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Sample records for handheld pcr thermocycler

  1. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  2. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  3. Detection of Francisella tularensis within Infected Mouse Tissues by Using a Hand-Held PCR Thermocycler

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Peter A.; Bell, Ryan; Dang, Jessica L.; McClanahan, Rebecca; David, John C.; Burgess, Robert J.; Thompson, Joseph; Collins, Lisa; Hadfield, Ted

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis of human cases of tularemia often relies upon the demonstration of an antibody response to Francisella tularensis or the direct culturing of the bacteria from the patient. Antibody response is not detectable until 2 weeks or more after infection, and culturing requires special media and suspicion of tularemia. In addition, handling live Francisella poses a risk to laboratory personnel due to the highly infectious nature of this pathogen. In an effort to develop a rapid diagnostic assay for tularemia, we investigated the use of TaqMan 5′ hydrolysis fluorogenic PCR to detect the organism in tissues of infected mice. Mice were infected to produce respiratory tularemia. The fopA and tul4 genes of F. tularensis were amplified from infected spleen, lung, liver, and kidney tissues sampled over a 5-day period. The samples were analyzed using the laboratory-based Applied Biosystems International 7900 and the Smiths Detection-Edgewood BioSeeq, a hand-held portable fluorescence thermocycler designed for use in the field. A comparison of culturing and PCR for detection of bacteria in infected tissues shows that culturing was more sensitive than PCR. However, the results for culture take 72 h, whereas PCR results were available within 4 h. PCR was able to detect infection in all the tissues tested. Lung tissue showed the earliest response at 2 days when tested with the ABI 7900 and in 3 days when tested with the BioSeeq. The results were in agreement between the ABI 7900 and the BioSeeq when presented with the same sample. Template preparation may account for the loss of sensitivity compared to culturing techniques. The hand-held BioSeeq thermocycler shows promise as an expedient means of forward diagnosis of infection in the field. PMID:12574268

  4. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  5. Analysis of PCR Thermocycling by Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ruchi; Ugaz, Victor

    2004-03-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated a novel device employing the circulatory flow field established by Rayleigh-Bénard convection to perform amplification of a 295 base target region from a human genomic DNA template inside a 35 uL cylindrical cavity using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [Krishnan, Ugaz & Burns, Science, Vol. 298, 2002, p. 793]. This design eliminates the need for dynamic external temperature control required in conventional thermocyclers that repeatedly heat and cool static sample volumes to denaturation, annealing, and extension temperatures. In this paper, we extend these studies by demonstrating the design and operation of a multiwell convective flow device capable of achieving amplification of a 191 base pair fragment associated with membrane channel proteins M1 and M2 of the influenza-A virus in as little as 15 minutes with performance comparable to a conventional thermocycler. We also study the effect of initial template concentration and observe no degradation in performance over four orders of magnitude of initial template loading dilution, consistent with conventional thermocycler results. These results illustrate the ability of convective flow PCR systems to achieve performance equal to or exceeding conventional thermocycling hardware, and demonstrate their suitability for use in rapid biodetection assays.

  6. Handheld real-time PCR device.

    PubMed

    Ahrberg, Christian D; Ilic, Bojan Robert; Manz, Andreas; Neužil, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    Here we report one of the smallest real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems to date with an approximate size of 100 mm × 60 mm × 33 mm. The system is an autonomous unit requiring an external 12 V power supply. Four simultaneous reactions are performed in the form of virtual reaction chambers (VRCs) where a ≈200 nL sample is covered with mineral oil and placed on a glass cover slip. Fast, 40 cycle amplification of an amplicon from the H7N9 gene was used to demonstrate the PCR performance. The standard curve slope was -3.02 ± 0.16 cycles at threshold per decade (mean ± standard deviation) corresponding to an amplification efficiency of 0.91 ± 0.05 per cycle (mean ± standard deviation). The PCR device was capable of detecting a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) copy. These results further suggest that our handheld PCR device may have broad, technologically-relevant applications extending to rapid detection of infectious diseases in small clinics. PMID:26753557

  7. Automated Forensic Animal Family Identification by Nested PCR and Melt Curve Analysis on an Off-the-Shelf Thermocycler Augmented with a Centrifugal Microfluidic Disk Segment

    PubMed Central

    Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Nested PCR remains a labor-intensive and error-prone biomolecular analysis. Laboratory workflow automation by precise control of minute liquid volumes in centrifugal microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems holds great potential for such applications. However, the majority of these systems require costly custom-made processing devices. Our idea is to augment a standard laboratory device, here a centrifugal real-time PCR thermocycler, with inbuilt liquid handling capabilities for automation. We have developed a microfluidic disk segment enabling an automated nested real-time PCR assay for identification of common European animal groups adapted to forensic standards. For the first time we utilize a novel combination of fluidic elements, including pre-storage of reagents, to automate the assay at constant rotational frequency of an off-the-shelf thermocycler. It provides a universal duplex pre-amplification of short fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes, animal-group-specific main-amplifications, and melting curve analysis for differentiation. The system was characterized with respect to assay sensitivity, specificity, risk of cross-contamination, and detection of minor components in mixtures. 92.2% of the performed tests were recognized as fluidically failure-free sample handling and used for evaluation. Altogether, augmentation of the standard real-time thermocycler with a self-contained centrifugal microfluidic disk segment resulted in an accelerated and automated analysis reducing hands-on time, and circumventing the risk of contamination associated with regular nested PCR protocols. PMID:26147196

  8. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    PubMed

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  9. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  10. Comparison of four thermocycling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, G.A.; Swartz, M.L.; Phillips, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation revealed no significant difference among the four thermocycling techniques. The use of a dye or an isotope was equally effective and penetrated the tooth/restoration interface to a similar degree. The extent of tracer penetration appeared to be independent of the dwell time in the thermal baths. All procedures involving thermal changes were more potent in demonstrating leakage than the noncycled method.

  11. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  12. A quantitative method of measuring the microleakage of thermocycled or non-thermocycled posterior tooth restorations.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Dos Santos, Alex José Souza; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified microleakage in restorations made with three packable resin composites-Solitaire, SureFil and P60; one hybrid resin composite-Z250 and an amalgam-Dispersalloy, with or without the thermocycling process. Sixty sound, freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally, creating buccal and lingual blocks. One hundred blocks with the flattest surface were selected. Cylindrical cavities with a diameter of 1.85 +/- 0.05 mm and a depth of 1.5 mm were prepared with a special diamond bur. The blocks were randomly assigned to 10 test groups (n = 10): five restorative materials and two thermal stress groups (thermocycled groups at 3,000 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a dwell time of one minute at each temperature, or non-thermocycled). After the thermocycling test, the samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 12 hours. The samples were ground and the powder prepared for analysis in an absorbance spectrophotometer. All the results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test. For the non-thermocycled groups, the means (microg/ml) of microleakage were: Amalgam-4.279 (a); Solitaire-4.148 (ab); Z250-3.418 (abc); P60-3.184 (bc); SureFil-2.890 (c). For the thermocycled groups, the means were: Amalgam-7.572 (a); Solitaire-5.471 (a); Z250-4.330 (ab); P60-3.418 (bc) and SureFil-2.779 (c). Thermocycling analysis showed no significant differences between the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups for each material tested. It was concluded that no test material prevented microleakage. Only SureFil and P60 showed leakage means significantly lower than amalgam, with SureFil showing lower leakage than Solitaire. P60 only showed lower leakage than Solitaire in the thermocycled groups and Z250 showed results similar to the others materials. PMID:14653296

  13. Handheld Searchlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Streamlite Inc. reengineered the NASA searchlight for commercial use. The brightest hand-held light yet produced is result of Xenon-arc lights developed as solar simulators at Johnson Space Center. Intense battery powered searchlight is rated a million candlepower - 50 times brighter than high beam headlights of a car, and weighs only 7 pounds. Lifetime of xenon lamp is at least 200 hours at maximum intensity. Retail cost is under $400.00. Company has introduced smaller unit in shape of a flashlight, produces 20,000 candlepower and costs approximately $60.00.

  14. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  15. Handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Bodtker, Brian H.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Mariella, Raymond P., Jr.; Koopman, Ronald P.; Belgrader, Philip

    2000-12-01

    There is a growing need for portable, lightweight, battery operated instruments capable of detecting and identifying bio-warfare and bio-terrorism agents in the field. To address this need, we have developed a handheld PCR instrument. LLNLs advanced thermal cycling technology and expertise with portable, field tested biological instrumentation, combined with the development of real-time, fluorescence based PCR assays, has enabled the development of a very portable, versatile, power efficient PCR instrument with a simplified operating system designed for use by first responders. The heart of the instrument is the sample module, which incorporates the advanced silicon thermal cycler developed at LLNL.

  16. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  17. A Foothold for Handhelds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers provide students tremendous computing and learning power at about a 10th the cost of a regular computer. Describes the evolution of handhelds; provides some examples of their uses; and cites research indicating they are effective classroom tools that can improve efficiency and instruction. A sidebar lists handheld resources.…

  18. Handheld Computing in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E.; Mehta, Sangeeta; Wax, Randy; Lapinsky, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs). The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use. PMID:12595403

  19. Handheld computing in medicine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Wax, Randy; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs). The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use. PMID:12595403

  20. Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube thermocycler for fast DNA amplification and real-time optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Ryan J.; Whitney, Scott E.; Sarkar, Amitabha; Nelson, Michael; Padhye, Nisha V.; Gogos, George; Viljoen, Hendrik J.

    2004-12-01

    An innovative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) thermocycler capable of performing real-time optical detection is described below. This device utilizes the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube in a system to efficiently and rapidly cycle three 20 μL samples between the denaturation, annealing, and elongation temperatures. The reaction progress is displayed real-time by measuring the size of a fluorescent signal emitted by SYBR green/double-stranded DNA complexes. This device can produce significant reaction yields with very small amounts of initial DNA, for example, it can amplify 0.25 fg (˜5 copies) of a 96 bp bacteriophage λ-DNA fragment 2.7×1011-fold by performing 45 cycles in less than 12 min. The optical threshold (150% of the baseline intensity) was passed 8 min into the reaction at cycle 34. Besides direct applications, the speed and sensitivity of this device enables it to be used as a scientific instrument for basic studies such as PCR assembly and polymerase kinetics.

  1. Digital droplet PCR on disk.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Geltman, Marcel; Schwemmer, Frank; Wadle, Simon; Domínguez-Garrido, Elena; López, María; Cervera-Acedo, Cristina; Santibáñez, Paula; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Paust, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Existing systems for digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) either suffer from low integration or are difficult to introduce to mass fabrication. Here we present an integrated system that is compatible to mass fabrication and combines emulsification, PCR, and fluorescence readout in a single chamber within a disposable cartridge (disk). Droplets are generated by injecting the sample into fluorinated oil via centrifugal step emulsification. The resulting emulsion is aligned in the PCR and readout zone by capillary action. During thermocycling, gas bubbles generated by degassing are removed by capillary driven transport through tapered regions in the PCR chamber. Thereby, the positioning of the emulsion within the readout zone of the PCR chamber is ensured at any time and no bubbles are present during readout. Manual handling of the disk solely requires pipetting of oil and PCR mix into the inlet structures, placing the disk into the thermocycler and subsequently into a microarray scanner. The functionality of the ddPCR process chain is demonstrated by quantitative detection of the cystic fibrosis causing mutation p.Phe508del, which is of interest for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). The mutation was detected in a concentration range spanning four orders of magnitude. We envision that this work will lay the base for the development of highly integrated sample-to-digital-answer PCR systems that can be employed in routine clinical diagnosis. PMID:26610263

  2. Miniaturized handheld hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huawen; Haibach, Frederick G.; Bergles, Eric; Qian, Jack; Zhang, Charlie; Yang, William

    2014-05-01

    A miniaturized hyperspectral imager is enabled with image sensor integrated with dispersing elements in a very compact form factor, removing the need for expensive, moving, bulky and complex optics that have been used in conventional hyperspectral imagers for decades. The result is a handheld spectral imager that can be installed on miniature UAV drones or conveyor belts in production lines. Eventually, small handhelds can be adapted for use in outpatient medical clinics for point-of-care diagnostics and other in-field applications.

  3. Handhelds, Testing and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Research shows that technology makes a difference in student motivation, engagement, and active learning. It also helps students develop critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills. Providing each student with his or her own computing device such as a Palm handheld computer and appropriate software can have a great impact. This…

  4. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  5. Thermal analysis of the vortex tube based thermocycler for fast DNA amplification: Experimental and two-dimensional numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, V.; Whitney, Scott E.; Ebmeier, Ryan J.; Padhye, Nisha V.; Nelson, Michael; Viljoen, Hendrik J.; Gogos, George

    2006-09-01

    In this article, experimental and numerical analyses to investigate the thermal control of an innovative vortex tube based polymerase chain reaction (VT-PCR) thermocycler are described. VT-PCR is capable of rapid DNA amplification and real-time optical detection. The device rapidly cycles six 20μl 96bp λ-DNA samples between the PCR stages (denaturation, annealing, and elongation) for 30cycles in approximately 6min. Two-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT v.6.2.16. Experiments and CFD simulations have been carried out to measure/predict the temperature variation between the samples and within each sample. Heat transfer rate (primarily dictated by the temperature differences between the samples and the external air heating or cooling them) governs the temperature distribution between and within the samples. Temperature variation between and within the samples during the denaturation stage has been quite uniform (maximum variation around ±0.5 and 1.6°C, respectively). During cooling, by adjusting the cold release valves in the VT-PCR during some stage of cooling, the heat transfer rate has been controlled. Improved thermal control, which increases the efficiency of the PCR process, has been obtained both experimentally and numerically by slightly decreasing the rate of cooling. Thus, almost uniform temperature distribution between and within the samples (within 1°C) has been attained for the annealing stage as well. It is shown that the VT-PCR is a fully functional PCR machine capable of amplifying specific DNA target sequences in less time than conventional PCR devices.

  6. Effects of thermocycling and light source on the bond strength of metallic brackets to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Vedovello Filho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of thermocycling and different light sources on the bond strength of metallic brackets to bovine tooth enamel using an adhesive resin. Bovine teeth were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel for 20 s. After application of primer, metallic brackets were bonded to the buccal surface using Transbond XT, forming 8 groups (n = 20), depending on the light source used for photoactivation (AccuCure 3000 argon laser--20 s, Apollo 95E plasma arc--12 s, UltraLume 5 LED--40 s and XL2500 halogen light--40 s) and experimental conditions without (Groups 1 to 4) or with thermocycling (Groups 5 to 8). Shear bond testing was carried out after 24 h of distilled water storage (Groups 1 to 4) or storage and thermocycling in distilled water (groups 5 to 8; 1,500 cycles--5°/55 °C). Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was evaluated at ×8 magnification. No significant differences (p>0.05) in bond strength were found when the conditions without and with thermocycling were compared for any of the light sources. No significant differences (p>0.05) in bond strength were found among the light sources, irrespective of performing or not thermocycling. There was a predominance of ARI scores 1 in all groups. In conclusion, light sources and thermocycling had no influence on the bond strength of brackets to bovine enamel. PMID:22189644

  7. The Impact of Thermocycling Process on the Dislodgement Force of Different Endodontic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermocycling (500 cycles, 5°C/55°C) on the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements including WMTA, Nano-WMTA, and Bioaggregate to root dentin. Forty-eight dentin slices were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16) and filled with Angelus WMTA, Nano-WMTA, or Bioaggregate. After incubation, half of the samples were thermocycled while the other half remained untreated. Push-out bond strength was calculated, and the modes of the bond failures were determined by SEM. The highest bond strength was seen in nonthermocycled Nano-WMTA samples and the lowest in thermocycled Bioaggregate samples. The significant differences between nonthermocycled and thermocycled samples were only noticed in WMTA and Nano-WMTA groups (P < 0.001). The mode of failure for thermocycled samples of all three cements was mostly cohesive. Thermocycling process can drastically affect the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements. The intrastructural damages occurred due to the thermal stresses, causing cohesive failures in set materials. Sealing property of endodontic cements which have experienced the thermal stresses can be jeopardized due to occlusal forces happening in furcation cites. PMID:24063004

  8. Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, A.; Boulle, N.; Lutfalla, G. S.

    Over the past few years there has been a considerable development of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR has now superseded conventional PCR techniques in many areas, e.g., the quantification of nucleic acids and genotyping. This new approach is based on the detection and quantification of a fluorescent signal proportional to the amount of amplicons generated by PCR. Real-time detection is achieved by coupling a thermocycler with a fluorimeter. This chapter discusses the general principles of quantitative real-time PCR, the different steps involved in implementing the technique, and some examples of applications in medicine. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides a way of obtaining a large number of copies of a double-stranded DNA fragment of known sequence. This DNA amplification technique, developed in 1985 by K. Mullis (Cetus Corporation), saw a spectacular development over the space of a few years, revolutionising the methods used up to then in molecular biology. Indeed, PCR has many applications, such as the detection of small amounts of DNA, cloning, and quantitative analysis (assaying), each of which will be discussed further below.

  9. Handheld Universal Diagnostic Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The rHEALTH technology is designed to shrink an entire hospital testing laboratory onto a handheld device. A physician or healthcare provider performs the test by collecting a fingerstick of blood from a patient. The tiny volume of blood is inserted into the rHEALTH device. Inside the device is a microfluidic chip that contains small channels about the width of a human hair. These channels help move the blood and analyze the blood sample. The rHEALTH sensor uses proprietary reagents called nanostrips, which are nanoscale test strips that enable the clinical assays. The readout is performed by laser-induced fluorescence. Overall, the time from blood collection through analysis is less than a minute.

  10. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  11. Handheld THz security imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duling, Irl N.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz energy, with its ability to penetrate clothing and non-conductive materials, has held much promise in the area of security scanning. Millimeter wave systems (300 GHz and below) have been widely deployed. These systems have used full two-dimensional surface imaging, and have resulted in privacy concerns. Pulsed terahertz imaging, can detect the presence of unwanted objects without the need for two-dimensional photographic imaging. With high-speed waveform acquisition it is possible to create handheld tools that can be used to locate anomalies under clothing or headgear looking exclusively at either single point waveforms or cross-sectional images which do not pose a privacy concern. Identification of the anomaly to classify it as a potential threat or a benign object is also possible.

  12. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  13. Thermocycling--the effects upon the compressive strength and abrasion resistance of three composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of thermocycling upon the compressive strength and abrasive wear resistance of three commercial composites Fulfil, P-50 and Herculite-XR. Specimens of each material were divided into five treatment groups comprising a control, and four different cycling and storage regimes. Tests for compressive strength and wear resistance were carried out. Prior to testing all specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 week. Three groups were stored at a temperature of 37 degrees C and the remaining two at 60 degrees C. Thereafter all groups that were thermocycled were subjected to 750 cycles of a thermocycling regime consisting of the cycle ACAB where A and B represent the fixed temperatures of 37 degrees C and 5 degrees C, and C, depending upon the treatment group, either 50 degrees C or 60 degrees C. One-way analyses of variance upon the compressive strength and wear factor data following the treatments highlighted significant differences in the mean compressive strength for all materials (Fulfil (P < 0.05), P-50 and Herculite-XR (P < 0.01)) and in the wear factor values for only Fulfil and P-50 (P < 0.001). Surprisingly, thermocycling P-50 with an upper temperature limit of 50 degrees C had catastrophic consequences upon the measured properties. It is concluded that some of the observed behaviour may have potentially detrimental consequences upon the long-term clinical durability of the materials tested. PMID:7996337

  14. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  15. Handheld hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Heikki; Aallos, Ville-Veikko; Holmlund, Christer; Malinen, Jouko; Mäkynen, Jussi

    2010-04-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new low cost hand-held staring hyperspectral imager for applications previously blocked by high cost of the instrumentation. The system is compatible with standard video and microscope lenses. The instrument can record 2D spatial images at several wavelength bands simultaneously. The concept of the hyperspectral imager has been published in SPIE Proc. 7474. The prototype fits in an envelope of 100 mm x 60 mm x 40 mm and its weight is ca. 300 g. The benefits of the new device compared to Acousto-Optic Tunable filter (AOTF) or Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter (LCTF) devices are small size and weight, speed of wavelength tuning, high optical throughput, independence of polarization state of incoming light and capability to record three wavelengths simultaneously. The operational wavelength range with Silicon-based CCD or CMOS sensors is 200 - 1100 nm and spectral resolution is 2 - 10 nm @ FWHM. Similar IR imagers can be built using InGaAs, InSb or MCT imaging sensors. The spatial resolution of the prototype is 480 x 750 pixels. It contains control system and memory for the image data acquisition. It operates either autonomously recording hyperspectral data cubes continuously or controlled by a laptop computer. The prototype was configured as a hyperspectral microscope for the spectral range 400 - 700 nm. The design of the hyperspectral imager, characterization results and sample measurement results are presented.

  16. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows an individual cell from the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  17. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  18. Pyxis handheld polarimetric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Vaden, Justin P.

    2016-05-01

    The instrumentation for measuring infrared polarization signatures has seen significant advancement over the last decade. Previous work has shown the value of polarimetric imagery for a variety of target detection scenarios including detection of manmade targets in clutter and detection of ground and maritime targets while recent work has shown improvements in contrast for aircraft detection and biometric markers. These data collection activities have generally used laboratory or prototype systems with limitations on the allowable amount of target motion or the sensor platform and usually require an attached computer for data acquisition and processing. Still, performance and sensitivity have been steadily getting better while size, weight, and power requirements have been getting smaller enabling polarimetric imaging for a greater or real world applications. In this paper, we describe Pyxis®, a microbolometer based imaging polarimeter that produces live polarimetric video of conventional, polarimetric, and fused image products. A polarization microgrid array integrated in the optical system captures all polarization states simultaneously and makes the system immune to motion artifacts of either the sensor or the scene. The system is battery operated, rugged, and weighs about a quarter pound, and can be helmet mounted or handheld. On board processing of polarization and fused image products enable the operator to see polarimetric signatures in real time. Both analog and digital outputs are possible with sensor control available through a tablet interface. A top level description of Pyxis® is given followed by performance characteristics and representative data.

  19. At Ease in the Handheld World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Eliot; Grohe, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Provides educational decision-makers with an overview of the offerings and issues related to adopting handheld computers. Describes several handheld products available to schools, including: Palm, iPAQ, Mindsurf, Symbol Technologies, Texas Instruments, and Gateway Handspring Visor. Compares handhelds to PCs, in terms of functionality, operating…

  20. New Clothing for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Clothing is influenced by many factors, trends, and social happenings. Much of what is worn today had utilitarian roots in the past. In the activitiy presented in this article, students will have the opportunity to redesign clothing for new trends, in this case, the explosion of handheld electronic devices.

  1. Hand-held medical robots.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Medical robots have evolved from autonomous systems to tele-operated platforms and mechanically-grounded, cooperatively-controlled robots. Whilst these approaches have seen both commercial and clinical success, uptake of these robots remains moderate because of their high cost, large physical footprint and long setup times. More recently, researchers have moved toward developing hand-held robots that are completely ungrounded and manipulated by surgeons in free space, in a similar manner to how conventional instruments are handled. These devices provide specific functions that assist the surgeon in accomplishing tasks that are otherwise challenging with manual manipulation. Hand-held robots have the advantages of being compact and easily integrated into the normal surgical workflow since there is typically little or no setup time. Hand-held devices can also have a significantly reduced cost to healthcare providers as they do not necessitate the complex, multi degree-of-freedom linkages that grounded robots require. However, the development of such devices is faced with many technical challenges, including miniaturization, cost and sterility, control stability, inertial and gravity compensation and robust instrument tracking. This review presents the emerging technical trends in hand-held medical robots and future development opportunities for promoting their wider clinical uptake. PMID:24927713

  2. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  3. A handheld point-of-care genomic diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Myers, Frank B; Henrikson, Richard H; Bone, Jennifer M; Bone, Jennifer; Lee, Luke P

    2013-01-01

    The rapid detection and identification of infectious disease pathogens is a critical need for healthcare in both developed and developing countries. As we gain more insight into the genomic basis of pathogen infectivity and drug resistance, point-of-care nucleic acid testing will likely become an important tool for global health. In this paper, we present an inexpensive, handheld, battery-powered instrument designed to enable pathogen genotyping in the developing world. Our Microfluidic Biomolecular Amplification Reader (µBAR) represents the convergence of molecular biology, microfluidics, optics, and electronics technology. The µBAR is capable of carrying out isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays with real-time fluorescence readout at a fraction of the cost of conventional benchtop thermocyclers. Additionally, the µBAR features cell phone data connectivity and GPS sample geotagging which can enable epidemiological surveying and remote healthcare delivery. The µBAR controls assay temperature through an integrated resistive heater and monitors real-time fluorescence signals from 60 individual reaction chambers using LEDs and phototransistors. Assays are carried out on PDMS disposable microfluidic cartridges which require no external power for sample loading. We characterize the fluorescence detection limits, heater uniformity, and battery life of the instrument. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of the HIV-1 integrase gene with the µBAR using the Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay. Although we focus on the detection of purified DNA here, LAMP has previously been demonstrated with a range of clinical samples, and our eventual goal is to develop a microfluidic device which includes on-chip sample preparation from raw samples. The µBAR is based entirely around open source hardware and software, and in the accompanying online supplement we present a full set of schematics, bill of materials, PCB layouts, CAD drawings

  4. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - Influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

    PubMed Central

    ATTIA, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to zirconia ceramic. Material and Methods A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm) were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia) and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent). Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6) according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA), silica-coating, (SC) (CoJet) and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI) (ESPE Sil). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2) according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus), self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem) and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix) were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm2). Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The o ther 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC) for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05). Results µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05). Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05) compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML) demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05) compared to RMGIC cement. Conclusions Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS. PMID:21710091

  5. Effect of Food Stimulated Liquids and Thermocycling on the Monomer Elution from a Nanofilled Composite

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Masumeh Hasani; Sadrai, Sima; Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Veisy, Nadia; Dehghan, Somaye

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of food simulating liquids and thermocycling on the elution of monomers from a nanofilled resin composite in different immersion times. Five Specimen discs were made from a nano-hybrid composite (Supreme 3M) for each group (Total = 180) and immersed in distilled water (control), citric acid, lactic acid, and 75% aqueous ethanol solution. The discs were removed after 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 1 wk, 4 wk, and 12 wk. Three groups of samples underwent thermocycling for 1000, 2000 and 3000 cycles. The solutes were analyzed with HPLC for detection of eluted monomers. The results showed that the amount of released TEGDMA was significantly higher than that of Bis-GMA; however, there were not any significant differences between the amount of released Bis-GMA and UDMA. Moreover, the highest amount of monomers was released from samples immersed in ethanol solution; samples immersed in citric acid and lactic acid significantly released more monomers than those immersed in distilled water. Furthermore, the immersion time in aqueous ethanol solution had an increasing effect on the release of monomers. In addition, the higher amounts of monomers were release from samples immersed in ethanol and citric acid which underwent a higher number of thermal cycles. In conclusion, food and drink stimulated liquids used in this study increased the amount of some of the monomers released from composite resin. Thermal shocks and storage time are other factors that increased the release of monomers from the composite resin PMID:23986791

  6. Effect of cement types on the tensile strength of metallic crowns submitted to thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Consani, Simonides; Santos, Julie Guzela dos; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between metallic cast crowns and tensile strength according to cement types submitted to thermocycling was studied. Seventy-two metallic crowns were cast with Verabond II Ni-Cr alloy and cemented in standardized preparations with 10 masculine tapering. Three types of finishing line (45-degree chamfered, 20-degree bevel shoulder and right shoulder) were made with diamond burs on bovine teeth. Twenty-four metallic crowns in each group were randomly subdivided into three subgroups of 8 samples each according to the cement used: SS White zinc phosphate cement, Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and Rely X resin cement and were submitted to thermocycling. Retention was evaluated according to tensile load required to displace the metallic cast crowns from tooth preparations with an Instron testing machine. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a statistically significant difference among luting materials, with greater results for Rely X resin cement (24.9 kgf) followed by SS White zinc phosphate cement (13.3 kgf) and Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement (10.1 kgf). The finishing line types did not influence the tensile resistance of the crowns fixed with the three cements. Increased tensile resistance of metallic crowns fixed on bovine teeth was obtained with resin cement, independent of the finishing line types. PMID:15057396

  7. Handheld Computers: A Boon for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazell, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    As I reflect on my many years as an elementary school principal, I realize how much more effective I would have been if I had owned a wireless handheld computer. This relatively new technology can provide considerable assistance to today?s principals and recent advancements have increased its functions and capacity. Handheld computers are…

  8. Envisioning the Handheld-Centric Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen; Soloway, Elliot

    2004-01-01

    While appropriate as an initial focus, it is time that the educational community move beyond an emphasis on 1:1 computing (each child having his/her own personal computer) to a vision of a handheld-centric classroom, where each child not only has his/her own personal, handheld computer, but also has access to networked PCs, probeware, digital…

  9. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  10. Choosing a Hand-Held Inventory Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lois; Hughes, Janet; Neff, Verne; Notartomas, Trish

    2008-01-01

    In spring of 2006, a task force was charged to look at the feasibility of acquiring hand-held inventory devices for the Pennsylvania State University Libraries (PSUL). The task force's charge was not to look at the whole concept of doing an inventory, but rather to focus on the feasibility of acquiring hand-held devices to use in an inventory.…

  11. Handheld Computer Software for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey; Murphy, Elizabeth Ann

    2005-01-01

    School nurses used computers in the 1980s, the Internet in the 1990s, and are embracing handheld computers in the first decade of the 21st century to improve their practice. The purpose of this article is to provide information about handheld computers and software applications that school nurses can use in day-to-day, emergency, and disaster…

  12. Improvement of the heat resistance of carbon steels by thermocycling thermochemical treatment with self-protective pastes based on boron carbide and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, I.; Sizov, I.; Mishigdorzhiyn, U.; Butukhanov, V.

    2016-02-01

    The positive effect after thermocycling thermochemical treatment on the structure and properties of formation of boroaluminized layer on steel 20 was established. The research results of metallographic analysis, x-ray spectrometry microanalysis and microhardness were given. The modes of thermocycling treatment (temperature, speed of heating and cooling) were carried out.

  13. Handheld erythema and bruise detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Duckworth, Mark G.; Yi, Dingrong; Caspall, Jayme J.; Wang, Jiwu; Zhao, Futing

    2008-03-01

    Visual inspection of intact skin is commonly used when assessing persons for pressure ulcers and bruises. Melanin masks skin discoloration hindering visual inspection in people with darkly pigmented skin. The objective of the project is to develop a point of care technology capable of detecting erythema and bruises in persons with darkly pigmented skin. Two significant hardware components, a color filter array and illumination system have been developed and tested. The color filter array targets four defined wavelengths and has been designed to fit onto a CMOS sensor. The crafting process generates a multilayer film on a glass substrate using vacuum ion beam splitter and lithographic techniques. The illumination system is based upon LEDs and targets these same pre-defined wavelengths. Together, these components are being used to create a small, handheld multispectral imaging device. Compared to other multi spectral technologies (multi prisms, optical-acoustic crystal and others), the design provides simple, low cost instrumentation that has many potential multi spectral imaging applications which require a handheld detector.

  14. Cross-Platform Evaluation of Commercial Real-Time SYBR Green RT-PCR Kits for Sensitive and Rapid Detection of European Bat Lyssavirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Peytavin de Garam, Carine; Schereffer, Jean Luc; Marchal, Clotilde; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of five two-step SYBR Green RT-qPCR kits and five one-step SYBR Green qRT-PCR kits using real-time PCR assays. Two real-time thermocyclers showing different throughput capacities were used. The analysed performance evaluation criteria included the generation of standard curve, reaction efficiency, analytical sensitivity, intra- and interassay repeatability as well as the costs and the practicability of kits, and thermocycling times. We found that the optimised one-step PCR assays had a higher detection sensitivity than the optimised two-step assays regardless of the machine used, while no difference was detected in reaction efficiency, R2 values, and intra- and interreproducibility between the two methods. The limit of detection at the 95% confidence level varied between 15 to 981 copies/µL and 41 to 171 for one-step kits and two-step kits, respectively. Of the ten kits tested, the most efficient kit was the Quantitect SYBR Green qRT-PCR with a limit of detection at 95% of confidence of 20 and 22 copies/µL on the thermocyclers Rotor gene Q MDx and MX3005P, respectively. The study demonstrated the pivotal influence of the thermocycler on PCR performance for the detection of rabies RNA, as well as that of the master mixes. PMID:25785274

  15. Cross-platform evaluation of commercial real-time SYBR green RT-PCR kits for sensitive and rapid detection of European bat Lyssavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Peytavin de Garam, Carine; Schereffer, Jean Luc; Marchal, Clotilde; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of five two-step SYBR Green RT-qPCR kits and five one-step SYBR Green qRT-PCR kits using real-time PCR assays. Two real-time thermocyclers showing different throughput capacities were used. The analysed performance evaluation criteria included the generation of standard curve, reaction efficiency, analytical sensitivity, intra- and interassay repeatability as well as the costs and the practicability of kits, and thermocycling times. We found that the optimised one-step PCR assays had a higher detection sensitivity than the optimised two-step assays regardless of the machine used, while no difference was detected in reaction efficiency, R (2) values, and intra- and interreproducibility between the two methods. The limit of detection at the 95% confidence level varied between 15 to 981 copies/µL and 41 to 171 for one-step kits and two-step kits, respectively. Of the ten kits tested, the most efficient kit was the Quantitect SYBR Green qRT-PCR with a limit of detection at 95% of confidence of 20 and 22 copies/µL on the thermocyclers Rotor gene Q MDx and MX3005P, respectively. The study demonstrated the pivotal influence of the thermocycler on PCR performance for the detection of rabies RNA, as well as that of the master mixes. PMID:25785274

  16. Impact of Daily Thermocycles on Hatching Rhythms, Larval Performance and Sex Differentiation of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Natalia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc; Vera, Luisa M.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    In the wild, water temperature cycles daily: it warms up after sunrise, and cools rapidly after sunset. Surprisingly, the impact of such daily thermocycles during the early development of fish remains neglected. We investigated the influence of constant vs daily thermocycles in zebrafish, from embryo development to sexual differentiation, by applying four temperature regimens: two constant (24°C and 28°C) and two daily thermocycles: 28:24°C, TC (thermophase coinciding with daytime, and cryophase coinciding with night-time) and 24:28°C, CT (opposite to TC) in a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (LD). Embryo development was temperature-dependent but enhanced at 28°C and TC. Hatching rhythms were diurnal (around 4 h after lights on), but temperature- and cycle-sensitive, since hatching occurred sooner at 28°C (48 hours post fertilization; hpf) while it was delayed at 24°C (96 hpf). Under TC, hatching occurred at 72 hpf, while under CT hatching displayed two peaks (at 70 hpf and 94 hpf). In constant light (LL) or darkness (DD), hatching rhythms persisted with tau close to 24 h, suggesting a clock-controlled “gating” mechanism. Under 28°C or TC, larvae showed the best performance (high growth and survival, and low malformations). The sex ratio was strongly influenced by temperature, as the proportion of females was higher in CT and TC (79 and 83% respectively), contrasting with 28°C and 24°C, which led to more males (83 and 76%). Ovarian aromatase (cyp19a) expression in females was highest in TC and CT (6.5 and 4.6 fold higher than at 28°C, respectively); while anti-müllerian hormone (amh) expression in males increased in testis at 24°C (3.6 fold higher compared to TC) and particularly at 28°C (14.3 fold increase). Taken together, these findings highlight the key role of environmental cycles during early development, which shaped the daily rhythms in fish embryo and larvae, and ultimately influenced sex differentiation. PMID:23284912

  17. A handheld real time thermal cycler for bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James A; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Karns, Jeffrey S; Shelton, Daniel R; Cooper, Mary; Gbakima, Aiah; Koopman, Ronald P

    2003-08-15

    The handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of electrical power at wavelengths of 490 nm (blue) and 525 nm (green), allowing detection of the dyes FAM and JOE/TAMRA. Results are displayed in real time as bar graphs, and up to three, 4-sample assays can be run on the charge of the 12 V portable battery pack. The HANAA was evaluated for detection of defined Escherichia coli strains, and wild-type colonies isolated from stream water, using PCR for the lac Z and Tir genes. PCR reactions using SYBR Green dye allowed detection of E. coli ATCC 11775 and E. coli O157:H7 cells in under 30 min of assay time; however, background fluorescence associated with dye binding to nonspecific PCR products was present. DNA extracted from three isolates of Bacillus anthracis Ames, linked to a bioterrorism incident in Washington DC in October 2001, were also successfully tested on the HANAA using primers for the vrrA and capA genes. Positive results were observed at 32 and 22 min of assay time, respectively. A TaqMan probe specific to the aroQ gene of Erwinia herbicola was tested on the HANAA and when 500 cells were used as template, positive results were observed after only 7 min of assay time. Background fluorescence associated with the use of the probe was negligible. The HANAA is unique in offering real time PCR in a handheld format suitable for field use; a commercial version of the instrument, offering six reaction chambers, is available as of Fall 2002. PMID:12788554

  18. Effect of thermocycling on the durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives on dentin.

    PubMed

    Sangwichit, Ketkamon; Kingkaew, Ruksaphon; Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare bond strengths of adhesives with/without thermocycling and to analyze the micromorphology of resindentin interfaces. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared and divided into eight groups to bond with four etch-and-rinse adhesives (Optibond FL, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Optibond Solo Plus, and Single Bond 2) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Adper SE Plus, Clearfil S(3) Bond and Adper Easy Bond). Specimens were further divided into two subgroups subjected for with/without thermocycling and then subjected to both micro-tensile test and resin-dentin interface evaluation. The results revealed that there were significant differences in bond strength between the groups with and without thermocycling for all etch-and-rinse groups and for the Adper Easy Bond self-etch group (p<0.01). Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated highly durable bond strengths. Furthermore, more silver ion uptake was observed at the resin-dentin interfaces for all etch-and-rinse adhesives and Adper SE Plus and Adper Easy Bond after thermocycling. PMID:27251990

  19. Video Browsing on Handheld Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürst, Wolfgang

    Recent improvements in processing power, storage space, and video codec development enable users now to playback video on their handheld devices in a reasonable quality. However, given the form factor restrictions of such a mobile device, screen size still remains a natural limit and - as the term "handheld" implies - always will be a critical resource. This is not only true for video but any data that is processed on such devices. For this reason, developers have come up with new and innovative ways to deal with large documents in such limited scenarios. For example, if you look at the iPhone, innovative techniques such as flicking have been introduced to skim large lists of text (e.g. hundreds of entries in your music collection). Automatically adapting the zoom level to, for example, the width of table cells when double tapping on the screen enables reasonable browsing of web pages that have originally been designed for large, desktop PC sized screens. A multi touch interface allows you to easily zoom in and out of large text documents and images using two fingers. In the next section, we will illustrate that advanced techniques to browse large video files have been developed in the past years, as well. However, if you look at state-of-the-art video players on mobile devices, normally just simple, VCR like controls are supported (at least at the time of this writing) that only allow users to just start, stop, and pause video playback. If supported at all, browsing and navigation functionality is often restricted to simple skipping of chapters via two single buttons for backward and forward navigation and a small and thus not very sensitive timeline slider.

  20. The effect of IDS (immediate dentin sealing) on dentin bond strength under various thermocycling periods

    PubMed Central

    Leesungbok, Richard; Lee, Sang-Min; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Suk-Won; Lee, Do Yun; Im, Byung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) on bond strength of ceramic restoration under various thermocycling periods with DBA (dentin bonding agent system). MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty freshly extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (1 control and 4 experimental groups) of 10 teeth. We removed enamel layer of sound teeth and embedded them which will proceed to be IDS, using All Bond II. A thermocycling was applied to experimental groups for 1, 2, 7, 14 days respectively and was not applied to control group. IPS Empress II for ceramic was acid-etched with ceramic etchant (9.5% HF) and silane was applied. Each ceramic disc was bonded to specimens with Duo-link, dual curable resin cement by means of light curing for 100 seconds. After the cementation procedures, shear bond strength measurement and SEM analysis of the fractured surface were done. The data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences between 4 experimental groups and control group, however the mean value started to decrease in group 7d, and group 14d showed the lowest mean bond strength in all groups. Also, group 7d and 14d showed distinct exposed dentin and collapsed hybrid layer was observed in SEM analysis. CONCLUSION In the present study, it can be concluded that ceramic restorations like a laminate veneer restoration should be bonded using resin cement within one week after IDS procedure. PMID:26140174

  1. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  2. Handheld ultrasonic concealed weapon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Norbert C.; Doft, Frank; Breuner, Dennis; Felber, Franklin S.

    2001-02-01

    A handheld, battery-operated prototype of a concealed weapon detector has been built and tested. Designed to detect both metallic and non-metallic weapons, the sensor utilizes focused ultrasound (40 kHz frequency) to remotely detect concealed objects from beyond arm's length out to a range of about 12 feet (4 meters). The detector can be used in prison settings, by officers in the field to allow for stand-off frisking of suspects, and to supplement security at courthouse entrances and other monitored portals. The detector emits an audible alarm (with provision for an earphone jack) as well as a visible light-bar indicator when an object is detected. A high intensity aiming light, with momentary switch, allows the user to accurately determine the location of the concealed object. Current efforts are aimed at increasing the probability of detection, reducing the false-alarm rate, and extending the range of detectability out to 20 feet. Plans for accomplishing these tasks will be presented together with data showing the effective range and probability of detection for the present system.

