used to operate a computer using the movement of the eyes is described. We developed this eye-tracking system for eye motion disability rehabilitation. When the user watches the screen of a computer, a charge-coupled device will catch images of the user's eye and transmit it to the computer. A program, based on a new cross-line tracking and stabilizing algorithm, will locate the center point of the pupil in the images. The calibration factors and energy factors are designed for coordinate mapping and blink functions. After the system transfers the coordinates of pupil center in the images to the display coordinate, it will determine the point at which the user gazed on the display, then transfer that location to the game subroutine program. We used this eye-tracking system as a joystick to play a game with an application program in a multimedia environment. The experimental results verify the feasibility and validity of this eye-game system and the rehabilitation effects for the user's visual movement.

  2. Degradation of Binocular Coordination during Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jianliang; Maruta, Jun; Heaton, Kristin J; Maule, Alexis L; Rajashekar, Umesh; Spielman, Lisa A; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    To aid a clear and unified visual perception while tracking a moving target, both eyes must be coordinated, so the image of the target falls on approximately corresponding areas of the fovea of each eye. The movements of the two eyes are decoupled during sleep, suggesting a role of arousal in regulating binocular coordination. While the absence of visual input during sleep may also contribute to binocular decoupling, sleepiness is a state of reduced arousal that still allows for visual input, providing a context within which the role of arousal in binocular coordination can be studied. We examined the effects of sleep deprivation on binocular coordination using a test paradigm that we previously showed to be sensitive to sleep deprivation. We quantified binocular coordination with the SD of the distance between left and right gaze positions on the screen. We also quantified the stability of conjugate gaze on the target, i.e., gaze-target synchronization, with the SD of the distance between the binocular average gaze and the target. Sleep deprivation degraded the stability of both binocular coordination and gaze-target synchronization, but between these two forms of gaze control the horizontal and vertical components were affected differently, suggesting that disconjugate and conjugate eye movements are under different regulation of attentional arousal. The prominent association found between sleep deprivation and degradation of binocular coordination in the horizontal direction may be used for a fit-for-duty assessment. PMID:27379009

  3. Degradation of Binocular Coordination during Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jianliang; Maruta, Jun; Heaton, Kristin J.; Maule, Alexis L.; Rajashekar, Umesh; Spielman, Lisa A.; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    To aid a clear and unified visual perception while tracking a moving target, both eyes must be coordinated, so the image of the target falls on approximately corresponding areas of the fovea of each eye. The movements of the two eyes are decoupled during sleep, suggesting a role of arousal in regulating binocular coordination. While the absence of visual input during sleep may also contribute to binocular decoupling, sleepiness is a state of reduced arousal that still allows for visual input, providing a context within which the role of arousal in binocular coordination can be studied. We examined the effects of sleep deprivation on binocular coordination using a test paradigm that we previously showed to be sensitive to sleep deprivation. We quantified binocular coordination with the SD of the distance between left and right gaze positions on the screen. We also quantified the stability of conjugate gaze on the target, i.e., gaze–target synchronization, with the SD of the distance between the binocular average gaze and the target. Sleep deprivation degraded the stability of both binocular coordination and gaze–target synchronization, but between these two forms of gaze control the horizontal and vertical components were affected differently, suggesting that disconjugate and conjugate eye movements are under different regulation of attentional arousal. The prominent association found between sleep deprivation and degradation of binocular coordination in the horizontal direction may be used for a fit-for-duty assessment. PMID:27379009

  4. Technology coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Steven

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology coordination are provided. Topics covered include: technology coordination process to date; goals; how the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) can support the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA); how OSSA can support OAST; steps to technology transfer; and recommendations.

  5. Deficits of Visuospatial Attention with Reflexive Orienting Induced by Eye-Gazed Cues in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder in the Lower Extremities: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yu-Kai; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tseng, Ko-Da

    2010-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate and compare the behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) measures in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and typically developing (TD) children when performing the visuospatial attention task with reflexive orienting. Thirty children with DCD and 30 TD children were…

  6. Rubber hands feel the touch of light.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Frank H; Evans, Laurel; Dunphy, Natalie; Klostermann, Susan; Simmons, Kristina

    2007-02-01

    Two experiments involving a total of 220 subjects are reported. The experiments document that "stroking" a false hand with the bright beam of light from a laser pointer can produce tactile and thermal sensations when the hand can be seen as one's own. Overall, 66% of subjects reported somatic sensations from the light. Felt hand location was recalibrated toward the location of the false hand for those subjects who felt the light. Moreover, the proprioceptive recalibration from the laser experience was comparable to that produced by actual coordinated brushing of the false hand and of the unseen real hand after 2 min of stimulation. The illusion may be experienced on one's real hand as well. The results are discussed in terms of multisensory integration. PMID:17425536

  7. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  8. Hand Dominance and Common Hand Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lutsky, Kevin; Kim, Nayoung; Medina, Juana; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) assess how frequently patients present for evaluation of common hand disorders in relation to hand dominance and (2) evaluate the effect of hand dominance on function in patients with these conditions. The authors hypothesized that (1) the majority of patients who seek evaluation would have a condition that affects the dominant hand, and (2) disability scores would be worse if the dominant hand is involved. They retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients who presented for treatment to their institution with unilateral symptoms of 5 common disorders of the hand: carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DEQ), lateral epicondylitis (LE), hand osteoarthritis (OA), and trigger finger (TF). The authors assessed the effect of diagnosis and hand dominance on Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores. The study group comprised 1029 patients (379 men and 650 women) with a mean age of 59.5 years. Ninety percent were right-hand dominant. The dominant and nondominant hands were affected with relatively equal frequency for CTS, DEQ, OA, and TF (range, 45%-53%). Patients with LE had a significantly higher incidence of dominant hand involvement. Men had lower DASH scores than women by an average of 7.9 points, and DASH scores were significantly but slightly higher for the overall group (3.2 points) when the dominant side was affected. Men with LE and women with TF and OA had significantly higher DASH scores when their dominant extremity was affected. Common hand disorders such as CTS, DEQ, OA, and TF affect the dominant and nondominant hands in roughly equivalent proportions, whereas LE is more common on the dominant side. Dominant hand involvement results in significantly worse DASH scores, although the magnitude of this is relatively small. Women have significantly higher DASH scores than men for the conditions evaluated. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e444-e448.]. PMID:27018604

  9. Eating for Your Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  10. Improving eye care in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kirstin; Rosewall, Thomas; Mackenzie, Graeme; Rehnborg, Gweneth; Hannema, Sjoerd; Presente, Max; Noe, Piet; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Nkurikiye, John; Habiyaremye, Francois; Dushime, Theophile

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem Visual impairment affects nearly 285 million people worldwide. Although there has been much progress in combating the burden of visual impairment through initiatives such as VISION 2020, barriers to progress, especially in African countries, remain high. Approach The Rwandan Ministry of Health has formed partnerships with several nongovernmental organizations and has worked to integrate their efforts to prevent and treat visual impairment, including presbyopia. Local setting Rwanda, an eastern African country of approximately 11 million people. Relevant changes The Rwandan Ministry of Health developed a single national plan that allows key partners in vision care to coordinate more effectively in measuring eye disease, developing eye care infrastructure, building capacity, controlling disease, and delivering and evaluating services. Lessons learnt Collaboration between stakeholders under a single national plan has ensured that resources and efforts are complementary, optimizing the ability to provide eye care. Improved access to primary eye care and insurance coverage has increased demand for services at secondary and tertiary levels. A comprehensive strategy that includes prevention as well as a supply chain for glasses and lenses is needed. PMID:26240465

  11. Spontaneous eye blinks during creative task correlate with divergent processing.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Tominaga, Atsuko; Kajimura, Shogo; Nomura, Michio