  3. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  4. Thermocycling effect on microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic using Er:YAG and tribochemical silica coating as surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana Luísa; Ramos, João Carlos; Santos-del Riego, Sérgio; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermocycling effect on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of different self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia using tribochemical silica coating Rocatec™ (ROC) and Er:YAG as surface conditioners. Two hundred forty square-like zirconia samples were polished and randomly assigned in four groups according surface treatment applied as follows: (1) no treatment (NT), (2) silica coating with ROC, 3) Er:YAG laser irradiation (LAS: 2.940 nm, 200 mJ; 10 Hz), and (4) laser followed by Rocatec™ (LAROC). Each group was divided into two subgroups according the resin tested as follows: (A) BiFix SE (BIF) and (B) Clearfil SA (CLE). After 24 h, half of the specimens from each subgroup were tested. The other half was stored and thermocycled (5-55 °C/5,000 cycles). A μSBS test was performed using a universal testing machine (cross head speed = 0.5 mm/min). Failure modes were recorded and observed by scanning electronic microscopy. Data was analyzed with ANOVA, Student's t test, and chi-square tests, and linear regression was performed (p < 0.05). Before thermocycling, both cements showed higher μSBS results with ROC and LAROC. After aging, (1) all BIF specimens evidenced severely decreased adhesion with mostly adhesive failures and (2) CLE maintained the initial results in ROC and LAROC groups, performing better with ROC. Thermocycling did not negatively influence the resin-zirconia μSBS results in the self-adhesive resin cement containing 10-MDP when used on zirconia surface coated with silica, independently of previous Er:YAG surface treatment. PMID:24013623

  5. Vibration absorber modeling for handheld machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Mustafa, Mohd Muhyiddin; Jamil, Jazli Firdaus; Salim, Mohd Azli; Ramli, Faiz Redza

    2015-05-01

    Handheld machine tools produce continuous vibration to the users during operation. This vibration causes harmful effects to the health of users for repeated operations in a long period of time. In this paper, a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is designed and modeled to reduce the vibration generated by the handheld machine tool. Several designs and models of vibration absorbers with various stiffness properties are simulated, tested and optimized in order to diminish the vibration. Ordinary differential equation is used to derive and formulate the vibration phenomena in the machine tool with and without the DVA. The final transfer function of the DVA is later analyzed using commercial available mathematical software. The DVA with optimum properties of mass and stiffness is developed and applied on the actual handheld machine tool. The performance of the DVA is experimentally tested and validated by the final result of vibration reduction.

  6. Handheld computers in medicine: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Horsley, A; Forster, L

    2005-07-01

    Handheld computers are now a common sight in medicine, but there are scarce data on who actually uses them and what functions are found to be most useful. This is the first study of handheld computer use in a British hospital, and shows that there is already considerable use and acceptance of the technology, with 22 of 55 (40%) physicians possessing and using such a device. Doctors in training grades are more likely to make use of medical software, particularly textbooks, calculators, and formularies. The main barriers to greater use of this technology were cost of software and poor applicability to UK practice. PMID:15998828

  7. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  8. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  9. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not...

  15. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not...

  20. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not...

  1. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from...

  2. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  3. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  4. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  5. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from...

  6. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be...

  7. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from...

  8. Trajectories in Operating a Handheld Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuer, Herbert; Sulzenbruck, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied the trajectories of the hand and of the tip of a handheld sliding first-order lever in aiming movements. With this kind of tool, straight trajectories of the hand are generally associated with curved trajectories of the tip of the lever and vice versa. Trajectories of the tip of the lever exhibited smaller deviations from…

  9. Handheld spectrometers: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombe, Richard A.

    2013-05-01

    "Small" spectrometers fall into three broad classes: small versions of laboratory instruments, providing data, subsequently processed on a PC; dedicated analyzers, providing actionable information to an individual operator; and process analyzers, providing quantitative or semi-quantitative information to a process controller. The emphasis of this paper is on handheld dedicated analyzers. Many spectrometers have historically been large, possible fragile, expensive and complicated to use. The challenge over the last dozen years, as instruments have moved into the field, has been to make spectrometers smaller, affordable, rugged, easy-to-use, but most of all capable of delivering actionable results. Actionable results can dramatically improve the efficiency of a testing process and transform the way business is done. There are several keys to this handheld spectrometer revolution. Consumer electronics has given us powerful mobile platforms, compact batteries, clearly visible displays, new user interfaces, etc., while telecomm has revolutionized miniature optics, sources and detectors. While these technologies enable miniature spectrometers themselves, actionable information has demanded the development of rugged algorithms for material confirmation, unknown identification, mixture analysis and detection of suspicious materials in unknown matrices. These algorithms are far more sophisticated than the `correlation' or `dot-product' methods commonly used in benchtop instruments. Finally, continuing consumer electronics advances now enable many more technologies to be incorporated into handheld spectrometers, including Bluetooth, wireless, WiFi, GPS, cameras and bar code readers, and the continued size shrinkage of spectrometer `engines' leads to the prospect of dual technology or `hyphenated' handheld instruments.

  10. [The design of handheld fast ECG detector].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Zhang, Genxuan; Tsau, Young

    2013-03-01

    A new handheld fast ECG detector based on low gain amplifier, the high resolution analog to digital converter, the real-time digital filter, fast P-QRS-T wave detection and abstraction algorithm was designed. The results showed that the ECG detector can meet the requirements of fast detecting heart rate and ECG P-QRS-T waveforms. PMID:23777065

  11. Native denaturation differential scanning fluorimetry: Determining the effect of urea using a quantitative real-time thermocycler.

    PubMed

    Childers, Christine L; Green, Stuart R; Dawson, Neal J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-09-01

    The effect of protein stability on kinetic function is monitored with many techniques that often require large amounts of expensive substrates and specialized equipment not universally available. We present differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), a simple high-throughput assay performed in real-time thermocyclers, as a technique for analysis of protein unfolding. Furthermore, we demonstrate a correlation between the half-maximal rate of protein unfolding (Knd), and protein unfolding by urea (I50). This demonstrates that DSF methods can determine the structural stability of an enzyme's active site and can compare the relative structural stability of homologous enzymes with a high degree of sequence similarity. PMID:27296634

  12. Cell Micromanipulation with an Active Handheld Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Ettensohn, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the use of an active handheld micromanipulator, known as Micron, for micromanipulation of cells. The device enables users to manipulate objects on the order of tens of microns in size, with the natural ease of use of a fully handheld tool. Micron senses its own position using a purpose-built microscale optical tracker, estimates the erroneous or undesired component of hand motion, and actively corrects it by deflecting its own tool tip using piezoelectric actuators. Benchtop experiments in tip positioning show that active compensation can reduce positioning error by up to 51% compared to unaided performance. Preliminary experiments in bisection of sea urchin embryos exhibit an increased success rate when performed with the help of Micron. PMID:21096452

  13. Microfluidic MEMS hand-held flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Maleki, Teimour; Zordan, Michael D.; Reece, Lisa M.; Byrnes, Ron; Jones, Alan; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2011-02-01

    Due to a number of recent technological advances, a hand-held flow cytometer can be achieved by use of semiconductor illuminators, optical sensors (all battery powered) and sensitive cell markers such as immuno-quantum dot (Qdot) labels. The specific application described is of a handheld blood analyzer that can quickly process a drop of whole, unfractionated human peripheral blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs) and further fluorescence analysis of Qdot labeled WBC subsets. Various microfluidic patterns were fabricated in PDMS and used to characterize flow of single cells and magnetic deflection of magnetically labeled cells. An LED excitation, avalanche photodiode detection system (SensL Technologies, Ltd., Cork, Ireland) was used for immuno-Qdot detection of WBC subsets. A static optical setup was used to determine the sensitivity of the detection system. In this work we demonstrate: valve-less, on-chip magnetic sorting of immunomagnetically labeled white blood cells, bright Qdot labeling of lymphocytes, and counting of labeled white blood cells. Comparisons of these results with conventional flow cytometric analyses are reported. Sample preparation efficiency was determined by labeling of isolated white blood cells. Appropriate flow rates were determined for optical detection and confirmed with flowing particles. Several enabling technologies required for a truly portable, battery powered, hand-held flow cytometer for use in future point-of-care diagnostic devices have been demonstrated. The combining of these technologies into an integrated handheld instrument is in progress and results on whole blood cell analysis are to be reported in another paper.

  14. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  15. 76 FR 22918 - In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components... States after importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  16. Bond strength of acrylic teeth to denture base resin after various surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco A; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the durability of adhesion between acrylic teeth and denture base acrylic resin. The base surfaces of 24 acrylic teeth were flatted and submitted to 4 surface treatment methods: SM1 (control): No SM; SM2: application of a methyl methacrylate-based bonding agent (Vitacol); SM3: air abrasion with 30-microm silicone oxide plus silane; SM4: SM3 plus SM2. A heat-polymerized acrylic resin was applied to the teeth. Thereafter, bar specimens were produced for the microtensile test at dry and thermocyled conditions (60 days water storage followed by 12,000 cycles). The results showed that bond strength was significantly affected by the SM (P < .0001) (SM4 = SM2 > SM3 > SM1) and storage regimens (P < .0001) (dry > thermocycled). The methyl methacrylate-based adhesive showed the highest bond strength. PMID:17455445

  17. Handheld magnetic sensor for measurement of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, K.; Rajamani, R.

    2012-04-01

    This letter develops an analytical formulation for measurement of tension in a string using a handheld sensor. By gently pushing the sensor against the string, the tension in the string can be obtained. An experimental sensor prototype is constructed to verify the analytical formulation. The centimeter-sized prototype utilizes three moving pistons and magnetic field based measurements of their positions. Experimental data show that the sensor can accurately measure tension on a bench top rig. The developed sensor could be useful in a variety of orthopedic surgical procedures, including knee replacement, hip replacement, ligament repair, shoulder stabilization, and tendon repair.

  18. Hand-held and automated breast ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Kimme-Smith, C.

    1985-01-01

    The book is a guide for physicians and technologists who use US as an adjunct to mammography; it carefully outlines the pros and cons of US of the breast and its role in the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. After an introduction that discusses the philosophy of breast US, the chapters cover the physics of US and instrumentation (both hand-held transducers as well as automated water path scanners), then proceed to a discussion of the normal breast. Sections on benign disorders, malignant lesions, and pitfalls of diagnosis are followed by quiz cases.

  19. A Cognitive Style Perspective to Handheld Devices: Customization vs. Personalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chen-Wei; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2016-01-01

    Handheld devices are widely applied to support open and distributed learning, where students are diverse. On the other hand, customization and personalization can be applied to accommodate students' diversities. However, paucity of research compares the effects of customization and personalization in the context of handheld devices. To this end, a…

  20. Handheld Technology Acceptance in Radiologic Science Education and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to,…

  1. Code Talk: Student Discourse and Participation with Networked Handhelds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the potential of networked handheld computers to support collaborative problem solving in small groups. Drawing on data from a middle school mathematics classroom equipped with a wireless handheld network, I argue that the sharing of mathematical objects through interactive devices broadens the "bandwidth" of classroom…

  2. Evaluation of a Handheld Data Collection Interface for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Cynthia Sims; Jones, Tricia; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2004-01-01

    Despite a rise in the use of handheld computers in classrooms, meaningful learning with personal digital assistant (PDA) technology remains poorly studied. This article reports results from an evaluation of customized handheld data collection software, the BioKIDS Sequence, which was used during an 8-week biodiversity curriculum unit by 5th and…

  3. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before...

  4. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before...

  5. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before...

  6. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before...

  7. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57.7053 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before...

  8. Educational Uses of Handheld Devices: What Are the Consequences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yanjie

    2007-01-01

    Handheld devices are being used increasingly in schools and higher education. Many researchers assume that the use of these devices will exert considerable impact on educational practices. However, to date, it appears that such use has not been sustainable and transferable. The impact of educational uses of handheld devices does not yet seem…

  9. Learning Object Design Considerations for Small-Screen Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Daniel; Hedberg, John

    2008-01-01

    The key limitation of handheld technology for the delivery of learning objects is the small screen that is available for effective display. The smallness of the screen not only adversely affects the clarity, but it also negatively impacts on the acceptance and integration of this potentially useful technology in education. Handheld devices are…

  10. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  11. A hand-held immaterial volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Antti; Rakkolainen, Ismo

    2014-03-01

    We have created an ultralight, movable, "immaterial" fogscreen. It is based on the fogscreen mid-air imaging technology. The hand-held unit is roughly the size and weight of an ordinary toaster. If the screen is tracked, it can be swept in the air to create mid-air slices of volumetric objects, or to show augmented reality (AR) content on top of real objects. Interfacing devices and methodologies, such as hand and gesture trackers, camera-based trackers and object recognition, can make the screen interactive. The user can easily interact with any physical object or virtual information, as the screen is permeable. Any real objects can be seen through the screen, instead of e.g., through a video-based augmented reality screen. It creates a mixed reality setup where both the real world object and the augmented reality content can be viewed and interacted with simultaneously. The hand-held mid-air screen can be used e.g., as a novel collaborating or classroom tool for individual students or small groups.

  12. Visual SLAM for Handheld Monocular Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Grasa, Óscar G; Bernal, Ernesto; Casado, Santiago; Gil, Ismael; Montiel, J M M

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) methods provide real-time estimation of 3-D models from the sole input of a handheld camera, routinely in mobile robotics scenarios. Medical endoscopic sequences mimic a robotic scenario in which a handheld camera (monocular endoscope) moves along an unknown trajectory while observing an unknown cavity. However, the feasibility and accuracy of SLAM methods have not been extensively validated with human in vivo image sequences. In this work, we propose a monocular visual SLAM algorithm tailored to deal with medical image sequences in order to provide an up-to-scale 3-D map of the observed cavity and the endoscope trajectory at frame rate. The algorithm is validated over synthetic data and human in vivo sequences corresponding to 15 laparoscopic hernioplasties where accurate ground-truth distances are available. It can be concluded that the proposed procedure is: 1) noninvasive, because only a standard monocular endoscope and a surgical tool are used; 2) convenient, because only a hand-controlled exploratory motion is needed; 3) fast, because the algorithm provides the 3-D map and the trajectory in real time; 4) accurate, because it has been validated with respect to ground-truth; and 5) robust to inter-patient variability, because it has performed successfully over the validation sequences. PMID:24107925

  13. Clear differences in hand-held dermoscopes.

    PubMed

    Blum, Andreas; Jaworski, Simone

    2006-12-01

    In order to correctly evaluate melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin tumors using a hand-held dermoscope, it is essential to have adequate magnification and illumination to allow the differential structures to be clearly seen. One example of a dysplastic compound melanocytic nevus and a thin malignant melanoma were examined with five different handheld dermoscopes (Heine Delta 10, Heine Delta 20, Dermogenius and Dermlite Foto 37 with and without glass plate) in order to assess the image quality. The magnification was identical in all dermoscopes. In the newer dermoscopes (Heine Delta 20, Dermogenius and Dermlite Foto 37 with and without glass plate) the light sources were clearly improved, as now 6 or 24 LEDs, respectively, are employed. This distinctly improved the image quality with regard to color and visible differential structures compared to the dermoscope (Heine Delta 10) with only one light source. Clear differences is assessing differential structures were seen in one dermoscope (Dermlite Foto 37 without glass plate). Using this dermoscope without any glass plate or liquid between the dermoscope and the skin, exophytic tumors were better visualized in a three-dimensional fashion but fewer differential structures were seen. PMID:17176414

  14. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  15. Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

    2007-01-01

    One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

  16. Compact handheld digital holographic microscopy system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; Sui, Liansheng; Asundi, Anand

    2009-12-01

    Development of a commercial prototype of reflection handheld digital holographic microscope system is presented in this paper. The concept is based on lensless magnification using diverging wave geometry and the miniaturized optical design which provides a compact packaged system. The optical geometry design provides the same curvature of object and reference waves and thus phase aberration is automatically compensated. The basic methodology of the system is developed and it further explored for 3D imaging, static deflection and vibration measurements applications. Based on the developed methodology an user-friendly software is developed suitable for industrial shop floor environment. The applications of the system are presented for 3D imaging, static deflection measurement and vibration analysis of MEMS samples. The developed system is well suitable for the testing of MEMS and Microsystems samples, with full-field and real-time features, for static and dynamic inspection and characterization and to monitor micro-fabrication process.

  17. Compact handheld digital holographic microscopy system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; Sui, Liansheng; Asundi, Anand

    2010-03-01

    Development of a commercial prototype of reflection handheld digital holographic microscope system is presented in this paper. The concept is based on lensless magnification using diverging wave geometry and the miniaturized optical design which provides a compact packaged system. The optical geometry design provides the same curvature of object and reference waves and thus phase aberration is automatically compensated. The basic methodology of the system is developed and it further explored for 3D imaging, static deflection and vibration measurements applications. Based on the developed methodology an user-friendly software is developed suitable for industrial shop floor environment. The applications of the system are presented for 3D imaging, static deflection measurement and vibration analysis of MEMS samples. The developed system is well suitable for the testing of MEMS and Microsystems samples, with full-field and real-time features, for static and dynamic inspection and characterization and to monitor micro-fabrication process.

  18. Optical links in handheld multimedia devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, S.; Duis, J.; Miller, R.

    2008-04-01

    Ever emerging applications in handheld multimedia devices such as mobile phones, laptop computers, portable video games and digital cameras requiring increased screen resolutions are driving higher aggregate bitrates between host processor and display(s) enabling services such as mobile video conferencing, video on demand and TV broadcasting. Larger displays and smaller phones require complex mechanical 3D hinge configurations striving to combine maximum functionality with compact building volumes. Conventional galvanic interconnections such as Micro-Coax and FPC carrying parallel digital data between host processor and display module may produce Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and bandwidth limitations caused by small cable size and tight cable bends. To reduce the number of signals through a hinge, the mobile phone industry, organized in the MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface) alliance, is currently defining an electrical interface transmitting serialized digital data at speeds >1Gbps. This interface allows for electrical or optical interconnects. Above 1Gbps optical links may offer a cost effective alternative because of their flexibility, increased bandwidth and immunity to EMI. This paper describes the development of optical links for handheld communication devices. A cable assembly based on a special Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) selected for its mechanical durability is terminated with a small form factor molded lens assembly which interfaces between an 850nm VCSEL transmitter and a receiving device on the printed circuit board of the display module. A statistical approach based on a Lean Design For Six Sigma (LDFSS) roadmap for new product development tries to find an optimum link definition which will be robust and low cost meeting the power consumption requirements appropriate for battery operated systems.

  19. Evaluating change in user error when using ruggedized handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Angela Brooke; Strawderman, Lesley; Burch, Reuben

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of handheld mobile devices used today and the increasing dependency on them in the workplace makes understanding how users interact with these devices critical. This study seeks to understand how user error changes based on user age as well as input content type on ruggedized handheld devices. Participants completed data entry tasks of word and character input on two different devices, a physical keypad and touchscreen device. The number of errors and types of error, corrected and permanent were collected for each participant. Based on results on the study, touchscreen devices proved to be the optimal ruggedized handheld device to minimize user error. PMID:26154226

  20. PCR microfluidic devices for DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xu, Jinliang; Ma, Wenli; Zheng, Wenling

    2006-01-01

    The miniaturization of biological and chemical analytical devices by micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology has posed a vital influence on such fields as medical diagnostics, microbial detection and other bio-analysis. Among many miniaturized analytical devices, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microchip/microdevices are studied extensively, and thus great progress has been made on aspects of on-chip micromachining (fabrication, bonding and sealing), choice of substrate materials, surface chemistry and architecture of reaction vessel, handling of necessary sample fluid, controlling of three or two-step temperature thermocycling, detection of amplified nucleic acid products, integration with other analytical functional units such as sample preparation, capillary electrophoresis (CE), DNA microarray hybridization, etc. However, little has been done on the review of above-mentioned facets of the PCR microchips/microdevices including the two formats of flow-through and stationary chamber in spite of several earlier reviews [Zorbas, H. Miniature continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: a breakthrough? Angew Chem Int Ed 1999; 38 (8):1055-1058; Krishnan, M., Namasivayam, V., Lin, R., Pal, R., Burns, M.A. Microfabricated reaction and separation systems. Curr Opin Biotechnol 2001; 12:92-98; Schneegabeta, I., Köhler, J.M. Flow-through polymerase chain reactions in chip themocyclers. Rev Mol Biotechnol 2001; 82:101-121; deMello, A.J. DNA amplification: does 'small' really mean 'efficient'? Lab Chip 2001; 1: 24N-29N; Mariella, Jr. R. MEMS for bio-assays. Biomed Microdevices 2002; 4 (2):77-87; deMello AJ. Microfluidics: DNA amplification moves on. Nature 2003; 422:28-29; Kricka, L.J., Wilding, P. Microchip PCR. Anal BioAnal Chem 2003; 377:820-825]. In this review, we survey the advances of the above aspects among the PCR microfluidic devices in detail. Finally, we also illuminate the potential and practical applications of PCR microfluidics to some fields such

  1. Improving qPCR telomere length assays: Controlling for well position effects increases statistical power

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Dan T.A.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Telomere length (TL) is commonly measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Although easier than the southern blot of terminal restriction fragments (TRF) TL measurement method, one drawback of qPCR is that it introduces greater measurement error and thus reduces the statistical power of analyses. To address a potential source of measurement error, we consider the effect of well position on qPCR TL measurements. Methods qPCR TL data from 3,638 people run on a Bio-Rad iCycler iQ are reanalyzed here. To evaluate measurement validity, correspondence with TRF, age and between mother and offspring are examined. Results First, we present evidence for systematic variation in qPCR TL measurements in relation to thermocycler well position. Controlling for these well-position effects consistently improves measurement validity and yields estimated improvements in statistical power equivalent to increasing sample sizes by 16%. We additionally evaluated the linearity of the relationships between telomere and single copy gene control amplicons and between qPCR and TRF measures. We find that, unlike some previous reports, our data exhibit linear relationships. We introduce the standard error in percent, a superior method for quantifying measurement error compared to the commonly used coefficient of variation. Using this measure, we find that excluding samples with high measurement error does not improve measurement validity. Conclusions Future studies using block-based thermocyclers should consider well position effects. Since additional information can be gleaned from well position corrections, re-running analyses of previous results with well position correction could serve as an independent test of the validity of these results. PMID:25757675

  2. Effect of thermocycling on the bond strength of composite resin to bur and laser treated composite resin.

    PubMed

    Özel Bektas, Özden; Eren, Digdem; Herguner Siso, Seyda; Akin, Gulsah E

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of two different surface treatments (Er:YAG laser and bur) and three different numbers of thermal cycling (no aging, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 cycles) on the micro-shear bond strength of repaired composite resin. Ninety-six composite blocks (4 mm × 4 mm × 1 mm) obtained with a micromatrix hybrid composite were prepared. The composite blocks were then randomly divided into four groups (n = 24), according to the thermal cycling procedure: (1) stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h (control group), (2) 1,000 cycles, (3) 5,000 cycles, and (4) 10,000 cycles. After aging, the blocks were further subdivided into two subgroups (n = 12), according to surface treatment. Bur and laser-treated composite surfaces were treated with an etch&rinse adhesive system. In addition, a microhybrid composite resin was bonded to the surfaces via polyethylene tubing. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength test by a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0 and 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α = 0.05) for micro-shear bond strengths. After conducting a bond strength test, it was found that the laser and bur-treated specimens had similar results. Aging with 10,000 thermocycles significantly affected the repair bond strength of composite resins. PMID:21833556

  3. HANDHELD DETAIL OF BRIDGE IN FORMER LOCATION SPANNING GANARGUA CREEK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HANDHELD DETAIL OF BRIDGE IN FORMER LOCATION SPANNING GANARGUA CREEK (MACEDON, NY), VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. - Aldrich Towing-Path Change Bridge, Spanning New York State Heritage Trail, Aqueduct Park (moved from Macedon, NY), Palmyra, Wayne County, NY

  4. Developing an SDK of usability-engineered handheld evaluation aid.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiao-Ling; Chang, Polun

    2007-01-01

    Handheld devices are useful tools to collect date at practice settings. However, it takes time and is very challenging for healthcare professionals to design a usability-engineered system. This study is to upgrade our practically-proven easy to use and effective handheld systems to an SDK. The SDK are composed of Excel-based form designer and Palm-based template. We have successfully tested the prototype in developing a 407-question homecare evaluation support system. PMID:18694082

  5. Electronic, Hand-Held, Wireless Text-And-Graphics Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed electronic, hand-held, wireless viewer presents written material to reader in way that closely resembles that of paper reading material. Viewer presents text and graphics like those normally found in books, newspapers, and magazines. Its hand-held and wireless features enable it to be used in positions and areas where books and magazines are normally used. Device consists primarily of two parts: the receiver/information store and viewing screen.

  6. Automated Hand-Held UXO Detection, Classification & Discrimination Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Thomas H.

    2000-06-12

    The research focused on procedures for target discrimination and classification using hand-held EMI sensors. The idea is to have a small, portable sensor that can be operated in a sweep or similar pattern in front of the operator, and that is capable of distinguishing between buried UXO and clutter on the spot. Curing Phase 1, we developed the processing techniques for distinguishing between buried UXO and clutter using the EM61-HH hand-held metal detector.

  7. Improvement and automation of a real-time PCR assay for vaginal fluids.

    PubMed

    De Vittori, E; Giampaoli, S; Barni, F; Baldi, M; Berti, A; Ripani, L; Romano Spica, V

    2016-05-01

    The identification of vaginal fluids is crucial in forensic science. Several molecular protocols based on PCR amplification of mfDNA (microflora DNA) specific for vaginal bacteria are now available. Unfortunately mfDNA extraction and PCR reactions require manual optimization of several steps. The aim of present study was the verification of a partial automatization of vaginal fluids identification through two instruments widely diffused in forensic laboratories: EZ1 Advanced robot and Rotor Gene Q 5Plex HRM. Moreover, taking advantage of 5-plex thermocycler technology, the ForFluid kit performances were improved by expanding the mfDNA characterization panel with a new bacterial target for vaginal fluids and with an internal positive control (IPC) to monitor PCR inhibition. Results underlined the feasibility of a semi-automated extraction of mfDNA using a BioRobot and demonstrated the analytical improvements of the kit. PMID:27022861

  8. [Hand-held echocardiography in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Mondillo, Sergio; Galderisi, Maurizio

    2005-05-01

    In the last years the industry has created echocardiographic portable machines of reduced size, available for a growing number of operators. After the first experiences of the '70s, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) is earned interesting commercial positions. The transportability of these machines allows to perform examinations outside the echo-lab and provides diagnostic information in heterogeneous locations such as intensive care unit, emergency room and outpatient structures, at the bedside and even in ambulance. HHE can be useful for detection of several pathologies including aortic aneurysms and left ventricular hypertrophy, regional wall motion abnormalities, pericardial and pleural effusion. To date, four main kinds of HHE can be distinguished: a first, high-cost variety, including miniaturized machines, equipped with instrumentations of standard echocardiography and even new softwares for tissue Doppler and myocardial contrast echocardiography; a second kind of machines of high level but not miniaturized; a third (intermediate level and low cost), and a fourth one (basic level and very low cost), including "cardioscopes" corresponding to the ultrasound stethoscope, able to complete efficaciously the clinical examination. The introduction of HHE opens controversy about its diagnostic accuracy, the opportunity to establish the clinical scenario where it should be utilized and the identification of the potential users and the needed competence level. Preliminary experiences show the possibility of improving and anticipating the diagnosis of several cardiac diseases but also the need to plan specific ultrasound training to avoid inappropriate use of HHE. PMID:15934422

  9. Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis; Dokos, Adam; Burns, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    The Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device (PHOWID) is a measurement system for imaging small defects (scratches, pits, micrometeor impacts, and the like) in the field. Designed primarily for window inspection, PHOWID attaches to a smooth surface with suction cups, and raster scans a small area with an optical pen in order to provide a three-dimensional image of the defect. PHOWID consists of a graphical user interface, motor control subsystem, scanning head, and interface electronics, as well as an integrated camera and user display that allows a user to locate minute defects before scanning. Noise levels are on the order of 60 in. (1.5 m). PHOWID allows field measurement of defects that are usually done in the lab. It is small, light, and attaches directly to the test article in any orientation up to vertical. An operator can scan a defect and get useful engineering data in a matter of minutes. There is no need to make a mold impression for later lab analysis.

  10. Use of handheld computers in clinical practice: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare professionals use smartphones and tablets to inform patient care. Contemporary research suggests that handheld computers may support aspects of clinical diagnosis and management. This systematic review was designed to synthesise high quality evidence to answer the question; Does healthcare professionals’ use of handheld computers improve their access to information and support clinical decision making at the point of care? Methods A detailed search was conducted using Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Science and Social Science Citation Indices since 2001. Interventions promoting healthcare professionals seeking information or making clinical decisions using handheld computers were included. Classroom learning and the use of laptop computers were excluded. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and extracted data. High levels of data heterogeneity negated statistical synthesis. Instead, evidence for effectiveness was summarised narratively, according to each study’s aim for assessing the impact of handheld computer use. Results We included seven randomised trials investigating medical or nursing staffs’ use of Personal Digital Assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across three distinct functions that emerged from the data: accessing information for clinical knowledge, adherence to guidelines and diagnostic decision making. When healthcare professionals used handheld computers to access clinical information, their knowledge improved significantly more than peers who used paper resources. When clinical guideline recommendations were presented on handheld computers, clinicians made significantly safer prescribing decisions and adhered more closely to recommendations than peers using paper resources. Finally, healthcare professionals made significantly more appropriate diagnostic decisions using clinical decision making tools on handheld computers compared to colleagues

  11. Monitoring biothreat agents (Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis) with a portable real-time PCR instrument.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Katz, Anna; Niemimaa, Jukka; Forbes, Kristian M; Huitu, Otso; Stuart, Peter; Henttonen, Heikki; Nikkari, Simo

    2015-08-01

    In the event of suspected releases or natural outbreaks of contagious pathogens, rapid identification of the infectious agent is essential for appropriate medical intervention and disease containment. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a novel portable real-time PCR thermocycler, PikoReal™, to the standard real-time PCR thermocycler, Applied Biosystems® 7300 (ABI 7300), for the detection of three high-risk biothreat bacterial pathogens: Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis. In addition, a novel confirmatory real-time PCR assay for the detection of F. tularensis is presented and validated. The results show that sensitivity of the assays, based on a dilution series, for the three infectious agents ranged from 1 to 100 fg of target DNA with both instruments. No cross-reactivity was revealed in specificity testing. Duration of the assays with the PikoReal and ABI 7300 systems were 50 and 100 min, respectively. In field testing for F. tularensis, results were obtained with the PikoReal system in 95 min, as the pre-PCR preparation, including DNA extraction, required an additional 45 min. We conclude that the PikoReal system enables highly sensitive and rapid on-site detection of biothreat agents under field conditions, and may be a more efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods. PMID:26043838

  12. The effect of thermocycling on the bonding of different restorative materials to access opening through porcelain fused to metal restorations

    PubMed Central

    AL-Moaleem, Mohammed M.; Shah, Farhan Khalid; Khan, Nausheen Saied

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Porcelain fused to metal (PFM) crowns provide the best treatment option for teeth that have a large or defective restoration. More than 20% of teeth with PFM crowns or bridges require non-surgical root canal treatment (NSRCT). This may be due to the effect of restorative procedures and the possible leakage of bacteria and or their by-products, which leads to the demise of the tooth pulp. Thus, this study was planned to compare the ability of the restorative materials to seal perforated PFM specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study evaluates the ability of amalgam, composite or compomer restorative materials to close perforated PFM specimen's in-vitro. Ninety PFM specimens were constructed using Ni-Cr alloys and feldspathic porcelain, and then they were divided into 3 groups: amalgam (A), composite + Exite adhesive bond (B) and compomer + Syntac adhesive bond (C). All the PFM samples were embedded in an acrylic block to provide complete sealing of the hole from the bottom side. After the aging period, each group was further divided into 3 equal subgroups according to the thermocycling period (one week for 70 cycles, one month for 300 cycles and three months for 900 cycles). Each subgroup was put into containers containing dye (Pelikan INK), one maintained at 5℃ and the other at 55℃, each cycle for 30 sec time. The data obtained was analyzed by SPSS, 2006 using one way ANOVA test and student t-test and significant difference level at (P<.01). RESULTS The depth of dye penetration was measured at the interfaces of PFM and filling materials using Co-ordinate Vernier Microscope. The lowest levels of the dye penetration for the three groups, as well as subgroups were during the first week. The values of dye leakage had significantly increased by time intervals in subgroups A and C. CONCLUSION It was seen that amalgam showed higher leakage than composite while compomer showed the lowest level of leakage. PMID:22259701

  13. Effect of Thermocycling, Degree of Conversion, and Cavity Configuration on the Bonding Effectiveness of All-in-One Adhesives.

    PubMed

    El-Damanhoury, H M; Gaintantzopoulou, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five all-in-one bonding agents with respect to microleakage, microtensile bond strength (μTBS), degree of conversion (DC) and the impact of cavity configuration. The materials tested were Adper Easy Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond, iBond, Optibond All-in-One, Xeno IV, and Adper Single Bond Plus as a control. The DC of each adhesive was measured on the surfaces of dentin discs (n=5) by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One hundred and forty-four extracted human molars were randomly divided and assigned to one of the five tested adhesives and the control group. The μTBS to dentin was measured on flat occlusal dentin with and without thermocycling and to the gingival floor dentin of class II cavities (n=8). All specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 resin composite. Class II samples were immersed in a 5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours, and microleakage was examined under a stereomicroscope. Micromorphological analysis of demineralized/deproteinized specimens was done using scanning electron microscopy. The DC and microleakage data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and μTBS data by two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test (α=0.05) and Weibull-distribution survival analysis. The relation between different variables and μTBS and microleakage was tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient and regression statistics. A moderate direct relation between DC and μTBS durability was found for all the adhesives tested. Significant wide variations exist among the results obtained for single-bottle adhesives tested regarding their μTBS and microleakage. Some of the all-in-one materials tested have shown significantly inferior results under a high C-factor or after aging. The use of these materials should be carefully considered. PMID:25748210

  14. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). When enamel and dentin interfaces were evaluated separately, (1) for the Self-Etch adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P < 0.0001); (2) for the Etch and Rinse adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives. PMID:22675358

  15. The methylation status of plant genomic DNA influences PCR efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, K V; Dubrovina, A S; Tyunin, A P

    2015-03-01

    During the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a versatile and widely used method, certain DNA sequences are rapidly amplified through thermocycling. Although there are numerous protocols of PCR optimization for different applications, little is known about the effect of DNA modifications, such as DNA methylation, on PCR efficiency. Recent studies show that cytosine methylation alters DNA mechanical properties and suggest that DNA methylation may directly or indirectly influence the effectiveness of DNA amplification during PCR. In the present study, using plant DNA, we found that highly methylated plant DNA genomic regions were amplified with lower efficiencies compared to that for the regions methylated at a lower level. The correlation was observed when amplifying stilbene synthase (STS1, STS10) genes of Vitis amurensis, the Actin2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, the internal transcribed spacer (AtITS), and tRNAPro of A. thaliana. The level of DNA methylation within the analyzed DNA regions has been analyzed with bisulfite sequencing. The obtained data show that efficient PCRs of highly methylated plant DNA regions can be hampered. Proteinase K treatment of the plant DNA prior to PCR and using HotTaq DNA polymerase improved amplification of the highly methylated plant DNA regions. We suggest that increased DNA denaturation temperatures of the highly methylated DNA and contamination with DNA-binding proteins contribute to the hampered PCR amplification of highly methylated DNA. The data show that it is necessary to use current DNA purification protocols and commercial kits with caution to ensure appropriate PCR product yield and prevent bias toward unmethylated DNA amplification in PCRs. PMID:25506767

  16. Advances in handheld FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Cardillo, Len; Judge, Kevin; Frayer, Maxim; Frunzi, Michael; Hetherington, Paul; Levy, Dustin; Oberndorfer, Kyle; Perec, Walter; Sauer, Terry; Stein, John; Zuidema, Eric

    2012-06-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenges of ConOps (Concepts of Operation) in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the advances resulting from a project designed to overcome the challenges associated with miniaturizing FT-IR instruments. The project team developed a disturbance-corrected permanently aligned cube corner interferometer for improved robustness and optimized opto-mechanical design to maximize optical throughput and signal-to-noise ratios. Thermal management and heat flow were thoroughly modeled and studied to isolate sensitive components from heat sources and provide the widest temperature operation range. Similarly, extensive research on mechanical designs and compensation techniques to protect against shock and vibration will be discussed. A user interface was carefully created for military and emergency response applications to provide actionable information in a visual, intuitive format. Similar to the HazMatID family of products, state-of-the-art algorithms were used to quickly identify the chemical composition of complex samples based on the spectral information. This article includes an overview of the design considerations, tests results, and performance validation of the mechanical ruggedness, spectral, and thermal performance.

  17. Handheld optical coherence tomography scanner for primary care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Jeon, Mansik; Chaney, Eric J; Stewart, Charles N; Boppart, Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop an advanced point-of-care diagnostic instrument for use in a primary care office using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system has the potential to enable earlier detection of diseases and accurate image-based diagnostics. Our system was designed to be compact, portable, user-friendly, and fast, making it well suited for the primary care office setting. The unique feature of our system is a versatile handheld OCT imaging scanner which consists of a pair of computer-controlled galvanometer-mounted mirrors, interchangeable lens mounts, and miniaturized video camera. This handheld scanner has the capability to guide the physician in real time for finding suspicious regions to be imaged by OCT. In order to evaluate the performance and use of the handheld OCT scanner, the anterior chamber of a rat eye and in vivo human retina, cornea, skin, and tympanic membrane were imaged. Based on this feasibility study, we believe that this new type of handheld OCT device and system has the potential to be an efficient point-of-care imaging tool in primary care medicine. PMID:21134801

  18. Handheld Optical Coherence Tomography Scanner for Primary Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Jeon, Mansik; Chaney, Eric J.; Stewart, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop an advanced point-of-care diagnostic instrument for use in a primary care office using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system has the potential to enable earlier detection of diseases and accurate image-based diagnostics. Our system was designed to be compact, portable, user-friendly, and fast, making it well suited for the primary care office setting. The unique feature of our system is a versatile handheld OCT imaging scanner which consists of a pair of computer-controlled galvanometer-mounted mirrors, interchangeable lens mounts, and miniaturized video camera. This handheld scanner has the capability to guide the physician in real time for finding suspicious regions to be imaged by OCT. In order to evaluate the performance and use of the handheld OCT scanner, the anterior chamber of a rat eye and in vivo human retina, cornea, skin, and tympanic membrane were imaged. Based on this feasibility study, we believe that this new type of handheld OCT device and system has the potential to be an efficient point-of-care imaging tool in primary care medicine. PMID:21134801

  19. Ultra-compact switchable SLO/OCT handheld probe design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; DuBose, Theodore; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-03-01

    Handheld scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems facilitate imaging of young children and subjects that have difficulty fixating. More compact and lightweight probes allow for better portability and increased comfort for the operator of the handheld probe. We describe a very compact, novel SLO and OCT handheld probe design. A single 2D microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner and a custom optical design using a converging beam prior to the scanner permitted significant reduction in the system size. Our design utilized a combination of commercial and custom optics that were optimized in Zemax to achieve near diffraction-limited resolution of 8 μm over a 7° field of view. The handheld probe has a form factor of 7 x 6 x 2.5 cm and a weight of only 94 g, which is over an order of magnitude lighter than prior SLO-OCT handheld probes. Images were acquired from a normal subject with an incident power on the eye under the ANSI limit. With this device, which is the world's lightest and smallest SLO-OCT system, we were able to visualize parafoveal cone photoreceptors and nerve fiber bundles without the use of adaptive optics.