    2016-07-01

    Creativity consists of divergent and convergent thinking, with both related to individual eye blinks at rest. To assess underlying mechanisms between eye blinks and traditional creativity tasks, we investigated the relationship between creativity performance and eye blinks at rest and during tasks. Participants performed an alternative uses and remote association task while eye blinks were recorded. Results showed that the relationship between eye blinks at rest and creativity performance was compatible with those of previous research. Interestingly, we found that the generation of ideas increased as a function of eye blink number during the alternative uses task. On the other hand, during the remote association task, accuracy was independent of eye blink number during the task, but response time increased with it. Moreover, eye blink changes in participants who responded quickly during the remote association task were different depending on their resting state eye blinks; that is, participants with many eye blinks during rest showed little increasing eye blinks and achieved solutions quickly. Positive correlations between eye blinks during creative tasks and yielding ideas on the alternative uses task and response time on the remote association task suggest that eye blinks during creativity tasks relate to divergent thinking processes such as conceptual reorganization. PMID:25863791

  12. Hand lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002708.htm Hand lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand lotion poisoning occurs when someone swallows hand lotion or ...

  13. Chapped hands (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Chapped hands can be sore and painful. Chapped hands may be soothed by the use of moisturizing lotions and the avoidance of excess exposure to water. If hands become badly chapped, hydrocortisone creams (available over the ...

  14. Hand splint - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100142.htm Hand splint - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... out of 4 Overview To begin making a hand dressing, place the injured hand around a cloth ...

  15. Following the Hand: The First Three Years of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orion, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the development of the human hand from birth to age three as it contributes to the formation of human personality. Considers how parallels in eye, hand, brain, and motor skill development portray the evolving complexity and adaptation of the human grasp and illustrate Montessori theories about the relationship between physical experience…

  16. Impact of Virtual Environments on Sensorimotor Coordination and User Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Taylor, Laura C.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    2011-01-01

    One critical unresolved issue related to the safe use of virtual environments (VEs) is maladaptive sensorimotor coordination following exposure to VEs. Moving visual displays used in VEs, especially in the absence of concordant vestibular signals leads to adaptive responses during VE exposure, but maladaptive responses following return to the normal environment. In the current set of investigations, we examined the effect of HMD and dome VE displays on eye-head-hand coordination, gaze holding and postural equilibrium. Subjects (61) performed a navigation and a pick and place task. Further, we compared 30 min and 60 min exposures across 3 days (each separated by 1 day). A subset of these results will be presented. In general, we found significant decrements in all three measures following exposure to the VEs. In addition, we found that these disturbances generally recovered within 1-2 hrs and decreased across days. These findings suggest the need for post-VE monitoring of sensorimotor coordination and for developing a set of recommendations for users concerning activities that are safe to engage in following use of a VE.

  17. Acute Arterial Thrombosis of the Hand.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Nicholas P; Higgins, James P

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis of the hand occurs infrequently but may result in considerable morbidity and compromise of hand function. The hand surgeon may be called upon to direct management in cases of acute arterial thrombosis of the hand and should have an understanding of the available diagnostic tools and treatment modalities. This article discusses the vascular anatomy of the hand and clinical manifestations of arterial thrombosis. Differences between isolated thrombosis and diffuse intravascular injury are detailed, and treatment options for these conditions are described. Appropriate care often requires coordination with interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons. Outcomes after treatment of arterial thrombosis of the hand are variable, and prognosis may be related to whether isolated thrombosis or diffuse intravascular injury is present. PMID:26408378

  18. HandsFree TLCMS

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-30

    The HandsFreeTLCMS software is able to - control an x,y,z stage connected to the computer via USB interface - automatically form and maintain the liquid junction between a TLC plate and the sampling probe of a TLC/MS surface sampler unit - automatically accomplish multiple-lane scans over a TLC plate making able to sample the whole surface by a pre-defined, reproducible, automated method - analyze mass spectrometric data collected during the surface scans and make datafiles those contain x,y coordinates of surface spots (collected during the surface scans) and the corresponding mass signal intensities (integrated over a pre-defined m/z range) at those spots to produce 3-dimensional plots later in external graphic programs. - produce and save greyscale or color 2D pictures where X and Y axises of the picture correspond to the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) range of the scanned surface area and the color of a pixel is determined by the corresponding mass signal intensities (integrated over a pre-defined m/z range) at that X,Y spot

  19. HandsFree TLCMS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-07-30

    The HandsFreeTLCMS software is able to - control an x,y,z stage connected to the computer via USB interface - automatically form and maintain the liquid junction between a TLC plate and the sampling probe of a TLC/MS surface sampler unit - automatically accomplish multiple-lane scans over a TLC plate making able to sample the whole surface by a pre-defined, reproducible, automated method - analyze mass spectrometric data collected during the surface scans and make datafilesmore » those contain x,y coordinates of surface spots (collected during the surface scans) and the corresponding mass signal intensities (integrated over a pre-defined m/z range) at those spots to produce 3-dimensional plots later in external graphic programs. - produce and save greyscale or color 2D pictures where X and Y axises of the picture correspond to the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) range of the scanned surface area and the color of a pixel is determined by the corresponding mass signal intensities (integrated over a pre-defined m/z range) at that X,Y spot« less

  20. Magnetosheath Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, M.; Chen, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    The eventual goal of this work is to develop an approximate analytical representation of solar-wind streamlines in the magnetosheath surrounding a magnetosphere of rather general shape. Previous analytical representations of magnetosheath streamlines and magnetic fields have invoked magnetopause shapes that conform to standard coordinate systems (e.g., spherical, cylindrical, paraboloidal, ellipsoidal), but it seems now that such a restriction on magnetopause shape is unnecessary. In the present work it is assumed only that the magnetopause is a continuously differentiable convex surface axisymmetric about the Sun-Earth line. This geometry permits the construction of an orthogonal coordinate system (mu, eta, chi) such that eta is the cosine of the cone angle between the Sun-Earth line and any conical surafce extending normally outward from the magnetopause, mu is a measure of the perpendicular distance of any magnetosheath point from the magnetopause, and chi is an azimuthal coordinate measured around the Sun-Earth line. It is convenient here to assign a label mu = mu* to the magnetopause itself, so that mu - mu* denotes perpendicular distance from the magnetopause and mu* is an adjustable parameter roughly comparable to the radius of the magnetotail. This choice provides for a rough correspondence between the (mu, eta, chi) coordinates introduced here and the ellipsoidal coordinates used in our previous efforts at magnetosheath modeling.

  1. Hand gesture guided robot-assisted surgery based on a direct augmented reality interface.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rong; Tay, Wei-Liang; Nguyen, Binh P; Chng, Chin-Boon; Chui, Chee-Kong

    2014-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is a good alternative to hepatic resection for treatment of liver tumors. However, accurate needle insertion requires precise hand-eye coordination and is also affected by the difficulty of RF needle navigation. This paper proposes a cooperative surgical robot system, guided by hand gestures and supported by an augmented reality (AR)-based surgical field, for robot-assisted percutaneous treatment. It establishes a robot-assisted natural AR guidance mechanism that incorporates the advantages of the following three aspects: AR visual guidance information, surgeon's experiences and accuracy of robotic surgery. A projector-based AR environment is directly overlaid on a patient to display preoperative and intraoperative information, while a mobile surgical robot system implements specified RF needle insertion plans. Natural hand gestures are used as an intuitive and robust method to interact with both the AR system and surgical robot. The proposed system was evaluated on a mannequin model. Experimental results demonstrated that hand gesture guidance was able to effectively guide the surgical robot, and the robot-assisted implementation was found to improve the accuracy of needle insertion. This human-robot cooperative mechanism is a promising approach for precise transcutaneous ablation therapy. PMID:24438993

  2. Wash Your Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... do if you don't have soap and clean, running water? Washing hands with soap and water is the ... specific questions. More Information CDC's Handwashing Work Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings Water-related Hygiene Hand Hygiene to Help Prevent Flu ...