  20. Assessment of Preparation of Samples Under the Field Conditions and a Portable Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the Rapid On-Site Detection of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Benyeda, Z; Zohari, S; Yacoub, A; Isaksson, M; Leijon, M; LeBlanc, N; Benyeda, J; Belák, S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (AMPV-1), is the causative agent of Newcastle disease affecting many species of birds and causing heavy losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Early, rapid and sensitive detection of the viruses or the viral nucleic acids is very important for disease diagnosis and control. This study aimed to evaluate sample preparation under field conditions and the application of a real-time RT-PCR method in the portable T-COR4 platform for the rapid, on-site detection of NDV on a farm. In the laboratory setting, the portable real-time RT-PCR assay had a similar performance compared with that obtained with a larger, stationary Rotor Gene real-time thermocycler. In the field conditions, viral nucleic acids were manually extracted just outside of animal units with minimal equipment and real-time RT-PCR detection was performed with the portable thermocycler T-COR4 placed in a nearby room. The portable assay at the farm detected viral RNA in 15 samples and reached an agreement of 83% (39/47) when the same RNA preparations were tested in the Rotor Gene thermocycler under the laboratory setting. The results demonstrated the feasibility of performing field detection but also the need to improve and further simplify sample preparation procedures. PMID:25209697

  1. A case of recurrent, self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Scarinci, Fabio; Labriola, Leanne T; Jampol, Lee M; Goldstein, Debra A; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with vision loss and discrete, bilateral foveal lesions. The patient returned 6 weeks later with worsening vision, prominent bilateral retinal lesions, and a full-thickness macular hole in the right eye consistent with recurrent self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy. After instructing the family to remove the patient's access to laser pointers, follow-up examination revealed spontaneous closure of the macular hole but minimal vision improvement. Recurrent ocular exposure to handheld lasers can masquerade as an organic process in patients who withhold pertinent history. Clinicians should rely on the distinguishing features seen on examination and multimodal imaging to make the diagnosis of handheld laser retinopathy. PMID:27012364

  2. 77 FR 32996 - Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Microsoft Corporation (``Microsoft'') of Redmond, Washington. 76 FR 22918. The complaint, as amended... COMMISSION Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  3. Semiautomated Intraocular Laser Surgery using Handheld Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Brian C.; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective In laser retinal photocoagulation, hundreds of dot-like burns are applied. We introduce a robot-assisted technique to enhance the accuracy and reduce the tedium of the procedure. Materials and Methods Laser burn locations are overlaid on preoperative retinal images using common patterns such as grids. A stereo camera/monitor setup registers and displays the planned burn locations overlaid on real-time video. Using an active handheld micromanipulator, a 7×7 grid of burns spaced 650 μm apart is applied to both paper slides and porcine retina in vitro using 30 ms laser pulses at 532 nm. Two scenarios were tested: unaided, in which the micromanipulator is inert and the laser fires at a fixed frequency, and aided, in which the micromanipulator actively targets burn locations and the laser fires automatically upon target acquisition. Error is defined as the distance from the center of the observed burn mark to the preoperatively selected target location. Results An experienced retinal surgeon performed trials with and without robotic assistance, on both paper slides and porcine retina in vitro. In the paper slide experiments at an unaided laser repeat rate of 0.5 Hz, error was 125±62 μm with robotic assistance and 149±76 μm without (p < 0.005), and trial duration was 70±8 s with robotic assistance and 97±7 s without (p < 0.005). At a repeat rate of 1.0 Hz, error was 129±69 μm with robotic assistance and 166±91 μm without (p < 0.005), and trial duration was 26±4 s with robotic assistance and 47±1 s without (p < 0.005). At a repeat rate of 2.0 Hz on porcine retinal tissue, error was 123±69 μm with robotic assistance and 203±104 μm without (p < 0.005). Conclusion Robotic assistance can increase the accuracy of laser photocoagulation while reducing the duration of the operation. PMID:20333740

  4. In vivo melanoma depth detection by a handheld photoacoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Xing, Wenxin; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We developed a handheld photoacoustic microscope (PAM) to detect melanoma and determine tumor depth in nude mice in vivo. Compared to our previous PAM system for melanoma imaging, a new light delivery mechanism is introduced to improve light penetration. We show that melanomas with 4.1 mm and 3.3 mm thicknesses can be successfully detected in phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively. With its deep melanoma imaging ability and novel handheld design, this system is promising for clinical melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical planning for patients at the bedside.

  5. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue, conventional polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balne, P K; Basu, S; Rath, S; Barik, M R; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    This study is a comparative evaluation (Chi-square test) of a closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue dye (HNB-LAMP), real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis. Considering clinical presentation as the gold standard in 33 patients, the sensitivity of HNB-LAMP assay (75.8%) was higher (not significant, P value 0.2) than conventional PCR (57.6%) and lower than real-time PCR (90.9%). Specificity was 100% by all three methods. No amplification was observed in negative controls (n = 20) by all three methods. The cost of the HNB-LAMP assay was Rs. 500.00 and it does not require thermocycler, therefore, it can be used as an alternative to conventional PCR in resource-poor settings. PMID:26470966

  6. Innovation and Integration: Case Studies of Effective Teacher Practices in the Use of Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Raymond Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Previous research conducted on the use of handheld computers in K-12 education has focused on how handheld computer use affects student motivation, engagement, and productivity. These four case studies sought to identify effective teacher practices in the integration of handhelds into the curriculum and the factors that affect those practices. The…

  7. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring...

  9. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Using a hand-held mobile telephone. 392.82 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone. (a)(1) No driver shall use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a CMV. (2) No motor...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring...

  11. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Using a hand-held mobile telephone. 392.82 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone. (a)(1) No driver shall use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a CMV. (2) No motor...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring...

  13. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to...

  14. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to...

  15. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring...

  18. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to...

  19. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Using a hand-held mobile telephone. 392.82 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone. (a)(1) No driver shall use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a CMV. (2) No motor...

  20. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  1. Epilepsy Forewarning Using A Hand-Held Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, LM

    2005-02-21

    Over the last decade, ORNL has developed and patented a novel approach for forewarning of a large variety of machine and biomedical events. The present implementation uses desktop computers to analyze archival data. This report describes the next logical step in this effort, namely use of a hand-held device for the analysis.

  2. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  3. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  4. Web-Based Spatial Training Using Handheld Touch Screen Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Dorta, Norena; Saorin, Jose Luis; Contero, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to harness the opportunities for mobility and the new user interfaces that handheld touch screen devices offer, in a non-formal learning context, with a view to developing spatial ability. This research has addressed two objectives: first, analyzing the effects that training can have on spatial visualisation using the…

  5. Hand-Held Ultrasonic Instrument for Reading Matrix Symbols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kula, John P.; Gurney, John W.; Lior, Ephraim D.

    2008-01-01

    A hand-held instrument that would include an ultrasonic camera has been proposed as an efficient means of reading matrix symbols. The proposed instrument could be operated without mechanical raster scanning. All electronic functions from excitation of ultrasonic pulses through final digital processing for decoding matrix symbols would be performed by dedicated circuitry within the single, compact instrument housing.

  6. Development of Handheld Multispectral Imaging For Food Safety Inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a handheld multispectral instrument for food safety inspection for poultry carcasses. The prototype system developed in this research consisted of a compact dual-band spectral imaging system, Light Emitting diode (LED), and portable computer. The dual-...

  7. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  8. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  9. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  10. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  11. Hand-held Calculators: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Max; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations of several publications with regard to the use of hand-held calculators in the mathematics curriculum are presented. Relevant portions of the NACOME and Euclid Conference reports are cited as well as a report to NSF and recommendations from an NIE/NSF conference. Recommendations support expanded use of, and research concerning,…

  12. Evaluation of Handheld Computers for Direct Systematic Classroom Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Michael W.; Gouwens, Donald A.; Schuh, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    Through this study the authors evaluate outcomes associated with the use of handheld computers by interventionists in improving the efficiency of direct systematic classroom observation. Information from observations is used by interventionists for treatment planning and evaluation. In this study, interventionists were trained to use personal…

  13. The State of the Art in Museum Handhelds in 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Nancy; Tellis, Chris

    This paper examines the rapidly changing state of museum handhelds from both a technology and content perspective. The paper also discusses the component parts for a successful museum installation: content, user interface, applications, form factor, positioning and the challenges to integrating these components. Specific examples are demonstrated…

  14. A HANDHELD REAL TIME THERMAL CYCLER FOR BACTERIAL PATHOGEN DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Handheld Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of ...

  15. Handheld technology acceptance in radiologic science education and training programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to, personal digital assistants such as a Palm TX, Apple iPod Touch, Apple iPad or Hewlett Packard iPaq, and cellular or smartphones with third generation mobile capabilities such as an Apple iPhone, Blackberry or Android device. The study employed a non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design to determine the potential of adopting handheld technologies based on the constructs of Davis's (1989) Technology Acceptance Model. An online self-report questionnaire survey instrument was used to gather study data from 551 entry level radiologic science programs specializing in radiography, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and medical sonography. The study design resulted in a single point in time assessment of the relationship between the primary constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and the behavioral intention of radiography program directors to adopt the information technology represented by hand held devices. Study results provide justification for investing resources to promote the adoption of mobile handheld devices in radiologic science programs and study findings serve as a foundation for further research involving technology adoption in the radiologic sciences.

  16. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-05-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers’ claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: • The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. • The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs’ departments (9%). • IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. • Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. • Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall

  17. Portable robotic platform for handheld landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herman; McMahill, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    To support the development of advanced algorithms for hand-held detectors, it is desirable to collect data with a specific sweep rate, height and spacing. In addition, it is also important that the position of each data point produced by the detector is known. Since it is impossible for a human operator to precisely control these sweep parameters, we have developed a semi-autonomous robotic data collection system. It is designed as a portable robot with a 2-axis manipulator that can be used to sweep any hand-held detector at a precise sweep rate, height, and spacing. It is also equipped with an interface to the hand-held detector, so it can log the output data during the sweeping motion. It also tags the output data with the position data from the on-board positioning system. As a result, we can construct an accurate 2-D or 3-D grid of the detector's output as a function of horizontal and vertical position of the detector. The manipulator is also equipped with force sensing capability that can be used to sense terrain height or collision. To increase deployment flexibility, all functions of the robot are controlled through a wireless communication link by a hand-held computer with a maximum operating distance of at least 100m. Through the hand-held computer, the operator can move the robot, and program its behavior using a script based motion sequencer. The robot has been deployed successfully on several data acquisition activities, and successfully produced high-resolution 2-D map of the buried targets.

  18. COLD-PCR enriches low-level variant DNA sequences and increases the sensitivity of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Milbury, Coren A; Guha, Minakshi; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2014-01-01

    Detection of low-level mutations is important for cancer biomarker and therapy targets discovery, but reliable detection remains a technical challenge. The newly developed method of CO-amplification at Lower Denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) helps to circumvent this issue. This PCR-based technology preferentially enriches minor known or unknown variants present in samples with a high background of wild type DNA which often hampers the accurate identification of these minority alleles. This is a simple process that consists of lowering the temperature at the denaturation step during the PCR-cycling protocol (critical denaturation temperature, T c) and inducing DNA heteroduplexing during an intermediate step. COLD-PCR in its simplest forms does not need additional reagents or specific instrumentation and thus, can easily replace conventional PCR and at the same time improve the mutation detection sensitivity limit of downstream technologies. COLD-PCR can be applied in two basic formats: fast-COLD-PCR that can enrich T m-reducing mutations and full-COLD-PCR that can enrich all mutations, though it requires an intermediate cross-hybridization step that lengthens the thermocycling program. An improved version of full-COLD-PCR (improved and complete enrichment, ice-COLD-PCR) has also been described. Finally, most recently, we developed yet another form of COLD-PCR, temperature-tolerant-COLD-PCR, which gradually increases the denaturation temperature during the COLD-PCR reaction, enriching diverse targets using a single cycling program. This report describes practical considerations for application of fast-, full-, ice-, and temperature-tolerant-COLD-PCR for enrichment of mutations prior to downstream screening. PMID:24259002

  19. Hand-held radiometry: A set of notes developed for use at the Workshop of Hand-held radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A set of notes was developed to aid the beginner in hand-held radiometry. The electromagnetic spectrum is reviewed, and pertinent terms are defined. View areas of multiband radiometers are developed to show the areas of coincidence of adjacent bands. The amounts of plant cover seen by radiometers having different fields of view are described. Vegetation indices are derived and discussed. Response functions of several radiometers are shown and applied to spectrometer data taken over 12 wheat plots, to provide a comparison of instruments and bands within and among instruments. The calculation of solar time is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the local time of LANDSAT satellite overpasses for any particular location in the Northern Hemisphere. The use and misuse of hand-held infrared thermometers are discussed, and a procedure for photographic determination of plant cover is described. Some suggestions are offered concerning procedures to be followed when collecting hand-held spectral and thermal data. A list of references pertinent to hand-held radiometry is included.

  20. Development of a Real-Time Microchip PCR System for Portable Plant Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Cifci, Osman S.; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L.; Ma, Bo; Kim, Sungman; Abdel-Raziq, Haron; Ong, Kevin; Jo, Young-Ki; Gross, Dennis C.; Shim, Won-Bo; Han, Arum

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens in the field is crucial to prevent the proliferation of infected crops. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process is the most reliable and accepted method for plant pathogen diagnosis, however current conventional PCR machines are not portable and require additional post-processing steps to detect the amplified DNA (amplicon) of pathogens. Real-time PCR can directly quantify the amplicon during the DNA amplification without the need for post processing, thus more suitable for field operations, however still takes time and require large instruments that are costly and not portable. Microchip PCR systems have emerged in the past decade to miniaturize conventional PCR systems and to reduce operation time and cost. Real-time microchip PCR systems have also emerged, but unfortunately all reported portable real-time microchip PCR systems require various auxiliary instruments. Here we present a stand-alone real-time microchip PCR system composed of a PCR reaction chamber microchip with integrated thin-film heater, a compact fluorescence detector to detect amplified DNA, a microcontroller to control the entire thermocycling operation with data acquisition capability, and a battery. The entire system is 25×16×8 cm3 in size and 843 g in weight. The disposable microchip requires only 8-µl sample volume and a single PCR run consumes 110 mAh of power. A DNA extraction protocol, notably without the use of liquid nitrogen, chemicals, and other large lab equipment, was developed for field operations. The developed real-time microchip PCR system and the DNA extraction protocol were used to successfully detect six different fungal and bacterial plant pathogens with 100% success rate to a detection limit of 5 ng/8 µl sample. PMID:24349341

  1. Development of a real-time microchip PCR system for portable plant disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chiwan; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Hyun Soo; Cifci, Osman S; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L; Ma, Bo; Kim, Sungman; Abdel-Raziq, Haron; Ong, Kevin; Jo, Young-Ki; Gross, Dennis C; Shim, Won-Bo; Han, Arum

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens in the field is crucial to prevent the proliferation of infected crops. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process is the most reliable and accepted method for plant pathogen diagnosis, however current conventional PCR machines are not portable and require additional post-processing steps to detect the amplified DNA (amplicon) of pathogens. Real-time PCR can directly quantify the amplicon during the DNA amplification without the need for post processing, thus more suitable for field operations, however still takes time and require large instruments that are costly and not portable. Microchip PCR systems have emerged in the past decade to miniaturize conventional PCR systems and to reduce operation time and cost. Real-time microchip PCR systems have also emerged, but unfortunately all reported portable real-time microchip PCR systems require various auxiliary instruments. Here we present a stand-alone real-time microchip PCR system composed of a PCR reaction chamber microchip with integrated thin-film heater, a compact fluorescence detector to detect amplified DNA, a microcontroller to control the entire thermocycling operation with data acquisition capability, and a battery. The entire system is 25 × 16 × 8 cm(3) in size and 843 g in weight. The disposable microchip requires only 8-µl sample volume and a single PCR run consumes 110 mAh of power. A DNA extraction protocol, notably without the use of liquid nitrogen, chemicals, and other large lab equipment, was developed for field operations. The developed real-time microchip PCR system and the DNA extraction protocol were used to successfully detect six different fungal and bacterial plant pathogens with 100% success rate to a detection limit of 5 ng/8 µl sample. PMID:24349341

  2. Sex Determination Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kima, Peter E.; Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can…

  3. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  4. Integrating RFID technique to design mobile handheld inventory management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yo-Ping; Yen, Wei; Chen, Shih-Chung

    2008-04-01

    An RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system is proposed in this paper. Differing from the manual inventory management method, the proposed system works on the personal digital assistant (PDA) with an RFID reader. The system identifies electronic tags on the properties and checks the property information in the back-end database server through a ubiquitous wireless network. The system also provides a set of functions to manage the back-end inventory database and assigns different levels of access privilege according to various user categories. In the back-end database server, to prevent improper or illegal accesses, the server not only stores the inventory database and user privilege information, but also keeps track of the user activities in the server including the login and logout time and location, the records of database accessing, and every modification of the tables. Some experimental results are presented to verify the applicability of the integrated RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system.

  5. Handheld computers in nursing education: PDA pilot project.

    PubMed

    Koeniger-Donohue, Rebecca

    2008-02-01

    Interest in the use and application of handheld technology at undergraduate and graduate nursing programs across the country is growing rapidly. Personal digital assistants (PDAs) are often referred to as a "peripheral brain" because they can save time, decrease errors, and simplify information retrieval at the point of care. In addition, research results support the notion that PDAs enhance nursing clinical education and are an effective student learning resource. However, most nursing programs lack the full range of technological resources to implement and provide ongoing support for handheld technology use by faculty and students. This article describes a 9-month pilot project for the initial use of PDAs by novice faculty and students at Simmons College. PMID:18320958

  6. Development of a remote handheld cardiac arrhythmia monitor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swaroop S; Hsiao, Henry S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and development of a real-time remote handheld cardiac arrhythmic monitoring system (RCAM). A client-server model based on Internet protocols was used. ECG data was transmitted from the remote handheld client to a centralized server, where the QRS and premature ventricular contraction detection algorithms were implemented and graded depending on the number and pattern of PVCs present. The QRS sensitivity and specificity on ECG records from Physionet archives in absence of arrhythmia was 100% and 99.62%, while in presence of arrhythmia was 99.34% and 99.31%. The average 'negative time' measured on ventricular tachyarrhythmia records was 92 seconds. The RCAM can provide remote detection of cardiac abnormalities and give specific diagnosis and recommendations of actions to be taken immediately. The limitation due to the inability of the PDA to perform complex computations was overcome by the use of the remote server. PMID:17947043

  7. Real-time focal stack compositing for handheld mobile cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solh, Mashhour

    2013-03-01

    Extending the depth of field using a single lens camera on a mobile device can be achieved by capturing a set of images each focused at a different depth or focal stack then combine these samples of the focal stack to form a single all-in-focus image or an image refocused at a desired depth of field. Focal stack compositing in real time for a handheld mobile camera has many challenges including capturing, processing power, handshaking, rolling shutter artifacts, occlusion, and lens zoom effect. In this paper, we describe a system for a real time focal stack compositing system for handheld mobile device with an alignment and compositing algorithms. We will also show all-in-focus images captured and processed by a cell phone camera running on Android OS.

  8. Engineering issues for hand-held sensing devices, with examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiwald, David A.; Freiwald, Joyce

    1994-03-01

    It is now U.S. defense policy that there will be no new platform starts. The emphasis for platforms will be on O&M cost reduction, life-extension improvements, and force-multiplier- device upgrades. There is also an increasing emphasis on hand-held force-multiplier devices for individuals, which is the focus of this paper. Engineering issues include operations analysis, weight, cube, cost, prime power, ease of use, data storage, reliability, fault tolerance, data communications and human factors. Two examples of hand-held devices are given. Applications include USMC, Army, SOCOM, DEA, FBI, SS, Border Patrol and others. Barriers to adoption of such technology are also discussed.

  9. Introducing a hand-held urinal service in secondary care.

    PubMed

    Pomfret, Ian; Vickerman, Julie; Tonge, Pauline

    Chorley & South Ribble Primary Care Trust's multiprofessional continence service was established in 2000 (Pomfret, 2001). An integral part of this service development was the creation of a community-based, hand-held urinal library. There are 28 female hand-held urinals available in the UK and many more for males. Some of the urinals are available on prescription and others have to be purchased by the patient. The urinal library allows patients in the community to use the urinals before they are prescribed or buy them, because it is only by using them that they will know that the product will be suitable. The service is proving to be hugely successful. PMID:15895500

  10. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groover, Krishangi; Izbicki, John

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  11. A Cheap, Semiquantitative Hand-Held Conductivity Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacky, Susan K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a design for a hand-held conductivity tester powered by a 9V battery that gives semi-quantitative results for aqueous electrolyte solutions of concentrations ranging from 0.001 M to 0.1 M. The tester uses a bar-graph LED driven by an LM3914 integrated circuit to indicate the level of conductivity. A list of parts, procedures, and results…

  12. Concept for tremor compensation for a handheld OCT-laryngoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Sabine; Deutsch, Stefanie; Bleeker, Sebastian; Ripken, Tammo; Krüger, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique which can create optical tissue sections, enabling diagnosis of vocal cord tissue. To take full advantage from the non-contact imaging technique, OCT was adapted to an indirect laryngoscope to work on awake patients. Using OCT in a handheld diagnostic device the challenges of rapid working distance adjustment and tracking of axial motion arise. The optical focus of the endoscopic sample arm and the reference-arm length can be adjusted in a range of 40 mm to 90 mm. Automatic working distance adjustment is based on image analysis of OCT B-scans which identifies off depth images as well as position errors. The movable focal plane and reference plane are used to adjust working distance to match the sample depth and stabilise the sample in the desired axial position of the OCT scans. The autofocus adjusts the working distance within maximum 2.7 seconds for the maximum initial displacement of 40 mm. The amplitude of hand tremor during 60 s handheld scanning was reduced to 50 % and it was shown that the image stabilisation keeps the position error below 0.5 mm. Fast automatic working distance adjustment is crucial to minimise the duration of the diagnostic procedure. The image stabilisation compensates relative axial movements during handheld scanning.

  13. Toward Automated Intraocular Laser Surgery Using a Handheld Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for automated intraocular laser surgery using a handheld micromanipulator known as Micron. The novel handheld manipulator enables the automated scanning of a laser probe within a cylinder of 4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter. For the automation, the surface of the retina is reconstructed using a stereomicroscope, and then preplanned targets are placed on the surface. The laser probe is precisely located on the target via visual servoing of the aiming beam, while maintaining a specific distance above the surface. In addition, the system is capable of tracking the surface of the eye in order to compensate for any eye movement introduced during the operation. We compared the performance of the automated scanning using various control thresholds, in order to find the most effective threshold in terms of accuracy and speed. Given the selected threshold, we conducted the handheld operation above a fixed target surface. The average error and execution time are reduced by 63.6% and 28.5%, respectively, compared to the unaided trials. Finally, the automated laser photocoagulation was demonstrated also in an eye phantom, including compensation for the eye movement. PMID:25893135

  14. Detecting buried explosive hazards with handheld GPR and deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besaw, Lance E.

    2016-05-01

    Buried explosive hazards (BEHs), including traditional landmines and homemade improvised explosives, have proven difficult to detect and defeat during and after conflicts around the world. Despite their various sizes, shapes and construction material, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is an excellent phenomenology for detecting BEHs due to its ability to sense localized differences in electromagnetic properties. Handheld GPR detectors are common equipment for detecting BEHs because of their flexibility (in part due to the human operator) and effectiveness in cluttered environments. With modern digital electronics and positioning systems, handheld GPR sensors can sense and map variation in electromagnetic properties while searching for BEHs. Additionally, large-scale computers have demonstrated an insatiable appetite for ingesting massive datasets and extracting meaningful relationships. This is no more evident than the maturation of deep learning artificial neural networks (ANNs) for image and speech recognition now commonplace in industry and academia. This confluence of sensing, computing and pattern recognition technologies offers great potential to develop automatic target recognition techniques to assist GPR operators searching for BEHs. In this work deep learning ANNs are used to detect BEHs and discriminate them from harmless clutter. We apply these techniques to a multi-antennae, handheld GPR with centimeter-accurate positioning system that was used to collect data over prepared lanes containing a wide range of BEHs. This work demonstrates that deep learning ANNs can automatically extract meaningful information from complex GPR signatures, complementing existing GPR anomaly detection and classification techniques.

  15. Identification of handheld objects for electro-optic/FLIR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Steve K.; Flug, Eric; Edwards, Timothy C.; Krapels, Keith A.; Scarbrough, John

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes research on the determination of the fifty-percent probability of identification cycle criterion (N50) for two sets of handheld objects. The first set consists of 12 objects which are commonly held in a single hand. The second set consists of 10 objects commonly held in both hands. These sets consist of not only typical civilian handheld objects but also objects that are potentially lethal. A pistol, a cell phone, a rocket propelled grenade (RPG) launcher, and a broom are examples of the objects in these sets. The discrimination of these objects is an inherent part of homeland security, force protection, and also general population security. Objects were imaged from each set in the visible and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectrum. Various levels of blur are then applied to these images. These blurred images were then used in a forced choice perception experiment. Results were analyzed as a function of blur level and target size to give identification probability as a function of resolvable cycles on target. These results are applicable to handheld object target acquisition estimates for visible imaging systems and MWIR systems. This research provides guidance in the design and analysis of electro-optical systems and forward-looking infrared (FLIR) systems for use in homeland security, force protection, and also general population security.

  16. Distributing Data from Desktop to Hand-Held Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2005-01-01

    A system of server and client software formats and redistributes data from commercially available desktop to commercially available hand-held computers via both wired and wireless networks. This software is an inexpensive means of enabling engineers and technicians to gain access to current sensor data while working in locations in which such data would otherwise be inaccessible. The sensor data are first gathered by a data-acquisition server computer, then transmitted via a wired network to a data-distribution computer that executes the server portion of the present software. Data in all sensor channels -- both raw sensor outputs in millivolt units and results of conversion to engineering units -- are made available for distribution. Selected subsets of the data are transmitted to each hand-held computer via the wired and then a wireless network. The selection of the subsets and the choice of the sequences and formats for displaying the data is made by means of a user interface generated by the client portion of the software. The data displayed on the screens of hand-held units can be updated at rates from 1 to

  17. The use of a handheld Raman system for virus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunyuan; Driskell, Jeremy D.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Cui, Yiping; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-06-01

    The combination of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with a handheld Raman system would lead to a powerful portable device for defense and security applications. The Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM instrument is a 785-nm handheld Raman spectrometer intended for rapid field identification of unknown solid and liquid samples. Its sensitivity and effectiveness for SERS-based detection was initially confirmed by evaluating detection of 1,2-di(4- pyridyl)ethylene as a reporter molecule on a silver nanorod (AgNR) substrate, and the results are comparable to those from a confocal Bruker Raman system. As avian influenza A viruses (AIV) are recognized as an important emerging threat to public health, this portable handheld Raman spectrometer is used, for the first time, to detect and identify avian influenza A viruses using a multi-well AgNR SERS chip. The SERS spectra obtained had rich peaks which demonstrated that the instrument can be effectively used for SERS-based influenza virus detection. According to the SERS spectra, these different influenza viruses were distinguished from the negative control via the principal component analysis and by partial least squares-discriminate analysis. Together, these results show that the combination effective SERS substrates when combined with a portable Raman spectrometer provides a powerful field device for chemical and biological sensing.

  18. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; McLain, Jean E.; Watts, George S.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  19. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Dustin K; Rao, Brianna M; McLain, Jean E; Watts, George S; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  20. Handheld portable real-time tracking and communications device

    DOEpatents

    Wiseman, James M.; Riblett, Jr., Loren E.; Green, Karl L.; Hunter, John A.; Cook, III, Robert N.; Stevens, James R.

    2012-05-22

    Portable handheld real-time tracking and communications devices include; a controller module, communications module including global positioning and mesh network radio module, data transfer and storage module, and a user interface module enclosed in a water-resistant enclosure. Real-time tracking and communications devices can be used by protective force, security and first responder personnel to provide situational awareness allowing for enhance coordination and effectiveness in rapid response situations. Such devices communicate to other authorized devices via mobile ad-hoc wireless networks, and do not require fixed infrastructure for their operation.

  1. The usefulness of handheld computers in a surgical group practice.

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, J.; Gorman, P.; Lohensohn, R.; Kraemer, D.; Svingen, S.

    1999-01-01

    We designed a system using hand-held computers allowing physicians in the hospital setting to access their surgical schedules, to track patients in multiple hospitals, and to quickly enter billing information. The physicians would then update their schedules and pass billing information electronically when they returned to the office. The system was successfully implemented, it was well accepted by clinicians and staff users, and it showed an increased capture of charges. Whether an economically important effect on the number of days to post hospital charges will be evident after follow-up data has been collected. PMID:10566447

  2. Ball Lens Fiber Optic Sensor based Smart Handheld Microsurgical Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-01-01

    During freehand performance of vitreoretinal microsurgery the surgeon must perform precise and stable maneuvers that achieve surgical objectives and avoid surgical risk. Here, we present an improved smart handheld microsurgical tool which is based on a ball lens fiber optic sensor that utilizes common path swept source optical coherence tomography. Improvements include incorporation of a ball lens single mode fiber optic probe that increases the working angle of the tool to greater than 45 degrees; and increases the magnitude of the distance sensing signal through water. Also presented is a cutting function with an improved ergonomic design. PMID:24224076

  3. Ball Lens Fiber Optic Sensor based Smart Handheld Microsurgical Instrument.

    PubMed

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L; Kang, Jin U

    2013-03-20

    During freehand performance of vitreoretinal microsurgery the surgeon must perform precise and stable maneuvers that achieve surgical objectives and avoid surgical risk. Here, we present an improved smart handheld microsurgical tool which is based on a ball lens fiber optic sensor that utilizes common path swept source optical coherence tomography. Improvements include incorporation of a ball lens single mode fiber optic probe that increases the working angle of the tool to greater than 45 degrees; and increases the magnitude of the distance sensing signal through water. Also presented is a cutting function with an improved ergonomic design. PMID:24224076

  4. Performance of new handheld IR camera using uncooled bolometer FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Takanori; Ohkawa, Norio; Kawashima, Yasuo; Matsui, Yasuji; Sugiura, Yosuke; Araki, Tomiharu; Kamozawa, Makoto; Ueno, Masashi; Kaneda, Osamu; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Hata, Hisatoshi; Hashima, Kazuo; Nakagi, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Akira; Kimata, Masafumi

    1996-06-01

    A camera using an uncooled infrared image sensor has been developed. This image sensor is a bolometer focal plane array (FPA), of which the readout circuit is designed to minimize the temperature drift or the pattern noise caused by the changes of the ambient temperature. The circuit has a bolometer for the load resistor, which has the same temperature coefficient of resistance as that of the pixel bolometer. Therefore the signal change induced by the temperature change of the FPA substrate is reduced because the resistance change of the load bolometer compensates for that of the pixel bolometer. The effectiveness of the drift- compensating circuit has been confirmed with a prototype handheld camera.

  5. Skylab-2 handheld photography alphabetized geographical features list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniel, J. L.; Devalcourt, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This publication represents a relisting of the Skylab-2, PTD Handheld Photography Catalog. The purpose of this publication is to provide imagery researchers a supplement to the PTD Catalog by alphabetically sorting together all similar major and minor features. Some cross-referencing of feature names was accomplished where the authors deemed necessary; however, no attempt was made to exhaust all possible means of cross-referencing. An example of the cross-referencing which was done: Kuril Islands may be found under the major feature column and also as a minor feature of Islands.

  6. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Omendra; Davies, Siobhan; Tibbins, Carly; Rees, JH Martyn; Lenney, Warren; Gilchrist, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handheld records (PHHRs) promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online. PMID:26316833

  7. Hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Deanna Lynn; Coleman, Matthew A; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Albala, Joanna; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-04-23

    A hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection includes a microarray reader engineered to be small enough for portable applications. The invention includes a high-powered light-emitting diode that emits excitation light, an excitation filter positioned to receive the excitation light, a slide, a slide holder assembly for positioning the slide to receive the excitation light from the excitation filter, an emission filter positioned to receive the excitation light from the slide, a lens positioned to receive the excitation light from the emission filter, and a CCD camera positioned to receive the excitation light from the lens.

  8. Using handheld GPS for data acquisition in blasting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Blasters in the field for years have been faced with the task of plotting blast locations for future reference and calculating scaled distances or seismograph placement from maps, aerial photo`s etc. With the constellation fully operational, GPS provides a satellite signal transmitted to a ground receiver which will display the desired coordinate positioning worldwide, 24 hours a day in any kind of weather conditions. There are a variety of GPS receivers available with varying levels of accuracy. The field trials of a handheld navigational quality instrument for plotting blast and seismograph locations along with other necessary industry related data is the basis of this paper.

  9. Development of dual sensor hand-held detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    In this paper hand-held dual sensor detector development requirements are considered dedicated to buried object detection. Design characteristics of such a system are categorized and listed. Hardware and software structures, ergonomics, user interface, environmental and EMC/EMI tests to be applied and performance test issues are studied. Main properties of the developed system (SEZER) are presented, which contains Metal Detector (MD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). The realized system has ergonomic structure and can detect both metallic and non-metallic buried objects. Moreover classification of target is possible if it was defined to the signal processing software in learning phase.

  10. Hand-held terminal antennas for personal satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caballero, J. E.; Badenes, J.; Fernandez, J.; Martin-Pascual, C.; Municio, F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with two hand-held antenna types operating with geostationary and medium earth orbit (GEO and MEO) satellite systems. They could be applied to the low earth orbit (LEO) and highly elliptical orbit (HEO) systems respectively doing the appropriate frequency scale designs. The first one is a lambda/2 (1/2 turn) quadrifilar helix (quasi-hemispherical coverage), and the second one is a self-diplexed antenna made of a circular patch and a short-circuited ring patch in stacked configuration (zenithal coverage).

  11. A high-plex PCR approach for massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Pope, Bernard J; Hammet, Fleur; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    Current methods for targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) have several drawbacks, including limited design flexibility, expense, and protocol complexity, which restrict their application to settings involving modest target size and requiring low cost and high throughput. To address this, we have developed Hi-Plex, a PCR-MPS strategy intended for high-throughput screening of multiple genomic target regions that integrates simple, automated primer design software to control product size. Featuring permissive thermocycling conditions and clamp bias reduction, our protocol is simple, cost- and time-effective, uses readily available reagents, does not require expensive instrumentation, and requires minimal optimization. In a 60-plex assay targeting the breast cancer predisposition genes PALB2 and XRCC2, we applied Hi-Plex to 100 ng LCL-derived DNA, and 100 ng and 25 ng FFPE tumor-derived DNA. Altogether, at least 86.94% of the human genome-mapped reads were on target, and 100% of targeted amplicons were represented within 25-fold of the mean. Using 25 ng FFPE-derived DNA, 95.14% of mapped reads were on-target and relative representation ranged from 10.1-fold lower to 5.8-fold higher than the mean. These results were obtained using only the initial automatically-designed primers present in equal concentration. Hi-Plex represents a powerful new approach for screening panels of genomic target regions. PMID:23931594

  12. My-Mini-Pet: A Handheld Pet-Nurturing Game to Engage Students in Arithmetic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, C. C. Y.; Chen, Z-H.; Cheng, H. N. H.; Chen, F-C.; Chan, T-W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more games have been developed for handheld devices. Furthermore, the popularity of handheld devices and increase of wireless computing can be taken advantage of to provide students with more learning opportunities. Games also could bring promising benefits--specifically, motivating students to learn/play, sustaining…

  13. An Investigation of Game-Embedded Handheld Devices to Enhance English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    This study proposed and implemented a system combining the advantages of both educational games and wireless handheld technology to promote the interactive English learning in the classroom setting. An interactive English vocabulary acquisition board game was designed with the system being implemented on handheld devices. Thirty sixth-grade…

  14. Mining What We Know about Handheld Computers: A Review of the [Anecdotal] Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Beverly B.

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers have gone beyond the world of business and are finding their way into the hands of teachers and students. The empirical evidence suggests that the integration of handheld technology into the K-12 classrooms promotes 1) teacher productivity and 2) student-centered learning. Despite a wealth of anecdotal evidence little research…

  15. Evaluation of an enclosed ultraviolet-C radiation device for decontamination of mobile handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Mathew, J Itty; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Sankar, Thriveen; Jencson, Annette L; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile handheld devices used in health care settings may become contaminated with health care-associated pathogens. We demonstrated that an enclosed ultraviolet-C radiation device was effective in rapidly reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and with longer exposure times, Clostridium difficile spores, on glass slides and reducing contamination on in-use mobile handheld devices. PMID:26921014

  16. 16 CFR 1225.2 - Requirements for hand-held infant carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for hand-held infant carriers... ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR HAND-HELD INFANT CARRIERS (Eff. 6-6-14) § 1225.2 Requirements...

  17. Are Handheld Computers Dependable? A New Data Collection System for Classroom-Based Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiguzel, Tufan; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Parker, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Very little research exists on the dependability of handheld computers used in public school classrooms. This study addresses four dependability criteria--reliability, maintainability, availability, and safety--to evaluate a data collection tool on a handheld computer. Data were collected from five sources: (1) time-use estimations by 19 special…

  18. Using Handheld Computers to Support Improved Classroom Assessment in Science: Results from a Field Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnall, Louise; Shechtman, Nicole; Penuel, William R.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of handheld applications and curricular materials have been developed to support inquiry science learning in recent years, but there are few handheld-supported assessment activities available to teachers. In Project WHIRL, researchers from SRI International worked in partnership with teachers from Beaufort County School District (SC) to…

  19. Implementing a Handheld Program Lessons from a District-Level Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Excitement about handhelds must be tempered by an understanding of what is typically required when any new technology is introduced into classrooms. We know, for example, that to succeed, handheld initiatives will need clear educational objectives and a logical theory of action that guides implementation. We can anticipate that teachers will need…

  20. Designing Handheld Software to Support Classroom Assessment: An Analysis of Conditions for Teacher Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Yarnall, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Since 2002, Project WHIRL (Wireless Handhelds In Reflection on Learning) has investigated potential uses of handheld computers in K-12 science classrooms using a teacher-involved process of software development and field trials. Te project is a three-year research and development grant from the National Science Foundation, and it is a partnership…

  1. Five Key Considerations for Networking in a Handheld-Based Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Vahey, Phil; Tatar, Deborah; Kaput, Jim; Hegedus, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Handheld devices, most familiar to educators today in the form of graphing calculators, are rapidly improving their interface, computational, and communication capabilities. Communication capabilities allow participants to rapidly share mathematical objects among their handhelds, potentially contributing to improved classroom discourse. We have…

  2. 75 FR 8400 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... and Battery Packs; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION... server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement of certain claims... importation of certain wireless communications system server software, wireless handheld devices or...

  3. Orchestrating the Instruments: Integrating ICT in the Secondary Mathematics Classroom through Handheld Technology Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study into the integration of ICT for students' personal use in the secondary mathematics classroom through using small software applications on handheld computing devices (graphical calculators). The handhelds were networked through wireless hubs so that data, software and output can be shared and an interactive space…

  4. Students Using Handheld Computers to Learn Collaboratively in a First Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Megan Lynne

    2005-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigated how first grade students used handheld computers to learn in collaboration with others throughout the learning process. This research focused specifically on how the use of handheld computers impacts students' learning outcomes and relates to technology standards. A qualitative methodology was used to capture…

  5. Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers: A Scoping Review of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice. Objective A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work. Methods A detailed search, sensitive for systematic reviews was applied for Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Global Health, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. All outcomes that demonstrated effectiveness in clinical practice were included. Classroom learning and patient use of handheld computers were excluded. Quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. A previously published conceptual framework was used as the basis for dual data extraction. Reported outcomes were summarized according to the primary function of the handheld computer. Results Five systematic reviews met the inclusion and quality criteria. Together, they reviewed 138 unique primary studies. Most reviewed descriptive intervention studies, where physicians, pharmacists, or medical students used personal digital assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across four distinct functions of handheld computers: patient documentation, patient care, information seeking, and professional work patterns. Within each of these functions, a range of positive outcomes were reported using both objective and self-report measures. The use of handheld computers improved patient documentation through more complete recording, fewer documentation errors, and increased efficiency. Handheld computers provided easy access to

  6. A hand-held EPR scanner for transcutaneous oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Helen; Ahmad, Rizwan; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous (skin) oxygenation is an important prognostic factor for the treatment of chronic wounds, skin cancer, diabetes side effects, and limb amputation. Currently, there are no reliable methods for measuring this parameter. Oximetry, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, is emerging as a potential tool for clinical oximetry, including cutaneous applications. The problem with EPR oximetry, however, is that the conventional EPR design requires the use of a large magnet that can generate homogeneous field across the sample, making it unattractive for clinical practice. We present a novel approach that makes use of a miniature permanent magnet, combined with a small microwave resonator, to enable the acquisition of EPR signals from paramagnetic species placed on the skin. The instrumentation consists of a hand-held, modular, cylindrical probehead with overall dimensions of 36-mm diameter and 24-mm height, with 150-g weight. The probehead includes a Halbach array of 16 pieces (4×4×8 mm3) of Sm-Co permanent magnet and a loop-gap resonator (2.24 GHz). Preliminary measurements using a Hahn-echo pulse sequence (800 echos in 20 ms) showed a signalto- noise ratio of ~70 compared to ~435 in a homogenous magnet under identical settings. Further work is in progress to improve the performance of the probehead and to optimize the hand-held system for clinical use

  7. Design of a handheld optical coherence microscopy endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde, Vrushali R.; Liebmann, Erica; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) combines coherence gating, high numerical aperture optics, and a fiber core pinhole to provide high axial and lateral resolution with relatively large depth of imaging. We present a handheld rigid OCM endoscope with a 6 mm diameter tip, 1 mm scan width, and 1 mm imaging depth. This probe will allow noninvasive imaging of fine structural detail in vivo. X-Y scanning is performed distally with mirrors mounted to micro galvonometer scanners incorporated into the endoscope handle. Two scanning doublet lenses relay the stop from the galvonometers to the afocal relay stop. The endoscope optical design consists of an afocal Hopkins relay lens system and a 0.4 NA objective. To allow focusing at various depths in the tissue, the endoscope housing is designed in two pieces screwed together with a fine pitch threads. A small rotation of the outer housing moves the lenses proximal and distal relative to the window, causing the focal location in the tissue to change. The space between the final objective lens and the window is filled with distilled water to avoid misalignment of the focus and coherence gate. A knife edge test was performed and the line spread function FWHM was measured to be 2.25 μm. The MTF has at least 0.3 contrast at a 5 μm line pair. This rigid handheld OCM endoscope will be useful for application ranging from minimally invasive surgical imaging to assessing dysplasia and sun damage in skin.

  8. Buried threat detection using a handheld ground penetrating radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Mary; Torrione, Peter; Collins, Leslie; Morton, Kenneth

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we explore the efficacy of two buried threat detectors on handheld data. The first algorithm is an energy-based algorithm, which computes how anomalous a given A-scan measurement after it is normalized according to its local statistics. It is based on a commonly used prescreener for the Husky Mounted Detection System (HMDS). In the HMDS setting measurements are sampled on a crosstrack-downtrack grid, and sequential measurements are at neighboring downtrack locations. In contrast, in the handheld setting sequential scans are often taken at neighboring crosstrack locations, and neighboring downtrack locations can be hundreds of scans away. In order to include both downtrack and crosstrack information, we compute local statistics over a much larger area than in the HMDS setting. The second algorithm is a shape-based algorithm. Shape Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features, which capture the gradient distributions of local patches, are extracted and used to train a non-linear Support Vector Machine (SVM). We found that in terms of AUC, the SIFT-SVM algorithm results in a 2.2% absolute improvement over the energy-based algorithm, with the greatest gains seen at lower false alarm rates.