  3. Infection after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative infections are uncommon after hand surgery. Infection can delay recovery and contribute to scarring and stiffness. Measures intended to reduce the risk of infection after hand surgery include hand washing, skin preparation, sterile technique, and prophylactic antibiotics. The role of prophylactic antibiotics for small, clean, elective hand surgery procedures lasting less than 2 hours is debated. PMID:25934209

  4. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  5. In a demanding task, three-handed manipulation is preferred to two-handed manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Elahe; Burdet, Etienne; Bouri, Mohamed; Himidan, Sharifa; Bleuler, Hannes

    2016-02-01

    Equipped with a third hand under their direct control, surgeons may be able to perform certain surgical interventions alone; this would reduce the need for a human assistant and related coordination difficulties. However, does human performance improve with three hands compared to two hands? To evaluate this possibility, we carried out a behavioural study on the performance of naive adults catching objects with three virtual hands controlled by their two hands and right foot. The subjects could successfully control the virtual hands in a few trials. With this control strategy, the workspace of the hands was inversely correlated with the task velocity. The comparison of performance between the three and two hands control revealed no significant difference of success in catching falling objects and in average effort during the tasks. Subjects preferred the three handed control strategy, found it easier, with less physical and mental burden. Although the coordination of the foot with the natural hands increased trial after trial, about two minutes of practice was not sufficient to develop a sense of ownership towards the third arm.

  6. In a demanding task, three-handed manipulation is preferred to two-handed manipulation.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Elahe; Burdet, Etienne; Bouri, Mohamed; Himidan, Sharifa; Bleuler, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Equipped with a third hand under their direct control, surgeons may be able to perform certain surgical interventions alone; this would reduce the need for a human assistant and related coordination difficulties. However, does human performance improve with three hands compared to two hands? To evaluate this possibility, we carried out a behavioural study on the performance of naive adults catching objects with three virtual hands controlled by their two hands and right foot. The subjects could successfully control the virtual hands in a few trials. With this control strategy, the workspace of the hands was inversely correlated with the task velocity. The comparison of performance between the three and two hands control revealed no significant difference of success in catching falling objects and in average effort during the tasks. Subjects preferred the three handed control strategy, found it easier, with less physical and mental burden. Although the coordination of the foot with the natural hands increased trial after trial, about two minutes of practice was not sufficient to develop a sense of ownership towards the third arm. PMID:26912293

  7. In a demanding task, three-handed manipulation is preferred to two-handed manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Elahe; Burdet, Etienne; Bouri, Mohamed; Himidan, Sharifa; Bleuler, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Equipped with a third hand under their direct control, surgeons may be able to perform certain surgical interventions alone; this would reduce the need for a human assistant and related coordination difficulties. However, does human performance improve with three hands compared to two hands? To evaluate this possibility, we carried out a behavioural study on the performance of naive adults catching objects with three virtual hands controlled by their two hands and right foot. The subjects could successfully control the virtual hands in a few trials. With this control strategy, the workspace of the hands was inversely correlated with the task velocity. The comparison of performance between the three and two hands control revealed no significant difference of success in catching falling objects and in average effort during the tasks. Subjects preferred the three handed control strategy, found it easier, with less physical and mental burden. Although the coordination of the foot with the natural hands increased trial after trial, about two minutes of practice was not sufficient to develop a sense of ownership towards the third arm. PMID:26912293

  8. Anatomy of the Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Anatomy of the Eye × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  9. Patient Eye Examinations - Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Patient Eye Examinations, Adults × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...

  10. Eye muscle repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... and physical exam before the procedure Orthoptic measurements (eye movement measurements) Always tell your child's doctor or nurse: ... D, Plummer LS, Stass-Isern M. Disorders of eye movement and alignment. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson ...

  11. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and comfortable as possible until help arrives. continue Chemical Exposure Many chemicals, even those found around the house, can damage an eye. If your child gets a chemical in the eye and you know what it ...

  12. Diabetes - eye care

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated eye exam. This is called digital retinal photography. Your eye doctor may ask you to come ... doctor if: You cannot see well in dim light. You have blind spots. You have double vision ( ...