  9. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  10. Military GPS handheld display development: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiel, Alicia P.; Smothers, Andrew D.

    1998-09-01

    The military Precision Lightweight Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver or 'PLGR' hand-held product eliminated many technical barriers to bring a low cost 'commercial' transflective display to be a standard military issue. This low cost display, combined with silicone keypad, provides a human interface that has been extremely successful at a current rate of 190 units built per day. With the PLGR and more recent PLGR-II success in meeting the challenges of the military GPS market with a low-cost display, the PLGR is now a platform to provide affordable military-commercial display solutions for the future. The paper will provide technical background on the display provided for the initial GPS hand- held award and the technology changes that were based on the voice of the customer. The display performance in the areas of contrast, Night Vision Goggle (NVG) compatibility, backlighting, and off axis viewability will be presented. Current and future challenges in hand-held and vehicular GPS products will also be presented with possible applications of new display technologies.

  11. Handheld standoff mine detection system (HSTAMIDS) field evaluation in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doheny, Robert C.; Burke, Sean; Cresci, Roger; Ngan, Peter; Walls, Richard; Chernoff, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program of the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), under the direction of the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (OASD SO/LIC) and with participation from the International Test and Evaluation Program (ITEP) for humanitarian demining, conducted an in-country field evaluation of the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) in the southern African country of Namibia. Participants included the US Humanitarian Demining Team of NVESD; ITEP personnel from several member countries; deminers from two non-governmental organizations in Angola, Menschen Gegen Minen (MgM) and HALO Trust; and CyTerra Corporation. The primary objectives were to demonstrate the performance of the U.S. Army's newest handheld multisensor mine detector, the HSTAMIDS, to the performance of the metal detector being used by local demining organizations and also to assess the performance of deminers using the HSTAMIDS after limited experience and training.

  12. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Miller, Fred S.

    1999-01-01

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  13. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  14. Turbulence degradation and mitigation performance for handheld weapon ID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Aghera, Sameer; Thompson, Roger; Miller, Jason

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence can severely limit the range performance of state-of-the-art large aperture imaging sensor systems, specifically those intended for long range ground to ground target identification. Simple and cost-effective mitigation solutions which operate in real-time are desired. Software-based post-processing techniques are attractive as they lend themselves to easy implementation and integration into the back-end of existing sensor systems. Recently, various post-processing algorithms to mitigate turbulence have been developed and implemented in real-time hardware. To determine their utility in Army-relevant tactical scenarios, an assessment of the impact of the post processing on observer performance is required. In this paper, we test a set of representative turbulence mitigation algorithms on field collected data of human targets carrying various handheld objects in varying turbulence conditions. We use a controlled human perception test to assess handheld weapon identification performance before and after turbulence mitigation post-processing. In addition, novel image analysis tools are implemented to estimate turbulence strength from the scene. Results of this assessment will lead to recommendations on cost-effective turbulence mitigation strategies suitable for future sensor systems.

  15. Programming Wireless Handheld Devices for Applications in Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiardja, R.; Saranathan, V.; Guidry, M.

    2002-12-01

    Wireless technology implemented with handheld devices has attractive features because of the potential to access large amounts of data and the prospect of on-the-fly computational analysis from a device that can be carried in a shirt pocket. We shall describe applications of such technology to the general paradigm of making digital wireless connections from the field to upload information and queries to network servers, executing (potentially complex) data analysis and/or database operations on fast network computers, and returning real-time information from this analysis to the handheld device in the field. As illustration, we shall describe several client/server programs that we have written for applications in teaching introductory astronomy. For example, one program allows static and dynamic properties of astronomical objects to be accessed in a remote observation laboratory setting using a digital cell phone or PDA. Another implements interactive quizzing over a cell phone or PDA using a 700-question introductory astronomy quiz database, thus permitting students to study for astronomy quizzes in any environment in which they have a few free minutes and a digital cell phone or wireless PDA. The presentation will include hands-on demonstrations with real devices.

  16. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the precise quantification of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 proviral loads in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients and identification of viral mutations.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Giovanna S; Massoud, Raya; Leibovitch, Emily C; Caruso, Breanna; Johnson, Kory; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Cortese, Irene; Jacobson, Steven

    2014-08-01

    An elevated human T cell lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV)-1 proviral load (PVL) is the main risk factor for developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 infected subjects, and a high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) PVL ratio may be diagnostic of the condition. However, the standard method for quantification of HTLV-1 PVL-real-time PCR-has multiple limitations, including increased inter-assay variability in compartments with low cell numbers, such as CSF. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated a novel technique for HTVL-1 PVL quantification, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). In ddPCR, PCR samples are partitioned into thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets, amplified on a thermocycler, and queried for fluorescent signal. Due to the high number of independent events (droplets), Poisson algorithms are used to determine absolute copy numbers independently of a standard curve, which enables highly precise quantitation. This assay has low intra-assay variability allowing for reliable PVL measurement in PBMC and CSF compartments of both asymptomatic carriers (AC) and HAM/TSP patients. It is also useful for HTLV-1-related clinical applications, such as longitudinal monitoring of PVL and identification of viral mutations within the region targeted by the primers and probe. PMID:24781526

  17. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. PMID:25089769

  18. Handheld access to radiology teaching files: an automated system for format conversion and content creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Raghav; Raman, Lalithakala; Raman, Bhargav; Gold, Garry; Beaulieu, Christopher F.

    2002-05-01

    Current handheld Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) can be used to view radiology teaching files. We have developed a toolkit that allows rapid creation of radiology teaching files in handheld formats from existing repositories. Our toolkit incorporated a desktop converter, a web conversion server and an application programming interface (API). Our API was integrated with an existing pilot teaching file database. We evaluated our system by obtaining test DICOM and JPEG images from our PACS system, our pilot database and from personal collections and converting them on a Windows workstation (Microsoft, Redmond, CA) and on other platforms using the web server. Our toolkit anonymized, annotated and categorized images using DICOM header information and data entered by the authors. Image processing was automatically customized for the target handheld device. We used freeware handheld image viewers as well as our custom applications that allowed window/level manipulation and viewing of additional textual information. Our toolkit provides desktop and web access to image conversion tools to produce organized handheld teaching file packages for most handheld devices and our API allows existing teaching file databases to incorporate handheld compatibility. The distribution of radiology teaching files on PDAs can increase the accessibility to radiology teaching.

  19. Hand-Held Reader for Colorimetric Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Askim, Jon R; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-08-01

    An inexpensive hand-held device for analysis of colorimetric sensor arrays (CSAs) has been developed. The device makes use of a contact image sensor (CIS), technology commonly used in business card scanners, to rapidly collect low-noise colorimetric data for chemical sensing. The lack of moving parts and insensitivity to vibration allow for lower noise and improved scan rates compared to other digital imaging techniques (e.g., digital cameras, flatbed scanners); signal-to-noise ratios are a factor of 3-10 higher than currently used methods, and scan rates are up to 250 times faster without compromising sensitivity. The device is capable of real-time chemical analysis at scan rates up to 48 Hz. PMID:26177346

  20. A Smart Haptic Hand-Held Device for Neurosurgical Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Microneurosurgery requires dexterity, precision and delicate force application in order to be carried out safely and effectively. Neurosurgeons must apply sufficient force in order to carry out microsurgical procedures effectively but not excessive force such that iatrogenic injury occurs. This paper presents a smart hand-held microsurgical instrument that indicates to the surgeon when a force-threshold has been exceeded by providing vibrotactile feedback. Many existing haptic-feedback systems, particularly master-slave robotic platforms, are large, highly complex, and costly. By comparison, the proposed device is compact, fail-safe and low cost. Two psychophysical user studies were carried out to assess the proposed vibrotactile force-threshold feedback system. A cadaveric pilot study was carried out to evaluate the device in a microdissection task. In all the studies performed, the haptic dissector device has shown to be effective in providing real-time feedback in terms of force application during microsurgical tasks. PMID:25631207

  1. Handheld Micromanipulation with Vision-Based Virtual Fixtures

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Brian C.; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Hager, Gregory D.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    Precise movement during micromanipulation becomes difficult in submillimeter workspaces, largely due to the destabilizing influence of tremor. Robotic aid combined with filtering techniques that suppress tremor frequency bands increases performance; however, if knowledge of the operator's goals is available, virtual fixtures have been shown to greatly improve micromanipulator precision. In this paper, we derive a control law for position-based virtual fixtures within the framework of an active handheld micromanipulator, where the fixtures are generated in real-time from microscope video. Additionally, we develop motion scaling behavior centered on virtual fixtures as a simple and direct extension to our formulation. We demonstrate that hard and soft (motion-scaled) virtual fixtures outperform state-of-the-art tremor cancellation performance on a set of artificial but medically relevant tasks: holding, move-and-hold, curve tracing, and volume restriction. PMID:23275860

  2. Comparative Geometrical Investigations of Hand-Held Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, T. P.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Lindstaedt, M.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Misgaiski-Hass, M.

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry) as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science): DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google's Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M). The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  3. Handheld multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging system for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo M; Liu, Boang; Malik, Bilal H; Jabbour, Joey M; Maitland, Kristen C; Wright, John; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Jo, Javier A

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in the application of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for medical diagnosis. Central to the clinical translation of FLIM technology is the development of compact and high-speed clinically compatible systems. We present a handheld probe design consisting of a small maneuverable box fitted with a rigid endoscope, capable of continuous lifetime imaging at multiple emission bands simultaneously. The system was characterized using standard fluorescent dyes. The performance was then further demonstrated by imaging a hamster cheek pouch in vivo, and oral mucosa tissue both ex vivo and in vivo, all using safe and permissible exposure levels. Such a design can greatly facilitate the evaluation of FLIM for oral cancer imaging in vivo. PMID:24688824

  4. Toward Standard Usability Questionnaires for Handheld Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marc Ericson C; Polvi, Jarkko; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Sandor, Christian; Kato, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Usability evaluations are important to improving handheld augmented reality (HAR) systems. However, no standard questionnaire considers perceptual and ergonomic issues found in HAR. The authors performed a systematic literature review to enumerate these issues. Based on these issues, they created a HAR usability scale that consists of comprehensibility and manipulability scales. These scales measure general system usability, ease of understanding the information presented, and ease of handling the device. The questionnaires' validity and reliability were evaluated in four experiments, and the results show that the questionnaires consistently correlate with other subjective and objective measures of usability. The questionnaires also have good reliability based on the Cronbach's alpha. Researchers and professionals can directly use these questionnaires to evaluate their own HAR applications or modify them with the insights presented in this article. PMID:26416363

  5. Flexure-based Manipulator for Active Handheld Microsurgical Instrument.

    PubMed

    Choi, David; Riviere, Cameron

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the design and initial experimental results of a flexure-based parallel manipulator that is actuated by three piezoelectric stacks. The manipulator is for an active handheld tremor canceling device for microsurgery. By using flexures to approximate pin and ball joints, errors due to friction, backlash, and imperfect assemblies have been eliminated. The results show that the manipulator is capable of tracking motions similar to physiological tremor in amplitude and frequency. The workspace of the manipulator is more than 7 times larger than the tremor space in the x and y axes, and about 1.5 times larger in the z axis. One dimensional and three dimensional tracking tests had rms errors of 6.5 μm and 12.1 μm respectively. PMID:17282701

  6. Flexure-based Manipulator for Active Handheld Microsurgical Instrument.

    PubMed

    Choi, David; Riviere, Cameron

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the design and initial experimental results of a flexure-based parallel manipulator that is actuated by three piezoelectric stacks. The manipulator is for an active handheld tremor canceling device for microsurgery. By using flexures to approximate pin and ball joints, errors due to friction, backlash, and imperfect assemblies have been eliminated. The results show that the manipulator is capable of tracking motions similar to physiological tremor in amplitude and frequency. The workspace of the manipulator is more than 7 times larger than the tremor space in the x and y axes, and about 1.5 times larger in the z axis. One dimensional and three dimensional tracking tests had rms errors of 6.5 μm and 12.1 μm respectively. PMID:17281390

  7. Design and Analysis of 6 DOF Handheld Micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2012-12-31

    This paper presents the design and analysis of a handheld manipulator for vitreoretinal microsurgery and other biomedical applications. The design involves a parallel micromanipulator utilizing six piezoelectric linear actuators, combining compactness with a large range of motion and relatively high stiffness. Given the available force of the actuators, the overall dimension of the micromanipulator was optimized considering realistic external loads on a remote center of motion representing the point of expected contact with the sclera of the eye during microsurgery. Based on optimization and workspace analysis, a benchtop version of the micromanipulator was built with a base diameter of 25 mm and a height of 50 mm. It provides a hemispherical workspace of 4.0 mm diameter at the tool tip. The manipulation performance of the constructed manipulator was measured under a lateral load applied at the remote center of motion. The micromanipulator tolerated side loads up to 200 mN. PMID:24649394

  8. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  9. Radioactive uranium measurement in vivo using a handheld interfaced analyzer.

    PubMed

    Ly, Suw Young; Lee, Jin-Hui; Jung, Dong Ho

    2010-05-01

    A trace uranium (U) detection method was developed with a handheld voltammetric analyzer that was the size of a mobile phone, with working sensors made of simple graphite pencil electrode (PE). The optimum stripping voltammetric conditions were sought, and the following results were obtained: 0.0 to 0.08 ng/L working ranges and a statistically relative standard deviation of 1.78% (RSD; n=15) at a 10.0 microg/L U spike. The experiment accumulation time used was only 150 s. Under this condition, the diagnostic detection limit approached 0.007 ng/L. The method was applied to soil of a natural rock in a radioactive mineralogy site. Earthworms that resided at this site were assayed. The method was found to be applicable in biological diagnosis or in real-time in vivo survey. PMID:20821536

  10. Self-contained, hand-held optical spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.; Nogar, N.S.

    1994-12-31

    The authors describe the design(s) and performance of a self-contained, portable (hand-held) optical spectrometer. The current instrument is based on a miniaturized monochromator, diode array detector, Peltier cooler and microprocessor control. It can be used either in absorption mode, or in a fluorescence-excitation mode (using an on-board UV penlamp). The unit contains an on-board computer, control pad and LCD display, and can write data to a demountable data key. On-board batteries allow operation for up to three hours in data acquisition mode, or up to twenty-four hours in stand-by mode. The instrument may couple to the sample either fiber-optically, or directly with a light-tight coupling unit. The authors also describe second generation instruments incorporating monolithic optical devices and/or interference filters. In general, these instruments can be made more compact, but at some cost in versatility and information content.

  11. Physician order entry of ultrasound examination with handheld wireless terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, Shiro; Onogi, Yuzo; Shinohara, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Izumi; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Niidome, Takuro; Oyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Although our hospital has an electronic order entry system, physician order entries must be performed using one of a limited number of terminals which are located in places like nurse stations. Due to this limitation, the mobility of the ultrasound machine cannot be fully exploited if a physician wants to perform a mobile ultrasound examination far from an entry terminal. In addition, this situation increases the possibility that a physician will fail to issue a paper voucher of the examination. In an attempt to resolve these problems, we have developed a mobile physician order entry system that incorporates ultrasound machines equipped with handheld wireless terminals, which use the 802.11b standard and the bandwidth is 11 Mbps. This is an efficient way to order ultrasound examination entries because physicians can register entries at any location in a hospital ward. In addition, the proposed system is a reliable method by which to attach images upon ultrasound examination entry.

  12. Center of percussion of hand-held implements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2004-05-01

    The center of percussion is commonly regarded as a sweet spot when referring to a baseball bat or a tennis racquet because it is assumed that there will be no sudden motion of the handle with respect to the hand if the corresponding axis of rotation passes through the hand. A problem with this interpretation is that the hand extends over a finite length of the handle and exerts an opposing reaction force on the handle. The hand also changes the total mass and moment of inertia of the system, while the arm restricts free motion of the hand. Experimental results are presented showing that the axis of rotation passes through the hand or the wrist for all the usual impact points on a hand-held implement. As a result, the impact point that feels best is usually the node of the fundamental vibration mode, not the center of percussion.

  13. Diagnostic Capability of Comprehensive Handheld vs Transthoracic Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Michael W.; Blauwet, Lori A.; Vatury, Ori M.; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Behrenbeck, Thomas R.; Scott, Christopher G.; Pellikka, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic capability of handheld echocardiography (HHE) compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) performed and evaluated by experienced sonographers and expert echocardiographers. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective study of adult outpatients undergoing comprehensive TTE from July 9, 2012, through April 3, 2013. Experienced sonographers performed a detailed, standardized examination with a handheld ultrasound device (Vscan; GE Healthcare) that included 2-dimensional and color Doppler images from standard imaging windows. TTE and HHE images were independently interpreted by expert echocardiographers to whom the other study was masked. Agreement between the standard TTE and the HHE reports was analyzed. Results The study group contained 190 patients (mean [SD] age, 62 [17] years; 49% male). κ Values were 0.52 for left ventricular (LV) enlargement, 0.52 for right ventricular enlargement, 0.62 for regional wall motion abnormalities, 0.73 for aortic stenosis, and 0.61 for mitral regurgitation. Lin concordance correlation coefficients ranged from 0.89 for LV end-systolic diameter to 0.78 for LV end-diastolic diameter. In 51 patients (27%), echocardiographic findings were discordant between HHE and standard TTE. The most common discordant finding was the presence vs absence of any regional wall motion abnormalities. In discordant cases, HHE tended to underestimate, rather than overestimate, the severity of abnormal findings. Conclusion HHE in experienced hands shows moderate correlation with standard TTE, but discordant findings were present in 27% of patients. HHE, even when performed and interpreted by experienced operators, should not be used as a surrogate for standard TTE. PMID:24684783

  14. A handheld laser-induced fluorescence detector for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Han-Yang; Fang, Pan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Fang, Qun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a compact handheld laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on a 450 nm laser diode and quasi-confocal optical configuration with a total size of 9.1 × 6.2 × 4.1 cm(3). Since there are few reports on the use of 450 nm laser diode in LIF detection, especially in miniaturized LIF detector, we systematically investigated various optical arrangements suitable for the requirements of 450 nm laser diode and system miniaturization, including focusing lens, filter combination, and pinhole, as well as Raman effect of water at 450 nm excitation wavelength. As the result, the handheld LIF detector integrates the light source (450 nm laser diode), optical circuit module (including a 450 nm band-pass filter, a dichroic mirror, a collimating lens, a 525 nm band-pass filter, and a 1.0mm aperture), optical detector (miniaturized photomultiplier tube), as well as electronic module (including signal recording, processing and displaying units). This detector is capable of working independently with a cost of ca. $2000 for the whole instrument. The detection limit of the instrument for sodium fluorescein solution is 0.42 nM (S/N=3). The broad applicability of the present system was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled amino acids and in flow cytometry of tumor cells as an on-line LIF detector, as well as in droplet array chip analysis as a LIF scanner. We expect such a compact LIF detector could be applied in flow analysis systems as an on-line detector, and in field analysis and biosensor analysis as a portable universal LIF detector. PMID:26838391

  15. Productivity enhancements using hand-held computers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bruns, B J

    1991-01-01

    In closing, the benefits of computerizing the equipment control information system have been assessed qualitatively and, to an extent, quantitatively. We have seen a drastic improvement in the operation of the clinical engineering department. Equipment repair and inspection results are readily accessible for technician use. Equipment service reports are typed and easy to read. Accountability of repair parts are immediately available for restocking and financial needs. Feedback reports are generated on a regular and timely basis. We have shown a reduction of around 12 minutes in the inspection procedure. This time has been directly linked to the automation of the inspection process using hand-held computers. The cost of automation was inexpensive, as the hand-held computers cost around 500 dollars per unit. Currently, the devices are used by any technician who performs inspections outside the department. The units time the inspection process and record the inspection result. We have interfaced the units to portable bar-code printers that produce an inspection label on-site. In the future, bar-code wands and guns will be used to streamline the data entry process of the inspection. A reduction in the number of incorrectly typed ECNs will improve the integrity of the database. The use of bar-codes will eventually spread to the parts' system. This will improve tracking, ordering, and inventorying repair parts. The plan is to improve the documentation of these parts and ease the analysis of new equipment needs, manufacturer reliability, and contract evaluations. At the present, we are addressing the problem of preparation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2032064

  16. Hand-held echocardiography: its use and usefulness.

    PubMed

    Mondillo, Sergio; Giannotti, Giovanna; Innelli, Pasquale; Ballo, Pier Carlo; Galderisi, Maurizio

    2006-07-28

    In recent years, several echocardiographic hand-held devices have been developed and are now available for a growing number of cardiologists. After the first clinical use 25 years ago, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) is now earning important commercial positions. Their transportability permits echo performance out the echo-labs and offers the possibility to make diagnosis in intensive care unit, emergency room, outpatient clinic, at the bedside, and even in ambulance. Experiences in the clinical setting have demonstrated the ability of HHE to detect multiple diseases including abdominal aortic aneurysms, left ventricular hypertrophy, regional wall motion abnormalities, pericardial and pleural effusions. At the present time, four varieties of HHE have to be recognized: the first includes high-cost, miniaturized machines, similar to the most advanced instrumentations, provided by new tools and imaging transfer systems; a second intermediate, middle-cost variety encompasses devices corresponding to standard echocardiography, but not miniaturized; according to the definition of the American Society of Echocardiography, a third and a fourth category comprise machines of weight lower than 2.7 kg, battery supplied and appropriately defined as "portable cardioschopes", which can be utilized as a technical refinement of physical examination. The use of HHE opens main controversy concerning their diagnostic accuracy, the opportunity to establish in which clinical settings they should be used and the identification of both potential users and required competence level. Preliminary experiences show the possibility to improve and anticipate diagnosis of several cardiovascular diseases but also the need to plan specific ultrasound training to avoid incorrect use of HHE. PMID:16087257

  17. Infrared detection, recognition and identification of handheld objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    A main criterion for comparison and selection of thermal imagers for military applications is their nominal range performance. This nominal range performance is calculated for a defined task and standardized target and environmental conditions. The only standardization available to date is STANAG 4347. The target defined there is based on a main battle tank in front view. Because of modified military requirements, this target is no longer up-to-date. Today, different topics of interest are of interest, especially differentiation between friend and foe and identification of humans. There is no direct way to differentiate between friend and foe in asymmetric scenarios, but one clue can be that someone is carrying a weapon. This clue can be transformed in the observer tasks detection: a person is carrying or is not carrying an object, recognition: the object is a long / medium / short range weapon or civil equipment and identification: the object can be named (e. g. AK-47, M-4, G36, RPG7, Axe, Shovel etc.). These tasks can be assessed experimentally and from the results of such an assessment, a standard target for handheld objects may be derived. For a first assessment, a human carrying 13 different handheld objects in front of his chest was recorded at four different ranges with an IR-dual-band camera. From the recorded data, a perception experiment was prepared. It was conducted with 17 observers in a 13-alternative forced choice, unlimited observation time arrangement. The results of the test together with Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived measurements of the camera and temperature difference and critical dimension derived from the recorded imagery allowed defining a first standard target according to the above tasks. This standard target consist of 2.5 / 3.5 / 5 DRI line pairs on target, 0.24 m critical size and 1 K temperature difference. The values are preliminary and have to be refined in the future. Necessary are different aspect angles, different

  18. Implementation of the 7-point checklist for melanoma detection on smart handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Rui, Hu; Lancaster, Keith; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we implement the 7-point checklist, a set of dermoscopic criteria widely used by clinicians for melanoma detection, on smart handheld devices, such as the Apple iPhone and iPad. The application developed is using sophisticated image processing and pattern recognition algorithms, yet it is light enough to run on a handheld device with limited memory and computational speed. When combined with a commercially available handheld dermoscope that provides proper lesion illumination, this application provides a truly self-contained handheld system for melanoma detection. Such a device can be used in a clinical setting for routine skin screening, or as an assistive diagnostic device in underserved areas and in developing countries with limited healthcare infrastructure. PMID:22255015

  19. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  20. Hand-held based near-infrared optical imaging devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sarah J; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-06-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is a non-invasive and non-ionizing modality that is emerging as a diagnostic/prognostic tool for breast cancer and other applications related to functional brain mapping. In recent years, hand-held based optical imaging devices are developed for clinical translation of the technology, as opposed to the various bulky optical imagers available. Herein, we review the different hand-held based NIR devices developed to date, in terms of the measurement techniques implemented (continuous wave, time or frequency-domain), the imaging methods used, and the specific applications towards which they were applied. The advantages and disadvantages of the different hand-held optical devices are described and also compared with respect to a novel hand-held based device currently developed in our Optical Imaging Laboratory towards three-dimensional tomography studies. PMID:19054704

  1. Demonstration Report: Handheld UXO Discriminator, SERDP No. MR-1667

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, E.

    2010-09-01

    In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed! The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs.' In keeping with these remarks and with prior funding (UX-1225, MM-0437, and MM-0838), the LBNL group has successfully designed and built the cart-mounted Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) and demonstrated its performance at various test sites (cf. Gasperikova et al., 2007, 2008, and 2009). Because hand-held systems have the advantage of being lightweight, compact, portable, and deployable under most site conditions, they are particularly useful in areas of dense vegetation or challenging terrain. In heavily wooded areas or areas with steep or uneven terrain, hand-held sensors may be the only suitable device for UXO detection and discrimination because it can be carried through spaces that the operator could walk through or at least approach. Furthermore, it is desirable to find and characterize a metallic object without the need to accurately locate the sensors at multiple positions around the target. The ideal system would thus locate and characterize the target from a single position of the sensor and indicate to the operator where to flag the target for subsequent study. Based on these considerations, we designed and built a sensor package in a shape of a 14-in (0.35 m) cube. This hand-held prototype incorporates the key features of the cart-mounted system - (a) three orthogonal transmitters and ten pairs of receivers, and (b) difference or gradient measurements that significantly reduce the ambient and motion

  2. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  3. Dental staff doses with handheld dental intraoral x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel E; Bailey, Edgar D; Ludlow, John B

    2012-02-01

    A handheld portable dental intraoral x-ray system is available in the United States and elsewhere. The system is designed to minimize the user's radiation dose. It includes specially designed shielding of the x-ray tube housing and an integral radiation shield to minimize backscatter. Personnel radiation dose records were obtained from 18 dental facilities using both the handheld system and a wall mounted dental x-ray system, providing 661 individual dose measurements. Dental staff doses were also compared for the handheld and conventional systems using both film and digital imaging for the same facilities and staff members. The results indicate that the doses for the handheld systems are significantly less than for wall-mounted systems. The average monthly dose for the handheld systems was 0.28 μSv vs. 7.86 μSv (deep dose equivalent) for the wall-mounted systems, a difference that is statistically significant at the p = 0.01 level. Consequently, there should be no concern about the use of this handheld dental intraoral x-ray system. Additional shielding efforts, (e.g., wearing a lead apron) will not provide significant benefit nor reduce staff radiation dose. PMID:22217586

  4. Handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography: developments, applications, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Sinescu, C.; Cernat, R.; Dobre, G.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the handheld scanning probes that we have recently developed in our current project for biomedical imaging in general and for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in particular. OCT is an established, but dynamic imagistic technique based on laser interferometry, which offers micrometer resolutions and millimeters penetration depths. With regard to existing devices, the newly developed handheld probes are simple, light and relatively low cost. Their design is described in detail to allow for the reproduction in any lab, including for educational purposes. Two probes are constructed almost entirely from off-the-shelf components, while a third, final variant is constructed with dedicated components, in an ergonomic design. The handheld probes have uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer scanners therefore they achieve transversal sections through the biological sample investigated - in contrast to handheld probes equipped with bi-dimensional (2D) scanners that can also achieve volumetric (3D) reconstructions of the samples. These latter handheld probes are therefore also discussed, as well as the possibility to equip them with galvanometer 2D scanners or with Risley prisms. For galvanometer scanners the optimal scanning functions studied in a series of previous works are pointed out; these functions offer a higher temporal efficiency/duty cycle of the scanning process, as well as artifact-free OCT images. The testing of the handheld scanning probes in dental applications is presented, for metal ceramic prosthesis and for teeth.

  5. Electrochemical detection of harmful algae and other microbial contaminants in coastal waters using hand-held biosensors.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Michael J; Fell, Jack W; Goodwin, Kelly D

    2007-06-01

    Standard methods to identify microbial contaminants in the environment are slow, laborious, and can require specialized expertise. This study investigated electrochemical detection of microbial contaminants using commercially available, hand-held instruments. Electrochemical assays were developed for a red tide dinoflagellate (Karenia brevis), fecal-indicating bacteria (Enterococcus spp.), markers indicative of human sources of fecal pollution (human cluster Bacteroides and the esp gene of Enterococcus faecium), bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Staphylococcus aureus), and a viral pathogen (adenovirus). For K. brevis, two assay formats (Rapid PCR-Detect and Hybrid PCR-Detect) were tested and both provided detection limits of 10 genome equivalents for DNA isolated from K. brevis culture and amplified by PCR. Sensitivity with coastal water samples was sufficient to detect K. brevis that was "present" (

  6. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  7. Handheld Flyback driven coaxial dielectric barrier discharge: Development and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V. J.; Milosavljevic, V.; O'Connor, N.; Daniels, S.; Lalor, J. F.

    2008-09-15

    The development of a handheld single and triple chamber atmospheric pressure coaxial dielectric barrier discharge driven by Flyback circuitry for helium and argon discharges is described. The Flyback uses external metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor power switching technology and the transformer operates in the continuous current mode to convert a continuous dc power of 10-33 W to generate a 1.2-1.6 kV 3.5 {mu}s pulse. An argon discharge breakdown voltage of {approx}768 V is measured. With a 50 kHz, pulse repetition rate and an argon flow rate of 0.5-10 argon slm (slm denotes standard liters per minute), the electrical power density deposited in the volume discharge increases linearly at a rate of 75{+-}20% mW/cm{sup 3} per 1 slm of gas. Electrical power transfer efficiency between the secondary Flyback coil and the discharge volume increases from 0.1% to 0.65%. Neutral argon gas forced convection analysis yields a similar energy loss rate to the electrical discharge process. Optical emission spectroscopy studies of the expanding discharge plume into ambient air reveal that the air climatically controls the plume chemistry to produce an abundance of neutral argon atoms and molecular nitrogen.

  8. Bone age maturity assessment using hand-held device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Gilsanz, Vicente; Liu, Xiaodong; Boechat, M. I.

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: Assessment of bone maturity is traditionally performed through visual comparison of hand and wrist radiograph with existing reference images in textbooks. Our goal was to develop a digital index based on idealized hand Xray images that can be incorporated in a hand held computer and used for visual assessment of bone age for patients. Material and methods: Due to the large variability in bone maturation in normals, we generated a set of "ideal" images obtained by computer combinations of images from our normal reference data sets. Software for hand-held PDA devices was developed for easy navigation through the set of images and visual selection of matching images. A formula based on our statistical analysis provides the standard deviation from normal based on the chronological age of the patient. The accuracy of the program was compared to traditional interpretation by two radiologists in a double blind reading of 200 normal Caucasian children (100 boys, 100 girls). Results: Strong correlations were present between chronological age and bone age (r > 0.9) with no statistical difference between the digital and traditional assessment methods. Determinations of carpal bone maturity in adolescents was slightly more accurate using the digital system. The users did praise the convenience and effectiveness of the digital Palm Index in clinical practice. Conclusion: An idealized digital Palm Bone Age Index provides a convenient and effective alternative to conventional atlases for the assessment of skeletal maturity.

  9. An analysis of sweep patterns for a handheld demining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Gader, P. D.; Ho, K. C.; Mazhar, R.

    2006-05-01

    Handheld sensors are commonly used to assist in landmine location and removal. A number of computer systems aimed at assisting humans in discriminating between buried mines and other objects have been developed. Each such system requires some protocol that involves sweeping the sensor over a region of ground using some set of patterns to search for objects (detection) and determine the nature of those objects (discrimination). The work reported here is an effort to determine an acceptable sweep pattern for mine/nonmine discrimination that provides good performance while still being simple for the operator to use. The paper describes a series of data collections and case studies employing a combined radar and metal detection sensor. The system was evaluated first using a robotic operator and later human operators. We discuss the application of a supervised learning system discriminator to each data set, and evaluate discrimination performance. We found that using a relatively simple sweep pattern, computer algorithms can achieve better discrimination performance than an expert human operator, and that (at least up to ten sweeps) our computer algorithm performs better with more sweeps over target.

  10. Mammographic interpretation training: how useful is handheld technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.; Scott, Hazel

    2008-03-01

    In the UK a national self-assessment scheme (PERFORMS) for mammographers is undertaken as part of the National Health Search Breast Screening Programme. Where appropriate, further training is suggested to improve performance. Ideally, such training would be on-demand; that is whenever and wherever an individual decides to undertake it. To use a portable device for such a purpose would be attractive on many levels. However, it is not known whether handheld technology can be used effectively for viewing mammographic images. Previous studies indicate the potential for viewing medical images with fairly low spatial resolution (e.g. CT, MRI) on PDAs. In this study, we set out to investigate factors that might affect the feasibility of using PDAs as a training technology for examining large, high resolution mammographic images. Two studies are reported: 20 mammographers examined a series of mammograms presented on a PDA, specifying the location of any abnormality. Secondly, a group of technologists examined a series of mammograms presented at different sizes and resolutions to mimic presentation on a PDA and their eye movements were recorded. The results indicate the potential for using PDAs to show such large, high resolution images if suitable Human-computer Interaction (HCI) techniques are employed.

  11. Handheld Flyback driven coaxial dielectric barrier discharge: Development and characterization.

    PubMed

    Law, V J; Milosavljević, V; O'Connor, N; Lalor, J F; Daniels, S

    2008-09-01

    The development of a handheld single and triple chamber atmospheric pressure coaxial dielectric barrier discharge driven by Flyback circuitry for helium and argon discharges is described. The Flyback uses external metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor power switching technology and the transformer operates in the continuous current mode to convert a continuous dc power of 10-33 W to generate a 1.2-1.6 kV 3.5 micros pulse. An argon discharge breakdown voltage of approximately 768 V is measured. With a 50 kHz, pulse repetition rate and an argon flow rate of 0.5-10 argon slm (slm denotes standard liters per minute), the electrical power density deposited in the volume discharge increases linearly at a rate of 75+/-20% mW/cm(3) per 1 slm of gas. Electrical power transfer efficiency between the secondary Flyback coil and the discharge volume increases from 0.1% to 0.65%. Neutral argon gas forced convection analysis yields a similar energy loss rate to the electrical discharge process. Optical emission spectroscopy studies of the expanding discharge plume into ambient air reveal that the air climatically controls the plume chemistry to produce an abundance of neutral argon atoms and molecular nitrogen. PMID:19044446

  12. Cordless hand-held optical 3D sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkelt, Christoph; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Kühmstedt, Peter; Schmidt, Ingo; Notni, Gunther

    2007-07-01

    A new mobile optical 3D measurement system using phase correlation based fringe projection technique will be presented. The sensor consist of a digital projection unit and two cameras in a stereo arrangement, whereby both are battery powered. The data transfer to a base station will be done via WLAN. This gives the possibility to use the system in complicate, remote measurement situations, which are typical in archaeology and architecture. In the measurement procedure the sensor will be hand-held by the user, illuminating the object with a sequence of less than 10 fringe patterns, within a time below 200 ms. This short sequence duration was achieved by a new approach, which combines the epipolar constraint with robust phase correlation utilizing a pre-calibrated sensor head, containing two cameras and a digital fringe projector. Furthermore, the system can be utilized to acquire the all around shape of objects by using the phasogrammetric approach with virtual land marks introduced by the authors 1, 2. This way no matching procedures or markers are necessary for the registration of multiple views, which makes the system very flexible in accomplishing different measurement tasks. The realized measurement field is approx. 100 mm up to 400 mm in diameter. The mobile character makes the measurement system useful for a wide range of applications in arts, architecture, archaeology and criminology, which will be shown in the paper.

  13. Portable multiwavelength laser diode source for handheld photoacoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The ageing population faces today an increase of chronic diseases such as rheumatism/arthritis, cancer and cardio vascular diseases for which appropriate treatments based on a diagnosis at an early-stage of the disease are required. Some imaging techniques are already available in order to get structural information. Within the non-invasive group, ultrasound images are common in these fields of medicine. However, there is a need for a point-of-care device for imaging smaller structures such as blood vessels that cannot be observed with purely ultrasound based devices. Photoacoustics proved to be an attractive candidate. This novel imaging technique combines pulsed laser light for excitation of tissues and an ultrasound transducer as a receptor. Introduction of this technique into the clinic requires to drastically shrink the size and cost of the expensive and bulky nanosecond lasers generally used for light emission. In that context, demonstration of ultra-short pulse emission with highly efficient laser diodes in the near-infrared range has been performed by Quantel, France. A multi-wavelength laser source as small as a hand emitted more than 1 mJ per wavelength with four different wavelengths available in pulses of about 90 ns. Such a laser source can be integrated into high sensitivity photoacoustic handheld systems due to their outstanding electrical-to-optical efficiency of about 25 %. Further work continues to decrease the pulse length as low as 40 ns while increasing the pulse energy to 2 mJ.

  14. Military forensic use of handheld 3D camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Hâkan; Letalick, Dietmar

    2013-05-01

    One of the main threats for armed forces in conflict areas are attacks by improvised explosive devices (IED). After an IED attack a forensic investigation of the site is undertaken. In many ways military forensic work is similar to the civilian counterpart. There are the same needs to acquire evidence in the crime scene, such as fingerprints, DNA, and samples of the remains of the IED. Photos have to be taken and the geometry of the location shall be measured, preferably in 3D. A main difference between the military and the civilian forensic work is the time slot available for the scene investigation. The military must work under the threat of fire assault, e.g. snipers. The short time slot puts great demands on the forensic team and the equipment they use. We have done performance measurements of the Mantis-Vision F5 sensor and evaluated the usefulness in military forensic applications. This paper will describe some applications and show possibilities and also limitations of using a handheld laser imaging sensor for military forensic investigations.

  15. Automated working distance adjustment for a handheld OCT-Laryngoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Sabine; Bleeker, Sebastian; Ripken, Tammo; Krueger, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique which enables diagnosis of vocal cord tissue structure by non-contact optical biopsies rather than invasive tissue biopsies. For diagnosis on awake patients OCT was adapted to a rigid indirect laryngoscope. The working distance must match the probe-sample distance, which varies from patient to patient. Therefore the endoscopic OCT sample arm has a variable working distance of 40 mm to 80 mm. The current axial position is identified by automated working distance adjustments based on image processing. The OCT reference plane and the focal plane of the sample arm are moved according to position errors. Repeated position adjustment during the whole diagnostic procedure keeps the tissue sample at the optimal axial position. The auto focus identifies and adjusts the working distance within the range of 50 mm within a maximum time of 2.7 s. Continuous image stabilisation reduces axial sample movement within the sampling depth for handheld OCT scanning. Rapid autofocus reduces the duration of the diagnostic procedure and axial position stabilisation eases the use of the OCT laryngoscope. Therefore this work is an important step towards the integration of OCT into indirect laryngoscopes.

  16. A simple handheld pupillometer for chromatic Flicker studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, M.; Tinarelli, R.; Peretto, L.; Rovati, L.

    2014-02-01

    A portable pupillometer has been developed which is capable of performing accurate measurements of the pupil diameter during chromatic flicker stimulations. The handheld measuring system records the near-infrared image of the pupil at the rate of 25 fps and simultaneously stimulates the eye using a diffused flicker light generated by light emitting diodes (LEDs). Intensity, frequency and chromatic coordinates of the stimulus can be easily adjusted using a user-friendly graphical interface. Thanks to a chromatic monitoring of the stimulus close to the plane of the eye, photopically matched conditions can be easily achieved. The pupil diameter/area can be measured during flickering stimuli that are generated with frequency in a range of 0.1-20 Hz. The electronic unit, properly connected to the personal computer through a USB port, drives the optical unit, which can be easily held in a hand. The software interface controlling the system was developed in LabVIEW. This paper describes the instrument optical setup, front-end electronics and data processing. Moreover preliminary results obtained on a voluntary are reported.

  17. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging with a handheld system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Pim J.; Daoudi, Khalid; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-02-01

    Flow imaging is an important technique in a range of disease areas, but estimating low flow speeds, especially near the walls of blood vessels, remains challenging. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging can be an alternative since there is little signal contamination from background tissue with photoacoustic imaging. We propose flow imaging using a clinical photoacoustic system that is both handheld and portable. The system integrates a linear array with 7.5 MHz central frequency in combination with a high-repetition-rate diode laser to allow high-speed photoacoustic imaging-ideal for this application. This work shows the flow imaging performance of the system in vitro using microparticles. Both two-dimensional (2-D) flow images and quantitative flow velocities from 12 to 75 mm/s were obtained. In a transparent bulk medium, flow estimation showed standard errors of ˜7% the estimated speed; in the presence of tissue-realistic optical scattering, the error increased to 40% due to limited signal-to-noise ratio. In the future, photoacoustic flow imaging can potentially be performed in vivo using fluorophore-filled vesicles or with an improved setup on whole blood.

  18. NUVU: handheld instruments for video inspection of aircraft wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, John N.; Mehrotra, Yogesh; Kaplan, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Most of the current practices of manual visual inspection of aircraft wiring bundles can be replaced or assisted by a portable test system consisting of a miniature B/W or color TV camera and controllable uniform illumination mounted in a flashlight-sized, hand-held unit weighing less than one pound. The location and configuration of the battery power supply and image viewing and storage means are at the discretion of the inspector. A typical viewed area is nominally 1 inch by 1.3 inches, with a depth of field up to 1.5 inches. Tradeoffs among pixel dimensions, geometrical optics, and lens diffraction which arise in the design of such a unit are discussed. Data are presented showing actuator measured depths of field and image resolutions vs. variable camera lens aperture under real conditions. The image size in these tests provided an overall 12X enlargement of the target, as viewed by the inspector in real time. On insulated wires as small as 1mm OD, printed markings are easily seen and read, as are common chafes, radial surface cracks, and other surface anomalies of the insulation. The present mechanical design permits the small unit not only to inspect areas in any direction to which the hand and wrist can point, but also allows insertion of the unit in areas not easily accessible to the hand or eye.

  19. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  20. Use of the hand-held calculator in office ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Christenson, D; McCown, R B

    1984-09-01

    Office ultrasonographers may use various fetal measurements for indices of fetal growth. One index predicts birth weight from biparietal diameter (BPD) and abdominal circumference from a set of reference tables generated by a computer-assisted analysis. An inexpensive hand-held programmable calculator may be used instead of the reference table to estimate birth weight. It produces results by direct calculation from the original equation after BPD and abdominal circumference are entered as data. A step-by-step program for a representative calculator is provided, along with data entry instructions. The program also will calculate the head-to-abdomen circumference ratio. Other functions that could be placed on pocket calculators include fetal brain-weight calculations or gestational age determinations from limb measurements. Because it is possible to represent any graph or data point set as a polynominal equation, entering the equation into a programmable calculator can eliminate tedious searches through charts and graphs. A table or graph can use only two measured parameters at a time, representing their complex relationship with a result. It is not possible to represent a result in terms of more than two parameters using a single graph or chart. A calculator permits complex calculations relating more than two parameters by the office practitioner as well as the researcher. PMID:6462574

  1. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  2. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  3. A short target real-time RT-PCR assay for detection of pestiviruses infecting cattle.

    PubMed

    La Rocca, S A; Sandvik, T

    2009-10-01

    A rapid single step real-time duplex TaqMan RT-PCR was developed for detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)-1, BVDV-2 and border disease virus (BDV). Based on alignment of available and newly generated partial 5'-UTR nucleotide sequences, one forward and two reverse primers were designed, which amplify a 104bp PCR product. Two TaqMan probes labelled with different fluorochromes were designed to detect BVDV-1/BVDV-2 and BDVs, respectively. The assay was able to detect a selection of strains and isolates that represent the genetic diversity of these three viruses, with an analytical sensitivity that corresponded to 3.6, 48 and 4.8 TCID(50) of BVDV-1, BVDV-2 and BDV, respectively. With an overall cycling time of around 70 min, the assay allows rapid diagnosis and efficient use of modern thermocycling machines. Although developed principally for the diagnosis of BVD, the assay should be equally useful for diagnosis of BD in sheep. PMID:19523981

  4. Hand-Held Units for Short-Range Wireless Biotelemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2008-01-01

    Special-purpose hand-held radiotransceiver units have been proposed as means of short-range radio powering and interrogation of surgically implanted microelectromechanical sensors and actuators. These units are based partly on the same principles as those of the units described in "Printed Multi- Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry" (LEW-17879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 48. Like the previously reported units, these units would make it unnecessary to have wire connections between the implanted devices and the external equipment used to activate and interrogate them. Like a unit of the previously reported type, a unit of the type now proposed would include a printed-circuit antenna on a dielectric substrate. The antenna circuitry would include integrated surface-mount inductors for impedance tuning. Circuits for processing the signals transmitted and received by the antenna would be included on the substrate. During operation, the unit would be positioned near (but not in electrical contact with) a human subject, in proximity to a microelectromechanical sensor or actuator that has been surgically implanted in the subject. It has been demonstrated that significant electromagnetic coupling with an implanted device could be established at a distance of as much as 4 in. (.10 cm). During operation in the interrogation mode, the antenna of the unit would receive a radio telemetry signal transmitted by the surgically implanted device. The antenna substrate would have dimensions of approximately 3.25 by 3.75 inches (approximately 8.3 by 9.5 cm). The substrate would have a thickness of the order of 30 mils (of the order of a somewhat less than a millimeter). The substrate would be made of low-radiofrequency- loss dielectric material that could be, for example, fused quartz, alumina, or any of a number of commercially available radio-frequency dielectric composite materials. The antenna conductors would typically be made of copper or a

  5. Portable Hand-Held Electrochemical Sensor for the Transuranics

    SciTech Connect

    Dale D. Russell, William B. Knowlton, Ph.D.; Russel Hertzog, Ph.D

    2005-11-25

    sensitive detector for uranium. Millimeter scale electrodes, operated by a hand-held instrument assembled in this lab and operated in the voltammetric mode, were transported to the DOE-Nevada test site (Las Vegas, NV) where field detection and quantitation of plutonium, uranium, and a mixture of these two elements was also demonstrated. Several probe designs were prepared, built and tested including probes with movable protective windows. A miniature, battery powered potentiostat was designed, built and demonstrated for use in a hand-held field portable instrument. This work was performed largely by undergraduates who gained valuable research experience, and many of them have continued on to graduate schools. In addition, they all gained exposure to and appreciation for national security research, in particular non-proliferation research. Four graduate students participated and one earned the MS degree on this project.

  6. Direction-Sensitive Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2012-10-04

    A novel, light-weight, hand-held gamma-ray detector with directional sensitivity is being designed. The detector uses a set of multiple rings around two cylindrical surfaces, which provides precise location of two interaction points on two concentric cylindrical planes, wherefrom the source location can be traced back by back projection and/or Compton imaging technique. The detectors are 2.0 × 2.0 mm europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu2+) crystals, whose light output has been measured to exceed 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal’s energy resolution, less than 3% at 662 keV, is also excellent, and the response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma-ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ is well matched to both photo-multiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. The solid-state photomultipliers used in this design (each 2.0 × 2.0 mm) are arrays of active pixel sensors (avalanche photodiodes driven beyond their breakdown voltage in reverse bias); each pixel acts as a binary photon detector, and their summed output is an analog representation of the total photon energy, while the individual pixel accurately defines the point of interaction. A simple back-projection algorithm involving cone-surface mapping is being modeled. The back projection for an event cone is a conical surface defining the possible location of the source. The cone axis is the straight line passing through the first and second interaction points.

  7. Evaluation of the SVOne: A Handheld, Smartphone-Based Autorefractor

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J.; Rosenfield, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The SVOne is a portable Hartmann-Shack wavefront aberrometer that can be attached to a smartphone to determine the refractive error of the eye objectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the findings of the SVOne with retinoscopy, subjective refraction, and two commercially available autorefractors (Topcon KR-1W and Righton Retinomax-3). Methods Refractive error was assessed both with and without cycloplegia in 50 visually normal, young adults using the five techniques described above. Further, to assess repeatability of the instruments, the entire procedure was repeated in a subgroup of 10 subjects. All data were analyzed in terms of power vectors (M, J0, and J45). Results No significant difference was observed between the mean values of M (spherical equivalent) for the different techniques. However, a significantly higher mean value of precyclopegic J0 was recorded for the SVOne, which also had the highest limits of agreement for both the J0 and J45 astigmatic components. Retinoscopy and subjective refraction showed the best repeatability (in terms of M values) for precycloplegic and postcycloplegic measurements, respectively. High and significant linear correlations were observed between the subjective findings and the other four techniques. Conclusions The results indicate that the SVOne handheld aberrometer provides measurements of refractive error in normal, young individuals that are not significantly different from other subjective and objective procedures. This instrument is valuable for vision screenings, as well as examinations taking place outside the clinical office. It may also serve as an adjunct in the standard optometric examination. PMID:26540478

  8. An ergonomic handheld ultrasound probe providing contact forces and pose information.

    PubMed

    Yohan Noh; Housden, R James; Gomez, Alberto; Knight, Caroline; Garcia, Francesca; Hongbin Liu; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a handheld ultrasound probe which is integrated with sensors to measure force and pose (position/orientation) information. Using an integrated probe like this, one can relate ultrasound images to spatial location and create 3D ultrasound maps. The handheld device can be used by sonographers and also easily be integrated with robot arms for automated sonography. The handheld device is ergonomically designed; rapid attachment and removal of the ultrasound transducer itself is possible using easy-to-operate clip mechanisms. A cable locking mechanism reduces the impact that gravitational and other external forces have (originating from data and power supply cables connected to the probe) on our measurements. Gravitational errors introduced by the housing of the probe are compensated for using knowledge of the housing geometry and the integrated pose sensor that provides us with accurate orientation information. In this paper, we describe the handheld probe with its integrated force/pose sensors and our approach to gravity compensation. We carried out a set of experiments to verify the feasibility of our approach to obtain accurate spatial information of the handheld probe. PMID:26737604

  9. Transfer alignment from a personal locator system to a handheld or head-mounted instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Lauro; Borenstein, Johann

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a method for computing position and attitude of an instrument attached to the human body such as a handheld or head-mounted video camera. The system uses two Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). One IMU is part of our earlier-developed Personal Dead-Reckoning (PDR) system, which tracks the position and heading of a walking person relative to a known starting position. The other IMU is rigidly attached to the handheld or head-mounted instrument. Our existing PDR system is substantially more accurate than conventional IMU-based systems because the IMU is mounted on the foot of the user where error correction techniques can be applied that are unavailable for IMUs mounted anywhere else on the body. However, if the walker is waving a handheld or head-mounted instrument, the position and attitude of the instrument is not known. Equipping the instrument with an additional IMU is by itself an unsatisfactory solution because that IMU is subject to accelerometer and gyro drift, which, unlike in the case of the foot-mounted IMU, cannot be corrected and cause unbounded position and heading errors. Our approach uses transfer alignment techniques and takes advantage of the fact that the handheld IMU moves with the walker. This constraint is used to bound and correct errors by a Kalman filter. The paper explains our method and presents extensive experimental results. The results show up to a five-fold reduction in heading errors for the handheld IMU.

  10. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  11. Sensitive fiber optics-based system for real-time detection of PCR-amplified DNA using molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Taylor A.; Cayouette, Michelle; Brown, Larry; Mousavi, Ali R.; Slaney, John; Moores, Jane

    1999-05-01

    Molecular Beacon hairpin shaped fluorescent oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools for quantifying specific nucleic acid sequences. Stratagene is developing a sensitive system, using these probes, for detecting and quantifying initial template copy number of nucleic acid sequences in real time during PCR amplification. The system allows parallel multiple fluorophore detection for many applications including allele discrimination and quantitative gene expression analysis. This instrument, combined with Stratagene's Sentinel Molecular Beacon kits, provides an effective system for molecular biology research. We report here the design and utility of an instrument that combines the capabilities of a microplate fluorescence reader with a PCR thermocycler into a low cost real time detection system. The instrument integrates a multiple fluorophore parallel fiber optic excitation and emission detection system, a precision X-Y translation stage, and a high performance thermoelectric temperature cycler with a computer controlled data collection and analysis system. The system uses standard PCR tubes, tube strips, and 96 well plates as the sample format. The result is a low cost, reliable, and easy to use system with premium performance for nucleic acid quantification in real time. 10

  12. Soap opera video on handheld computers to reduce young urban women's HIV sex risk.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a soap opera video, A Story about Toni, Mike, and Valerie, designed to communicate HIV risk reduction themes. The study evaluated viewing the video and responding to audio computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) on a handheld computer. The sample was 76 predominately African American women, aged 18-29, in sexual relationships with men. Data were collected in urban neighborhoods in the northeastern United States. A pretest-posttest control group design with systematic assignment indicated statistically significant reduction in expectations to engage in unprotected sex in the experimental group. The handheld computer was found to be acceptable to view the near feature length video and complete ACASI. To date, no study has reported on use of video and ACASI on a handheld device to reduce HIV risk. The significance is the potential to stream health promotion videos to personal devices, such as cell phones. PMID:18535900

  13. Diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection with Handheld Microscopy in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Meister, Isabel; Utzinger, Jürg; Odermatt, Peter; Andrews, Jason R; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is a neglected tropical disease, yet it is of considerable public health importance in Southeast Asia given the predilection for chronically infected persons to develop cholangiocarcinoma. We evaluated a handheld microscope for the diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini in a community-based setting in Lao People's Democratic Republic in comparison with conventional light microscopy. In stool samples collected from 104 individuals, handheld microscopy revealed a sensitivity of 70.6% and a specificity of 89.5% for O. viverrini infection. Pearson's correlation for quantitative fecal egg counts between the two devices was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). With small adjustments to further increase diagnostic sensitivity, a handheld microscope may become a helpful tool to screen for O. viverrini and other helminth infections in public health settings. PMID:26526923

  14. Open source handheld-based EMR for paramedics working in rural areas.

    PubMed Central

    Anantraman, Vishwanath; Mikkelsen, Tarjei; Khilnani, Reshma; Kumar, Vikram S.; Pentland, Alex; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2002-01-01

    We describe a handheld-based electronic medical record (EMR) for use in certain rural settings. The system is based on the Linux operating system and allows access to large mobile databases. The open source system is designed for paramedical health workers serving remote areas in rural India. A PDA loaded with the handheld-based EMR provides workers who have little access to medical doctors with different kinds of decision support and alerts. It addresses two important problems in developing countries: prenatal care and child health. This paper describes the technical challenges and innovation needed in the design, development, adaptation and implementation of the handheld EMR in a real setting in India PMID:12463777

  15. Performance of a 6-Degree-of-Freedom Active Microsurgical Manipulator in Handheld Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; Wells, Trent S.; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental results from human users of a new 6-degree-of-freedom handheld micromanipulator. This is the latest prototype of a fully-handheld system, known as “Micron,” which performs active compensation of hand tremor for microsurgery. The manipulator is a miniature Gough-Stewart platform incorporating linear ultrasonic motors that provide a cylindrical workspace 4 mm long and 4 mm wide. In addition, the platform allows the possibility of imposing a remote center of motion for controlling motion not only at the tip but also at the entry point in the sclera of the eye. We demonstrate hand tremor reduction in both static and dynamic micromanipulation tasks on a rubber pad. The handheld performance is also evaluated in an artificial eye model while imposing a remote center of motion. In all cases, hand tremor is significantly reduced. PMID:24111024

  16. Motion Tracking Of A Handheld Scanner With An Infrared Vision System

    SciTech Connect

    Seppi, Jeremy H.; Hatchell, Brian K.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2011-08-07

    Handheld scanners are used in a large number of applications to inspect walls, floors, tanks, and other large structures. Measurements are made to characterize physical properties, uncover defects, detect evidence of tampering, quantify surface contamination, and so forth. Handheld scanning suffers from a number of drawbacks. The relationship between the data collected and scanned location is difficult or impossible to track. Humans using handheld scanners can unintentionally scan the same area multiple times or entirely overlook an area of interest. An automated scanner tracking system could improve upon current inspection practices with a handheld scanner in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and quality. The authors have developed a handheld scanner tracking system that will allow users to visualize previously scanned areas, highlight areas where important or unusual data are acquired, and store scanning location with acquired data. The scanned regions are saved in real time and projected back on the scanned area using a projector. The system currently utilizes the Smoothboard software, which has already been designed to interpret the location of a captured infrared source from a Wii Remote controller to create an interactive whiteboard. This software takes advantage of the Wii Remote’s ability to track the location of an infrared source, and when proper calibration of the Wii Remote orientation is complete, any surface can become a virtual whiteboard. In addition to recording and projecting scan pathways, the system developed by the authors can be used to make notes on the scanning process and project acquired data on top of the scanned area. This latter capability can be used to guide sample acquisition or demolition activities. This paper discusses development of the system and potential benefits to wall scanning with handheld scanners.

  17. Hand-Held Color Meters Based on Interference Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Chen, Gang; Yang, Rong Gui

    2004-01-01

    Small, inexpensive, hand-held optoelectronic color-measuring devices based on metal-film/dielectric-film interference filters are undergoing development. These color meters could be suitable for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements to quantify or match colors for aesthetic purposes but there is no need for the high spectral resolution of scientific-grade spectrometers. Such applications typically occur in the paint, printing, and cosmetic industries, for example. The figure schematically depicts a color meter of this type being used to measure the color of a sample in terms of the spectrum of light reflected from the sample. Light from a white source (for example, a white light-emitting diode) passes through a collimating lens to the sample. Another lens collects some of the light reflected from the sample and focuses the light onto the input end of optical fiber. Light emerging from the output end of the optical fiber illuminates an array of photodetectors covered with metal/dielectric-film interference filters like those described in Metal/Dielectric-film Interference Color Filters (NPO-20217), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 70. Typically, these are wide-band-pass filters, as shown at the bottom of the figure. The photodetector array need not be of any particular design: it could be something as simple as an assembly containing several photodiodes or something as elaborate as an active-pixel sensor or other imaging device. What is essential is that each of the photodetectors or each of several groups of photodetectors is covered with a metal/dielectric-film filter of a different color. In most applications, it would be desirable to have at least three different filters, each for a spectral band that contains one of the three primary additive red, green, and blue colors. In some applications, it may be necessary to have more than three different color filters in order to characterize subtle differences in color

  18. A Review of Research Methodologies Used in Studies on Mobile Handheld Devices in K-12 and Higher Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    Mobile handheld devices are increasingly being used in education. In this paper, we undertook a review of empirical based articles to summarise the current research regarding the use of mobile handheld devices (personal digital assistants/PDAs, palmtops, and mobile phones) in K-12 and higher education settings. This review was guided by the…

  19. The Role of Research on Contexts of Teaching Practice in Informing the Design of Handheld Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Tatar, Deborah G.; Roschelle, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    One definition of design is "creating something new that fits with reality" (Stults, 1985). This article describes a project in which the researchers started with the intuition that new handheld-based wireless technologies held the promise of creating something new and highly desirable for K-12 education. We saw the potential for handheld-based…

  20. 78 FR 20695 - Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Office of Justice Programs Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method... detectors and hand-held metal detectors. In order to ensure that the test methods in the standards are properly documented, NIJ is requesting proposals (including price quotes) for test method...

  1. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging by a handheld dual-axes confocal microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Hyejun; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Mandella, Michael J.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Hardy, Jonathan; Wang, Thomas D.; Contag, Christopher H.; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav

    2008-01-01

    We present a handheld dual-axes confocal microscope that is based on a two-dimensional microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner. It performs reflectance and fluorescence imaging at 488 nm wavelength, with three-dimensional imaging capability. The fully packaged microscope has a diameter of 10 mm and acquires images at 4 Hz frame rate with a maximum field of view of 400 μm × 260 μm. The transverse and axial resolutions of the handheld probe are 1.7 μm and 5.8 μm, respectively. Capability to perform real time small animal imaging is demonstrated in vivo in transgenic mice. PMID:18545427

  2. Application of Handheld Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to Geochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Connors, Brendan; Somers, Andrew; Day, David

    2016-05-01

    While laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been in use for decades, only within the last two years has technology progressed to the point of enabling true handheld, self-contained instruments. Several instruments are now commercially available with a range of capabilities and features. In this paper, the SciAps Z-500 handheld LIBS instrument functionality and sub-systems are reviewed. Several assayed geochemical sample sets, including igneous rocks and soils, are investigated. Calibration data are presented for multiple elements of interest along with examples of elemental mapping in heterogeneous samples. Sample preparation and the data collection method from multiple locations and data analysis are discussed. PMID:27170779

  3. Use of the handheld programmable calculator in the preparation of TPN solutions.

    PubMed

    DiDonato, L J

    1983-10-01

    A handheld programmable calculator was used to increase speed and decrease errors when calculating and labeling total parenteral nutrition formulations for pediatric patients. A program was developed and tested and an evaluation of the calculator vs. the manual method was performed. The time required to calculate total parenteral nutrition formulations decreased 50% and errors decreased from 3% to 0. Use of a handheld programmable calculator saves time and increases the accuracy of calculations and labels when preparing total parenteral nutrition formulations. The approximate total cost of the calculator, printer, and card reader is $1000. PMID:10310318

  4. Handheld Automated Microsurgical Instrumentation for Intraocular Laser Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; Lobes, Louis A.; Martel, Joseph N.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Laser photocoagulation is a mainstay or adjuvant treatment for a variety of common retinal diseases. Automated laser photocoagulation during intraocular surgery has not yet been established. The authors introduce an automated laser photocoagulation system for intraocular surgery, based on a novel handheld instrument. The goals of the system are to enhance accuracy and efficiency and improve safety. Materials and Methods Triple-ring patterns are introduced as a typical arrangement for the treatment of proliferative retinopathy and registered to a preoperative fundus image. In total, 32 target locations are specified along the circumferences of three rings having diameters of 1, 2, and 3 mm, with a burn spacing of 600 μm. Given the initial system calibration, the retinal surface is reconstructed using stereo vision, and the targets specified on the preoperative image are registered with the control system. During automated operation, the laser probe attached to the manipulator of the active handheld instrument is deflected as needed via visual servoing in order to correct the error between the aiming beam and a specified target, regardless of any erroneous handle motion by the surgeon. A constant distance of the laser probe from the retinal surface is maintained in order to yield consistent size of burns and ensure safety during operation. Real-time tracking of anatomical features enables compensation for any movement of the eye. A graphical overlay system within operating microscope provides the surgeon with guidance cues for automated operation. Two retinal surgeons performed automated and manual trials in an artificial model of the eye, with each trial repeated three times. For the automated trials, various targeting thresholds (50–200 μm) were used to automatically trigger laser firing. In manual operation, fixed repetition rates were used, with frequencies of 1.0–2.5 Hz. The power of the 532 nm laser was set at 3.0 W with a

  5. The Use of Handheld Devices for Improved Phonemic Awareness in a Traditional Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magagna-McBee, Cristy Ann

    2010-01-01

    Effective teaching strategies that improve the development of phonemic awareness are important to ensure students are fluent readers by third grade. The use of handheld devices to improve phonemic awareness with kindergarten students may be such a strategy, but no research exists that evaluates the use of these devices. This study explored the…

  6. Learning Motivation and Adaptive Video Caption Filtering for EFL Learners Using Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide adaptive assistance to improve the listening comprehension of eleventh grade students. This study developed a video-based language learning system for handheld devices, using three levels of caption filtering adapted to student needs. Elementary level captioning excluded 220 English sight words (see Section 1…

  7. Enhancing Mathematical Concepts through Leading Questions and Hand-Held Data Collection Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughbaum, Edward D.

    Hand-held data collection technology allows for access to real-world data collection--at any other time and almost any place. Is the use of data and its collection desirable to the mathematical learning process? The answer is a resounding yes! Not only can significant mathematical ideas be taught in the process; colleagues are also helped in the…

  8. Measurement of muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Samosawala, Nidhi R.; Vaishali, K.; Kalyana, B. Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intensive Care Unit (ICU) acquired weakness is a common complication in critically ill patients affecting their prognosis. The handheld dynamometry is an objective method in detecting minimum muscle strength change, which has an impact on the physical function of ICU survivors. The minimal change in the force can be measured in units of weight such as pounds or kilograms. Aim of the Study: To detect the changes in peripheral muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in the early stage of ICU stay and to observe the progression of muscle weakness. Methodology: Three upper and three lower limb muscles force measured with handheld dynamometer during ICU stay. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to detect changes in force generated by muscle on alternate days of ICU stay. Results: There was a reduction in peripheral muscle strength from day 3 to day 5 as well from day 5 to day 7 of ICU stay (P < 0.01). The average reduction in peripheral muscle strength was 11.8% during ICU stay. Conclusion: This study showed a progressive reduction in peripheral muscle strength as measured by handheld dynamometer during early period of ICU stay. PMID:26955213

  9. Efficacy of Handheld Electronic Visual Supports to Enhance Vocabulary in Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Boles, Margot B.; Goodwyn, Fara D.; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Although electronic tools such as handheld computers have become increasingly common throughout society, implementation of such tools to improve skills in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities has lagged in the professional literature. However, the use of visual scripts for individuals with disabilities, particularly those…

  10. Beyond the Organizer: A Manual of Educational Uses for the Handheld Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibiger, Carol A.

    This manual was initially written to support the University of South Dakota's Palm Initiative. It has been substantially revised and updated to include the latest in handheld applications with educational uses, and it applies to any Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) using the Palm OS Software (3.1 or higher) and having at least 8 megabytes of…

  11. "New Directions for Traditional Lessons": Can Handheld Game Consoles Enhance Mental Mathematics Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Susan; O'Rourke, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study that compared the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) handheld game consoles (HGCs) with traditional teaching methods to develop the automaticity of mathematical calculations and self-concept towards mathematics for year 4 students in two metropolitan schools. One class conducted daily sessions using the HGCs…

  12. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Conceptualizing Astronomical Scale: Virtual Simulations on Handheld Tablet Computers Reverse Misconceptions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how using two different ways of displaying the solar system--a true-to-scale mode vs. an orrery mode--affected students' knowledge of astronomical concepts. Solar system displays were presented in a software application on a handheld tablet computer. In the true-to-scale mode, users navigated a simulated three-dimensional…

  13. Analysis of Peer Interaction in Learning Activities with Personal Handhelds and Shared Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Chung, Chen-Wei; Chen, Nian-Shing; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is extensively applied in classroom activities, but the screens on handheld devices are designed for individual-user mobile applications and may constrain interaction among group learners. The small screen size may lead to fragmented and tete-a-tete communication patterns and frequently obstruct the externalization of the…

  14. Engaging Students with Disabilities in the Learning Process through Handheld Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2010-01-01

    Through a grant from the Regional Alliance for Science, Engineering, and Math (RASEM[squared]), funded by the National Science Foundation, a research study was conducted to explore the use of handheld technology with students with disabilities in elementary and middle school settings. The purpose of the project was to (a) introduce electronic task…

  15. Droplet size characterization of hand-held atomization equipment typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The atomization characteristics from four hand-held sprayers (Leco P-1, Colt ULV Aerosol Generator, UlVAFAN MK2, Turbair ElectraFan 12) and a Stihl SR400 backpack sprayer were evaluated using water- and oil-based solutions. The effects on droplet size spectrum for three insecticides (Tempo SC Ultra...

  16. Online Responses towards Parental Rearing Styles Regarding Hand-Held Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geng, Gretchen; Disney, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This article reviewed the literature on parental rearing styles and used responses from an online discussion forum to investigate people's opinions towards parental rearing styles and strategies when children use hand-held devices. Critical discourse analysis (CDA) was used as an analysis method via micro, meso and macro multi-level…

  17. Notebooks, Handhelds, and Software in Physical Education (Grades 5-8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    Heart monitors, pedometers, and now virtual reality-based equipment (e.g., Cyberbikes, "Dance Dance Revolution") have been embraced by physical educators as technologies worth using in the physical education program; however, the use of computers (be it a desktop, notebook, or handheld) in the physical education instructional program, has not been…

  18. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements. PMID:25464945

  19. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  20. The Use and Efficacy of Handheld Computers for School-Based Data Collection: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiguzel, Tufan; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Zellner, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Given the increasing influence of technology and the explosion in data collection demands, the acceptance and assimilation of new paradigms and technologies require today's educators, researchers, and evaluators to consider alternative tools, and apply them effectively. One of these alternatives, handheld computers, also known as personal digital…

  1. A Fresh Look at the Crystal Violet Lab with Handheld Camera Colorimetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutson, Theodore R.; Knutson, Cassandra M.; Mozzetti, Abbie R.; Campos, Antonio R.; Haynes, Christy L.; Penn, R. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Chemical kinetic experiments to determine rate laws are common in high school and college chemistry courses. For reactions involving a color change, rate laws can be determined experimentally using spectrophotometric or colorimetric equipment though this equipment can be cost prohibitive. Previous work demonstrated that inexpensive handheld camera…

  2. A Study of the Use of a Handheld Computer Algebra System in Discrete Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert A.; Allison, Dean E.; Grassl, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the TI-92 handheld Computer Algebra System (CAS) on student achievement in a discrete mathematics course. Specifically, the researchers examined the differences between a CAS section and a control section of discrete mathematics on students' in-class examinations. Additionally, they analysed student approaches…

  3. Using Hand-Held Calculators in Sixth Grade Classes. A Brief Report of an Educational Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ray; Keefe, Michael

    This brief report describes an exploratory pilot project in which sixth-grade students used hand-held calculators throughout the school year. The report includes guidelines on the purchase and use of calculators as well as advice on gaining community support for such a project. Issues related to classroom management are discussed; in particular,…

  4. 40 CFR 1054.110 - What evaporative emission standards must my handheld equipment meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1060.102. These requirements apply starting in the 2012 model year, except that they... in 40 CFR 1060.103. These requirements apply for handheld equipment starting in the 2010 model year... requirements of this paragraph (b) apply starting in the 2012 model year. (Note: 40 CFR 90.129...

  5. 40 CFR 1054.110 - What evaporative emission standards must my handheld equipment meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1060.102. These requirements apply starting in the 2012 model year, except that they... in 40 CFR 1060.103. These requirements apply for handheld equipment starting in the 2010 model year... requirements of this paragraph (b) apply starting in the 2012 model year. (Note: 40 CFR 90.129...

  6. 40 CFR 1054.110 - What evaporative emission standards must my handheld equipment meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1060.102. These requirements apply starting in the 2012 model year, except that they... in 40 CFR 1060.103. These requirements apply for handheld equipment starting in the 2010 model year... requirements of this paragraph (b) apply starting in the 2012 model year. (Note: 40 CFR 90.129...

  7. 40 CFR 1054.110 - What evaporative emission standards must my handheld equipment meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1060.102. These requirements apply starting in the 2012 model year, except that they... in 40 CFR 1060.103. These requirements apply for handheld equipment starting in the 2010 model year... requirements of this paragraph (b) apply starting in the 2012 model year. (Note: 40 CFR 90.129...

  8. 40 CFR 1054.110 - What evaporative emission standards must my handheld equipment meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1060.102. These requirements apply starting in the 2012 model year, except that they... in 40 CFR 1060.103. These requirements apply for handheld equipment starting in the 2010 model year... requirements of this paragraph (b) apply starting in the 2012 model year. (Note: 40 CFR 90.129...

  9. 75 FR 27504 - Substantial Product Hazard List: Hand-Held Hair Dryers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... compliance with UL 859. An additional 42 companies are listed in the Intertek ETL Listed Mark Product... Certifications directory and another four firms are listed in the Intertek ETL Listed Mark Product Directory as... additional 42 suppliers listed in the Intertek ETL Listed Mark Product Directory as supplying hand-held...

  10. 40 CFR 1054.103 - What exhaust emission standards must my handheld engines meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... credits under the averaging, banking, and trading (ABT) program for HC+NOX emissions as described in... Emission Standards for Handheld Engines (g/kW-hr) Engine displacement class HC+NOX CO Class III 50 805... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What exhaust emission standards...

  11. 40 CFR 1054.103 - What exhaust emission standards must my handheld engines meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... credits under the averaging, banking, and trading (ABT) program for HC+NOX emissions as described in... Emission Standards for Handheld Engines (g/kW-hr) Engine displacement class HC+NOX CO Class III 50 805... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What exhaust emission standards...

  12. 40 CFR 1054.103 - What exhaust emission standards must my handheld engines meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... credits under the averaging, banking, and trading (ABT) program for HC+NOX emissions as described in... Emission Standards for Handheld Engines (g/kW-hr) Engine displacement class HC+NOX CO Class III 50 805... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What exhaust emission standards...

  13. 75 FR 43206 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ..., 2010, based on a complaint filed by Motorola, Inc. (``Motorola'') of Schaumburg, Illinois. 75 FR 8401... and Battery Packs: Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review An Initial Determination... communications system server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement...

  14. PDAs and Handhelds: ICT at Your Side and Not in Your Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Jocelyn; Ramsden, Andy; McFarlane, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers to support initial teacher training (ITT), 14 science teacher trainees at the Graduate School of Education in the University of Bristol were given PDAs with mobile phone connectivity to use throughout the academic year. The following areas were…

  15. Handheld multispectral dual-axis confocal microscope for cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapukdee, Pongsak; Rattanavarin, Santi; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Jolivot, Romuald; Jung, Il Woong; López, Daniel; Mandella, Michael J.; Piyawattanametha, Wibool

    2013-03-01

    Our work demonstrates a MEMS based handheld dual-axis confocal microscope for cervical cancer screening. Imaging demonstration is performed with plant and animal tissue biopsies. The data is collected and displayed in real time with 2-5 Hz frame rates.

  16. 78 FR 68862 - Certain Handheld Magnifiers and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation Pursuant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Handheld Magnifiers and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to..., under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, on behalf of Freedom Scientific... investigation and, after the investigation, issue a limited exclusion order and cease and desist...

  17. [Solution of PACS to communicate with the handheld mobile intelligent equipment based on web service].

    PubMed

    Xue, Weijing; Wang, Pengcheng; Meng, Jian; Wang, Haiyang

    2013-09-01

    Using the Web Service technology, the paper puts forward a solution of remote communication between PACS and the handheld mobile intelligent devices, the characteristics of the solution are simple, easy to implement, short development cycle, high practicability, and low cost etc. PMID:24409803

  18. A Mobile Mixed-Reality Environment for Children's Storytelling Using a Handheld Projector and a Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugimoto, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a system called GENTORO that uses a robot and a handheld projector for supporting children's storytelling activities. GENTORO differs from many existing systems in that children can make a robot play their own story in a physical space augmented by mixed-reality technologies. Pilot studies have been conducted to clarify the…

  19. Performance assessments of Android-powered military applications operating on tactical handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Brian A.; Fronczek, Lisa; Morse, Emile; Kootbally, Zeid; Schlenoff, Craig

    2013-05-01

    Transformative Apps (TransApps) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funded program whose goal is to develop a range of militarily-relevant software applications ("apps") to enhance the operational-effectiveness of military personnel on (and off) the battlefield. TransApps is also developing a military apps marketplace to facilitate rapid development and dissemination of applications to address user needs by connecting engaged communities of endusers with development groups. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) role in the TransApps program is to design and implement evaluation procedures to assess the performance of: 1) the various software applications, 2) software-hardware interactions, and 3) the supporting online application marketplace. Specifically, NIST is responsible for evaluating 50+ tactically-relevant applications operating on numerous Android™-powered platforms. NIST efforts include functional regression testing and quantitative performance testing. This paper discusses the evaluation methodologies employed to assess the performance of three key program elements: 1) handheld-based applications and their integration with various hardware platforms, 2) client-based applications and 3) network technologies operating on both the handheld and client systems along with their integration into the application marketplace. Handheld-based applications are assessed using a combination of utility and usability-based checklists and quantitative performance tests. Client-based applications are assessed to replicate current overseas disconnected (i.e. no network connectivity between handhelds) operations and to assess connected operations envisioned for later use. Finally, networked applications are assessed on handhelds to establish baselines of performance for when connectivity will be common usage.

  20. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  1. Development of Real-Time Dual-Display Handheld and Bench-Top Hybrid-Mode SD-OCTs

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Park, Kibeom; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Shin, Yong Seung; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2014-01-01

    Development of a dual-display handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for retina and optic-nerve-head diagnosis beyond the volunteer motion constraints is reported. The developed system is portable and easily movable, containing the compact portable OCT system that includes the handheld probe and computer. Eye posterior chambers were diagnosed using the handheld probe, and the probe could be fixed to the bench-top cradle depending on the volunteers' physical condition. The images obtained using this handheld probe were displayed in real time on the computer monitor and on a small secondary built-in monitor; the displayed images were saved using the handheld probe's built-in button. Large-scale signal-processing procedures such as k-domain linearization, fast Fourier transform (FFT), and log-scaling signal processing can be rapidly applied using graphics-processing-unit (GPU) accelerated processing rather than central-processing-unit (CPU) processing. The Labview-based system resolution is 1,024 × 512 pixels, and the frame rate is 56 frames/s, useful for real-time display. The 3D images of the posterior chambers including the retina, optic-nerve head, blood vessels, and optic nerve were composed using real-time displayed images with 500 × 500 × 500 pixel resolution. A handheld and bench-top hybrid mode with a dual-display handheld OCT was developed to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional method. PMID:24473286

  2. Development of real-time dual-display handheld and bench-top hybrid-mode SD-OCTs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Park, Kibeom; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Shin, Yong Seung; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2014-01-01

    Development of a dual-display handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for retina and optic-nerve-head diagnosis beyond the volunteer motion constraints is reported. The developed system is portable and easily movable, containing the compact portable OCT system that includes the handheld probe and computer. Eye posterior chambers were diagnosed using the handheld probe, and the probe could be fixed to the bench-top cradle depending on the volunteers' physical condition. The images obtained using this handheld probe were displayed in real time on the computer monitor and on a small secondary built-in monitor; the displayed images were saved using the handheld probe's built-in button. Large-scale signal-processing procedures such as k-domain linearization, fast Fourier transform (FFT), and log-scaling signal processing can be rapidly applied using graphics-processing-unit (GPU) accelerated processing rather than central-processing-unit (CPU) processing. The Labview-based system resolution is 1,024 × 512 pixels, and the frame rate is 56 frames/s, useful for real-time display. The 3D images of the posterior chambers including the retina, optic-nerve head, blood vessels, and optic nerve were composed using real-time displayed images with 500 × 500 × 500 pixel resolution. A handheld and bench-top hybrid mode with a dual-display handheld OCT was developed to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional method. PMID:24473286

  3. Picoliter droplet-based digital peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR and dielectric sorting for low abundant K-ras mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huidan; Sperling, Ralph; Rotem, Assaf; Shan, Lianfeng; Heyman, John; Zhang, Yizhe; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the US, and the 5-year survival of metastatic CRC (mCRC) is less than 10%. Although monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide incremental improvements in survival, approximately 40% of mCRC patients with activating KRAS mutations won't benefit from this therapy. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a synthetic non-extendable oligonucleotides, can bind strongly to completely complementary wild-type KRAS by Watson-Crick base pairing and suppress its amplification during PCR, while any mutant allele will show unhindered amplification. The method is particularly suitable for the simultaneously detection of several adjoining mutant sites, just as mutations of codons 12 and 13 of KRAS gene where there are totally 12 possible mutation types. In this work, we describe the development and validation of this method, based on the droplet-based digital PCR. Using a microfluidic system, single target DNA molecule is compartmentalized in microdroplets together with PNA specific for wild-type KRAS, thermocycled and the fluorescence of each droplet was detected, followed by sorting and sequencing. It enables the precise determination of all possible mutant KRAS simultaneously, and the precise quantification of a single mutated KRAS in excess background unmutated KRAS.

  4. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .931 (P < .0001) at 1 year when the handheld and laboratory tests were performed within 1 day of each other. Correlation for handheld forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) with laboratory forced vital capacity was r = .914 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .826 (P < .0001) at 1 year. The bias, or the mean difference (handheld minus laboratory), for FEV1 at day 80 and 1 year was -.13 L (limits of agreement, -.63 to .37) and -.10 L (limits of agreement, -.77 to .56), respectively. FEV6 showed greater bias at day 80 (-.51 L [limits of agreement, -1.44 to .42]) and 1 year (-.40 L [limits of agreement, -1.81 to 1.01]). Handheld spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. PMID:26748162

  5. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  6. Protocol: a fast and simple in situ PCR method for localising gene expression in plant tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An important step in characterising the function of a gene is identifying the cells in which it is expressed. Traditional methods to determine this include in situ hybridisation, gene promoter-reporter fusions or cell isolation/purification techniques followed by quantitative PCR. These methods, although frequently used, can have limitations including their time-consuming nature, limited specificity, reliance upon well-annotated promoters, high cost, and the need for specialized equipment. In situ PCR is a relatively simple and rapid method that involves the amplification of specific mRNA directly within plant tissue whilst incorporating labelled nucleotides that are subsequently detected by immunohistochemistry. Another notable advantage of this technique is that it can be used on plants that are not easily genetically transformed. Results An optimised workflow for in-tube and on-slide in situ PCR is presented that has been evaluated using multiple plant species and tissue types. The protocol includes optimised methods for: (i) fixing, embedding, and sectioning of plant tissue; (ii) DNase treatment; (iii) in situ RT-PCR with the incorporation of DIG-labelled nucleotides; (iv) signal detection using colourimetric alkaline phosphatase substrates; and (v) mounting and microscopy. We also provide advice on troubleshooting and the limitations of using fluorescence as an alternative detection method. Using our protocol, reliable results can be obtained within two days from harvesting plant material. This method requires limited specialized equipment and can be adopted by any laboratory with a vibratome (vibrating blade microtome), a standard thermocycler, and a microscope. We show that the technique can be used to localise gene expression with cell-specific resolution. Conclusions The in situ PCR method presented here is highly sensitive and specific. It reliably identifies the cellular expression pattern of even highly homologous and low abundance

  7. SkinScan©: A PORTABLE LIBRARY FOR MELANOMA DETECTION ON HANDHELD DEVICES.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Lancaster, Keith; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2011-03-30

    We have developed a portable library for automated detection of melanoma termed SkinScan© that can be used on smartphones and other handheld devices. Compared to desktop computers, embedded processors have limited processing speed, memory, and power, but they have the advantage of portability and low cost. In this study we explored the feasibility of running a sophisticated application for automated skin cancer detection on an Apple iPhone 4. Our results demonstrate that the proposed library with the advanced image processing and analysis algorithms has excellent performance on handheld and desktop computers. Therefore, deployment of smartphones as screening devices for skin cancer and other skin diseases can have a significant impact on health care delivery in underserved and remote areas. PMID:21892382

  8. WebAlchemist: a Web transcoding system for mobile Web access in handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Yonghyun; Jung, Changwoo; Kim, Jihong; Chung, Sungkwon

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of WebAlchemist, a prototype web transcoding system, which automatically converts a given HTML page into a sequence of equivalent HTML pages that can be properly displayed on a hand-held device. The Web/Alchemist system is based on a set of HTML transcoding heuristics managed by the Transcoding Manager (TM) module. In order to tackle difficult-to-transcode pages such as ones with large or complex table structures, we have developed several new transcoding heuristics that extract partial semantics from syntactic information such as the table width, font size and cascading style sheet. Subjective evaluation results using popular HTML pages (such as the CNN home page) show that WebAlchemist generates readable, structure-preserving transcoded pages, which can be properly displayed on hand-held devices.