  13. Diabetes and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye that can lead to blindness Macular edema: blurry vision due to fluid leaking into the ... in your retina (neovascularization) or you develop macular edema, treatment is usually needed. Eye surgery is the ...

  14. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye (vitreous hemorrhage) Cancer of the retina ( retinoblastoma ), under the retina, or in other parts of ... Cataract removal Melanoma of the eye Retinal detachment Retinoblastoma Ultrasound Update Date 2/23/2015 Updated by: ...

  15. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  16. Toxoplasmosis (and the Eye)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of known infected babies. What happens to the eyes of babies born with congenital toxoplasmosis? The infection ... to further reduce the inflammation. Updated 03/2015 Eye Terms & Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia ...

  17. Sports and Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... More Information Optical Illusions Printables Sports and Your Eyes Gear up! If you play sports, you know ...

  18. Lasik eye surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000525.htm Lasik eye surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lasik eye surgery permanently changes the shape of the cornea ( ...

  19. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It ... light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. ...

  20. Fluorescein eye stain

    MedlinePlus

    Abnormal results may point to: Abnormal tear production (dry eye) Blocked tear duct Corneal abrasion (a scratch on ... foreign object in ) Infection Injury or trauma Severe dry eye associated with arthritis (keratoconjunctivitis sicca)

  1. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  2. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye nausea or vomiting after an eye injury Think Prevention! Kids who play sports should wear protective goggles or unbreakable glasses as needed. Keep chemicals and other potentially dangerous objects out of the reach of children. Reviewed by: ...

  3. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause ... surgery, with follow-up care. Two other eye problems can happen to people with diabetes. A cataract ...

  4. Eye muscle repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child's eyes should look normal a few weeks after the surgery. ... Surgical Approach to the Rectus Muscles. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, ... Hug D, Plummer LS, Stass-Isern M. Disorders of eye movement and ...

  5. Anatomy of the Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... it becomes red or pink. This is called conjunctivitis or “pinkeye”. Lacrimal Gland: The lacrimal gland produces tears that ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  6. Eye - foreign object in

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002084.htm Eye - foreign object in To use the sharing features on this ... Blinking The eye will often flush out small objects, like eyelashes and sand, through blinking and tearing. ...

  7. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... are near. Sunlight can damage your eye. Wear dark glasses or shade your eyes until the effects ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  8. COORDINATED AV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLEAVES, PAUL C.; AND OTHERS

    THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER IS LOCATED IN THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPPLIES ALL SCHOOLS IN THE AREA. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT ORDERS, AFTER SELECTIONS ARE MADE BY THE CLASSROOM TEACHER, ARE PROCESSED BY THE CENTER, CONFIRMED AND DELIVERED BY TRUCK THREE TIMES EACH WEEK. EACH SCHOOL HAS A BUILDING COORDINATOR WHO CHECKS THE ORDERS INTO THE…

  9. Eye Carduino: A Car Control System using Eye Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arjun; Nagaraj, Disha; Louzardo, Joel; Hegde, Rajeshwari

    2011-12-01

    Modern automotive systems are rapidly becoming highly of transportation, but can be a web integrated media centre. This paper explains the implementation of a vehicle control defined and characterized by embedded electronics and software. With new technologies, the vehicle industry is facing new opportunities and also new challenges. Electronics have improved the performance of vehicles and at the same time, new more complex applications are introduced. Examples of high level applications include adaptive cruise control and electronic stability programs (ESP). Further, a modern vehicle does not have to be merely a means using only eye movements. The EyeWriter's native hardware and software work to return the co-ordinates of where the user is looking. These co-ordinates are then used to control the car. A centre-point is defined on the screen. The higher on the screen the user's gaze is, the faster the car will accelerate. Braking is done by looking below centre. Steering is done by looking left and right on the screen.

  10. Get Your Eyes Tested

    MedlinePlus

    ... over age 40 Have a family history of glaucoma Have diabetes People with diabetes may need eye exams more ... or if you have a family member with diabetes or an eye disease. Eye diseases like glaucoma can lead to vision loss and blindness if ...