  9. Handheld array-based photoacoustic probe for guiding needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Maslov, Konstantin; Jankovic, Ladislav; Akers, Walter J.; Song, Liang; Achilefu, Samuel; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Pashley, Michael D.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-07-01

    By modifying a clinical ultrasound array system, we develop a novel handheld photoacoustic probe for image-guided needle biopsy. The integration of optical fiber bundles for pulsed laser light delivery enables photoacoustic image-guided insertion of a needle into rat axillary lymph nodes with accumulated indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic contrast of the needle is achieved. After subcutaneous injection of the dye in the left forepaw, sentinel lymph nodes are easily detected, in vivo and in real time, beneath 2-cm-thick chicken breast overlaying the axillary region. ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes is confirmed with fluorescence imaging both in vivo and ex vivo. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this handheld photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  10. Novel blue LED-based handheld fluorometer for detection of terrestrial algae on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Eric; McStay, Daniel; Wakefield, Rachael D.; Campbell, Ian

    1998-09-01

    The application of an hand-held fluorometer used to monitor algal growth on stone surfaces is reported. The system is based on a modulated ultra-bright blue LED, used to induce chlorophyll-a fluorescence, as well as that of accessory pigments. With the addition of an encoding wheel and when linked to computer this system can produce real time map of the algae population on solid surface. The system has been shown to have a linear response to algal concentration, making it a viable tool for algal monitoring. The hand-held system is relatively immune to ambient light allowing it to be used on-site in various daylight conditions. Results from field and laboratory tests of the system on historically important sites and test samples are presented.

  11. Test-retest reliability of isometric shoulder muscle strength measurement with a handheld dynamometer and belt

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to develop a method of measuring isometric shoulder joint muscle strength using a handheld dynamometer with a belt and investigate its test-retest reliability. [Subjects] The subjects comprised 40 healthy adults. [Methods] Six types of isometric shoulder muscle strength were measured twice, and reliability was assessed. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient (1, 1) values ranged from 0.976 to 0.902. The result of a Bland-Altman analysis showed differences in the types of errors between measurement items. [Conclusion] The relative reliability of isometric shoulder muscle measurement using a handheld dynamometer with a belt was high. However, analysis of absolute reliability revealed errors that may affect interpretation of values; therefore, it was considered that adapting the greater of two measurement values is appropriate. PMID:26180305

  12. Hand-held transendoscopic robotic manipulators: A transurethral laser prostate surgery case study

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Richard J.; Mitchell, Christopher R.; Herrell, S. Duke; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice endoscopic surgery can enable incisionless approaches, but a major challenge is the lack of small and dexterous instrumentation. Surgical robots have the potential to meet this need yet often disrupt the clinical workflow. Hand-held robots that combine thin manipulators and endoscopes have the potential to address this by integrating seamlessly into the clinical workflow and enhancing dexterity. As a case study illustrating the potential of this approach, we describe a hand-held robotic system that passes two concentric tube manipulators through a 5 mm port in a rigid endoscope for transurethral laser prostate surgery. This system is intended to catalyze the use of a clinically superior, yet rarely attempted, procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia. This paper describes system design and experiments to evaluate the surgeon’s functional workspace and accuracy using the robot. Phantom and cadaver experiments demonstrate successful completion of the target procedure via prostate lobe resection. PMID:27570361

  13. User satisfaction and frustration with a handheld, pen-based guideline implementation system for asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, R. N.; Liaw, Y.; Navedo, D. D.; Freudigman, K. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinicians' satisfaction and frustrations with the use of a handheld computer system that implements a guideline for management of childhood asthma exacerbations. SETTING: Nine primary-care pediatric practices. DESIGN: Survey component of a randomized, prospective before-after trial. INTERVENTION: Newton MessagePad outfitted with custom software (called "AsthMonitor") that assists in documentation of clinical findings and provides guideline-based recommendations. RESULTS: Overall, 3 users gave strongly positive global ratings while 6 users were neutral. The majority used the documentation functions concurrently with care. Except for recommendations to administer oxygen (which were unsupported by evidence), users found the recommendations appropriate and appreciated the reminders. Seven of 9 participants believed it took more time to document with AsthMonitor. CONCLUSIONS: Handheld computers are acceptable to some office-based practitioners to provide guideline-based advice within the context of the clinical encounter. PMID:10566499

  14. Clinical nursing instructors' use of handheld computers for student recordkeeping and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Kay

    2003-01-01

    I have found the Palm IIIc to be useful in tracking undergraduate student progress in the clinical area. Entrepreneurial thinkers continue to develop new ideas in software, so the possibilities for using these devices will only grow. Future possibilities for handheld computers include built-in Internet connections or providing students with devices to record and analyze their experiences or complete assignments. Many nurses and physicians who have learned to use handheld computers are sure they never want to go back to using paper and pen (Labkoff & O'Mahony, 1997; Wilson & Fulmer, 1998). I will continue to depend on and find new uses for this pocket-sized, yet powerful, device. PMID:12555822

  15. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  16. An efficient solid modeling system based on a hand-held 3D laser scan device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The hand-held 3D laser scanner sold in the market is appealing for its port and convenient to use, but price is expensive. To develop such a system based cheap devices using the same principles as the commercial systems is impossible. In this paper, a simple hand-held 3D laser scanner is developed based on a volume reconstruction method using cheap devices. Unlike convenient laser scanner to collect point cloud of an object surface, the proposed method only scan few key profile curves on the surface. Planar section curve network can be generated from these profile curves to construct a volume model of the object. The details of design are presented, and illustrated by the example of a complex shaped object.

  17. Using a Handheld Device for Patient Data Collection: A Pilot for Medical Countermeasures Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Daley, Matthew F; Goddard, Kristin; McClung, Melissa; Davidson, Arthur; Weiss, Gretchen; Palen, Ted; Nyirenda, Carsie; Platt, Richard; Courtney, Brooke; Reichman, Marsha E

    2016-01-01

    Medical countermeasures (MCMs) are medical products used during public health emergencies. This study, conducted within the Mini-Sentinel Initiative, sought to develop the patient identification and matching processes necessary to assess safety outcomes for MCMs. A handheld device was used to collect identifying information (e.g., name, birthdate, and sex) from the driver's licenses of 421 individuals presenting for routine care at their primary care medical office. Overall, 374 individuals (88.8%) could be linked to their electronic health data using driver's license information. The device was also pilot-tested at a seasonal influenza immunization clinic: detailed vaccine information (e.g., lot number and manufacturer) was captured with a high degree of accuracy. This investigation demonstrated that a handheld device is a feasible means of collecting patient identity and medical product receipt data. This capacity should be useful for safety surveillance of MCMs, particularly when dispensed in settings outside the traditional health-care delivery system. PMID:26843667

  18. Computer implemented method, and apparatus for controlling a hand-held tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Kenneth William (Inventor); Taylor, James Clayton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The invention described here in is a computer-implemented method and apparatus for controlling a hand-held tool. In particular, the control of a hand held tool is for the purpose of controlling the speed of a fastener interface mechanism and the torque applied to fasteners by the fastener interface mechanism of the hand-held tool and monitoring the operating parameters of the tool. The control is embodied in intool software embedded on a processor within the tool which also communicates with remote software. An operator can run the tool, or through the interaction of both software, operate the tool from a remote location, analyze data from a performance history recorded by the tool, and select various torque and speed parameters for each fastener.

  19. Early Childhood Vision Screening in Hawai'i Utilizing a Hand-Held Screener.

    PubMed

    Chang, Duane A; Ede, Roger C; Chow, Dominic C; Souza, Ryan D; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Hanks, Nancy; Nakamoto, Beau K; Mitchell, Brooks; Masutani, Alison T; Fisk, Sam; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Dill, Jan E

    2015-09-01

    The goal of early childhood vision screening is to detect subnormal vision and amblyopic risk factors that threaten visual development so that treatment can be initiated early to yield the highest benefit. Hand-held, portable, instrument-based vision screening devices can be used in children as young as 6 months of age. We assessed the feasibility of hand-held photoscreeners to screen for vision disorders in pre-school children in Hawai'i. A total of 137 preschool children on O'ahu in the "Tutu and Me"/Partners in Development program were screened at 6 different locations using the Plusoptix S12 hand-held photoscreener. Once technical issues were resolved, screening was fast and well tolerated. Possible vision abnormalities were found in 11 of the 137 children (8%). Poor compliance for follow-up with formal vision examination limited our ability to confirm these abnormalities. We conclude that photoscreening has the potential to facilitate early childhood vision screening in Hawai'i. The optimal referral criteria for use in Hawai'i will need to be determined after considering the age of the screening population and the available medical resources in Hawai'i. Early detection of treatable eye disorders has far-reaching benefits for the visual development and long term health and well-being of children. A comprehensive early childhood vision screening program in Hawai'i utilizing automated hand-held photoscreeners may have public health value. Such a program should integrate referral to an eye care professional for confirmation and management of vision disorders of at-risk children found on screening. PMID:26468424

  20. Mass spectra of proteins and other biomolecules recorded using a handheld instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janfelt, Christian; Talaty, Nari; Mulligan, Christopher C.; Keil, Adam; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2008-12-01

    Proteins (myoglobin and cytochrome C), peptides (bradykinin and melittin), alkaloids in complex plant materials, and mixtures of phospholipids from a bacterial extract all give characteristic electrospray mass spectra using a handheld tandem mass spectrometer, Mini 10. The mass/charge range of the 10 kg Mini 10 was extended to m/z 2000 using resonant ion ejection at low frequency allowing analysis of proteins with molecular weights up to 17,000 Da. Fragmentation of peptides and proteins was observed.

  1. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli in water using a hand-held fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Wildeboer, Dirk; Amirat, Linda; Price, Robert G; Abuknesha, Ramadan A

    2010-04-01

    The quantification of pathogenic bacteria in an environmental or clinical sample commonly involves laboratory-based techniques and results are not obtained for 24-72 h after sampling. Enzymatic analysis of microbial activity in water and other environmental samples using fluorescent synthetic substrates are well-established and highly sensitive methods in addition to providing a measure of specificity towards indicative bacteria. The enzyme beta-d-glucuronidase (GUD) is a specific marker for Escherichia coli and 4-methylumbelliferone-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) a sensitive substrate for determining the presence of E. coli in a sample. However, currently used procedures are laboratory-based and require bench-top fluorimeters for the measurement of fluorescence resulting from the enzyme-substrate reaction. Recent developments in electronic engineering have led to the miniaturisation of fluorescence detectors. We describe the use of a novel hand-held fluorimeter to directly analyse samples obtained from the River Thames for the presence of E. coli. The results obtained by the hand-held detector were compared with those obtained with an established fluorescent substrate assay and by quantifying microbial growth on a chromogenic medium. Both reference methods utilised filtration of water samples. The miniaturised fluorescence detector was used and incubation times reduced to 30 min making the detection system portable and rapid. The developed hand-held system reliably detected E. coli as low as 7 cfu/mL river water sample. Our study demonstrates that new hand-held fluorescence measurement technology can be applied to the rapid and convenient detection of bacteria in environmental samples. This enables rapid monitoring to be carried out on-site. The technique described is generic and it may, therefore, be used in conjunction with different fluorescent substrates which allows the assessment of various target microorganisms in biological samples. PMID:20153013

  2. Handheld Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Aptamer Sensor for Bone Markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts lose significant bone mass during lengthy space flights. NASA wishes to monitor this bone loss in order to develop nutritional and exercise countermeasures. Operational Technologies Corporation (OpTech) has developed a handheld device that quantifies bone loss in a spacecraft environment. The innovation works by adding fluorescent dyes and quenchers to aptamers to enable pushbutton, one-step bind-and-detect FRET assays that can be freeze-dried, rehydrated with body fluids, and used to quantify bone loss.

  3. Protein Crystals Grown in the hand-held Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Crystals grown in the hand-held Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM) onboard STS-61C. The PCAM has a pedestal in the center of a circular chamber, the surrounding chamber holds an absorbent reservoir that contains a solution of the precipitant. Vapor pressure differences between the protein solution and the reservoir solution force water to move from the protein solution to the reservoir. As protein concentrations increase, protein crystals begin to nucleate and grow.

  4. [Design of hand-held heart rate variability acquisition and analysis system].

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiyuan; Wang, Buqing; Wang, Weidong

    2012-07-01

    A design of handheld heart rate variability acquisition and analysis system is proposed. The system collects and stores the patient's ECG every five minutes through both hands touching on the electrodes, and then -uploads data to a PC through USB port. The system uses software written in LabVIEW to analyze heart rate variability parameters, The parameters calculated function is programmed and generated to components in Matlab. PMID:23189641

  5. Development of a handheld blood flow measurement system using laser speckle flowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Chul; Konishi, Naoki; Fujii, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    A new handheld blood flow measurement system using laser speckle flowgraphy was developed for easy measurement of blood flow. The developed system features a small display unit that allows measurement results to be viewed without a PC. The system is miniaturized, integrated with a microcontroller, a line sensor, and a laser unit. Our experiment was carried out to confirm the usefulness of the developed system to measure the blood flow variation.

  6. A handheld optical fiber parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheung-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2014-03-01

    In current photoacoustic tomography (PAT), l-D or 2-D ultrasound arrays and multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are used to detect the photoacoustic signals simultaneously for "real-time" image construction. However, as the number of transducer elements and DAQ channels increase, the construction and operation of the ultrasound receiving system will become complex and costly. This situation can be addressed by using parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create true time delays in multiple PA signal channels. The time-delayed PA signals will reach the ultrasound transducer at different times and therefore can be received by one single-element transducer without mixing with each other. In this paper, we report the development of the first miniaturized PADL probe suitable for handheld operations. Fusedsilica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation were used to construct the 16 PADLs with specific time delays. The handheld probe structure was fabricated using precision laser-micromachining process to provide robust mechanical support and accurate alignment of the PADLs with minimal acoustic distortion and inter-channel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. Photoacoustic imaging of a black-ink target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was successfully conducted using the handheld PADL probe with two single-element transducers and two DAQ channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8:1). Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe could provide a promising solution for real-time PAT with significantly reduced complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system.

  7. A full featured handheld LIBS analyzer with early results for defense and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, D.; Connors, B.; Jennings, M.; Egan, J.; Derman, K.; Soucy, P.; Moller, S.; Sackett, D.

    2015-06-01

    A handheld LIBS instrument has been designed that includes most features found in large bench-top systems including variable gating, argon purge, high resolution, wide spectral range, sample rastering, and video targeting. In this presentation we will discuss the feature selection, trade-off decisions and new developments that made this kind of size reduction possible. Early results will be presented for elemental presence detection and quantification with specific emphasis on defense and security.

  8. Using hand-held point and shoot video cameras in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Stoten, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    Clinical educators are challenged to design and implement creative instructional strategies to provide employees with optimal clinical practice learning opportunities. Using hand-held video cameras to capture patient encounters or skills demonstrations involves employees in active learning and can increase dialogue between employees and clinical educators. The video that is created also can be used for evaluation and feedback. Hands-on experiences may energize employees with different talents and styles of learning. PMID:21323214

  9. Note: A hand-held high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device operating without shielding.

    PubMed

    He, D F

    2011-02-01

    By improving the compensation circuit, a hand-held high-Tc rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) system was developed. It could operate well when moving in unshielded environment. To check the operation, it was used to do eddy-current testing by hand moving the SQUID, and the artificial defect under 6 mm aluminum plate could be successfully detected in shielded environment. PMID:21361649

  10. [Rapid PCR authentication Lonicera japanica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Hou, Jing-Yi; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan

    2014-10-01

    To simply and rapid authenticate Lonicera japanica. Rapid allele-specific PCR primer was designed base on trnL-trnF 625 G/T Single nucleotide polymorphism and the PCR reaction systems including annealing temperature was optimized; optimized results were performed to authenticate L. japanica and its 9 adulterants. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product of 87 degrees C initial denatured 1 min; 87 degrees C denatured 5 s, 68 degrees C annealing 5 s, 30 cycle; L. japanica visualize strong green fluorescence under 365 nm UV lamp whereas adulterants without. The results indicate rapid allele-specific PCR could authenticate L. japanica and its adulterants rapidly and simply. PMID:25612418

  11. Winter wheat stand density determination and yield estimates from handheld and airborne scanners. [Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aase, J. K.; Millard, J. P.; Siddoway, F. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Radiance measurements from handheld (Exotech 100-A) and air-borne (Daedalus DEI 1260) radiometers were related to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stand densities (simulated winter wheat winterkill) and to grain yield for a field located 11 km northwest of Sidney, Montana, on a Williams loam soil (fine-loamy, mixed Typic Argiborolls) where a semidwarf hard red spring wheat cultivar was needed to stand. Radiances were measured with the handheld radiometer on clear mornings throughout the growing season. Aircraft overflight measurements were made at the end of tillering and during the early stem extension period, and the mid-heading period. The IR/red ratio and normalized difference vegetation index were used in the analysis. The aircraft measurements corroborated the ground measurements inasmuch as wheat stand densities were detected and could be evaluated at an early enough growth stage to make management decision. The aircraft measurements also corroborated handheld measurements when related to yield prediction. The IR/red ratio, although there was some growth stage dependency, related well to yield when measured from just past tillering until about the watery-ripe stage.

  12. Neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) forward-viewing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Vuong, Barry; Cusimano, Michael; Brukson, Alexander; Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    A prototype neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging probe has been developed to provide micron resolution cross-sectional images of subsurface tissue during open surgery. This new ergonomic hand-held probe has been designed based on our group's previous work on electrostatically driven optical fibers. It has been packaged into a catheter probe in the familiar form factor of the clinically accepted Bayonet shaped neurosurgical non-imaging Doppler ultrasound probes. The optical design was optimized using ZEMAX simulation. Optical properties of the probe were tested to yield an ~20 um spot size, 5 mm working distance and a 3.5 mm field of view. The scan frequency can be increased or decreased by changing the applied voltage. Typically a scan frequency of less than 60Hz is chosen to keep the applied voltage to less than 2000V. The axial resolution of the probe was ~15 um (in air) as determined by the OCT system. A custom-triggering methodology has been developed to provide continuous stable imaging, which is crucial for clinical utility. Feasibility of this probe, in combination with a 1310 nm swept source OCT system was tested and images are presented to highlight the usefulness of such a forward viewing handheld OCT imaging probe. Knowledge gained from this research will lay the foundation for developing new OCT technologies for endovascular management of cerebral aneurysms and transsphenoidal neuroendoscopic treatment of pituitary tumors.

  13. Application of Handheld Tele-ECG for Health Care Delivery in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meenu; Sinha, Vineet; Manoj Kumar, Rohit; Pant, Pankaj; Kumar, Munish

    2014-01-01

    Telemonitoring is a medical practice that involves remotely monitoring patients who are not at the same location as the health care provider. The purpose of our study was to use handheld tele-electrocardiogram (ECG) developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC) to identify heart conditions in the rural underserved population where the doctor-patient ratio is low and access to health care is difficult. The objective of our study was clinical validation of handheld tele-ECG as a screening tool for evaluation of cardiac diseases in the rural population. ECG was obtained in 450 individuals (mean age 31.49 ± 20.058) residing in the periphery of Chandigarh, India, from April 2011 to March 2013, using the handheld tele-ECG machine. The data were then transmitted to physicians in Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, for their expert opinion. ECG was interpreted as normal in 70% individuals. Left ventricular hypertrophy (9.3%) was the commonest abnormality followed closely by old myocardial infarction (5.3%). Patient satisfaction was reported to be ~95%. Thus, it can be safely concluded that tele-ECG is a portable, cost-effective, and convenient tool for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases and thus improves quality and accessibility, especially in rural areas. PMID:25368654

  14. Application of Handheld Tele-ECG for Health Care Delivery in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenu; Agarwal, Amit; Sinha, Vineet; Manoj Kumar, Rohit; Jaiswal, Nishant; Jindal, Ishita; Pant, Pankaj; Kumar, Munish

    2014-01-01

    Telemonitoring is a medical practice that involves remotely monitoring patients who are not at the same location as the health care provider. The purpose of our study was to use handheld tele-electrocardiogram (ECG) developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC) to identify heart conditions in the rural underserved population where the doctor-patient ratio is low and access to health care is difficult. The objective of our study was clinical validation of handheld tele-ECG as a screening tool for evaluation of cardiac diseases in the rural population. ECG was obtained in 450 individuals (mean age 31.49 ± 20.058) residing in the periphery of Chandigarh, India, from April 2011 to March 2013, using the handheld tele-ECG machine. The data were then transmitted to physicians in Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, for their expert opinion. ECG was interpreted as normal in 70% individuals. Left ventricular hypertrophy (9.3%) was the commonest abnormality followed closely by old myocardial infarction (5.3%). Patient satisfaction was reported to be ~95%. Thus, it can be safely concluded that tele-ECG is a portable, cost-effective, and convenient tool for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases and thus improves quality and accessibility, especially in rural areas. PMID:25368654

  15. Handheld photoacoustic tomography probe built using optical-fiber parallel acoustic delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Yu, Jaesok; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The development of the first miniaturized parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for handheld photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is reported. Using fused-silica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation, we constructed two arrays of eight PADLs. Precision laser micromachining was conducted to produce robust and accurate mechanical support and alignment structures for the PADLs, with minimal acoustic distortion and interchannel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs, each with a different time delay, were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. A handheld PADL probe was constructed using two single-element transducers and two data acquisition channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8∶1). Photoacoustic (PA) images of a black-ink target embedded in an optically scattering phantom were successfully acquired. After traveling through the PADLs, the eight channels of differently time-delayed PA signals reached each single-element ultrasonic transducer in a designated nonoverlapping time series, allowing clear signal separation for PA image reconstruction. Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe can potentially enable real-time PAT, while significantly reducing the complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system.

  16. A Mixed Methods Analysis of a Library Based Handheld Intervention with Rural Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Richard L.; Woodward, Nakia J.; Wolf, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine Library has participated for several years in projects to provide rural clinicians with health information resources. Objectives To determine if a strategy of handheld devices with a best-evidence point-of-care disease tool and a drug database paired with access to a medical library for full-text articles and training to use the tools would be an affordable way to meet the information needs of rural underserved clinicians. Methods This study is a mixed methods methodology. The first project was evaluated using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodology. The second was evaluated qualitatively using interviews and focus groups. Results The quantitative findings discovered that clinicians equipped with a handheld device with evidence-based software more frequently found answers to clinical questions, found answers more quickly, were more satisfied with information they found, and use expensive resources such as continuing medical education, online databases, and textbooks less than the group that did not have access to online technology. Qualitative results supported the quantitative findings. Conclusion Librarians can implement a three-pronged strategy of the secondary literature via a handheld, the primary literature via LoansomeDoc, and quality training to meet basic information needs of rural clinicians. PMID:25155980

  17. Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements—a theoretical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkanen, Ville

    2010-05-01

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p < 0.05). The stiffness parameter was weakly (on average R2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements.

  18. A hand-held electronic tongue based on fluorometry for taste assessment of tea.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuang-Hua; Chen, Richie L C; Hsieh, Bo-Chuan; Chen, Po-Chung; Hsiao, Hsien-Yi; Nieh, Chi-Hua; Cheng, Tzong-Jih

    2010-12-15

    A hand-held electronic tongue was developed for determining taste levels of astringency and umami in tea infusions. The sensing principles are based on quenching the fluorescence of 3-aminophthalate by tannin, and the fluorogenic reaction of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) with amino acids to determine astringency and umami levels, respectively. Both reactions were measured by a single fluorescence sensing system with same excitation and emission wavelengths (340/425 nm). This work describes in detail the design, fabrication, and performance evaluation of a hand-held fluorometer with an ultra-violet light emitted diode (UVLED) and a photo-detector with a filter built-in. The dimension and the weight of proposed electronic tongue prototype are only 120×60×65 mm(3) and 150 g, respectively. The detection limits of this prototype for theanine and tannic acid were 0.2 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively. Correlation coefficients of this prototype compared with a commercial fluorescence instrument are both higher than 0.995 in determinations of tannin acid and theanine. Linear detection ranges of the hand-held fluorometer for tannic acid and theanine are 1-20 μg/ml and 0.2-10 μg/ml (CV<5%, n=3), respectively. A specified taste indicator for tea, defined as ratio of umami to astringency, was adopted here to effectively distinguish flavour quality of partially fermented Oolong teas. PMID:20728331

  19. Handheld histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning confocal optical microscope for interventional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Avritscher, Rony; Wang, Youmin; Lane, Nancy; Madoff, David C; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Uhr, Jonathan W; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-04-01

    A handheld, forward-imaging, laser-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) demonstrating optical sectioning comparable with microtome slice thicknesses in conventional histology, targeted towards interventional imaging, is reported. Fast raster scanning (approximately 2.5 kHz line scan rate, 3.0-5.0 frames per second) was provided by a 2-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror fabricated by a method compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing. Cost-effective rapid-prototyped packaging combined the MEMS mirror with micro-optical components into a probe with 18 mm outer diameter and 54 mm rigid length. ZEMAX optical design simulations indicate the ability of the handheld optical system to obtain lateral resolution of 0.31 and axial resolution of 2.85 microm. Lateral and axial resolutions are experimentally measured at 0.5 microm and 4.2 microm respectively, with field of view of 200 x 125 microm. Results of reflectance imaging of ex vivo swine liver, and fluorescence imaging of the expression of cytokeratin and mammaglobin tumor biomarkers in epithelial human breast tissue from metastatic breast cancer patients are presented. The results indicate that inexpensive, portable handheld optical microscopy tools based on silicon micromirror technologies could be important in interventional imaging, complementing existing coarse-resolution techniques to improve the efficacy of disease diagnosis, image-guided excisional microsurgery, and monitored photodynamic therapy. PMID:20012209

  20. A hand-held micro surgical device for contact force regulation against involuntary movements.

    PubMed

    Seulki Kyeong; Dongjune Chang; Yunjoo Kim; Gwang Min Gu; Seungkey Lee; Soohoa Jeong; Jung Kim

    2015-08-01

    Involuntary movements such as heart beating in surgical environment and surgeon's tremor disturb a micro surgical manipulation and cause a risk of patient wound. Although the delicate operation is performed by a skilled surgeon, the sensitivity of the surgeon is limited to quantify the range of safe contact forces. In this paper, we developed a compact hand-held surgical device to maintain a required contact force to maintain a required contact force using a custom force sensor and a linear delta mechanism. The custom optical force sensor measured the contact force of the device tip and the linear delta mechanism compensated undesired forces to maintain a consistent contact force. The proposed device is consisted of force sensing unit and actuating unit. The device was improved from our previous Linear Delta mechanism based prototype in terms of size, weight, and force sensing capability. The developed device was validated by investigation of contact force accuracy in a fixed condition and a hand-held condition. In hand-held condition, the visual feedback of the current contact force was provided, and the performance of the contact force regulation was investigated by comparing the root mean square (RMS) contact force errors and standard deviation in with and without control cases. The fluctuation (less than 50 mN) of the force regulation control of the device showed the feasibility of the device for the use in delicate operations. PMID:26736400

  1. Usefulness of a handheld nebulizer in cough test to screen for silent aspiration.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Yoko; Tohara, Haruka; Nakane, Ayako; Murata, Shino; Mikushi, Shinya; Susa, Chiaki; Takashima, Maho; Umeda, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Ruriko; Uematsu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Cough test to screen for silent aspiration (SA) was reported, and the effectiveness was excellent. However, the device was rather large so that the portability was poor. So, the purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of a handheld nebulizer for the test and verify the reproducibility of the method. The subjects were 160 patients who were suspected of having dysphagia and underwent videofluorography (VF) or videoendoscopy (VE). They inhaled 1.0 % citric acid-physiologic saline orally for 1 min using a handheld nebulizer, and the examiner observed the number of coughs: more than five coughs was considered as negative (normal), while less than four coughs was regarded as positive. Among the subjects, 70 patients administered the cough test and VF or VE twice or more at some intervals. The k coefficient was calculated in reproducibility. Using the results of the VF or VE examination as the standards, for SA detection, the sensitivity was 0.86, specificity was 0.71, positive predictive value was 0.53, and negative predictive value was 0.93. The k coefficient was 0.79. In conclusion, the handheld nebulizer was useful in the cough test to screen for SA. Furthermore, satisfactory reproducibility was shown. PMID:23053789

  2. Handheld photoacoustic tomography probe built using optical-fiber parallel acoustic delay lines.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Yu, Jaesok; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V; Zou, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The development of the first miniaturized parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for handheld photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is reported. Using fused-silica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation, we constructed two arrays of eight PADLs. Precision laser micromachining was conducted to produce robust and accurate mechanical support and alignment structures for the PADLs, with minimal acoustic distortion and interchannel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs, each with a different time delay, were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. A handheld PADL probe was constructed using two single-element transducers and two data acquisition channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8∶1). Photoacoustic (PA) images of a black-ink target embedded in an optically scattering phantom were successfully acquired. After traveling through the PADLs, the eight channels of differently time-delayed PA signals reached each single-element ultrasonic transducer in a designated nonoverlapping time series, allowing clear signal separation for PA image reconstruction. Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe can potentially enable real-time PAT, while significantly reducing the complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system. PMID:25104413

  3. Preliminary fire extinguishing tests with handheld bottles: A comparison of extinguishing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guastavino, T. M.; Fann, F.

    1990-01-01

    In 1982, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center completed a test and evaluation project on use of handheld extinguishers in transport category aircraft. Some of the tests involved the comparative effectiveness of handheld extinguishers in a specific fire scenario: a triple non-fireblocked aircraft seat ignited with gasoline. The test work included the identification and quantification of effluent gas species produced by the fire and the extinguishing chemicals. The comparative effectiveness of the extinguishers used in the above tests and some newer systems in two distinct fire tests are described. The first test is the crib test used by Underwriters Laboratory, Inc. to rate handheld estinguishers. The second test is the same seat test used in the earlier work. The tests employed aircraft approved water extinguishers and Halon 1211 extinguishers as benchmarks. New formulations using surfactants and extinguishing powders in aqueous solutions were tested against the benchmark performance levels. In these tests, certain new solutions were able to meet or exceed the performance of the benchmark agents.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of CDC Category “A” DNA and RNA Bioterrorism Agents by Use of Multiplex PCR & RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Kraft, Andrea J.; Fan, Jiang; Van Dyke, Meredith; Wang, Lihua; Bose, Michael E.; Khanna, Marilyn; Metallo, Jacob A.; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2009-01-01

    , respectively. The surrogate sensitivities of these two assays were 100% (95%CI 83–100) for FT, BA (pX02), YP, VM, VZV, dengue 2,3,4 and 95% (95%CI 75–100) for BA (pX01) and dengue 1 using spiked clinical specimens. The specificity of both BioT multiplex assays on spiked specimens was 100% (95% CI 99–100). Compared to other available assays (culture, serology, PCR, etc.) both the BioT DNA mPCR-EHA and BioT RNA mRT-PCR-EHA are rapid, sensitive and specific assays for detecting many category “A” Bioterrorism agents using a standard thermocycler. PMID:20224751

  5. MEMS-Based Handheld Fourier Domain Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography for Intraoperative Microvascular Anastomosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of a miniature handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) imager for real time intraoperative vascular patency evaluation in the setting of super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis. Methods A novel handheld imager Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography based on a 1.3-µm central wavelength swept source for extravascular imaging was developed. The imager was minimized through the adoption of a 2.4-mm diameter microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, additionally a 12.7-mm diameter lens system was designed and combined with the MEMS mirror to achieve a small form factor that optimize functionality as a handheld extravascular OCT imager. To evaluate in-vivo applicability, super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis was performed in a mouse femoral vessel cut and repair model employing conventional interrupted suture technique as well as a novel non-suture cuff technique. Vascular anastomosis patency after clinically successful repair was evaluated using the novel handheld OCT imager. Results With an adjustable lateral image field of view up to 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm, high-resolution simultaneous structural and flow imaging of the blood vessels were successfully acquired for BALB/C mouse after orthotopic hind limb transplantation using a non-suture cuff technique and BALB/C mouse after femoral artery anastomosis using a suture technique. We experimentally quantify the axial and lateral resolution of the OCT to be 12.6 µm in air and 17.5 µm respectively. The OCT has a sensitivity of 84 dB and sensitivity roll-off of 5.7 dB/mm over an imaging range of 5 mm. Imaging with a frame rate of 36 Hz for an image size of 1000(lateral)×512(axial) pixels using a 50,000 A-lines per second swept source was achieved. Quantitative vessel lumen patency, lumen narrowing and thrombosis analysis were performed based on acquired structure and Doppler images. Conclusions A miniature handheld OCT imager that can be used for

  6. Ligation-independent cloning of PCR products (LIC-PCR).

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, C; de Jong, P J

    1990-01-01

    A new procedure has been developed for the efficient cloning of complex PCR mixtures, resulting in libraries exclusively consisting of recombinant clones. Recombinants are generated between PCR products and a PCR-amplified plasmid vector. The procedure does not require the use of restriction enzymes, T4 DNA ligase or alkaline phosphatase. The 5'-ends of the primers used to generate the cloneable PCR fragments contain an additional 12 nucleotide (nt) sequence lacking dCMP. As a result, the amplification products include 12-nt sequences lacking dGMP at their 3'-ends. The 3'-terminal sequence can be removed by the action of the (3'----5') exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase in the presence of dGTP, leading to fragments with 5'-extending single-stranded (ss) tails of a defined sequence and length. Similarly, the entire plasmid vector is amplified with primers homologous to sequences in the multiple cloning site. The vector oligos have additional 12-nt tails complementary to the tails used for fragment amplification, permitting the creation of ss-ends with T4 DNA polymerase in the presence of dCTP. Circularization can occur between vector molecules and PCR fragments as mediated by the 12-nt cohesive ends, but not in mixtures lacking insert fragments. The resulting circular recombinant molecules do not require in vitro ligation for efficient bacterial transformation. We have applied the procedure for the cloning of inter-ALU fragments from hybrid cell-lines and human cosmid clones. Images PMID:2235490

  7. A study of PCR inhibition mechanisms using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Opel, Kerry L; Chung, Denise; McCord, Bruce R

    2010-01-01

    In this project, real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to study the mechanism of PCR inhibition through examination of the effect of amplicon length, melting temperature, and sequence. Specifically designed primers with three different amplicon lengths and three different melting temperatures were used to target a single homozygous allele in the HUMTH01 locus. The effect on amplification efficiency for each primer pair was determined by adding different concentrations of various PCR inhibitors to the reaction mixture. The results show that a variety of inhibition mechanisms can occur during the PCR process depending on the type of co-extracted inhibitor. These include Taq inhibition, DNA template binding, and effects on reaction efficiency. In addition, some inhibitors appear to affect the reaction in more than one manner. Overall we find that amplicon size and melting temperature are important in some inhibition mechanisms and not in others and the key issue in understanding PCR inhibition is determining the identity of the interfering substance. PMID:20015162

  8. Portable handheld diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for clinical evaluation of skin: a pilot study in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Guo, Jean-Yan; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Hung Ji; Chou, Shih-Jie; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been utilized to study biological tissues for a variety of applications. However, many DRS systems are not designed for handheld use and/or relatively expensive which limit the extensive clinical use of this technique. In this paper, we report a handheld, low-cost DRS system consisting of a light source, optical switch, and a spectrometer, that can precisely quantify the optical properties of tissue samples in the clinical setting. The handheld DRS system was employed to determine the skin chromophore concentrations, absorption and scattering properties of 11 patients with psoriasis. The measurement results were compared to the clinical severity of psoriasis as evaluated by dermatologist using PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) scores. Our statistical analyses indicated that the handheld DRS system could be a useful non-invasive tool for objective evaluation of the severity of psoriasis. It is expected that the handheld system can be used for the objective evaluation and monitoring of various skin diseases such as keloid and psoriasis. PMID:26977366

  9. Portable handheld diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for clinical evaluation of skin: a pilot study in psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Guo, Jean-Yan; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Hung Ji; Chou, Shih-Jie; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been utilized to study biological tissues for a variety of applications. However, many DRS systems are not designed for handheld use and/or relatively expensive which limit the extensive clinical use of this technique. In this paper, we report a handheld, low-cost DRS system consisting of a light source, optical switch, and a spectrometer, that can precisely quantify the optical properties of tissue samples in the clinical setting. The handheld DRS system was employed to determine the skin chromophore concentrations, absorption and scattering properties of 11 patients with psoriasis. The measurement results were compared to the clinical severity of psoriasis as evaluated by dermatologist using PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) scores. Our statistical analyses indicated that the handheld DRS system could be a useful non-invasive tool for objective evaluation of the severity of psoriasis. It is expected that the handheld system can be used for the objective evaluation and monitoring of various skin diseases such as keloid and psoriasis. PMID:26977366

  10. A new hand-held optical reflectometer to measure enamel erosion: correlation with surface hardness and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the surface reflection intensity (SRI) was measured from enamel with different induced erosion degrees using a hand-held pen-size reflectometer (Hand-Held) and a Table-Top reflectometer. To validate the Hand-Held reflectometer, we correlated its optical signals with the change of surface microhardness (SMH), and amount of calcium released from the enamel samples during erosion. We used 124 tooth enamel specimens that were exposed to an erosive challenge of either 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes. SRI and SMH were measured before and after the erosive challenge and we also measured the amount of calcium released to the citric acid. Relative SRI loss (rSRIloss) and relative SMH loss (rSMHloss) were calculated. rSRIloss from the Hand-Held and the Table-Top reflectometers were similar and significantly correlated to rSMHloss and calcium release. The regression analyses showed a significant association between rSRIloss from both reflectometers and rSMHloss and calcium, showing that both reflectometers can be used to measure erosive demineralization of enamel. The Hand-Held reflectometer is capable of assessing in vitro erosion, correlating to other commonly used methods. It is small, easy to handle and provides fast measurement, being a possible candidate to measure erosion in clinical studies. PMID:27121129

  11. Anaesthesia record system on handheld computers--pilot experience and uses for quality control and clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Xue, Zhanggang; Zhu, Jie; Fors, Uno; Klein, Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes a mobile information system to collect patient information for anesthesia quality control. In this system, a mobile database program was designed for use on handheld computers (Pocket PC). This program is used to collect patient data at the bedside on the handhelds, with a daily synchronization of the data between the anaesthesiologists' handhelds with the anaesthesia database. All collected data are later used for quality control analysis. Furthermore, clinical guidelines will be included on these same handhelds. During the pilot phase, data from a sample set of about 300 patients were incorporated. The processes and interfaces of the system are presented in the paper. The current mobile database system has been designed to replace the original paper-based data collection system. The individual anaesthesiologist's handheld synchronizes patient data daily with anaesthesia database center. This information database is analyzed and used not only to give feedback to the individual doctor or center, but also to review the use of the guidelines provided and the results of their utilization. PMID:15652637

  12. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the breath of infected cattle using a hand-held device to collect aerosols.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Brehm, Katharina E; Skov, Julia; Harlow, Kenneth W; Christensen, Julia; Haas, Bernd

    2011-10-01

    Exhaled air of individual cattle infected experimentally with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was sampled to assess the feasibility of a rapid, non-invasive general screening approach for identifying sources of FMDV infection. The air sampler used was a handheld prototype device employing electrostatic particle capture in a microchip chamber of 10-15 μL and was shown to effectively capture a high percentage of airborne microorganisms. The particles were eluted subsequently from the chip chamber and subjected to real-time RT-PCR. Sampling exhaled air for as little as 1 min allowed the detection of FMDV in cattle infected experimentally. Detection in exhaled air from individual cattle was compared to FMDV detection in serum and saliva for 3 different strains of FMDV (O1/Manisa/69, C/Oberbayern/FRG/1960 and SAT1/Zimbawe/1989). Detection of FMDV in exhaled air was possible for all strains of FMDV used for experimental infection but the period that detection was possible varied among the strains. Detection in exhaled air generally peaked on day 2-4 post infection. The perspectives of monitoring for FMDV in the breath of infected cattle are discussed in the context of real-time epidemiological contingencies. PMID:21723882

  13. A Data-Driven Design Evaluation Tool for Handheld Device Soft Keyboards

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Matthieu B.; Sunderland, Elsie M.; Jindrich, Devin L.; Dennerlein, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    Thumb interaction is a primary technique used to operate small handheld devices such as smartphones. Despite the different techniques involved in operating a handheld device compared to a personal computer, the keyboard layouts for both devices are similar. A handheld device keyboard that considers the physical capabilities of the thumb may improve user experience. We developed and applied a design evaluation tool for different geometries of the QWERTY keyboard using a performance evaluation model. The model utilizes previously collected data on thumb motor performance and posture for different tap locations and thumb movement directions. We calculated a performance index (PITOT, 0 is worst and 2 is best) for 663 designs consisting in different combinations of three variables: the keyboard's radius of curvature (R) (mm), orientation (O) (°), and vertical location on the screen (L). The current standard keyboard performed poorly (PITOT = 0.28) compared to other designs considered. Keyboard location (L) contributed to the greatest variability in performance out of the three design variables, suggesting that designers should modify this variable first. Performance was greatest for designs in the middle keyboard location. In addition, having a slightly upward curve (R = −20 mm) and orientated perpendicular to the thumb's long axis (O = −20°) improved performance to PITOT = 1.97. Poorest performances were associated with placement of the keyboard's spacebar in the bottom right corner of the screen (e.g., the worst was for R = 20 mm, O = 40°, L =  Bottom (PITOT = 0.09)). While this evaluation tool can be used in the design process as an ergonomic reference to promote user motor performance, other design variables such as visual access and usability still remain unexplored. PMID:25211465

  14. Handheld ultrahigh speed swept source optical coherence tomography instrument using a MEMS scanning mirror

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen D.; Kraus, Martin F.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Liu, Jonathan J.; Choi, WooJhon; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E.; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    We developed an ultrahigh speed, handheld swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) ophthalmic instrument using a 2D MEMS mirror. A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating at 1060 nm center wavelength yielded a 350 kHz axial scan rate and 10 µm axial resolution in tissue. The long coherence length of the VCSEL enabled a 3.08 mm imaging range with minimal sensitivity roll-off in tissue. Two different designs with identical optical components were tested to evaluate handheld OCT ergonomics. An iris camera aided in alignment of the OCT beam through the pupil and a manual fixation light selected the imaging region on the retina. Volumetric and high definition scans were obtained from 5 undilated normal subjects. Volumetric OCT data was acquired by scanning the 2.4 mm diameter 2D MEMS mirror sinusoidally in the fast direction and linearly in the orthogonal slow direction. A second volumetric sinusoidal scan was obtained in the orthogonal direction and the two volumes were processed with a software algorithm to generate a merged motion-corrected volume. Motion-corrected standard 6 x 6 mm2 and wide field 10 x 10 mm2 volumetric OCT data were generated using two volumetric scans, each obtained in 1.4 seconds. High definition 10 mm and 6 mm B-scans were obtained by averaging and registering 25 B-scans obtained over the same position in 0.57 seconds. One of the advantages of volumetric OCT data is the generation of en face OCT images with arbitrary cross sectional B-scans registered to fundus features. This technology should enable screening applications to identify early retinal disease, before irreversible vision impairment or loss occurs. Handheld OCT technology also promises to enable applications in a wide range of settings outside of the traditional ophthalmology or optometry clinics including pediatrics, intraoperative, primary care, developing countries, and military medicine. PMID:24466495

  15. Handheld ultrahigh speed swept source optical coherence tomography instrument using a MEMS scanning mirror.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chen D; Kraus, Martin F; Potsaid, Benjamin; Liu, Jonathan J; Choi, Woojhon; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S; Fujimoto, James G

    2013-12-20

    We developed an ultrahigh speed, handheld swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) ophthalmic instrument using a 2D MEMS mirror. A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating at 1060 nm center wavelength yielded a 350 kHz axial scan rate and 10 µm axial resolution in tissue. The long coherence length of the VCSEL enabled a 3.08 mm imaging range with minimal sensitivity roll-off in tissue. Two different designs with identical optical components were tested to evaluate handheld OCT ergonomics. An iris camera aided in alignment of the OCT beam through the pupil and a manual fixation light selected the imaging region on the retina. Volumetric and high definition scans were obtained from 5 undilated normal subjects. Volumetric OCT data was acquired by scanning the 2.4 mm diameter 2D MEMS mirror sinusoidally in the fast direction and linearly in the orthogonal slow direction. A second volumetric sinusoidal scan was obtained in the orthogonal direction and the two volumes were processed with a software algorithm to generate a merged motion-corrected volume. Motion-corrected standard 6 x 6 mm(2) and wide field 10 x 10 mm(2) volumetric OCT data were generated using two volumetric scans, each obtained in 1.4 seconds. High definition 10 mm and 6 mm B-scans were obtained by averaging and registering 25 B-scans obtained over the same position in 0.57 seconds. One of the advantages of volumetric OCT data is the generation of en face OCT images with arbitrary cross sectional B-scans registered to fundus features. This technology should enable screening applications to identify early retinal disease, before irreversible vision impairment or loss occurs. Handheld OCT technology also promises to enable applications in a wide range of settings outside of the traditional ophthalmology or optometry clinics including pediatrics, intraoperative, primary care, developing countries, and military medicine. PMID:24466495

  16. A wireless handheld probe with spectrally constrained evolution strategies for diffuse optical imaging of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Flexman, M. L.; Kim, H. K.; Stoll, R.; Khalil, M. A.; Fong, C. J.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, portable, wireless diffuse optical imaging device. The handheld device is fast, portable, and can be applied to a wide range of both static and dynamic imaging applications including breast cancer, functional brain imaging, and peripheral artery disease. The continuous-wave probe has four near-infrared wavelengths and uses digital detection techniques to perform measurements at 2.3 Hz. Using a multispectral evolution algorithm for chromophore reconstruction, we can measure absolute oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration as well as scattering in tissue. Performance of the device is demonstrated using a series of liquid phantoms comprised of Intralipid®, ink, and dye. PMID:22462907

  17. ROPtool analysis of images acquired using a noncontact handheld fundus camera (Pictor)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Laura A; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Prakalapakorn, S Grace

    2015-12-01

    The presence of plus disease is the primary indication for treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but its diagnosis is subjective and prone to error. ROPtool is a semiautomated computer program that quantifies vascular tortuosity and dilation. Pictor is an FDA-approved, noncontact, handheld digital fundus camera. This pilot study evaluated ROPtool's ability to analyze high-quality Pictor images of premature infants and its accuracy in diagnosing plus disease compared to clinical examination. In our small sample of images, ROPtool could trace and identify the presence of plus disease with high accuracy. PMID:26691046

  18. Pulse arrival time estimation from the impedance plethysmogram obtained with a handheld device.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Clapers, J; Casanella, R; Pallas-Areny, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to estimate pulse arrival time (PAT) from the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the impedance plethysmogram (TPG) obtained by using a compact and easy-to-use handheld device with only four electrodes. A proof-of-concept has been carried out where PAT values obtained with the proposed device have been compared to PAT values measured between the ECG and the photoplethysmogram (PPG) during three experiments of paced respiration to induce controlled PAT changes. The results show that both methods yield equivalent PAT values in within ± 7 ms (95 % confidence interval), which is less than typical deviations reported for common PAT measurements. PMID:22254361

  19. Handheld dual-wavelength Raman instrument for the detection of chemical agents and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christesen, Steven D.; Guicheteau, Jason A.; Curtiss, Justin M.; Fountain, Augustus W.

    2016-07-01

    Handheld Raman systems have become powerful analytical tools for the detection and identification of hazardous chemical materials that are now commonly used by both the civilian and military communities. Due to the availability of compact lasers and sensitive detectors, systems typically operate at 785 nm. However, the Raman return at this wavelength can still be obscured by fluorescent impurities in the targeted materials or their matrices. To potentially mitigate this shortcoming, a prototype dual-wavelength Raman incorporating both 785- and 1064-nm excitations was developed and assessed at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. The results of that evaluation are discussed here.

  20. Accuracy and validity of IK4 handheld video keratometer measurements in children

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Erin M.; Miller, Joseph M.; Schwiegerling, Jim; Clifford-Donaldson, Candice E.; Green, Tina K.; Messer, Dawn H.; Dobson, Velma

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Keratometer (IK4) is a custom handheld instrument that was designed specifically to allow measurement of corneal astigmatism in infants as young as 6 months of age. In this study, accuracy of IK4 measurements using standard toric surfaces was within 0.25 D. Validity measurements obtained in 860 children aged 3–7 years demonstrated slightly higher astigmatism measurements in the IK4 than in the Retinomax K+. Measurement success was 98% using the IK4. The IK4 may prove to be clinically useful for screening children as young as 3 years of age at high risk for corneal astigmatism. PMID:21907130

  1. Applications of a hand-held GPS receiver in South American rain forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baksh, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A hand-held Global Positioning System receiver was used to determine the precise locations of villages, houses, gardens, and other cultural and environmental features in poorly mapped South American rain forests. The Magellan NAV 1000 unit profides extremely accurate latitude and longitude information, but determination of altitude is problematical. Overall, the receiver effectively allows anthropologists to obtain essential locational data useful for categorizing land uses, mapping tribal boundaries, and other applications in regions where environmental conditions are harsh and/or accessibility is difficult.

  2. Hand-held electronic teaching-aid for demonstrating MRI concepts.

    PubMed

    Malko, J A; Nelson, R C

    1989-11-01

    We describe a hand-held electronic teaching-aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can be used to demonstrate the dependence of signal intensity on changing pulse sequence parameters (TR and TE), the dependence of intensity on changing tissue parameters (T1 and T2), and the ideas of "T1-weighting" and "T2-weighting" as they relate to image contrast. The device was specifically designed to be easy to use and readily accessible to residents-in-training and MR neophytes. PMID:2807811

  3. Multiple instance dictionary learning for subsurface object detection using handheld EMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Alina; Cook, Matthew; Alvey, Brendan; Ho, Dominic K.

    2015-05-01

    A dictionary learning approach for subsurface object detection using handheld electromagnetic induction (EMI) data is presented. A large number of unsupervised and supervised dictionary learning methods have been developed in the literature. However, the majority of these methods require data point-specific labels during training. In the application to subsurface object detection, often the specific training data samples that correspond to target and non-target are not known and difficult to determine manually. In this paper, a dictionary learning method that addresses this issue using the multiple instance learning techniques is presented. Results are shown on real EMI data sets.

  4. A Wireless, Handheld Decision Support System To Promote Smoking Cessation in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Michel, George; Marcy, Theodore; Shiffman, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    Tobacco use remains a relatively unaddressed cause of disease and death in the daily care of patients by physicians. To overcome the barriers that physicians face in addressing tobacco use and its treatment in the primary care setting, we have developed a clinical decision support system that is readily accessible through the use of familiar wireless handheld devices and supportive of treatment through the implementation of the Tobacco Use and Dependence Treatment Guideline recommendations. We adopted the Information Management Services model to ensure that the application would effectively implement the guideline. The techniques used here are readily adaptable to implementing a broad range of clinical guidelines. PMID:16779096

  5. Environmental applications of hand-held photography taken from the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlberger, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Astronauts have been taking photographs of earth since 1965, years before unmanned satellites began systematic coverage. The trained eye of an intelligent observer permits the rapid identification of a feature or an anomaly so that it can be the central focus of the photograph, rather than one of an endless stream of information from an unmanned satellite through which the interpreter has to sort and pick. This paper describes some of the environmental uses of hand-held photography since the launch of the first Space Shuttle in April, 1981.

  6. Rapid Diagnosis of an Ulnar Fracture with Portable Hand-Held Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Brown, Ross; Diebel, Lawrence N.; Nicolaou, Savvas; Marshburn, Tom; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic fractures are a common injury in operational activities, injuries that often occur in isolated or hostile environments. Clinical ultrasound devices have become more user friendly and lighter allowing them to be easily transported with forward medical teams. The bone-soft tissue interface has a very large acoustic impedance, with a high reflectance that can be used to visualize breaks in contour including fractures. Herein reported is a case of an ulnar fracture that was quickly visualized in the early phase of a multi-system trauma resuscitation with a hand-held ultrasound device. The implications for operational medicine are discussed.

  7. Quantitative Chemical Analysis of Archaeological Slag Material Using Handheld X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rebecca B; Eekelers, Kim; Degryse, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) has seen a dramatic increase in use for archaeological projects. The attraction of the technique is its portable and nondestructive nature. In many cases, the archaeological artefacts in question cannot be destructively sampled, or the piece itself cannot be sent to an analytical laboratory. One of the current research interests associated with the Sagalassos project is the study of the Roman iron industry. Previously exported iron slag and ore from the site and the surrounding area was subjected to laboratory chemical analyses. These indicated that different ores were being utilized in the production of iron in different periods. In order to further the project the slag material still in the site depot needed to be analyzed. However, recent legislative changes mean that materials can only be analyzed on-site. Since samples could not be taken and destructive chemical analysis was no longer feasible, a portable, nondestructive technique was required. Handheld XRF can easily provide qualitative data, but these data are only comparable to other handheld XRF qualitative data, from the same device. Quantitative data gathering is possible, but can be more problematic, particularly when the material in question is heterogeneous in nature. A calibration file was created using the manufacturer's software and "in-house" standards made from the pre-quantified samples of iron slag available in the laboratory. In order to make the calibration as robust as possible, the composition of the standards was analyzed statistically to determine which of these created bias and leverage for specific elements. These standards were then omitted from the calibration for that element. The calibration was tested in the laboratory using samples of iron slag previously analyzed with wet chemistry, and the results indicated that most sample analyses showed <30% error. Results with a >30% error were found in samples which contained very low or very

  8. Hand-held spectral radiometer to estimate gramineous biomass. [with interfaced pocket calculator solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. L.; Miller, L. D.; Tucker, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    A simple hand-held instrument has been designed and constructed to nondestructively estimate above-ground gramineous biomass using radiometric measurements. The prototype unit consists of a modified two-channel digital radiometer interfaced to a pocket calculator. A digital interface was constructed to join electronically and control the radiometer and calculator to enable the radiometer-calculator system to solve a linear conversion solution from radiometric units to estimated biomass. This instrument has been used to estimate radiometrically gramineous biomass in a more efficient fashion with a high degree of accuracy.

  9. Area estimation in pharmacokinetic studies using a hand-held programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Bury, R W

    1984-01-01

    A short program for area analysis in pharmacokinetic studies using the Hewlett-Packard HP41C hand-held programmable calculator is described. Area under the concentration-time curve is calculated firstly within defined time limits and then with extrapolation to infinite time using the slope constant of the terminal phase. Input of concentration-time data is simple and there is no limit on the number of time-concentration co-ordinates which can be entered for area calculation. PMID:6735513

  10. Active depth-guiding handheld micro-forceps for membranectomy based on CP-SSOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Lee, Phillip; Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a handheld motion-compensated micro-forceps system using common-path swept source optical coherence tomography with highly accurate depth-targeting and depth-locking for Epiretinal Membrane Peeling. Two motors and a touch sensor were used to separate the two independent motions: motion compensation and tool-tip manipulation. A smart motion monitoring and guiding algorithm was devised for precise and intuitive freehand control. Ex-vivo bovine eye experiments were performed to evaluate accuracy in a bovine retina retinal membrane peeling model. The evaluation demonstrates system capabilities of 40 um accuracy when peeling the epithelial layer of bovine retina.

  11. Spring wheat-leaf phytomass and yield estimates from airborne scanner and hand-held radiometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aase, J. K.; Siddoway, F. H.; Millard, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt has been made to relate hand-held radiometer measurements, and airborne multispectral scanner readings, with both different wheat stand densities and grain yield. Aircraft overflights were conducted during the tillering, stem extension and heading period stages of growth, while hand-held radiometer readings were taken throughout the growing season. The near-IR/red ratio was used in the analysis, which indicated that both the aircraft and the ground measurements made possible a differentiation and evaluation of wheat stand densities at an early enough growth stage to serve as the basis of management decisions. The aircraft data also corroborated the hand-held radiometer measurements with respect to yield prediction. Winterkill was readily evaluated.

  12. Applications of GIS and a Handheld XRF for Mapping Cu and Pb Contaminations in Abandoned Mine Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Choi, Y.; Yi, H.; Kim, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we used a handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to create soil contamination maps regarding Cu and Pb around abandoned mining areas. The Busan abandoned mine in Korea was selected as a study area. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)-based Terrain analysis was performed to identify locations for investigating the soil contamination. At the locations, Cu and Pb contaminations were investigated by using the handheld XRF. The field investigation data were inputted into GIS and utilized to create soil contamination maps using the ordinary kriging method (one of the geostatistical interpolation techniques used in GIS). High concentrations of Cu and Pb were shown at the waste and tailings dumps around abandoned mine openings. As a result, we could know that the method for creating soil contamination maps using a handheld and GIS can be utilized effectively.

  13. Hands-free versus hand-held cell phone conversation on a braking response by young drivers.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Joy L; Switzer, Jamie R

    2007-10-01

    As some states allow motorists to use hands-free cell phones only while driving, this study was done to examine some braking responses to see if conversing on these two types of cell phones affects quick responding. College-age drivers (n=25) completed reaction time trials in go/no-go situations under three conditions: control (no cell phone or conversation), and conversing on hands-free and hand-held cell phones. Their task involved moving the right foot from one pedal to another as quickly as possible in response to a visual signal in a lab setting. Significantly slower reaction times, movement times, and total response times were found for both cell phone conditions than for the control but no differences between hands-free and hand-held phone conditions. These findings provide additional support that talking on cell phones, regardless if it is hands-free or hand-held, reduces speed of information processing. PMID:18065072

  14. Laboratory evaluation of the GreenSeeker (TM) hand-held optical sensor to variations in orientation and height above canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Handheld optical sensors recently have been introduced to the agricultural market to simplify acquisition of spectral reflectance data. These handheld sensors are able to provide operators with Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) data when cloud cover prevents acquisition of satellite or ...

  15. The Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV Hand-Held Computer as a Medium for Teaching Mathematics to Fire Control Systems Repairers. Research Report 1408.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldovici, John A.; Scott, Thomas D.

    A study compared the benefits of using the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV hand-held computer, as opposed to conventional training without computers, in teaching mathematics to fire control systems repairers. Thirty soldiers in a course to train fire control systems repairers received training in technical mathematics using the hand-held computer, whereas…

  16. A novel handheld fluorescent microarray reader for point-of-care diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Kozma, P; Lehmann, A; Wunderlich, K; Michel, D; Schumacher, S; Ehrentreich-Förster, E; Bier, F F

    2013-09-15

    A novel handheld optical sensor for quantification of fluorescent microarrays, the so-called portMD-113 has been developed. On the surface of a planar waveguide, the spots of different fluorescently labeled biological complexes are excited by the evanescent field of the guided light. The emitted fluorescence signals of the spots are independently and simultaneously detected applying our system, which consists of a pinehole array, a microlens array, an interference filter and a detector array. As it is demonstrated in comparative measurements, the detection limit of this sensor is close to that of commercial top microarray readers, e.g. of modern laser scanners, while it has remarkable and important advantages over them. Namely, the device comprises only a few low-cost, lightweight and small components without applying any moving or energy-intensive elements, which results in turn in a commercially competitive, handheld and compact design and in the possibility to be supplied simply by a battery or a personal computer. These advantageous properties open prospects e.g. for point-of-care medical checks, as well. PMID:23612063

  17. Handheld delivery system for modified boron-type fire extinguishment agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michael E.; Tapscott, Robert E.

    1993-11-01

    A handheld, portable extinguisher was developed for Boralon, a modified Boron-type Class D fire extinguishing agent. The development of this unit progressed through the design, prototype, and final product stages. Two prototypes were designed as valved, stored-pressure types using Boralon compatible materials in critical areas exposed to the agent. The units were tested at an operating pressure of 200 lbf/sq in and an agent capacity of 2 to 3 gallons to determine the optimum application rate, throw range and throw pattern. The most favorable unit was tested for reliability. The information obtained in the prototype testing was developed further into a final design. This design specified a stored-pressure type that was sealed with a frangible plug or splined rupture disk and was activated by depressing the handle and removing the seal. Further requirements of a fill ratio of 75 percent agent to 25 percent pressure head at 200 lbf/sq in and an agent fill capacity of at least 2 gallons were also specified. Two manufactured units were found that met the criteria. An extinguisher with a frangible plug seal was successfully tested against 30- and 50-pound magnesium fires. Both the frangible plug and splined rupture disk designs satisfy the final design requirements of the handheld Boralon extinguisher. Both types are recommended for use in the Draft Military Specification for this unit.

  18. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A R J; Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  19. A Handheld Open-Field Infant Keratometer (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate a new infant keratometer that incorporates an unobstructed view of the infant with both eyes (open-field design). Methods: The design of the open-field infant keratometer is presented, and details of its construction are given. The design incorporates a single-ring keratoscope for measurement of corneal astigmatism over a 4-mm region of the cornea and includes a rectangular grid target concentric within the ring to allow for the study of higher-order aberrations of the eye. In order to calibrate the lens and imaging system, a novel telecentric test object was constructed and used. The system was bench calibrated against steel ball bearings of known dimensions and evaluated for accuracy while being used in handheld mode in a group of 16 adult cooperative subjects. It was then evaluated for testability in a group of 10 infants and toddlers. Results: Results indicate that while the device achieved the goal of creating an open-field instrument containing a single-ring keratoscope with a concentric grid array for the study of higher-order aberrations, additional work is required to establish better control of the vertex distance. Conclusion: The handheld open-field infant keratometer demonstrates testability suitable for the study of infant corneal astigmatism. Use of collimated light sources in future iterations of the design must be incorporated in order to achieve the accuracy required for clinical investigation. PMID:21212850

  20. Hand-held optoacoustic probe for three-dimensional imaging of human morphology and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We report on a hand-held imaging probe for real-time optoacoustic visualization of deep tissues in three dimensions. The proposed solution incorporates a two-dimensional array of ultrasonic sensors densely distributed on a spherical surface, whereas illumination is performed coaxially through a cylindrical cavity in the array. Visualization of three-dimensional tomographic data at a frame rate of 10 images per second is enabled by parallel recording of 256 time-resolved signals for each individual laser pulse along with a highly efficient GPUbased real-time reconstruction. A liquid coupling medium (water), enclosed in a transparent membrane, is used to guarantee transmission of the optoacoustically generated waves to the ultrasonic detectors. Excitation at multiple wavelengths further allows imaging spectrally distinctive tissue chromophores such as oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin. The performance is showcased by video-rate tracking of deep tissue vasculature and three-dimensional measurements of blood oxygenenation in a healthy human volunteer. The flexibility provided by the hand-held hardware design, combined with the real-time operation, makes the developed platform highly usable for both small animal research and clinical imaging in multiple indications, including cancer, inflammation, skin and cardiovascular diseases, diagnostics of lymphatic system and breast

  1. Three-dimensional multispectral hand-held optoacoustic imaging with microsecond-level delayed laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Bay, Erwin; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional hand-held optoacoustic imaging comes with important advantages that prompt the clinical translation of this modality, with applications envisioned in cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease, disorders of the lymphatic system, breast cancer, arthritis or inflammation. Of particular importance is the multispectral acquisition of data by exciting the tissue at several wavelengths, which enables functional imaging applications. However, multispectral imaging of entire three-dimensional regions is significantly challenged by motion artefacts in concurrent acquisitions at different wavelengths. A method based on acquisition of volumetric datasets having a microsecond-level delay between pulses at different wavelengths is described in this work. This method can avoid image artefacts imposed by a scanning velocity greater than 2 m/s, thus, does not only facilitate imaging influenced by respiratory, cardiac or other intrinsic fast movements in living tissues, but can achieve artifact-free imaging in the presence of more significant motion, e.g., abrupt displacements during handheld-mode operation in a clinical environment.

  2. Application of handheld and portable spectrometers for screening acrylamide content in commercial potato chips.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Huseyin; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2015-05-01

    The most common methods for acrylamide analysis in foods require the use of LC-MS/MS and GC-MS. Although these methods have great analytical performance, they need intensive sample preparation, highly specialised instrumentation, and are time consuming. In this study, portable and handheld infrared spectrometers were evaluated as rapid methods for screening acrylamide in potato chips and their performances were compared to those of benchtop infrared systems. The acrylamide content of 64 commercial potato chips (169-2453 μg/kg) was determined by LC-MS/MS. Spectral data were collected using mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) calibration models were developed to predict acrylamide levels. Overall, good linear correlation was found between the predicted acrylamide levels and actual measured acrylamide concentrations by LC-MS/MS (rPred > 0.90 and SEP < 100 μg/kg). Our results indicate that portable and handheld spectrometers can be used as simple and rapid alternatives for acrylamide analysis in potato chips. PMID:25529665

  3. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  4. Active and passive EO sensing for the detection of humans and handheld objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Larsson, Hâkan; Petterson, Magnus

    2015-05-01

    Some results from a low light trial in Porton Down UK are described. The purpose was to compare imaging performance for active and passive sensors in the visible, NIR, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR bands concerning detection and identification of humans carrying certain handheld objects and performing associated activities. This paper will concentrate on results from active and passive NIR and SWIR only. Both NIR and SWIR sensors provided passive imagery down to illumination levels between 1-10 lux corresponding to sunset-overcast to moonlight. The active mode gave usable imagery out to 2-3 km at much lower light levels. NIR and SWIR sensor images are compared concerning target to background contrast, cloth recognition and the detection of humans, activities and handheld objects. The target to background contrast was often somewhat better in the SWIR as compared with the NIR wavelength region. The contrast between different types of clothing was in general more discriminative in the NIR vs the SWIR. This was especially true for the active sensing modes. The recognition of large weapons could be done out to 600-1000 m range and handguns out to the 300-600 meter range. We found that activities could be detected and recognized out to 1400 m at least, but depends on the contrast between the person the background.

  5. Algorithms for a hand-held miniature x-ray fluorescence analytical instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, W.T.; Newman, D.; Ziemba, F.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this joint program was to provide technical assistance with the development of a Miniature X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analytical Instrument. This new XRF instrument is designed to overcome the weaknesses of spectrometers commercially available at the present time. Currently available XRF spectrometers (for a complete list see reference 1) convert spectral information to sample composition using the influence coefficients technique or the fundamental parameters method. They require either a standard sample with composition relatively close to the unknown or a detailed knowledge of the sample matrix. They also require a highly-trained operator and the results often depend on the capabilities of the operator. In addition, almost all existing field-portable, hand-held instruments use radioactive sources for excitation. Regulatory limits on such sources restrict them such that they can only provide relatively weak excitation. This limits all current hand-held XRF instruments to poor detection limits and/or long data collection times, in addition to the licensing requirements and disposal problems for radioactive sources. The new XRF instrument was developed jointly by Quantrad Sensor, Inc., the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and the Department of Energy (DOE). This report describes the analysis algorithms developed by NRL for the new instrument and the software which embodies them.

  6. A 3D visualization and guidance system for handheld optical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Fred S.; de Roquemaurel, Benoit; Cerussi, Albert; Hajjioui, Nassim; Li, Ang; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Sauer, Frank

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a novel 3D visualization and guidance system for handheld optical imaging devices. In this paper, the system is applied to measurements of breast/cancerous tissue optical properties using a handheld diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) instrument. The combined guidance system/DOS instrument becomes particularly useful for monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients and for longitudinal studies where measurement reproducibility is critical. The system uses relatively inexpensive hardware components and comprises a 6 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) magnetic tracking device including a DC field generator, three sensors, and a PCI card running on a PC workstation. A custom-built virtual environment combined with a well-defined workflow provide the means for image-guided measurements, improved longitudinal studies of breast optical properties, 3D reconstruction of optical properties within the anatomical map, and serial data registration. The DOS instrument characterizes tissue function such as water, lipid and total hemoglobin concentration. The patient lies on her back at a 45-degrees angle. Each spectral measurement requires consistent contact with the skin, and lasts about 5-10 seconds. Therefore a limited number of positions may be studied. In a reference measurement session, the physician acquires surface points on the breast. A Delaunay-based triangulation algorithm is used to build the virtual breast surface from the acquired points. 3D locations of all DOS measurements are recorded. All subsequently acquired surfaces are automatically registered to the reference surface, thus allowing measurement reproducibility through image guidance using the reference measurements.

  7. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  8. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demian, Dorin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-01-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic—for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat—in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  9. Estimation of antioxidant components of tomato using VIS-NIR reflectance data by handheld portable spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuvandzsiev, Péter; Helyes, Lajos; Lugasi, Andrea; Szántó, Csongor; Baranowski, Piotr; Pék, Zoltán

    2014-10-01

    Processing tomato production represents an important part of the total production of processed vegetables in the world. The quality characteristics of processing tomato, important for the food industry, are soluble solids content and antioxidant content (such as lycopene and polyphenols) of the fruit. Analytical quantification of these components is destructive, time and labour consuming. That is why researchers try to develop a non-destructive and rapid method to assess those quality parameters. The present study reports the suitability of a portable handheld visible near infrared spectrometer to predict soluble solids, lycopene and polyphenol content of tomato fruit puree. Spectral ranges of 500-1000 nm were directly acquired on fruit puree of five different tomato varieties using a FieldSpec HandHeld 2™ Portable Spectroradiometer. Immediately after spectral measurement, each fruit sample was analysed to determine soluble solids, lycopene and polyphenol content. Partial least square regressions were carried out to create models of prediction between spectral data and the values obtained from the analytical results. The accuracy of the predictions was analysed according to the coefficient of determination value (R2), the root mean square error of calibration/ cross-validation.

  10. Demonstration of three-dimensional imaging based on handheld Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Taya, T.; Kabuki, S.

    2015-11-01

    Compton cameras are potential detectors that are capable of performing measurements across a wide energy range for medical imaging applications, such as in nuclear medicine and ion beam therapy. In previous work, we developed a handheld Compton camera to identify environmental radiation hotspots. This camera consists of a 3D position-sensitive scintillator array and multi-pixel photon counter arrays. In this work, we reconstructed the 3D image of a source via list-mode maximum likelihood expectation maximization and demonstrated the imaging performance of the handheld Compton camera. Based on both the simulation and the experiments, we confirmed that multi-angle data acquisition of the imaging region significantly improved the spatial resolution of the reconstructed image in the direction vertical to the detector. The experimental spatial resolutions in the X, Y, and Z directions at the center of the imaging region were 6.81 mm ± 0.13 mm, 6.52 mm ± 0.07 mm and 6.71 mm ± 0.11 mm (FWHM), respectively. Results of multi-angle data acquisition show the potential of reconstructing 3D source images.

  11. Rich internet application system for patient-centric healthcare data management using handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, L; Pradana, R; Kim, J; Gong, P; Fulham, Michael; Feng, D

    2009-01-01

    Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) are an emerging software platform that blurs the line between web service and native application, and is a powerful tool for handheld device deployment. By democratizing health data management and widening its availability, this software platform has the potential to revolutionize telemedicine, clinical practice, medical education and information distribution, particularly in rural areas, and to make patient-centric medical computing a reality. In this paper, we propose a telemedicine application that leverages the ability of a mobile RIA platform to transcode, organise and present textual and multimedia data, which are sourced from medical database software. We adopted a web-based approach to communicate, in real-time, with an established hospital information system via a custom RIA. The proposed solution allows communication between handheld devices and a hospital information system for media streaming with support for real-time encryption, on any RIA enabled platform. We demonstrate our prototype's ability to securely and rapidly access, without installation requirements, medical data ranging from simple textual records to multi-slice PET-CT images and maximum intensity (MIP) projections. PMID:19963888

  12. Handheld and portable test systems for decentralized testing: from lab to marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, Konrad; Haberstroh, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Emergency Diagnostics, Homeland Security, Epidemiological Preparedness and the high cost of the Health Care Systems have increased demand for affordable and mobile point of care (POC) devices with highest sensitivity, specificity and rapid time to result. We have developed pocket and brief case sized systems for point of care and field based tests based on fluorescence read-out. The core consists of battery operated, 90 gram electro-optical units with optional wireless data transfer, which have been optimized to achieve highest accuracy and sensitivity combined with simplicity of use. The robust systems have been applied to molecular diagnostics such as DNA based testing, immunodiagnostics as well as environmental monitoring and agricultural testing. Starting with the current bottlenecks of in-vitro diagnostics testing and a brief market overview, we will show commercially available portable test systems for molecular diagnostics and how we solve the current bottlenecks. We will further show battery operated handheld prototypes for DNA testing. ESE's handheld and portable testing platforms have been shown to provide sensitive, accurate, and specific results, as well as rapid turnaround. The stand-alone devices demonstrate operational and physical robustness, and they can be manufactured to be affordable.

  13. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  14. Overview of passive and active vision techniques for hand-held 3D data acquistion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mada, Sreenivasa K.; Smith, Melvyn L.; Smith, Lyndon N.; Midha, Prema S.

    2003-03-01

    The digitization of the 3D shape of real objects is a rapidly expanding discipline, with a wide variety of applications, including shape acquisition, inspection, reverse engineering, gauging and robot navigation. Developments in computer product design techniques, automated production, and the need for close manufacturing tolerances will be facts of life for the foreseeable future. A growing need exists for fast, accurate, portable, non-contact 3D sensors. However, in order for 3D scanning to become more commonplace, new methods are needed for easily, quickly and robustly acquiring accurate full geometric models of complex objects using low cost technology. In this paper, a brief survey is presented of current scanning technologies available for acquiring range data. An overview is provided of current 3D-shape acquisition using both active and passive vision techniques. Each technique is explained in terms of its configuration, principle of operation, and the inherent advantages and limitations. A separate section then focuses on the implications of scannerless scanning for hand held technology, after which the current status of 3D acquisition using handheld technology, together with related issues concerning implementation, is considered more fully. Finally, conclusions for further developments in handheld devices are discussed. This paper may be of particular benefit to new comers in this field.

  15. Stabilized, hand-held, gamma-ray verification instrument for special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Wiig, G.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, Los Alamos has developed intelligent, hand-held, search instruments for use by non-specialists to search for special nuclear materials (SNM). The instruments sense SNM by detecting its emitted radiation with scintillation detectors monitored by digital alarm circuitry. Now, we have developed a new hand-held instrument that can verify the presence or absence of particular radioisotopes by analyzing gamma-ray spectra. The new instrument is similar to recent, microprocessor-based, search instruments, but has LED detector stabilization, three adjustable regions-of-interest, and additional operating programs for spectrum analysis. We call the new instrument an SNM verification instrument. Its spectrum analysis capability can verify the presence or absence of specific plutonium isotopes in containers or verify the presence of uranium and its enrichment. The instrument retains the search capability, light weight, and low-power requirement of its predecessors. Its ready portability, detector stabilization, and simple operation allow individuals with little technical training to verify the contents of SNM containers. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications. PMID:26294659

  17. Mobile Navigation Using Haptic, Audio, and Visual Direction Cues with a Handheld Test Platform.

    PubMed

    Koslover, R L; Gleeson, B T; de Bever, J T; Provancher, W R

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a series of user experiments evaluating the design of a multimodal test platform capable of rendering visual, audio, vibrotactile, and directional skin-stretch stimuli. The test platform is a handheld, wirelessly controlled device that will facilitate experiments with mobile users in realistic environments. Stimuli rendered by the device are fully characterized, and have little variance in stimulus onset timing. A series of user experiments utilizing navigational cues validates the function of the device and investigates the user response to all stimulus modes. Results show users are capable of interpreting all stimuli with high accuracy and can use the direction cues for mobile navigation. Tests included both stationary (seated) and mobile (walking a simple obstacle course) tasks. Accuracy and response time patterns are similar in both seated and mobile conditions. This device provides a means of designing and evaluating multimodal communication methods for handheld devices and will facilitate experiments investigating the effects of stimulus mode on device usability and situation awareness. PMID:26963827

  18. Development of a handheld bistatic imaging sonar system for underwater search and survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Alice; Broadstone, Steven; Impagliazzo, John

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution, handheld imaging sonar system is under development by Teratech Corporation for the U.S. Navy. This is a 192 channel, dual frequency bistatic sonar for Navy divers performing search and survey missions for underwater explosives. Our goal is to provide the most compact and energy efficient imaging system for the divers. The system consists of a self-contained handheld unit and a head mounted display integrated into the divers mask. The low power and small volume are a result of the development of Teratechs Charge Domain Processing (CDP) technology. This technology has led to the development of a low power 64-channel beamformer chip. As a result, only three beamformer chips will be required for the 192 channels. Until now, the implementation of small, low power sonar systems containing this many elements and forming enough beams to create an image was considered impossible. Progress in the development of this product will be presented. In-water testing is planned for late summer 2003. Experimental results and test images available will be presented at the conference. [Work sponsored by ONR and OSD Small Business Innovative Research Program, Program manager, Mr. Bruce Johnson, Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division.

  19. Radiology on handheld devices: image display, manipulation, and PACS integration issues.

    PubMed

    Raman, Bhargav; Raman, Raghav; Raman, Lalithakala; Beaulieu, Christopher F

    2004-01-01

    Handheld personal digital assistants (PDAs) have undergone continuous and substantial improvements in hardware and graphics capabilities, making them a compelling platform for novel developments in teleradiology. The latest PDAs have processor speeds of up to 400 MHz and storage capacities of up to 80 Gbytes with memory expansion methods. A Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-compliant, vendor-independent handheld image access system was developed in which a PDA server acts as the gateway between a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and PDAs. The system is compatible with most currently available PDA models. It is capable of both wired and wireless transfer of images and includes custom PDA software and World Wide Web interfaces that implement a variety of basic image manipulation functions. Implementation of this system, which is currently undergoing debugging and beta testing, required optimization of the user interface to efficiently display images on smaller PDA screens. The PDA server manages user work lists and implements compression and security features to accelerate transfer speeds, protect patient information, and regulate access. Although some limitations remain, PDA-based teleradiology has the potential to increase the efficiency of the radiologic work flow, increasing productivity and improving communication with referring physicians and patients. PMID:14730053

  20. A Non-Invasive Handheld Assistive Device to Accommodate Essential Tremor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anupam; Redmond, John A.; Allen, Michael; Chou, Kelvin L.

    2014-01-01

    Background We explored whether a non-invasive, handheld device using Active Cancellation of Tremor (ACT) technology could stabilize tremor-induced motion of a spoon in individuals with essential tremor (ET). Methods Fifteen ET subjects (9M/6F) performed 3 tasks with the ACT device turned on and off. Tremor severity was rated with the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (TRS). Subjective improvement was rated by subjects with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI-S). Tremor amplitude was measured using device-embedded accelerometers in 11 subjects. Results TRS scores improved with ACT on (versus off) in all 3 tasks: holding (1.00±0.76 vs. 0.27±0.70, p=0.016), eating (1.47±1.06 vs. 0.13±0.64, p=0.001) and transferring (1.33±0.82 vs. 0.27±0.59, p=0.001). CGI-S improved with eating and transferring, but not the holding task. Accelerometer measurements demonstrated 71-76% reduction in tremor with ACT device on. Conclusions This non-invasive, handheld ACT device can reduce tremor amplitude and severity for eating and transferring tasks in individuals with ET. PMID:24375570

  1. Handheld Reflective Foil Emissometer with 0.007 Absolute Accuracy at 0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ham, E. W. M.; Ballico, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    The development and performance of a handheld emissometer for the measurement of the emissivity of highly reflective metallic foils used for the insulation of domestic and commercial buildings are described. Reflective roofing insulation based on a thin coating of metal on a more robust substrate is very widely used in hotter climates to reduce the radiant heat transfer between the ceiling and roof in commercial and residential buildings. The required normal emissivity of these foils is generally below 0.05, so stray reflected ambient infrared radiation (IR) makes traditional reflectance-based measurements of emissivity very difficult to achieve with the required accuracy. Many manufacturers apply additional coatings onto the metallic foil to reduce visible glare during installation on a roof, and to provide protection to the thin reflective layer; however, this layer can also substantially increase the IR emissivity. The system as developed at the National Measurement Institute, Australia (NMIA) is based on the principle of measurement of the modulation in thermal infrared radiation, as the sample is thermally modulated by hot and cold air streams. A commercial infrared to band radiation thermometer with a highly specialized stray and reflected radiation shroud attachment is used as the detector system, allowing for convenient handheld field measurements. The performance and accuracy of the system have been compared with NMIA's reference emissometer systems for a number of typical material samples, demonstrating its capability to measure the absolute thermal emissivity of these very highly reflective foils with an uncertainty of better than.

  2. Initial Usability Testing of a Hand-held Electronic Logbook Prototype for the Human Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Andrea H.; Whitmore, Mihriban

    1996-01-01

    The Apple(R) Newton(TM) MessagePad 110 was flown aboard the KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft for microgravity usability testing. The Newton served as the initial hand-held electronic logbook prototype for the International Space Station (ISS) Human Research Facility (HRF). Subjects performed three different tasks with the Newton: (1) using the stylus to tap on different sections of the screen in order to launch an application and to select options within it; (2) using the stylus to write, and; (3) correcting handwriting recognition errors in a handwriting-intensive application. Subjects rated handwriting in microgravity 'Borderline' and had great difficulties finding a way in which to adequately restrain themselves at the lower body in order to have their hands free for the Newton. Handwriting recognition was rated 'Unacceptable,' but this issue is hardware-related and not unique to the microgravity environment. It is suggested that the restraint and handwriting issues are related and require further joint research with the current Handheld Electronic Logbook prototype: the Norand Pen*key Model #6300.

  3. Handheld non-contact evaluation of fastener flushness and countersink surface profiles using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James H.; Wang, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We report the use of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for non-contact optical evaluation of fastener flushness and countersink surface profile. Using a handheld galvanometer scanner of only 0.5 lb in weight the SD-OCT can perform line scan surface profile measurement of fastener and countersink without demanding accurate scan center alignment. It demonstrates fast measurement of fastener flushness, radius, slant angle, as well as countersink edge radius and surface angle within 90 ms suitable for handheld operation. With the use of a broadband light source at 840 nm center wavelength and 45 nm spectral bandwidth and a lens of 60 mm focal length, the low coherence interferometry based SD-OCT measurement offers axial depth resolution of 8.5 μm, lateral resolution of 19 μm, and measurement depth of 3.65 mm in the air. Multi-line scans can yield 3D surface profiles of fastener and countersink.

  4. Curvelet filter based prescreener for explosive hazard detection in hand-held ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Julie L.; Anderson, Derek T.; Ball, John E.; Parker, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Explosive hazards, above and below ground, are a serious threat to civilians and soldiers. In an attempt to mitigate these threats, different forms of explosive hazard detection (EHD) exist; e.g., multi-sensor hand-held platforms, downward looking and forward looking vehicle mounted platforms, etc. Robust detection of these threats resides in the processing and fusion of different data from multiple sensing modalities, e.g., radar, infrared, electromagnetic induction (EMI), etc. Herein, we focus on a new energy-based prescreener in hand-held ground penetrating radar (GPR). First, we Curvelet filter B-scan signal data using either Reverse-Reconstruction followed by Enhancement (RRE) or selectivity with respect to wedge information in the Curvelet transform. Next, we aggregate the result of a bank of matched filters and run a size contrast filter with Bhattacharyya distance. Alarms are then combined using weighted mean shift clustering. Results are demonstrated in the context of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve performance on data from a U. S. Army test site that contains multiple target and clutter types, burial depths and times of the day.

  5. Advanced sampling techniques for hand-held FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Frunzi, Michael; Weber, Chris; Levy, Dustin

    2013-05-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenging ConOps in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, extreme reliability, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the HazMatID™ Elite, a FT-IR instrument designed to balance the portability advantages of a handheld device with the performance challenges associated with miniaturization. In this paper, special focus will be given to the HazMatID Elite's sampling interfaces optimized to collect and interrogate different types of samples: accumulated material using the on-board ATR press, dispersed powders using the ClearSampler™ tool, and the touch-to-sample sensor for direct liquid sampling. The application of the novel sample swipe accessory (ClearSampler) to collect material from surfaces will be discussed in some detail. The accessory was tested and evaluated for the detection of explosive residues before and after detonation. Experimental results derived from these investigations will be described in an effort to outline the advantages of this technology over existing sampling methods.

  6. Teaching Formative Assessment Strategies to Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Use of Handheld Computing to Facilitate the Action Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kristin Redington; Cunningham, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate classroom assessment now tends to utilize formative measures with greater frequency, especially in the early grades and with learner groups at risk of not passing state-mandated standardized tests. Within the authentic context of an action research project, teacher candidates were given handheld computers equipped with data-collection…

  7. Manipulator Design and Operation for a Six-Degree-of-Freedom Handheld Tremor-Canceling Microsurgical Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and actuation of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) manipulator for a handheld instrument, known as “Micron,” which performs active tremor compensation during microsurgery. The design incorporates a Gough-Stewart platform based on piezoelectric linear motor, with a specified minimum workspace of a cylinder 4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter at the end-effector. Given the stall force of the motors and the loading typically encountered in vitreoretinal microsurgery, the dimensions of the manipulator are optimized to tolerate a transverse load of 0.2 N on a remote center of motion near the midpoint of the tool shaft. The optimization yields a base diameter of 23 mm and a height of 37 mm. The fully handheld instrument includes a custom-built optical tracking system for control feedback, and an ergonomic housing to serve as a handle. The manipulation performance was investigated in both clamped and handheld conditions. In positioning experiments with varying side loads, the manipulator tolerates side load up to 0.25 N while tracking a sinusoidal target trajectory with less than 20 μm error. Physiological hand tremor is reduced by about 90% in a pointing task, and error less than 25 μm is achieved in handheld circle-tracing. PMID:25419103

  8. Linear Text vs. Non-Linear Hypertext in Handheld Computers: Effects on Declarative and Structural Knowledge, and Learner Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Chanhee; Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Minjeong

    2011-01-01

    This study compared linear text-based and non-linear hypertext-based instruction in a handheld computer regarding effects on two different levels of knowledge (declarative and structural knowledge) and learner motivation. Forty four participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions: linear text, hierarchical hypertext,…

  9. A Scaffolding Strategy to Develop Handheld Sensor-Based Vocabulary Games for Improving Students' Learning Motivation and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    Vocabulary is the foundation for students who learn a foreign language. Nevertheless, students may be bored by the painstaking process of rote learning. To this end, this study designed a handheld sensor-based vocabulary game based on a scaffolding strategy for improving students' motivation and achievement in vocabulary learning. On the one hand,…

  10. Comparison of a MEMS-Based Handheld OCT Scanner With a Commercial Desktop OCT System for Retinal Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Samir I.; Nolan, Ryan M.; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Chaney, Eric J.; Stewart, Charles N.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of our handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner to image the posterior and anterior structures of the human eye, and especially the individual layers of the retina, and to compare its diagnostic performance with that of a fixed desktop commercial ophthalmic OCT system. Methods We compared the clinical imaging results of our handheld OCT with a leading commercial desktop ophthalmic system (RTVue) used in specialist offices. Six patients exhibiting diabetes-related retinal pathology had both eyes imaged with each OCT system. Results In both sets of images, the structural irregularities of the retinal layers could be identified such as retinal edema and vitreomacular traction. Conclusions Our handheld OCT system can be used to identify relevant anatomical structures and pathologies in the eye, potentially enabling earlier screening, disease detection, and treatment. Images can be acquired quickly, with sufficient resolution and negligible motion artifacts that would normally limit its diagnostic use. Translational Relevance Following screening and early disease detection in primary care via our optimized handheld OCT system, patients can be referred to a specialist for treatment, preventing further disease progression. While many primary care physicians are adept at using the ophthalmoscope, they can definitely take advantage of more advanced technologies. PMID:25068092

  11. Manipulator Design and Operation for a Six-Degree-of-Freedom Handheld Tremor-Canceling Microsurgical Instrument.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; MacLachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design and actuation of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) manipulator for a handheld instrument, known as "Micron," which performs active tremor compensation during microsurgery. The design incorporates a Gough-Stewart platform based on piezoelectric linear motor, with a specified minimum workspace of a cylinder 4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter at the end-effector. Given the stall force of the motors and the loading typically encountered in vitreoretinal microsurgery, the dimensions of the manipulator are optimized to tolerate a transverse load of 0.2 N on a remote center of motion near the midpoint of the tool shaft. The optimization yields a base diameter of 23 mm and a height of 37 mm. The fully handheld instrument includes a custom-built optical tracking system for control feedback, and an ergonomic housing to serve as a handle. The manipulation performance was investigated in both clamped and handheld conditions. In positioning experiments with varying side loads, the manipulator tolerates side load up to 0.25 N while tracking a sinusoidal target trajectory with less than 20 μm error. Physiological hand tremor is reduced by about 90% in a pointing task, and error less than 25 μm is achieved in handheld circle-tracing. PMID:25419103

  12. Open Walls to a Larger World: What Handheld Computing Can Do for School Libraries and Media Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embrey Theresa A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers give students access to the larger world of information beyond the classroom. Wireless access allows students real time access to all networks resources, including downloading e-books and documents, searching the library media centres catalog and searching databases to which the library has subscribed.

  13. The Pixel Paradox and Transition-Metal Spectroscopy: One of Many Uses of the Handheld Digital Microscope in Chemical Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitz, Ed

    2010-01-01

    A handheld digital microscope (HDM) interfaced to a computer with a presentation projector is used to project an out-of-focus yellow patch on the screen, then the patch is brought into focus to show that, paradoxically, there are red and green but no yellow pixels. Chromaticity diagrams are used to discuss this observation and spectroscopic…

  14. Guiding Brain Tumor Resection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles and a Hand-Held Raman Scanner

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The current difficulty in visualizing the true extent of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection represents one of the major reasons for the poor prognosis of brain tumor patients. Here, we evaluated the ability of a hand-held Raman scanner, guided by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, to identify the microscopic tumor extent in a genetically engineered RCAS/tv-a glioblastoma mouse model. In a simulated intraoperative scenario, we tested both a static Raman imaging device and a mobile, hand-held Raman scanner. We show that SERS image-guided resection is more accurate than resection using white light visualization alone. Both methods complemented each other, and correlation with histology showed that SERS nanoparticles accurately outlined the extent of the tumors. Importantly, the hand-held Raman probe not only allowed near real-time scanning, but also detected additional microscopic foci of cancer in the resection bed that were not seen on static SERS images and would otherwise have been missed. This technology has a strong potential for clinical translation because it uses inert gold–silica SERS nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner that can guide brain tumor resection in the operating room. PMID:25093240

  15. High-Tech versus Low-Tech Instructional Strategies: A Comparison of Clickers and Handheld Response Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Marianne; Forrest, Stacey L.

    2011-01-01

    Although the use of clickers (classroom response systems) has been widely investigated, fewer studies directly compared outcomes for clickers with other active response methods, such as handheld response cards. We measured students' test performance and their self-reported anxiety and hope for upcoming tests after attending review sessions for an…

  16. Handheld E-Book Readers and Scholarship Report and Reader Survey: ACLS Humanities E-Book. White Paper No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gielen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a conversion experiment and subsequent reader survey conducted by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Humanities E-Book (HEB) in late 2009 and early 2010 to assess the viability of using scholarly monographs with handheld e-readers. As sample content, HEB selected six titles from its own online collection, three…

  17. Schools Going Mobile: A Study of the Adoption of Mobile Handheld Technologies in Western Australian Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegrum, Mark; Oakley, Grace; Faulkner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in ten Western Australian independent schools, based on interviews with staff conducted in 2011. iPads were the most popular device, followed by iPod Touches and iPhones. Class sets were common at lower levels, with 1:1 models becoming increasingly common at higher levels. Mobile…

  18. Are PDAs Pedagogically Feasible for Young Children? Examining the Age-Appropriateness of Handhelds in a Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Young Mi; Mullen, Laurie; Stuve, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    The frequency and form of computing for children are still open to definition at the classroom level. There are three major classifications of general-purpose computers to consider: desktops, laptops and handhelds (PDAs). However, despite the final commercial realization of a "computer" teachers should consider the physiological and cognitive…

  19. Using Video Modeling via Handheld Computers to Improve Geometry Skills for High School Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihak, David F.; Bowlin, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    The researchers examined the use of video modeling by means of a handheld computer as an alternative instructional delivery system for learning basic geometry skills. Three high school students with learning disabilities participated in this study. Through video modeling, teacher-developed video clips showing step-by-step problem solving processes…

  20. Use of Crystalline Boron as a Burn Rate Retardant toward the Development of Green-Colored Handheld Signal Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Jesse J.; Poret, Jay C.; Broad, Russell N.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of using crystalline boron in green-colored handheld signal formulations is described. Due to its chemically inert nature, crystalline boron served to reduce the burn rates of the formulations. By adjusting crystalline boron percentages in the formulations, the pyrotechnic system could be tuned to meet burn time specifications.

  1. Performance, Accuracy, Data Delivery, and Feedback Methods in Order Selection: A Comparison of Voice, Handheld, and Paper Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Timothy D.; Goomas, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Field study was conducted in auto-parts after-market distribution centers where selectors used handheld computers to receive instructions and feedback about their product selection process. A wireless voice-interaction technology was then implemented in a multiple baseline fashion across three departments of a warehouse (N = 14) and was associated…

  2. Identifying paleoseismic information from limestone normal faults with a handheld XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzon, Ruben; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Skelton, Alasdair; Goodfellow, Brad W.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2014-05-01

    Predicting earthquakes would help immensely in saving human lives and protecting economic interest but a reliable method has not yet been found. When making risk assessments scientists continue to rely on paleoseismic studies. Determining a fast and cheap proxy for paleoseismicity is therefore of much interest. Surface exposure dating is an emergent method for paleoseismic studies of active normal fault scarps in the Mediterranean region. This method gives crucial paleoearthquake information such as timing and vertical slip along the fault but the analysis of cosmogenic nuclides is costly and the sampling is both complicated and time consuming. In our study we employ an Olympus Innov-X DeltaTM handheld XRF to analyse the geochemistry of a scarp surface in order to determine the number and magnitude of slips along the fault. This method requires no drilling and it is possible to analyse the results at the fault scarp. Exposure dating is still required to yield the timeframe of the paleoearthquake record, but the number of sampling points may be significantly reduced since it would be possible to pin-point the sampling locations around suspected former soil horizons. We have analysed 200 sample points with the handheld XRF from a 6.8 m section of the limestone normal fault scarp surface close to Sparta, southern Greece. Our profile is taken next to the Benedetti et al.[Geophysical Research Letters, 29, 8 (2002)] sampling site. Our results show significant variations in Yttrium concentration along the profile with a strong peak just below the present soil cover at the base of the section and then repeated peaks up along the transect on the subaerially exposed scarp surface. These Yttrium concentrations at the surface are correlated with Yttrium concentrations in the rock determined from drill cores taken every 10 cm from the same profile. The preliminary dataset appears to indicate a good correlation between the Yttrium concentrations and the earthquake events

  3. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  4. Non-destructive Measurement of Calcium and Potassium in Apple and Pear Using Handheld X-ray Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kalcsits, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and potassium are essential for cell signaling, ion homeostasis and cell wall strength in plants. Unlike nutrients such as nitrogen and potassium, calcium is immobile in plants. Localized calcium deficiencies result in agricultural losses; particularly for fleshy horticultural crops in which elemental imbalances in fruit contribute to the development of physiological disorders such as bitter pit in apple and cork spot in pear. Currently, elemental analysis of plant tissue is destructive, time consuming and costly. This is a limitation for nutrition studies related to calcium in plants. Handheld portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) can be used to non-destructively measure elemental concentrations. The main objective was to test if handheld XRF can be used for semi-quantitative calcium and potassium analysis of in-tact apple and pear. Semi-quantitative measurements for individual fruit were compared to results obtained from traditional lab analysis. Here, we observed significant correlations between handheld XRF measurements of calcium and potassium and concentrations determined using MP-AES lab analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.73 and 0.97. Furthermore, measuring apple and pear using handheld XRF identified spatial variability in calcium and potassium concentrations on the surface of individual fruit. This variability may contribute to the development of localized nutritional imbalances. This highlights the importance of understanding spatial and temporal variability in elemental concentrations in plant tissue. Handheld XRF is a relatively high-throughput approach for measuring calcium and potassium in plant tissue. It can be used in conjunction with traditional lab analysis to better understand spatial and temporal patterns in calcium and potassium uptake and distribution within an organ, plant or across the landscape. PMID:27092160

  5. Non-destructive Measurement of Calcium and Potassium in Apple and Pear Using Handheld X-ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kalcsits, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and potassium are essential for cell signaling, ion homeostasis and cell wall strength in plants. Unlike nutrients such as nitrogen and potassium, calcium is immobile in plants. Localized calcium deficiencies result in agricultural losses; particularly for fleshy horticultural crops in which elemental imbalances in fruit contribute to the development of physiological disorders such as bitter pit in apple and cork spot in pear. Currently, elemental analysis of plant tissue is destructive, time consuming and costly. This is a limitation for nutrition studies related to calcium in plants. Handheld portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) can be used to non-destructively measure elemental concentrations. The main objective was to test if handheld XRF can be used for semi-quantitative calcium and potassium analysis of in-tact apple and pear. Semi-quantitative measurements for individual fruit were compared to results obtained from traditional lab analysis. Here, we observed significant correlations between handheld XRF measurements of calcium and potassium and concentrations determined using MP-AES lab analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.73 and 0.97. Furthermore, measuring apple and pear using handheld XRF identified spatial variability in calcium and potassium concentrations on the surface of individual fruit. This variability may contribute to the development of localized nutritional imbalances. This highlights the importance of understanding spatial and temporal variability in elemental concentrations in plant tissue. Handheld XRF is a relatively high-throughput approach for measuring calcium and potassium in plant tissue. It can be used in conjunction with traditional lab analysis to better understand spatial and temporal patterns in calcium and potassium uptake and distribution within an organ, plant or across the landscape. PMID:27092160

  6. Impact of an external radiation field on handheld XRF measurements for nuclear forensics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Mertz, Carol J.; Finck, Martha R.; Engelstad, Gary; Carney, Kevin P.; Chamberlain, David B.

    2015-03-28

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is an attractive technique for nuclear forensics applications. We evaluated a handheld, portable XRF device by applying an external radiation field (10 mR/h to 17 R/h) using two types of radiography sources: a 60Co radiography camera to observe effects from high-energy gamma emissions and an 192Ir radiography camera to observe effects from several low-energy gamma (0.604, 0.468, and 0.317 MeV) and decay daughter x-ray emissions. External radiation tests proved that radiation, in general, has a significant effect on the dead time or background at dose rates over 1 R/hr for both the 192Ir and 60Co sources.

  7. Scanning in biomedical imaging: from classical devices to handheld heads and micro-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2014-01-01

    We review some of the most important scanning systems that are competitive in high-end biomedical imaging applications such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), but also Confocal Microscopy (CM) or multiphoton microscopy. Both 1-D (uni-dimensional) and 2-D (bi-dimensional) scanning systems are considered. The paper discusses different scanners, including polygon mirror, galvanometer-based and Risley prisms. Their configurations and characteristics, as well some of our contributions in the domain are presented. The tendency of applying them into special designs such as handheld scanning probes and endoscopes - the latter with MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) and micro-systems is pointed out. A discussion on further advancements of scanning technology in biomedical applications in general and in OCT in particular concludes the study.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy system with a compact fiber-based femtosecond-pulse laser and handheld probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Kieu, Khanh; Wise, Frank W; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system that integrates a compact and robust fiber laser with a miniature probe. The all normal dispersion fiber femtosecond laser has a central wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse width of 125 fs and average power of more than 1 W. A double cladding photonic crystal fiber was used to deliver the excitation beam and to collect the two-photon signal. The hand-held probe included galvanometer-based mirror scanners, relay lenses and a focusing lens. The packaged probe had a diameter of 16 mm. Second harmonic generation (SHG) images and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of biological tissues were demonstrated using the system. PMID:20635426

  9. The Complimentary Role of Methoxy-Isobutyl-Isonitrile and Hand-Held Gamma Probe in Adamantinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Masha; Korowlay, Nisaar; Ellmann, Prof

    2016-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare locally aggressive osteolytic tumor that is found 90% of the time in the diaphysis of the tibia with the remaining lesions found in the fibula and long tubular bones. A case of adamantinoma of the tibia is presented. The added value of nuclear medicine investigations in the workup of this patient is described. A three-phase whole body 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone and a whole body 99mTc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile scans were complimentary in the demarcation of viable bone tumor and the assessment of the remainder of the bone and soft tissue to exclude other sites. Intra-operative assistance with a hand-held gamma probe, guided the biopsy of the most metabolically active tumor tissue. Histology revealed a biphasic tumor composed of epithelial and fibrous components, in keeping with an adamantinoma. PMID:26912979

  10. Application of hand-held and portable infrared spectrometers in bovine milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Poliana M; Pereira-Filho, Edenir R; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2013-02-13

    A simple and fast method for the detection and quantification of milk adulteration was developed using portable and hand-held infrared (IR) spectrometers. Milk samples were purchased from local supermarkets (Columbus, OH, USA) and spiked with tap water, whey, hydrogen peroxide, synthetic urine, urea, and synthetic milk in different concentrations. Spectral data were collected using mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) classification models exhibited tight and well-separated clusters allowing the discrimination of control from adulterated milk samples. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was used to estimate adulteration levels, and results showed high coefficients of determination (R(2)) and low standard errors of prediction (SEP). Classification and quantification models indicated that the tested MIR systems were superior to NIR systems in monitoring milk adulteration. This method can be potentially used as an alternative to traditional methods due to their simplicity, sensitivity, low energy cost, and portability. PMID:23339381

  11. Hand-Held Dynamometry Isometric Torque Reference Values for Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, Désirée B.; Lepage, Céline; Saulnier, Joanne; Crête, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To establish hand-held dynamometry (HHD) maximal isometric muscle torque (MIT) reference values for children and adolescents who are developing typically. Methods: The MIT of 10 upper and lower limb muscle groups was assessed in 351 Caucasian youth (4 years 2 months to 17 years) using a standardized HHD protocol, previously shown to be feasible, valid, and reliable. Results: The mean MIT and 95% confidence interval of the mean for all muscle groups, for each of the 14 age groups (1 year age span for each group), and for each sex, were reported in both absolute (Nm) and normalized (Nm/kg) values. Conclusion: These HHD reference values may be helpful in the identification of muscle strength impairments in several pediatric populations, especially when bilateral impairments are present. PMID:26397089

  12. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  13. Position-Based Virtual Fixtures for Membrane Peeling with a Handheld Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Brian C.; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2012-01-01

    Peeling delicate retinal membranes, which are often less than 5 µm thick, is one of the most challenging retinal surgeries. Preventing rips and tears caused by tremor and excessive force can decrease injury and reduce the need for follow up surgeries. We propose the use of a fully handheld microsurgical robot to suppress tremor while enforcing helpful constraints on the motion of the tool. Using stereo vision and tracking algorithms, the robot activates motion-scaled behavior as the tip reaches the surface, providing finer control during the critical step of engaging the membrane edge. A hard virtual fixture just below the surface limits the total downward force that can be applied. Furthermore, velocity limiting during the peeling helps the surgeon maintain a smooth, constant force while lifting and delaminating the membrane. On a phantom consisting of plastic wrap stretched across a rubber slide, we demonstrate our approach reduces maximum force by 40–70%. PMID:24724041

  14. Handheld Electronic Technology for Weight Loss in Overweight/Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle C; Burley, V J; Cade, J E

    2014-09-01

    Handheld electronic devices could offer a convenient and scalable platform with which to deliver a weight loss intervention. This paper aims to summarise the evidence provided by randomised trials of such interventions. There is heterogeneity among trials in terms of the components of the intervention package, the theoretical framework, the comparison groups and the duration of follow-up. While in the short term (<6 months) trials have shown some promising findings, two trials (one of a text message intervention and one of a PDA device for dietary self-monitoring) do not indicate clinically significant weight loss in the longer term (1-2 years). Topical issues are discussed including the importance of further research into dietary self-monitoring, the logistics of trialling smartphone applications and considerations of health literacy. There is currently no definitive randomised controlled trial of a smartphone app for weight loss in adults and further research into this approach is warranted. PMID:26626760

  15. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; Proicou, M.; Duran, G.; Kamto, J.

    2015-09-01

    A new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurable to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.

  16. PalmCIS: A Wireless Handheld Application for Satisfying Clinician Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Elizabeth S.; Mendonça, Eneida A.; McKnight, Lawrence K.; Stetson, Peter D.; Lei, Jianbo; Cimino, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Wireless handheld technology provides new ways to deliver and present information. As with any technology, its unique features must be taken into consideration and its applications designed accordingly. In the clinical setting, availability of needed information can be crucial during the decision-making process. Preliminary studies performed at New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH) determined that there are inadequate access to information and ineffective communication among clinicians (potential proximal causes of medical errors). In response to these findings, the authors have been developing extensions to their Web-based clinical information system including PalmCIS, an application that provides access to needed patient information via a wireless personal digital assistant (PDA). The focus was on achieving end-to-end security and developing a highly usable system. This report discusses the motivation behind PalmCIS, design and development of the system, and future directions. PMID:14527976

  17. Use of handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometry units for identification of arsenic in treated wood

    PubMed Central

    Block, Colleen N.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of handheld XRF analyzers on wood that has been treated with a preservative containing arsenic. Experiments were designed to evaluate precision, detection limit, effective depth of analysis, and accuracy of the XRF arsenic readings. Results showed that the precision of the XRF improved with increased sample concentration and longer analysis times. Reported detection limits decreased with longer analysis times to values of less than 1 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg, depending on the model used. The effective depth of analysis was within the top 1.2 cm and 2.0 cm of sample for wood containing natural gradients of chemical preservative and concentration extremes, respectively. XRF results were found to be 1.5-2.3 times higher than measurements from traditional laboratory analysis. Equations can be developed to convert XRF values to results which are consistent with traditional laboratory testing. PMID:17241725

  18. Development of highly sensitive handheld device for real-time detection of bacteria in food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kewei; Zhang, Anxue; Fu, Liling; Chin, Bryan A.; Cheng, Z.-Y.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure the safety of food, a detection device, which can detect/monitor the present of bacteria in a real-time manner and can be easily used for in-field tests, is highly desirable. Recently, magnetostrictive particles (MSPs) as a new type of high-performance biosensor have been developed. The detection of various bacteria and spores in food with high sensitivity has already been experimentally demonstrated. To fully use the technique for food safety, two miniaturized interrogation systems based on frequency-domain and time-domain technique are developed to fabricate a handheld detection device. The detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) in liquid using a time-domain based interrogation system was demonstrated.

  19. The Rosetta phone: a hand-held device for automatic translation of signs in natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafri, Syed Ali Raza; Mikkilineni, Aravind K.; Boutin, Mireille; Delp, Edward J.

    2008-02-01

    When traveling in a region where the local language is not written using the Roman alphabet, translating written text (e.g., documents, road signs, or placards) is a particularly difficult problem since the text cannot be easily entered into a translation device or searched using a dictionary. To address this problem, we are developing the "Rosetta Phone," a handheld device (e.g., PDA or mobile telephone) capable of acquiring a picture of the text, identifying the text within the image, and producing both an audible and a visual English interpretation of the text. We started with English, as a developement language, for which we achieved close to 100% accuracy in identifying and reading text. We then modified the system to be able to read and translate words written using the Arabic character set. We currently achieve approximately 95% accuracy in reading words from a small directory of town names.

  20. Handheld Diffuse Reflectance Spectral Imaging (DRSi) for in-vivo characterization of skin

    PubMed Central

    Bish, Sheldon F.; Sharma, Manu; Wang, Youmin; Triesault, Nicholas J.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Zhang, John X.J.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a noninvasive means to measure optical and physiological properties of tissues. To expand on these measurements, we have developed a handheld diffuse reflectance spectral imaging (DRSi) system capable of acquiring wide field hyperspectral images of tissue. The image acquisition time was approximately 50 seconds for a 50x50 pixel image. A transport model was used to fit each spectra for reduced scattering coefficient, hemoglobin concentration and melanin concentration resulting in optical property maps. The system was validated across biologically relevant levels of reduced scattering (5.14% error) and absorption (8.34% error) using tissue simulating phantoms. DRSi optical property maps of a pigmented skin lesion were acquired in vivo. These trends in optical properties were consistent with previous observations using point probe devices. PMID:24575350

  1. A handheld laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging–confocal Raman microspectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Chetan A.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Mackanos, Mark A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy have shown potential for non-destructive analysis of samples at micron-scale resolutions. Current studies utilizing these techniques often employ large bench-top microscopes, and are not suited for use outside of laboratory settings. We have developed a microscope which combines laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging and confocal Raman spectroscopy into a compact handheld probe that is capable of high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in a variety of settings. The compact size of the probe is largely due to the use of a MEMS mirror for beam scanning. The probe is capable of axial resolutions of up to 4 μm for the confocal imaging channel and 10 μm for the confocal Raman spectroscopy channel. Here, we report instrument design, characterize optical performance, and provide images and spectra from normal skin to demonstrate the instrument’s capabilities for clinical diagnostics. PMID:22435097

  2. Handheld standoff mine detection system (HSTAMIDS) field evaluation in Thailand (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doheny, Robert C.; Burke, Sean; Cresci, Roger; Ngan, Peter; Walls, Richard

    2005-06-01

    The Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program of Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), under the direction of the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (OASD/SOLIC) and with participation from the International Test and Evaluation Project (ITEP) for Humanitarian Demining, conducted an in-country field evaluation of HSTAMIDS in the region of Humanitarian Demining Unit #1 (HMAU1) in Thailand. Participants included the US Humanitarian Demining Team of NVESD, ITEP personnel, Thailand Mine Action Center (TMAC), HALO Trust organization from Cambodia, and CyTerra Corporation. The primary objectives were to demonstrate the performance of the U.S. Army's latest handheld multisensor mine detector, the AN/PSS-14, in a demining environment in comparison to the performance of the metal detector being used by the local deminers and also to assess the performance of the trained deminers after limited experience and training with the HSTAMIDS.

  3. Textbooks on tap: using electronic books housed in handheld devices in nursing clinical courses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Margaret G; Dittmer, Arlis

    2009-01-01

    Changing technology is creating new ways to approach nursing education and practice. Beginning in 2003, using a quasi-experimental design, this project introduced personal digital assistants (PDAs) as a clinical tool to five experimental and control groups of students and faculty. The handheld device, or PDA, was loaded with e-books for clinical practice. Differences in learning styles and preferences emerged during the different phases of the study. Students were quickly able to master the technology and use the device effectively, reporting that they liked the concise nature of the information obtained. No students expressed dissatisfaction or regret at being in the experimental group. Results and implications for clinical practice, education, and library resources are discussed. PMID:19753854

  4. A review of the use of handheld computers in medical nutrition.

    PubMed

    Holubar, Stefan; Harvey-Banchik, Lillian

    2007-08-01

    Handheld computers, or personal digital assistants (PDAs), have been used to assist clinicians in medical nutrition since the early 1980s. The term PDA was originally applied to programmable calculators; over time, the capabilities of these devices were expanded to allow for the use of more complicated programs such as databases, spreadsheets, and electronic books. Slowly, the device evolved into what is more commonly thought of as a PDA, that is, a device such as a PalmOS (PalmSource, Inc, Tokyo, Japan) or PocketPC (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) unit. We present a review of the literature about the use of PDAs in medical nutrition, followed by a discussion of the different types of PDAs and mobile technologies that are commercially available. This is followed by a discussion of software applications that are currently available for use by nutrition clinicians, focusing on freeware applications. Finally, future technologies and applications are discussed. PMID:17644697

  5. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  6. Detection of Depleted Uranium in Soil Using Portable Hand-Held Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.

    1999-11-13

    The Measurement Applications and Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has collected and analyzed data with the purpose of evaluating the in-situ detection capabilities of common hand-held detectors for depleted uranium ({sup 238}U) in soil. Measurements were collected with one each of the following detectors: a FIDLER operated in a gross (full spectrum) mode, a FIDLER operated in a spectrum specific (windowed) mode, a 1.25'' x 1.5'' cylindrical NaI detector operated with a gross count rate system, and both open and closed-window pancake-type detectors. Representative samples were then collected at the same location and later analyzed at an ORNL laboratory. This report presents a correlation between the measurements and the soil concentration results and should be helpful to anyone interested in estimating measurement sensitivities for depleted uranium in soil.

  7. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; et al

    2015-06-10

    In this study, a new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurablemore » to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.« less

  8. User-friendly tools on handheld devices for observer performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Hara, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Junji; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Abe, Hiroyuki; Matsusako, Masaki; Yamada, Akira; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    ROC studies require complex procedures to select cases from many data samples, and to set confidence levels in each selected case to generate ROC curves. In some observer performance studies, researchers have to develop software with specific graphical user interface (GUI) to obtain confidence levels from readers. Because ROC studies could be designed for various clinical situations, it is difficult task for preparing software corresponding to every ROC studies. In this work, we have developed software for recording confidence levels during observer studies on tiny personal handheld devices such as iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. To confirm the functions of our software, three radiologists performed observer studies to detect lung nodules by using public database of chest radiograms published by Japan Society of Radiological Technology. The output in text format conformed to the format for the famous ROC kit from the University of Chicago. Times required for the reading each case was recorded very precisely.

  9. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; Proicou, M.; Duran, G.; Kamto, J.

    2015-06-10

    In this study, a new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurable to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.

  10. Determining risk of heart disease and obesity with a hand-held programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Everett, W D

    1989-10-01

    Two sets of programs are presented which aid the practicing flight surgeon to quickly assess risk of cardiovascular disease or calculate percent body fat. Risk of cardiovascular disease is easily computed using the Framingham Risk Equation and relating it to the average risk and minimal risk of a patient the same age. A "cardiovascular age" is also computed. Body composition determinations can be done quickly using only circumference measurements and recognized military formulas. Confidence intervals about the estimate and U.S. Air Force maximum allowable weights are computed. For males a maximum weight for health is computed. The programs presented were written for a simple, hand-held calculator. The calculator was selected because it is portable, inexpensive, can be used in a small clinic anywhere in the world, and requires no computer expertise, bringing sophisticated research statistical methods to the everyday clinical practice of aerospace medicine. PMID:2818379

  11. Free-viewpoint video of human actors using multiple handheld Kinects.

    PubMed

    Ye, Genzhi; Liu, Yebin; Deng, Yue; Hasler, Nils; Ji, Xiangyang; Dai, Qionghai; Theobalt, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We present an algorithm for creating free-viewpoint video of interacting humans using three handheld Kinect cameras. Our method reconstructs deforming surface geometry and temporal varying texture of humans through estimation of human poses and camera poses for every time step of the RGBZ video. Skeletal configurations and camera poses are found by solving a joint energy minimization problem, which optimizes the alignment of RGBZ data from all cameras, as well as the alignment of human shape templates to the Kinect data. The energy function is based on a combination of geometric correspondence finding, implicit scene segmentation, and correspondence finding using image features. Finally, texture recovery is achieved through jointly optimization on spatio-temporal RGB data using matrix completion. As opposed to previous methods, our algorithm succeeds on free-viewpoint video of human actors under general uncontrolled indoor scenes with potentially dynamic background, and it succeeds even if the cameras are moving. PMID:23893757

  12. Photopic Negative Response Obtained Using a Handheld Electroretinogram Device: Determining the Optimal Measure and Repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhichao; Hadoux, Xavier; Hui, Flora; Sarossy, Marc G.; Crowston, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the measure of the photopic negative response (PhNR) of the full-field electroretinogram (ERG) that exhibits the optimal level of test-retest repeatability, and examine its repeatability under different conditions using a handheld, nonmydriatic ERG system and self-adhering skin electrodes. Methods Multiple ERG recordings (using 200 sweeps each) were performed in both eyes of 20 normal participants at two different sessions to compare its coefficient of repeatability (CoR; where 95% of the test-retest difference is expected to lie) between different PhNR measures and under different testing conditions (within and between examiners, and between sessions). Results The ratio between the PhNR trough to b-wave peak and b-wave peak to a-wave trough amplitude (PhNR/B ratio) exhibited the lowest CoR relative to its effective dynamic range (30 ± 4%) when including three recordings. There were no significant changes in the PhNR/B ratio over seven measurements (4 right and 3 left eyes) at either session (P ≥ 0.100), or significant difference in its CoR between different testing conditions (P = 0.314). Conclusion The PhNR/B ratio was the measure that minimized variability, and its measurements using a novel handheld ERG system with self-adhering skin electrodes and the protocols described in this study were comparable under different testing conditions and over multiple recordings. Translational Relevance The PhNR can be measured for clinical and research purposes using a simple-to-implement technique that is consistent within and between visits, and also between examiners. PMID:27540494

  13. Prospective evaluation of hand-held focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Sirois, Marco; Laupland, Kevin B.; Goldstein, Leanelle; Brown, David Ross; Simons, Richard K.; Dulchavsky, Scott; Boulanger, Bernard R.

    2005-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) has become indispensable in assessing the status of the injured patient. Although hand-held US equipment is now commercially available and may expand the availability and speed of US in assessing the trauma patient, it has not been subjected to controlled evaluation in early trauma care. Methods A 2.4-kg hand-held (HH) US device was used to perform focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) on blunt trauma victims at 2 centres. Results were compared with the “truth” as determined through formal FAST examinations (FFAST), CT, operative findings and serial examination. The ability of HHFAST to detect free fluid, intra-abdominal injuries and injuries requiring therapeutic interventions was assessed. Results HHFAST was positive in 80% of 313 patients who needed surgery or angiography. HHFAST test performances (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios of positive and negative test results) were 77%, 99%, 96%, 94%, 95%, 95 and 0.2, respectively, for free fluid, and 64%, 99%, 96%, 89%, 90%, 74 and 0.4, respectively, for documented injuries. HHFAST missed or gave an indeterminate result in 8 (3%) of 270 patients with injuries who required therapeutic intervention and 25 (9%) of 270 patients who did not require intervention. FFAST performance was comparable. Conclusions HHFAST performed by clinicians detects intraperitoneal fluid with a high degree of accuracy. All FAST examinations are valuable tests when positive. They will miss some injuries, but the majority of the injuries missed do not require therapy. HHFAST provides an early extension of the physical examination but should be complemented by the selective use of CT, rather than formal repeat US. PMID:16417051

  14. Raman spectra of nitrogen-containing biomarkers obtained using a handheld instrument at winter mountain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, Adam; Jehlička, Jan; Čapoun, Tomáå.¡

    2010-05-01

    In this study a performance and feasibility of commercially available handheld Raman spectrometer was tested as an approximation to the Raman spectrometers that are to be used on the future robotic planetary surface exploration missions focused mainly on the search of the traces of life. The conditions on the Alpine test site (low temperature, snowstorm and increased radiation from Sun) were far from the common laboratory conditions and can be considered to be relatively extreme. Well-resolved Raman spectra of examples of mainly nitrogen-containing compounds were acquired using a portable Raman instrument (Ahura First Defender XL) outdoors at a low ambient temperature of -15°C and at an altitude of 2860 metres in the Austrian Alps. The rugged handheld Raman spectrometer tested here is equipped with a 785 nm diode laser and fixed frontal probe. Primary purpose of this type of instruments is to serve as tools for drug and explosives detection. Solid form of formamide, urea, 3-methylpyridine, aniline, 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, indoline as well as two nitrogen-free compounds indene and benzofuran were detected unambiguously under these complex field conditions. Studied compounds were chosen as representatives of aliphatic and aromatic heteroatomic molecules that can potentially be found in the frame of Titan tholins. The main Raman features (strong, medium and partially weak bands) were observed at the correct wavenumber positions (with a spectral resolution 7 - 10 cm-1) in the wavenumber range 200 - 1600 cm-1. The results obtained demonstrate the possibility to apply a miniaturised Raman spectrometer as a key instrument for investigating the presence of nitrogen-containing organic compounds and biomolecules outdoors under low temperature conditions. Within the payload designed by ESA and NASA for future missions, focussing not only on Mars but also on the outer solar system worlds like Titan and Europa, Raman spectroscopy represents an important instrument for the

  15. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  16. Development of a hand-held 3D photoacoustic imaging system for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aabed, Hazem; Roumeliotis, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a non-invasive imaging modality that employs non-ionizing near infrared (NIR) laser light to obtain optical images of tissues with depth penetration and resolution comparable to ultrasound imaging. PA images are created by illuminating tissues with a short laser pulse (~10 ns), which causes optically absorbing structures to heat up slightly, but so rapidly that conditions of thermal and stress confinement are met and the structure emits a pressure wave at ultrasonic frequencies. Detection of the pressure waves at the tissue surface with an ultrasound transducer array provides the data needed to reconstruct the distribution of light-absorbing structures within the tissue. Since it is recognized that cancerous breast lesions absorb light to a greater degree than surrounding normal tissue, PA imaging is a viable candidate for detection of lesions within the intact human breast. Therefore, we have constructed a transportable PA imaging system suitable for breast imaging. The system incorporates a hand-held transducer array with 30 detector elements arranged on a ring. Laser light is delivered coaxially in relation to the ring using a fiber optic light guide. The supporting hardware includes a NIR tuneable laser, transducer cabling, 30 preamplifiers, 30 independent data acquisition channels with onboard memory, and a computer with control and image reconstruction software. Initial tests with the transducer array suggest that it has sufficient sensitivity to detect optically absorbent objects on the order of 1- mm at a depth of 2 cm. It is anticipated that a small hand-held PA imaging unit will be amenable to patient work-up and would complement standard ultrasound imaging.

  17. Functional requirements analysis and human machine interface specifications for handheld metal detector wands

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, V.; Hartney, C.; Banks, W.

    1994-11-01

    Functional Requirements Analysis (FRA) and Human-Machine-Interface Design Specifications (HMIDs) are critical elements in the development of effective security systems. Handheld metal detector wands are currently used by security personnel to detect metal weapons and munitions that might be smuggled onboard an aircraft by terrorists or individuals who intend to do harm to passengers, aircraft, or other air carrier-related targets. The FAA has requested that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assist in developing functional requirements for handheld metal detector devices (wands) used at airports. This effort is focused on both defining and assuring adequate functional and human interface designs that are an integral part of airport security operations. In addition to developing functional requirements, LLNL was also requested to examine and review wanding procedures currently used by the airports and air carriers and provide comments, recommendations, and suggestions for enhanced security based upon this review. The phrase ``Human-Machine-Interface`` (HMI) is frequently used to describe the characteristics of a system that allows the human to interact and control the machine or system. Equipment used by checkpoint security Pre-Board Screeners (PBS`s) during rapid search of passengers must be designed to fit a broad range of anthropometric differences in height, hand size, grip strength, upper body strength, visual. acuity, auditory acuity, and other related human variables. In essence, if there is a high degree of compatibility between the end-user and the equipment, there will be a direct enhancement of total system performance and system operability. Thus, this document may also be used as, a guideline to enhance ergonomic compatibility between the PBS`s and the equipment they use.

  18. Haemoassist--a hand-held electronic patient diary for haemophilia home care.

    PubMed

    Mondorf, W; Siegmund, B; Mahnel, R; Richter, H; Westfeld, M; Galler, A; Pollmann, H

    2009-03-01

    On-demand or prophylactic home-treatment is currently the treatment of choice for haemophilia patients. To allow physicians to monitor the amount of factor concentrates administered, the patients document each factor injection in a paper-diary. Nevertheless, because of the fact that most patients visit their physicians only two to four times a year, there could be considerable delay in detecting medication problems. The aim of this pilot study was to assess whether an electronic documentation tool could successfully replace traditional paper-diaries for haemophilia A patients and enable the physician to have a timely overview of the patient's treatment. An electronic, hand-held documentation tool, Haemoassist, was developed. In this study, patients using prophylaxis and on-demand therapies documented their factor consumption both electronically and on paper-diaries. Documentations were compared and descriptively evaluated. Patients also completed a survey to evaluate the feasibility and gather their opinions on the Haemoassist system. Ten patients from two haemophilia treatment centres in Germany submitted a total of 548 records via hand-held device during the observation period, from March 2006 to February 2007. Comparison of electronic and paper-based records showed differing responses among patients with some patients entering more electronic and some others more paper-based documentations. In the questionnaires on feasibility and usefulness of Haemoassist, three patients preferred the electronic tool, two patients wanted to continue using paper-based diaries, and one had no preference. The study shows that an electronic documentation system is feasible for haemophilia patients and provides the physician with the opportunity to more closely monitor patients. However, not all patients seem to be qualified for using an electronic tool, and the tool has to run reliably without major errors for ensuring reliability and acceptability. In the future, Haemoassist might

  19. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  20. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control. PMID:23513039